Title: Seminole voice
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091445/00018
 Material Information
Title: Seminole voice
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Community Media Holdings, LLC
Place of Publication: Oviedo, Fla.
Publication Date: October 24, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
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Bibliographic ID: UF00091445
Volume ID: VID00018
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text


'a .-~Z A
.,, a ~


ONLY


www.SeminoleVoice.com


Serving Greater Oviedo and Winter Springs for more than 17 years!
--- October 24 -October 30, 2008 I-


Halloween safety
Tip to make your Halloween safe for
both you and your children.


Historical haunt
Local actors haunted the Ovledo Cemetery
on Tuesday with tales of the city's past.


Football focus > 1?
It was a Friday of tough losses and
scrappy performances for area teams.


Chief says

goodbye

after

12 years


JENNY ANDREASSON
THE VOICE
Winter Springs Police Chief
Dan Kerr announced his
resignation Monday, Oct.
20, after serving almost 12
years as the city's top cop.
He won't be going far -
he's accepted the job as
director of the Center for
Public Safety at Seminole
Community College.
Kerr's last day with the
city is Nov. 3. Captain Kevin
Brunelle will serve as inter-
im chief until a new chief is
selected, a national search
process that
92 will take four
months, City
Manager Ron
McLemore
said.
r Kerr has
I spent about 25
of his 38-year
Chief Kerr law enforce-
ment career
involved in training and
education. He said he had
always dreamed of being
more involved, so when the
director job opened up, he
jumped at the opportunity
to be a part of the growing
facility.
He said when the job
offer came, it wasn't an easy
decision.
"It's been one of those
things where you put your
heart and soul into trying
to make it the best police
department around," Kerr
said. "To leave, that was very
difficult."
Since he joined Winter
Springs in February of
1997, the city's crime rate
has plunged 40 percent.
He credits this drop to the
> turn to KERR on page A5


ISAAC BABCOCK
THE VOICE

Oviedo City Councif hope-
fuls pushed to distinguish
themselves at a first-of-
its-kind candidate forum
broadcast live on cable TV
from City Hall Oct. 16.
Economics dominated
the discussion as incum-
bent Council members
Dominic Persampiere and
Steve Schenck grappled
with how they would
improve the city during a
faltering economy, while


AMY K.D. TOBIK
THE VOICE
It looked like a sea of pink
as the 28 players scrambled
onto the courts to begin
the Women Playing for
TIME tennis tournament


challengers Rick Burns and
Rob Thrift chided their
opponents for not doing
enough.
"This project will bear
fruit," Persampiere, an
eight-year Council member,
said about the city's mixed-
use new downtown proj-
ect, which has languished
for nearly two years while
development has stalled.
Burns, a past and cur-
rent member of several city
boards, said he would use

> turn to FORUM on page A3


Monday at the Tuscawilla
Country Club.
As they prepared to play,
the women quietly shared
stories about friends and
family members affected
by breast cancer. That day's


PHOTO BY JENNY ANDREASSON THE VOICE
Oviedo City Council candidates traded barbs on Oct. 16 at a City Hall forum.


tournament was beyond a
typical tennis match it
was about raising money
for a cause close to the
hearts of so many.
Tami Bradley, coordi-
nator of this year's event,


said she stepped right up
when she heard about the
opportunity to make a dif-
ference.
"A few months ago, my

> turn to TENNIS on page A4


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INDEX
Stetson's Corner...................................A4
Interests ........................... ........A7
Calendar................................... ....A8
G.O. Family.................................... A9
Athletics.......................................A12
Weather.............................................A13
Voices................................................. A14
Classifieds and Games .................. A15


Just 35t
m i. i


Politics heats up in Oviedo


Rackets fly in hopes of a cure






Page A2 October 24 October 30, 2008 The Voice


STHIS WEEK in history

THI.: E The USS Constitution, a 44-gun U.S. Navy frigate, is launched
in Boston Harbor. During the War of 1812, the Constitution won
its nickname "Old Ironsides" after defeating the British warship
Guerriere off the coast of Nova Scotia. Cannon
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. . .. 47 5 2


Published Friday,
October 24, 2008


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*Proceeds to benef the Mikenda Form 4h COub


Volume 18
Issue No. 43


Phone 407-628-8500 SeminoleVoice.com Fax 407-628-4053


PUBLISHER
Kyle Taylor, extension 302
kyle@observernewspapers.com
EDITOR
Alex Babcock, extension 304
alexb@theoviedovoice.com
DESIGNER
Stephanie Erickson, extension 306
stephanie@observernewspapers.com
CHIEF REPORTER
Isaac Babcock of Winter Springs
isaacb@theoviedovoice.com
ADVERTISING SALES
Pat Lqvaglio, extension 305
advertising@theoviedovoice.com


REPORTERS
Jenny Andreasson of Oviedo- jennya@observernewspapers.com
Karen Phillips of Geneva- karenp@theoviedovoice.com
Amy K.D. Tobik of Winter Springs amyt@theoviedovoice.com
COLUMNISTS
Janet Foley of Oviedo janetf@theoviedovoice.com
Jay Getty of Oviedo jayg@theoviedovoice.com
Sandi Vidal of Casselberry sandi@christianhelp.org
Ben Wheeler of Chuluola benw@theoviedovoice.com
COPY EDITOR
Jonathan Gallagher Extension 309
jgallagher@observemewspapers.com
INTERN
Mary Elizabeth Schurrer


Celebrating the spooky and the sudsy

S..- .
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...
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I.~,I- &4 "a.


The Oviedo-Winter Springs Voice publishes on Fridays for readers in Oviedo,
Winter Springs, Geneva, Chuluota and their neighbors.
The Voice began publishing in 1991.
Its current owner is Observer Newspapers,
which also publishes the Winter Park-Maitland Observer newspaper.


Talk with us about news stories at
407-628-8500. Ask for Alex Babcock.
Write to us about your opinions at:
voices@theoviedovoice.com or at:
P.O. Box 2426, Winter Park, FL 32790
Help us correct mistakes by writing
to corrections@theoviedovoice.com or
by calling 407-628-8500 and asking
for Editor Alex Babcock.
If you think we can do a better job
serving you, please let us know.

Renew your subscription or start a
new one by calling 407-628-8500. A
year's subscription costs just $24.80.
Advertise in The Voice by calling Pat
Lovaglio 407-628-8500.


The Voice cares about environmen-
tal health. The newspaper you hold
comes from a mixture of recycled con-
tent. Unsold copies of the newspaper
are archived or recycled. We also re-
cycle all in-office paper waste, bottles
and cans.

Stop by the office in Oviedo sometime.
We take walk-in guests each Thursday
- and also by appointment. We're at
1401 W. Broadway St.:
OVIEDO




7 lHammo,', Ro.i


NOTES

Inwood walks
for Breast Cancer
For the third year in a row Inwood
Consulting Engineers Inc. formed a
team to participate in the American
Cancer Society's Making Strides
Against Breast Cancer 5K walk,
held Oct. 18.
Inwood employees, family and
friends joined more than 5,000
walkers in downtown Orlando.
The 28-member team raised more
than $2,900 for the cause and
was awarded with Bronze Striders
recognition.
Susan Makowski, the MSABC
manager, said the money raised
at the event will fund vital Breast
Cancer programs in the commu-
nity.
In recognition of National
Breast Cancer Awareness Month
and MSABC, Oct. 13-17 was des-
ignated "Pink Week" at Inwood. A
weeklong bake sale, "Wear Pink to
Work" day and a breakfast fund-
raiser are just a few of the activi-
ties that were held in the office to
encourage employee involvement.
Visit Cancer.org/stridesonline
or call Susan Makowski at 407-
843-8680 for more information.

Seminole animal shelter
needs cat litter
The Seminole County SPCA is ask-
ing for donations of cat litter at
their facility in Sanford. The SPCA
is at 2800 County Home Road in
Sanford, just south of Flea World.
Call 407-323-8685 for more
information.

Oviedo man appointed
to state group
Gov. Charlie Crist has appointed
Kip Beacham of Oviedo to the
Juvenile Justice and Delinquency
Prevention State Advisory Group.
Beacham is a captain at the
Seminole County Sheriff's Office,
and was appointed for an open-
ended term that began Oct. 2.


PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE VOICE
Longtime Oviedo resident Tanya Walter, at left, took on an early Oviedian's country look for the annual Oviedo Preservation Project Cemetery Tour held Tuesday, Oct.
21. Oviedo City Councilman Keith Britton wears a shirt that says it all a souvenir from Oviedo's annual Oktoberfest celebration, held Saturday, Oct. 18.


I,


The Oviedo-Winter Springs Voice is published on Fridays POSTMASTER: Send address
by Community Media Holdings, LLC. USPS #008-093 changes to The Voice,
Periodicals postage is paid at Oviedo, Florida. I P.O. Box 2426, Winter Park, FL 32790


~II II






I FIti: (Th VtnhV r 24 Octohrr 't 200r PaQV


C


FORUM I No love lost between political rivals


< continued from the front page
his surveying and zoning experience to
help keep the project on track.
The lively debate spurred some pointed
corrections between candidates as jabs hit
home about topics such as experience and
even water quality.
"I personally don't drink the water here,"
Burns said, remarking on water
quality that he said was unac-
ceptably poor. "'We neei
Burns struck back after he city friend
said Persampiere attacked him nesses."
during the debate, question-
ing Persampiere's motives and cify
asking for civility.
All candidates derided a
botched hiring process in find-
ing the city's new manager earlier in the
year, with Persampiere and Schenck calling
attention to the misgivings of head-hunt-
er Colin Baenziger's alleged spreading of
rumors that led to re-votes and candidates
backing out of negotiations.
Thrift, a financial planner and former
baseball league manager, said Schenck, a
first-term councilman, had flip-flopped
on which city manager candidate he sup-
ported. Schenck and Persampiere said they


were trying to build consensus on a man-
ager candidate rather than have a divided
Council.
The candidates mostly avoided a ques-
tion about the aesthetics of roadside signs
for businesses. An ordinance recently had
been pushed through the City Council to
allow businesses to erect temporary signs


d to make the
lier to busi-

Rob Thrift
Council candidate


near the road and on their
buildings to draw in more
customers.
All applauded the legisla-
tion for helping businesses,
but Thrift said the city hadn't
done enough in the past.
"We need to make the
city friendlier to businesses,"
Thrift said, adding that city


ordinances in the past-had presented an
intimidating image toward potential new
companies looking to settle in the city. He
claimed he would help improve the city's
image to bring in more business.
Though time constraints cut the debate
short, some of the participants called it a
success.
"I think it went well," Persampiere said.
"I had fun."


. Call
J ; ._407.628.8500
for home
D delivery
or visit us
online!


Bands go on tour

experience affects those
Iviedo middle schools hit the students who are "on the
fence" about staying in
road for high school shows band. "It gives them a nudge
of enthusiasm," he said.
Barbara Kaminsky,
AMY K.D. TOBIK LawtonChilesMiddleSchool
THE VOICE band director, agrees. "As the
evening progresses, the stu-
rowd cheered wildly as Each year, middle school dents are really energized
Ireds of middle school- students are paired with for their field performance
)ined the Hagerty High high school mentors prior with the high school," she
ol Husky Band -on the to the game. They practice said.
)all field. It was half- their music together, share Enabling the schools to
and the students were some pizza, and then pile work together also gives
led to be a part of such into the stands. The men- the parents a sneak peek
ipressive performance. tors show the younger stu- at high school band. "The
early 200 seventh- and dents the ropes of being in parents from both schools
h-gradersfromJackson a marching band, from the work together to assist the
hts and Lawton Chiles drum major's commands students with any help they
Ile schools, dressed to the tricks needed to per- might need that evening,"
y in their school band form well while being tight- Kaminsky said. "This gives
3rms, fell right into ly packed in the stands. the middle school parents
Sas they played "Land "I think they need to see an opportunity to view
000 Dances" alongside first of all what's happen- life in the band at the high
rty High School band ing in the environment of school level."
mnts. high school bands because JHMS seventh-grader
while band members it gives them a taste of the Holly Romero said she was
these two Oviedo mid- type of music they can play," glad to have the opportu-
schools typically per- Williamson said. unity to play her clarinet
in concerts through- "They also get an oppor- with the older students. "It
he year, playing at such tunity to see high school was very cool to play along-
ge social event, band kids do their show and wasde the high school kids. Itay along-
tors say, boosts school meet the students from the makes me want to play in
Sand enthusiasm for (high school) band and the high school now" she said.
c. band director so it is a good Lawton Chiles oboist
had a student who was recruitment tool." Courtney Rothermich also
d of the whole thing The rewards go both in seventh grade said she
lidn'twant todoit,"said ways. "The mentoring fac- reay ddnt kn hat
S band director Jeremy tor also gives the high performing on a big field
amson. "It came to be school students an oppor- would be like and now she
ay of the event and she tunity to show some leader- plans to continue the music
a good time. She did a ship," Williamson said. The p thouh
program through high
plete one-eighty after same performance music is school.
ng outside in front of a intentionallyusedfromyear "My brother is in the
rowd," Williamson said. to year so by the time the Oviedo High School band
esteem is a key issue. I seventh-graders advance to and he plays every day so
They get a little more eighth grade, they are very it was cool to do what he
ortable with the idea familiar with it. does," Rothermich saidwith
being in band in high Williamson said that a giggle was really, really
.a giggle. "It was really, really
o1. 'typically the performance fun."


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PHOTO BY LAURENCE SAMUELS THE VOICE
Members of the Jackson Heights Band await their turn in the floodlights on Friday.


-


LLERGY


October 24 October 30, 2008 Paqe A3


Tho \nion


i











Tough times put life in perspective


By Karen McEnany-Phillips


It is a time of uncertainty.
However, one thing that
is certain is that the next
few weeks will hold many
secrets. Which diving direc-
tion will the stock market
take on its roller coaster
ride? Who should lead our
country?
Less than two weeks
before the national elec-
tion Americans weigh
sound bytes against the
real financial pressures
they face every day. Pundits
predict which states will
turn blue and red. Out-of-
work folks ponder the job
market. No longer do they
have the luxury of time to
imagine a perfect career.
"Do what you love" is pret-
ty much out the window.
Competition is fierce and
job fairs are filled with indi-
viduals from all walks of
life willing to do anything
for a paycheck.


Families worry if they
will still be able to pay for
their children's higher
education. Retirees are
rethinking their golden
years in light of the finan-
cial turbulence. And with
the holidays and the fourth
quarter upon us, American
businesses are huddling,
planning new strategies to
salvage what they can from
this tough situation. Those
critical six to eight weeks
which represent at least 40
percent of annual business
hang in the balance. Joe
the consumer looks at his
credit card debt, his disap-
pearing financial safety net,
and wonders how he can
afford anything?
The silver lining in this
time of crisis is the recon-
nection between voting,
government, and the deci-
sions we make at our own
kitchen tables. Admittedly


we have had a dismal voter
turnout over the last sev-
eral decades. The right to
vote is one of many things
we have taken for granted.
Gasoline, convenient prod-
ucts and services, jobs,
credit, health care and
food are others; all have
been easily attainable until
now.
Times have changed.
People have been fore-
closed from their homes
and are living in their cars.
These are not bums and
addicts, but normal every-
day individuals, some with
kids and.pets, some middle-
aged, with nowhere to go.
Higher-end items go by
the wayside and discount
stores see more traffic as
people try to stretch their
dollars.
Mall foot traffic is
reported to be light and the
few people walking around
are looking but not buying.
We suddenly realize what
is a necessity and what is
not. Funny how the diet
we should have been on to
curb our collective obesity
has found its way to our
wallet.
As of this writing, gaso-
line has dropped under $3


a gallon who would have
thought that would ever be
cause to celebrate?
And so creativity comes
into play and the country
looks for ways to enjoy
time without spending
money. What about a day
at the beach, visiting no-fee
dog parks, smiling during
an afternoon of old home
movies, challenging friends
or family to board games,
or an afternoon at a play-
ground?
Think about giving your
loved ones a gift of time
and outdoor activities
instead of expensive elec-
tronics this holiday.
Rural folks have always
known how to give to oth-
ers and replenish their
souls without breaking
the bank. It doesn't matter
if you live in the Western
mountains, the Midwestern
plains, the Southwest
deserts, or here in the
Southeast. We have every-
thing we need right in our
own backyards and none of
it comes with a bar code.
Our transportation
may be canoe, bicycle,
foot, all-terrain-vehicle, or
horse little or no gaso-
line required. Our music


is the hoot of the barred
owl, the cry of the osprey
and eagle, the knock of
the woodpecker, the call
of the mourning dove. It
might be the soft sounds of
handmade instruments at a
community bluegrass jam.
Our theme park'is found
in the lazy curves of our
rivers, the soft muddy foot
trails of the wetlands, and
quiet off-road vistas.
We may give up some
things yet discover ones
more valuable. Yes, the
silver lining before us may
have a way of not only
reconnecting us to our
political process but to
each other as well.




TALK A e
> O KAREN
Please share your thoughts about
Geneva at 407-221-7002,
karenp@theoviedovoice.com
with "Stetson's Corner" in the sub-
ject line, or fax 407-349-2800.
Thanks!
This column is dedicated to
Deputy Sheriff Gene "Stetson"
Gregory, killed in the line of duty
on July 8, 1998. Geneva will never
be the same because of Deputy
Gregory it will be better.


TENNIS I Overwhelming community response to cancer-fighting tournament


< continued from the front page
tennis instructor asked if anyone
would like to take part in a fund-
raiser tournament," she said. "When
I heard it was for breast cancer, I
started to cry and raised my hand."
"A friend who is a breast cancer
survivor inspired me; I admire her
bravery and tenacity," she added
with tears in her eyes.
Bradley said she chose to sup-
port this particular nonprofit orga-
nization because she believes in its
focus on education. Breast cancer
is the second leading cause of death
in women, with more than 40,000
deaths projected for 2008.
The organization "encourages
women of all ages to become aware
and safeguard their own health,"
Bradley said.
Elaine Lustig and Sheila Solomon


co-founded Women Playing for
TIME in 1993. The money that the
tournament raises benefits breast
cancer Technology, Immediate
diagnosis, Mammography and
Education hence the acronym
TIME.
Throughout the years, the char-
ity has raised more than $6.5 mil-
lion for the M.D. Anderson Cancer
Center Orlando, part of Orlando
Health, through a variety of events,
including tennis and golf tourna-
ments.
Bradleysaidshe hopes the money
raised through the tournament
registrations and a silent auction
and raffle, along with the luncheon
following the tennis, will make a
difference for future generations.
"I think we have made a big dent
in education just from the time


we first started self-breast exami-
nations," Bradley said. "Since early
detection is a big component of
treating breast cancer, just having
access to the mammography will
hopefully allow early treatment."
Marilee Flint, Tuscawilla Country
Club's head tennis professional,
said the choice to support W'omen
Playing for TIME is ideal because
people in the community can relate
to it. "I think so many people can
say they know someone with breast
cancer. It is personal for everybody,"
she said.
As soon as Bradley posted her
handmade sign covered in pink
glitter in the tennis pro shop, peo-
ple signed up to participate. "We
had an overwhelming response
from the community; it makes me
feel like I am making a difference,"


Bradley said. "It .helps me to see the
human spirit is engendered in oth-
ers."
"I am proud the members have
clambered together to make a dif-
ference," Flint said. "I am always
amazed to see the turnout and peo-
ple are always so willing to chip in.
There is so much alive and active
here, and this epitomizes that."
Denise McEwan of Winter
Springs proudly wore her pink ten-
nis shirt in support of breast can-
cer awareness. "What better way to
raise money than play a little ten-
nis," she said with a smile. "It's very
close to my heart. My aunt died of
breast cancer.
"I am out here playing for my
Aunt Jean. I loved Aunt Jean."


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The Voice


Page A4 October 24 October 30, 2008









Ghosts and goblins to haunt the town


Be careful out there, as
just a week from now the
ghosts and goblins will be
roaming the area at night
to perhaps come knocking
at your door. Best be pre-
pared for the trick-or-treat-
ers. You don't want to be
caught without a treat and
be invaded by monsters,
witches and their friends.
Early and absentee
voting is the thing to do,
especially to avoid the long
lines at the poll on Nov. 4.
Early voting will continue
for those in Oviedo at the
East Branch Library, 310
Oviedo Blvd, until Nov. 2
on weekdays 10 a.m. to
6 p.m., and then noon to
4 p.m. on the weekends.
To request an absentee
ballot, call the Seminole
County Voter Hotline at
407-585-VOTE or visit


VoteSeminole.org. Just
remember, all absentee bal-
lots must be returned to
the election office by 7 p.m.
on Election Day.
Some upcoming
Halloween events: Fall
Fling, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Oct.
25 at Boston Hill Park, 777
S. Central Ave. in Oviedo.
The MOMS Club event will
feature a bounce house,
inflatable twister, a disc
jockey, Halloween parade
and pumpkin-carving con-
test. Please bring a canned
food item for the Hope
Food Pantry. For more
information, call 407-977-
1559.
The Family Fall Festival
with games, vendors and
a petting zoo will be held*
from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday, Oct. 25, Central
Park, Park Avenue, Winter


Park. Free admission.
There will be a Kid's
Fun Day from 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. Oct. 25 at the Lake
Mary Historical Museum,
158 N. Country Club Road,
Lake Mary. The event
will feature Halloween-
themed face painting and
crafts. Admission is free.
Participation is $1 per child.
For more information,
please call 407-324-3011.
Something for the dog-
gies Howl-O-Ween for
the Dogs will run from 11
a.m. to 2 p.m. Oct. 26 at
Pawmosa Dog Park, 140
Plumosa Ave., Casselberry.
There will be a dog cos-
tume contest and parade.
Cost is $5 to $10 for dogs;
accompanying humans get
in free. For more informa-
tion, call 407-339-2663.
"Hoooowl for the
Arts" event will be held
at 6:30 p.m. Oct. 25 at the
Seminole Harley-Davidson
Buell, 620 Hickman Circle,
Sanford. The Seminole
Cultural Arts Council will
auction off more than
25 original masks cre-
ated by Seminole County
Commissioner Bob


Dallari and other com-
munity leaders and well-
known artists, such as Rae
Marie and Robin Marks.
Entertainment will be pro-
vided by local band The
Rythmatics and Central
Florida's Jacqueline Jones.
Proceeds will help support
cultural arts in Seminole
County. Cost is $35 per
person or $50 per couple.
If you need more informa-
tion, call 407-261-2314.
The Oviedo Police
Department will hold its
"Not-So-Scary Halloween
Haunted Carnival" at
the C.O.P.S. Center at the
Oviedo Marketplace mall,
Friday, Oct. 31.
The event is an indoor
alternative to include car-
nival games and other fun,
rather than door-to-door
neighborhood walking. For
more information, call 407-
971-5705.
Senior Games will be
held again this year from
Nov. 8 through Nov. 14 at
the Senior Center, 401 E.
Seminole Blvd., Sanford.
The 34th annual Golden
Age Games will be at
various locations in the


Sanford area. There will be
numerous events including
archery, billiards, bowling,
basketball shooting, golf,
swimming, table tennis, a
craft and hobby show, and
a talent show. Admission
cost is $8 for the first event,
$2 for each additional
event. For more informa-
tion, call 407-688-5129.
Nov. 1, a first for the
Oviedo community is the
Children in Action forum
where students in grades
K-8 will have the oppor-
tunity to share ideas with
Mayor Mary Lou Andrews
and the rest of the City
Council. The program will
run from 9 a.m. to noon.
A thought If you don't
believe in ghosts, you've
never been to a family
reunion.
Ashleigh Brilliant




TALK I & T
TO JAET
Send word to Janet Foley about
events and let her know what's
going on around town by e-mailing
janetf@theoviedovoice.com.


KERR I Chief cut crime on bare-bones budget


< continued from the front page

department's community
policing philosophy.
The Citizen Advisory
Committee, one of a number
of programs implemented
by Kerr, has connected the
Police Department with the
community, Brunelle said.
Citizen meetings, where
police give crime updates
and tips on prevention,
are now held in sister city
Oviedo too. When Oviedo's
police chief, Jeff Chudnow,
attended one of Kerr's
meetings, he was impressed.
"The reaction he got from
the citizens was so positive,"
Chudnow said. "I think he's
going to be a great asset
down at the academy."
Brunelle said that Kerr
is not only a leader, he's a
friend to everyone at the
police department. "His
compassion, friendship and
loyalty to the community
has been greatly appreci-
ated ... everybody is just so
close to him."
Commissioner Sally
McGinnis agreed, calling
Kerr "approachable," and
"very kind."
"He's always appeared
to be very professional but
there's a soft side to him
also ... He's certainly gained
the respect of the commu-
nity," she said.
The Winter Springs Police
Department is one of few
thathaveobtainedandmain-
tained national accredita-
tion from the Commission
on Accreditation for Law
Enforcement Agencies.
"He's put us on the map,"
McGinnis said.
That hasn't been an easy
task. While Winter Springs'


crime rate is the lowest in
Seminole County, it also has
the lowest amount of police
officers per capital and the
leanest budget to work
with.
Kerr said that hasn't worn
him down or influenced his
decision to leave.
"I think if anything it
gives you more satisfaction
knowing what you are able
to achieve with having lean


resources knowing that
the men and women of the
department are working as
hard as they could in order
to be able to achieve that,"
he said.
Mayor John Bush said it's
going to be a great chal-
lenge to fill Kerr's shoes.
"I hate to see him go," he
said, "but I know his legacy
will live on."


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October 24 October 30, 2008 Page A5


Thf Voice


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Parw a ft m Lrtnt I -Cr 2A OntnhIr ,fl fhV


Struggle

BE ON THE LOOKOUT!
Crirne, arrests and
puticc safety news from
ihe Oviedo Police Department
By Lt. George llemsky


Suspect Tased after struggle
to get officer's weapon
At about 11:20 p.m. Oct. 15, Officer
Heather Bates checked out a sus-
picious male who gave her a false
name in the area of Artesia Street.
Through investigative efforts the
officers determined the Gorrect
name of the individual and deter-
mined that there was an active war-
rant out of Seminole County for
robbery.
Bates attempted to take the indi-
vidual into custody for the active
warrant. A struggle ensued whereby
the suspect reached for the offi-
cer's Taser. The struggle went to the
ground, and the Taser was ripped
off her duty belt. The suspect then
went for the officer's duty weapon,
and the struggle continued where-
by she was forced to strike the sus-
pect with her baton several times
while maintaining security of her
weapon.
When it became apparent that
back up officers were quickly
approaching, the suspect fled on
foot but was apprehended by an
officer who successfully deployed
his Taser. Then officers took -him
into custody. Officer Bates suffered
minor injuries and was treated at a
local hospital and released.
Burglaries, thefts and vandalism
On Oct. 13 a burglary was reported
on the 300 block of Graham Avenue.
The perpetrator caused damage to
the door and air conditioning unit
within the residence.
Also that day, a burglary was
reported at Oviedo Mower where-
by persons) entered the business
property and stole two rear tires
from a mower located on the prop-
erty.
Lastly, a theft from a boat
located at the 1500 block of West
Broadway was reported whereby
the perpetrators) stole a Sony ste-
reo and two speakers from the con-
sole of the vessel.
On Oct. 14 vandalism was report-
ed to a business located at the 800
block of Executive Drive. The com-
plainant reported when he came in
to work he discovered the electrical
panel tampered with and the lock,
which was on the electrical panel,
was broken off. He also stated the
circuit for the parking lot light was
turned off.
On Oct. 16 a vehicle burglary


e over gun
was reported on the 1000 block of
Catfish Creek Court. The complain-
ant reported that someone entered
his van and removed a Garmin
Street Pilot GPS.
Also that day, graffiti was report-
ed at the Alafaya Woods Park on
Alafaya Woods Boulevard.
On Oct. 17 a utility trailer with
lawn equipment was stolen from
the complainant's property located
at the 400 block of North Central
Avenue.
Also that day, a vehicle burglary
was reported on the 1000 block
of Joshua Creek Court. The victim
reported her Garmin GPS with its
cradle, and her LG "Rumor" phone
were missing. She further advised
she did not lock the vehicle since
the driver's side door lock had not
been working properly and does
not automatically lock when she
uses her remote.
On Oct. 19 a criminal mischief
complaint was lodged when the
complainant reported the double-
pane sliding glass door was shat-
tered at his residence on Carib
Lane.
Reward for sign vandalism leads
The gateway monument sign locat-
ed at Lockwood Road and Geneva
Drive was damaged by someone
shooting into, destroying the LED
portion of the sign. This is the sec-
ond time a city of Oviedo sign has
been damaged by gunfire. Several
bullet holes of an unknown cali-
ber were discovered. The approxi-
mate damage to the sign is valued
at $10,000.
Anyone with knowledge of
the crimes, or the identity of the
persons) responsible may be
eligible for a reward by anony-
mously contacting Central
Florida Crimeline at 1-800-423-
8477 (TIPS) or contact Detective
Corporal Nelson Genao of the
Criminal Investigations Division at
the Oviedo Police Department at
407-971-5710.
$5,000 for tip about sign shooter
Oviedo Police need the'public's
help to solve a crime the shoot-
ing of an Oviedo gateway sign at
Lockwood Boulevard and County
Road 426. The digital animated
sign was shot multiple times, caus-
ing $10,000 in damage. A $5,000
reward is being offered to find the
shooter. Direct tips to Crimeline at
1-800-423-8477.
Cop talk: "Don't fight a battle
if you don't gain anything by win-
ning."
GeorgeS. Patton,
U.S. Army general


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Police are looking for a sus-
pect who they say robbed at
gunpoint the Oviedo Metro PCS
store and attempted sexual bat-
tery on the clerk Wednesday.
The suspect is a black male,
wearing a red shirt, red headband
and denim shorts, according to a
Seminole County Sheriff's Office
news release. Direct tips to
Crimeline, 1-800-423-8477.









IMAGE COURTESY OF THE SEMINOLE
COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE


I


I


The Voice


Paae A6 Octobepr.24- October 30. 20081





The Voice October 24 October 30,2008 Page A7


THIS WEEK in human history

R |Sixty-three-year-old schoolteacher Annie Edson Taylor, strapped
for cash and seeking fame, becomes the first person to take the
plunge over Niagara Falls in a barrel. Taylor's brief fame cooled,
Sand she was unable to make the fortune for which she had
^ INTEREST k^ jL J syphoped.


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE VOICE
Actors Joe Reed and Peg O'Keefe play friends caught up in the segregation era of Florida in "Parallel Lives," written in part by an Oviedo resident. It's showing at Seminole Community College this weekend.






PIne AR mu tohor 24 October 30.., 2T


CALENDAR Gourmet Food

Book fair comes to -( o-l-
Keeth Elementary
Keeth Elementary School in Winter
Springs hosts a book fair Nov.
3 through Nov. 7. A Family Fun
Night will be hosted from 6-8 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 6. There will be food
and entertainment at the event. A
parents-only night will be from 5:30-
7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 4.

SCC offers month of. Dominicks To Go
concerts in November 5804 Red Bug Lake Rd.
Seminole Community College's Fine Winter Springs
Arts Department offers a diverse 407,699.8646
month of music in its Encore! Opendaily from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.
month of music in its Encore! -,,. e. ,,,;
Concert Series. SCC presents a
guitar ensemble concert at noon on www.DominicksCatering.co
Wednesday, Nov. 5 in the Sanford-
Lake Mary Campus Fine Arts Concert
Hall (building G).
Other concerts will be held Nov.
10,17 and 19.
All events are free and open to
the public. Call 407-708-2040 for
more information.
: -'' ......... ... ... .... .. ...... > 5g--- -.- - -,"- -...... ,. ....---- '-,--,- -,-- -- ...
Tennis'exhibition Nov. 16 Q. .- - ,' - _
Put your character on the line, or on w
the "clay," from 6-8 p.m. Thursday, MHj .,---.f. ..
Oct. 30 at Stonewood Grill and $2
Tavern at.Tuscawilla, at 5248 Red $221
Bug Lake Road in Winter Springs. 8 VALUE!
Pre-register for the 4th annual tennis i
exhibition, to be played Sunday, Nov. Includes
16. A $25 donation at the Stonewood Kids Welcome Exam,
reception will also allow you in at Appointment Cleaning
the Nov. 16 awards banquet at the & X-Rays!
Tuscawilla Country Club after the
tennis exhibition. -Bring your tennis | : :.. -. -
champion or sponsor your favorite. .
player.
Register with Henry Vales at
hvales@dountoothers.net or call $78 Welcome Appointment for Children Ages 12 and Under!
321-262-6269

Goldenrod throws
a party for fall
The Goldenrod Chamberof Commerce
hosts the 30th Annual Festival and -
Parade this Saturday, Oct. 25. There
will be a pancake breakfast, parade, 4 :3
kids corner, cookout, dessert bake- .- ..-
off and museum tours. .Ae..
A parade on Aloma Avenue will
last from 11 a.m. to noon. The event
is centered at Goldenrod Station, an
old renovated fire station at 4755 N.
Palmetto Ave. east of Winter Park. OFFERSMAI BE COMBINED. OFFERS HAVENOCASH VALUE. THEPATIENTANDANYOTHERPERSONRESPONSIBL.E FOR PAYMENTHASARIGHTTOREFUSETO PAY, CANCEPAYMENT. ORRE REIMBURSED FORPAYMENT FORANYOTHERSERVIF,
A political mingle and barbecue I EXAMINA1ONRTREATMENTTHATIS PERFORMEDASARESULTOFANDWITHIN72HOURSOF RESPONDINGTOTHEADVERISEMENTFORTHE FREEDISCOUNTEDFEEORREDUCEDFEESEKEEXAMINA1ON ORTREA MENT FLUC.DN14545
will follow the parade. Children will
have bounce houses, carnival games,
face painting, cookie decorating and g s ,A0 I,
a coloring contest, all for free.
The dessert bake-off is from 1 p.m.
to 2 p.m. The Goldenrod Museum will
be open from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. The
pancake breakfast lasts from 7 a.m.
to 11 a.m.

Halloween extravaganza
at SCC Planetarium i
Seminole Community College's .
Planetarium is hosting a free family
Halloween Extravaganza that will
feature the planetarium's show
"Into the West: Astronomical Origins .
of Halloween"; educational and
safety information; and traditional .
Halloween treats. The event will i
include a costume contestfor children.
12 and younger; candy and prizes; a "apt:
haunted school where kids will learn
about snakes, owls and other night ',
creatures on hand for Halloween;
and telescopes for peering into the O.isn
wonders of the night sky.- -
The event is from 7-11 p.m. on :. ,..- .. .1,-
Saturday, Oct. 25 in SCC's Planetarium 4 7 3 6`'6 SS.-nt
on the Sanford-Lake Mary Campus. .
Visit www.scc-fl.edu/planet or call
407-708-2360 for more information. i FAMILY VI910N EYE HEALT


I


The Voice


PanFe A8 October 24 October 30, 2008


f


.





Family

Calendar


Hiss and Howl-O-Ween
in Sanford
Trick out your pet, and treat it to a
day of fun at the First Annual Hiss
and Howl-O-Ween Pet Costume
Contest and Adoption Event from
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Oct.
25 at Seminole County Animal
Services, 232 Bush Blvd. in
Sanford (across the street from
Flea World).
It will be a fun-filled day of
doggie games, food, face painting
for the kids and a Howl-arious
costume contest for your pets.
The costume contest begins at 1
p.m. You can even dress up too if
you are part of your pet's costume
theme. The event and contest are
free, and prizes will be given for
the best costumes.
There will be dozens of great
dogs and cats just waiting to be
adopted.

Central Florida Zoo
offers haunted hayride
The Central Florida Zoo's "Zoo
Boo Bash" hosts trick-or-treaters
Saturday, Oct. 25 and Sunday,
Oct. 26 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Dress up as your favorite
character, grab your goodie
bag, and trick or treat with the
animals at Central Florida Zoo
this Halloween. There will be
face painting, a haunted hayride
and a special pumpkin patch
to entertain visitors of all ages.
Guests will also learn about
the myths and realities of some
misunderstood animals.

Haunted hayride comes
to the country
Mikenda Farm 4H Club will
be having a Haunted Halloween
Hayride and Festival from 4-10
p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 25. Events
will include a family-friendly
hayride, haunted horror hayride,
costume contest, Halloween
games, pumpkin-carving contest,
and a professional photographer
to take pictures of you or your
little ones in their Halloween
costumes.
Full concessions will be on site
all evening so bring your hunger.
The event is near the intersection
of Lake Pickett and Ft. Christmas
roads. Follow the signs the day
of the event. Tickets are $5
in advance, $8 the day of the
event. Visit www.mikendafarm.
com/4hclub.htm for more
information.

Disney's magical twist
on Halloween
Mickey's Not-So-Scary
Halloween Party returns to the
Magic Kingdom Oct. 23, 24,
26. 30 and 31, from 7 p.m. to
midnight.
Visit the park in costume, and
trick-or-treat for candy with
some of your favorite Disney
Characters, also dressed up for
the evening.
Visit DisneyWorld.com for more
information.


ing it scary, but safe

-I4, 4;: i. v -. :- --

.-,, i ..... "?,..- .o- i.....,, ,.,
1.. -1
~ ~ ,
~" I
*--~& ~ia


fIU Tu BY LAUnn EUE anIUELu i n VUIC
Ashanti Thomas, 6, proudly displays a long-stemmed pumpkin at Hagerty High school's pumpkin patch Friday evening, Oct. 17, in Oviedo.


AMY K.D. TOBIK
VOICE STAFF
Halloween night stirs up images of
children dressed up as villains, heroes
and princesses bursting with excite-
ment as they ring doorbells and fill
their bags with candy. Unfortunately,
while the night should be filled with
good-natured enjoyment, more
children are injured on Halloween
in pedestrian-automobile accidents
than any other holiday. As the spooky
night of Allhallows Eve approaches,
be sure to take special precautions
to make sure your little goblins stay
safe.

Choosing a costume
It is imperative that the Halloween
costume fit properly and the child is
wearing comfortable shoes to prevent
tripping either on the costume or
the curbs. According to the National
Safety Council, the No. 1 cause of inju-
ry on Halloween is accidental falls
while walking door to door.
Bright costumes make it easier for
motorists to see children walking.
Always bring a flashlight, and if pos-
sible, trim bags and costumes with
reflective tape for added protection.
When purchasing a costume, look
for a label indicating the costume is
flame resistant, which means it will
still catch fire, but can be quickly


or


extinguished if ignited.
The U.S. Consumer Product Safety
Commission suggests children use
cosmeiics rather than a loose fitting
mask that might obstruct vision or
breathing. If a mask is crucial to the
costume, the commission advises that
it fit securely and the eyeholes are large
enough to allow full vision. All cos-
tume accessories, such as swords,
should be soft and flexible to
prevent accidental injury.
Brian Meyers, spokesper-
son for the Maitland
Police Department,
suggests parents pin
a name and address
on small children
in case they get
lost in the dark. ~

Walking
door-to-door
Meyers encour-
ages the buddy
system while trick-
or-treating. Arrange
for an adult to accom-
pany a group, know the
route your child will travel
and arrange a return time. Make
sure your child knows to go to homes
that have lights on and remind them
to never enter a person's house unless
accompanied by an adult. Always use
sidewalks when available rather than


Ii


recat


the street and don't run across lawns.

Candy safety
The U.S. Consumer Product Safety
Commission advises parents to
not let their children eat any treats
until an adult has carefully exam-
ined them for evidence
of tampering. Throw
away all unwrapped
or suspicious can-
dies. Also ensure the
candy will not pose
a choking hazard
for smaller children.
The Food and Drug
Administration rec-
ommends children
have a light snack
prior to the outing
to help prevent the
desire to nibble on
treats.

Safety at home
Use caution when
using candles as lumi-
naries tQ light pumpkins
and remember to extin-
guish the flame after a few
hours. Meyers recommends people
take extra safety precautions and lock
up valuables such as bicycles and lawn
mowers and report suspicious activity
to your local police department.


These locations are offering !fun and safe plc
treating. Check the.'oit! -.


SANFORD
Central Florida Zoo
Oct. 18, 19, 25,26
9 a.m. to 3 p.m,.

ORLANDO
Fashion Square Mall
Oct. 31
6 p.m. to 8 p.m.


WINTER PARK -
Central Park ;
. Saturday, Oct. 25 :
11 a.m.to2 p2r.-ri-

WINTER SPRINGS j1
Winter Springs T6wn
Saturday Oct._'8 1
.5:30 p.m. to 9p


October 24 October 30, 2008 Page A9


Th \VnirQ


G.O. Family






Pace A 0 ctoer 4 -Ocobe 30 208 Te Vic


PLAY I Story started as a series of essays about race relations


< continued from page A7
O'Keefe and Joe Reed.
The development of
the play has been an evo-
lution. Ten years ago, the
Florida Humanities Council
commissioned the two
prominent writers to pro-
duce essays regarding their
experiences growing up
in Florida during segrega-
tion. Coyle, a white college
professor, and Maxwell, an
African-American news-
paper journalist, spent five
years visiting 60 cities shar-
ing their individual stories
reflecting life in nearby
towns.
The progression from
once tentative associates


thrown together a decade
ago by a writing assignment
to lifelong friends prompt-
ed the collaboration.
Six years ago, the St.
Petersburg Times provid-
ed funding to the Florida
Humanities Council to
transform the poignant
essays into a play. "Parallel
Lives" made its debut at the
American Stage Theatre
Company in St. Petersburg
in 2003.
"The Florida Humanities
-Council thought we would
have interesting memories
and knew we both go a cou-
ple of generations back,"
Coyle said. "Bill goes back
to a runaway slave from the
Everglades after the Civil


War. We are both connect-
ed to old-timers and small
towns." Maxwell looks back
on life in Crescent Beach
while Coyle's memories
include Oviedo.
"My mother is fifth or
sixth generation (Oviedian)
and her grandparents came
right after the Civil War,"
Coyle said. While she also
has childhood memo-
ries of living in Miami and
Boynton Beach, Oviedo
was the home she always
returned to when visiting
her extended family.
"My great-grandparents
bought one of the hous-
es on Lake Charm right
after the great freeze from
Northerners who left," she


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said. Today, Coyle lives in
New York and travels back
to Oviedo to visit family. "I
am just so fond of the place,"
she said.
"Parallel Lives" is a play
about race, Coyle said, but
not in a prolific way. "It's
a story about friendship,
and [the characters] hap-
pen to be black and white
at a time when they realize
that they could never have
been friends as children,"
she said. The real journey
throughout the play, Coyle
said, is the evolution of their
friendship.
The play attempts to
define what creates the
lines that separate any
group and asks how people
can learn to get past ste-
reotype. "When they reach
a point," Coyle asked, "do
"they walk away or do they
walk it through?"
"We try to go over how
tricky it is so people can
be reminded that it is hard
to reach across racial lines,"
she said. The play ends on a
very hopeful note because
the colleagues, eventually
realize they are meant to be
friends and are even closer
because they dared to assess
their difficulties.
Paul Luby, SCC Fine Arts
Department chair, added,
"In light of the complexity
of race relations playing out
in our presidential election
campaign, 'Parallel Lives'
reminds us of our own lega-


S ae*he ho

"Parallel Lives" opens at
Seminole Community College's
main campus in Sanford at 8
p.m. Friday, Oct. 24, continu-
ing at 8 p.m. Oct. 25 and with
a final showing at 2 p.m. Oct.
26.'A forum with the play-
wrights will follow the show.
These performances are free.
Call 407-708-2040 or visit
SCC-FL.edu/arts for more
information.

cy and where it has brought
our Central Florida com-
munity.
"The play's pertinence,
both temporal and geo-
graphical, will resonate
with our audiences."
"We provided a really
comfortable place to go
back and remember for
our children how there was
legal segregation," Coyle
said. "You can hear that, and
hear that, and hear that, but
until you talk to people who
lived through it, who said
things like I did, [they] were
oblivious to it."
Friendship is so easy to
walk away from, Coyle said.
"That becomes the under-
lying heartbeat because we
can walk away. And if we
don't and we dare to cry
over this, together we'll get
somewhere."


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Page Al 0 October 24 October 30, 2008


v


The Voice






ThI I It; October 24 Oobr3.20-A---ll


Hello, Chamber


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE VOICE
The Oviedo-Winter Springs Regional Chamber of Commerce's president
elect, Paul Partyka, left, stands with Winter Springs Mayor John Bush at the
Chamber's ribbon cutting for its new location at the Vistawilla Office Center.
On Sept. 2, the Chamber moved from its former headquarters near downtown
Oviedo to a spot equidistant from the hearts of both Oviedo and Winter Springs.
The ribbon cutting was catered by Let's Break Bread, Mo's Catering, Polio
Tropical and TJ's Seafood Shack, with door prizes provided by J & J Creations.


i I


CINEMA I


Areaiu1J U mo ie imes or Fiday, O4'IIi ct.2
Tm s ar gnealy 6ald or Satudayand Sunayto -cal* o es ure.


HIGH SCHOOL MUSICAL 3 (G)
noon, 12:30,1:00,1 ;30, 2:30, 3:35,
4:05, 5:05, 6:40, 7:00, 7:35, 8:05,
9:05, 9:35,10:05,10:45,11:40,
12:05am, 12:35am

PRIDE AND GLORY (R) noon,
4:30,7:45,10:40

SAW V (R) 12:30,1:35,2:45,
4:10, 4:55, 7:20, 8:15, 9:30, 1030,
midnight, 12:40

MAX PAYNE (PG-13) 12:15, 1:25,
2:50,4:00,5:20,7:15,7:40,9:50,
10:20, 12:15am

THE SECRET LIFE OF BEES
(PG-13) 12:45,3:45,6:35,9:10,
11:35

SEX DRIVE (R) 12:40, 4:25, 7:30,
10:15, 12:45am

W. (PG-13) 12:20, 4:20, 7:15,
10:30

BODY OF LIES (R) 1:15, 4:40,
7:50,10:50

CITY OF EMBER (PG) 12:10,
2:35, 5:00, 7:55,10:25

QUARANTINE (R) 1:20, 4:30,
7:40,10:00,12:20am

BEVERLY HILLS CHIHUAHUA
(PG) 1:10, 3:50, 6:55, 9:25 12:10

NICK AND NORAH'S INFINITE
PLAYLIST (PG-13) 1:05, 4:05,
7:10,9:40,11:55

RELIGULOUS (R) 12:35, 3:40,
7:25,10:10,12:50am

EAGLE EYE (PG-13) 12:05, 4:10,
6:50,9;55,12:30am

FIREPROOF (PG) 12:55, 3:55,
7:05,10:35

NIGHTS IN RODANTHE (PG-13)
12:50, 4:45, 8:00,10:40


THE DUCHESS (PG-13) 12:25,
4:50, 8:10,10:50


'High School Musical 3' Opens Friday


RG WATERFORD
. .. .. .


I


HIGH SCHOOL MUSICAL 3 (G)
11:30am, noon, 12:45, 1:40, 2:10,
3:35, 4:20, 4;50, 5:20, 6;30, 7:00,
7:30, 8:00, 9:10, 9:40,10:10,10:40,
11:55, 12:25am

PRIDE AND GLORY (R) 12:25,
4:05, 7:35,10:50

SAW V (R) 12:10,12:55,1:30,
2:35, 3:40, 4:30, 5:05, 7:10, 7:40,
8:15, 9:45, 10:15, 10:50, 12:20am,
12:50am

MAX PAYNE (PG-13) 4:00, 7:15,
10:00,10:45,12:35am Open
captioned and descriptive audio
showtimes: 1:20, 7:45

THE SECRET LIFE OF BEES
(PG-13) 1:35, 4:25, 7:55, 10:25

SEX DRIVE (R) 12:20,4:40,8:10,
10:55

W. (PG-13) 12:35, 4:45, 7:50,
10:35

BODY OF LIES (R) 12:40, 3:50,
6:50,9:50,12:55am

CITY OF EMBER (PG) 1:00,4:15

QUARANTINE (R) 11:40am, 2:50,
5:25, 8:05, 9:20,10:30,12:45am

BEVERLY HILLS CHIHUAHUA
(PG) 1:05,4:10,5:10,6:45,9:20,
midnight

NICK AND NORAH'S INFINITE
PLAYLIST (PG-13) 11:50am, 2:00,
4:35, 7:25, 9:55,11:50

EAGLE EYE (PG-13) 12:50, 3:55,
7:05,10:05,12:55am

FIREPROOF (PG) 12:30,3:45,
6:55


Two high school lovebirds, nearing the end of senior year, worry about
being separated by college. They team up with their classmates to stage
a musical that expresses their hopes and anxieties about the future.


1 hour 52 minutes G


Also opening Friday 'Pride and Glory'


NIGHTS IN RODANTHE (PG-13)
10:20,12:40am

THE NIGHTMARE BEFORE
CHRISTMAS 3-D (PG) 12:15,
2:55, 5:15, 7:20, 9:35, 12:05am


Opening Oct. 31


4:00,6:30

ANIMATION SHOW 4 (NR) 9:15


'Haunting of Molly Hartley'

1 hour 26 minutes PG-13


.In your i hen




'I ..







Request your Absentee Ballot today at: www.VoteSeminole.org .
dYd t1W AybopyceanePg HjBtitiA gl-,lMy ffdegisgito lul EDy I bldat, saiet sb h elr stbrIc dbob stk e eo d"


------"""- --------- --~ -~~--- ~~~""~"~~~"""~~"~~""""~"~"`~--~ ----~--------~ ~-------~1~


October 24 October 30, 2008 Page Al 1 -


ThP Vnice


I EGLCIEAS2


i


I





Page A12 October 24 October 30, 2008 The Voice


THIS WEEK in sports history

&1- RN Washington State's Rueben Mayes sets a college football record
Switch 357 rushing yards in one game against Oregon. The new
;j record of 406 yards is currently held by San Diego Charger
LaDainian Tomlinson.






Bears fare best amona local teams


ISAAC BABCOCK
VOICE
A big night on the grid-
iron ended with the Winter
Springs Bears on top in a
23-3 pummeling at Lyman
High School on Friday
night.
The No. 8 ranked team in
Central Florida unleashed
their top running back -
Al-Terek McBurse on
the Greyhounds, and he
responded with 212 yards
and all of his team's three
touchdowns to demoralize
the home team.
But the game didn't start
with all the look of a blow-
out. Neither team managed
a score in the first quarter as
defenses took center stage
and McBurse failed to find
the end zone.
Lyman struck first, with
its only score coming on a
field goal that gave it a tenu-
ous lead that it would- not
relinquish in the first half.
McBurse found the end
zone for the first time in
the third quarter, giving
his team its first lead of the
game, which it kept to the
end.
In the fourth quarter
the Bears just piled on the
misery for Lyman, with a
fumble becoming a safety
for the Bears in between
two long McBurse rushing


PHOTO BY LAURENCE SAMUELS THE VOICE
Hagerty Huskies Coach Nate Gierke went up against his father, Edgewater Coach Bill Gierke, in the teams' match last Friday.


touchdowns.
The win brought the
Bears to 5-1 on the sea-
son. They played their only
Thursday game of the year
at home against Oviedo
after press time. The Lions
are 2-5, with a three-game
losing streak.
Oviedo suffered its sec-
ond straight blowout loss
Friday, with Lake Brantley
coming to Oviedo's home
field and rocking them
41-13.
The Patriots ,had 27
points on the board after
four straight unanswered
scores in the first half.
But the Lions came
roaring back in the third


quarter, with running back
Collin Christmas catching
a 13-yard touchdown pass
from quarterback Blake
Bortles.
It wasn't enough, with
the Patriots continuing to
pull away, despite a final
trip into the end zone by
the Lions' wide receiver Trey
Lundquist.
The Lions faced the Bears
in Winter Springs 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, after press time.
The Hagerty Huskies
also faced the losing end
of a blowout Friday, with
Edgewatcr handing them a
41-7 loss.
Huskies Coach Nate
Gierke met his father,


Edgewater coach Bill Gierke,
on the field for the second
time. The Eagles now have
a 2-0 record against 'the
Huskies.
Hagerty's only score
came on a Mitch Hatton
run in the second quarter,
which brought the score to
14-7. The Huskies wouldn't
score again in the contest.
Hagerty dropped to 2-4'
with the loss. They traveled
to Lake Howell at 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, after press time.
The Lake Howell Silver
Hawks suffered their sev-
enth straight loss in a 36-7
rout by Lake Mary.


IH ? I Irit'TiII



Winter Springs
vs. Oviedo
7:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 23
at Winter Springs
130 Tuskawilla Road
Winter Springs

Hagerty
vs. Lake Howell
7:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 23
at Lake Howell
4200 Dike.Road, Winter Park

Trinity Prep
vs. Taylor Middle School
7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 24
at 100 East Washington Ave.
Pierson, Fla.


Knights' defense soars, offense sinks


ISAAC BABCOCK
THE VOICE


For UCF football fans, this
season has been a tale of
two cities, only the cities are
on the same gridiron, and
they're the team's defense
and offense.
Confused? Ask the
Knights how they're doing
so far this season, and you'll
probably get two totally dif-
ferent answers, depending
on who you're asking.
It's hard for the offense to
hold their heads high when
they're the second worst
team in their 120-team
Division 1- football bowl
subdivision. That's worse
than every winless team in
the nation, even worse than
Wyoming, which only has
seven touchdowns in seven
games.
They have the worst
average yards per carry of
any team this season, worse
than even North Texas,
which is 0-6 this year.
Despite the lackluster
performance of quarter-
back Kyle Israel last season,


Next Game:
vs. Tulsa Golden Hurricane


WHERE: Tulsa, Okla.

The game will be broadcast
live on ESPN. Tulsa is favored.



the Knights have sunk fur-
ther in the passing depart-
ment, now 10th-worst in
the nation with 121.7 yards
per game. In 2006, they
were 30th with 233.8 yards
per game.
But in rushing, the
Knights fell the hardest
over the last season. In 2007
running back Kevin Smith,
coupled with prolific scam-
perer Kyle Israel, helped
UCF to ninth in the nation
in rushing with 234.79
yards per game. This sea-
son the Knights are 84th,


with 126.67 yards per game,
many of them coming from
freshman Ronnie Weaver.
But the Knights are 2-4
this season, so how could
they be so bad on offense
and survive? Defense has
kept them alive. Not just
good defense record-
breaking defense.
Despite a lackluster sea-
son by Miami this year, they
were still favored over the
Knights in their game on
Oct. 11. But the Knights
managed an unlikely come-
back, without the help of
their offense, which gained
an embarrassing 78 total
yards.
The Knights stayed alive
thanks to two touchdowns
from their defensive backs.
Johnell Neal intercepted a
pass and ran more than half
the field for a touchdown.
Joe Burnett, returning a
kick, sped 91 yards for UCF's
final score.
But there wvas no magic
left for the Knights when
they got the ball back on
offense. They ended their
comeback with a failed
fourth-down conversion,


with Burnett and Neal
watching from the side-
lines.
For Burnett, watching
the offense from the side-
lines is particularly painful.
He's the only non-offensive
player in the FBS's top 100
list for all-purpose yardage,
at No. 33. He's No. 7 on the
C-USA list with 826 yards
gained, yet he hasn't been
involved in a single offen-
sive play this season. That's
twice as good as any UCF
offensive player.
As a kick returned,
Burnett is among the best
in the nation in all catego-
ries. He's fourth in his NCAA
football bowl subdivision in
yards per return with 32.47.
He's tied for the top in the
nation in kicks returned for
a touchdown. Every third
game he plays he returns a
ball more than 90 yards on
a kickoff.
Along with Neal and
Sha'reff Rashad, he's helped
lead the Knights to No. 2 in
the nation in interceptions
with 13. Two years ago, the
Knights were 86th in the
nation, with 10 intercep-


tions all season. Burnett has
broken the team all-time
interception record -this
year, with 14 picks so far..
Frequently teams don't
get so far as throwing the
ball against the Knights.
They're 12th in the nation
in tackles behind the line
of scrimmage, with nearly
eight tackles for a loss per
game.
But when things get
tough, the Knights get
inconsistent on defense.
They're 27th in the nation
in stopping third-down
conversions, but against
teams that have tried for a
fourth-down conversion,
they blow the Knights away.
THe Knights are 109th in
the country in stopping the
final play, giving it up 80
percent of the time.
Those are the numbers,
and against their upcom-
ing opponent, Tulsa, things
don't look good. Tulsa is the
top offensive team in the
nation, with nearly all of
their wins coming as blow-
outs. The Knights can only
hope their defense can stop
them.


Ti" -u
11 ,;T-







The Voice October 24 October 30. 2008 Paoe Al 3


Hagerty Huskies Sports Review


COMPILED BY JAY GETTY
HAGERTY HIGH SCHOOL
Football -
Huskies fall early and-
stay down against Edgewater
A Gierke-led football team emerged
victorious last Friday night by 41-7
at Sam Momary Stadium; unfortu-
nately for the home team, it was the
Edgewater Eagles and not the Hagerty
Huskies. The Huskies fell behind early
in the. contest as the Eagles scored
on their first three possessions of the
game. For Hagerty, the lone score
came on a Mitch Hatton 4-yard run in
the second quarter of play.
Offensively, quarterback Jeff Driskel
connected with Zach Haywood three
times for 20 yards. Driskel finished
6-14 for 63 yards passing while Caleb
Amon gained 59 yards rushing on 17
attempts.
Defensively, Andreus DuBose led
the team with five tackles. Taylor Blair
and Eric Joly each recovered a fumble
for the Huskies.


Cross Country -
Compher and Mendes lead
teams at Pre-State Meet
In cross country action last Saturday
at the Pre-State Meet in Dade City,
Shannon Compher and Sean Mendes
led their respective squads to top-five
team finishes in the 23-school fields.
The meet is held on the hilly state
meet course as a prep for the FHSAA
Finals.
For the girls, Compher finished third
overall in a time of 19:35 to lead
the team to its fifth-place position.
Following Compher and completing
the team score were: Ashley Seymour
(14th 20:36), Shannon Dunne (41st -
21:16), Amy Ankli (47th 21:29), and
Sarah Ankli (21:43).
For the boys, Mendes crossed the
line just ahead of Peter Licari as the
duo set the pace for the third-place
team finish. Mendes finished 11th in
16:53, while Licari was 17th in a time
of 17:05. Rounding out the team score
for the boys were: Kyle.Burton (29th


- 17:29), Alex Ruedas (51st 18:01),
and Evan Binder (56th 18:08).
The teams will compete this
Saturday in the Holy Trinity Fall Classic
in Melbourne.

Swimming -
Boys finish second
at SAC Championships
In swim action at the Seminole
Athletic Conference Championships
last week, Matt Curby, Takashi Worrell,
Kyle Geiger, and Jordan Pollack pro-
pelled the team to a second-place
finish behind Seminole High School.
Curby captured two individual titles
in the 200 IM (1:57.90) and 100 Back
(53.05). Takashi Worrell also finished
first in the 500 Free in a time of
4:54.60. In the relays, the quartet of
Curby, Worrell, Geiger and Pollack won
the 400 Free in a time of 3:21.20.
For the girls, Olivia Sims won the
50 Free (25.82) to help the team to a
sixth-place finish.


Volleyball -
Losses to Lake Brantley and
Oviedo bring record to 7-10
Two SAC losses in four-game sets
to Lake Brantley and Oviedo pushed
the team's overall record to 7-10 last
week. In the contest with the Patriots,
Alex Teixeira and Anna Vols recorded
25 points and 11 points respectively
on assists from Mandy Mclntosh (35).
Versus the Lions, Teixeira and Vols
each scored 21 points as Mclntosh
assisted on 36 points.

Golf-
FHSAA 2A-7 District
Championships Results 2008
On the course at Zeliwood Country
Club, Tom Calhoon (84) and Erik Ware
(90) led the men to an 11th-place
finish to complete their season at the
district tournament. For the ladies,
Veronica Gajownik (106) and Inca
Joy Gordon (131) paced the girls to a
sixth-place finish at Deer Run Country
Club. At the event, Gajownik set new


school records for both nine holes (46)
and 18 holes for the Huskies.

Bowling -
Teams defeat Seminole in
Baker match 4-1
Identical Baker match scores of 4-1
last week over the 'Noles helped
improved the men's and women's
team records to 10-2 and 9-3 over-
all.

Softball -
Two doubleheader splits
for the Huskies
Wins over Lake Mary (2-1) and Lyman
(10-5) balanced losses to Oviedo (6-4)
and Lake Brantley (8-7) over the last
two weeks of play. Offensively, Kelsey
Carpenter and Missy Montgomery
have provided consistency at the
plate. On the mound, Erin Wagstaff
and Kaitlyn Baker have tossed solid
games from the rubber. The team is
now 9-5 overall as it heads into the
SAC tournament.


WEATHER


700 760 800 680
7 a.m. I Noon 4 p.m. I 6 a.m.


3
UV INDEX I Moderate



MORNING LOW 680
t A x DAYTIME HIGH 820
lqg 30% chance of rain
Sunrise Sunset 11:12 hours Wind
7:33 a.m. 6:45 p.m. of sunlight NW 5 mph



MORNING LOW 61
DAYTIME HIGH 790
Great day to be outdoors.


Sunset
6:44 p.m.


11:11 hours
of sunlight


Wind
NW 5 mph


0 MORNING LOW 61
DAYTIME HIGH 81
Great day to be outdoors.


Sunset 11:09 hours
6:43 p.m. of sunlight


Wind
NW 5 mph


MORNING LOW 59
DAYTIME HIGH 780
Winds approaching 5 mph late.


Sunset
6:42 p.m.


11:07 hours
of sunlight


Wind
NNW 10 mph


TODAY: High near 76. East
wind between 10 and 15
mph, with gusts as high
as 20 mph as a cold front
pushes through the state.


GAINESVILLE
670 770


rOVIEDO
70 I 800


TAMPA
700 t 830


ORLANDO
68 0183



^^ry N


gastline near Ev
II
I I II 1


MARINE FORECAST
Cocoa Beach tide schedule
Time Low High
Saturday 11:51 a.m. 5:39 a.m.
Oct. 25 ----------- 5:56 p.m.
Sunday 12:11 a.m. 6:28a.m.
Oct. 26 12:37 p.m. 6:39 p.m.


FLORIDA FORECAST


Tampa


Friday Sat.
70/83 70/81


Jacksonville 68/74 67/79


Gainesville
Ft. Lauderdale
Miami
Naples


NATIONAL FORECAST


Atlanta
New York
Chicago


Friday Sat.
47/52 49/63
38/61 43/61
50/56 45/52


Friday Sat.


Washington, D.C. 40/63


Seattle


49/65


45/56 45/58


San Francisco 52/74


54/74


Los Angeles 56/90 54/88 Houston 49/79 54/79


67/77 61/79
79/85 76/86


79/85


76/85


72/85 74/83


Tallahassee 61/72 58/76



INTERNATIONAL


City
London
Paris
Tokyo
Mexico City


Friday Sat.
51/59 44/59
39/57 41/55
65/73 64/73
50/77 53/75


Sunrise
7:33 a.m.


Sunrise
7:34 a.m.


Sunrise
7:35 a.m.


The Voice


October 24 October 30, 2008 Page Al 3


t!







Pa-. Al- -- 4__- Oct r 24 O


I".- it, I


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR


Railway transportation
progress: uncertain
I asked Bill Wichterman, special
assistant to the president for
public liaison, if there would be a
public ceremony when President
George W. Bush signed the Rail
Safety Bill, a five-year authoriza-
tion for Amtrak and new money
authorized for the Washington,
D.C., subway system, the Metro.
This major piece of legislation
passed both houses of Congress
by veto-proof majorities. I was
quickly told that while Bush
would sign the measure, he would
do so without public ceremony.
He didn't want to have another
one of his vetoes overridden.
President Bush didn't much care
for the bill.
It reminds me of when, on
his way to the Democratic
Convention in 1996, President
Clinton signed the Defense of
Marriage Act legislation. The
bill provided that no other
state would have to accept gay
marriage if a state adopted it.
He didn't want the fight with
Congress but he hated the bill.
It is strange that while
Republican presidents always
have paid lip service to doing
away with Amtrak, it has done
better with the Republicans than
with the Democrats. President
Jimmy Carter nearly destroyed
the national system when his
people gave the axe to many
long-distance trains. President
Clinton paid Amtrak lip service
but gave it a starvation diet. It
was, after all, President Richard
Nixon who brought Amtrak into
being. The great conservative
Ronald Reagan always said he
wanted to end federal payments
to Amtrak, yet Amtrak fared bet-
ter under President Reagan than
it did under President Carter and
perhaps even under President
Clinton.
President Bush has appeared to
be anti-Amtrak for his entire time
in office. His budgets were always
designed to kill the national
system. Now he ends up signing
the first authorization bill that
could give Amtrak more than just
enough money merely to survive.


Of course, this is only an authori-
zation bill. What Amtrak actually
receives will depend upon how
many dollars the appropriators
are willing to cough up. It also
will depend upon who is presi-
dent.
As of this writing, the presi-
dential contest is Sen. Barack
Obama's to lose. Should his oppo-
nent, Sen. John McCain, score
a come-from-behind victory,
Amtrak would be in real trouble.
He has made it clear that he wants
to abolish the system as we know
it. He would not merely pay lip
service to abolishing the national
system, he would fight. This is a
senator who opposed the Phoenix
light-rail system in his own back- -
yard. The voters approved of
light rail by a two-thirds vote.
He called the light-rail system in
Minneapolis a boondoggle and a
waste of taxpayers' money when
virtually all other observers, both
local and national, have pro-
nounced the Hiawatha Light Rail
a rip-roaring success.
On the other hand, if
Democrats pick up as many seats
in Congress as they project they
will, a President McCain may
find himself with a Congress that
would overwhelmingly override
his vetoes.
The truth is we really won't
know how either new president
would treat Amtrak and urban rail
systems untilwe see their actions
in office. Today's promises mean
little when the new president
has to confront the country's fis-
cal realities in the future. And we
won't know when we first see
their initial budgets. It may well
be that we have to wait until the
end of fiscal year 2009 (Sept. 30,
2009) until we have a solid idea as
to whether America will be back
on track, so to speak.
PaulM. Weyrich
Chairman of the Free Congress Foundation

Teens say street racing
poses significant risk
Amid rising concerns about dan-
gerous teen driving behaviors sits
a common threat rarely consid-
ered outside of popular depic-
tions in such movies as "Rebel


Without a Cause," "Grease," and
"The Fast and the Furious": street
racing.
Perhaps surprisingly, teens
themselves rank street racing as
one of the most risky in a slate
of driving practices that lead to
crashes, injuries, and, too often,
deaths (between 2001 and 2006,
804 fatalities have been attributed
to street racing, according to the
National Highway Traffic Safety
Administration).
Indeed, a new study from
Liberty Mutual Insurance
and SADD (Students Against
Destructive Decisions) reveals
that a vast majority of teens (97
percent) feel that street racing
is dangerous, listing it above cell
phone use, speeding, having more
than three passengers in the car,
being upset, using a GPS system,
and changing clothes while driv-
ing.
Nevertheless, the research
points out that more than one
third of teen drivers (38 percent)
say they have engaged in street
racing.
That's bad news.
So, too, are media accounts of
the consequences.
In Eagle Rock, Calif., four teens
were killed (including three from
one family) and another was
critically injured in what an LAPD
lieutenant called "a high-speed
drag race," according to egpnews.
In Eugene, Ore., a college foot-
ball player required 75 stitches
to close a gash in his head, the
result of street racing, said the
Associated Press.
In Mountainside, NJ., an
18-year-old and a 20-year-old
were killed after their Chevy
Corvette crashed in a street race
against a Chevy Camaro, reported
My Central Jersey.
And on Staten Island in New
York, seven teens were trans-
ported to the hospital after a
street racing crash that ultimately
claimed the life of a 17-year-old
who succumbed to what WNBC4
referred to as severe head and
internal injuries.
Fortunately, good news can
be found in the fact that some
states, including California,
Massachusetts and Illinois, are


revisiting or introducing laws to
better protect teen drivers and, by
extension, other motorists on our
roads and highways. That includes
stiffer fines and longer jail sen-
tences.
Research shows that young
drivers may be more likely to lis-
ten to their friends than to adults
- so teen passengers need to be
empowered to speak up when
drivers are placing them, and oth-
ers, at risk.
Speaking up about slowing
down will fuel peer-led persua-
sion to stop teens from chasing
cars.
Stephen Wallace
National chairman of SADD

Help taxpayers, charities and auto
dealers by passing bill HR 6727
The current economic crisis has
hit everyone hard. With most
Americans cutting back on spend-
ing, car sales and donations to
charities have plummeted. At the
same time, the demand for help
from charities that assist low-
income and homeless citizens has
increased sharply.
The passage of bill HR 6727
will help alleviate some of this
strain by repealing the limita-
tion to vehicle donations enacted
by Congress in 2004. Under this
bill, taxpayers would be allowed
to deduct the Fair Market Value
up to $2,500 for their car dona-
tion, and the appraised value over
$2,500.
Passing this bill will be the
equivalent of an economic stimu-
lus package. It will provide a
miuch-needed incentive for tax-
payers to donate their old car and
purchase a newer one. The result
will be a valuable tax deduction
for taxpayers, increased car sales
and more money to charities. It
will be a win-win-win situation.
I am asking everyone: taxpay-
ers, auto dealers, auto workers,
charities, etc. to write, call, e-mail
or fax their Congressional mem-
bers and senators and urge them
to pass bill HR 6727 immediately!
A sample letter can be found at
Cars4Charities.org/press.php
Karen Campese
President/CEO
Cars4Charities Car Donation Center


Don't slack at your job while searching for another


EMPLOYMENT

Ask

Sandi_

Dear Sandi,
I am really bored with my job
and I would like to find a new one.
The problem is that my boss is very
well-connected and I am afraid he
will hear that I am looking and I will
be fired. I cannot afford to lose my
job, but I find myself trying to "look


busy" all the time. I can do the rest
with my eyes closed.
Bored and Looking

Dear Bored,
First things first: If you need the
job, you need to make sure you are
at maximum performance while you
are there. Have you thought about
.asking for other tasks and learning
new areas? Show your boss that you
are able to handle more responsibil-
ity.
As far as looking, you may want
to apply to places your boss has no
connection to, or state in your cover


letter that it is important the resume
be kept confidential. While recruit-
ers do talk to each other, they should
not be "ratting you out" on your job
search.
Be careful when attending job
fairs or other public recruiting
events. This may give your boss
the hint that you are looking. The
important thing is to retain the job
you have until you find another one.
Do your best daily!
Best wishes.
-Sandi Vidal,
executive director, Christian
HELP/CFECN


TALK n
TO SANDI

Sandi Vidal is the executive director for
Christian HELP and the Central Florida
Employment Council, with more than 10
years of recruiting and human resources
experience. Please send questions about
employment by fax 407-260-2949,
sandi@christianhelp.org, or mail Ask
Sandi C/O Christian HELP, 450 Seminola
Blvd., Casselberry, FL 32707.
Subjects may include employment
search, resumes, networking and promo-
tion opportunities.
Employers: E-mail your job leads to cfec@
cfec.org and we will share them with
Christian HELP clients.


- I II I -I I I I I I L


The Voice


Page Al 4 October 24 October 30, 2008


Air Force igt. Leonara Matovicn, a decorated veteran or 1eW
Vietnam War, is given a "general" discharge by the Air Force after
publicly declaring his homosexuality. In 1979, after winning a
much-publicized case against the Air Force, his discharge was
upgraded to "honorable."







The Voice October 24 October.30..2008- .mAl


Marketplace


REALTORS:
Licensed Real Estate Professionals needing
to earn additional income. Become a
part time or full time loan officer. Control
your own closings. Gain access to
hundreds of mortgage programs. Save
your clients thousands of dollars. Call
Maitland Mortgage Lending Company
(407)629-5626

0/0'S NEEDED! HOME WEEKENDS!
1-95 Roundtrips Miami to S. PA. Fruit/foliage
up. Refer. back. CDL-A req. MCT 877-564-
6628






SENIOR APARTMENTS
Winter Park The Plymouth Apartments:
Studio/1BR Senior Apts, All Utilities Incl.,
Newly Renovated. Rents start at $591. Call
407-644-4551

TOWN HOUSE
Winter Park excellent location, 2b/2b
upstairs, Living/Dining area downstairs, eat-
in kitchen, powder room, washer & dryer.
$900/mo. Call 407-645-2642.

WATERBRIDGE TOWNHOUSE 32789
On cul-de-sac near Tennis Courts. Walk to
middle and high school, bus, W.P. hospital,
dog park. $299,900 (was $340,000). Winter
Park Land Co. Realty 407-644-2900



FOR RENT
Oviedo Office Space, great frontage. 750
to 1,050 sf available. $1,070 to $1,350 per
month. 1401 Broadway St. Contact Megan
at (407) 687-3524. -

PARK AVE OFFICE SPACE
Park Ave Office Space avail to Real Estate
Broker. All office equipment included. Call
407/741-8541.




FREE 2 YORKIE TERRIERS
Free 2 Yorkie Terriers pet adoption to good
home. Contact me for more information @
randabright@yahoo.com

BEDS AND FURNITURE
We Sell New Mattresses! Pillow-Top Sets
start at $275.00. All sizes. Brand New!
We Have Bed Frames and New Futons! A
Furniture Menagerie. 407-366-0002.

HUGE FURNITURE SALE
Huge Sale- Quality Consignment Like New
Black Leather Sofa, $799.00 and Matching
Chair $499.00. Sectionals only $595.00.
Counter Height Table Sets, only $299.00.
New And Used Furniture. A Furniture
Menagerie. (407) 366-0002.

SHEDS 8X12 AND 10X12
Florida certified, lifetime warranty, will
accept payment. Call Mario at 407-658-
6400.




HOW TO DETOX FOR
OVERNIGHT RELIEF
Natural herbal patches, overnight
detoxification, pain relief: knees, back, foot,
gout, sciatic, lumbago, carpal tunnel, cancer
treatment. Attach to foot great night's
sleep. http://www.ebook-detox-patches.org
(407) 970-1483

WANTED: MATURE MODELS
Wanted: mature models to complete
discounted Healthy Detox Program for
promotional testimonies. Lose Inches, Burn
Calories, Feel Great Look Good. 407-455-
3964. www.detoxants.net








Find out what your
home is worth on-line.
OrlandoHomeHunting.com
Free Recorded Message
1-877-895-1807 l.D.6041

BakFoecosre


HANDYMAN/CARPENTRY
Let me take care of the chores you don't
have time to do yard work, carpentry,
painting, (whole house or interior rooms),
driveways, repairs, pressure washing, and
more. No job too small. Local. Prompt.
Affordable. Call Scott at 321-460-3905.

KITCHEN/BATHROOM SURFACES
Repair and resurface bathtubs, ceramic
tile, vanities, kitchen countertops, cabinets,
appliances and much more. No dust and
dirt and very little down time. Have a new
factory-like finish and save up to four times
the replacement cost. Licensed/insured/
member BBB. All Surface Technology, 407-
691-0062

CARPENTER
Robert A. Paige. Specializing in finished
carpentry to termite and wood-rot damage.
Interior and exterior. Call me and ask if I can
do your job. 352-552-6157


Oviedo High School
Reunion 30 Yrs !!!
Classes 1977 -1978 -1979
November 14th and 15th
Homecoming Game/Bonfire
Dinner/Dance
Register @
www.oviedohighreunion.com
Don Jacobs # 321-228-4040




Reading volunteers NEEDED -. Jackson
Heights Middle School in Oviedo is looking
for adults who are interested in serving as a
Reading Mentor to assist students who are
reading below grade level. Volunteers work
one-on-one with an assigned student before
school for 30 minutes, one or more times
a week through the end of the school year
to build fluency and comprehension skills.
Sessions are from 8:30-9:00 a.m., M-F.
Please contact Connie O'Hanlon for more
information, 407-365-7585.



WE BUY

HOUSES!
Sell Your Home
for CASH
On the Day of Your Choice
"As-ls" with NO Repairs!

Call Now:

407-297-8749






Home Care Services
start at $11/hr.
Review website at:
www.LeanOnMeHCS.com
.or call 407-401-8308
for more info.





IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 18TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.: 08-DR-866-02-DL
JUDI S. KING, Petitioner
and
PAUL T. KING, Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF
MARRIAGE
TO: (name of Respondent) FAULT. KING
(Respondent's last known address) ADDRESS
UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been filed
against you and that you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on (name
of Petitioner) JUDI S. KING, whose address is 105
LARKWOOD DRIVE, SANFORD, FLORIDA 32771 on
or before November 6, 2008, and file the original
with the clerk of this Court at (clerk's address) 301
NORTH PARK AVENUE, SANFORD, FLORIDA 32271
before service on Petitioner or immediately there-
after. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered
against you for the relief demanded in the petition.
Copies of all court documents in this case,
including orders, are available at the Clerk of the
Circuit Court's office. You may review these docu-
ments upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Court's
office notified of your current address. (You may
file Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme
Court Approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future
papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address
on record at the clerk's office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law
Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic
disclosure of documents and information. Failure to
comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal
or striking of pleadings.
Dated October 2, 2008.
Maryanne Morse,
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Nancy R. Winter
Deputy Clerk
10/10, 10/17, 10/24, 10/31


Sh ou ld it (klas'e fd' ad'ver tiz'ing) Noun. Advertising
Should it Ce compactly arranged, as in newspaper
,- t' .- 'r-' --i- i columns, according to subject, under such
L Ii, j LL ':" listings as help wanted and for sale


How


W.i up i, 22 weids ir ,lJ BOXING GLOVES If you're selling it
wrml ,,u ire i.ll.. B.,. 1 ,1; .r--, e nbkne f y re s t.
i.ri. -j ,, title Pa ."' t for less than $500,
,Io' tree ao'
Include a contact l ,,
pF.,-., ,uT|L~.I I l,:,lrUii: A :il II.. I ,r..,,, price. No business ads. It will
e-mail (3 words) or Web site (2 words). (,...r.. ... ......


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October 24 october 30,2008 Page Al


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SOUTH SEMINOLE HOSPITAL
Sr.,


ORLANDO HEALTH


407.767.1200 I southseminolehospital.com
555 W. State Road 434, Longwood, FL 32750 1 South Seminole Hospital is part of the Orlando Health family of hospitals


The Voice


Paoe Al 6 October 24 October 30. 2008


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