Title: Seminole voice
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 Material Information
Title: Seminole voice
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Community Media Holdings, LLC
Place of Publication: Oviedo, Fla.
Publication Date: October 3, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
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Bibliographic ID: UF00091445
Volume ID: VID00015
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Holding Location: University of Florida
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W w. 'l_ : '~V oice i-c,_,


This Week
A former coach for the NFL and for the UCF
football team is helping out at Trinity Prep.
1kj


Serving Greater Oviedo and Winter Springs for more than 17 years!
---October 3 October 9, 2008


Interests
A theater transforms into a dark place,
perfect for a little shop's man-eating plant.


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE VOICE
Former President Bill Clinton drew cheers from University of Central Florida students and other fans of Barack Obama at a
rally in support of the Illinois senator and presidential candidate on Wednesday, Oct. 1, at the university's main campus south of
Oviedo. Clinton told the audience that the country needed real change to get the economy humming again, blaming Republicans
for the economic crisis affecting the lending industry. Students waved banners, some reading "Knights for Obama."




Killer asks for death


JENNY ANDREASSON
THE VOICE
Testimony is over for con-
victed killer Andrew Allred,
who in April confessed to
the slaying of his former
girlfriend and their mutual
friend. The sentence death
or life in prison won't be
handed down for at least a
month, a spokeswoman for
the State Attorney's Office
said.
A year ago, on Sept.
24, Allred. slammed his
car into an Oviedo home
where University of Central
Florida student Michael
Ruschak lived, and fatally
shot Ruschak and Allred's
former girlfriend Tiffany
Barwick.
From jail, Allred, 22, of
Oviedo, began writing to
Tiffany, as if she were alive,


and also to her parents. In
a letter dated Nov. 28, 2007,
he wished the woman he
killed a happy birthday.
"I hope you're doing OK
up there," Allred wrote on
ruled paper in small, uni-
form letters. "I'm sure you
are.
"Don't forget about me
because I'll probably be join-
ing you soon ... Who knows,
maybe you can put in a good
word for me with God and
he can help me out."
The judge then ordered
that Allred have no further
contact with the Barwick
family.
In April, Allred, who had
pleaded not.guilty, changed
his plea to guilty, bypassing
the first phase of his trial. In
July, he attempted to fire his
attorney in hopes to further
speed up sentencing.


"It's ridic-
ulous that I
I have to wait
i .i six months
for my sen-
tencing," he
writes to the
Allred judge. "I'm
asking you
to allow me to represent
myself during my sentenc-
ing, and that you schedule
that sentencing as soon as
possible."
The judge convinced
Allred that. firing his
attorney would actually
slow things down, State
Attorney's Office spokes-
woman Lynne Bumpus-
Hooper said.
On Thursday, Oct. 2,
after press time, a hear-
ing was scheduled for the

> turn to ALLRED on page A4


Bad economy




bites eateries


JENNY ANDREASSON
THE VOICE
wo iconic Oviedo
eateries closed their
doors for good this
summer, calling into ques-
tion whether the city can
support its lineup of busi-
nesses and continue to
recruit new ones.
Bill's Elbow South at the
Oviedo Marketplace mall
signed off last Monday with
a message posted on its
Web site, thanking patrons
and employees for 16 great
years. A for-sale sign hangs
in the.window of Broadway
Street's Toucan Willie's,
which said its goodbyes in
mid-June.
"It's unfortunate for
them and scary for the rest
Sof us," said Tim Shepardson,
who is set to open TJ's
Seafood Shack restaurant
Sin mid-October.
But Oviedo Councilman
Dominic Persampiere said
the problem is bigger than
Oviedo. "Everybody keeps
harping on how this will
affect the city it's just
the effects of an extremely
uncooperative economy


right now," he said.
Rising energy prices sure
don't help people don't
go out to eat as much and
restaurants pay more for
goods. As the price of gas
goes up, so do food prices,
because 10 percent of gas
is now made from corn-
based ethanol. "It's like a
double whammy on busi-
nesses," Shepardson said.
Bill's owners did not
divulge the reason for the
closing, but their location
may have been a strike
against them.
Bill's moved into the
mall space in 2003, a sub-
stantial increase in size
from its Broadway location,
said Bryan Cobb, Oviedo
Development Services
director. When namesake
Bill Foulkes died in 2005, his
daughter, Lindsey Foulkes,
took over the business.
"Maybe it might create
an opportunity for folks
who want to come in and
open up a new business,"
Persampiere said of Bill's
closing. "Ever since Bill
passed away, the folks run-

> turn to ELBOW on page A5


Ilh,,, l h,,I ,,i,,.ll ,,ill , ,l,, l lh,, , ,11111, n
**************ALL FOR ADC 320
2350
WILL CANOVA
UF SMATHERS LIBRARY
PO BOX 117007
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007


INDEX
Stetson's Corner...................................A4
Celery Stalks .......................................A5
Old Road... ..................................... A8
Cinema........................................ A
Weather..........................................A 2
Athletics..................................... A1 3
Voices..................................... ..... A14
Classifieds and Games .....................A15


Big man on campus


Just 35:


Athletics
Facing the formidable Patriots, Winter
Springs fell short, but Oviedo won!


-00-


Cj
ol
----- m










""" T THIS WEEK in history


EK


The Federal Communications Commission issued CBS the first
license to broadcast color television. However, RCA contested the
license and a restraining order was issued. Despite this setback,
CBS did broadcast the first color TV program in June 1951.


NFL coach helps prep school squad


ISAAC BABCOCK
THE VOICE

blue and yellow helmet
flashes through the reflec-
tion of two chrome shades,
just about the time "rock and
roll!" shoots out of Mike Kruczek's
mouth and a player streaks down-
field, catching a bullet wrapped in
brown pigskin.
There are nearly half a dozen
new faces on Trinity Prep's football
coaching lineup this season, but
none of them as conspicuous as
Kruczek's. Whether you call it "crew
check" or "crewk-zek," it's hard
to mistake the name. If it sounds
familiar, that's no coincidence. He
grabbed two Super Bowl champi-
onship rings sharing quarterback
duties with Terry Bradshaw with
the Steelers, and coached the UCF
Knights for 10 straight seasons. Yes,
that Mike Kruczek.
But Kruczek's is not the usual
career track for a man who, as of
the preseason of this year, stood on
the sidelines for the Trinity Prep
Saints.
It's hard to be more succinct
than Kruczek's own explanation.
Inasmuch as time can be blurred
over the course of a long hot sum-
mer, Kruczek stepped onto a plane
in Arizona as the offensive coordi-.
nator for the Phoenix Cardinals,
and stepped off in Orlando looking
for a new job. That came calling
almost immediately.
"I told [Trinity Prep head foot-
ball coach Drew Nemec] that I
didn't have anything to do this fall,
so he asked me if I wanted to be
his offensive coordinator," Kruczek
said.
Despite the long flight across
the country, the job couldn't be any
more at home for Kruczek, whose
house is almost literally across the
street from Trinity Prep.
"I've lived right here for as long
as I've lived in Orlando," he said.


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE VOICE
Mike Kruczek, center in ballcap, offers pointers to Trinity Preparatory School football players at a recent practice. The offensive coordinator held the same job with
the NFL's Phoenix Cardinals just last season, after having coached UCF's football team and playing in the NFL. He lives within walking distance of Trinity.


"That's going on 20 years."
It didn't hurt that Nemec and
Kruczek both had children playing
in the same Pop Warner football
league. Nor did it hurt that Kruczek
has a knack for teaching young-
sters.
"It gives me something to do and
I can help the kids out at the same
time," Kruczek said. "So it works
out well for me."
Despite a dramatic change in
the team's style of play Kruczek
decided to give it a college-style
offense players were already
adapting and improving in the
third week of the season.
Austin Barton, who led the
team's running game last year, was
accustomed to Nemec's coach-


ing style, a running the game. But
with Kruczek calling the shots on
offense, the changes are for the
better, he said.
Kruczek's demanding plays
called out behind those mirror-
tinted shades had to be toned down
a bit for the Saints. As a small class
2B team, they don't have enough
players to field a full defense and
offense, let alone a special teams
squad. Most of the players play both
ways.
Barton and his younger brother
Taylor connected on a play that
took him nearly the full length
of the field for a touchdown last
week, but if you ask the Saints' star
running back what he's hoping for
this season, he'll tell you to make a


tackle, with his brother's help.
That poses a significant chal-
lenge for a coach used to working
with specialized players.
Assistant Coach Derek Wolfe,
also a newcomer on the team, said
it's football like the old days.
"It's a throwback way of play-
ing," he said. "They haven't played
both ways in the NFL since the '50s
or '60s. It's a challenge, but I like
it."
For Kruczek, whose high-flying
career took a side trip to Trinity
Prep, he said he's going to enjoy it
while it lasts.
"I'm waiting for that call to go
back to college or the NFL," he
said. "Until that comes, I'm glad to
help."


Published Friday,
October 3, 2008


W ire


Volume 18
Issue No. 40


Phone 407-628-8500 SeminoleVoice.com Fax 407-628-4053


PUBLISHER
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kyle@observernewspapers.com
EDITOR
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COPY EDITOR
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jgallagher@observernewspapers.com
INTERN
SMary Elizabeth.Schurrer


The Oviedo-Winter Springs Voice publishes on Fridays for readers in Oviedo,
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The Voice


Paqe A2 Octobetr 3 October 9, 2008


I






r ebotcO 3 October 9, 2008 Pace A3


Aldi opens early to an eager throng


JENNY ANDREASSON
THE VOICE

Shoppers clustered outside
discount grocer Aldi on
Thursday, waiting for the
doors to open to the public
for the first time. Because of
the anxious crowd, employ-
ees opened up earlier than
planned, said Bob Schmalz,
Aldi director of store opera-
tions.
By Friday afternoon,
curious customers were still
flowing steadily into the
intimate supermarket on
Aloma Avenue in the Aloma
Square Shopping Center,
east of Winter Park.
Shopper Carmen Rivera
of East Orlando said the
store reminded her of a
small wholesale retailer
because of the stacked card-
board containers of prod-
ucts Aldi does this to cut
the cost of stocking shelves.
"The prices are reason-
able it gives you a break,"
Rivera said.





Specialty discount grocer Aldi is
now open at 6766 Aloma Ave.,
east of Winter Park. Hours are from
9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through
Saturday, and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on
Sunday. Visit AldiFoods.com for
more information.


A "specialty discount
grocer," Aldi sells mostly its
own brands; part of the rea-
son for this, the chain says,
is that it saves consumers up
to 50 percent on purchases
compared with traditional
supermarkets.
For example, a gallon of
milk at Aldi is $2.79, com-
pared with $3.79 at another
local grocery store.
The store brands are
always tested against the
national brands to make
sure they meet or exceed
national quality, Schmalz
said.
Geneva resident Randy
Deavers, shopping with his
wife, Cindy, said it's natural
to be wary of the quality of
an unfamiliar store's brands.
"We've got half a buggy full,"
Randy said with a laugh. "I
guess we'll see when we get
home."
But if a customer isn't sat-
isfied with a product, Aldi's
"double guarantee" replaces
the product and returns the
money, Schmalz said.
Aldi also keeps costs low
by having customers bag
their own groceries and hav-
ing a coin-operated shop-
ping cart system return
the car, get your quarter
back so employees don't
have to retrieve carts.
Customers roamed
the three-cart-wide aisles
Friday, grabbing food items
for the coming weekend.


The store is designed to let
customers get in and out in
10 or 15 minutes, Schmalz
said. The prices are clearly
displayed and "the small
format is easy to navigate."
One thing Rivera said
she wasn't happy about was
that Aldi does not provide
grocery bags a trait that
Schmalz says takes some
getting used to.
Plastic bags are 10 cents


a piece, paper bags are 6
cents, and reusable canvas
bags are $2.
Other grocers have also
limited their use of plas-
tic bags, including Whole
Foods Market, which elimi-


nated plastic altogether, for
environmental reasons. But
Aldi originally did it so they
didn't pass on the cost to
the customer, he said. "We
did it before it was cool to
do it," he joked.


Students read and relax like adults


AMY K.D. TOBIK
THE VOICE

"Free hot chocolate? You really
have free hot chocolate?" asked the
intrigued students as they peeked
their heads into the cafeteria.
With 45 minutes until the morn-
ing bell rang at Jackson Heights
Middle School, more than 50 stu-
dents wandered in to check out the
new weekly reading program that
offered light fare, including choco-
late, free of charge.
Still somewhat groggy on a
Wednesday morning, the students
casually leafed through a hefty
collection of magazines scattered
across the cafeteria tables as they
waited for their drinks to cool and
munched on homemade muffins.
Volunteer Connie O'Hanlon
couldn't help but grin as she passed
out cups of orange juice, fresh
fruit and bagels to the students as
the crowd gathered at the Bobcat
Bistro, her latest endeavor to create
lifelong readers in Seminole County
schools. Severalyears ago, O'Hanlon
initiated another successful reading
program called Panther Reading
Partners at the elementary school
level.
The cafe style setting of the bis-
tro, she hopes, will encourage stu-
dents to stop by and read casually
for pleasure. O'Hanlon's goal was
to have children realize that read-
ing can be rewarding and not
to think of it merely as a dreaded
requirement for school or work.
She anticipates the expansive col-


election of magazines, which range
in subject from sports, news, animal
care, cars, electronics, travel and
fishing, will appeal to a wide audi-
ence. "I'm trying to expose them
to other reading material without
textbooks," O'Hanlon said.
Jackson Heights Principal
Winston Bailey said he believes the
program will help students in all
subject areas. "I think students will
be encouraged to read more and
that will improve their fluency and
comprehension. Casual reading
of periodicals is great for middle
schoolers because they get hooked
on what interests them," he said.
O'Hanlon said she also antici-
pates an increase in overall reading
skills as a result of the program. "It
is a behavioral thing. If you give
kids enough small things, like mag-
azines, newspapers, and word puz-
zle books, to glance at and look at
the pictures, they are going to start
picking up more reading material
and it will become habit," she said.
,O'Hanlon, whose children have
since graduated from Jackson
Heights, said the idea for the cafe
blossomed over the summer when
she was trying to think of new ways
to improve literacy in the schools.
After mentioning the idea to a few
people she wasn't certain the proj-
ect would come to fruition, espe-
cially with the reduction in overall
expenditures within the commu-
nity.
When school began, however,
O'Hanlon said she was surprised
to be greeted with an influx of


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE VOICE
The Bobcat Bistro at Jackson Heights Middle School offers children the chance to sample a variety of peri-
odicals while enjoying snacks and juice before school. Oscar Lopez, 13, checks out a magazine, above.


enthusiasm and support from mul-
tiple sources, including the Oviedo
Woman's Club who donated funds
to pay for the food and The Friends
of the Library who donated maga-
zines and books. Volunteers from
the community also stepped in to
work at the bistro.
Jackson Heights security officer
Lemmie Chapman plans to stop by
some mornings to encourage stu-
dents to read financial magazines
because he would like to see middle
schoolers learn about planning for
the future and basic money man-


agement, O'Hanlon said.
Eighth-grader Kelsey Malmburg
said she thinks the Bistro will
encourage her peers to read, espe-
cially with the large selection of
magazines. Kelsey enjoyed the expe-
rience so much that she volunteered
to help pass out some of the food
in upcoming weeks. Mayra Colon,
seventh grade, said she also plans
to come back next Wednesday. "I
think Bobcat Bistro is going to help
improve literacy. I really enjoyed
reading the Dog Fancy magazine,"
she said with a giggle.


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PgiOo riOo rIeOt r Ot r 2 8Jlnt


Village first taking


By Karen McEnany-Phillips

"This generation was united not only by a common purpose, but also by
common values duty, honor, economy, courage, service, love of family
and country, and, above all, responsibility for oneself."
Tom Brokaw,-author of "The Greatest Generation"


In the last few weeks we've
seen so many examples
of individuals and com-
munities taking personal
responsibility in the face of
adversity not waiting for
the government to ride to
the rescue nor pointing the
finger of blame at agencies
for not anticipating our
trouble.
The folks along the St.
Johns River got moving, got
creative and got together to
find solutions. Those living
on higher ground tempo-
rarily housed animals and
possessions; those with
four-wheel drive vehicles,
boats and trailers fer-
ried precious cargo out of
harm's way. Quiet heroes
sloshed through murky
waters and waves day after
day to help those in areas


such as Rest Haven and
Stone Island. Some days
seemed 26 hours long.
Doing what was needed,
doing the right thing, and
doing for others where
did this spirit of generosity
come from?
Neighbors helped neigh-
bors adversity strength-
ened some relationships
and brouglit other resi-
dents together for the first
time. Family, friends and
co-workers pitched in,
helped pack up precious
possessions and provided
food and supplies.
Community leaders such
as Tracy Whiting fielded
phone calls and coordi-
nated all kinds of help for
Genevans in need. Business
owners such as Liz and
Mike Crowthers at Focal


Landscaping assisted to
provide equipment, sand
and labor. Seminole County
Sheriff deputies spent
hours on and off duty
- helping whenever and
wherever they were need-
ed, especially in remote
areas.
River folk assessed their
situation and took action.
We bought waders and rub-
ber knee-boots to wade
through hip- and knee-
deep water, salt and chlo-
rine to heal our pool water,
and hay rounds and sand-
bags to fortify our livestock
and entryways.
If we could just bottle
that action, spirit and moti-
vation that promotes doing
the right thing and sets
aside personal agendas for
the sake of the community.
It is not depending on gov-
ernment to provide all the
answers, doctors to keep
us healthy, or media to tell
us how to think. Personal
responsibility it's a
refreshing concept that is
critical right now.
Our grandparents and
great-grandparents under-
stood this instinctively
when they served in World
War II and came home to
build a new version of the
American Dream. They


s

i

d


a


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c
s
f
c
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tj
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s


responsibility
were proud and fierce, Nov. 4, whichever lever you
steeped in American values, pull or box you bubble, we
with no thought of stand- must expect more action
ng. in line for entitlements, and personal responsibility
Somehow in the last few of our elected officials at all
decades, many Americans levels. The clock is ticking.
iave lost those instincts. Political partisanship is not
low do I know this? As new to America, nor is a
Country we are in debt, stagnant Congress or jock-
)bese and more concerned eying for political agendas
vith voting on "American it has always been part of
dol" than for our elected our history. We must expect
officials We've become more and demand more of
oft and dependent on ourselves and our leaders.
foreign oil, on the media, And so in the face of the
n credit, on politically challenges that we face on
:orrect thinking. We don't Main Street and Wall Street,
vant to ruffle feathers, we we again find reasons to
vant what we want when be grateful for living in
ve want it, and we settle on Geneva. A diverse commu-
he couch with our drug of nity that understands who
choice. it is, what it stands for, and
The greatest generation takes responsibility for its
et an example in daily life future.


not just in times of crisis.
We see this demonstrated
in our village as well. We
stand for principles and try
to live by them no matter
who is watching. We honor
our history and learn from
it. Our Citizen's Association
continues a cordial yet
vigilant relationship with
county officials. We don't
wait to be told what to
think or wait until the last
minute to take action.
Our country clearly
stands at a crossroads. On


>" KAREN
Please share your thoughts about
Geneva at 407-221-7002,
karenp@theoviedovoice.com
vith "Stetson's Corner" in the sub-
ject line, or fax 407-349-2800.
Thanks!
This column is dedicated to
Deputy Sheriff Gene "Stetson"
Gregory, killed in the line of duty
on July 8, 1998. Geneva will never
be the same because of Deputy
Gregory it will be'better.


ALLRED I Murders inspired change in laws to protect girlfriends


< continued from the front page


attorneys to argue pertinent law
to the judge, Bumpus-Hooper said.
Then the judge will deliberate. A
deith sentence requires a "sentenc-
ing memorandum," a somewhat
lengthy paper that defends that
punishment, thus prolonging the
wait, she said.
On Sept. 22, testimony was
taken from friends of Ruschak and
Barwick who were at the house
the evening the murders occurred.
Allred's parents, David and Tora
Allred, took the stand in defense
of their son, who was not in the


courtroom during the proceedings
per his request. He also waived his
right to a jury, leaving the judge to
determine his fate.
In a statement taken Oct. 12,
David Allred told attorneys that
on the night of the murders he
spoke with Andrew, who said-he
had "quit his job and was getting
drunk." David tried to coax Andrew
to come home, but Andrew hung
up the phone.
Records show that Tiffany filed a
report that day with the Seminole
County Sheriffs Office regarding
harassing communications made
by Andrew, including threatening


e-mails, cell phone text messages,
and that he had accessed her per-
sonal bank account. She' "was in
fear for her life," the report states.
Officers were unable to arrest
Andrew because they had not wit-.
nessed the threats. A bill has since
been passed in honor of the victims
that gives the same protection to
dating violence victims as domestic
violence victims. As a result of the
bill, Allred would be arrested today
if there was probable cause that he
made such threats.
But Ruschak and Barwick's fami-
lies don't blame the lawbooks. They
say that had the Sheriffs Office


done its job, Tiffany and Michael
would still be alive. The families
gave notice on Aug. 7 that they plan
to file a lawsuit against the agency.
"The Sheriffs Office opted to
do nothing to protect [Tiffany and
Michael] despite being presented
with clear, definite evidence that an
attack by Andrew Allred was immi-
nent," writes the families' attorney
in the notice of claim.
Sheriff Don Eslinger said in a
statement that his agency's response
did not cause the deaths, saying
that the agency "managed this case
professionally and within the scope
of the law."


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Big bear set free

Winter Springs High School unveiled a massive metal
bear sculpture on Friday, Sept. 26, purchased as a trib-
ute to the school's mascot the bear. The scultpure,
specifically, is of a Kodiak grizzly bear, and will greet
visitors to the school's football stadium.

PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK -- THE VOICE




Soldiers' families gather in Oviedo


"Half A Heart Away," a social program for families of soldiers stationed overseas, gave Oviedo residents the chance to share
stories of coping in the absence of their loved ones. The event happened Saturday, Sept. 27 at Riverside Park.


Page A4 October 3 October 9, 2008


The Vnipr


r










Festivals galore and a Whale of a Sale


Our church, the First
United Methodist Church
of Oviedo, is having its
annual event, Whale of
a Sale, on Oct. 3 and 4. I
volunteered to spend time
working with others help-
ing to sort, price, etc., and I
thoroughly enjoyed myself.
I came home all excited to
dig into my trove of stuff
for more "treasurers" to
take. My guest room closet
is a magnet of collectable
items, especially that big
carton on the top shelf,
the contents of which I
had forgot. Lo and behold,
when I tried to pull the box
down I thought I could
reach it I got it down, all
right, along with the entire
shelf. What a mess. Called


my youngest son, my 911
child, who was coming
over to patch a spot on my
roof the next day. "Mom, I
will add it to the list." Just
love them. Sons can fix
most anything but the cost
is love,food and hugs. They
are priceless.
What a great idea those
"Stop Thief' tags are, espe-
cially with the big holi-
days coming up. Stop by
C.O.P.S., the Oviedo Police
Department's volunteer
center in the Oviedo mall,
to pick up your yellow vinyl
tag. The tags are hung from
the cars'.rearview mir-
rors, a signal to criminals
that there are no valuables
inside and that the doors
are locked. They send a


message to bad people:
Don't waste your time here.
Next week the 35th
Annual Winter Park
Autumn Art Festival, locat-
ed in downtown Winter
Park along Park Avenue,
will be held from 9 a.m. to
5 p.m., Oct. 11 and 12. The
show is presented by Blue
Cross Blue Shield of Florida
and boasts of quality visual
art and activities for the
whole family. Live enter-
tainment and children's
activities are part of the
many attractions.
More festivals to attend:
Oktoberfest, 5 to 9 p.m.
Oct. 11, Avalon Park, 13001
Founder's Square, Orlando.
The event will feature
live music and traditional
dance with performances
by Europa, the Sheers
Lumberjack Show, and
the Schupplattler Gruppe
Alpenrose Dance Group.
Admission is free. For more
information call 407-658-
6565.
The 32nd Annual
Maitland Rotary Art Festival


will be from 6 to 10 p.m.
Oct. 3, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.
Oct. 4, and 10 a.m. to 5
p.m. Oct. 5, at Lake Lily
Park, 840 Lake Lily Drive,
Maitland. The event will
have about 150 artists
vying for $20,000 in prize
money in this juried show.
Awards will also be pre-
sented to artists partici-
pating from local schools.
Proceeds from the sale of
food, parking and festivals
posters will benefit local
charities. Admission is
free. Call 407-782-9714 for
more information.
A local golf tournament
will be held 8 a.m. Oct. 17
at the Twin Rivers Golf
Course, 2100 Ekana Drive,
Oviedo. Oviedo Police
Explorer Post 851's inaugu-
ral tournament will include
prizes for longest drive,
closest to the pin and hole-
in-one. Registration opens
at 6:30 a.m. The cost is $65
per person.
An outdoor screening
of "Young Frankenstein"
will be held at 8 p.m. Oct.


9 at Central-Park Avenue
in Winter Park. Free admis-
sion. Call 407-629-0054 if
you need more information
or directions.
The Oviedo Historical
Society's general meeting
will be Oct. 13 at 7 p.m.
at the Memorial Building.
The Oviedo's 3rd Annual
Cemetery Tour will be held
Oct. 21. Finally, the 35th
Annual Great Day in the
Country will be Saturday,
Nov. 4.
A thought "Two
important things are to
have a genuine interest in
people and to be kind to
them. Kindness, I've discov-
ered, is everything in life."
Isaac Bashevis Singer


TALK IA E
>TOJANET
Send word to Janet Foley about
events and let her know what's
going on around town bye-mailing
janetf@theoviedovoice.com.


ELBOW I Tough times forcing businesses to change to stay the same


< continued from the front page

ning it they gave a hell of
an effort but it's just the size
of the space ... not even that
it's economic."
The Oviedo Marketplace
itself has been struggling,
as the economy slows con-
sumer traffic and tenants
are forced out of business.
"That's potentially one of
the reasons it closed down -
the trafficwas just not there,"
said Paul Partyka, president-
elect of the Oviedo-Winter
Springs Regional Chamber
of Commerce.


The Chamber, 'Partyka
said, works to make sure
local ordinances and laws
are supporting businesses.
Oviedo recently eased up
on temporary signage rules.
The Chamber also serves
as a mouthpiece. "The big-
gest thing is that we get the
word out and help promote
those businesses," he said.
While some struggling
businesses choose to down-
size, others come up with
new ways to market prod-
ucts. Some switch gears alto-
gether, such as Shepardson.
He recently closed his


meal-assembly business, My
Girlfriend's Kitchen, when
he realized the model wasn't
catching on, and decided to
open a quick-casual seafood
eatery.
But not many business
owners can afford huge
changes when they're cir-
cling the drain.
That might have been
the fatal blow for Toucan's,
Partyka said. "In restaurants
you have to change things
all the time. The concept
was a little dated," he said
of the Bahamian-themed
eatery.


Barb Wells, of Charles
Wells Photography in
Oviedo, was shocked when
she heard about Bill's clos-
ing, but said it's a familiar
story. Her business' sales are
down 50 percent from last
year and she is selling one
of the properties she owns
with husband Charles. She
said it was shown last week
and the prospective buyers
are talking to Oviedo about
plans for it.


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The last time Oviedo offi-
cials did that, Wells said that
they turned down a pro-
spective buyer's concept for
an events venue because it
didn't fall in line with city
code. Upon closer review,
after the buyer was gone,
officials deemed that the
concept did adhere to code.
"Let's keep our fingers
crossed that the powers that
be are encouraging and not
discouraging," she said.


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October 3 October 9, 2008 Page A5


Th Vonice










Tough times, desperate crimes


BE ON THE LOOKOUT!
Crime, arrests and
public safety news from
the Oviedo Police Department

By Lt. George Ilemsky


Oviedo Police Explorers
holds fundraiser
The Oviedo Police Explorers
will be holding its inaugu-
ral golf tournament at 8
a.m. Friday, Oct. 17, at the
Twin Rivers Country Club.
Registration begins at 6:30
a.m. There will be a "shot-
gun start" at 8 a.m. Cost is
$65 per person. Interested
persons can contact Officer
Stephen Dunn at 407-971-
5709 or sdunn@cityofovie-
do.net.
The Explorers is an
Oviedo Police-sponsored
Boy Scouts-affiliated pro-
gram for youth ages 14-21


who are interested in a
career in law enforcement.

Be aware of easy
access for thieves
On Sept. 15, a victim had
her debit card removed
from her purse while the
car was parked on Wilson
Avenue.
On Sept. 26, a Samsung
Blackjack II cell phone
and cash were taken from
an unlocked classroom at
Oviedo High School while
students were in another
class.
On Sept. 27, a victim
reported three credit cards


were taken from her purse
at an unknown location and
that the cards were fraudu-
lently used.

Charities victimized
by vandals, thieves
Sometime between 3 p.m.
Sept. 23 and 11 a.m. Sept.
24, entry was made to a rear
window of a Habitat for
Humanity house located on
Chinaberry Avenue. Holes
were punched in walls of
the residence and profan-
ity was drawn on doors and
walls. Damage was estimat-
ed at about $2,500.
In a second case, the Vine
Thrift Shop located at 98
W. Broadway St. was bur-
glarized during the night of
Sept. 25. Cash and jewelry
valued at mpre than $4,000
were taken.

Stealing gas from
open garage
On Sept. 28 at about 11 a.m.,
a red-maroon newer model


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Ford Mustang convertible
pulled in front of a resi-
dence in the 2600 block of
Running Springs Loop. The
car had a loud exhaust, dark
tinted windows and a "For
Sale" sign in the back win-
dow with numbers begin-
ning with "407." The car was
occupied by a white male in
his early 20s or late teens,
with dark hair and a heavy
build, and a black female in
her early 20s or late teens,
with dark hair, about 5 feet
5 inches tall with a thin
build. The female in the car
ran into an open garage and
stole a gas can.

Online predators on
CraigsList.com?
A victim on North Lake
Claire Circle had advertised
merchandise on CraigsList.
com for sale and gave her
address to a person who
wanted to meet to make
a purchase. On Sept. 24 a
subject, described by the
victim as a "tall giant per-
son," was seen running out
of her house. Jewelry and
gold-plated coins were
stolen from the residence.
She believes the person
responsible was the per-
son she gave her address to
on CraigsList.


SCrime at a glance
On Sept. 22, a city worker
discovered a drinking foun-
tain ripped off a wall at
Boston Hill Park.
Sometime between Sept.
12 and Sept. 16, a John
Deere Model 110 tractor
was stolen from where it
was parked at a retention
pond at the end of Stump
Street. The tractor was locat-
ed near Oviedo Marketplace
Boulevard.
In a separate case on
Sept. 25, a back door was
forced open and a front
window smashed to a busi-
ness in the 1700 block of
West Broadway Street. A
Sharp 37-inch LCD televi-
sion, two Acer laptops and
other items were stolen.
On Sept. 26 at about 2
a.m., 'a front glass win-
dow was broken out of the
Sunoco gas station located
at 590 Geneva Drive.
On Sept. 27, an LG8700
cell phone and TomTom
GPS device were taken from
a vehicle parked in the
1000 block of Lockwood
Boulevard. Also that day,
victims at three different
residences reported tires
slashed on vehicles that
were parked in the 1000
block of Providence Lane.


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The Voice


Paqe A6 October 3 October 9, 2008


."P"~tisa

~Le~,-






The Voice October 3 October 9, 2008 Page A7


THIS WEEK in human history

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man-hours required to complete one Model T from 12 1/2 hours
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Killer singing plant attacks Orlando


ISAAC BABCOCK
THE VOICE
deep breath, and
then, like fire, lyrics
burst from Michelle
Allsopp's lungs, setting alight
a tale of redemption for a
downtrodden man saved by
a killer plant. Little Shop of
Horrors has returned to Or-
lando, with a promised grit-
ty reality rarely seen in the
fiercely farcical tale, accord-
ing to Director Dan Roche.
"I wanted the world of
the play to feel grittier and
darker," he said.
Steam rises from sewers
in the garbage-strewn street,
and the stage itself comes
alive as Skid Row.
"This isn't a Disney set.
It's gonna be a world that's
a little scary, a little danger-
ous-feeling, but there's a lot
of tongue-in-cheek humor."
The stage is nearly set for
the iconic man-eating plant
drama, just in time for Hal-
loween season. Just to make
sure everybody's paying at-
tention, the artists inside


The Plaza theater on Bumby
Avenue have covered the
outside of the playhouse
walls with tentacles seem-
ingly bursting out onto the
street. Their slogan: Eating
Orlando Alive.
On Monday afternoon,
Roche reached out of the
darkness below the stage
and into the limelight to
chase away the last of a
dance scene's miscues be-
fore dress rehearsal time.
"Everything is about the
little tiny details," Roche
said. "It's those details that
say this is a professional pro-
duction that's better than
what people are used to."
But a big detail nobody
is likely to miss was already
built weeks ago.
Kerry. Silson weighs an-
other 29 pounds when he
straps on the largest of four
man-eating plant puppets
- called Audrey Two -
built specifically for this
production by Hollywood
designer Paul McAvene. Sil-

> turn to HORRORS on page A9


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE VOICE
Kerry Silson and Scott Silson, expert puppeteers, play an integral role in bringing the show's main character, Audrey, to life.


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Fruit season

the beginning
the, beginning


Fruit season: it is an expression
that means happy days are here
again. The sale of a new crop
means money for growers who
hadn't had anything coming in
*since June, and the laborers, who
spent the summer living on a gar-
den, a sack of corn meal, and fish.
Fishing is a fine way to spend the
hot summer days, wielding a cane
pole and enjoying a cool breeze
down on the river prairie at the
washout, and the mere sugges-
tion that a body should buy fish
would indicate either heat stroke
or senility.
When the first of the crop is
harvested, the fruit is at least
half-green. It's edible well sort
of provided one keeps in mind
the fact that having had no fresh
fruit all summer makes for a less-
than-picky palate. Way back in
the dim and distant past, some-
one discovered by accident that
putting green fruit in a tightly
closed room heated with kero-
sene caused it to change color in
a matter of a few days. The active


ingredient was found to be eth-
ylene gas, a naturally occurring
ripening agent.
To ensure quality, the USDA
enforces a set of maturity stan-
dards for color, taste and skin
defects. Beginning in mid-Sep-
tember, and depending on pre-
vailing growing conditions, fruit
begins to creep up toward the
minimum test requirements. It's
not fit to eat really, but the lure
of high prices, which only last for
a few weeks, lures growers and
shippers to try to make the early
market by any means necessary,
up to and including cheating on
the test and bribing the inspec-
tors. Sometimes it works, but
sure as you're born, someone gets
caught trying to disguise batches
of fruit that won't pass, with some
that does. When that happens
the inspectors turn down the
crop. The expression used then
is, "there's so much yellow tape in
the coloring room it looks like a

> turn to OLD ROAD on the next page


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JP -
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The Voice


n^a ARro n.,th. q rPnea^r n Qnno








OLD ROAD I Before boom boxes, fruit pickers sang joyfully while they worked


< continued from the last page


crime scene," and while trying to
ship immature fruit is not a felony,
it is a "crime" in the sense that
once fooled, the consumer is put
off on the merchandise even after
the quality improves.
There is something about
harvest. It is one of the seasons
and times to every purpose so
eloquently rendered by King
Solomon. Commencement of har-
vest signs the gathering of proven-
der and sustenance made possible
by the grace of God and a year's
labor, and validates the farmer's
sense of purpose and fulfillment of
his role on earth. It is the tangible
connection between the Heavenly
Father, the Earth and mankind and
is recognized and celebrated by


every civilization around the world
regardless of their concept of a
higher power.
It was on this wise that an old
and pleasant sight met my eyes
yesterday. Sitting off to one side
of Lake Pickett road was a semi-
trailer with bins of half-green
navel oranges. Across the road sat
a bedraggled old school bus with a
water keg on the back and a "goat,"
the truck used to handle the pick-
ing bins. I saw ladders standing in
the treetops and heard the sound
of hard green navel oranges being
dumped from pick sacks into
the bins, "thh-ruuuump!" It is the
beginning of another fruit season.
There is a rhythm, a cadence to
picking fruit, as surely as the gait
of a horse, shoveling dirt, or the
pitching of hay with a fork. The


air is cooler and dryer now, and
the sounds and scents of fruit har-
vesting float across acres of grove
- the smell of green citrus peel,
smoke from warming and cooking
fires, and cooking food. On week-
ends, children work some and play
even more in the soft sand at the
feet of their elders.
Before the advent of portable
radio, there was singing to pass
the hours and take folks' minds
off the toil. Picking fruit is piece-
work, and happy anticipation of a
week's earnings was heard in song
and whistle as skilled hands riffled
through the trees' leaves in search
of the golden apples. There was
the singing most often in call-
and-answer form rising from
the depths, drifting over the grove
like puffy clouds on a summer day.


Sometimes joyful, sometimes blue,
it is a sound to be felt as much
as heard, and never forgotten, a
thread that runs deep in the fabric
of old Southern culture, cloaking,
comforting, and feeding body and
soul.
- The laughter and banter is still
very much in evidence today, and
you still can hear the occasional
singular melody, but the indescrib-
ably beautiful singing voices have
been replaced by rap music and
boom boxes. We know that noth-
ing stays the same. Our culture
continues to evolve as do harvest-
ing methods, but the harvest itself
remains constant the bellwether,
the standard, the provision, the
fruit of our labor, the continuum of
life on Earth.


HORRORS I Puppet comes to life in show


Hnui U aB IAAirBA UBUUK -- i vuIL
Steven Lane, plaid shirt second from left, and Michelle Allsopp, center, play Seymour and Audrey in "Little Shop of Horrors."


< continued from page A7

son is lucky. The original
one weighed 60 pounds and
was well-known for sending
puppeteers to the doctor's
office.
As Silson moves the gi-
ant green-and-red plant's
head, it comes alive on a
darkened stage just a few
feet around the corner from
Little Shop's infamous Skid
Row. Come Friday night,
he'll be eating four people
per show as characters lit-
erally disappear down the
plant's throat.
That extra dose of danger
keeps in step with the origi-
nal musical, which Roche
used as the basis for his ad-
mittedly less-Disneyfied in-
terpretation.
"In the Broadway pro-
duction ... I thought they




"Little Shop of Horrors" premieres
at The Plaza Theatre on Friday, Oct.
3, and runs through Oct. 26. Show
times are 7:30 p.m. Thursday, 8
p.m. Friday, Saturdays at 2:30
p.m. and 8 p.m., and Sundays at 3
p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Tickets are $38
for general admission and $33 for
seniors and students.
Tickets for opening night are $58.
The theater is at 425 N. Bumby
Ave. in Orlando, near the Orlando
Executive Airport.


cartoonized it," Roche said.
"Everything became a joke."
To that aim he's making
sure all the details are as re-
alistic as they come.
These are the last days
for turning pure fiction into
gritty reality, and in its final
stages the puppeteer train-
ing verges on laborious.
Puppeteer specialist Scott
Silson wrests half an hour's


worth of tutoring into 10
seconds of stage time. Re-
alism is the running man-
tra.
"At its root level all
puppetry has one goal,
and that's to make it live,"
Scott Silson said.
Come Friday night, it'll
be dinnertime for Broad-
way's hungriest plant.


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The Voice


October 3 October 9, 2008 Page A9






rd yr m u Ulrtnhcv 'LU l 0 fLt ZTe LVoe


Discipline by example


AMY K.D. TOBIK
THE VOICE

ecky Bailey tells her story with
a level of passion in her eyes
and an excitement as if it hap-
pened only yesterday.
While working as a volunteer aide
with mentally challenged children
34 years ago, Bailey met a boy named
Marcus. Marcus didn't follow the
instructor's directions one day while
swimming at a local park he simply
didn't want to leave the water.
As teachers yelled at him and made
all sorts of threats to throw away his
lunch and leave him at the lake, Bailey
begged the supervisor to give her a
chance to talk to him.
"It was an inspiring
moment, because I had


Becky Bailey's books offer
Instruction on norw 10 help
children control Ineir lives
:- E. AMY
K.D. TOBIK


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no credentials, I had no experience
and no skills," Bailey said. "My intent
when I walked into that water was
to connect with that child. Not try to
make him get out," she said.
While her sincere efforts were met
with failure that day, Bailey caught a
quick glimpse of what would become
her life's passion to find a better
way.
"When we get to discipline, we
think it is about control. And it's not
- it's about connection because the
connection gives you the willingness
when you need an ounce of coopera-
tion," she said.
Bailey, who has lived in Oviedo
for 20 years, is an award-winning
author of seven books related
to guidance and discipline
I plus several children's books
and CDs. She is well-known
locally for her contribu-
tion to the Early Childhood
Education department at
the University of Central
.. Florida and is an interna-
cionally recognized expert
in childhood education
and developmental psy-
chology.
Twelve years ago,
S Bailey founded Loving
Guidance Inc., a
company located in
Oviedo devoted to cre-
ating positive envi-
ronments for chil-
dren, families, schools
and businesses. She esti-
mates her philosophy has
touched the lives of hun-
dreds of thousands of peo-
ple through her work-
shops held across the
country. The Conscious
Discipline program has
been implemented in
both public and private
schools and day cares


across the country, including school
districts in Alaska and a school in
Mexico City.
Bailey's social-emotional programs
help teachers create "school fami-
lies" using caring as the foundation.
Research indicates schools utilizing
Conscious Discipline experienced a
decrease in aggression and impulsiv-
ity/hyperactivity in "difficult" chil-
dren and an increase in academic
scores.
Fern Creek Elementary, a school
that serves some of the poorest areas
in downtown Orlando, began imple-
menting the Conscious Discipline
program five years ago and has expe-
rienced enormous success. "In that
time, our mobility rate has dropped
from 104 percent to 86 percent, and
working with homeless students,
this is an amazing stat," said Holly
Christian, Conscious Discipline
Coordinator at the school. "By build-
ing the school family and creating a
safe environment, we have seen our
higher-level referrals (such as weap-
ons and fighting) drop," she added.
Bailey's programs give parents and
teachers the tools to change their
approach to discipline while utilizing
what is scientifically known about
the brain. "I think-it helps to under-
stand the brain.-It helps us realize
that [children] aren't just trying to be
bad. I think it gives us some objectiv-
ity to see what is going on and under-
stand it gives us more patience,"
Bailey said.
"We tend to think of discipline
starting with a conflict, but what trips
us up is the upset. Some of us aren't
good at handling upset and it's not
that our parents did a bad job, they
didn't know either," Bailey said. "If we
learn to manage ourselves, it is easy to
teach it to our children."
When people reach a level of anxi-

> turn to DISCIPLINE on the next page


This week, Amy K.D. Tobik asked children at

Layer Elementary School in Winter Springs:


"What do you think of when you

hear the word 'autumn'?"

Interested in getting your face on The Buzz? Call us at 407-628-8500
and ask for Editor Alex Babcock to sign up for a visit to your school.


"Picking apples
with my mom
and dad and two
brothers."
Anna,
age 5


"I think of
flowers growing
and some leaves
falling."
Connor,
age 8


"Leaves falling
even in
Florida."
Ella,
age 6


"I think of
colorful leaves
falling down."
- Jennifer,
age 10


"Picking fall-
colored flowers."
Madeline,
age 5


SsOti'ch ha sie of
i4-d triindley events
Oviedo Fun Days return on
Thursday, Oct. 9 and Friday,
Oct. 24 at Riverside Park on
Lockwood Boulevard. Children
ages 5-12 can swim, play indoor
and outdoor games, and do arts
and crafts. The program lasts
from 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Riverside Park stages a
spooktacular Halloween Party on
Friday, Oct. 24. Tickets cost $10
and include pizza, a small drink,
candy and a raffle ticket.There will
be a costume contest with prizes
awarded to the best costumes.
The program lasts from 6:30 p.m.
to 9:30 p.m. Tickets go on sale at
10 a.m. Sunday, Oct. 5.
Oviedo's Teenie Weenie
Halloweenie event for children 5
and younger is from 10 a.m. to
noon on Friday, Oct. 31 .Admission.
is one bag of individually wrapped
candy. There will be costume
contests, games and more!
Call Sal Rovetto at 407-
971-5579 or e-mail srovetto@
cityofoviedo.net for more
information.

Walk to School with
kids around the globe
Dommerich Elementary School
in Maitland will join schools from
around the globe in celebrating
International Walk to School Day
on Oct. 8.
About 250 students from
Dommerich will be walking to
school Wednesday along with
parents, teachers and community
leaders. The event begins at 7:55
a.m. and will last until school
begins at 8:45 a.m..
In the U.S., International Walk
to School Day is expected to
include 5,000 schools from all
50 states. Walkers from the U.S.
will join children and adults in 40
countries throughout the world.
Walk to School events work to
create safer routes for walking
and bicycling and emphasize
the importance of issues such
as increasing physical activity
among children, pedestrian
safety, traffic congestion,
concern for the environment and
building connections between
families, schools and the broader
community.
In addition to International
Walk to School Day, Dommeric
Elementary has designated .
day each month asabike andwalk
to school day. These are known
as Walk n' Roll Wednesdays.
Participants receive a punch card
and will receive rewards at the
end of the year. The first Walk
n' Roll Wednesday in September
had 240 participating students.
This event is being organized
by The Bike and Walk Committee
of Dommerich Elementary PTA.
Call Jody Lazar at 321-439-1007
or e-mail jodylazar@yahoo.com
for more information.


I I - I


I IP


Panp Al 0 Ortnhpr 3 Drtoherr 9. 2008


The Voice


I






II VIt; tVIbr 3 t- Ocoe .208 Pa l


DISCIPLINE I Author's philosophy: monkey see, monkey do


< continued from the last page

ety and distress, the emo-
tional center of the brain
can be triggered. "The emo-
tional centers of our brains,
the CD-ROM that has been
handed down from genera-
tion to generation, starts
playing in our brains. Our
buttons get pushed, the
CD-ROM starts playing,
and next thing you know
we become our mothers,"
Bailey said with a laugh.
"People need to know
how to get out of that situ-
ation," she said, "which is
the biggest challenge facing
parents, teachers, all of us."
Bailey gives the same
advice to parents, teach-
ers and children when it


comes to self-control: "Be
a STAR," which stands for
Smile, Take a deep breath
And Relax before you open
your mouth.
People need new skills,
Bailey believes, not quick
fixes. "We need a way to
resolve our internal con-
flicts and be the person we
want children to become,"
she writes in her class-
room management book,
"Conscious Discipline."
"We have mirror neu-
rons in our brains, which
guarantees a child will copy
your behavior," Bailey said.
While copying proves help-
ful with skills like speech,
it also affects behavior and
emotional regulation. "They
copy what we do not the


little lectures we give when
we are calm," Bailey said.
For example, when a child
hears a parent scream at
another driver for cutting
him off, the child will likely
mimic that behavior when
he is told "no" and feels cut
off.
If people could make
themselves aware of the
negative things they say,
they would want to change
their own behavior. "We
wouldn't have to work
hard, we wouldn't have to
learn 45 million skills, we
wouldn't have to go to 100
classes, just the awareness.
The shift isn't that difficult,"
she added.
"Educators are starved
for this information," Bailey


said, "this is a way to access
their own brilliance during
times of conflict and stress.
When we are dealing with
human relationship issues
you have to come out with
the patience of a saint and
the emotional intelligence
of the Dalai Lama to handle
this," she said.
"Self-regulation is a
tough skill, but we can do
it. Overall we have come
to the point where we can
move the ball forward. We
can access the higher cen-
ter of our brains and evolve
ourselves. It took all the
generations before us to get
us here," Bailey said. "This is
our generation's gift."
Visit LovingGuidance.com
for more information.


CINEMA


Are moviie ti [imes forFrida,[t EW 3
Tie .aegenerlly alidfor Satuda ad Sndy oo-6 lltobes ure


Oviedo Marketplace
1500 Oviedo Marketplace Blvd.
407-977-1107
AN AMERICAN CAROL (PG-13)
1:25,4:35,8:10,10:35

BEVERLY HILLS CHIHUAHUA
(PG) Noon, 1:10, 2:30, 3:50, 4:55,
6:50, 7:20, 9:30, 10:30, midnight

BLINDNESS (R) 12:50, 3:45, 7:45,
10:50

FLASH OF GENIUS (PG-13)
12:35, 3:40, 6:45, 9:40, 12:45am -

HOW TO LOSE FRIENDS &
ALIENATE PEOPLE (R) 12:30,
4:30, 7:10, 9:50, 12:25am

NICK AND NORAH'S INFINITE
PLAYLIST (PG-13) 12:10,1:05,
2:35,4:05, 5:00, 7:30, 8:05,10:00,
10:40,12:35am

EAGLE EYE (PG-13) 12:10,12:45,
1:20, 2:40, 4:20, 5:15, 7:20, 7:50,
8:20,10:00,10:25,12:45am

FIREPROOF (PG) 1:00, 3:55, 7:00,
10:15

MIRACLE AT ST. ANNA (R)
12:30,4:00,8:00,9:35,11:40

NIGHTS IN RODANTHE (PG-13)
12:20, 2:45, 5:20, 7:40,10:05,
12:35am

APPALOOSA (R) 12:55, 4:50,
7:30,10:20

GHOST TOWN (PG-13) 1:15,
4:40, 7:25,10:30

LAKEVIEW TERRACE (PG-13)
12:55,4:10,7:10,10:10, 12:45am

MY BEST FRIEND'S GIRL (R)
12:40, 4:25, 7:15, 9:55, 12:30am

BURN AFTER READING (R)
12:20, 2:55, 5:10, 7:35,10:15,
12:40am

RIGHTEOUS KILL (R) 12:15,
2:50, 5:05, 7:55,10:45


IGOR (PG) 12:05, 2:25, 4:45, 7:05

THE WOMEN (PG-13) 1:30, 4:15,
6:55, 9:45, 12:20am

TROPIC THUNDER (R) noon,
3:35,10:50






Waterford Lakes Town Center
541 N. Alafaya Trail
407-207-4603
AN AMERICAN CAROL (PG-13)
12:20, 2:45, 5:05, 7:45,10:05, .
12:05am

BEVERLY HILLS CHIHUAHUA
(PG) 12:05, 1:05, 2:35, 4:10, 5:10,
7:00, 8:10, 9:20,10:40,11:40

BLINDNESS (R) 12:40, 4:35, 7:50,
10:45

FLASH OF GENIUS (PG-13)
12:50, 3:55, 7:15, 10:10, 1:00am

HOW TO LOSE FRIENDS &
ALIENATE PEOPLE (R) 12:35,
3:50,7:30,10:15,12:50am

NICK AND NORAH'S INFINITE
PLAYLIST (PG-13) 12:10,1:20,
2:40, 4:00, 5:00, 7:10, 8:05, 9:45,
10:35,12:15am

EAGLE EYE (PG-13) 1:35, 3:35,
4:50,6:50,7:40,8:15,9:50,10:30,
11:10, 12:40am; Captioned at 12:45

FIREPROOF (PG) 1:25, 4:25, 7:15,
10:20

MIRACLE AT ST. ANNA (R) 1:00,
4:30, 8:00,11:30

NIGHTS IN RODANTHE (PG-13)
11:55am, 2:25, 4:55, 7:25, 9:55,
12:30am

GHOST TOWN (PG-13) 12:15,
3:40

IGOR (PG) NOON, 2:20, 4:45, 6:55


'Nick and Norah's Infinite Playlist' Opens Friday


Nick is nursing a broken heart. Norah is questioning the world.
With nothing in common but a love for music, they find a legendary
band's secret show and end up on their first date.


1 hour 30 minutes PG-13


'Beverly Hills Chihuahua'






.ue I o f


1 hour 25 minutes PG


LAKEVIEW TERRACE (PG-13)
1:15, 4:20, 7:55,10:50

MY BEST FREIND'S GIRL (R)
12:25,4:15,6:45,9:25,12:10am

BURN AFTER READING (R)
1:10, 4:05, 7:05

RIGHTEOUS KILL (R) 9:35,
midnight


Chioe, a diamond-
clad Beverly Hills
Chihuahua, hardly
notices Papi, a Chi-
huahua who's crazy
for her. But when she
gets lost in Mexico,
Papi heads south of
the border to rescue
his true love.


TYLER PERRY'S THE FAM-
ILY THAT PREYS (PG-13) 9:30,
12:35am



Maitland
1300 S. Orlando Avenue
Maitland, FL 32751
407-629-0054
.CHOKE (R) 3:45, 6:30, 9:15


'Religulous'
Political comedian Bill
Maher of the HBO series
"Real Time" documents
his travels throughout the
world talking to people
about religion, bringing
his wry wit to the other-
wise serious subject.


Opening Oct. 10








'The Express'

2 hours 9 minutes PG-13


Call 407.628.8500
for home delivery


or visit us online!


II--I I


October 3 October 9, 2008 Page Al 1


The Vnice


I






rdyrmie ui Autnhir a ArtnhLr 0900UTe Voi


CALENDAR


Winter Springs candidate
forum in Highlands
The Highlands neighborhood hosts a
Winter Springs City Commission can-
didate forum at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct.
7. The event will be at the Highlands
Clubhouse, 2200 Shepard Road. The
candidates will each get a chance to
state their positions on city issues and
answer questions from guests.

SPCA gets a cut
of your art purchases
Shop and support the SPCA of Central
Floridafrom 10 a.m.to 6 p.m. Saturday,
Oct. 4 at Ten Thousand Villages at 346
Park N. Ave. in Winter Park.
Ten Thousand Villages, a nonprofit
organization that supports fair trade
for artisans worldwide, will donate
10 percent of sales to the SPCA
of Central Florida, the leading ani-
mal welfare organization in Central
Florida. Shop for handcrafted jewelry
and home d6cor while helping needy
pets in Central Florida!
Call Monisha Seth at 407-461-1768


or Robin Longley at the SPCA at 407-
248-1758 for more information.

Car show highlights
alternative fuel vehicles
Seminole Community College's
Automotive Program will highlight
alternative fuel vehicles at its second
annual Car and Truck Show from 9
a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 4 on the
Sanford-Lake Mary Campus.
The event will be held in conjunction
with National Alternative Vehicle Day
Odyssey, sponsored by the National
Alternative Fuels Training Consortium.
SCC is one of only two locations in
Florida hosting Odyssey Day -events
this year.
Among the alternative vehicles are:
Hydrogen cell Ford Focuses from
Progress Energy; hydrogen-fueled
buses; a Smart Car; a fully electric
Scion eBox, which has a lithium ion
battery; and all-electric GEM cars.
The show will be held at the SCC's
CFADA Professional Automotive
Training Center. All proceeds benefit


scholarships for automotive students.
There will also be food, a DJ and
raffles. The show is free for specta-
tors; there is a $20 registration fee to
enter the car show.
The car show will also include tours
of SCC's automotive building, a chil-
dren's safety village from the Orange
County Sheriff's Office, and Dyno drag
racing. Rock the Vote also will be reg-
istering voters.
Call Jason Gaschel at 407-708-
2278 for more information.

Have your dogs, cats
and skunks blessed
Most Precious Blood Catholic Church
in Oviedo hosts a pet blessing event
from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Oct. 5 at Lawton
Chiles Middle School on State Road
419 in east Oviedo. People can bring
their pets to be blessed by the priest
amid supporters such as the Seminole
County Animal Services and other
organizations related to pets and ani-
mals. Beside the usual array of dogs
and cats there will be some exotic


animals and a few unique ones like
pet skunks and rare exotic tortoises.

German drinking tradition
comes to Casselberry
Oktoberfest comes to Casselberry
from 2 p.m. to midnight Saturday, Oct.
4, thanks to the German-American
Society of Central Florida. Enjoy
German food, beer, music and danc-
ing, for $5. Children 12 and younger
are free. The event is at 381 Orange
Lane in Casselberry. Call 407-834-
0574 for more information.

Walk to benefit
farm animal welfare
Orlando hosts a Walk for Farm
Animals on Saturday, Oct. 4 starting
at the Ethos Vegan Kitchen at 1235 N.
Orange Ave. in Orlando. Registration
begins at 11 a.m. with the walk
at noon. The effort benefits Farm
Sanctuary, which has efforts to rescue
farm animals with poor living condi-
tions and raise awareness through
educational campaigns..


Registration costs $15 in advance
and $20 on that day. Visit
WalkForFarmAnimals.org to register.

SCC hosts 75 colleges
at recruiting night
Meet with representatives from more
than 75 colleges and universities
at Seminole Community College's
College Night 2008 from 6 p.m.
to 8 p.m. Monday, Oct. 6 at SCC's
Center for Economic Development at
Heathrow.
The free event is for local college-
bound high school students and their
parents. College and university rep-
resentatives will answer questions
and provide information on tuition,
registration procedures, academic
offerings, intercollegiate sports, hous-
ing arrangements and financial aid
assistance.
College Night will be held at SCC's
Heathrow Campus at 1055 AAA Drive
in Heathrow. V
Visit scc-fl.edu/collegenight or call
407-708-2050 for more information;


WEATHER


9


UV INDEX 1 Very high


SAfTURDAYISOATE T-TORV


MORNING LOW 70
DAYTIME HIGH 850
30% chance of rain


Sunrise
7:20 a.m. 7


Sunset
:07 p.m.


11:47 hours
of sunlight


Wind
NE 12 mph


^\ MORNING LOW 720


_.I


Sunrise
7:20 a.m.


DAYTIME HIGH 830
30% chance of rain


Sunset
7:06 p.m.


11:46 hours
of sunlight


Wind
NE 11 mph


/- MORNING LOW 720


DAYTIME HIGH 830
50% chance of rain.


Sunrise
7:21 a.m. 7


Sunset
:04 p.m.


11:43 hours
of sunlight


Wind
NE 10 mph


/P" \ MORNING LOW 720


DAYTIME HIGH 840
30% chance of rain.


Sunrise S
7:22 a.m. 7:


Sunset
03 p.m.


11:41 hours
of sunlight


Wind
NE 12 mph


660 820 840 640
6 a.m. I Noon 3 p.m. I 6 a.m.


TODAY: Mostly sunny, with
a 20% chance of scattered
showers in the afternoon
and evening.


GAINESVILLE
500 I 830


THI**S WEE

the soteatr U.S. An
the. mideAlni os
reio reore record


MARINE FORECAST
Cocoa Beach tide schedule
Time High Low
Saturday 10:54 a.m. 4:15a.m.
Sept. 27 11:03p.m. 5:10p.m.


Sunday
Sept. 28


OVIEDO
630 1850


ORLANDO
650 I 850


11:42 a.m. 4:58 a.m.
11:52 a.m. 6:10 p.m.


FLORIDA FORECAST
City Friday Sat.
Tampa 63/85 65/85
Jacksonville 59/81 59/81
Gainesville 50/83 52/83


Ft. Lauderdale
Miami
Naples
Tallahassee


TAMPA
630 1 85


NATIONAL FORECAST


City
Atlanta
New York
Chicago


Friday Sat.
49/79 50/79
47/67 49/65
49/61 45/65


74/86


74/85


74/85 74/85


70/83
47/83


72/83
49/83


INTERNATIONAL


Friday Sat.


Washington, D.C. 47/72


Seattle


49/72


56/63 54/63


San Francisco 56/61


56/61


City
London
Paris
Tokyo


Friday Sat.
44/51 41/60
41/55 41/55
62/73 62/78


Los Angeles 61/74 61/68 Houston 61/85 65/88


The Voice


mi IM r


Pane Al 2 October October 9. 200


r


I PEAK TO


Mexico City 53/73 55/73






The Voice October 3 October 9, 2008 Page Al 3



THIS WEEK in sports history

/^L eI .., *The St. Louis Cardinals defeated the Detrott Tigetr e=TY
game of the World Series. The Cardinals"'Gashouse Gang" nick-
name had to do with the team's close resemblance to the rowdy,
Sdirt-streaked thugs who hung around the Gashouse District on
L T_____ Manhattan's East Side.


Bears, Hawks fall; Lions rule


ISAAC BABCOCK-
THE VOICE
A l-Terek McBurse
stole the spotlight
with two long runs
for Winter Springs, but
Antonio Miles won the
game with persistence as
the Lake Brantley Patriots
downed the Bears on Friday
night.
The game started out
with both running backs
taking their starring roles
with strong running per-
formances in the first quar-
ter.
But where McBurse
showed his magic with
some big plays to help put
the Bears up 14-0 early on,
Miles kept coming, with a
series of consistent, albe-
it shorter runs to help his
team battle its way down-
field.
Regardless, Miles
couldn't find the end zone,
and the Bears stayed ahead
by two touchdowns going
into the second half.
But offensive miscues by
the Bears led to a night-
mare in the third quarter, as
an interception and a fum-
ble led to two quick touch-
downs for the Patriots, and
locked up a game that had
been all Bears.
That's when McBurse
did what he does best, rac-
ing more than half the field
for a touchdown to bring
the score to 21-14.
And then suddenly the
Bears' offensive machine
ran out of gas just as the
Patriots were finding their
first real offense of the
night.
Two long drives brought
the Patriots to the goal line,


and short runs got them
across it to seal the victory.
The Bears will try to avoid
a two-game slide, traveling
for a 7:30 p.m. Friday, Oct.
3, kickoff at Hagerty.
Hagerty returns to the
field Friday after taking a
breather last week. They'll
be looking for their second
win of the season against
the Bears. The Huskies won
their first varsity game ever
against Oviedo in week
two.
The Lions bounced back
from a two-game skid to
clobber Lake Mary 41-21
last week. That was a big
offensive game for the
Lions, who scored a sea-
son high in points, nearly
matching the point spread
they had against Lake
Howell in week one.
The Lions travel to Lake
City Columbia for a 7:30


p.m. kickoff this Friday,
Oct. 3. Columbia is 1-3 this
season coming off a 26-21
loss to Jacksonville's Teriy
Parker High.
The Silver Hawks con-
tinued their season-long
losing streak with a 37-6
loss to Lyman last week.
That's the second time in
two weeks the Hawcks have
allowed a team to score 37
points on them.
So far the Hawks have
had trouble mobilizing
their offense, scoring only
30 points in four games this
season. In the meantime
their defense has allowed
123 points against them.
That's not good news
considering the prolific
offense of Seminole High,
which travels to Lake
Howell at 7:30 p.m. Friday.
The Seminoles fell 34-22 to
Dr. Phillips last week.


running DacK Al-lereK McBurse;
despite the efforts of the Winter
Springs color guard, the Bears fell to
the Lake Brantley Patriots last Friday.
PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK
THE VOICE


....a. hi ,gh -..-. h


Oviedo
vs. Columbia
7:30 p.m. at Columbia.
469 S.E. Fighting Tiger Drive,
Lake City

Hagerty
vs. Winter Springs
7:30 p.m. at Hagerty
3225 Lockwood Blvd.,
Oviedo

Lake Howell
vs. Seminole
7:30 p.m. at Lake Howell
4200 Dike Road,
Winter Park


a



Next Game:
vs. SMU Mustangs

WHEN: 3:30 p.m.
Saturday, Oct. 4

WHERE: Bright House Sta
at UCF


idium


The Knights last played UTEP
in El Paso, falling 58-13.
UCF is 1-3 overall.


Hagerty Huskies Sports Review


COMPILED BY JAY GETTY
HAGERTY Ir-.iH SCHOOL

Volleyball -
Win over Barracudas improves
district standing to 2-1
A three-game win (25-19, 14, 17)
against the visiting squad from New
Smyrna Beach started the week on
a positive note for the Huskies. In the
contest, Mandy Mclntosh distributed
25 assists primarily to Lauren Colton,
Anna Vols and Alex Teixeira. Colton
and Vols each recorded nine kills in
the game.
An extremely close contest with the
Patriots finished the week and added
a loss to Hagerty's overall record. The
team is currently 5-5 on the year. In
the game, Mclntosh accounted for 32
assists as Volz and Teixeira scored 19
and 16 points respectively.


Cross country -
Compher and Mendes capture
titles in Key West
A quad meet with Key West, Baker,
Park Vista and Hagerty provided the
opportunity for individual champion-
ships for the program.
On the girls' side, Shannon Compher
ran down the race leader in the final
10th of a mile to win with a time of
20:57 minutes. For the boys, Sean
Mendes and Peter Licari ran stride-
for-stride for the last mile to finish
first and second overall, with Mendes
edging out Licari at the end.
The difficult course accounted for
48 mini-hills on the Key West Golf
Course.
As a team, the girls won the meet
by 8 points over a tough team from
Baker High School. The boys finished
second to Baker in the meet. Both


teams travel to Titusville this weekend
for the Flrunners.com Invitational.

Softball -
Doubleheader split leaves team
with a 6-2 record overall
After a first game loss to Lake Brantley
by the score of 4-0, the Huskies
pushed six runs across the plate in
the second game of a doubleheader
to defeat Lake Mary 6-3. The win
improved their season record to 6-2.
Kelsey Carpenter contributed two hits
and Erin Wagstaff was solid on the
mound against the Rams.

Bowling -
Overton and Liberatore pace
the Huskies on the lanes
The duo of Deborah Overton and
Justin Liberatore rolled series totals of.
528 and 629 to pace their respective


teams to wins over Crooms by scores
of 2317-1145 for the girls and 2891 -
2284 for the boys.
Earlier in the week, both squads
defeated Winter Springs in a Baker
match.The girls won 7-0 and the boys
won 5-2. Overall, both groups are 7-1
and ranked in the Orlando Sentinel
Super Six. The boys are currently
ranked fifth and the girls are sixth in
the ranking system.

-Golf-
Match with Oviedo influenced
by rain, poor conditions
In their only match of the week, the
Huskies were defeated by the Lions
on both sides of the program. The
match with the girls was halted at
five holes with Oviedo ahead 121-
146. The girls were led by Veronica
Gajownik (33) and Inca Joy Gordon


(41). The boys were led by George
"Tucci (43) and Tom Calhoon (44) in the
164-182 loss. The girls are now 3-4
overall while the boys are 2-6.

Swimming -
Multiple dual meet wins high-
light the week in the pool
In swimming action, the boys posted
three wins on the week over Circle
Christian (223-8), Lyman (181-95),
and Oviedo (193-93). The girls were
victorious in two of their three match-
es with wins over Circle Christian
(207-26) and Lyman (185-70). The
loss to Oviedo was by. the score of
T59.5-135.5.
The teams were led by Takashi
Worrell and Olivia Sims. Both were
individual double winners with Worrell
in the 200 and 500 freestyle and Sims
in the 50 and 100 freestyle events.


Is






Page A14 October 3 October 9, 2008 The Voice




THIS W EEK in political history

V I E The U.S. House of Representativs voted tipea6h Presde Bill
Clinton on charges of perjury and obstruction of justice. He was
Acquitted after a five-week trial. Clinton was the first president to
VI A Ebe impeached by the House since Andrew Johnson in 1868.
1 I L


LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Make absentee voting easier for all


I need to confess a shameful secret,
a sin of omission from last year
that I've regretted ever since: I
didn't vote.
By most measures, I am a politi-
cally engaged college student. I
read the news and political blogs
every day. Since I was in high
school, I've organized voter reg-
istration drives to help other stu-
dents vote and can sit for hours
discussing policy and politics with
friends and family. But on April 1,
when Wisconsin chose its swing
Supreme Court Justice, I was not a
part of that decision.
It's not that I didn't care I
probably had a stronger opinion
about those two candidates than
I've had in most elections. I wasn't
distracted by an important trip,
nor was I refusing to participate
in a broken election system. I was
away at school. Between term
papers and the less academic por-
tion of the college experience, I
forgot to send in an application to
get my absentee ballot.
I wasn't alone. I did an infor-
mal survey of acquaintances after
the 2006 elections to find out
who didn't vote. If they didn't
vote, I wanted to know why. Not
a single person told me "I didn't


care." Not a single person said, "I
don't see how the election affects
me." These are the great myths of
young people who don't vote, and
its perpetrators will often point
out with a concerned frown that
voters aged 18 to 25 tend to have
lower turnout rates. However, one
further statistic points us toward
the real story: Among registered
voters, 18- to 25-year-olds turn out
at basically the same rate as other
age groups.
Unfortunately, the American
election system contains hurdles
that are particularly serious for
young, mobile voters. Not only
must we navigate complicated ID
requirements to register to vote for
the first time, but many of us must
also apply for an absentee ballot. If
you are from Michigan, Tennessee
or Louisiana, you may be out of
luck. If you register to vote by mail
in those states, you are required to
vote in person for your first elec-
tion. This is grossly unfair not only
to new 18-year-old freshmen in
college, but to displaced victims of
the recent Gulf Coast hurricanes as
well..
For those of us who can vote
by absentee ballot, just figuring
out how to get one can be a chal-


lenge. The request process varies
from state.to state and often even
County to county. We need to fig-
ure out whether to contact our
state elections board, our county
clerk or our municipal registrar. In
some states, we can simply send
our election official an e-mail;
however, in some, we must send an
original form by mail. Oddly, North
Carolina requires a signed, hand-
written note requesting a ballot.
Particularly frustratingly are
Kentucky, South Carolina and
some counties in Illinois, which
require that a voter call to have an
absentee ballot request form sent,
wait for the form to arrive, fill it
out, send it back, wait for the bal-
lot to arrive, and send the ballot in
time to arrive on Election Day.
Elections in the United States
are arcane, and a clear nationwide
snapshot of any aspect of election
administration probably requires
different information from each
of our country's thousands of vot-
ing jurisdictions. The challenge is
assembling that information in a
way that is easily accessible to vot-
ers, especially new voters who may
be less familiar with the process.
Luckily, the Internet gives us
simple and powerful tools for


managing and accessing large
amounts of data. Those of us who
have grown up with technology
expect and demand information
in a few clicks. We don't like click-
ing through unwieldy Web sites or
needing to visit multiple sites.
Providing easy-to-follow guid-
ance through a complicated pro-
cess should be a first step. That is
why some friends and I founded
GoVoteAbsentee.org. It is an online
resource that takes those who
must vote absentee step-by-step
through the voting process for
their county or municipality, pro-
viding forms, procedures, contact
information and easy-to-follow
instructions.
We must work to change the
process to make it easy and fair.
The more transparent these mech-
anisms of democracy are, the more
voices will be heard on Election
Day. As with any election, there
will be a significant number of new
voters. A lot of them will be 18. We
need to ensure that they and all
registered voters can vote easily -
and if necessary, vote absentee.
Sam Oliker-Friedland
Senior at Brown University
Co-founder of GoVoteAbsentee.org


Reach out, help each other in tough economy


EMPLOYMENT

Ask

Sandi


I know that many of the people
reading this column have been
seriously affected by the downturn
in our economy. During the past
couple of days, car dealerships
have closed and banks have failed.
More and more people are find-
ing themselves in a situation they
never expected.


The unemployment rate is at 6.5
percent, which is extremely high in
our community. I wish I had good
news that it will all change very
soon.
I want to encourage those of
you who are working to reach out
and help your neighbors. If you are
blessed with a stable job, now is a
great time to support a nonprofit
that is helping people to make it
through the tough times. There are
many great ones in our commu-
nity.
Help your neighbors by letting
them know of job opportunities
you hear of. Volunteer to watch


their kids while they go to an inter-
view or invite them over for a nice
meal.
We are seeing so many middle-
class people coming into food
pantries and asking for assistance
with finances. Agencies are over-
whelmed with the volume of peo-
ple coming in.
We have seen a 100 percent
increase in clients at Christian
HELP. Hope Foundation in Oviedo
helped more than 500 families last
month.
The need is great reach out
today. If you are looking for work,
please contact us at 407-834-4022.


>TO SANDI
Sandi Vidal is the executive director for
Christian HELP and the Central Florida
Employment Council, with more than 10
years of recruiting and human resources
experience. Please send questions about
employment by fax 407-260-2949, sandi@
christianhelp.org, or mail: Ask Sandi
C/O Christian HELP, 450 Seminola Blvd.,
Casselberry, FL 32707.
Subjects may include employment search,
resumes, networking and promotion oppor-
tunities.
Employers: E-mail your job leads to cfec@
cfec.org and we will share them with
Christian HELP clients.


Here's what kids at

cu Lawton Head Start

0 had to say about
"I their families.


/


=

C
cm


r


My family is made
of my mommy,
my grandpa, my
grandma, and me. I
love them and they
cook for me. I have
cousins tool
Adrian C.
4 years old


I have a big fam-
ily my mom and .
dad, grandma and
grandpa, brothers
and sisters, aunts
and uncles, and a
godmother! They all
take care of me. We
have a bird too!
Savanna W.
4 years old


My mom and dad
take care of me and
my two brothers -
they also make me
food. I help take care
of my little brother.
We also have a black
cat.
Amir 0.
3 years old


My family loves me.
My mommy and
daddy play with me
and they clean up
too. We eat dinner
together, my mom is
a good cook..
Mia T.
3 years old


,
r'


S "



'' -


/


My family shares things together.
My mommy and grandma and my
sister and brother are my family. We
color together and share crayons.
They fix good food like pizza. I love
S them and they are cute!
- Danna F. _E-----
4 years old
We would
love .,
/to .


/ from "
/ young
/ Yng 4is
i l; "y . .. -


/Call editor Alex Babcock at 407-628-8500
to have The Voice visit your class or group.


'00


h


















SMarketplace


October 3 October 9, 2008 Page A15


? 1 Should it be (klas'e fid' ad'ver tizing) Noun. Advertising
i" Sl -i t b C compactly arranged, as in newspaper

S,' ',- p,"ry't -- - ', i columns, according to subject, under such
-_:. ... listings as help wanted and for sale


REALTORS:
Licensed Real Estate Professionals needing
to earn additional income. Become a
part time or full time loan officer. Control
your own closings. Gain access to
hundreds of mortgage programs. Save
your clients thousands of dollars. Call
Maitland Mortgage Lending Company
(407)629-5626

WANTED: MATURE MODELS
Wanted: mature models to complete
discounted Healthy Detox Program for
promotional testimonies. Lose Inches, Burn
Calories, Feel Great Look Good. 407-455-
3964. www.detoxants.net







MUST SELL
Gorgeous 4 bed, 2 1/2 bath pond-view
home, built in 2007, 2,784 sq. ft., with tons
of upgrades and HUGE yard, $325K, must
sell. Tanya McDonnell, Re-Max Town &
Country, 407-695-2066 ext. 604



FOR RENT
Oviedo Office Space, great frontage. 750
to 1,050 sf available. $1,070-to $1,350 per
month. 1401 Broadway St. Contact Megan
at (407) 687-3524.

PARK AVE OFFICE SPACE
Park Ave Office Space avail to Real Estate
Broker. All office equipment included. Call
407/741-8541.





Reading volunteers NEEDED Jackson
Heights Middle School in Oviedo is looking
for adults who are interested in serving as a
Reading Mentor to assist students who are
reading below grade level. Volunteers work
one-on-one with an assigned student before
school for 30 minutes, one or more times
a week through the-end of the school year
to build fluency and comprehension skills.
Sessions are from 8:30-9:00 a.m,, M-F
Please contact Connie O'Hanlon for more
information, 407-365-7585.





HOW TO DETOX FOR
OVERNIGHT RELIEF
Natural herbal patches, overnight
detoxification, pain relief: knees, back, foot,
gout, sciatic, lumbago, carpal tunnel, cancer
treatment Attach to foot great night's
sleep. http://www.ebook-detox-patches.
com. (407) 970-1483









Find out what your
home is worth on-line
OrlandoHomeHunting.com
Free Recorded Message
1-877-895-1807 1.0.6041















Get fast same or next day service!

Repairs, upgrades, build-to-spec,
wireless networking, maintenance
or virus removal.

Need training?

No problem!
We provide that too.

Over 25 years experience.

Call 917-803-2440

Code 4


HANDYMAN/CARPENTRY
Let me take care of the chores you don't
have time to do yard work, carpentry,
painting, (whole house or interior rooms),
driveways, repairs, pressure washing, and
more. No job too small. Local. Prompt.
Affordable. Call Scott at 321-460-3905.

KITCHEN/BATHROOM SURFACES
Repair and resurface bathtubs, ceramic
tile, vanities, kitchen countertops, cabinets,
appliances and much more. No dust and
dirt and very little down time. Have a new
factory-like finish and save up to four times
the replacement cost. Licensed/insured/
member BBB. All Surface Technology, 407-
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Services start at $11/hr.
Review website at:
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or call 407-401-8308'
for more info.




WE BUY


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for CASH
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407-297-8749


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
FileNo. 2008-CP-1722
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARVIN J. CRITES,
Deceased.
NOTICETO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of MARVIN J.
CRITES, deceased, whose date of death was August
17, 2008, is pending in the Circuit Court for Semi-
nole County, Florida, Probate Division, File Number
2008-CP-1722, the address of which is 301 N. Park
Avenue, Sanford, Florida 32772-8099. The estate is
testate. The names and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
"'11 ,3,,,', I, Ih, ,, ,'13,,7, ., ir,, ,,,:1 'VT1 Il II
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is
10/3/2008.


Attorney for Personal Representative:
PAUL BRYAN SLADEK
Florida Bar No.: 869031
CLONINGER & FILES.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
1519W.8roadway d
P.O. Box 620337
Oviedo, FL 32765
Telephone: (407) 365-5696
Facsimile: (407) 365-8919
Personal Representative:
JACK CRITES
412 Garden Grove Court,
Spartanburg, SC 29302
10/3,


10/10


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.:08-CA-513-14-L
THE CROSSINGS MASTER COMMUNITY ASSOCIA-
TION, INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JASON R PROODIAN and MILDRED PROODIAN,
Defendants.
NOTICE FACTION
TO: Mildred Proodian
785 Minerva Lane
Lake Mary, Florida 32746
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to enforce a lien
foreclosure on the following property in Seminole
County, Florida:
Lot 39, GREENWOOD LAKES UNIT D-3B, ac-
cording to the Platthereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 38, at Page 99 and 100, of the Public
Records of SEMINOLE County, Florida.
A lawsuit has been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your written defenses,
if any, to it on JEFF A. STONE, ESQUIRE, Plaintiff's
Attorney, whose address is CLAYTON & MCCULLOH,
1065 MAITLANO CENTER COMMONS BLVD., MAI-
TLAND, FLORIDA 32751, within thirty (30) days
after the first publication of this notice, and file the
original with the Clerk of this Court either before
service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately there-
after; otherwise a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the Lien Foreclosure
Complaint.
DATED on September 17, 2008.
MARYANNE MORSE
Clerk of County Court
By: Linda Passou
Deputy Clerk
9/26,10/3


you5 ;
a;- .-^'?;


WA.,,I. u[,, 22 words :,,u BOiNG GLOVES If you're selling it
.n tf youreseh ['. t it
,. gl i. .......- .. .,. flor less than $500,
it's a free ad!
include a contact W 0 01 lees me rules: You get one per month.
vrr (ijfiL i:,:i.l :l ') 1 I 1I .ust have a price. No business ads. It will
e-mail (3 words) or Web site (2 words). publish as space is available.


I i J U L-1 i FC1 jtiZ
SI.. -.--- -- s i i j


...or suggest your own!

Call 407-628-8500 or e mraii cdssifieds@oOse,-erriewspapers.com


I


Copyrighted Material s




Syndicated Content




Available from Commercial News Providers


I


NOTICE OF SALE OF MOTOR VEHICLE
Pursuant to Florida Statute 713.585, Mid-Florida
Lien And Recovery, wffl sell at public sale for cash
the following described vehicles located at lienor's
place to satisfy a claim of lien. 2001 FORD VIN:
1FAFP53211A191476. Lien Amt: $2500.00. Lienor/
STEVE'S TRANSMISSION REPAIR 1801 E.ALTAMON-
TE DR ALTAMONTE SPRINGS, FL 407-331-3199.
2003 HYUNDAI VIN: KMHWF25S83A894922. Lien
Amt: $1443.85. Lienor/AUTO CARE CLINIC 1208 S
ELM AVENUE SANFORD, FL 407-688-9399. Sale
Date: October 20, 2008, 10:00 AM. At Mid Florida
Lien & Recovery 3001 Aloma Ave. Winter Park FL
32792. Said vehicles) may be redeemed by satisfy-
ing the lien prior to sale date. You have the right to
a hearing at any time prior to sale date by filing a
demand for hearing in the circuit court. Owner has
the right to recover possession of vehicle by post-
ing a bond in accordance with ES. 559.917. Any
proceeds in excess of the amount of the lien will
be deposited with the Clerk of Circuit Court in the
county where the vehicle is held.
10/3


IN THE EIGHTH CIRCUIT COURT FOR SEMINOLE
COUNTY, FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 2008-CP-1750
IN RE: ESTATE OF
RICHARD P. STEMMER,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of RICHARD P
STEMMER, deceased, whose date of death was
June 19, 2008, File Number 2008-CP-1750 is
pending in the Circuit Court for Seminole County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is
301 N. Park Avenue, Sanford, Florida 32771. The
name and address of the Personal Representative
and of the Personal Representative's attorney are
set forth below,
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate, on whom a copy of this notice is served
must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE
LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against the
decedent's estate must file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
Date of the first publication of this notice of
administration: September 26, 2008.
WE Winderweedle, JR.
Attorney
219 W Comstock Avenue
Winter Park, Fl. 32790-2997
Telephone: (407) 628-4040
Florida Bar No. 0116626
Judyann Schipani
Co-Personal Representative
9/26, 10/3


Answers.









IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO.: 2008-CP-1774
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JAMES NICHOLAS KRUEGER,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of JAMES NICH-
OLAS KRUEGER, deceased, whose date of death
., .. ",.,i,.,i 11: ;. :..-,1 ,.,1 a i.,: li 1 '. Ci i r .,i.
I.:., i'lO Ll: i',., "..* 1, l1I !.,h I'1. n ,.... '. Ih,-
address of which is Post Office Box 8099, Sanford,
Florida 32772-8099. The names and addresses of
the personal representative and the personal repre-
sentative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
: 1 ,;: ,3 ....1 .1.: I th ..F .. ,'I ,T Ir1ii . ......" V IrHlir
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN'THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is Oc-
tober 3, 2008.
Signed on September 25, 2008.
GERALD P KRUEGER
Personal Representative
4105 Komes Court
Alexandria, VA 22306-1252
RESPECTFULLY SUBMITTED on this 25th day of
September, 2008.
IAN L. GILDEN, ESQUIRE
IAN L GOLDEN, P.A.
Florida Bar No. 0321941
151 Lookout Place, Suite 110
Maitland, Florida 32751
Telephone: (407) 645-4446
Facsimile: (407) 629-0090
Attorney for Gerald P. Krueger
10/3, 10/10


The Voice


- .










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mi :ni.:.:iin a(..is


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;;









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Page A16 October 3 October 9, 2008


SOUTH SEMINOLE HOSPITAL




ORLANDO HEALTH


For information or a physician referral, call 407.76 7.1200 or visit southseminolehospital.com
555 W. State Road 434, Longwood, FL 32750 1 South Seminole Hospital is part of the Orlando Health family of hospitals.


The Voice











eniorOserver


Volume 18, No. 10


Est. 1990


For the mind, body and soul


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK SENIOR OBSERVER
At the Mayflower Retirement Community in Winter Park, instructor Mim Dubuc leads seniors as they strike tai chi poses. The ancient Chinese art form trains better balance and range of motion.


AMY K.D. TOBIK
THE OBSERVER

r"' here is a lot of energy in
Lthe air today," MimDubuc
says as she slowly stretches her
arms outward, palms parallel
with the floor. The movements
are smooth and methodical as
she transforms the space into a
calm, peaceful spot. "When your
hands tingle it means it is work-
ing," she says quietly. "You can
feel the energy in your finger-
tips."
Dubuc has been sharing her
delight in the ancient Chinese
art of tai chiwith fellow residents
at the Mayflower Retirement
Community in Winter Park for


more than 13 years. Now in
her mid-90s, Dubuc is regarded
by her peers as the tai chi guru
whose passion and enthusiasm
inspire men and women of all
ages to exercise.
Every Tuesday afternoon a
group of dedicated Mayflower
residents stroll into the recre-
ation room in an effort to reduce
stress, increase flexibility and
boost energy levels.
"As you get older, whether you
realize it or not, you start to
lose some of your sense of bal-
ance and your natural grace,"
Dubuc said, "so it's important
to do what you can to keep that
sense of balance alive. There are
so many people who don't pay


any attention to that until it is
too late and they wait until they
lose their balance at home and
fall," she said.
As the students move their
arms to the soft Hawaiian music,
some look straight ahead while
others close their eyes as they
concentrate on their posture.
"Place all your worries and aches
and pains in a ball and take it to
the other side," Dubuc tells the
class as they are gradually trans-
ported into another realm by
the gentle movements.
Dubuc said she chose the
soothing sounds of Hawaiian
music, reminiscent of her time
spent with her husband sta-
tioned in Hawaii during World


War II, because it maintains the
same rhythm and time so she
can go from one number to the
next without having to pause.
The ancient Chinese art of tai
chi pronounced "tie-chee" -
dates back more than 2,000 years
and was originally developed as
a form of self-defense. Today,
people of all ages connect their
mind and body through the 19
official tai chi movements and
one pose. According to the Web
site of the Mayo Clinic, a not-for-
profit medical practice, studies
show tai chi can reduce anxi-
ety and depression, slow bone
loss in women after menopause,

see TAI CHI on page B5


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While awareness is growing
about the seriousness of diabe-
tes, more needs to be done to
fight this deadly disease. That's
the word from experts who
consider diabetes to be the big-
gest public health crisis of the
21st century.
During American Diabe-
tes Month this November, the
American Diabetes Association
is asking the American public


"Why should you care about dia-
betes?"
According to John B. Buse,
M.D., president, Medicine & Sci-
ence, American Diabetes Asso-
ciation, "Few people realize the
seriousness of diabetes. Not only
does it affect many aspects of a
person's daily routine, but the
complications that can occur as
a result of diabetes can be dead-
ly. It is possible to delay or even


avoid these complications with
proper diabetes management
and treatment."
Proper diagnosis and control
can help reduce the risks for a
number of serious complica-
tions, some of which are life-
threatening. These include:
Heart disease and stroke -
Adults with diabetes have heart

see DIABETES on page B6


The ABCs of diabetes



Tips to manage complications from the disease






Senrbs e trLg


Observer
"': *-; I -":* 'l

NEWS SENIORS CAN USE, SINCE 1990

Kyle P.Taylor
Publisher
kyle@observernewspapers.com


Alex Babcock
Editor
alexb@observernewspapers.com

Amy K.D. Tobik
Reporter
amykdtobik@bellsouth.net

Jenny Andreasson
Reporter
jennya@observernewspapers.com


Isaac Babcock
Reporter
isaacb@observernewspapers.com


609 Executive Drive, Winter Park, FL 32789

Observer Newspapers is a member of:
*Winter Park Chamber of Commerce
*Maitland Chamber of Commerce
*The Florida Press Association
*Central Florida Press Club


Lacy Rushin
Designer
lacyr@observernewspapers.com

Jonathan Gallagher
Copy Editor
jgallagher@observernewspapers.com

Tracy Craft
Advertising Sales
tcraft@observernewspapers.com


Pat Lovaglio
Advertising Sales
plovaglio@observernewspapers.com


I 407-628-8500 I WPMObserver.com

Published monthly by Observer Newspapers,
publishers of the:
*Winter Park/Maitland Observer
*Oviedo/Winter Springs Voice


The publisher reserves the right to refuse or edit advertisements, its content or
letters to the editor for reasons of libel or space availability.
We encourage you to send us your opinion.
All material is subject to copyright the Senior Observer.


The Senior Observer's September edition
featured a mislabeled photograph of cro-
quet player George Stewart. He is pictured
at right. We apologize for this error.


GEORGE STEWART


Freqentl Use
Phone u-mber
for Senior


Beardall Senior Center
800 S. Delaney Ave.
Orlando
407-246-2637


St. Cloud Senior Center
Indiana Ave. & 8th St.
St. Cloud
407-892-2533


Marks Street Senior Center Osceola Senior Center
99 E. Marks St. 1099 Shady Lane
Orlando Kissimmee
407-245-0921 407-846-8532

Maitland Senior Center Sanford Senior Center
345 S. Maitland Ave. 401 E. Seminole Blvd.
Maitland Sanford
407-539-6251 '407-302-1010

RSVP Senior Volunteers Senior Resource Alliance
407-422-1535 407-228-1800

Alzheimer Resource Center Seminole County
407-843-1910 Better Living for Seniors
407-228-1800


TV goes digital



in February


Anyone who gets televi-
sion over the air with
an antenna should take
steps now to prepare for the
conversion to digital TV before
the Feb. 17 deadline.
On that date, all full-power
television stations in the U.S.
will stop broadcasting using
traditional analog technology
and move exclusively to broad-
casting digital TV, aka DTV.
"We encourage viewers to
take care of this now so they
aren't left behind," said John
Boland, chief content officer of
PBS. "Given the government's
first-come, first-served con-
verter box coupon program
and the possibility of reception
problems, it's best to prepare
now. And digital channels are
already available, so viewers
who make the switch will have
instant access to more free pro-
gramming."
If you use an antenna to re-
ceive over-the-air television,
you can switch to DTV either
by connecting your television
to a converter box that allows
DTV signal reception, replac-
ing your analog TV with a new


digital TV, or subscribing to a pay
service, such as cable or satellite.
Consumers who own a digital
TV set should already be receiv-
ing over-the-air DTV signals.
Every household in America
is eligible for two government-
sponsored coupons worth $40
toward an approved converter
box; Converter boxes'cost $40
to $70. For coupons or to learn
more about the coupon pro-
gram, call (888) DTV-2009 or
visit DTV2009.gov. The coupons
expire 90 days after issue.
SConsumers who currently
have good analog television
reception should continue to
receive good digital reception.
However, some households may
experience problems. Adjusting
the home's outdoor antenna
or purchasing a small indoor
antenna could resolve such dif-
ficulties. Information about an-
tennas can be found at Anten-
naWeb.org.
PBS has created numerous
resources to help viewers make
the switch. "Get Ready for Digi-
tal TV," a 30-minute special from

> turn to DIGITAL on the next page


PHOTO COURTESY OF NAPSA
Kevin O'Connor, left, and Norm Abram, hosts of "This Old House," will host a 30-minute special titled "Get
Ready for Digital TV" that will air in October on PBS to help viewers make the switch to digital TV.


SenioicrObserver


8002r ebotcO









Recording women's war history


The female experience is a vital
part of America's military expe-
rience, and the Veterans History
Project created a new initiative
to honor the contributions of
women in the military.
Women make up 15 percent
of those in active military ser-
vice, and by 2010 will constitute
10 percent of all living Ameri-
can veterans. They have one-of-
a-kind experiences to share, and
the Library of Congress is one
place their stories can be told.
The Veterans History Project
(VHP) at the Library of Congress
American Folklife Center was
created by Congress in 2000 to
collect, safeguard and make ac-
cessible the personal accounts
of American war veterans.
The VHP has grown to be the
largest oral history program in
American history, having col-
lected nearly 60,000 firsthand
recollections approximately
3,500 of them from female war
veterans.
Visitors to the Project's Web
site, www.loc.gov/vets, can see
and hear from women like Vio-
let Hill Gordon, a young black
woman who, at the height of
segregation, joined the Women's
Auxiliary Army Corps and went
on to become a commanding
officer in the Central Postal Di-
rectory during World War II.
Rhona Marie Prescott, a chief
nurse in a remote hospital in


An Khe during the height of the
war in Vietnam, tells another
compelling story. With Army
doctors in short supply, Prescott
was called to perform surgeries
in makeshift tents in non-sterile
environments and decide who
might be saved.
Another military history mak-
er was Darlene Iskra, who enlist-
ed in the Navy in 1979 and went
on to become one of the first
females to graduate from dive
school. Her tenacity and talent
won her a loyal following in the
higher echelons of the Navy, and
in December 1990 she became
the first woman to take com-
mand of a U.S. Navy ship, aptly
named the Opportune.
You can become a volunteer
historian and record stories for
this important program. Go to
the VHP Web site and learn step
by step how to get involved.
There is a timely need for in-
terviews from veterans of World
War II, the Korean War and the
Vietnam War. In addition, VHP
seeks interviews from female
veterans from all conflicts, vet-
erans representing all minor-
ity communities, as well as
Merchant Marine, Coast Guard,
National Guard and Reserve vet-
erans.
Visit VHP at www.loc.gov/
vets, e-mail vohp@loc.gov or call
1-888-371-5848.


PHOTO COURTESY OF VET
Violet Hill Gordon joined the Women's Auxiliary Army Corps during World War II.


DIGITAL I PBS educates about TV switch


PHOTO COURTESY OF PBS.ORG
On the PBS Web site, www.pbs.org/dtv; users can find information to help them understand the upcom-
ing switch, when over-the-air television broadcasts will go from being analog to being digital.


< continued from the last page
ti-- .tome-improvement gurus
at "This Old House," will debut
on PBS stations in October. PBS
also offers a DTV Web site, www.
pbs.org/dtv, with helpful infor-
mation, including download-
able fact sheets such as DTV Ba-
sics and DTV Myths and Facts


in English, Spanish and large-
print formats. The site also in-
cludes video DTV Tips and links
to other DTV-related sites.
Viewers with questions can
call the PBS station to learn
how to get ready for digital TV
and to find out what kind of
programming is available on
the current digital channels.


Advertise your business in the Senior Observer!
Call us today at 407-628-8500 and ask for Tracy or Pat.


Downtown Orlando

Apartments For the

Low Income Elderly


Kinneret Apartments


Call today
to Apply:
407-425-4537
1-800-955-8771
FL. Relay



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We provide a loving home where each member
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1340 Oxford Road | Maitland, Fl 32751 1 407-339-0389
407-247-8937 | www.EnglishEstatesALF.com
License # AL10968 A


SeniorObserver


October 2008








I)aily cat vomiting %ignals problem


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Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers
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OPEN HOUSE
October 24th 3:30-6pm
Champagne, Hors d'oeuvres
& Entertainment
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407-622-5076


Alabama Oaks
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* Respite for Family Caregivers
* Alzheimer's Special Care


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407-302-4138
License #30211302


www.VisitingAngels.com


GET LOCAL NEWS FROM A LOCAL SOURCE!
SUBSCRIBE TO THE SENIOR OBSERVER FOR THE
LATEST "NEWS SENIORS CAN USE!"

EDITOR@O gQ [BN E WSPAPERS@ N)


--ATTENTION--

Notice to Orange County Voters

Voters needing bilingual assistance or assistance
in reading and/or marking their ballots at Orange
County Early Voting sites, or at the polling place on
Election Day, are allowed to bring a person of their
choice (except employers or Union Representatives)
to help them. Poll workers and Election Staff are
also trained to provide this assistance, if needed. All
voting locations are Handicapped Accessible and
ADA compliant voting equipment is available. If you
have questions about voting procedures, ask your
poll worker for assistance. If you make a mistake
marking your ballot, you may ask for up to two
replacement ballots to insure that your vote counts.


Orange County Supervisor of Elections
119 W. Kaley Street, Orlando 32806
(407) 836-VOTE (8683) or (407) 836-2070
www.orangevotes2008.com or
www.ocfelections.com

Equal Opportunity Employer


I


Seni~orObserver


October 2008


Help s ceebrat our10th nnivrsar
at our bautifulOld Wintr Park Facilit


~o7@13i~`77


: : :_ : ::-.............:I






October 2008 SeniorObserver


TAI CHI I Students see results after a few weeks of relaxing tai chi


< continued from the front page

develop balance and coordina-
tion, improve cardiovascular fit-
ness, lower blood pressure and
relieve chronic pain.
Resident Elizabeth Brownlee
has been taking tai chi for 13
years and said she finds the
experience very relaxing. "You
can be upstairs (in the residen-
tial apartments) and you think,
'I don't want to go down,' and
then you do and you feel better.
It's very calming," she said.
Resident Joan McComber,
who has been taking the class
for nearly four years, added, "It
is a wonderful activity; it's relax-
ing and it is so good for balance.
I feel great after class. Exercise
is very important and this par-
ticular activity has balance and
music, which is conducive to
meditation. And Mim is won-
derful."
As the 45-minute class comes
to a close, the students use slow,
deep breathing techniques
believed to heal certain ail-
ments. Tranquil 'and at peace,
the. class finishes with the bal-
ance and focus needed for the
tai chi consciousness pose.
Dubuc said her students tell
her after a few weeks of tai chi
that they feel healthier, have a
better range of motion and sleep
more soundly.
"The head of the physical
therapy department tells me she
can tell the people who have


PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK SENIOR OBSERVER
Tai chi instructor Mim Dubuc, seen here at the head
of the class wearing a white shirt, sets her classes to
Hawaiian music because of its constant'rhythm and
its connection to her time spent stationed in Hawaii
with her husband during World War II.


had tai chi. She said when she
measures their balance she can
always tell," Dubuc said with
a smile. "That's why I am still
doing it."


-\c~f -) I. LI~


Ca1l us for a tour
or more information
407-718-7937
1759 Alabama Dr-, Winter Park
ww;altabamnaoaks.com


Assisted Living Residence

Assisted Living Residence


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Make Faith House Your HoO

Our Amenities Include:
Warm Home Cooked Meals Monitored & Secured
Housekeeping/ Laundry Environment
Services 24-Hour Staffing
Assistance with Medication Private & Semiprivate -
and Personal Care Needs Accommodations
Scheduled Transportation Scheduled Day Trips
Services' Daily Activity Program


Faith House is committed to providing excellent
service in a loving home-like environment.
O ur warm and inviting 13 bed assisted living facility is located
on Lake Catherine off County Road 419 in Chuluota.
At Faith House you can be sure your loved one will receive tender
loving care by our experienced, caring and supportive staff
Faith House is owned and operated by a registered nurse whose
purpose and passion is to provide the elderly with the best quality


care, love and respect.



407-366-9961
Chuluota/Oviedo Win


321-947-1888
ter Springs (Opening Soon)


Seni'orObserver


October 2008


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Special Open House Event!

1 Day Only! October 14th, 2008


Come in for a personal listening demonstration
on October 14th only. Jana Rentz, Au.D., Phonak -
Technology Expert will be available to answer your
questions regarding this new technology and even
offer suggestions on your current hearing situations. Jana Rentz,Au.D.

Dr. Riess has expertise in the fitting of digital hearing aids,
FM devices and cochlear implants. She is the founder of
Hearing Associates of Central Florida where she works with
patients of all ages.
Dr. Melissa Riess -

100% FREE Hearing Screening
and Consultation during this.event!


ASSOCIATES
OF CENTRAL FLORIDA


Hearing Associates of Central Florida
1460 Lake Baldwin Lane, Suite A, Orlando, FL 32814
407-898-2220
www.OrlandoHears.com


- - - - - - - -
Brig tiswit yo ad rceie p- t $0 0 f n aro
Phonk *:iaDigtalHeaingInsrum nts


a


"Change Is Inevitable, But You Can

Manage It To Your Advantage."


As an experienced financial planner,
Elizabeth Brothers understands the
importance of anticipating.change
and taking control wherever you
can. That's why she moved to
The Mayflower. "In financial
planning, it's important to know
you have some control over medical
costs," she says. "A continuing
care retirement community like
The Mayflower enables you to do


'KI
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that. But don't wait too long or
you won't be able to enjoy all the
benefits a CCRC has to offer."
If you're looking at retirement
living options, take a look at
The Mayflower. It's a good plan
for the future.
Call today to secure a spot on
our waiting list.
(407) 672-1620


THE MAYFLOWER
A Plain .r tlh Future
1620 Mayflower Court
Winter Park, Florida 32"92
(40) 6"2-1620
Swww.themayflower.com
Iv 4 ['R.\141PR hAD, ,,,._"""


SeniocrObserver


October 2008






October 2008


B 8 SeniorObserver


COMMU IT BULLETIN


............


AARP group meets in
Winter Park on Oct. 21
The AARP Winter Park Chapter 1047 hosts
its monthly meeting at the Rachel D. Murrah
Civic Center at 1050 W. Morse Blvd. at
S1:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 21. Our speaker
is Charles Lewis, AARP Legal Services
Attorney. Call President Dora Harms at 407-
629-2585 for more information.

Play tennis with fellow
seniors in Altamonte
Vintage Tennis, a group of players 55 and
older, meets at 10 a.m. Friday, Oct. 3 at
Sanlando Park in Altamonte Springs. The
group hosts this annual celebration to start
another year of good health, with round-
robin tennis and snacks. The event is free.
Sanlando is at 401 W. Highland St. Call
Marie Cheeseman at 407-834-1230 for
more information.

Maitland Senior Center
offers wealth of activity
The Maitland Senior Center hosts a variety
of events in October. Here's their calendar:
Monday, Oct. 6, 1 p.m. Math Club: Does
the Bell Shaped Curve Ring a Bell?
Monday, Oct. 6, 2 p.m. Book Club
Tuesday, Oct. 7, 11:30 a.m. Lecture:
"Problems Facing the Next President"
Tuesday, Oct 7, 1:30 p.m. Investment
Club: Led by Bill Long
Friday, Oct. 10, 11:30 a.m. -Video: African
Queen (Hepburn and Bogart)


i~ih




..........
. . .. ...... ............ . .. .
2MRA-VC


Tuesday, Oct.14, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. -
Questions and discussion with representa-
tives from the Republican and Democratic
parties.
Wednesday, Oct. 15, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. -
First session: Hand-building clay workshop
- (Slab, coil, pinch.)
Monday, Oct. 20 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. -
Senior Advisory Board Meeting open to the
public.
Tuesday, Oct. 21, 11:30 a.m. Lecture:
Financial Questions and Solutions to:
"When Seniors Need Assistance from their
Caregiver Child"
Wednesday, Oct. 22, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. -
Second session: Clay workshop (Kiln
loading, care of, types of firing, types of
glazes.)
Tuesday, Oct. 28, 11:30 a.m. Highlights
in Art by Don Miller
Call the Maitland Senior Center at 407-
539-6251 for more information.

Help needed caring for
the most vulnerable
Samaritan Care Hospice nonprofit orga-
nization is looking for caring volunteers
who can assist terminally ill patients and
their caregivers by adult-sitting while the
caregiver runs errands, providing emotional
support and companionship, and more.
Call Damaris Johnson-Santos at 407-
514-1320 or e-mail damaris.johnson@
samaritancarehospice.com for more infor-
mation.


* D*


Copyrighted Material .


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers
Available *-


SLE~l


-4b -l i -U


Call
(800) 990-9557


Visit us at
www.binsons.com


able Medical Equiptment

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