Title: Seminole voice
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091445/00016
 Material Information
Title: Seminole voice
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Community Media Holdings, LLC
Place of Publication: Oviedo, Fla.
Publication Date: October 10, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00091445
Volume ID: VID00016
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Serving Greater Oviedo and Winter Springs for more than 17 years!


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I October 10 October 16, 2008 I


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Standoff at The Highlands


PHOTO BY JENNY ANDREASSON THE VOIC
City Commissioner Don Gilmore, right, addresses an audience question Tuesday at a candidate forum in The Highlands; to his right is his opponent, Gary Bonner. Bill Poe an
Jean Hovey, also pictured, are running against each other for the Commission seat being vacated by Robert Miller, who is leaving due to term limits. Election Day is Nov. 4.


JENNY ANDREASSON
THE VOICE
About 100 residents packed into
The Highlands Clubhouse on
Tuesday night, Oct. 7, for the
first of two forums starring the Winter
Springs Commission candidates.
Citizens submitted questions about


growth, land use and taxes at the'
event, moderated by the Seminole
County League of Women's Voters
and sponsored by the neighborhood's
homeowners association.
The first issue- addressed, likely
nearest and dearest to the audience,
was the future of the closed Winter
Springs Golf Club, which was snapped


up by an investor in 2006. Som
thought Arman Rahbarian's inten
was to develop the land, but a con
servation easement owned by the
city currently prohibits that.
Candidate Gary Bonner, who i
challenging incumbent Don Gilmor

> turn to CANDIDATES on page A


New downtown has a chance

JENNY ANDREASSON
THE VOICE


Broad Street Partners will
not raise Oviedo's new
downtown, at least not by
itself, a company spokes-
man said Wednesday.
The Oviedo on the Park
developer is "diligently"
seeking a buyer or a joint-
venture partner for the
project, said Gene Godbold,
representing the estate of
Broad Street's Steve Walsh,
who died in June.
"We definitely, together
with the city, think it's a
very worthwhile and good


project," Godbold said, "but
with Steve Walsh's death, we
need to rethink it."
A few interested develop-
ers have already met with
Broad Street and the city
to review the project plans,
although Godbold declined
to name them.
City officials are optimis-
tic.
"This project is low-hang-
ing fruit for the right devel-
oper," City Councilman

> turn to DEVELOPMENT on A4


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE VOICE ARCHI\
Despite an economic downturn and the sudden death of a key player in the deve
opment of Oviedo's new downtown, the project is still being pushed forward.


Toxic loan

fallout

Sskips local

banks


JENNY ANDREASSON
THE VOICE

While many national banks
are sliding and asking for
help, Central Florida's com-
munity banks seem to have
a firm grip on the local mar-
ket.
The $700 billion bailout
bill passed by Congress last
week will benefit, for the
most part, larger banks. The
rescue allows the govern-
ment to buy bad mortgage-
related securities and other
assets from troubled finan-
cial institutions in the hopes
d of freeing up the clogged
credit market.
Three of Central Florida's
e community banks say they
t don't need help because
they didn't get involved
e with high-risk loans in the
S first place.
S "Community banks,
e including Citizens Bank of
Florida, [do not] engage in
2 that type of lending prac-
tice. As a result, we're fis-
cally sound and stable," said
Don Drummer, chief finan-
cial officer of Oviedo-based
Citizens Bank of Florida, in
a prepared statement.
Winter Park-based
Commerce National Bank
has also eluded the crisis by
sticking to the basics and
focusing on lending in the
community, President Ray
Colado said. "We're not
involved in the type of lend-
ing that gave you higher
yields or more risk," such as
sub-prime mortgages.
Even though local banks
aren't embroiled in the
credit crunch, they stand to
gain assets if the economy
E improves as a result of the
> turn to BAILOUT on page A3
> turn to BAILOUT on page A3


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INDEX
Stetson's Corner.......:............................A4
Old Road..............................................:A
Cinema............................... A 1
Athletics........................... .A 2
Weather................................... .... A13
Voices..................................... ... A14
Classifieds and Games ....................... A15


_________11_11__________1_1~1~~


-I-







Page A2 October 10 October 16, 2008 The Voice




QUOTEABLE,
S1, however, place economy among the first and most important
republican virtues, and public debt as the greatest of the dangers
)W EK | to be feared."
S-- Thomas Jefferson (1762-1826), American president



Party and put food on someone's table


JENNY ANDREASSON
THE VOICE

Oviedo city officials, businesses,
churches and citizens will all
come together Saturday, Oct.
18, to collect food for needy
Seminole County residents.
The annual event, It's a God
Thing, attracted more than
20,000 pounds of food last
year, said Cindy Rosarius, who
founded the event with hus-
band Paul Rosarius, founder and
CEO of Oviedo-based Palm Tree
Computer Systems.
In these hard economic times,
more people need help than ever
before.
"I'm hoping people don't have


that mindset of 'Wow things are
tight; we can't give,"' Cindy said.
The event is not just a food
drive, she said; it's an all-out
block party with live music, ven-
dors, prizes and free activities,
such as bounce houses and face
painting.
Non-perishable food items
such as cereals, soup, pasta, and
canned vegetables and meats
will be donated to the Sonshine
Community Thrift Store and
Food Pantry.
"If we can help them to get
some food on the table to feed
their families, it makes it eas-
ier for them to pay rent," said
Sonshine food drive coordina-
tor Tanya Tolan. "It keeps people


in their homes and their apart-
ments so they don't become
homeless."
When Sonshine opened two
years ago, it was only feeding
75 Seminole County families
a month, she said. Now each
month it serves at least 700.
It's a God Thing'seeks to fill
up Sonshine's pantry shelves.
People who give food items will
be entered into a drawing -
based on their donation for a
free desktop computer valued at
about $600. If a person donates
10 items, they will get 10 entries
in the drawing.
"Food drives like this are so
much needed," Tolan said.


"It's a God Thing," an annual food drive and
block party, will be held from 11-a.m. to 4 p.m.
Saturday. Oct. 18, in downtown Oviedo, on the
corner of Broadway Street and Geneva Drive.
Proceeds will benefit Sonshine Community Thrift
Store and Food Pantry. Visit ItsaGodThing.info and
HelpfortheHomeless.net for more information.


CANDIDATES I Four candidates + two seats = a fight to the finish


< continued from the front page

for his seat, said he supports
the easement but he thinks
"fresh ideas" are needed.
Gilmore said he supports a
second party, such as the
Audubon Society, joining in
on the easement to make
it stronger, calling develop-
ment the "worst thing" for
the land.
Candidate Bill Poe, who
is vying for term-limit-
ed Commissioner Robert


Miller's seat, also advocated
reinforcing the easement
but with more than two
parties. His opponent, Jean
Hovey, supported the ease-
ment and future existence
of the golf course.
On the future of the
Town Center, Bonner said
daytime customers are the
"missing link" and that they
will come with commer-
cial growth. Gilmore said
he understands frustration
over the stalled comple-


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tion of the Town Center,
but patience is needed. "We
must stay the course," he
said.
Hovey called the Town
Center a "great avenue" for
residents to enjoy events.
Poe said the city must pay
attention to the econo-
my when planning future'
development there, citing
the current impracticality
of condominiums.
Then the discussion
shifted to fire service and


whether the city made the
right call in giving its fire
department to Seminole
County.
Hovey called consolida-
tion an "easy fix."
Bonner said, "It's a loss
of a part of our communi-
ty we will never recover ...
my view is it was not neces-
sary."
Gilmore said it wasn't
a loss because the county
and city department were
already "so integrated."


/


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IK
Your second chance to see the
Winter Springs City Commission
candidates address citizens'
questions is 7 p.m. Tuesday,
Oct. 14, at the Hacienda Village
clubhouse at 280 La Vista Drive.

Poe said, "Did I want
to see the fire department
go? No, but it was the only
way."
While all candidates
advocated the usage of red-
light cameras to increase
safety, all but Gilmore
praised the revenue stream
- about $300,000 this year
- that the cameras would
capture. "We need revenue,
that's a good thing," Bonner
said.
But Gilmore didn't like
the idea of looking at it as a
"financial resource."


Volume 18
Issue No. 41


Phone 407-628-8500 SeminoleVoice.com Fax 407-628-4053
PUBLISHER REPORTERS
Kyle Taylor, extension 302 Jenny Andreasson of Oviedo jennya@observernewspapers.com
kyle@observernewspapers.com Karen Phillips of Geneva karenp@theoviedovoice.com
EDITOR Amy K.D. Tobik of Winter Springs- amyt@theoviedovoice.com
Alex Babcock, extension 304 COLUMNISTS
alexb@theoviedovoice.com Janet Foley of Oviedo janetf@theoviedovoice.com
DESIGNER Jay Getty of Oviedo jayg@theoviedovoice.com
Lacy Rushin, extension 306 Sandi Vidal of Casselberry sandi@chrislianhelp.org
lacyr@observernewspapers.com Ben Wheeler of Chuluota benw@theoviedovoice.com
CHIEF REPORTER COPY EDITOR
Isaac Babcock of Winter Springs Jonathan Gallagher Extension 309
isaacb@theoviedovoice.com jgallagher@observernewspapers.com
ADVERTISING SALES INTERN
Pat Lovaglio, extension 305 Mary Elizabeth Schurrer
advertising@theoviedovoice.com

The Oviedo-Winter Springs Voice is published on Fridays POSTMASTER: Send address
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Periodicals postage is paid at Oviedo. Florida. P.O. Box 2426, Winter Park, FL 32790


The Oviedo-Winter Springs Voice publishes on Fridays for readers in Oviedo,
Winter Springs, Geneva. Chuluota and their neighbors.
The Voice began publishing in 1991.
Its current owner is Observer Newspapers,
which also publishes the Winter Park-Maitland Observer newspaper.


Talk with us about news stories at
407-628-8500. Ask for Alex Babcock.

Write to us about your opinions at:
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P.O. Box 2426, Winter Park, FL 32790

Help us correct mistakes by writing
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Renew your subscription or start a
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The Voice cares about environmen-
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comes from a mixture of recycled con-
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are archived or recycled. We also re-
cycle all in-office paper waste, bottles
and cans.

Stop by the office in Oviedo sometime.
We take walk-in guests each Thursday
- and also by appointment. We're at
1401 W. Broadway St.:
OVIEDO





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Published Friday,
October 10, 2008


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Tailored to fit wounded vets


AMY K.D. TOBIK
THE VOICE

As American soldiers battle for
freedom overseas, a group of seam-
stresses based out of the First United
Methodist Church here in Oviedo
fight for a related cause to return
a little dignity to the wounded.
Together the women have discov-
ered the magical threads that bind
Americans on the home front.
Every Monday, dedicated mem-
bers of the sewing group arrive at
Fellowship Hall, sewing machines
in hand, ready to make a difference
in the lives of soldiers through the
Sew Much Comfort program.
Military men and women may
be relegated to wearing a hospi-
tal gown full-time after having suf-
fered a serious injury. While the
gown easily accommodates medi-
cal devices and offers convenience
while changing the dressings on
wounds, the clothing provides little
privacy or dignity.
The local group constructs
clothing or replaces the seams of
purchased shirts, pants and under-
garments with Velcro to make get-
ting dressed and getting treatment
a little easier. Adaptive swimwear is
also made to facilitate water-based
physical therapy. This specially
made clothing accommodates
prosthetics and casts, encourages
personal independence and mini-
mizes the visual impact of a medi-
cal condition.
"The goal is to provide each sol-
dier with an individually designed
and tailored wardrobe of adaptive
clothing, in order to provide them
comfort and maintain their dig-
nity, thereby facilitating the healing
process," said Pat White, the retired
Army nurse who initiated the proj-
ect locally a couple of years ago.
Anne Dunson, who has taught
sewing for more than 30 years at
local adult education outreach
programs and community centers,
worked with White to encourage
local volunteers to take on the
Sew Much Comfort project. Since
they began, the patriotic group has
donated more than 900 pieces of
sewn clothing to be distributed to
soldiers.
"We all felt that we wanted to
support and provide dignity to
our wounded military by adapting
clothing regardless of our feelings
about the validity of the war," White


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK -- THE VOICE
Michele Cuppy, center, traveled from Minnesota just to meet the women behind "Sew Much Comfort," a charity that sews clothing for wounded soldiers.


said.
Sew Much Comfort, a nation-
al nonprofit charity founded by
Ginger Dosedel and Michele Cuppy
four years ago, provides members
of the military and National Guard
with adaptive clothing at no charge.
Today, more than 1,200 seamstress-
es across the country, in Canada,
Germany, Puerto Rico and Korea,
volunteer their time and energy to
the construction of clothing. The
clothes are sent to distribution
centers at Veterans Affairs hospi-
tals throughout the United States,
Landstuhl Regional Medical Center
in Germany, as well as combat sur-
gical hospitals in Iraq, Afghanistan
and Kuwait.
Cuppy, who attended the Sept. 15
meeting as a special guest, said she
traveled from Minnesota especially
to meet the women who work so
industriously behind the scenes in
Oviedo.
The process requires support at
so many levels, she explained, from
the people who make monetary
donations to supply the sewers with
materials, to the ambassadors who
work with the hospitals to help ful-
fill their needs, to the distribution
facility in Ohio that receives the
donated products and sends them
out where they are most needed.


"It's so wonderful all these
women work so hard," she said as
she looked around the room at the
women diligently arranging fab-
ric and sewing. "Every time they
sew something they are giving the
wounded a hug."
Another guest at the meeting,
Joy Campbell, Sew Much Comfort
Coordinator for Florida, shared the
story of the man who had injuries to
his bowels and had to wear diapers.
After he received the specially made
clothing, he immediately contacted
the group. "He got on the phone, he
cried, his wife cried, because it was
the first time in years he could wear
clothes," Campbell said.
"I think it is a real warm fuzzy for
them to see something handmade
that really addresses their needs,"
Dunson said. "We try to make things
that look like 'regular clothes.' I
think they appreciate that we are
trying to make them look tailored."
Volunteer seamstress Ann Selby,
whose husband and son are both
retired military, and whose two
grandsons are currently serving in
the military, sews the special Sew
Much Comfort labels onto the
clothing. Selby said she is glad so
many people are still eager to help
the cause, especially with the cur-
rent economy, because the soldiers


are so appreciative. "We receive let-
ters from grateful famif's that real-
ly grab you," she said.
Volunteer Shirleen Harms also
has close ties to the military with a
great-nephew who has served in a
couple of tours in Iraq. "For them
to know there are people out there
who care and are really devoted
to them for what they have done I
think is a tremendous thing," Harms
said. "To do something like this and
use my talent and know that I am
personally affecting another young
person is a thrill to me and I am
glad I have the opportunity to do
that," she said.
"As I do this," Harms added wist-
fully as she ran the material through
the sewing machine, "I pray for each
one of them."




The Monday sewing class is open to
people of all sewing levels and participants
are welcome to participate in the
Sew Much Comfort Iroject.
Non-sewers may help with monetary con-
tributions to offset the cost of supplies.
Call the First United Methodist Church
of Oviedo at 407-365-3255 or visit
SewMuchComfort.org for more information.


BAILOUT I Economy fix could help local banks


< continued from the front page

bailout, said Sean Snaith,
director of the Institute for
Economic Competitiveness
at the University of Central
Florida.
Included in the bailout
measure is a temporary
increase in the amount of
money the FDIC insures,
from $100,000 to $250,000,
regardless of the size of the
bank.
"That's something that
was probably overdue,"
Snaith said. "It's been quite
a few years since that hun-
dred thousand was estab-
lished."
The insurance cap
increase, set to expire in
December 2009, is geared
more toward small banks


that fear their customers -
individuals or small busi-
nesses will abandon them
for bigger banks, which are
considered less likely to col-
lapse.
"It may help to ease some
depositors' fears," Snaith
said.
There may be intangible
benefits felt by community
banks as well.
Maitland-based First
Colony Bank President
Bruce May said people are
likely to change the way
they bank just as they are
likely to think differently
about investing in the real
estate market.
"As some of the ills come
out about the problems
with larger banks, people
will be more careful, period,


on where they bank and do
a little more homework,"
he said, thus highlighting
the viability of commu-
nity banks. "We will be a
very appealing alternative
for someone to do business
with."


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October 10 October 16, 2008 Page A3


Th Vonicer







I r Uateri irecedes, but leaves reminder


Water recedes, but leaves reminders


By Karen McEnany-Phillips




By Karen McEnany-Phillips ^


Throughout the last six
weeks, many of us have
been blessed to watch
the floodwaters gradually
retreat.
During the peak of
flooding, it's an odd feel-
ing when you look across
your property and all you
see is water. And equally
strange is after the water
has gone down and you can
hardly believe the water
was ever there except for
the telltale watermarks on
the cypress, oak, and palm
trees.
Floridians often say they
miss the change of seasons,
especially the wonderful
fall season. As our land
emerges from under the
water, we see an array of
neutral colors, so different
from the vibrant greens
and colorful florals we are


used to. Who knew there
were so many variations of
gray, beige and brown?
Even a little bit of green
ranges from the faded
greenish-gray of the strug-
gling Italian cypress, and
brave patches of bright
bahia grass insist on thriv-
ing as if never underwater.
Strange items appear
from the muck surrounded
by thousands of buzzing
gnats and flies pieces
of craggy oak branches,
an empty.flower pot, even
bright green hyacinths
-punctuate the landscape in
unusual places such as our
driveway and side lawns.
Buzzards fight over the
larger dead fish while water
birds pick at the thousands
of minnows trapped in
bowl-shaped lower land.
Thick river grass, once a


lovely green, has faded to
shades of brown and lays
about like piles of hair
swept up on a beauty salon
floor.
The gray of the cypress
trees dominate the vista
of tree lines, quite faded
except for the dark water-
marks. Their necklaces of
green foliage fade as well,
and the forested areas are
reminiscent of the neutral
beiges and grays of north-
ern forests.
And so the clean up
begins; little by little,
human, water bird and
buzzard clean up what the
water has left behind.
Speaking of fall, Geneva
welcomes the pump-
kins and gourds to the
Methodist Church around
the middle of the month,
tentatively Wednesday, Oct.
15. Also the church will
be hosting the Fall Bazaar
on Oct. 25, featuring food,
pumpkins and crafts. You
can rent space for $10 and
sell crafts too.
Something we are
all thankful for is the
upcoming Relay for Life
of Geneva/Chuluota.


Everyone who is inter-
ested in participating
in the 2008/2009 event
is welcome to attend a
"kick-off cookout" at the
Yarborough Ranch at 6
p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 22.
Participants will start sign-
ing up teams and distribut-
ing team packets so you are
welcome to bring family,
friends and co-workers.
During these tough
economic times, if you or
someone you know is in
need of food, the Geneva
Methodist Church has
restarted the Community
Dinners program on
Wednesday evenings from
5 p.m. to 6 p.m. All din-
ners are $5 per person and
include main entree, salad,
drink and dessert. You can
also do carryout for your
family.
This is open to everyone
in the community, and you
can meet your neighbors. It
usually suspends over the
summer, so come on over
and have a delicious meal
for cheap.
Finally a reminder to
everyone about the Angel
Food Ministries and new


Senior Box: You can order
a box of food valued
$80-$100 for $30, which
includes meats, dry goods
and frozen vegetables. The
new Senior Box is $28 and
has a little less food, with
10 prepared dinners.
Place your order for
yourself or someone you .
care about with Pastor
Jeanine or Miss Rose at
407-349-9596 or e-mail at
genevafumc@aol.com This
month Friday Oct. 10 is
the deadline, and the food
can be picked up at 9 a.m.
Saturday, Oct. 25. Mark
your calendar for next
month as well.



> TKAREN
Please share your thoughts about
Geneva at 407-221-7002,
karenp@theoviedovoice.com
with "Stetson's Corner" in the sub-
ject line, or fax 407-349-2800.
Thanks!
This column is dedicated to
Deputy Sheriff Gene "Stetson"
Gregory, killed in the line of duty
on July 8, 1998. Geneva will never
be the same because of Deputy
Gregory it will be better.


- S S S


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DEVELOPMENT I Options are few


< continued from front page

Dominic Persampiere said,
citing the appeal of having
an approved site plan and
existing infrastructure.
But there aren't many
firms capable of build-
ing this "mixed-use
urban village," said city
Development Services
Director Bryan Cobb. The
project, upon completion,
couldhave asmanyas 1,200
residential units likely a
mix of town houses, con-
dos and apartments and


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close to 200,000 square feet
of office and retail space,
including an amphitheater.
"Broad Street is being
very careful to make sure
people who do come to see
them can actually handle
it," Cobb said.
Broad Street has been
regrouping since its manag-
ing partner's death. A series
of lawsuits accusing Walsh
of stealing millions of dol-
lars from real-estate part-
ners has stalled many of its
projects.
Broad Street's Oviedo
project is not entangled in
the lawsuits brought forth
by former investment part-
ner Schrimsher and Co.,
Godbold said.
Financing for the entire
Oviedo project is done
through a single creditor,
M&I Bank, which has also
assured its commitment to
the project, Persampiere
said.
If a new developer were
to buy the land from Broad


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* Real Estate Law
* Wills, Trusts, Estates
* Criminal Law
* Bankruptcy
* Personal Injury


for saviors

Street, that developer would
assume the development
agreement for the project.
Another Broad Street
project that has escaped liti-
gation grasps is in Maitland.
The Residences at Ravinia,
planned to be a mixture of
upscale condos, commercial
and retail space, has been
passed off to Miami-based
developer Bcom, which
was previously involved as
a fundraising arm, Maitland
CommunityRedevelopment
Agency Director Verl Emrick
said.
Bcom President Denny
St. Remain said Broad Street
is still involved as a limited
partner. "What we've done
is step into the role of the
developer and we are mov-
ing to push the project for-
ward," he said.
This isn't likely to happen
in Oviedo's case because the
financing is coming from a
bank, not a real-estate part-
ner, Cobb said.


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---~I- --~~--


The Voice


Psop A4 nrtnhrr 10 October 16. 2008


'LLERGY 6






1r ebotcO 0 October 1 6 2008 Page A5


Sne voice -.. -.......----.


Bill's Elbow will be missed by Oviedo


Isn't this weather ideal? I
just hope it stays that way.
I see more people out and
about doing things when
just a few weeks ago every-
body was hiding inside
their air-conditioned hous-
es. Fall is such a great time
of year, especially for those
up North that can enjoy
the changing of the leaves,
although we do have a few
trees that change color, but
it's too early. Maybe I am
just dreaming for a quick
scenery change.
I would like to share this
item of interest with you
from one of my readers -
Ingrid Bryant. "Dear Editor,
I would like to express my
thank you to our mayor,
City Council members
and the staff of the city of
Oviedo. I have lived here
for 49 years and have seen
many challenges that the
city has overcome. This one
item the budget cut is
worthy of all of our thanks.
When we see one of these
fine people, whether it is
by paying your water bill
at City Hall or one of the
staff or Council members
around town, including our


mayor and city manager,
be sure and thank them
personally for the budget
cuts without an employee
being laid off. These are
difficult times and to find
a way to help the situation
andltighten the budget is
commendable. God Bless
our city leaders for their
wisdom and God Bless the
city of Oviedo."
Attention all: The
Lawton House location of
the Oviedo-Winter Springs
Regional Chamber of
Commerce remains open
and is designated as a
Welcome and Information
Center for the Chamber
here in town. Nita Rawlson,
executive assistant to
the Chamber staff, will
continue to work at the
Lawton House from 8:30
a.m. to 2 p.m., Monday
through Thursday. The
office is closed Friday. If you
need information about
the Chamber, the city, or
want printed materials,
please give Nita a call; if she
doesn't know the answer to
your question, she will be
glad to find someone who
does. The new phone num-


ber at the Lawton House is
407-365-6538. You can also
stop in and visit, and Nita
will answer your need-to-
know questions.
Coming up soon is the
Oviedo-Winter Springs
Regional Chamber of
Commerce Annual Golf
Tournament on Oct. 27
at the Tuscawilla Country
Club. Helicopter Drop
tickets are $10 each and
can be purchased at the
Lawton House. Five hun-
dred numbered golf balls
are dropped from the heli-
copter with prizes for the
four balls nearest the hole.
One does not have to be
present to win. First prize:
$1,000. Second prize: $600.
Third prize: $300. Fourth
prize: $100.'All entry forms
for the golf tournament
are available at the Lawton
House, 200 W. Broadway
St., Oviedo.
You are invited to the
next general meeting of the
Oviedo Historical Society
at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 14,
at the Oviedo Memorial
Building, 30 S. Central Ave.
(next to the fire station).
The society is proud to
present the guest speaker,
Randy Noles, who used
to be on the staff of the
Outlook, the Oviedo news-
paper. Noles will blend
music with history when
he talks about his book
"Fiddler's Curse: The Untold
Story of Ervin T. Rouse,
Chubby Wise, Johnny Cash


and the Orange Blossom
Special." This meeting is
open to the public. Bring
a friend and enjoy the
light refreshments that are
served after the meeting. If
you are interested in join-
ing, please contact Janet at
407-365-6859.
Don't forget this
Saturday, Oct. 11, when
the Orlando Philharmonic
Orchestra will play
"Schubertiade," conducted
by Christopher Wilkins.
This concert is part of the
St. Luke's Concert Series
and is offered free for the
entire community. You may
call 407-365-3408 or check
their Web site at StLukes-
Oviedo.org.
Fall Fling: 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. Saturday, Oct. 25, at
Boston Hill Park, 777 S.
Central Ave., Oviedo. The
MOMS Club event will
include a bounce house,
inflatable twister, a disc
jockey, Halloween parade
and pumpkin-carving con-
test. Admission is a canned
food item for Hope Food
Pantry. Need more infor-
mation, call 407-977-1559.
It's hard to say goodbye
to a favorite landmark -
Bill's Elbow South. Many
of us enjoyed lots of good
times at their old establish-
ment on S.R. 426. It was
a place for an after-hours
board meeting luncheon
for the Woman's Club, or a
dinner with friends meet-
ing place for all, and when.


Bill moved to the Oviedo
Marketplace mall, we all
followed. It was a meeting
place and an institution
of 16 years. Bill was very
charitable with all orga-
nizations: the Woman's
Club at Great Day, many
nonprofit organizations,
and even back when The
Voice was located on the
corner of S.R. 434 and
Artesia at Easter Time, The
Voice found Easter Bunny
footprints by the door with
a goody basket. Our owner
Randy Noles remarked,
"Easter Bunny Bill strikes
again." We know that the
mall location was not the
best for them and we hope
someday we will see a Bill's
Elbow located somewhere
in the city limits. We will be
there!
Skeeters getting to you
in your neighborhood? To
request a mosquito spray-
ing in your area or for more
information on Oviedo's.
mosquito control program,
please contact the Public
Workers Operations at 407-
971-5670.
A thought "We've put
more effort into helping
folks reach old age than
into helping them enjoy it."
-Frank A Clark

TK JANET

Send word to Janet Foley about
events and let her know what's
going on around town by e-mailing
janetf@theoviedovoice.com.


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Inaugural day for the arts in Winter Springs


PHOTOS BY LAURENCE SAMUELS THE VOICE
Winter Springs' first Festival of the Arts drew thousands to the Town Center on Saturday, Oct. 4, for a mixture of arts, crafts, music and food. The event was hosted by the Oviedo-Winter Springs Chamber of
Commerce, bringing the city its first arts festival, an effort to attract business to the downtown area while heightening the profile of the city.


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Hostage situation at Little Caesars?


BE ON THE LOOKOUT!
Crime, arrests and
public safety news from
the Oviedo Police Department

By Lt. George Ilemsky


Burglaries and thefts
Sometime between Sept. 29
and Sept. 30, a side window
of a business on Clark Street
was shattered and the busi-
ness entered. Some money
was taken.
On Oct. 4 an attempted
burglary was reported at
Oviedo Mower. It appeared
that the audible alarm
scared off the intruders
when they attempted to
make entry, and they were
unsuccessful in stealing any
property.
On Oct. 5 a person enter-
ing an open garage and


attempted to steal gas cans.
He was charged with bur-
glary; he also violated his
probation.
On Oct. 3 a female walked
into Little Caesars Pizza
and claimed she needed all
the money from the store
because her mother was sit-
ting in a van with a man who
requested it to be carried
out. The clerk said she did
not have access to the safe
and the female then asked
for the money from the reg-
ister, which was reported to
be less than $300. A witness
got the information on a
white van leaving the area


?IUI




R,


and the case is now under
investigation.
On Oct. 3 a case of Bud
Light beer was stolen from
the Mobil gas station on
West Broadway by two male
perpetrators. One person
held the door
open while the
other ran out with
the beer without
paying.
On Oct. 4 Oviedo
a juvenile was be loo
taken into custo- speeders
dy for theft from Sunday. C
a couple of retail Saturday,
establishments Mitchell
within Oviedo Road an
Marketplace. Both Roac
establishments Watch
wished prosecu- school z
tion in the matter bus stop
in order to protect is in s
their assets.

Acts of vandalism
On Sept. 30 a victim on
Strand Loop Court found
the screen to the second


v


er of alcohol.


story window of her home
had been pulled away from
the window and damaged.
On Oct. 4 vandalism was
reported at the Happy Bays
Car Wash. A hose sprayer
and coin slot were dam-
aged.
On Oct. 3 spray
paint was discov-
ered on the front
door of a residence
lice will and its garage
ng for door.
etweeen
1. 12 and Traffic stop; coke
ct. 18 on charge
immock On Oct. 1 a
County 53-year-old male
119 was stopped for
it near speeding. During
es ana the traffic stop,
s school drug parapherna-
3sion. lia was found that
tested positive for
cocaine. He was
arrested for possession of
cocaine and drug parapher-
nalia and issued a citation
for having an open contain-


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SEMNOLE COUNTY
fOi DAS '..i)-


The Voice


Page A6 October 10 October 16, 2008


Domestic battery charges
On Oct. 1 a female was
charged with domestic bat-
tery on the 1000 block of
New Castle Lane.
On Oct. 3 an argument
over financial difficulties
resulted in a female striking
her boyfriend in the face,
which subsequently led
to her being charged with
domestic battery.
These are two examples
that the law is not always
against the man when it
involves a physical alterca-
tion of the aggressive par-
ties.

Sit on your own porch
On Oct. 4 two people were
taken into custody for loi-
tering and prowling after
they failed to dispel the offi-
cers' curiosity about their
activities on someone else's
property. The officers were
not satisfied that the loiter-
ers were "resting" when it
was discovered they were
very near to their home.
SCop talk
Safety and vigilance is all
of our responsibility. Report
suspicious activity and be
on the lookout!
"All progress has result-
ed from people who took
unpopular positions."
Adlai Stevenson









THIS WEEK in human history

''The U.S. Naval Academy opens in Annapolis, Md., as the Naval
School. The school became the U.S. Naval Academy in 1850,
|I with the introduction of a new curriculum requiring midshipmen
to study at the academy for four years and train aboard ships
INTERES S each summer.




Thriving after breast cancer

JENNY ANDREASSON
THE VOICE .. .-' _.'


"4 really strong woman
accepts the war she went
through and is ennobled
by her scars."
Singer Carly Simon

at Fieler, wearing a T-shirt
S emblazoned in pink with "I
J ., fight like a girl: breast can-
cer survivor," clicked onJo Dee Mes-
sina's ballad "Bring on the rain" and
began to lead a group of breast can-
cer survivors in seated exercises.
Lyrics of "Tomorrow's another
day/ And I'm thirsty anyway/ So
bring on the rain" told the story of
a woman overcoming hard times,
leaving some in the intimate dance
studio emotional.
The women, all of them wearing
at least one article of bright-pink
clothing, gracefully moved to the
music, stretching areas of their bod-
ies that have endured surgery or
surgeries and are plagued with
scar tissue and nerve and muscle
damage.
Abbi Laney, donning a pink cap
over her bald head, grasped the back
of her chair and extended her right
leg. She has had three lymph nodes
removed from under her arm.
"My doctor asked me if I had
been stretching and I said no," she
said. "I had an almost-frozen shoul-


5'. -


Breast cancer recovery classes are held
4-5 p.m. Sunday at The Zebra Room, a
private studio in Orlando at 2609 Gowen
St. Classes are free but space is limited;
visit BreastCancerRecoveryClass.com for
more information.


rnulu aBY JnnY AnuIEIAOun- tH vuICL
Instructor Kat Fieler, in black, offers breast cancer survivors physical therapy classes to help them cope.with injury and physical stress after treatments.


der." Since beginning the weekly
class, she has regained some range
of motion.
SThe instructor, Fieler, a certified
fitness instructor and four-year
breast cancer survivor, also offers
relaxation techniques and support
during her free classes.
The 12 women signed up are
in different stages of their battle
with cancer. Some are just begin-
ning chemotherapy, some have had
surgeries, some are awaiting more
surgery, and others have been can-
cer-free for years. Each woman has
been assessed by Fieler and placed


in a corresponding level to make
sure they are not performing exer-
cises beyond what is beneficial.
Many doctors discourage breast
cancer patients from exercising,
Fieler said, because of the risks as-
sociated with it.
During chemo, a woman's im-
mune system is weakened and she
may lose her hair and gain weight,
making gym visits unhealthy and
often emotionally difficult. "A per-
sonal trainer is focused on body
sculpting, not on healing," Fieler
said.
Classmate Linda Schulte is a


four-year survivor and co-founder
of the Orlando group of the Young
Survival Coalition, made up of the
5 percent of women who are diag-
nosed with breast cancer before
their 40th birthday.
"I wish I had known more,"
Schulte said, referring to early-de-
tection education.
Fieler also seeks to educate other
women about breast cancer issues
and hopes her class will help wom-
en commit to a lifetime of exercise.
"Life is finite," she said. "I had
cancer and beat it, but that's not the
only thing that is threatening."


Located on a beautiful campus setting, our two Savannah Court
communities provide full assisted living services while Savannah
Cottage offers a secured residence For those with memory loss.
* Restaurant Style Dining E>pe ience
* Vibrant and Extensive Activities Program
* 24/7 Well Trained and Caring Associates
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* Scheduled Transportation and Fun Outings
* Individualized Services and Care
Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all
of the above! You are always welcome at Savannah Court and
Cottage of Oviedo.


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--- --sl-


October 10 October 16,. 2008 Page A


Thf Voice


o ~~w~. -1.I i"
P: ..


r
r


i"


i

-.


I


ASSSlTED LIVI1









A baptism becomes a laughing matter


In the summer of 1970,
our citrus packinghouse
stopped using 90-pound,
two-bushel field boxes
that had been standard
in the industry for 100
years. Labor was increas-
ingly hard to get, thus we
converted to new 10-box
equivalent pallets, which
could be handled with
forklifts. Extensive renova-
tions were required, includ-
ing a modern steel struc-
ture with concrete floors
at ground level, which
was added to the at-least
90-year-old original wood
frame building.
My father purchased two
rebuilt forklift machines
from a business associate


in Greenville, S.C. At the
tender age of 18, he com-
missioned me to take a
flatbed truck, pick up the
forklifts and bring them
home. Accompanying me
was my favorite compan-
ion and mentor, Joe Smith,
a contract hauler who had
taught me to drive the big
trucks used to haul fruit.
We left on a Friday
afternoon and drove into
South Georgia. We arrived
in Greenville around
noontime on Saturday.
The weather had already
turned cool north of the
Florida line low humid-
ity, a crisp breeze, golden
sunshine and not a cloud in
the sky. I savored the cool


TRAVEL ON

THE OLD ROAD
BY BEN WHEELER

TALES OF OLD TIMES 'N GOOD DAYS


1- ping in Dublin, Ga
second night. Next
Sing dawned bright
I UlE I I beautiful as before
1" I homestretch of ou
or ZA Working on Sunda
SAL I precedent-setting
at regular menu price & get the

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., for the
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y was a
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~iC;)i


fall air with the windows
full down, even though I
learned later that "Pop"
caught a cold as the result
of my exuberance.
With the forklifts loaded
and secured, we set about
locating Joe's brother "J.D."
who lived in Greenville and
ran a store and produce
market. As a young man,
J.D. made his living hauling
moonshine under truck-
loads of watermelons. As a
result, he had inadvertently
learned something about
the produce business.
He and his wife, Suzie,
ran a store in Greenville.
Not being disposed to hard
work, J.D. found that the
store served as an ideal
vehicle for pursuing vari-
ous all-cash enterprises
that required cunning, but
not a great deal of exer-
tion. We spent one whole
afternoon riding the streets
of Greenville and learning
about a side of life that I
hadn't known existed.
We bid J.D. farewell in
late afternoon and drove
until about 10 D.m.. stop-


As we climbed the grade
toward the new bridge,
I looked down and saw
a church congregation
conducting a baptism ser-
vice in the river. It was an
unusual event even then
and I stopped, explaining
to Pop, "Let's watch; you
probably won't ever get to
see this again."
As we parked, we were
looking down from prob-
ably 30 or 40 feet, far
enough away to go unno-
ticed by the church folk.
We stayed inside the truck
so as not to disturb the pro-
ceedings.

> turn to OLD ROAD next page


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Black residents attend a baptism in a river in this photo from a government archive.


Call now to set up an appointment

407-733-7159


us. Never had it happened
in my lifetime, and I had
been told that only once in
family history prior to that.
'Traveling U.S. 441, we
headed south. Joe had been
a long distance trucker in
the '50s, and he entertained
me with stories of those
days, as landmarks came
and went. About noontime,
we came to Fargo, Ga., a
tiny town just north of the
Florida line. The highway
crosses the Suwannee River,
and a beautiful new arched
concrete-span bridge had
been erected, including a
raised roadbed, and a park
situated on the old right-
of-way.


Page A8 October 10 October 16, 2008


The Voice


~4~ itrl


~p~~~





I II VUIUe


CALENDAR


Celebrate the harvest
season in Winter Springs
Winter Springs hosts its annual Hometown
Harvest event the evening of Saturday, Oct. 18
in the Town Center. The event starts at 5:30
p.m. and will include live music by Southern
rock band "Project Bare Bonz," along with
entertainment by Edge Dance Studio and Mr.
and Miss UCF.
Arnie Nussbaum will host the event along
with Dave and Leslye from the Magic 107.7 FM
morning show.
The event is free. Call 407-327-6593 or visit
WinterSpringsFL.org for more information.

Oviedo Methodist Church hosts
pumpkin patch
Bring the kids and the camera! The Youth of First
United Methodist Church of Oviedo hosts its
annual pumpkin patch through Friday, Oct. 31.
All ages are welcome to visit the patch which is
located on Red Bug Lake Road between Target
and the YMCA in the field next to the medical
offices building.
Proceeds from the fundraiser will be split
between the Native American farmers in New
Mexico and the youth members to pay for sum-
mer '09 mission trips. Hours of operation will be
9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Saturday and
10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday.
In addition to pumpkins in all shapes, sizes


and colors, other fall decorative items will b
for sale including gourds, bales of hay, and ki
to decorate pumpkins. Morning story times ai
also offered for preschool-age children.
Call 407-365-3255 for more information.

Tire amnesty day returns
in Seminole County
There will be free disposal of up to 10 was
tires for residents of Seminole County 0
Saturday, Oct. 18 at the Central Transfer Static
or the Seminole County Landfill from 8
a.m. to 2 p.m.
The Central Transfer Station is at
1950 State Road 419 in Longwood, and
the Seminole County Landfill is at 1930
E. Osceola Road in Geneva.
This event is for private households
only; businesses are not eligible to par-
ticipate. Call 407-665-2260 for more
information.

Oviedo hosts
Mustard Seed Conference
Canterbury's Ninth Annual Mustard Seed
Conference, featuring the Rev. John
Jacobs on C.S. Lewis, comes to Oviedo
from Friday, Oct. 31 through Sunday,
Nov. 2 at the Canterbury Retreat and
Conference Center at 1601 Alafaya Trail.
This is a nondenominational event and


OLD ROAD I Wrong place, wrong time


< continued from the last page

There were 12 or 15 men
and women standing on the
bank to witness the baptism of
a very large female convert. She
stood waist-deep in the river
in a flowing white robe that
trailed away from her massive
figure, flanked by two ministers.
Joe and I surmised it would be
all both men could do to wash
her sins away and raise her up
again. Off to one side. stood a
huge, old live oak tree, and suffi-
ciently removed from the action
so as not to disturb the service,
a photographer had set up his
tripod and camera to record the
moment for posterity.
SWe had been sitting in the
truck for what we later esti-
mated to be at least five minutes,
possibly 10 when it happened!
The truck was shut off, but for
reasons that will forever remain
a mystery, it backfired with a
deafening explosion. It sounded
like a cannon shot off in a deep
valley: "ka-boom-baboom-ba-
boom-boom-boom!"
Never before or since have I
ever seen such pandemonium!
That lady's feet churned the
water white like an Evinrude
outboard coming up to plane!
She came up that bank and
swamped both ministers in
her wake. There were people
screaming and running in cir-
cles. Women were holding their
bonnets on with one hand and
the ends of their long skirts out
of the mud with the other! They
ran completely over the man's
camera and tripod in a mad rush
to their cars!
We had done nothing inten-
tional to cause the ruckus, and
to say that we laughed doesn't
do the word justice. Rolling
around almost in the floor-
boards in the grip of spasms
of laughter, we were unable to
move long after the last of the
cars had roared out of sight
down 441.
I have no idea how long we


sat there, but I do remember
getting belly cramps and tears
streaming down my face that
I couldn't wipe them off. The
remainder of the trip was no
better! We'd get just about
calmed down and one of us
would look at the other causing
an entire new round of howls to
commence!
When we stopped at Joe's
house late that afternoon, we
tried hard not to appear hys-
terical, but it didn't work. Tish
took a good look at us and
.said, "What is the matter with
you two?!" It took another 10
minutes to gasp out the story
between gasps of laughter!
That big woman probably
figured she was going to need
her newfound salvation a lot
quicker than she'd thought.
Well, if she ever did get baptized,
it didn't happen that day, but
she sho' 'nuff made a lifelong
impression on me and Pop!


be
ts
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te
On
on


open to the public.
Call Susan at 407-365-5571 extension 12
or svernon@canterburyretreat.org for reserva-
tions.

Four-H offers public speaking
classes for students
Are you interested in improving your pub-
lic speaking skills? A new 4-H Club Public
Speaking club is starting for middle and high
school students this month. The club will meet


October 10 October 16, 2008 Page A9


at the Cooperative Extension Office at 250 W.
County Home Road in Sanford twice a month
on Thursday from 4:45-5:45 p.m. The club
will have an emphasis on learning about public
speaking as well as gaining impromptu speak-
ing skills.
The next meeting will be on Thursday, Oct. 16.
Call Seminole County 4-H Office at 407-665-
5560 for more information.


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Day-trip destination: Cypress Gardens


AMY K.D. TOBIK
THE ',',1 t-: .

It was an amazing era a time
when Ginger Rogers and Fred
Astaire danced across the silver
screen into the hearts of America,
Margaret Mitchell's romantic novel
"Gone with the Wind" had just been
published, and Cypress Gardens
emerged as Florida's first amuse-
ment park.
Park guests can sense this rich
history as they meander through
acres of exquisite botanical gardens
today. While people struggled to
recover from an economic depres-
sion in the 1930s and international
tensions mounted, Cypress Gardens
offered a respite from daily pres-
sures with flourishing landscapes
and serene boat rides.
The same can be said
today, with its lush botani-
cal gardens, topiaries and
plantation gardens, more
than 40 rides including six
roller coasters, and engag-
ing water-ski.shows. The park
Cypress Gardens was Friday, S
founded by Dick and Julie and Sur
Pope in 1936 and was October.
later run by son Dick Pope to check
Jr. In 1985, ownership of hours ~
the park transferred sev- ary day
eral times until it closed var da
in 2003 after a slowdown Located
in the tourism industry Haven,
resulting from Sept. 11. Gardens
As people petitioned to an hour
keep the park open, the from 0
state asked the Trust for due sou
Public Land to purchase Cypress(
the land, a purchase that com fo
was approved four years inform
ago. Polk Country bought
the botanical gardens and
Wild Adventures Theme Park in
Georgia took ownership of the rest
of the park and revitalized it. Last
year, Land South Adventures LLC of
Mulberry, Fla., purchased Cypress


Gardens Adventure Park.
While the park has expanded
and modernized throughout the
years, Cypress Gardens has not lost
its old-fashioned appeal.
Park guests peacefully stroll
along the historic gardens, almost
lost in the beauty of the abundant
native and exotic plantings and the
canopy provided by the enormous
banyan tree, planted in 1939 from
a seedling. An herb garden, rose
garden and butterfly garden com-
pliment the manicured landscape
of Magnolia Mansion. A charming
wedding gazebo attracts couples
from around the world as an idyllic
spot to exchange vows.
The impressive collection of
topiaries attracts the interest of vis-
itors of all ages. Children are drawn,
in particular, to the cas-
cading waterfall surround-
ed by flowers, the whimsi-
cal topiary rabbit wearing
glasses, the elegant swan,
impressive caterpillar and
the colorful ladybug.
is open Discover more than 20
saturday species of butterflies in the
iday in Butterfly Arboretum and
Be sure watch the birds, such as the
k park 'lorries; feed from the nec-
Star in the Aviary. A jaguar,
s they lemur and African Pygmy
-to-day, goats are just a few of the
n Winter amazing animals that can
presss be found in Nature's Way
is about alongside native Florida
s drive reptiles.
rlando, For visitors looking for
th. Visit a trip on one of the origi-
iardens. nal rides at the park: The
.more Sunshine Sky Adventure
action. transports people 16-sto-
ries in the air on a revolv-
ing platform for an incred-
ible view of Cypress Gardens and
about 17 miles.of the surrounding
area.
Cypress Gardens is the home of
Florida's first wooden roller coast-


PHOIU BY AMY K.U. IUIK IT VUICL
Boasting of Florida's oldest roller coaster, Cypress Gardens contrasts natural beauty with mechanical
thrills in a flowery, lush Winter Haven theme park. It also boasts of a water park with a massive wave pool.


er, rescued in 2004 when Panama
City's Miracle Strip Amusement
Park closed. Known as the Starliner,
the old-fashioned sound of the
clackity-clack is followed by gleeful
screams as riders face hairpin turns
and plunge nearly 70 feet, reach-
ing speeds up to 70 miles per hour.
Traditional bumper cars, a merry-
go-round and an enormous Ferris
wheel add to the vintage amuse-
ment park appeal.
When the weather proves too
hot, visitors often turn to Splash
Island Park, the new interactive
water play area filled with tremen-
dous slides, a 20,000-square-foot
wave pool and a relaxing lazy river.
People looking for a refreshing
thrill can take a ride on the Tonga
Tubes, a twin tube-slide consisting
of four stories of twisting and turn-
ing with a cool pool at the bottom.
The Cypress Garden Water Ski
Show on Lake Eloise, which dates
back to 1941, gives visitors a sneak
peek at the daring barefoot ski-
ing, lifts, tandem jumps and water


ski pyramid that made the park
famous decades ago. The sense of
history and tradition is evident as
water skiers proudly perform using
the original stage.
Cypress Gardens also hosts
performers at the Star Haven
Amphitheater throughout the
year for all-star concerts, includ-
ing country singer Billy Currington
and the music of The Drifters in
upcoming weeks.
Haley Kish, public relations
manager at Cypress Gardens, said,
"Preserving Cypress Gardens is
important because it is Florida's
first theme park. We are different
and unique in the fact that we can
offer this historical point."
"Families come back to Cypress
Gardens because it is-a great value
and tons of fun," Kish added. "One
can visit the historical gardens and
ski show in the morning then ride
roller coasters and see exotic ani-
mals in the afternoon."


' :A~t 3- '


This week's artwork comes from students at
Red Bug Elementary in Casselberry.


Illustrated by
Kevin Van
1st grade


Turtle


Crayon on paper


Kitty


Illustrated by
Ryann Scutte
3rd grade


Illustrated by
Charlotte Ralph


Crayon on paper 3rd grade


Family

Disney's magical twist
on Halloween
Mickey's Not-So-Scary Halloween Party
returns to the Magic Kingdom Oct. 10, 16, 23,
24, 26, 30 and 31, from 7 p.m. to midnight.
Visit the park in costume, and trick-or-treat
for candy with some of your favorite Disney
Characters, also dressed up for the evening.
Visit www.disneyworld.com for more infor-
mation.

Friendly spooks lurk
at Sea World
Sea World's Halloween Spooktakular starts
Saturday, Oct. 11, continuing Oct. 12, 18, 19,
24, 25, 26 and 31, beginning at 11 a.m. each
day. Join in on the fun and trick or treat in
your costume among the friendly sea witches,
mermaids, pumpkin fish and ice witches. Visit
www.seaworld.com for more information.

Central Florida Zoo offers
haunted hayride
The Central Florida Zoo's "Zoo Boo Bash"
hosts trick-or-treaters Oct. 18, 19, 25 and 26
from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. There will be face paint-
ing, a haunted-hayride and a special pumpkin
patch to entertain visitors of all ages. Guests
will also learn about animal myths.


K -
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Sunny


Crayon on paper


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The Voice


G.O.







The 1 Vt O r 0l1


209 Geneva Ave., Oviedo (407) 977-9800



HONEST & RELIABLE LOCAL REFERENCES KNOW WHO YOU LET IN YOUR HOME

truck mounted steam cleaner
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CINEMA


Aem itm e for F rid ay Oct. I0


Oviedo Marketplace
1500 Oviedo Marketplace Blvd.
407-977-1107
BILLY: THE EARLY YEARS (PG)
12:45, 4:10, 7:40, 10:10, 12:45am

BODY OF LIES (R) 12:25,1:15,
3:35, 4:45, 7:00, 7:55,10:25,10:55

CITY OF EMBER (PG) noon, 2:30,
5:00, 7:35, 10:00,12:35am

THE EXPRESS (PG) 12:30, 3:55,
7:00,10:05

QUARANTINE (R) 12:15,1:20,
3:45, 4:30. 6:55, 7:45, 9:15, 10:15,
11:40, 12:20am

AN AMERICAN CAROL (PG-13)
1:25, 4:35, 8:10. 10:35

BEVERLY HILLS CHIHUAHUA
(PG) 12:05. 1:10, 2:30. 3:50, 4:55,
6:50, 7:20, 9:30, 10:30, midnight

BLINDNESS (R) 4:00, 12:15am

FLASH OF GENIUS (PG-13) 1:05,
7:15

HOW TO LOSE FRIENDS &
ALIENATE PEOPLE (R) 12:40

NICK AND NORAH'S INFINITE
PLAYLIST (PG-13) 1:35, 2:35,
4:05,7:10. 9:05, 9:35,11:55

RELIGULOUS (R) 12:35, 3:40,
7:25,10:10.12:55am

EAGLE EYE (PG-13) 12:10, 1:00,
2:40, 5:15, 7:20, 7:50, 10:25-

FIREPROOF (PG) 1:00, 3:55, 7:05,
10:15

MIRACLE AT ST. ANNA (R) 3:45,
9:55

NIGHTS IN RODANTHE.(PG-13)
12:50, 4:15, 8:05,10:40

APPALOOSA (R) 12:55, 4:50,
7:30,10:20

THE DUCHESS (PG-13) noon,
2:45,5:30,8:15,10:50


LAKEVIEW TERRACE (PG-13)
4:40, 10:40,

MY BEST FRIEND'S GIRL (R)
12:35, 6:45, 9:40

BURN AFTER READING (R) 3:30,
8:00.10:45.12:50am

RIGHTEOUS KILL (R) 12:20, 6:40,
11:45


Waterford Lakes Town Center
541 N. Alafaya Trail
407-207-4603
BILLY: THE EARLY YEARS (PG)
1:00, 5:30, 8:20, 10:55

BODY OF LIES (R) 12:40,1:25,
3:50, 4:45, 6:50, 7:40, 9:50,10:35,
12:55am

CITY OF EMBER (PG) 12:05.
2:30, 5:00. 7:30, 10:00, 12:20am

THE EXPRESS (PG) 1:15, 4:20,
7:20,10:20

QUARANTINE (R) 11:45am, 1:30,
2:50, 4:30, 5:25, 7:05, 8:05, 9:25,
10:30,11:45.12:45am

AN AMERICAN CAROL (PG-13)
12:20, 2:45, 5:05,-7:45, 10:05,
12:05am

BEVERLY HILLS CHIHUAHUA
(PG) 12:10, 2:35.4:10, 5:10, 7:00,
8:10, 9:40, 10:40. midnight -
Open captioned showtimes: 1;05

BLINDNESS (R) 3:00, 9:30

FLASH OF GENIUS (PG-13) 3:55,
9:45

HOW TO LOSE FRIENDS (R)
10:15,12:50am

NICK AND NORAH'S (PG-13)
11:50am, 1:20, 2:00,4:15, 5:15,
7:10,7:50,9:35,11:50

EAGLE EYE (PG-13) 12:15,1:35,
4:50,6:45,8:15,11:10,12:25AM


'City of Ember' Opens Friday


The City of Ember, built underground as a refuge for humanity and
powered by a generator, is a world of dazzling lights. But when the gen-
erator begins to fail, two teenagers must race to save Ember's citizens.


95 minutes PG


'Body of Lies'


2 hours 8 minutes R


CIA operative Roger
Ferris navigates
the muddy world
of espionage as he
peddles information
and tracks down
a terrorist with the
help of his shady
boss. Also aiding
him in his search is
the head of Jordan s
covert operations.


'Quarantine'
A TV reporter, assigned
to the night shift at a fire
station, accompanies
them on a 911 call to an
apartment building, gets
sealed in for quarantine,
and experiences a hellish
night.


89 minutes R


..e .rJ,.ctn...s*~, -4~4A ~ ,.a~a z.~a .a11~ a. ~ ~ ~.n ~ .M~flf.* n -


FIREPROOF (PG) 1:10, 4:25,7:15,
10:25

MIRACLE AT ST. ANNA (R) 12:35

NIGHTS IN RODANTHE (PG-13)
11:55am, 2:25, 4:55,7:25, 9:55,
12:30am

APPALOOSA (R) 12:30, 3:45,
7:35,10:30
L .________


THE DUCHESS (PG-13) noon,
2:40, 5:20, 8:00,10:45

LAKEVIEW TERRACE (PG-13)
4:05,7:55,10:50

MY BEST FREIND'S GIRL (R)
12:25,6:55, 12:35AM


Maitland
1300 S. Orlando Avenue
Maitland, FL 32751
407-629-0054
A GIRL CUT IN TWO (NR) 3:30,
6:30, 9:30


-- II


October 10 October 16, 2008 Page Al 1


The Voice






Page A12 October 10 October 16, 2008 The Voice


THIS WEEK in sports history

The St. Louis Cardinals defeat the Detroit Tigers in the seventh
game of the World Series. The Cardinals' "Gashouse Gang" nick-
name referred to the team's close resemblance to the rowdy,
dirt-streaked thugs who hung around the Gashouse District on
L '% Manhattan's East Side.
AI- il E TIC S


Lions, Huskies put up fight


II I.


ISAAC BABCOCK
T :. VOICE

Blake Bortles showed he's
changing Oviedo's offense
with a powerful- 303-yard
performance against Lake
City Columbia on Friday.
The Lions lost 23-20 to
Columbia in a game that
came down to a hail-biter
finish. But Bortles stood out
in the game with more than
300 yards in his second con-
secutive game.
That's something that's
become a rarity this season
with teams starved of strong
passers. Many Seminole
County teams have been
forced to resort to a run-
only offense to survive.
Bortles and Lions Coach
Wes Allen have changed
that approach for the Lions
this season, adding the
threat of the pass to help.
keep defenses on their toes.
But Bortles couldn't make
up for his own defense's
miscues Friday. The Lions
allowed Columbia into the
end zone three times.
The Lions face Seminole
at 7:30 p.m. Friday at home.
The Seminoles have strug-
gled against passing teams
this year, losing games
fought in the air.
Hagerty's Jeff Driskel
shined despite a loss to
Winter Springs on Friday.
The Huskies fell 26-17 at
home, which is the team's
first home loss this season.
That came largely at the
hands of Bears running back
Al-Terek McBurse, who once
again racked up triple-digit
yardage to pass the 1,000-


: LAURENCESAMUELS 7 1 =
Hagerty and Winter Springs players pray before.taking the field last Friday, Oct. 3. The Bears won their fourth game this year,
handing the Huskies their first loss at home this season, despite a strong game by Huskies' starting quarterback Jeff Driskel.


yard mark at midseason.
But Driskel's 168 yards in
the air showed he could find
receivers when he needed
to, airing it out to eight dif-
ferent sets of hands during
the game.
The Hagerty defense also
pressured the Bears into a
fumble and a sack.
But it was the Bears
who came out on top after
showing dominance in the
run game, outpacing the
Huskies in visits to the end
zone.
The Huskies, now 1-3 on
the season, face Lyman at
home this week, with kick-
off at 7:30 p.m. Friday. The
Greyhounds are fresh off a
loss to Lake Mary and their
worst offensive perfor-
mance of the season.


The Bears moved up to
4-1 on the season with the
win. They take the week off
before traveling to Lyman at
7:30 p.m. Oct. 17.
Lake Howell suffered an
embarrassing 43-0 shutout
at their homecoming game
Friday night, with Seminole
rebounding on the win.
The game started out
with an ominous first
play as Seminole's kickoff
returned Toby Durham ran
95 yards for a touchdown in
the first 10 seconds of the
game. From then on, it was
all Seminole.
TheSilverHawksdropped
to 0-5 on the season after
only moving the chains for
two first downs in the entire
game;
And while the Hawks'


offense struggled, the
Seminoles ran the field, with
quarterback Ray Armstrong
connecting for three touch-
down passes.
This week the Hawks
travel to what could be their
toughest opponent of the
season. Mainland was one
of the top teams in the state
last year, easily winning the
district crown before enter-
in the playoffs.
The Buccaneers are 5-0
on the season, holding
opponents to two touch-
downs or fewer in all of
those games. They host the
Hawks in the district rival-
rv game that kicks off 7:30
p.m. Friday.


Oviedo
vs. Seminole
7:30 p.m. at Oviedo
601 King St.,
Oviedo

Hagerty
vs. Lyman
7:30 p.m. at Hagerty
3225 Lockwood Blvd.,
Oviedo

Lake Howell
vs. Mainland
7:30 p.m. at Mainland
1255 Int'l Speedway Blvd.,
Daytona Beach


Next Game:
vs. Miami

WHEN: 3:45 p.m.
Saturday, Oct. 11

WHERE: University of Miami

The Knights beat SMU 31-17
at home in their last game.
They're 2-3 overall.


Knights return to winning ways


ISAAC BABCOCK
THE' '

The University of Central Florida
Knights got back into the win col-
umn with a 31-17 victory over
Southern Methodist University on
Saturday, Oct. 4. The win improved
the Knights' overall record against
Conference USA teams at Bright
House Stadium to 6-0.
It also snapped a three-game
slide for the Knights, who had fallen
hard in a recent road trip against
non-conference teams, including a
58-13 blowout in El Paso against
UTEP at the end of September.
The Knights had fallen behind
early, allowing SMU to score 10
unanswered points in the first half
to take a 10-3 lead. But they came
back strong in the second quarter
and didn't look back.
With the comeback, the Knights
found some traction on offense that


had been missing in their three loss-
es. They also racked up their highest
score of the season.
Thanks for that performance
goes- to Ronnie Weaver, the fresh-
man running back who rushed for
123 yards a career high.
Quarterback Michael Greco also
connected on a 56-yard touchdown
pass to Brian Watters the longest
from scrimmage of the season.
But interceptions by the UCF
defense provided much of the team's
offense yet again. The Knights only
gained 280 total yards compared
with SMU's 376, but picked up 112
yards on three interceptions and
one fumble return.
The Knights travel to their next-
biggest challenge of the year this
weekend, kicking off at 3:45 p.m.
Saturday in Miami. The Hurricanes
are on a two-game skid after narrow
losses to Universityof North Carolina
and Florida State University.


f !4.j


LAURENCE SAMUELS
UCF's Brian Watters races to the end zone after catching a pass from quarterback Michael Greco, It was
the Knights' longest passing touchdown play from scrimmage this year. The Knights won.31-17 over SMU.


""
a






IIO I lr 00IIO tb P


Hagerty Huskies Sports Review


COMPILED BY JAY GETTY
HAGERTY HIGH SCHOOL

Cross Country -
Compher sets school record at
flrunners.com Invite
In action at the Flrunners.com Invite in
Titusville last week, Shannon Compher
paced the girls' varsity to a fifth-place
finish in the 27-team field. Compher
raced away to a fourth-place finish
in a time of 19:20 on splits of 5:51,
6:34 and 6;22 for the 5K distance.
The men were led by the tandem
of Sean Mendes and Peter Licari.
Mendes finished with a time of 17:06,
while Licari crossed the line at 17;12
overall. The men finished eighth in the
27-team field.
The team will compete Saturday,
Oct. 11, in Oviedo at the Hagerty
Invitational. The meet will take place
at SCC-Oviedo with the varsity races
starting at 8 a.m. On hand for the
event will be 2008 Beijing Olympian
Jennifer Barringer.


Volleyball -
Two wins and a loss
for the Huskies
A tuneup win over Crooms started
the week of play for the girls as
they demolished the Panthers in three
straight games with scores of 25-3,
25-8 and 25-14. After the tuneup, the
team split a pair of district matches
with Seabreeze and Lake Howell. In
the Seabreeze win (25-10, 25-21,
25-23), Alex Teixeira and Lauren
Colton led the stat sheet with 17
points and 10 points respectively.
In the loss to Lake Howell (19-25,
23-25, 17-25), Anna Vols paced the
Huskies with 10 points in the contest.

Softball-
Carpenter touches
all the bases!!
With Erin Wagstaff on the mound
for Hagerty, the girls recorded their
seventh win of the season by a 5-3
margin over Lake Howell. Wagstaff
once again provided a solid perfor-
mance from the rubber with consis-


tent strikes. At the plate, Kadieann
Tighe stroked a two-run double to go
along with Kelsey Carpenter's home
run to pace the offense; The team is
now 7-2 overall.

Golf -
McCormack leads the charge
in win over Master's Academy
Patrick McCormack notched three
pars in a row to finish the round with
a team low of 42 in the 174-175 win
over the Eagles to start the week. After
McCormack's 42, Hagerty posted 44s
from George Tucci, Tom Calhoon, Nick
Vitale and Tobias Midtvaage in the
match.
Against Trinity Prep, the team was
led by Vitale's round of 39 in a loss to
the Saints (151-174).

Golf -
Gordon, Gallagher and
Gajownik pace the ladies
The girls defeated Crooms (136-NTS)
and lost to Lake Brantley (218-258)
last week. Inca Joy Gordon and Megan


Gallagher led the team with rounds of
29 and 34 in a five-hole match. In
the complete round match with the
Patriots, Veronica Gajownik shot a 58
to lead the team.

-- Swimming -
Sims leads the girls in
the pool with two wins
In a tri-match with Seminole and
Bishop Moore, Olivia Sims emerged
victorious in both the 50 Free (25.96)
and 100 Free (57.48) for the Huskies.
Despite her first-place event finishes,
Hagerty was defeated by both par-
ticipating schools (BM 165 HH 126 /
SEM 164 HH 127).

Swimming -
A win and loss in
the pool for the men
For the Huskies, Takashi Worrell,
Kyle Geiger and Matt Curby all cap-
tured individual first-place finishes in
a tri-match with Bishop Moore and
Seminole. Worrell won the 500 Free
(4:53.74), while Geiger touched the


wall first in the 100 Breast (1:03.34)
and Curby was first in the 200 IM in a
time of 1:59.80. With the event wins,
the Huskies defeated Bishop Moore
by the score of 164-121 and suffered
their first dual-meet loss of the year to
the 'Noles (164-127).

Football
Huskies can't contain
the Bears in 26-17 loss
Jeff Driskel opened the scoring in
the game with a first-quarter 1-yard
quarterback sneak to give the home
team their only lead at 7-0. At the
half, Winter Springs led 9-7 as the top
running back in Central Florida started
to get on track for the Bears.
In the third quarter, a Patrick Todd
35-yard field goal made the score
16-10 for the Bears. Finally in the
fourth, Mitch Hatton scored on a
4-yard run for the Huskies.
The team will play at home Friday,
Oct. 11, at 7:30 p.m. versus Lyman
High School.


WEATHER

'I g ; I ifi : 6 Bi"FARe


730 820 830 710
S6a.m. I Noon 3 p.m. 6 a.m.





UV INDEX U B Very high


TODAY: Isolated
thunderstorms, with a 30%
chance of precipitation in
the afternoon and evening.


THfjI'Sl' WEEKfi~ffTlli~H


produced torenial rafldin
-ailong the nrhat coast
th tAgsian


SATRDA 'I IICLUD


MORNING LOW 71

DAYTIME HIGH 850
20% chance of rain


Sunrise S
7:24 a.m. 6:


Sunset
59 p.m.


11:35 hours
of sunlight


Wind
NNE 5 mph


MORNING LOW 710
DAYTIME HIGH 870
40% chance of rain


Sunrise Sunset
7:24 a.m. 6:58 p.m.


11:34 hours
of sunlight


Wind
E 10 mph


MORNING LOW 710
" DAYTIME HIGH 880
S 30% chance of rain; windy, gusts to 20


Sunrise
7:25 a.m.


Sunset
6:57 p.m.


11:31 hours.
of sunlight


Wind
ENE15 mph


MORNING LOW 720 -
DAYTIME HIGH 880
Windy, gusts to 20 mph
Sunrise Sunset 11:29 hours Wind
7:26 a.m. 6:56 o.m. of sunlight ENE 10 moh


( GAINESVILLE
-'5 6501850






OVIEDO
r 730 1830


ORLANDO
70o 1 88


TAMPA
700 I 880


NATIONAL FORECAST


Atlanta
New York
Chicago


Friday Sat.
59/79 61/77
58/74 52/72
56/72 58/76


Los Angeles 58/72 54/68


Friday Sat.


Washington, D.C. 58/74


Seattle


54/72


43/56 40/59


San Francisco 49/63
Houston 63/86


49/65
67/88


MARINE FORECAST
Cocoa Beach tide schedule
Time High Low
Saturday 5:23 a.m. 11:38 a.m.
Oct. 11 5:45 p.m. ---
Sunday 6:13a.m. 12:00 a.m.
Oct. 12 6:30 p.m. 12:23 p.m.





FLORIDA FORECAST


Tampa


Friday Sat.
70/88 72/90


Jacksonville 68/83 68/83


Gainesville
Ft. Lauderdale
Miami
Naples -
Tallahassee
" *


65/85 65/85
76/88 76/86
74/88 77/86
74/88 74/86
58/85 63/85


INTERNATIONAL


City
London
Paris
Tokyo
Mexico City


Friday Sat.
53/64 51/66
46/68 50/73
62/73 62/69
55/75 57/73


October 10O October 16, 2008 Page Al 3


Th Vonice







Page A14 October 10 October 16, 2008 The Voice



THIS WEEK in political history

S Private FRrst Class Desmond T. Doss of Lynchburg, Va., was pre-
sented the Congressional Medal of Honor for outstanding bravery,
the first conscientious objector to receive the award. Doss, an
Army medic, put his life in peril during the battle for Okinawa,
saving dozens of lives.



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR


Public housing helped
bring down economy
Remember "public hous-
ing?" Since Americans were
too greedy and stupid to
provide good housing for
the poor, the government
would do it for us. It would
be planned. It would be
controlled. It would be
wonderful.
It was a disaster.
Regular folks would
have learned.humility from
that. Not the adherents
of control everything
government. What it failed
to do with brick and mor-
tar, it would achieve with
banks and mortgages. For.
years, bureaucrats leaned


on banks to make loans
that were politically cor-
rect instead of financially
sound. Strike one.
Then, when lenders
wondered what to do with
these loans, Freddie Mac -
a "government-sponsored
entity" pioneered bun-
dling and selling them on
secondary markets, hiding
the risk. Strike two.
Finally, easy money poli-
cies, intended to stimulate
the economy, pumped the
borrowing up into a bloat-
ed bubble. Strike three.
And the entire mortgage
industry is out.
Jeffrey Payne
Winter Springs


Put money where it's
needed and jobs will grow
The economic illiterates in
Washington threw a small
cake of economic ice called
an income tax rebate at
a self-inflicted economic
problem. Like a chunk of
ice thrown to a drowning
man, it melted, only mak-
ing the rising price prob-
lem worse.
Being economic illiter-
ates, they honestly believe
that a bigger piece of eco-
nomic ice will do the job.
A larger cake of ice will
take a bit longer to melt,
which will only make the
economic lake bigger and
deeper.


It should not take a
great deal of imagination
to know that if you have
people out of work, the
sensible thing to do is put
them to work building
something needed by all
the people.
The recent storms prove
that all power lines should
be put underground. The
price of gasoline proves
that thousands of people
need rapid rail to get to
work.
Giving money to rescue
the stock market will not
produce either of these
critically needed utilities.
Seven hundred billion
dollars' worth of elec-


tric lines underground
and hundreds of miles of
needed rail transportation
would put tens of thou-
sands of people back to
work.
Those wage earners
would then recycle their
earnings back into the
economy, providing jobs
for tens-of thousands of
others who could then
afford to pay taxes to help
us out from under our
oppressive national debt.
Kenneth L. Russell
Professor of education,
emeritus
Sam Houston State
University


Even with ample education, times are tough


EMPLOYMENT

Ask

Sandi


Dear Sandi,
I am a teacher with a master's
degree and can't even find sub jobs
- due to the flooding of people
unemployed.
Also, my daughter graduated
from college and is job hunting
without success. She majored in



Here's what students from
(I Midway Elementary School
of the Performing Arts had
to say about their experi-
"I ence of being in the band.




> M
.
LT 3) ^
'I -^ j ^


psychology. Here is a new col-
lege graduate who took calculus
and many challenging courses to
obtain her degree. She is presently
looking into taking the GMAT
exam for a master's degree, but
student loans are even frozen now.
Any suggestions?
Qualified and searching

Dear Qualified,
You're in the same situation as
many other professionals right
now. They had some job fairs in
Lakeland for teachers recently.
Keep looking at county schools'


jL-




I play the violin and
it is very fun. ... Ms.
Hallberg is my teach-
er and she teaches
me how to play and
how to hold the bow.
We will learn easy
songs at first.
Austin M.
10 years old


Last year I played the
violin but.this is my
first year playing the
saxophone. I practice
30 minutes every
day. It is interesting
how people have
composed music I
would like to do that.
Cameron C.
10 years old


Web sites. Also go to greatschools.
net and see if there might be pri-
vate schools that are hiring. The
salaries are generally lower, but it
would keep you teaching.
I wish I had an easy answer.
Keep looking online for opportu-
nities. Try Indeed.com as it pulls
from many other Web sites.
-As for college loans, hopefully
we will see this ease up a bit. It
will not be immediate, but may be
soon.
-Sandi Vidal,
executive director,
Christian HELP/CFEC


I play the oboe ...
not everyone plays
it so that makes it
unique. It is a double-
reed instrument; that
makes it easier to
play. Mr. Bowers, our
teacher, is a good
coach.
Michaela M.
10 years old


This is my third year
playing the clarinet.
... Mr. Bowers, my
teacher, coaches me
to sit up straight,
smile, keep my feet
on the ground and to
take big breaths..
Sara B.
11 years old


> T SANDI
Sandi Vidal is the executive director for Christian
HELP and the Central Florida Employment
Council, with more than 10 years of recruiting and
human resources experience. Please send ques-
tions about employment by fax 407-260-2949,
sandi@christianhelp.org, or mail Ask Sandi C/O
Christian HELP, 450 Seminola Blvd., Casselberry,
FL 32707.
Subjects may include employment search,
resumes, networking and promotion opportunities.
Employers: E-mail your job leads to cfec@cfec.
org and we will share them with Christian HELP
clients.


This is my first year playing the trom-
bone. My teacher ... encourages me
to keep good habits and to work hard
S to be successful.
-Titus W.
11 years old


We would

/ to
love

7/ from S


Young


/Call editor Alex Babcock at 407-628-8500
to have The Voice visit your class or group.


Don't let your There'sno better place to ge


thewod ot hanTh Voce


Cal Pt ovglo t pac a a








October 10 October 16. 2008 Paae A15


Marketplace


REALTORS:
Licensed Real Estate Professionals needing
.to earn additional income. Become a
part time or full time loan officer. Control
your own closings. Gain access to
hundreds of mortgage programs. Save
your clients thousands of dollars. Call
Maitland Mortgage Lending Company
(407)629-5626

WANTED: MATURE MODELS
Wanted: mature models to complete
discounted Healthy Detox Program for
promotional testimonies. Lose Inches, Burn
Calories, Feel Great Look Good. 407-455-
3964. www.detoxants.net

ACCOUNT & PAYMENT
REPRESENTATIVE NEEDED
As part of our expansion program a small
company is looking for Account & Payment
representative, it pays $4000 a month
plus benefits and takes only little of your
time. Please contact us for more details.
Requirements Should be a computer
Literate. 2-3 hours access to the intemet
weekly. Must be over 19yrs of age. Must be
Efficient and Dedicated. If you are interested
and need more information, Contact Racardo,
Email: racardojackson@gmail.com


HOME FOR SALE:
Price Reduced! $174,950. Located at 1005
Whittier Cir. Alafaya Woods. Move in Ready.
Call 1-850-329-7370




WINTER PARK OFFICE SPACE
Goldenrod frontage, neat building,
signage, great prices, three units from
800-1750 sq. ft., now available. 407-
293-1934
(10/23)

FOR RENT
Oviedo Office Space, great frontage. 750
to 1,050 sf available. $1,070 to $1,350 per
month. 1401 Broadway St. Contact Megan
at (407) 687-3524.

PARK AVE OFFICE SPACE
Park Ave Office Space avail to Real Estate
Broker. All office equipment included. Call
.407/741-8541.




ESTATE AUCTION
10-18-08, 12 noon/view 11 a.m. At the
senior center, 109 West Park Street,
Aubumdale, FL 33823. Large collection of
antique furniture, glass, etc. See listing and
pictures at www.hoviousauction.com or call
863-299-9227. Bev Hovious Auction Co.
AB935 AU1344. Cash, check, 10% buyer's
premium








Get fastsame or next day service!

Repairs, upgrades, build-to-spec,
wireless networking, maintenance
or virus removal.

Need training?

No problem!
We provide that too.

Over25years experience.

Call 917-803-2440

Code 4




WE BUY

HOUSES!
Sell Your Home
for CASH
On the Day of Your Choice
"As-ls" with NO Repairs!

Call Now:

407-297-8749


HANDYMAN/CARPENTRY
Let me take care of the chores you don't
have time to do yard work, carpentry,
painting, (whole house or interior rooms),
driveways, repairs, pressure washing, and
more. No job too small. Local. Prompt.
Affordable. Call Scott at 321-460-3905.

KITCHEN/BATHROOM SURFACES
Repair and resurface bathtubs, ceramic
tile, vanities, kitchen countertops, cabinets,
appliances and much more. No dust and
dirt and very little down time. Have a new
factory-like finish and save up to four times
the replacement cost. Licensed/insured/
member BBB. All Surface Technology, 407-
691-0062




Reading volunteers NEEDED Jackson
Heights Middle School in Oviedo is looking
for adults who are interested in serving as a
Reading Mentor to assist students who are
reading below grade level. Volunteers work
one-on-one with an assigned student before
school for 30 minutes, one or more times
,a week through the end of the school year
to build fluency and comprehension skills.
Sessions are from 8:30-9:00 a.m., M-F
Please contact Connie O'Hanlon for more
information, 407-365-7585.


HOW TO DETOX FOR
OVERNIGHT RELIEF
Natural "herbal patches, overnight
detoxification, pain relief: knees, back, foot,
gout, sciatic, lumbago, carpal tunnel, cancer-
treatment. Attach to foot great night's
sleep, http://www.ebook-detox-patches.org
(407) 970-1483


FIXR UPES




Q .1 . In 111 1.


rina out wnai your
home is worth on-line
OrlandoHomeHunting.com
Free Recorded Message
1-877-895-1807 in-1nds


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2008-CP-1722
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARVIN J. CRITES,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of MARVIN J.
CRITES, deceased, whose date of death wasAugust
17, 2008, is pending in the Circuit Court for Semi-
nole County, Florida, Probate Division, File Number
2008-CP-1722, the address of which is 301 N. Park
Avenue, Sanford, Florida 32772-8099. The estate is
testate. The names and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All othercreditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
.IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is
10/3/2008.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
PAUL BRYAN SLADEK
Florida Bar No.: 869031
CLONINGER & FILES
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
1519 W. Broadway
.O. Box 620337
Oviedo, FL 32765
Telephone: (407) 365-5696
Facsimile: (407) 365-8919
Personal Representative:
JACK CRITES
412 Garden Grove Court,
Spartanburg, SC 29302
10/3,10/10





X. f1 E e
f?. ..^*^.f ,,--e -,^1--.


Sho ld it be (klas'e fid'ad'ver tzing) Noun. Advertising
Sh oulci It b c compactly arranged, as in newspaper
: ) columns, according to subject, under such
_ ... listings as help wanted and for sale .


How

YoUplace
,nad


i' vi'. 1' .22 .ara .',i -is IIiGGLO If you're selling it
..,,[ ll ', "r v ,lhi,.'5z,4: re. -11-l P
*an ne.t ~,~w 'd. I j- fuo for less than $500,
Slie. it's a free ad!
include a conacil gi b i"- rules: You get one per month.
:- n',, .5u mr, r I,:.:.un l ; ....1: 1 ,,,, ,, price. No business ads. It will
e-mail (3 words) or Web site (2 words). publish as space is available.


I,.,, ___
-. r-~. iL2.J~'C.


...or suggest your own!

Cal. 407-628-8500 or e-mail crassifeds@observemnewspapers.com


*


Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content



Available from Commercial News Providers
=gw o


..
. "
'


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 18TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.: 08-DR-866-02-DL
JUDI S. KING, Petitioner
and
PAUL T. KING, Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF
MARRIAGE
TO: (name of Respondent) PAUL T. KING
(Respondent's last known address) ADDRESS
UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been filed
against you and that you are required to serve a
Of : -l, l ,,- ,., ,,.1.11: 1 ,- I, l, ,I 1,, ,, ,,Ii,, ,'- y ,:
LARKWOOD DRIVE, SANFORD; FLORIDA 32771 on
or before November 6, 2008, and file the original
with the clerk of this Court at (clerk's address) ?12
NORTH PARK AVENUE, SANFORD, FLORIDA 32271
before service on Petitioner or immediately there-
after. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered
against you for the relief demanded in the petition.
Copies of all court documents in this case,
'-i,,;- ,:,,. o v available at the Clerk of the
r: .i i:i,. ,,n..- You may review these-docu-
ments upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Court's
office notified of your current address. (You may
file Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme
Court Approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future
papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address
on record at the clerk's office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law
Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic
disclosure of documents and information. Failure to
comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal
or striking of pleadings..
Dated October 2, 2008.
Maryanne Morse,
'Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Nancy R. Winter
Deputy Clerk
1.0/10, 10/17,10/24, 10/31
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO.: 2008-CP-1774
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JAMES NICHOLAS KRUEGER,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of JAMES NICH-
OLAS KRUEGER, deceased, whose date of death
was August 7, 2008, is pending in the Circuit Court
for SEMINOLE County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is Post Office Box 8099; Sanford,
Florida 32772-8099. The names and addresses of
the personal representative and the personal repre-
sentative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
'NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE. ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is Oc-
tober 3, 2008.
Signed on September 25, 2008.
GERALD P KRUEGER
Personal Representative
4105 Komes Court
Alexandria, VA 22306-1252
RESPECTFULLY SUBMITTED on this 25th day of
September, 2008.
IAN L. GOLDEN, ESQUIRE
IAN L. GILDEN, PA.
Florida Bar No. 0321941
151 Lookout Place, Suite 110
Maitland, Florida 32751
Telephone: (407) 645-4446
Facsimile: (407) 629-0090
Attorney for Gerald P.Krueger
10/3,10/10


,r ,





NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME STATUTE
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
Notice is hereby given that the undersigned,
pursuant to the "Fictitious Name Statute" Chapter
865.09, Florida, upon receipt of proof of the
publication of this notice, the fictitious name, to-
wit:
Cannie Wearz LTD
under which we are engaged in business at the
following address:
1532 Pickwood Ave., Fern Park, FL 32730
That the parties in said business enterprise are as
follows:
Sandra K. Hodgskin, Pres.
Sharks Success Marketing Enterprises, Inc.
Dated at Fern Park, Florida this 10th day of October,
2008.
10/10


a. .... ......


*l


-1I






Io


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tf


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& Distress Sales


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rlandoHomeHunting.com

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521 S.434, Siiitc#100, L hve. FL 3Fil i cmin'.ospitalcim


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