Title: Seminole voice
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091445/00023
 Material Information
Title: Seminole voice
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Community Media Holdings, LLC
Place of Publication: Oviedo, Fla.
Publication Date: November 28, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Seminole -- Oviedo
United States -- Florida -- Seminole -- Winter Park
Coordinates: 28.659722 x -81.195833 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00091445
Volume ID: VID00023
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text















www.SeminoleVoice.com


.'a. afooda '-ned v. a Ifth ba'ig
tAf -aahuhot s of Oiaieflans..


Serving Greater Oviedo and Winter Springs for more than 17 years!
I I_. L'L._ n rin -n L.. A flrlAtAO .


I NovemnerU 0 UUebIIUUI UU

Teenage politics
Students, politicians and statistics give
insight into teenage apathy toward politics..


McLemore

secures

severance

package


JENNY ANDREASSON
THE VOICE

The Winter, Springs City
Commission approved
a separation agreement
Monday for City Manager
Ron McLemore, with
Commissioner Rick Brown
dissenting.
If the Commission decides
to replace McLemore he will
receive six months' worth
of compensation and ben-
efits. The agreement is not
an "obstacle to your right to
make a change" of manager,
McLemore said at Monday's
meeting, but it gives him
78 what he says he deserves.
"If I were forced to leave,"
he said, "I would need a cer-
tain amount
of time and
security to be
able to do that
without my
service to this
Commission
over the last
McLemore 12 years caus-
ing me sub-
stantial finan-
cial harm."
At his hire, McLemore
was given a contract with a
nine-month severance that
has since lapsed.
Brown, who phoned
in at the meeting, said
McLemore's severance plan
should be negotiated with
the incoming Commission,
not "rushed through as
an add-on on the last
night of the existing City
Commission." He called
the contract a "going-away
present."
"Just for the record I
think it is inappropriate,"
Brown said, "and I think it
> turn to McLEMORE on page A4


Hidden cam case goes to trial


JENNY ANDREASSON
THE VOICE

A former Oviedo smoothie shop
owner pleaded not guilty Nov. 3 to
attempting to record a female work-
er undressing, an attempted video
voyeurism charge.
Oviedo resident Rene Orellana,
owner of the recently shuttered Juice
It Up, is scheduled to appear in a
Seminole County courtroom for a
pre-trial hearing Dec. 2. He has filed a
notice of his intent to claim an alibi.
"Typically what it means is the
defendant intends to present evi-
dence showing that he or she was
not at the scene of the crime," State
Attorney's Office spokesman Chris


White said.
The State Attorney's Office charged
Orellana in September with attempt-
ed video voyeurism in connection
with the April event.
According to Oviedo Police, the
employee went into
Orellana's office to
change into her work
clothes as she often did
but found the camera
under a towel on a shelf.
She yanked the memory
card out of the camera
and left the store.
Orellana Police reviewed the
recording, which they
said showed Orellana setting the cam-
era on the shelf and then the victim


coming in and finding the camera.
"Orellana stated he used a towel to
place over his personal Sony camera
so it would not be seen," the police
report ,states. "He said he did this so
he could record an employee in the
back office without her knowledge,
in order to watch her change out of
her clothes and into her uniform."
Also according to the report,
Orellana said the camera was only in
the store to download photos from
the camera to his personal laptop.
If convicted of this second-degree
misdemeanor, Orellana faces up to 60
days in jail or a $500 fine. Video voy-
eurism is a first-degree misdemean-
or but "generally, 'attempt' lowers a
crime by one degree," White said.


ol
CO
.......... p
c0


1,11,, 1,l. 11. ....11,..1 111,,.111 li .11., l, l ..I .,l III1..l I
*************AUTO**ALL FOR ADC 320
2350
WILL CANOVA
UF SMATHERS LIBRARY
PO BOX 117007
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007


INDEX
Stetson's Corner................................ A4
Celery Stalks .................................. ......A5
G.O. Family........ ..................... ....... A8
Cinema...... ..................................... 11
Athletics..................................... A12
Voices.............................................. A14
Classifieds and Games.....................A15
Weather....................................6...... A16


Just 350


Football stats .
Secord-breaking numbers from local.
:. teams tell the story of a se9s-o.
, :^ ".- ---.. *- ,_" --' : .;. .- ;*- .'^-' i -. ^ "'-'.,-*^' "-


iI


"-


~.





Page A2. November 28 December 4, 2008 The Voice



THIS WEEK in history

President Franklin Roosevelt closed the books on the Work Projects
TH V V L Administration (WPA), one of the government's most ambitious pub-
lic-works programs. Fueled by $11 billion of government money, the
program created jobs for 8.5 million people during the Depression.




City gets frugal to get parade funding

JENNY ANDREASSON ed by sponsors and not the city, the Winter Springs, While this is a break
THE VOICE Winter Springs Events Committee with tradition, Carson said, "it's not
had to decide whether to have it an east versus west thing ... A lot of
The 27th Annual Holiday Parade in a new location or not have it at What: Winter Springs 27th Annual work was involved in having it at
in Winter Springs will take a new all, said Chris Carson, Parks and Holiday Parade and Tree Lighting the older area."
route that saves on cost and is safer, Recreation programs supervisor. Mary Alice Wilder, head of the
officials say. Moving the parade and consoli- Where: Parade starts at Keeth Events Committee, said local busi-
This year's parade, on Saturday, dating the two events saves more Elementary on Tuskawilla Road and ness EZ Yield is sponsoring the
Dec.6,will take the same route as the than $5,000 because they don't have ends in Town Center, where Tree 35-foot Santa Claus float in the
high school homecoming parade, to shut down State Road 434, part Lighting will occur, parade and there will be more
beginning at Keeth Elementary and of the former route, he said.. When: Saturday, Dec. 6, with parade at vendors this year. Macy's will have
winding down Tuskawilla Road to Winter Springs Mayor John Bush 4 p.m. and lighting from 6-9 p.m. a booth for the Make-A-Wish
end at the Town Center. Also dif- said the new route is a "good move," Foundation, and the Russian Ballet
ferent this year: The Holiday Tree citing that the parade distance is. of Orlando will perform.
Lighting will be on the same day, almost exactly the same but they as it was." "In these times," she said, "it's
directly after the parade. don't have to close down so many For the last 26 years the parade going to be a great thing for every-
Because events this year are fund- streets. "It's not such a traffic issue was held on the older west side of body."





Teen political disconnect lingers


MARY-ELIZABETH SCHURRER
GUEST REPORTER

In the wake of a historic
presidential election, poli-
tics has pervaded everyday
life. Talk of what-ifs domi-
nate conversation at the
water cooler. It's an adult
world largely ignored by
the younger generation -
whose wants and needs
don't connect with the
obscurity of government
policy and finely tuned
stump speeches. It's a gen-
eration that can feel mar-
ginalized, .removed from
political discourse entirely.
"When we do express
our opinions, they are dis-
carded like some unedu-
cated opinion of youth. I'd
rather not put my time and
effort into doing something
that doesn't really matter
and is seen as naivety," said


Michelle Slinger, a sopho-
more at Winter Springs
High School.
According to statistics
gathered by the U.S. Census
Bureau, only 36.1 percent
of young people age 18 to
24 voted in the past two
presidential elections.
Seventy-three percent of
18-year-olds and 70 percent
of 19-year-olds tended to
either drag their feet going
to the polls or refused to
show up at all.
Despite the stigma that
teens are simply disen-
gaged, Ted Halstead, presi-
dent of the New American
Foundation and author of
"A Politics for Generation
X" argues, "they see the out-
lines of very real problems
ahead ... but in the nation's
political system they per-
ceive no leadership on the
issues that concern them ...


So Xers have decided, for
now, to tune out. After all,
they ask, what's the point?"
Winter Springs Mayor
John F. Bush explained,
"Growing up, I never gave
politics a thought. I was too
interested in school, athlet-
ics, and just being a young
person. Teenagers today are
much like myself at that
age. They are just interested
in other things, and they are
not old enough to vote."
Besides a fear of speaking
up only to be hushed by the
older crowd, a typical high
school student is burdened
with pressure to play sports,
get good grades and get into
a top-notch university. Most
teens are simply too busy to
keep up with the affairs of
state.
"There are many other
things competing for their
attention. I have found that


when I have an opportu-
nity to speak with both high
school and younger stu-
dents, that they are inter-
ested in what goes on in
our city, but normally don't
have an opportunity to have
someone speak with them,"
Bush said.
Though there are politi-
cally apathetic teens, it's
not an absolute. Some take
an active interest in the
subject, soaking up what's
available.
"Every day I read the
news and know the on-
goings of the political field
because I find it intriguing,
interesting, and a fun intel-
lectual activity. An active
and aware youth is essential
for a healthy America," said
Robert Colonel, a senior at
WSHS and president of the
school's Young Democrats
club.


Nicole Hester, a junior at
WSHS, shares a similar view-
point. "Even though I can't
vote, the outcome of elec-
tions still affects me, and I
want to be informed about
my leaders. Already under-
standing issues facing our
country and being aware of
a politician's record or his-
tory will help a person make
a more educated decision
when they are old enough
to vote," she said.
Some teens possess the
knowledge and curios-
ity to debate the merits of
McCain's military back-
ground and Obama's raw
charisma. The stereotype of
the apathetic teen has merit,
but while adults talk about
politics from the perspec-
tive of active voters, most
teens aren't legally able to
vote. As Slinger said, "I'll
leave that stuff for later."


Published Friday, Volume 18
November 28, 2008 o ?0 5JUIlie Issue No. 48

Phone 407-628-8500 SeminoleVoice.com Fax 407-628-4053


PUBLISHER
Kyle Taylor, extension 302
kyle@observernewspapers.com
EDITOR
Alex Babcock, extension 304
alexb@theoviedovoice.com
DESIGNER
Stephanie Erickson, extension 306
stephanie@observernewspapers.com
CHIEF REPORTER
Isaac Babcock of Winter Springs
isaacb@theoviedovoice.com
ADVERTISING SALES
Pat Lovaglio, extension 305
advertising@theoviedovoice.com


REPORTERS
Jenny Andreasson ol Oviedo jennya@observernewspapers.com
Karen Phillips of Geneva karenp@theoviedovoice.com
Amy K.D. Tobik of Winter Springs amyt@theoviedovoice.com

COLUMNISTS
Janet Foley of Oviedo janetf@theoviedovoice.com
Jay Getty of Oviedo jayg@theoviedovoice.com
Sandi Vidal of Casselberry sandi@christianhelp.org
Ben Wheeler oft Chuluota benw@theoviedovoice.com
COPY EDITOR
Jonathan Gallagher Extension 309
jgallagher@observernewspapers.com
INTERN
Mary Elizabeth Schurrer


The Oviedo-Winter Springs Voice publishes on Fridays for readers in Oviedo,
Winter Springs, Geneva, Chuluota and their neighbors.
The Voice began publishing in 1991.
Its current owner is Observer Newspapers, .
which also publishes the Winter Park-Maitland Observer newspaper.


Talk with us about news stories at
407-628-8500. Ask for Alex Babcock.

Write to'us about your opinions at
voices@theoviedovoice.com or at:
P.O. Box 2426, Winter Park, FL 32790

Help us correct mistakes by writing
to corrections@lheoviedovoice.com or
by calling 407-628-8500 and asking
for Editor Alex Babcock.

If you think we can do a better job
serving you, please let us know.

Renew your subscription or start a
new one by calling 407-628-8500. A
year's subscription costs just $24.80.

Advertise in The Voice by calling Pat
Lovaglio 407-628-8500.


The Voice cares about environmen-
tal health. The newspaper you hold
comes from a mixture of recycled con-
tent. Unsold copies of the newspaper
are archived or recycled. We also re-
cycle all in-office paper waste, bottles
and cans.

Stop by the office in Oviedo sometime.
We take walk-in guests each Thursday
- and also by appointment. We're at
1401 W. Broadway St.:
1 OOVIEDO


The Oviedo-Winter Springs Voice is published on Fridays POSTMASTER: Send address
by Community Media Holdings, LLC. USPS #008-093 changes to The Voice,
Periodicals postage Is paid at Oviedo, Florida. P.O. Box 2426, Winter Park, FL 32790
. .






evoN mber 28 Decembe 3


iT e V o ice hT u vu .l l i u ,- u ,.. ., ,-., ,wt-... . ..



A fresh taste in Oviedo seafood


JENNY ANDREASSON
THE VOICE
The line of hungry people
flowed out the door of TJ's
Seafood Shack on Friday,
Nov. 14, at the eatery's grand
opening.
About 200 people,
including city and Chamber
of Commerce officials and
residents, munched on fish
sandwiches, hush puppies,
Maryland-style crab, cakes,
shrimp po'boys and home-
made chowder, washing it
down with beer, wine and
soda.
Brother-sister owners
Tim Shepardson and Mary
Strickland smiled and chat-
ted with their guests, know-
ing they had succeeded in
converting their storefront
from a meal-assembly busi-
ness into a quick-casual sea-
food eatery.
That change saved them
from having to shut down
like manyof their neighbors.
There are five empty store-
fronts between LA Fitness
and Outback Steakhouse in
the Town Center Shoppes
at Mitchell Hammock Road
and State Road 434, where
TJ's is located.
Even though local restau-
rants are crumbling around
them, Strickland said their
eatery has what it takes
to weather the economic


storm.
"We're not huge," she
said, "and we bring people
food at a reasonable price."
The most expensive item on
the menu is the crab cakes
at $9.75. Entrees come fried,
grilled or blackened, with
no difference in price.
Oviedo Councilman
Steve Schenck, who attend-
ed Friday's ribbon-cutting
ceremony, said it's encour-
aging to see a new business
open in these economic
times and it will bring traffic
to the ailing plaza. "It's also.
encouraging to see people
are going in at lunchtime
on a Tuesday," he said of his
second visit.
The coastal-seafood-
shack atmosphere,
Strickland said, is "cozy,
quaint and fun." A surfboard,
wooden birds, fun sayings
and other seaside knick-
knacks decorate the walls
surrounding the wooden
tables and chairs.
Quick-casual the
hybrid of sit-down eat-
ery quality and fast-food
pace is a newer market
that includes Tijuana Flats,
Panera Bread and the local-
ly owned Sandfire Grill.
Customers order and pay at
the counter and find a seat,
and then employees bring
out their food.
Strickland said the own-


S PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE VOICE
Sister and brother Mary Strickland and Tim Shepherdson stand in the seaside-themed dining room of TJ's Seafood Shack, which
the pair opened Nov. 14 in the Town Center Shoppes at the corner of Mitchell Hammock Road and Alafaya Trail in Oviedo.


ers of Sandfire had already
visited twice by Monday
and they had other repeat
guests as well. She said the
city has been great through
the changeover. "They want
businesses in Oviedo to suc-
ceed as much as we do."
Oviedo resident Lindsay
Culbreth enjoyed the crab
cakes at TJ's on Monday.
Her friend, Alex Karas, an


Orlando resident, had a fish
platter that she said was
fluffy and flaky. The atmo-
sphere, she said, is casual
and relaxing.
"In a budget-conscious
time this is exactly what
people are looking at,"
Schenck said.


TJ's Seafood Shack, on Mitchell
Hammock Road in Oviedo next
to LA Fitness, is open from 11
a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through
Thursday, and 11 a.m. to 9:30
p.m. Friday and Saturday. Visit
TJsSeafoodShack.com for more
information.


4


Restaurant Owners...


* -~ ..


Right Now Consumers In Your Area


Are Thinking About


Where To Dine Out.



Il


Don't you wish they had

your ad In their hands?


1o]


i


Tk. %Wa


I


4rf^..









Now more than ever, we give thanks


SBy Karen McEnany-Phillips


Come one, come all to the
annual Geneva Community
Yard and Craft Sale on
Saturday, Dec. 6, from 9
a.m. to 2 p.m. The event
is always a fantastic time
to find great gifts for the
holidays and great bar-
gains too. There will be
over 50 booths and you'll
find wonderful treasures
for everyone in your fam-
ily, including you. There
will be clothing, toys, food,
home decorations, tools,
pet accessories, handmade
crafts, books, and more.
Hot coffee, snacks and
lunch will also be available
for a nominal price.
It's easy to give thanks
when times are good. In
easy times we don't give it
much thought. We indulge
in the enjoyment, of the
long weekend and addic-
tive temptations from the


kitchen, and bask in the
competition of the retail
paparazzi vying for our dol-
lar. That was then and this
is now. We still have the
long Thaoksgiving week-
end but many no longer
enjoy it as a paid holiday.
The classified section in
print or online has become
more important than the
big stack of ads and inserts.
Mall and parking lot traf-
fic is light and no one is
embarrassed to be seen in
the discount stores.
The sweet silver lining of
our current economic con-
dition is that it has begun
to correct our materialistic
bent and to push the pen-
dulum in the other direc-
tion. Extreme consumption
despite the lack of ability
to pay is starting to auto-
correct and our perception
of what is necessary and


what truly makes us happy
is shifting. ,
In the last few months,
we realized that in order
to save fuel costs we could
get by without unneces-
sary trips. Even with the
lower gas prices, reports
indicate most are still cau-
tious about that expendi-
ture. With retirement and
401(k)s dwindling at this
time, we look at our cur-
rent automobile and see
it as dependable and con-
sider the option to enjoy it
another year or two. At the
grocery store we choose
staples over snacks and pay
more attention to weekly
specials and coupons. The
dining room or breakfast
area is now open for fam-
ily dinner, replacing the
expensive fast food and
chain restaurant habits.
Sometimes divine provi-
dence shakes us up like the
scene between Cher and
Nicolas Cage in the movie
"Moonstruck" when she
says, "Snap out of it!"
This U-turn in behav-
ior can surely benefit our
children and us. Yes we will
continue to worry, for these
are anxious times. But the


lessons of thrift, conscious
consumption, and recog-
nizing what is long-lasting
and truly important are
critical for our survival.
Many have lost their jobs
and wonder what the
future holds. I can vouch
from personal experience
that discovering a new
career can be personally
and professionally enrich-
ing. It is unsettling to leave
a comfort zone but it also
restores confidence when
you add a new stable of
skills to your life and your
resume.
And so we come to this
Thanksgiving, counting
our many blessings in a
time that may not be as
materially prosperous yet
more than ever reflects
the true spirit of the holi-
day. I may still have water
in my back pasture but I
am eternally grateful that
Mother Nature left us alone
for the rest of the hur-
ricane season. On Aug. 24
the river rose 3 feet in one
day and soon peaked at a
record high of 11.09 feet.
Yet 10 tropical.storms and
hurricanes later we found
ourselves spared, out of the


swirling tropical path it
was miraculous. I am also
grateful for the kindness
of colleagues, neighbors,
friends and strangers who
helped in ways large and
small throughout the last
anxious and stressful 90
days. I am grateful that we
are part of a community
that fends for itself by the
simple unselfishness of
ordinary people who help
and support one another.
Like the original pil-
grims we face hardships
and uncertainty but maybe
this year, more than ever,
we have reason to give
thanks.


ToKAREN
Please share your thoughts about
Geneva at 407-221-7002,
karenp@theoviedovoice.com
with "Stetson's Corner" in the sub-
ject line, or fax 407-349-2800.
Thanks!
This column is dedicated to
Deputy Sheriff Gene "Stetson"
Gregory, killed in the line of duty
on July 8, 1998. Geneva will never
be the same because of Deputy
Gregory it will be better.


PHOTOS BY JENNY ANDREASSON THE VOICE


McLEMORE I New
deal for manager
< continued from the front page

compromises your position and the
outgoing commissioners' and that's
all I have to say."
McLemore said the current
Commission was the right enti-
ty with which to negotiate. "I've
worked for these people for 12'
years and believe these are the peo-
ple that I need to deal with in resur-
recting that separation agreement,"
he said.
McLemore lost a bid last week
for a job in Ormond Beach. Monday
he said he has unfinished business
in Winter Springs and would like to
retire tliere. He wants to bring the
Town Center and other projects to
fruition once the economic clouds
have parted.
"My first goal is to demonstrate
to the new Commission that I can
do the job for them, that I can make
the necessary.changes in direction
that they believe is in the best inter-
est of this community," he said. "If
that's not possible, then we need to
separate."
After some minor language
changes by City Attorney Anthony
Garganese, the Commission
approved the agreement. Now it
can only be changed or extended
with the "mutual consent" of the
city and McLemore.
Outgoing Commissioner Don
Gilmore said he would have liked
to give the manager back the nine-
month severance package.
Outgoing Commissioner Robert
Miller said the agreement was "fair,"
citing McLemore's achievements.
"We only set the benchmark, and.
the city manager got us there."


Keys to


the city



for exiting
'"


leaders




Winter Springs City
Commissioners Don Gilmore,
above, and Robert Miller, right,
receive plaques featuring a "key .
to the city" from Mayor John
Bush at the City Commission
meeting on Monday, Nov. 24. -
Gilmore and Miller presided over
their last meeting as elected
officials. Miller leaves office
due to term limits, and Gilmore
will cede his seat to incom-
ing Commissioner Gary Bonner.
Jean Hovey takes over for
Miller. -


Page A4 November 28 December 4, 2008


The Voice






November 28 December 4, 2008 Pae A5


mie VU iT c


Chilly weather gets you moving


Did someone say, "It is
chilly outside"? I think it's
neat gets you moving
and moving. Several of
us did just that. Saturday
morning, Laurie Cain, Stacy
Carden, Connie Washam
and I popped over to
the Longwood Arts and
Crafts Festival to finish the
Christmas shopping that
we had the opportunity to
start at our own Great Day
in the Country. It was nice
to see our crafters again
and they said they loved
our show.
Much to our surprise,
the Longwood show was
disappointing in that some
of the vendors that were
always there did not come
back again this year; in
other words, we had a full
house and they sure didn't.


The gals and I had fun any-
way and we did not leave
empty-handed.
A wonderful treat is
coming soon to Oviedo.
"Christmas Tea at the
Manor," presented by King's
Manor Bed & Breakfast,
322 King St., Oviedo. Come
step back in time! Enjoy
a wonderful holiday tea,
including: savories, des-
serts, tea and a gift to take
home. Dates: Monday, Dec.
8, and Sunday, Dec. 21.
There will be two seatings:
11:30 a.m. and 1 p.m. each
day.
Reservations are
required. The price is $25
per person. Please call
Roberta at 407-365-4200
for reservations. We have
available five tables for
four, one table for two and


one table for six to eight
people.
Oviedo's own Holiday
Parade and Christmas Tree
Lighting and Expo will be
held Dec. 6. The parade will
begin at 4:45 p.m. starting
from the Aquatic Facility
and concluding at the
Lawton House in time for
the Christmas tree lighting.
Come join in the festivities
and have some refresh-
ments and cookies. Santa
will once again ride on the
fire engine I heard his
sleigh is in the sleigh shop
getting a tuneup.
Christmas in the Park
will be held 6:15 p.m.
Dec. 4, Central Park, Park
Avenue, Winter Park.
The Morse Museum of
American Art will light up
Central Park with century-
old Tiffany windows from
its renowned collection at
the 30th annual event. The
leaded-glass windows set
the stage for a performance
of seasonal favorites by the
150-voice Bach Festival
Choir. Free admission. For
more information, call 407-
645-5311.


There's another
Christmas parade and tree
lighting Saturday, Dec. 6, in
the Winter Springs Town
Center, 158 Tuskawilla
Road. The annual holiday
parade route will be along
Tuskawilla Road and end
at the Winter Springs Town
Center. The parade will
begin at 4 p.m. and end at
5:30 p.m. Following the
parade, the city holiday tree
lighting ceremony will take
place at 6 p.m. Admission
is free.
You may need this
advice: The Perfect
Poinsettia 11:30 a.m.
Tuesday, Dec. 2, at the
South Creek Library, 1702
Deerfield Blvd., Orlando.
There will be a presenta-
tion on how to care for
holiday poinsettias and
what to do with them after
the holidays. This presen-
tation is given by Orange
County and the University
of Florida Institute of
Food and Agricultural
Sciences Master Gardeners.
Admission is free. Call 407-
835-7480 for more infor-
mation.


The Sanford Tour
of Historic Homes will
run 6:30 to 9 p.m. on
Dec. 5, and 11 a.m. to 4
p.m. on Dec. 6. Call 407-
263-4484 for locations
or check their Web site
SanfordHistoricTrust.org.
Light up UCF: outdoor
skating, holiday light show
and film screenings shown
daily through Jan. 2 at
the University of Central
Florida Arena Building, 50
N. Gemini Blvd., Orlando.
Admission is free (skating is
$10). For special events go
to LightUpUcf.com or call
407-823-6006.
A thought "Work con-
sists of whatever a body is
obliged to do. Play consists
of whatever a body is not
obliged to do."
Mark Twain




TALK A
>To JANET

Send word to Janet Foley about
events and let her know what's
going on around town by e-mailing
janetf@theoviedovoice.com.


SHOP I Big companies not insulated from economy's woes


< continued from the front page

at UCF, said the economy is in bad
shape and is only getting worse.
Unemployment is on the rise and
Americans have lost trillions of dol-
lars in the stock market and home
equity. "Consumers are under siege
and they're going to batten down the
hatches," he said.
The dayafter Thanksgiving is called
Black Friday, Snaith said, because it's
the kickoff of the holiday season,
a period where retailers go from
being "in the red" using red ink in
their accounting records to indicate
unprofitable times to being "in the
black" turning a profit.
But there are several accounts on
how the term originated.
Popular theorysaysitwas dubbed
BlackFridaybythePhiladelphiaPolice


Department around 1960 because of
the crowds it brought. A column writ-
ten in January 1966 by Philadelphia
retailer Martin L. Apfelbaum in The
American Philatelist explained the
term.
"'Black Friday' officially opens the
Christmas shopping season in cen-
ter city," he wrote, "and it usually
brings massive traffic jams and over-
crowded sidewalks as the downtown
stores are mobbed from opening to
closing."
Research by the American Dialect
Society suggests that the red-to-black
ink usage didn't occur in print until
1981.
Despite its origins, it was not a
term that was used or liked by
retailers until more recently. "Black
Friday is not an accepted term in the
retail industry and as far as retail-


ers are concerned, it is understood
to mean the Friday the stock mar-
ket crashed in 1929," the National
Retail Merchants Association said
in a statement that appeared in the
Philadelphia Inquirer in 1985.
Today the day is even more hectic
with stores advertising "door bust-
ers," or sales, sometimes beginning
before the sun comes up, meant to
lure in shoppers.
The big box stores can set the
lowest prices and thus attract more
shoppers, but they're not immune
to the economic woes. "I suspect the
pain will be fairly evenly distributed"
between large and small businesses
this year, Snaith said. "Size isn't nec-
essarily going to shield you."


I Creion


A photograph of the Winter
Springs High School homecom-
ing parade that published in
the previous edition included
an erroneous caption. It should
have noted that the parade pho-
tos were taken on King Street in
Oviedo.


,NEW PATIENT WELCOME SPECIAL!


Christie
DENTAL


v V -
Regularly $221
In absence of gum disease


Dental Insurance is welcome.
Financing Is available.

(407) 830.4383


Miniature video camera tour of your mouth
* All necessary x-rays, consultation with
the doctor and oral cancer screening
* Gentle ultrasonic cleaning
* Fluoridated polishing paste for healthier
teeth and a gleaming smile
* Polishing between the teeth to get rid of
those embarrassing dark stains


OAK GROVE


T'- P 1I. B. .-',,.'s'EL, .:1E, M-,b.. -- ..,LUE. THE PATIENT AND ANY OTHER PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR
r t, l I -, :_ .. i..-rT I -f r.':i T p. E r J_- i i-. i F ..fi E rjF ._: [-l( i f .,i. _f"- v- .r iTP f.:.1. -[i. ...TH Ir.
ER .I'.,E L.'E.1l[jlrJ ,4j ri, -., 'TP il I TH.T -i fWF ., r -- I'I'-,IT I '-F IrJ: ..,-HiiJ Hi;-l-- P '. ; 'il',i 'r-,r -
TG. THF T, f f l- lr i ljT 1- ..1 THE FFt i i I:I:.-'-.IIT : f. ':.f t- i.'.ti', F, -f t E rI ,1 'r n* ,- -d.n 1 '-r.1WnT FL.
U'- C l. tC : "-L nW-,'.l 'r 11:1:1


Fresh Fruit
Vine Ripe Tomatoes
Vegetables i




"Get Healthy From the Inside Out!"



Free Coney Island Hot Dogs for our

Customers Every Saturday, 9am-5pm

J & B U-Pull-It Auto Parts
10 acres ofAutos for Parts

Entry 17105 E Hwy 50, Bithlo, FL Entry
Fee (407) 568-2131 Fee


get
.... noticed



advertise'
.. here










contact pat
407-628-8500
plovaglio@observernewspapers.com


Emergencies Seen Same Day!_
I ex


Tho X/Ural






P A6 N b 28 D ember 4 8


e ga Io v eV III ,,c '+l --I', U0


Police wrap drug sweep, seize cash


BE ON THE LOOKOUT!
i Crime, arrests and
public safety news from
the Oviedo Police Department

By Lt. George Ilemsky


Drug sting nets four
On Friday, Nov. 14, mem-
bers of the Oviedo Police
Department's Community
Response Team (CRT)
ended a month-and-a-half
investigation into the ille-
gal street sales of drugs in
the Washington Heights
(Johnson Hill) area of
Oviedo when members of
the Oviedo
CRT executed
a search war-
rant at one of
the homes in
the neighbor-
hood. Officers
confiscated-
Green cash total-
ing $1,299
and drugs
with a total
street value of
approximate-
ly$17,000, and
also seized
three hand-
guns. Arrested
Lott were Carnelle
Green, Joseph
Lott, Michael
Morris and Willice Daniels.
During the operation,
officers of the Altamonte
Springs Police Department
assisted by acting in an


undercover capacity, posing
as drug users to purchase
illegal drugs from dealers in
the area.
Members
of the CRT
also turned
over informa-
tion to the
City County
Investigative
Bureau regard-
ing a residence Morris
in the unincor-
porated area
Washington i
Heights, which
also led to the
execution of
a search war-
rant. As a result
one individual Daniels
was arrested Daniels
and agents
recovered a handgun that
had been reported stolen.

Driving while possessing
On Nov. 17, a traffic stop on
Alafaya Woods Boulevard
near Blockbuster Video
resulted in the driver get-
ting charged for possession
of marijuana.
On Nov. 17, a traffic stop
in the area of Reed Road
and Harrison Street at 1:30


in the morning resulted in
the driver being in violation
of restriction for a learn-
er's permit and for being in
possession of alcohol while
being under the age of 21.

Vehicle burglaries
On Nov. 18, a vehicle bur-
glary was reported on
Manchester Avenue. The
complainant had parked
his vehicle in the driveway
of his residence and discov-
ered his Blackberry and Treo
cell phones and his rolling.
green briefcase contain-
ing promotional items to
be missing. No forced entry
was evident.
On Nov. 18, a vehicle
burglary was reported on
MacTavandash Drive. The
complainant had parked
her vehicle in the driveway
of her residence and discov-
ered her Gateway Laptop
computer, Free Agent GB
hard drive still in the box
and wrapped, and her kara-
oke machine missing.
On Nov. 18, a vehicle bur-
glary was reported at the
Alafaya Woods Apartments.
The complainant stated a
GPS was stolen from the
vehicle while it was parked
outside his apartment.
On Nov. 18, a vehicle
burglary was reported on
Garden Street. The com-
plainant parked the vehicle
on Garden Street while she
was on her doctor's appoint-
ment at Oviedo Family
Medical located on South
Central Avenue. The com-
plainant parked her vehicle


at 9:15 a.m. and returned at
approximately 10:30 a.m. to
find the rear passenger win-
dow shattered. A purse that
contained the victim's wal-
let, personal effects, cash
and jewelry was among the
missing items.

Home invasion thwarted
The Oviedo Police
Community Response
Team, acting on intelligence
information of a possible
home invasion,
set up surveillance
teams and arrest
teams to stake
out the location.
At approximately Oviedo p
10:15 p.m. on Nov. be look
18, the attempted speeders
home invasion Sunday, Ni
was thwarted Saturday,
when officers Oviedo ME
moved in before BoulevE
the perpetrators County F
were able to move Watch c
into the house. school z(
One of the sub- bus stops
jects was taken is in s
down at the scene
while the others
got back in the vehicle and
fled from the scene. In their
haste for a getaway, the sub-
jects drove their stolen Ford
Explorer through a mailbox
and struck an unmarked
police vehicle occupied
with two officers. A vehicle
pursuit ensued, taking the
pursuit through Seminole
County into Orange County.
The pursuit terminated
in Orange County where
another subject was taken
into custody for an attempt-


ed home invasion while
two other subjects fled. This
investigation is still ongo-
ing.

Probation violation
On Nov. 19, Oviedo Police
were assisting a probation
officer with a probation
check. During a routine
walk-through of the pro-
bationer's bedroom, a large
quantity of alprazolam -
a controlled substance


-
police will
king for
between
ov. 30, and
Dec. 6, on
marketplace
ard and
load 419.
out near
ones and
, as school
session.


under Florida Law
- Etolac and a
marijuana smok-
ing device were
discovered which
violated the terms
of his probation.

I fought the law.
The law won!
On Nov. 20, an
investigation into
a possible disabled
vehicle resulted
in a passenger
being arrested
for an outstand-
ing warrant after
her companion


and driver decided not to
comply. This resulted in the
driver having charges filed
against him for battery on
a law enforcement officer,
fleeing and eluding, driving,
while license is suspended
or revoked, and resisting an
officer without violence.

The Oviedo Police
Department wish you a
wonderful Thanksgiving!


Notes


All Seminole County boat ramps have,
reopened for public use. Both the Mullet Lake
Park boat ramp, located at 2368 Mullet Lake
Road in Geneva, and the Lake Monroe Wayside
boat ramp, located at 4150 N.E. Highway 17-
92 in Sanford have reopened after being closed
since late August.
Floodwaters from Tropical Storm Fay had left
the ramps submerged for months but they have
now been determined ready for boaters to get
back in the water.

The Central Florida Zoo and Botanical
Gardens received a $10,000 donation on Nov.
25 from the National City-Harbor Foundation.
The donation will help fund Phase I of the
Zoo's $11.5 million "Get Your Wild On" Capital


Campaign by supporting the "Tiger Outpost"
exhibit and will help to ensure the survival of
the critically endangered Sumatran tiger by
bringing the tiger to the zoo.
Joe Montisano, CEO of the Central Florida Zoo
and Botanical Gardens, said the zoo is thrilled
about the donation and greatly appreciates the
gift that will provide a significant boost in their
fundraising efforts.

AAA Auto Club South and Budweiser will be
protecting drivers on the road for Thanksgiving
weekend thanks to "Tow to Go." The program
provides a confidential ride home and tow, free
of charge, to anyone who may have had too
much to drink simply by calling 1-800-AAA-
HELP.


The "Tow to Go" program is offered throughout
the holiday season beginning Nov. 27 and will
last until Jan. 1. The programs services are
offered in Atlanta, Savannah, Nashville and
throughout the state of Florida and has kept
more than 8,000 drunk drivers off the roads
since 1998.

RDC Golf Group, Inc., a leading golf course
ownership and management company,
announces that Jim Sides has been appointed
general manager of the Tuscawilla Country Club
in Northeast Orlando.
Sides brings nearly 20 years of experience in
the golf and hospitality industries to the club.
With seven years experience from the IPM/CRM
Group where he served as general manager/


regional director of the club's operations, where
he directed operations for the company's hotel/
club/resort division that included multiple
properties in the United States. He also sent four
years as the managing director/chief operating
officer for the Glen Dornoch Castle in Scotland,
and seven years as general manager corporate/
director for AlpeNZ, where he was responsible
for supervising operations for the company's
five hotels and resorts in Switzerland, Austria
and New Zealand.
In addition to his club and resort operations
knowledge, Sides also brings an extensive
culinary background to the upgraded dining
facilities at Tuscawilla as a graduate of the
Royal Academy of Culinary Arts in Scotland.


SHodges Brothers Roofing
Locally owned roofing company serving Orlando since 1978 with shingle, built-
up, modified bitumen and metal roof work. Licensed, Bonded and Insured
CCC042845
C allfr *or RE simt


Monday through Friday 7 am 4 pm
Randy Hodges
1201 W. Amelia St. Orlando, FL 32805
Tel: (407) 650-0013 info@hodgesbrothers.net


jWNPflNAL
CONTRiACTORS
AsoMEMBERc1
LRIMEMBER p


HONEST & RELIABLE LOCAL REFERENCES KNOW WHO YOU LET IN YOUR HOME


* truck mounted steam cleaner
upholstery, mattresses, tile
no harsh chemicals


Mention uDthis dfora f10%WIdh'fIiscunt!
E Cal u at 47-34-9537-


Oviedo s Full Service Law Firm


* Family Law

* Real Estate Law

* Wills, Trusts, Estates

* Criminal Law

* Bankruptcy

* Personal Injury


Stein
Sonnenschein
Hochman
& Peppler
Attorneys at Law

We're here when
you need us!

1420 Alafaya Trail, Oviedo, FL
(407) 977-6868


The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements.
Before you decide, ask us to send yqu free written information about our qualifications and experience.


The Voice


r






The Voice November 28 December 4, 2008 Page A7


STHIS WEEK in human history

I Rfty-three-year-old LelsWashkansky mreceiedtef an
heart transplant in Cape Town, South Africa. Washkansky was
given drugs to stop his body from rejecting the heart, but those
drugs also left him susceptible to sickness, and 18 days later he
IR died from double pneumonia.



Desperate retailers sweeten deals


AMY K.D. TOBIK
THE VOICE

The special assignment
begins promptly at 3:00 a.m.
when two women dressed
in matching gear quietly slip
out the door and into thqir
cars. Equipped with back-
packs crammed with lists,
bottled water, snacks, cell
phones and walkie-talkies,
they know their mission
won't end for at least 21
hours.
It's Black Friday and
these friends are more than
prepared to do their holiday
shopping.
Devoted Black Friday
shopper Becky Piety of
Oviedo said she anticipates
this season's shopping will
be challenging.
"This year it is going to be
even more crowded due to a
tough economy," Piety said.
"More people will be look-
ing for deals."
Her advice to first-time
Black Friday shoppers:
"Start early; the early bird
gets the worm. Leave your
kids at home. Black Friday
shopping craziness is no
place for kids."
The holiday shopping
season traditionally goes
into full swing the day after
Thanksgiving, when the
majority of retailers offer
enormous discounts and
extended hours to lure
more shoppers. The term
"Black Friday" may refer to
a promising shift in profit
due to the sudden influx
of sales and dates back to
when accounting records
were kept by hand using red
ink to represent unprofit-
able periods, to black ink
for profit.
Newspapers are typically


.... ," ..' .. .. .. ... ." .,, ., : .. .- .'* ,
-:.^. i^^ ,VS '^I., iB':-.,i' '- '' :



'. -^Sfll~h ^


PHOTO BY LAURENCE SAMUELS THE VOICE
Retailers facing touch times collide with holiday shoppers eager for "Black Friday" bargains on the day after Thanksgiving, this Friday, Nov. 28.


packed with early bird cir-
culars offering unusual dis-
counts on electronics and
toys. More than 100 Black
Friday advertisements from
large retailers can also be
found online weeks in
advance, offering hot deals
and coupons to entice con-
sumers. Some large discount
stores keep their hours
secret up until the last min-
ute, hoping to beat out the
competition.
This year, Piety antici-
pates people will be search-
ing for the best prices on


The Sign Man

160 East Broadway Phone: (407) 365-3722
PO Box 622143 Fax: (407) 365-7786
Oviedo, FL 32765 www.signman.net
Computerized Laser & Rotary Engraving Picture ID Name Badges
Vinyl Lettered Banners & Signs Self-Inking Rubber Stamps
Magnetic Signs Plaques & Awards Large Format Printing
Phone: (407) 365-3722 Fax. (407) 365-7786
(Located at the base of the Nelson & Co. water tower)




WINDOW REGULATORS NEW HEADLIGHTS
- NEW TAILIGHTS SIDE MIRRORS HOODS -
FENDERS AND MORE.....


"hot" items such as plasma
and LCD TVs, Blu-ray disc
players, video games, Nerf
N-Strike Vulcan Blaster
and action figures such as
Bakugan Battle Brawlers.
While economic times
may seem challenging this
year, Chris Molho, assistant
general manager of Oviedo
Marketplace and Altamonte
Mall, said he remains opti-
mistic.
"The traffic has been phe-
nomenal at both Altamonte
and Oviedo the past two
weekends, despite what


People Air Conditioning
and Heating, Inc.
Residential Maintenance
Commercial Repairs
Sales /Service Installation
@)TRANE
The People's Choice for Air Conditioning
407-947-8443
www.peopleacc.com
LIC#CAC044869

ARCHITECTURAL
DESIGN SERVICE
House Plans-
Custom Home Design
Room Additions
Kitchen-Bathroom Design
Interior-Exterior Design Service
Construction Management

407-366-7748


people have been saying
about it being a slow sea-
son," Molho said. "Everyone
will be looking for a deal
with-the credit crunch."
The Altamonte Mall will
kick off the holiday season
at one minute past midnight
with the "Rockin' Shoppin'
Eve" celebration. In addi-
tion to store discounts, the
mall will be giving away a
$1,000 shopping spree and
gift cards on Black Friday.
Oviedo Marketplace will
host "Get Your Gift On" and
open at 6 a.m. on Friday.


Prizes, such as a big, flat
screen television, a laptop
.computer and special gift
bags will be given away at
the event.
"I can't wait," Molho said.
"I'll be there bright and
early."
Oviedo Borders book-
store manager Jeff Fike
said the Winter Park Village
store will open an hour ear-
lier than normal on Black
Friday, at 8 a.m., hoping to
increase book sales. "The

> turn to SALES on page A10


S I G CBernard S. Zeffren, MD
LLERGYEugene F. Schwartz, MD
Winnie Whidden, MSN, ARNP-C
Voted Best Doctors of Central FL,
I Orlando Magazine
for 6 consecutive years





Diplomats American Board of
Allergy and Immunology


407-366-7387
7560 Red Bug Lake Rd., Ste. 2064 Oviedo, FL 32765
www.orlandoaltergy.com
Additional Offices in Altamonte, Waterford Lakes, Hunters Creek & Orange City






e gaA8 Noveber28 Dec fl~, ,n A )A h oc


G.O. Family


Family

Calendar


and Tree Lighting ceremony on
Saturday, Dec. 6. The event will
feature floats, bands, carolers
and the arrival of Santa Claus. A
holiday expo at the Lawton House
will feature wares of Chamber of
Commerce members.
The parade begins at 4:45
p.m. at Oviedo Boulevard and
Mitchell Hammock Road, on a
path to the Lawton House at 200
W. Broadway St. The tree-lighting
event follows the parade.
The event is free. Call 407-
278-4871 for more information.
Winter Springs hosts its annual
Holiday 'Parade and Tree
Lighting starting on Saturday,
Dec. 6. To save money, this
year's parade route will run along
iTuskawilla Road into the Town
Center, at 158 Tuskawilla Road.
VThe parade, starts at 4 p.m.,.
-followed by the tree-lighting
Ceremony at 6 p.m. These events,
rere-tee^'< : -
Call 407-w32776593 for more
Triffortnation.-: -
.:,-. .- -
Sho off your creative side
and joinerhole"County 4-H
for.,. their dg"d holiday crafts
workshop. This opportunity will
give youth ages 5 through 14 the
opportunity to make a variety of
simple holiday crafts and gifts.
"The workshop will be held in the
Cooperative Extension Auditorium
at 250 W. County Home Road in
Sanford from 10 a.m. to noon on
Saturday, Dec. 13.
The cost is $4 per person. Pre-
registration is required. Call the
4-H office at 407-665-5560 by
Thursday, Dec. 11 to register.


For Greater Orlando's Active Families


Good deeds for the holidays


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE VOICE
Oviedo children took up two causes this month to help bring joy to the world during the holiday season: collecting pet food for needy families, and writing cards to soldiers.


AMY K.D. TOBIK
THE VOICE
Every time a child walks
into the Oviedo City
, J Hall with, pet food or
homemade cards in hand,
it warms Linda DeBonis'
heart.
The records specialist in
the City Clerk's Office has
watched the collection of


donated canned and dry
pet food increase every day,
along with a growing stack
of Thanksgiving cards dec-
orated with hand-drawn
turkeys and cornucopias,
intended for American sol-
diers stationed in Iraq.
These two special proj-
ects were set in motion at
the first.Children in Action
Forum hosted in early


November by the Oviedo
City Council. The attendees,
who ranged in age from ele-
me'ntary to middle school
students, discussed local
issues and concerns, and
were encouraged to express
their community project
ideas to Oviedo Mayor Mary
Lou Andrews through secret
ballot.
Project suggestions var-


ied, from planting trees on
city property to cleaning up
litter and recycling. Nearly
half of the respondents,
however, voted to collect
pet food for an Oviedo food
pantry. The children theo-
rized that people who need
to visit food banks to pro-
vide for their families must
> turn to ACTION on page A10


Hungry Howie's

O b your area andbey -. -Adt
or rLIZZA
I a Experienced, licensed, insured and
at regular menu price & get the I reliable! For more information/ Y
,SE On DONEn FRE! ,I reservations, call Ann at:
1333 West Broadway Ave. I fj ',,
(at equal or lesser value.) (OviedoPlaza-Off426 near Publix) .s-3 6
S Couponaliduntil-30-08 407-366-2332 w w w.annstow ncar.corn
16 -uov a-id untlgg M gg..-I I


I oie ii


Oviedo Uision
M Center

FAMILY VISION Y H-IALTFI


Place your ad in the





Eng ements
.. ddings
iversaries
SBirths
Birthdays
Graduations
Celebrations

4 Call -atick Lova0io
407-628-&5W exL 305
pOiiior 3234MM2j~goi


-


-1-


The Voice


Dana 4 2i0 iUVIIU9A0- lU '.Aunn


I






.... Voice N


Featured art
This week's art comes from art students at Carillon Elementary in Oviedo.


Thanksgiving

Chalk on paper


Illustrated by
Eric Hunter
2nd grade


Fall Illustrated by Scarecrow
..... ................ ............................. ........ S a m a ntha G ra nd e
Crayon on paper 2nd grade Crayon on paper


Illustrated by
Mila Gaarder
2nd grade


BINGO! NEW NIGHT!
-- EVERY WEDNESDAY
/ a Temple Israel
i ^50 S. Moss Rd.
Winter Springs, FL
"o IL.3o OWq. -h cn-c ewee
S.. 1No Smoking. No outside
-*f* food due to dietary laws.
& r.6th.a tL-s co.pom.- -foir
pMBHMlllliimiimii~iaii~toi o off ^yxjpt-ves fIsyfOS


"A Furniture Menagerie"
73 Alafaya Woods Blvd. Alafaya Square Between Publix & Froggers


AftVEXR4EtXr 2008
The Florida State Stamp Show a WSP event! '.
Central Florida Fairgrounds & Exposition Park
F. Main Exhibit Bldg --- 4603 West Colonial Drive (SR50)
Orlando, Florida 32808
Fnida\, December 5 from 10:00 AM 6.00 PM .
SaturdaN. December 6 from 10 00 AM.l 5.00 PNM
Sunday December from 10:00 AM 3:00 PN I A
POSTAGE STAMPS FOR COLLECTORS
49 dealers to BUY SELL TRADE


FREE ADMISSION & PARKING DOOR PRIZES PUBLIC AUCTION
YOUTH AREA FREE STAMPS FOR KIDS SOCIETY MEETINGS
, www.FLOREXStampShow.com
&kWW~ZW


Savannah Cor adCotg


Located on a beautiful campus setting, our two Savannah Court'
communities provide full assisted living services while Savannah
Cottage offers a secured residence for those with memory loss.
* Restaurant Style Dining Experience
* Vibrant and Extensive Activities Program
* 24/7 Well Trained and Caring Associates
* Laundry, Housekeeping and Linen Services
* Scheduled Transportation and Fun Outings
* Individualized Services and Care
Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all
of the above! You are always welcome at Savannah Cogrt and
Cottage of Oviedo.

SJANNAH COURT A-\\ANNAH" TTAGE
ASSISTED LIVING RESIDENCE MEMORY CARE RESIDENCE
Where hospitality is truly a way of life!
395 Alafaya Woods Blvd., Oviedo, FL 32765
407-977-8786
ALF License No. 9235, 9308, 9307 www.slm.net/SCOviedol


Signature property of


Gourmet Food

/6 21-The-6o/






Dominick's To Go
5804 Red Bug Lake Rd.
Winter Springs
407.699.8646
o,,i;c-'L CA' i.'; Open daily from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.
www.DominicksCatering.com


g


.I


November 28 December 4,.2008 Pace A9


The Voice







M -l0 Nvember28-December, 4. 2008oi


Cultivate your own butterfly bush


A member of the legume
family and native to Brazil
and other countries in
South America, the but-
terfly bush produces a
brilliant display of yellow
blossoms in the fall that
resemble golden butterflies.
This plant is also known as
climbing cassia, Christmas
senna, winter cassia or
simply cassia shrub. This
plant is the food and nectar
source of various yellow
butterflies.

The plant
This sprawling, semi-
evergreen shrub reaches a
height of 8 to 10 feet with
an equal spread. Leaves are
alternate with ovate leaf-
lets less than 2 inches long.
When partially folded, the
leaf creates a "lobster-tail."
The flowers are yellow,
very showy, about 1.5 inch-
es across and in three to
12 flowered racemes that
grow near the stem tips.
Each flower has prominent,
curved, filamentous sta-
mens, which are character-
istic of this plant. The fruit
is a brown, slender cylindri-
cal pod, about 3 to 6 inches
long.
r
The butterflies
Cloudless sulphur, sleepy
orange and orange-barred
sulphur are three of the


most prominent butter-
flies that feed on this plant.
Sulphur butterflies often
migrate across the state
in large numbers, going
south during the months
of September through
November, and a smaller
migration occurs in a
northward direction in the .
spring.
The cloudless sulphur
butterfly is one of the most
common butterflies in
Florida. Males are easily
recognized because of their
pure yellow color without
any markings on the upper
side of their wings. The
females have small black
spots and markings along
the edges of the fore wings.
Both sexes have very small
silver spots, rimmed in
pink, on the underside of
the hind wings.
The sulphur butterflies
are so named because of
their bright yellow col-
oration, resembling the
color of the element sulfur.
Actually, their colors vary
from lemony yellow to
bright orange and pastel
green to faded white. Some
of the.females have a yel-
low and a white form.

Ecological notes
Commonly cultivated for
ornament in Florida at least
since the 1940s is known


" Florida

Gardening
SBY AL FERRER
SEMINOLE COUNTY URBAN
HORTICULTURIST


to escape cultivation dis-
placing native vegetation
in disturbed and undis-
turbed areas of Florida's
tropical hammocks, coastal
strands and canal banks. It
has become naturalized in
South Florida, considered
somewhat weedy in the
Bahamas and disturbed
areas in South America.

Culture
The butterfly bush grows
well in partial shade but
needs full sun for best
growth and flowering. It
tolerates a wide range of
well-drained types of soil
and becomes moderately
drought-tolerant after
becoming established.
This plant will benefit
from frequent pinching of
the young shoot tips dur-
ing the growing season
up to the beginning of
September; this encourages
branching and increases
the number of flowers.
Blooming occurs in late fall
or early winter, producing
numerous seeds in each
pod. Appropriate training
can produce a very small
specimen tree that looks
nice growing in a low
ground cover.
Trees often fall over and
will require staking to hold
them upright. For this rea-
son, it is easiest to place it
in a shrub border among
other shrubs that will help
hold it erect. Cut off at
ground level as soon as the
frost kills back the stems
during severe winters.

Uses
Container or above-ground
planter. It is recommended
for buffer strips around
parking lots or for median


strip plantings in the high-
way. Plant it near a deck or
patio or use as specimen.
Use in the back of a border
to hide its straggly, leafless
lower stems.
Leaves are used as a pur-
gative, but large amounts.
may be harmful. The nectar
is said to be toxic to bees.

Propagation
The butterfly bush can be
propagated by seeds or cut-
tings.

Pests and diseases
In the fall, the foliage and
flower buds of this plant
are often eaten by cater-
pillars. These caterpillars
can be easily picked off by
hand. You can control the
damage of the caterpil-
lars by spraying biological
insecticides such as Dipel
or Thuricide.
If you are a butterfly
lover, you can leave some
caterpillars alive so they
can reach the adult stage
while you watch their
life cycle unfold in front
of your eyes. Damaged
or stressed plants can be
infested with trunk borers..
There are no serious disease
problems that affect cassia
plants.

Note
Buddleia officinalis is
another plant known as
butterfly bush, belonging
to the plant family, which
includes the Carolina
Yellow-jasmine and is not
related to the Cassia.


ACTION I Kids voted to send homemade cards to soldiers at Camp Victory


< continued from page A8

also need animal food to feed the
family pet. Residents were asked to
contribute in order to help prevent
people from having to give up a pet
because of the cost, or being tempt-
ed to share their "people food." The
children collected enough animal
food for several Oviedo pets.
The enthusiasm for helping local
animals did not surprise Andrews.
"Most children can easily sym-
pathize with pets because they
are perceived as innocent and
dependent upon a human's care,"


Andrews said. "Although adults may
be in need, I believe it is harder for
children to empathize with adults
.because children view adults as
capable and 'in charge.'
"I believe that children have a
hard time wrapping their emotions
around the concept that an adult
can also be dependent and in need
of care."
The children were also asked at.
the forum to select a Thanksgiving
project. The mayor received ear-
nest suggestions ranging from col-
lecting books for the homeless
to making cards for the elderly.


Fifteen out of 26 .children voted
for a Thanksgiving card project to
raise the spirits of military person-
nel stationed at Camp Victory in
Iraq. Andrews said she thinks the
card project was so popular with
the children because the military is
a high-visibility entity that children
have seen in newspapers and on
television.
Deputy City Clerk Sue Andrews,
who helped coordinate the effort,
said she was overwhelmed by the
response. "These are children who
really know what is happening in
our world, which is both tragic and


amazing to me," she said. "I grew
up in a small town in Kentucky and
had no idea what the issues were,
let alone have an opinion or a solu-
tion. I truly believe that these are
the children who will one day be
our city, county and state leaders."
Debonis added, glancing at the
growing pile of contributions, "It
makes me feel wonderful that chil-
dren are interested in wanting to
participate ... the more we involve
children in actual events the stron-
ger our community will be.
"And the earlier we start, the bet-
ter."


TANAUSA
Frermier Indoor Tanning

SNO CONTRACTS!

1Month Unlimited Tanning $25*
65 Alafaya Woods Blvd, Oviedo
(between Publix & Froggers)
407-366-3088
*limited time only, coupon required, restrictions may apply.


SALES I 'We need
a Black December'
< continued from page A7

whole sales year has been
light," Fike said. "A 'big day'
(in sales) is so subjective
now; it has been nowhere
near our expectations."
"I think everyone in
retail is so far out of the
black this year," Fike said,
adding, "We need a Black
December and every
patriot out there to sup-
port their country."







(Hours may vary by store)
Oviedo Marketplace mall
1700 Oviedo Marketplace Blvd.,
407-977-2400
Hours: 6 a.m. to 9 p.m.

Altamonte Mall
451 E. Altamonte Dr.
407-215-5100
Hours: 12:01 a.m. to 9 p.m.

Waterford Lakes Town Center
413 N. Alafaya Trail
407-737-2866
Hours: 7 a.m. to 9:30 p.m.

The Florida Mall
8001 S. Orange Blossom Trail,
Orlando
407-851-6255
Hours: 5 a.m. to 10 p.m.

Orlando Fashion Square
3201 East Colonial Drive,
Orlando
407-896-1131
Hours: 6 a.m. to 10 p.m.


Call us @ The Voice:
407.628.8500


Can't Make Your House Payments?
Facing Foreclosure?

We buy houses in foreclosure.
Any Condition. Anywhere.
We can work with all situations.
Get rid of your burden Today!

Call 321-262-7575! Let's talk!


The Voice


e gaP A1 0 November 28 8





The Voice NnvulmIhILr UUful I im -th f 4 f(R Pr a All


CINEMA


!e o ts for Wedns daNo.2


Oviedo Marketplace
1500 Oviedo Marketplace Blvd.
407-977-1107
AUSTRALIA (PG-13) 11:40am,
12:40,3:25,4:20, 7:05, 8:05, 10:40

FOUR CHRISTMASES (PG-13)
11:50am, 12:35,1:10, 2:10,3:10,
4:10,4:40,5:35,6:50,7:30,8:15,
9:10, 9:50,10:35

TRANSPORTER 3 (PG-13) 12:10,
2:55, 5:30, 8:20,10:45

TWILIGHT (PG-13) 12:30, 1:00,
1:30, 3:30, 4:00, 4:35, 7:10, 7:40,
8:10,10:00,10:30,10:55

BOLT (PG) Noon, 12:45,1:15, 2:30,
3:50,.4:15, 4:50, 6:35, 7:20, 7:50,
9:15, 9:45,10:25

QUANTUM OF SOLACE (PG-13)
11:45am, 12:15,1:20,2:20,2:50,
4:25, 4:55, 5:25, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00,
9:35,10:05,10:35

THE BOY IN THE STRIPED
PAJAMAS (PG-13) 12:20, 4:45,
7:15,10:10

MADAGASCAR 2 (PG) 11:40am,
noon, 2:00, 2:25, 4:30, 5:00, 7:25,
7:55, 9:40,10:20

ROLE MODELS (R) 12:05, 2:45,
5:20, 7:35,10:20

ZACK AND MIRI MAKE A-
PORNO (R) 12:25,6:40
. .. .............. ........... ......_........


CHANGELING (R) 3:40,9:55

HIGH SCHOOL MUSICAL 3 (G)
11:55am, 2:35, 5:05

EAGLE EYE (PG-13) 7:45,10:25

FIREPROOF (PG) 1:25, 4:05, 6:55,
9:50


Waterford Lakes Town Center
541 N. Alafaya Trail
407-207-4603
AUSTRALIA (PG-13) 12:40, 3:40,
4:40, 7:20, 9:40

FOUR CHRISTMASES (PG-13)
1:05,1:10,3:15,4:00,5:30,7:00,
7:45, 9:55,10:20

TRANSPORTER 3 (PG-13) 12:10,
1:25, 2:50, 4:20, 5:20, 7:30, 8:05,
10:00, 10:40, 12:25am

TWILIGHT (PG-13) 11:30am,
12:25,1:20,2:20,3:30,4:25,5:15,
6:50, 7:15, 8:10, 9:45,10:15,10:55

QUANTUM OF SOLACE (PG-13)
12:45,1:35,2:15,3:35,4:10,4:55,
6:55, 7:35, 9:35,10:05,10:35,
12:15am
Open captioned and descriptive
audio showtimes: 11:40am, 8:00
. ..... .. . . . .


'Australia' Opens Wednesday



.- -


When her husband dies, an English aristocrat inherits his Australian
ranch. Soon, however, cattle barons plot to take over the land, and she
must unite with a rough drover to herd her cattle across the wilderness.


BOLT (PG)'12:35, 1:30, 3:20, 4:05,
5:50, 6:45, 8:20,11:00
3-D showtimes: 11:50am. 2:25,
4:50, 7:25, 9:50

THE BOY IN THE STRIPED
PAJAMAS (PG-13) 11:35am,
2:05, 4:45, 7:10,10:25

MADAGASCAR 2 (PG) 11:45am,
12:15, 2:10, 2:45, 4:35, 5:05, 7:05,
L9:25 )


ROLE MODELS (R) 12:05,4:15,
7:55,10:30
..... ... ........ .............. L ........ ........ .......... ............ .. ...... ... ........... .. ........
ZACK AND MIRI MAKE A
PORNO (R) 7:40, 10:10

CHANGELING (R) 9:30

HIGH SCHOOL MUSICAL 3 (G)
Noon

. ... I .. .


Also opening Wed.








'Four Christmases'


I hour 22 minutes PG-13


Calendar


Come enjoy a holiday concert at St. Luke's
Lutheran Church in Oviedo. The concert
begins at 7 p.m. on Dec. 5 and 2 p.m. and 7
p.m. on Dec. 6. and will feature the Brass Band
of Central Florida. Call 407-365-3408 for more
information.

Winter Spring's annual holiday parade and
tree lighting will be held Saturday, Dec. 6. The
parade will begin -at 4 p.m. along Tuskawilla
Road and end at the Winter Springs Town Center
with a tree lighting at 6 p.m. Call 407-327-6593
for more information.

Oviedo's annual holiday parade and tree
lighting will be held in Oviedo at 4:45 p.m. on
Saturday, Dec. 6. The event will feature floats,
bands, carolers and the arrival of Santa. Oviedo-


Winter Springs Chamber of Commerce members
will display their wares in a holiday expo. The
parade will end at Lawton House at 200 W.
Broadway St. for a tree lighting ceremony. Call
407-278-4871 for more information.

Wrap up your Christmas shopping at St.
Luke's 11th Annual Holiday Gift Fair 8 a.m. to
2 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 6. The event will take
place at St. Luke's Lutheran Church in Oviedo
and will display more than 50 exhibits by local
craftspeople and businesses, a bake sale and
food concessions. Admission is free.
Visit stlukes-oviedo.org and see "What's New"
for more information about the gift fair and to
find out about Christmas tree sales and free
Brass Band of Central Florida concerts taking
place on the same day.


Geneva holds its 9th Annual Community Yard
and Craft Sale from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday,
Dec. 6 at the Geneva Community Center on 1st
Street. The event is sponsored by the Geneva
Historical and Genealogical Society, Inc. and
will feature over 50 exhibitors with yard sale
bargains and beautiful crafts for great Christmas
gifts. Food will also be available.

Come join a bicycle ride through fantasyland
on Saturday, Dec. 13. The charity event starts
with registration and a bicycle show at 4 p.m.
and welcomes all age to participate in a bicycle
ride through Casselberry and Winter Park.
The ride will include a 10-mile tour of
Christmas-decorated homes and begins at 6
p.m. at the intersection of State Road 436 and
Winter Park Drive. Cost to ride is $10 in advance


or $12 the night of the event. Children younger
than six ride for free.
All children younger than 16 must wear a
helmet and flashers are recommended. Proceeds
will support New Hope For Kids. Visit www.
NewHopeForKids.org or call 407-331-3059, ext.
10 for more information.

The Oviedo Preservation Project's Annual
Holiday Gathering will be at 7 p.m. Tuesday,
Dec. 2 in the Fellowship Hall of First United
Methodist Church of Oviedo. Come join them
with your favorite Thanksgiving leftover.
The meetings are kid-friendly, prompt, and
filled with good food, so please spread the word
and remember to head their way.


VIP Special $13 The Basic $8 I
I Includes a cut and style, shampoo and Includes a cut and style
scalp massage, steamed towel for face, for men and boys.
I and shoulder and neck massage.
407--------------3335------------ 1391 West Broadway Oviedo, FL 32765

407-366-3335 1391 West Broadway Oviedo, FL 32765


THE DAVEY TREE EXPERT COMPANY
Discover The Davey Difference.
( 'Complete Tree, Shrub & Lawn Care
'Quality Pruning
SDeep-Root Fertilization
: Insect & Disease Management
-ISA Certified Arborists


*I ~


sv.


www.davey.com

DAVEYI

407-331-8020


Call us @ The Voice:
407-628-8500


--


---- I I


The Voice


evoN mber 28 Decembe l


-41






Page A12 November 28 December 4,2008 The Voice



THIS WEEK in sports history

SI [ g# 1I The U.S. team won the first Women's World Championship of
soccer, held in China. The event also marked the first time that
female referees officiated at the highest levels of FIFA (F6d6ration
,E I Internationale de Football Association) soccer.




Records, triumphs, disappointments








.2 .


ARCHIVE PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK AND LAURENCE SAMUELS THE VOICE
A season of records, triumphs and disappointments kept fans on their toes in 2008. Mike Kintz, above left, and the Bears had a strong year led by running back AI-Terek McBurse, who broke the single-season Seminole
County rushing record but fell just short of the playoffs. The Lions were led by a strong passing game from Blake Bortles, above right, who broke the Seminole County single-season record for passing yards.


ISAAC BABCOCK
THE VOICE

The 2008 football season
was a year of big numbers
for some Seminole County-
players. Huge numbers.
Many of them came in
the last game of the season,
such as Al-Terek McBurse's
narrow squeeze past the old
all-time Seminole County
rushing record, with his
2,234 yards in the season.
Those final few yards
came in a trouncing of Lake
Howell in the last game of
the season, taking away the
Silver Hawks' final chance
at a win this season, and tak-
ing former Hawk Marquette
Smith's record in the pro-
cess. All the Hawks could
do was watch as McBurse
obliterated their record and
their season.
For the Hawks, the loss
was a final deathblow on
one of the worst seasons in


the school's history zero
wins, 10 losses.
Platooning two quarter-
backs who had rare experi-
ence throwing the ball, the
team broke the statistical
mold of comparing inter-
ceptions to touchdowns,
instead comparing inter-
ceptions to completions.
They completed just shy
of two dozen passes, while
throwing nearly a dozen
interceptions, and no pass-
es for touchdown.
By the end of the year
they were listed as the
second worst team in the
state in passing, just ahead
of Colonial High School -
which beat the Hawks in
week two. The Hawks' 53
points scored puts them at
No. 300 of 319 teams in the
state.
For the Winter Springs
Bears, a totally different
season ended with a like-
wise finish. No playoff ticket


greeted the Bears as they
exited their stadium for the
final time in 2008 after van-
quishing the Hawks. They
had lost that chance in
week seven.
That's when a struggling
Lions team on a three-
game losing streak took
on a Bears team that then
had a 5-1 record, and the
Lions won, stealing away
from the Bears any chance
of a shot at the postseason,
despite what would be a 7-3
overall record for Winter
Springs propelled by that
unstoppable rushing force
of McBurse.
In that game between
the Lions and Bears, it
would be an unlikely pass-
ing masterpiece that would
spell victory for Oviedo. In
a year dominated by rush-
ing offenses throughout
the area, Oviedo quarter-
back Blake Bortles broke
the mold, becoming a pro-


lific passer when everybody
else's game hit the ground.
His 257 yards in the air
during his team's final-game
loss to Osceola propelled
him to a Seminole County
all-time passing record. He
threw for 2,472 yards and
23 touchdowns this season.
But his team's inability to
keep opponents out of the
end zone would prove its
undoing. In the Lions' seven
losses in their 3-7 season, all
but one were after allowing
four or more touchdowns.
Bortles only twice all sea-
son failed to give his team at
least three touchdowns, but
the Lions only won games
when he completed the dif-
ficult task of giving them
five touchdowns or more.
The Lions scored four
touchdowns when they
played Hagerty, and still lost
35-28, in what would be the
biggest turning point in the
Huskies' history as a varsity


football team.
That win would be the
team's first on the field,
engineered by quarterback
Jeff Driskel, who would
shine as the team's passer.
He passed for 1,143 yards
in the season while lead-
ing the team to upsets over
Oviedo and Lyman. By the
time they faced Lake Howell,
they were the favorite -to
win, and they did, in what
would be their last win of
the season.
The Master's Academy
was just behind Hagerty
with a 2-8 record overall,
though one of those wins
came on a forfeit. Their lone
outright victory came in a
16-12 score against Lake
Mary Prep. The team felt the
pains of a decimated line-
up from last year's squad,
which had gone 7-4 overall,
including a trip to the play-
offs.


Knights win second-straight


ISAAC BABCOCK
THE VOICE

The Knights are on a roll after win-
ning their second conference game
in a row, this time a 28-21 win over
Memphis.
The Knights were on a two-game
road trip against conference rivals,
and won both games to bring their


record to 3-4 in Conference USA play.
Quarterback Rob Calabrese, who
had trouble with interceptions in pre-
vious weeks, went 6-for-12 with two
touchdowns and no interceptions.
Once again the Knights managed
to be out-gained by their opponent in
yardage, but won the game anyway.
Much of UCF's scoring came thanks
to linebacker Derrick Hallman's


26-yard fumble-recovery for a touch-
down. Defensive back Joe Burnett
returned an interception for 42 yards
to set the Knights up at the Memphis
21-yard line.
The Knights are now 4-7 overall
heading home for their final game.
They play C-USA East Division base-
ment-dweller University of Alabama
at 1 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 29.


Next Game:
vs. University of Alabam
WHEN: 1 p.m.
Saturday, Nov. 29

WHERE: Home


The Knights are looking to end
with a 4-4 conference record.


a





evoN mber 28 December 4, 2008 Page A13


Hagerty Huskies Sports Review


COMPILED BY JAY GETTY
HAGERTY HIGH SCHOOL

Wrestling -
Team opens the regular season
with impressive performances
As a precursor to the first full tour-
nament of the season, the Huskies
demolished visiting Pine Ridge by
a score of 66-18 in a dual match.
Hagerty's 122 points were good for
a fourth-place finish in the 13-school
field at the Alan Solomon Classic in
Brooksville. The Huskies were repre-
sented very well on the medal stand
at the meet as Joey Wagstaff (103)
and Gavin Reilly (125) captured weight
class titles while Stephen Perry (171)
and David Hamilla (189) were run-
ners-up in their respective classes.
For the champions, Wagstaff was
3-0 in the tourney with three pins.
Reilly's tournament record was 4-0
with two pins. For the year, Wagstaff
is 4-0 while Reilly is now 5-0.


Cross Country -
Cross Country State Finals -
Compher, 3rd Team 4A All-State
Shannon Compher crossed the line
with a personal course record of
19:13 at the FHSAA CC State Finals
in Dade City last weekend at the Little
Everglades Steeplechase. Ranch. For
Compher, the 19:13 was good for a
15th-place finish and earned her a
spot on the 2008 4A 3rd Team All-
State squad.
The 5k finish time was completed
on splits of 5:42, 6:37, and 6:18.
Compher will represent Hagerty High
School in the FACA Senior All-Star
Race on Dec. 6 in Tallahassee as a
member of the Region 1 Team.

Soccer --
Big win over Lake Mary tops
the week of play for the girls
The women were victorious in two of
their three matches last week with
wins over Lyman (6-0) and Lake Mary


(1-0). The lone loss came on.the road
at Mainland High School. In the con-
test, the team responded to a three-
goal deficit at the half by evening
the game at 3-3 before falling to the
Buccaneers on a late goal in the final
minutes of the game.
Versus the Greyhounds, a pair of
Huskies (Samantha Shuman and Alexa
Dimatteo) each recorded two goals on
the night to go along with scores from
Danielle Filliben and AngelaMalanga.
In the biggest win in program his-
tory, Malanga laced home the game
winner with 24:24 remaining in the
game for the Huskies at Lake Mary.
Defensively, goalkeeper Sarah Rassel
grabbed 12 saves behind the strong
showing from the back three of Kait
Briggs, Lindsey Flury and Adriana
Chimelis.
Completing the week, Anisa
Stewart's two goals and Julie Tran's
single goal were not enough in the
district loss at Mainland. The team is
now 4-3-2 overall.


Sweep of week,
boys are now 4-1 overall
Wins over Trinity Prep (3-1), Mainland
(9-1) and Seminole (1-0) last week
reflected a 13-2 differential in the
scoring column in favor of the Huskies.
With the wins, the team will look to
continue its win streak this week in a
contest with Winter Springs before the
Thanksgiving break.
Versus the Saints, the trio of Adam
Tran, Matt Bertoncini and Brian Quails
accounted for all the scoring for
Hagerty.
In the time-shortened game at
Mainland, Hagerty's eight-goal dif-
ferential was highlighted by Kyle
Richmond's two-goal, two-assist per-
formance. Bertoncini also added two
goals in the game as well.
Wrapping up the week, Glenis
Graham recorded his first shutout of
the season as goalkeeper as a result
of Tran's game-winner for Hagerty.
The team is now 4-1 overall.


Basketball -
Girls open the year with
win over Winter Springs
A 63-55 victory over the Bears at
home last week started the season
with a bang for the girls. In the win,
Jaclyn Maldonado and Cierra Gaines
led all Husky scorers on the night.
Maldonado netted 27 points while
snatching seven steals in the game.
Gaines contributed 15 points and 13
rebounds on both ends of the floor.
In the second game of the week,
Maldonado added nine points to her
season total to lead all Husky scorers
in the 60-23 loss to the Lake Mary
Rams.
To conclude the week, the team fell
just short in its bid to knock off the
Lyman Greyhounds in a 46-42 defeat.
Maldonado grabbed five rebounds and
tossed in 15 points in the game.


AIVJE

Hardware
Pet Friendly Stores


Stop in and check out our
HOLIDAY LIGHTING

SALE
GOING ON NOW!!!

Sale Ends 12-25-08


S "h h 1 /. h '.-




ICICLE LIGHTS
100 Lights
100 Iciclelights,
18 Vertical Strands,
10" L. Features white
wire with clear bulbs.
UL Listed
9830100
While Supplies Last



$3.97


SANFORD LONGWOOD
207 E. 25th St. Hwy 434 & 427
- 321-0885 339-4883


I,
I


OUTLET POWER
STRIP
Adds extra outlets
where needed.
Circuit breaker
prevents overloading
UL listed. (33543)e






$3.97


CASSELBERRY OVIEDO
Winter Park Dr. Hwy 434 & 426
339-7365 --365-6634--


Call

407.628.8500
for home
Delivery
or visit us
S. online!


I Ihe VoUItcet ...


T-r'. :^^


I






Page A14 November 28 December 4, 2008 The Voice


THIS WEEK in political history


VOC E to investigate the assassination of President John F Kennedy.
The Warren Commission report concluded that there was no
conspiracy. However, in 1978, the House Select Committee on
Assassinations concluded that Kennedy was "probably assassi-
O IE nated as a result of a conspiracy."



Times are tough keep the job you've got


EMPLOYMENT came out last Friday. It was 6.9 looking for a job. TALK
F- jTpercent. This number is an indica- Brush up on your interviewing oS AN D I
A ^k tion that things are not so great for skills. Role-play with friends and
people seeking jobs. attend open-house interview ses- Sandi Vidal is the executive director for
SThe important things to remem- sions. Christian HELP and the Central Florida
a rare: Network in every fashion: Employment Council, with more than 10
If you have a job, hold on to it. If through your congregation, experience. Please send questions about
you hear that there are rumors of LinkedIn, Facebook, your friends, employment by fax 407-260-2949, sandi@
My neighbor dropped her resume layoffs, start looking silently. Often it is your "weak links" that christianhelp.org, or mail Ask Sandi
at my door. A former co-worker Do the best job you can and take help you get a job. o hristian HELP, 450 Seminola Blvd.,
stopped me at the job fair to say on more responsibility without a Stay positive and have a wonder- Subjects may include employment search,
hello. Friends are calling in favors complaint. Being the MVP (most ful Thanksgiving weekend. resumes, networking and promotion oppor-
... My best friend got laid off. When valuable player) is important at this Best wishes. tunities.
will it end? time. Sandi Employers: E-mail your job leads to
The new unemployment figure Dress for success when you are cfec@cfec.org and we will share them with




Letters to 'c:


Accusations surprise, but
a lawsuit is welcomed
I 'don't know exactly the
reason why my name was
brought up in Bob Goffs
letter to the media-since I
never spoke falsely about
his two candidates and
thank the Lord have never
spoken to him although
familiar with his tactics.
How dare sewer-mouth
inject his foul, out-of-
place remarks in the city
of Winter Springs' affairs
while sinfully using my
name?
A little history will show
that Mr. Goff, together
with another well-known
citizen of Winter'Springs,
did years ago put out a
newsletter supported by
a well-known insidious
group for the purpose of
assailing our city admin-
istration. It failed miser-
ably in the same fashion
-he failed to satisfy the
people of Casselberry who
recently booted him out of
office. I resigned my office
and Commissioner Robert
Miller was termed out, not
booted out as in the pres-
ent situation.
I imagine that his intru-


sion into the political arena
of Winter Springs is not for
the best; it is for money and
self-aggrandizement.
Mr. Goff is a former
mayor of Casselberry, who
while in office did know-
ingly get involved with a
project in Winter Springs
and went around the city
manager and his staff
and developed a plan for
the site in question that
was presented to the City
Commission during a
special meeting this year,
which was called at the
behest of Commissioner
Rick Brown. His asinine
methodology while intrud-
ing in the affairs of a neigh-
boring city leaves a lot to
be desired.
I am not anyone's side-
kick but have been serving
the people of this county
and our city as a volunteer
for the best part of 20 years.
My only desire has been to
work with the people in
order to develop a sound
and prosperous community
while considering values
and tradition. I have not
received one red cent in
salary nor sought out rec-
ognition for my dedication


except for the stipend paid
to me by the city of Winter
Springs while serving there.
While discussing slander,
he ought to be aware that
his whimpering statements
about Robert Miller and
his remarks to John Mica
should be considered libel-
ous.
To put the icing on the
cake:A friend of all four
candidates he is because
they suit him, and time
will tell if they are of the
same mentality. The new
Winter Springs team and
their staunch supporters
are now in the driver's seat,
and we have to pray that
their stewardship does not
travel in time back to 1996.
May God always bless
Winter Springs and our
country.
By the way, I do welcome
a lawsuit that will avail me
of the opportunity to sub-
poena records and depose
witnesses under oath.
Edward Martinez Jr.
Winter Springs

A fighting chance to
end bad lawsuits
The U.S. Supreme Court just
heard arguments in Wyeth


v. Levine, a case with pro-
found implications for the
health of all Americans.
The plaintiff, Diana
Levine, was given
Wyeth's anti-nausea drug
Phenergan, then on the
market for 45 years. In rare
instances, Phenergan can
cause gangrene if it comes
in contact with arterial ves-
sels.
In Levine's case,
Phenergan was wrongly
administered. She given
double the recommended
dose, and the physician's
assistant who injected the
drug ignored Levine's com-
plaints of intense pain. The
label identifies such pain as
a sign of arterial exposure.
Levine, who lost part of
her right arm, successfully
sued the health center and
several staff members for
her injury. But that was
not the end of the matter.
Next she sued Wyeth, and
won $7.4 million, upheld
on appeal by the Vermont
Supreme Court. Wyeth
argues that it can't comply
with both state and fed-
eral labeling requirements,
which were at odds in this
case.


A ruling in Levine's favor
would undermine the FDA's
effectiveness. Liability con-
cerns also affect medicine
availability. Three decades
ago, lawyers targeted the
popular morning-sickness
drug Bendectin, which a
National Enquirer article
had linked to birth defects.
The claim proved bogus,
but the cost of litigation-
forced the manufacturer
to stop selling the drug.
Hospital admissions for
morning sickness doubled,
increasing the risk of preg-
nancy complications.
Liability lawsuits benefit
the legal industry more
than injured people. Less
than 15 cents of every tort-
cost dollar goes to victims.
In Wyeth v. Levine, the
U.S. Supreme Court has a
chance to rein in unscru-
pulous fort lawyers and
re-affirm the supremacy of
federal law over state law
when there's a conflict.
As they consider the argu-
ments, the justices should
remember that the health
of all Americans is at stake.
Lawrence J. McQuillan, direc-
tor of business and economic studies
Pacific Research Institute


Here's what kids
C) at Winter Springs

C ,Elementary had
Sto say about what

they're thankful for: ._ )
I'm thankful that I I'm thankful that we
get to have fun this have our freedom
year-I'm having a and independence,
great time in school. unlike other coun-
SI'm also thankful that tries and also for
we get a lot of food our troops who fight
Sat Thanksgiving. for us.
S- Christopher R. Keven A.
9 years old 11 years old


We have the oppor- I'm thankful that we
tunity to go to school have the opportunity
unlike other kids who to go to school and to
don't have homes. learn safely. We can
I'm thankful we tell our opinion and
can learn different have the freedom to
subjects and that we speak our minds.
have books to read, Miara U.
like Math books. 10 years old
Kiara R.
8 years old


L i'm thankful for food because with-
out it we couldn't leam as well as
we do; also for our families who
love us so much.
Victoria S.
6 years old


^ We would
love A
to

"myour



Call editor Alex Babcock at 407-628-8500
to have The Voice visit your class or group.






November 28 December 4. 2008 Page A15


TheMarketplace


REALTORS:
Licensed Real Estate Professionals needing
to earn additional income. Become a
part time or full time loan officer. Control
your own closings. Gain access to
hundreds of mortgage programs. Save
your clients thousands of dollars. Call
Maitland Mortgage Lending Company
(407)629-5626

CAREGIVER WANTED
CAREGIVER/Housekeeper wanted for my
100 year old mother at her lovely home -
Lake Sue, Winter Park. Various times day &
night. Call 317 545-5540 after 10 a.m. or
email to rosemail@comcast.net

EXPERIENCED DRIVERS
Experienced Drivers W/Class A CDL, Home
weekends, East Coast Runs, Fruit and
Foliage up and refrigerated back. Call MCT
@ 877-564-6628

SERVERS WANTED
FT/PT, flexible hours. Beef '0' Brady's,
Lockwood and 419 at Publix shopping
center. Apply M-F 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 407-
366-2333







WATERBRIDGE TOWNHOUSE 32789
On cul-de-sac near Tennis Courts. Walk to
middle and high school, bus, W.P. hospital,
dog park. $299,900 (was $340,000). Winter
Park Land Co. Realty 407-644-2900



TOWNHOUSE FOR RENT
Altamonte Springs town house, 1 bedroom
1 bath, Spring Valley area, tennis, pool,
washer/dryer,.nice, $675/mo, 407-492-
9006

SENIOR APARTMENTS
Winter Park The Plymouth Apartments:
Studio/1BR Senior Apts, All Utilities Incl.,
Newly Renovated. Rents start at $591. Call
407-644-4551



FORRENT
'- Oviero -ttmce-sapac -great~rontage. 751)
to 1,050 sf available. $1,070 to $1,350 per
month. 1401 Broadway St. Contact Megan
at (407) 687-3524.





JACUZZI
$1,500 Jacuzzi In Good Condition. Green
and white interior with wooden panel
siding: Seats 4-5 people. Includes cover and
portable step. Call 407-761-1298

CHANDELIER
Chandelier. Beautiful 8-arm ivory antiqued
metal, linen shades, perfect condition,
34" diameter. $85. Can e mail picture.
Linda1131vail@aol.com

DRUM SETS
Drum Sets 5 piece TKO paiste hi-hat
Zildjian ride $450; congas Aspire 10" and
11" heads $200; Pearl Double bass pedal,
$120; Thin pan snare w/ stand, $80. 386-
690-0621

KAYAK
Kayak Heritage feather-lite skirt and
paddle, good condition, $220; also new
rubber inflatable kayak, great lounger, $50.
386-690-0621





Reading volunteers NEEDED Jackson
Heights Middle School in Oviedo is looking
for adults who are interested in serving as a
Reading Mentor to assist students who are
reading below grade-level. Volunteers work
one-on-one with an assigned student before
school for 30 minutes, one or more times
a week through the end of the school year
to build fluency and comprehension skills.
Sessions are from 8:30-9:00 a.m., M-F
Please contact Connie O'Hanlon for more
information, 407-365-7585.





HOW TO DETOX FOR
OVERNIGHT RELIEF
Natural herbal patches, overnight
detoxification, pain relief: knees, back, foot,
gout, sciatic, lumbago, carpal tunnel, cancer
treatment. Attach to foot great night's
sleep, http://www.ebook-detox-patches.org
(407) 970-1483


HANDYMAN/CARPENTRY
Let me take care of the chores you don't
have time to do yard work, carpentry,
painting, (whole house or interior rooms),
driveways, repairs, pressure washing, and
more. No job too small. Local. Prompt.
Affordable. Call Scott at 321-460-3905.

KITCHEN/BATHROOM SURFACES
Repair and resurface bathtubs, ceramic
tile, vanities, kitchen countertops, cabinets,
appliances and much more. No dust and
dirt and very little down time. Have a new
factory-like finish and save up to four times
the replacement cost. Licensed/insured/
member BBB. All Surface Technology, 407-
691-0061

CARPENTER
Robert A. Paige. Specializing in finished
carpentry to termite and wood-rot damage.
Interior and exterior. Call me and ask if I can
do your job. References available. 352-552-
6157

NEED HELP WITH
CLEANING, ERRANDS?
Senior citizen seeking part-time house
cleaning,-we'll also run errands, grocery
shopping, and doctor's office, etc. 407-838-
8075 or 407-756-2361



WE BUY

HOUSES!
Sell Your Home
for CASH
On the Day of Your Choice
"As-Is" with NO Repairs!

Call Now:

407-297-8749




IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2008-CP-2033
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JAMES ALLEN GRAHAM,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of JAMES AL-
LEN GRAHAM, deceased, whose date of death was
September 8, 2008, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Seminole County, Florida, Probate. Division, the
address of which is 301 N. Park Avenue, Sanford,
Florida 32771-8099. The estate is testate. The
names and addresses of the personal representa-
tive and the personal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBL-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is
11/21/2008.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
EVELYN W. CLONINGER
Florida Bar No.: 210382
CLONINGER & FILES
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
1519W. Broadway
Oviedo, Florida 32765
Telephone: (407) 365-5696
Facsimile: (407) 365-8919
Personal Representative:
PETER MINDERMAN
1681 Winchester Drive, Winter Park, FL 32789
11/21,11/28
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 18TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.: 08-0DR-2975
Jasnin McLeod, Petitioner
and
Richard McLeod, Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF
MARRIAGE
TO: (name of Respondent) Richard McLeod
(Respondent's last known address)
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been filed
against you and that you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on (name
of Petitioner) Jasmin McLeod, whose address is
460 Meadowood Blvd. Fern Park, Fl. 32730 on
or before December 1, 200B, and file the original
with the clerk of this Court at (clerk's address) 301
North Park Ave., Sanford, FL 32772 before service
on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to
do so, a default may be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the petition.
Copies of all court documents in this case,
including orders, are available at the Clerk of the
Circuit Court's. office. You may review these docu-
ments upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Court's
office notified of your current address. (You may
file Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme
Court Approved Family Law Form 12,915.) Future
papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address
on record at the clerk's office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law
Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic
disclosure of documents and information. Failure to
comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal
or striking of pleadings.
Dated October 27, 2008.
MARYANNE MORSE, CLERK
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: Debra A. Jesperson
Deputy Clerk
11/21,11/28, 12/5, 12/12


*hd it (klas'e fid'ad'ver fiz'ing) Noun. Advertising
S compactly arranged, as in newspaper

(M _.. A (^^^columns, according to subject, under such
(-YL "I(~liI~t~J listings as help wanted and for sale


How
YoUplace

angd!
0


Wile up ,:., 22 words r,,ui O ~iJ GLO ES i, ,e i ,,,,
Ohat you Jl1e :,-ll,'.: I-...L ,,-... ,r.. .,..w -. i.l l.. "
S 1.1 .. ,, ..,.i .1 .' i,.,i,; .... r,,, S500
Gl ii 11J iT .; ,-itdtle 1")' 'r j ...... .." "i
lr ,",,- Iree ad'
Include a contact ,' ., ,,,,,


i .





computers remedies ...or suggest your own!

Call 407-628-8500 or e-mail classifieds@observemewspapers.com


Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content



Available from Commercial News Providers


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2008-CP-2113
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BILLY R. STUTTS,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of BILLY R.
STUTTS, deceased, whose date of death was
October 26, 2008, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Seminole County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 301 N. Park Avenue, Sanford,
Florida 32771-8099. The names and addresses of
the personal representative and the personal repre-
sentative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice Is
11/28/2008:
Attorney for Personal Representative:
EVELYN W. CLONINGER
Florida Bar No.: 210382
CLONINGER & FILES
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
1519W. Broadway
Oviedo, Florida 32765
Telephone: (407) 365-5696
Facsimile: (407) 365-8919
Personal Representative:
MARY EDITH MONTGOMERY
2484 Fort Lane Rd., Geneva, FL 32732-9722
11/28, 12/5


5~
0


*
. U

S


4


a
~ '~


* *


* ^





,


The Vnice


*d1





- -


q


'*


* O


- a M


-


I IIt VIVV ... .- -


4=Ndlmw
40m
4m4pm
dlw


me





I


TODAY: Partly cloudy with
a 10% chance for rain.
'600 Highs in the mid 70s.
I 6a.m.


THS WEE
On No. 27,883 fr
engies wre c lle u



in e o rkCitynN
H Con.,asa e
ofth afeglowofth


MORNING LOW 60*
DAYTIME HIGH 76*

Sunrise Sunset 30% chance Wind
6:59 a.m. 5:28 p.m. of rain WSW 11 mph



MORNING LOW 58*
DAYTIME HIGH 770

Sunrise Sunset 30% chance Wind
7 a.m. 5:28 p.m. of rain WSW 10 mph

MONiDA PARTLYWCLO'DY


Sunrise !
7:01 a.m. 5:


MORNING LOW 53
DAYTIME HIGH 770

Sunset 10% chance Wind
28 p.m. of rain WNW 7 mph


P rTii, IH'T. .. OF CARL M. ANGLESEA. FROM CHULUOTA
An American bald eagle perches in a pine tree in the backyard of
Carl M. Anglesea's home near Lake Mills in Chuluota. The shot was
taken in November 2006. Anglesea calls it "one of the great wild
things left in Central Florida."
Got a shot to share? Send it to editor@theoviedovoice.com.


NATIONAL


Seattle


Friday Sat.
40/47 43/52


Los Angeles 50/64 50/67


Houston


43/76 38/62


City
Atlanta
Chicago
New York


Friday Sat.
45/61 27/59
30/40 28/36
43/47 35/46


MARINE FORECAST
Cocoa Beach tide schedule
Time Low High
Saturday 2:02 a.m. 8:24 a.m.
Nov. 29 2:29 p.m. 8:24 p.m.
Sunday 2:39 a.m. 9:02 a.m.
Nov. 30 3:07 p.m. 9:04 p.m.

FLORIDA FORECAST
City Friday Sat.
Jacksonville 56/70 49/75
Miami 66/77 66/79
Tampa 60/74 59/79
Pensacola 54/75 40/70


INTERNATIONAL


City
London
Paris
Tokyo


Friday Sat.
38/45 38/47
35/38 35/42
47/59 45/58


Focal Point Landscape
Nursery & Supply, Inc. Garden Center & Gift Shop


5S West SR 46 Geneva Phone: (407) 349-2200

Beautiful Garden Center containing Pottery, Water Features & Garden Accessories

WE ARE SELLING POINSETTIAS AND

CHRISTMAS CACTUS ALONG WITH
MUCH MORE HOLIDAY COLOR!
Specializing in Unique but Affordable Gifts!
Prices Ranging from $10 up to $ 500!
Come out and see our extensive selection of gifts and
home decor. WVe knov y ou will find a gift for all of
y our Christmas needs!
Save 1096 up tco 25% throughout the Gift Shop and Garden Center!

SPEND A DAY SHOPPING AND EXPLORING
BEAUTIFUL RURAL SEMINOLE COUNTY!
Visit Geneva's newest I'amily owned business, Stricklands Meat Market
& Dell owned and operated by Butcher Bill, a butcher yvith 28 years of
experience! opening g WVednesday November I 9O1h located at 1S5 1West
SR 46 next door to the Geneva General Store.


1* horse. wt'agon. hike., trutor. boar, plane or auto. discovr the .* cniLc
b aVtvs & trails of Gcnrevu, C.'huluotu tint Black Hanoock.
THE ISLAND yrN/D VILLAGE OF

/nvi'v.is y,u"i .,t s/.r your r our of Rural Sermin/le County ill L.aid.'cape" Kiosk CGei 'our mafip and plenic lunch az Strc-klands A/fea Alarkrl
.*hdlh votf ge. hilopping Gcer 'a Rural H ertiage Site: wwwin iuoys.con/Rienei'a


Focal Point Landscape Nursery & Supplies
Christm as Holiday Event!
Bring your httle ones (or big') to visit \with Santa Claus Friday,
December 191h between the hours of 9 am through I 2 pm and
again from 4 pm through 8 pm. Face painting between the
hours of 4 pm through 8 pm Free hot dogs & drinks!
Pictures available! .


570
6 a.m.


LA


690
I Noon


UV


750
3 p.m.


VIEW FROM YOUR NECK OF THE WOODS


The Voice


e gaP A16 November 28 8


WEATHER

,FIDANV %20 1%-ANCAC* WN:SW9MH6:8ama:8pm


Ih[0G11=IU I I;




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs