Title: Seminole voice
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091445/00012
 Material Information
Title: Seminole voice
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Community Media Holdings, LLC
Place of Publication: Oviedo, Fla.
Publication Date: September 12, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Seminole -- Oviedo
United States -- Florida -- Seminole -- Winter Park
Coordinates: 28.659722 x -81.195833 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00091445
Volume ID: VID00012
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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www.SeminoleVoice.com .


Serving Greater Oviedo and Winter Springs for more than 17 years!
September 12 September 18, 2008 I

Onthe Web
r n !Chek SeminoleVoIce.com for debate about
0o9iffng ftom:TS. Fay in the Black Hammock.


JENNY ANDREASSON
THE VOICE
City Commissioner Robert
Miller's tenure wraps up in
December, and there are
two longtime residents vying to
take his place as a Winter Springs
leader: Bill Poe and Jean Hovey;
In seat five, Commissioner
JoanneKrebswas re-electedunop-
posed, and in the running for seat
three are incumbent Don Gilmore
and business owner Gary Bonner.
The general election will be held
Nov. 4. Last week The Voice pro-
filed Gilmore and Bonner. This


week, here's a look at the candi-
,dates in the Hovey-Poe race.
Bill Poe has wanted to run for
Commission for a while now, but
he spends his Monday nights at-
his grandson's Cub Scouts meet-
ings. His grandson will graduate
to Boy Scouts soon, freeing Poe up
on the city meeting nights.
"I never ran because I didn't
have the time to do it," he said,
glancing at a picture of his eight,
grandchildren and three great-
grandchildren. "I made a commit-
ment to my grandson.".,
Since 1981, Poe has been a resi-
dent of Winter Springs and the


executive director of theSeminole
Work Opportunity Program, or
SWOP, a nonprofit mailing house
that employs special needs adults.
He is a retired major of the Army,
where he served for 21 years.
He serves on the city's Planning
and Zoning Committee and
served on the Beautification of
Winter Springs Board, experience
he said will be crucial to increas-
ing the commercial tax base in
the overly residential community.
"The committees that I've sat on
for the past 1.0 or 12 years give

> turn to CANDIDATES on page A3


Hospital

will end up

in Oviedo


JENNY ANDREASSON
THE VOICE

Land has not been officially
secured for a hospital, but it
will fall within the boundar-
ies of Oviedo, a company spokes-
woman said.
Health Management Associates
of Naples, better known as HMA,
won permission from the state in
February to build a 60-bed hospital
in the area. It must begin construc-
tion in a year in order to retain that
permission, called a "certificate of
need."
"We have narrowed it down to
two sites within city limits," said
Ann Barnhart, senior vice president
and division CEO for the company,
on Tuesday. "I can't be more specific
than that."
HMA has lowered its criteria for
the amount of continuous acres
needed for the site, from 40 to 60
acres to "an acreage that is less than
that." In addition to the hospital
site, she said the company is look-
ing into the possibility of putting
medical office buildings elsewhere.
One of the proposed hospital
sites more frequently discussed is at
the intersection-of State Road 426
and Red Bug Lake Road. The land
is owned by Sanford-based Central
Florida Regional Hospital, land the
company bought during its legal
battle to seize HMA's certificate of
need. In February, a spokesman for
Central Florida Regional said the
company plans to build a medi-
cal office complex, which doesn't
require a certificate of need.
Another hospital-sized site in
the city is an area near the Oviedo
Marketplace behind the ABC Fine
Wine and Spirits store. This land
was annexed into the city by Florida
Hospital, which secured a certif-
icate of need in December 2002
to build a hospital but then relin-
quished it in June 2003. The com-
> turn to HOSPITAL on page A3


.il!.,hl h. ll ,,,llh... ll,.I II,, lh ,l,,,llh,,h.,l..,ll
***************ALL FOR ADC 320
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INDEX
Stetson's Corner................................. A4
Celery Stalks ... .............................. A5
Police Log....... ............................. A6
W eather............Al...................................A 1
Athletics........... .................. A13
Voices...................................... A4.......A 4
Classifieds and Games.......................A15


S i rCopyrighted Material


J yndicated ontenit.



Available from Commercial News Providers


Just 35


Two vie for Miller's seat


a'
0






Page A2 September 12 September 18, 2008 The Voice




THIS WEEK in history

T H I SE K ty to some types of dirift'violators and military deserters from the
Vietnam War. To receive amnesty, one had to swear allegiance to the
E United States and complete two years of community service.


At its Sept. 3 regular meeting and first public hearing on the fiscal year
2008-2009 budget, the Oviedo City Council unanimously agreed to set
the property tax rate at 4.8626 mills $4.86 per $1,000 of taxable
property.
When including the voted debt service millage rate of .2316 for the
new town center infrastructure, the combined city tax rate for fiscal
year 2009 will be 5.0942 mills. Based on this combined tax rate, the
average residential city taxpayer with a $200,000 home, minus the
$50,000 homestead tax exemption, would pay $764 in city property
taxes compared to $852 in 2007.
The City Council also approved a total budget of $64.1 million a
decrease of $12.8 million compared with last year. The city's new fiscal
year begins on Oct. 1.
Final approval of the tax rate and budget is subject to one more
public hearing that will be held as part of the City Council's regular
meeting scheduled for 6:30 p.m. on Monday, Sept. 15, at City Hall, 400
Alexandria Blvd.





The Senior Observer featured a mis-
labeled photograph of croquet player
George Stewart. He is pictured at right.
We apologize for this error.

Pertinent information was left out of
a story package about the Maitland
Telephone Museum. It is open from noon .
to 4 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday. The
cost is $3 for adults and $2 for children. .
Those five and younger are free. Call 407-
644-1364 or visit MaitlandHistory.org for George Stewart
more information.


No Contracsts Fat4 Owned %
CompiketeSer4"- -
Starting at S35 BB


AMY K.D. TOBIK
THE VOICE

A local riot brewed tempers were flar-
ing, and it was feared the circumstances
could quickly spiral out of control. Officer
Diane Duffy received a call to immedi-
ately assist with the serious situation,
where people of all ages were crowd-
ing around the Oviedo neighborhood as
officers tried to temper the anger before
someone got hurt.
Duffy clearly remembers that moment,
years ago, that changed the way she
viewed herself and her job. Between the
angry tones, a little voice cried out, "Hey
Mommy, that's Officer Duffy." Another
child shouted out, "That's my DARE
teacher." Suddenly the crowd dispersed
arid the parents crowded around, anx-
ious to meet the woman their children
looked up to the local DARE Officer.
"It was a very cool feeling," Duffy said.
Duffy, who has taught the Drug Abuse
Resistance Education program for' nine of
her 10 years on the Oviedo police force,
said she is honored to help promote posi-
tive relationships between students and
their local police department. Taught pri-
marily at the elementary school level,
the program began in Seminole County
in 1991 and provides fifth-graders with
the tools they need to resist drugs and
peer pressure. It is based on the national
DARE program created in 1986 through
the combined efforts of the Los Angeles
Police Department, parents and teach-
ers.
While budget restraints have tight-
ened the belt on many programs within
Seminole County, Duffy said she is proud
to have the support she needs from the
school board and police department to
continue her daily work with Lawton,
Stenstrom, Partin and Evans elementary
schools.
While many Seminole County schools
can no longer fund the program, Duffy
said, a few cities within the county man-
aged to maintain it, such as Oviedo,
Altamonte Springs and Sanford.
"As far as we are concerned, DARE


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE VOICE
Oviedo Police Officer Diane Duffy says the pride she feels in
being a role model for students validates her anti-drug work.

is just so-strong in our city and so many
people love .it and support it that they just
don't want it gone. I think in our city it-is
very, very effective," Duffy said.
Like most resource officers, Duffy said,
her salary is paid using a combination of
funds from the police department and the
school board.
"We have a lot of support with our depart-
ment and our chief, and they want to keep
the DARE program going. So [if] we lose the
funding for my half of salary, then we will
continue on." The department also funds
all books, T-shirts and supplies.
Oviedo Police Chief Jeff Chudnow said
he plans to continue the program locally as
long as fiscally possible. "Number one, it is
a very positive reinforcement for elemen-
tary school kids to have a positive contact
with a police officer; I think that is one of
the best benefits. I think the second benefit

> turn to DARE on page A6


Published Friday,
September 12,2008


Volume 18
Issue No. 37


Phone 407-628-8500 SeminoleVoice.com Fax 407-628-4053


PUBLISHER
Kyle Taylor, extension 302
kyle@observernewspapers.com
EDITOR
Alex Babcock, extension 304
alexb@theoviedovoice.com
DESIGNER
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lacyr@observemewspapers.com
CHIEF REPORTER '
Isaac Babcock of Winter Springs
isaacb@theoviedovoice.com
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advertising@theoviedovoice.com


REPORTERS
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Porter Maerz of Oviedo-- porterm@theoviedovoice.com
Karen Phillips of Geneva- karenp@theoviedovoice.com
Amy K.D. Tobik of Winter Springs- amyt@theoviedovoice.com
COLUMNISTS
Janet Foley of Oviedo janetf@theoviedovoice.com
Jay Getty of Oviedo jayg@theoviedovoice.com
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Ben Wheeler of Chuluota benw@theoviedovoice.com
COPY EDITOR
Jonathan Gallagher Extension 309
jgallagher@observemewspapers.com
INTERN
Mary Elizabeth Schurrer


The Oviedo-Winter Springs Voice publishes on Fridays for readers in Oviedo,
Winter Springs, Geneva, Chuluota and their neighbors.
Randy Noles founded The Voice in 1991. Its current owner is Observer Newspa-
pers, which, also publishes the Winter Park-Maitland Observer.
The publisher is Kyle Taylor.


Talk with us about news stories at
407-628-8500.
Ask for Editor Alex Babcock.

Write to us at:
voices@theoviedovoice.com or at:
P.O. Box 2426, Winter Park, FL 32790

Help us correct mistakes by writing
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If you think we can do a better job
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Renew your subscription or start a
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Advertise in The Voice by calling Pat
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tal health. The newspaper you hold
comes from a mixture of recycled con-
tent. Unsold copies of the newspaper
are archived or recycled. We also re-
cycle all in-office paper waste, bottles
and cans.

Stop by the office in Oviedo sometime.
We take walk-in guests each Thursday
- and also by appointment. We're at
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DARE stays with kids


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a











Winter Springs mulls tax hike


JENNY ANDREASSON
THE VOICE

The owner of a Winter
Springs shopping center
said he's already losing ten-
ants and many of the ones
left are struggling to pay
him rent.
Zaheer Salarbux, along
with a handful of other res-
idents, spoke out Monday
against a tax increase at the
Winter Springs Commission
meeting, where the tenta-
tive property tax rate was
set at $3.0338 per $1,000 of
taxable property.
Salarbux said he has
raised rents to compensate
for already-high property
taxes, forcing some of his
tenants to leave. One ten-
ant, a barber shop owner
who's been there for more
than 10 years, is on the
brink of shutting down.
"I couldn't even raise


his rent after I spoke to
him," he said at Monday's
Commission meeting. "It's
mind-boggling why you are
raising people's taxes."
But although 'Winter
Springs' property- owners
will see an overall increase
in their taxes this year, the
city said it's not the culprit.
Three reasons are cited
for the increase: a mandat-
ed 8.5 percent increase for
school funding, the fact that
onlyhalf of fire services were
paid for by property taxes
in 2007 the other half
was paid by the fire assess-
ment fee and finally, the
city must recover the $1.1
million lost to Amendment
1 and the economic down-
turn, according to the cur-
rent city newsletter.
But the Commission has
the option of trimming
the budget in certain areas,
such as community events


and other non-essential
services, to lower the ten-
tative tax rate called the
"millage" in technical speak
- which won't be finalized
until the end of the month.
"Winter Springs taxes
have still gone up (despite
consolidation of fire services
with the county) because of
the addition of 1 mil to give
us flexibility," City Manager
Ron McLemore said. "That
could still go down."
That extra 1 mil is pro-
posed to fund community
events including the holi-
day parade, tree lighting,
the Fourth of July 50th
Anniversary, the Hometown
Harvest, pay raises for city
staffers, the retention of the
two fire department clerks
who weren't absorbed by
the county, two new police
officers and equipment,
foreclosed-home lawn
maintenance, and a study to


determine if Winter Springs
salaries are competitive.
Left out of the budget is
the holiday concert.
A budget workshop will
be held Monday, Sept. 15, to
further discuss what should
be kept in the budget. Then
on Monday, Sept. 22, there
will be another vote taken.
After hearing from the
angered residents, the
Commission was split on
whether to even approve
,..- tentative millage. It
was approved 3-2 with
Commissioners Joanne
Krebs and Rick Brown dis-
senting;
The first motion to
approve the rate, made
by Commissioner Sally
McGinnis, died without
support.
"How can I make a
motion when I don't have
all of the figures or knowl-
edge to make that motion?"


askedCommissionerJoanne
Krebs.
This infuriated Commis-
sioner Robert Miller, who
said the only reason he
didn't second the motion
is because his term in office
ends in December, and he
didn't want to affect the
budget for his successor. He
protested the indecision of
his colleagues, saying the
Commission met six times
in two months on this item,
so it should be able to make
a decision.
Krebs voted no on the
second motion to approve,
made by Miller, say-
ing that information the
Commission was given
about the budget had been
changed..
Miller disagreed. "Don't
play games," he said. "Now
is not a time to play games."


HOSPITAL I Long-delayed medical facility has few possible locations


< continued from the front page

- pany cited that it didn't have
the resources available to
recruit the doctors needed in
a Jan. 24, 2003, press release.
When asked if the Florida
Hospital land is a possible
location for the new hos-
pital, Oviedo Councilman
Dominic Persampiere
"declined to comment. "You
have to understand I cannot
divulge any of their trade
secrets," he said. "The site
selection process has been
narrowed down."
Once land is selected, HMA
will go through an expedit-
ed permitting process with
city staff to help them meet
their August 2009 deadline.
It could also be given access
to about $500,000 in the


city economic development
fund, which Council set up
with its primary target being
the hospital, he said.
"We hope to be able to
have the location resolved
very soon," Barnhart said.
"Once we secure the site, we'll
be meeting with Council and
the new city manager" to dis-
cuss available aid.
Once the hospital opens
it doors, it's going to jump-
start Oviedo's economy,
Persampiere said, bringing
high-paying jobs and work-
ers who eat and shop in the
area on their breaks.
"We want that hospi-
tal here in our city," he said.
"We've done, in my mind, to
this point everything seem-
ingly possible short of buy-
ing them a lot of land."


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE VOICE
A patch of undeveloped land near the Oviedo Marketplace could become the home of a 60-bed hospital, though it's just one
of a handful of possible sites for such a facility, which would need about 30 acres of land to fit.


CANDIDATES I Both City Commission hopefuls are new to politics


< continued from the front page

me the qualifications that I
need to manage the remain-
-ing growth of the city," he
said.
The Seminole Way proj-
ect, a planned high-tech
business corridor, is going
to be "huge" for the city's
future, he said. "I think
Winter Springs needs to
jump on that and take
whatever action necessary
to ensure we get some high-
dollar businesses in there."
He is also a strong propo-
nent of maintaining "valu-
able" city services, such as
the Senior Center and its
therapy pool. "All of us in
one point of our life are
going to be a senior citizen
and we may need that assis-
tance," he said.
Listening to the residents
of Winter Springs will be his
priority, he said, but quality
of life comes at a price. "I
can do anything you want
but you got to pay for what
you get ... where is it that


you want the city to go?"

Jean Hovey, like Poe, had
always been interested in
her city's government, but
several events this year led
her to say.that's enough.
The implementation of a
fire assessment fee and then
the "giving away" of the fire
department both left her
dissatisfied. She also said
the city has been spend-
ing money inappropriately
considering the state of the
economy.
"Why do we need a d6g
park in Central Winds right
now?" she asked, admitting
that she is a dog owner. "In
tight budget times we need
to look at where the money
is going." .
Hovey, a 21-year resi-
dent, owns a temp agency
in Winter Springs called
Jean's Office Assistants and
she also does legal work for
local attorneys. She is the
vice president of leadership
for the Florida PTA, an elect-
ed position in which she


puts on leadership-training
workshops for as many as
1,300 members. This expe-
rience, she said, will aid her
in making decisions for the
future of the city.
She is the former
Seminole County PTA pres-
ident, where she helped
found a program that dis-
tributes free school sup-
plies to teachers, called the
Teacher Supply Depot.
She was nominated
recently to be. president-
elect of the organization,
so if she gets an opponent
there, she could be running
two campaigns for the next
two months, something she
said she can handle.
Winter Springs residents
can expect Hovey to help the
city become more business-
friendly, she said. Attracting
more business will expand
the commercial tax base,
taking some of the burden
off the residents.
Hovey, who just entered
the race Aug. 28, is well
aware her opponent has a


PHOTOS BY JENNY ANDREASSON -- THE VOICE
Bill Poe, at left, and Jean Hovey are vying to replace departing Winter Springs City
Commissioner Robert Miller, who is term-limited. The election will be on Nov. 4.


big head start, but she said
she can make it up.
"Mr. Poe is well-liked in
the community," she said.
"But when people get to


know me, they'll see I'm will-
ing to help and do what's
needed."


--~^I----~----------a~^~^-~ ~


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Thf VniceF


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Sentember 12 Settehbr 18. 009 Pao A


Z)









Fay not quite 'old news' for Genevans


SBy Karen McEnany-Phillips


It's been an interesting cou-
ple of weeks. I hope by the
time you are reading this,
Hurricane Ike is well to our
west and not adding to our
worries. Are you as tired as
I am of hearing "We'll have
to keep an eye on hurri-
cane-tropical storm XYZ?"
Fay's flooding definitely
illustrated the gap between
television news and real-
ity. As far as the rest of the
world is concerned, Fay
is old news. But of course
if you live anywhere near
Seminole County's major
lakes or near the St. Johns
River you know all too well
that Fay's effects will stay
with us for weeks, and in
some cases months. How
wonderful it will be to go
through a day without
looking at the National
Weather Service hydrology
table every hour or the five-


day hurricane projection
every three hours.
Along the shores of
Lake Harney, neighbors
living on the same street
could be having very dif-
ferent experiences. Newer
homes that were built at
the new 15-foot elevation
standard may be comfort-
ably perched on dry land.
Homes that have water
pumps and air conditioners
installed at higher heights
might still enjoy those lux-
uries. Folks without them
had to evacuate, finding
conditions impossible to
stay. Others had to change
their travel route due to
flooding, huge cavities-and
washouts in the roads.
Everyone who com-
mutes by boat has a story. I
heard someone from Stone
Island tell of slowly pulling
her hands from the sides of


their boat when her hus-
band spotted a gator close
by. The gator no doubt was
thinking, "Hey, what are
they doing in my canal?"
Their boat route took them
over neighborhood lawns
and streets.and down a
canal to high ground to
their parked cars.
On the lighter side, the
daily commute by boat has
taught me a few things. For
example: A girl has to adapt
her handbag and shoes
under these conditions. I
have learned to carry far
fewer items in a much
smaller handbag that now
doubles as a backpack. My
other stuff extra towel,
can of bug spray, folding
umbrella, dry cleaning,
change of clothes and
lunch bag goes into a
garbage bag that protects
contents from water that
gathers in the bottom of
the boat overnight. (Bug
spray in case the ants
attempt another takeover
of the car).
Rubber knee boots wait
in the garage and serve
me well wading through
the water before I board
the boat. After the boat


is docked, the boots are
switched for boat shoes
that stay in the trunk of
the car. The muddy ground
around the car is not ready
for work shoes yet. I use
grungy jeans and kha-
kis for the boat trip and
change when I get to work.
When we leave the house
before dawn, I hold the
spotlight as we make the
journey under the stars. My
husband pulls it by rope
through the low water
and up on the soggy bank.
The scene reminds me of
Katharine Hepburn and
Humphrey Bogart in "The
African Queen." Rose Sayer
and Charlie Allnut mak-
ing their way through the
murky water surrounded
by marsh, mosquitoes and
moss one clearly in his
element, one clearly out of
hers. Fortunately, leeches
have not attacked us,
although we do see them!
Several months ago I
met Mike Laws who dives
in the St. Johns River
to recover logs that are
decades old. The river
water, aka his office, is dark
from the tannins of the
trees and vegetation. I truly


had no appreciation of this
until Hurricane Gustav's
outer winds pushed the
river into our swimming
pool. The pool water
turned from blue to green
to brown to black in a mat-
ter of minutes. Goodness
knows what is lurking in
its depths! Mike, you are a
true professional, and very
brave.
Good luck to everyone
in the midst of this flood-
ing and all the worry, mis-
ery and memories that
accompany it. Hurricane
season 2008 is teaching us
all kinds of lessons in and
out of our comfort zones.


TA KAREN
Please share your thoughts about
Geneva at 407-221-7002,
karenp@theoviedovoice.com
with "Stetson's Corner" in the sub-
ject line, or fax 407-349-2800.
Thanks!
This column is dedicated to
Deputy Sheriff Gene "Stetson"
Gregory, killed in the line of duty
on July 8, 1998. Geneva will never
be the same because of Deputy
Gregory it will be better.


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New Fairwinds branch
to open in Oviedo
Fairwinds Credit Union's new-
est branch will open Monday, Sept.
15 in Seminole County. The East
Oviedo branch is at 1475 E. Mitchell
Hammock Road. The full-service
branch will offer financial servic-
es including savings, checking and
money-market accounts, auto and
home loans, commercial mortgages,
investment services, and business
services.

Help a child read,
make a difference
Calling all book lovers! If you enjoy
reading and would like to share
that passion for books with a child,
why not volunteer to be a Lawton
Elementary School Panther Reading
Partner? The Reading Partner pro-
gram needs volunteers for 20-30
minutes, one day a week. You will
get the opportunity to be a mentor to
a single student once a week to read
for pleasure or work on a specific
reading assignment.
This program provides a wonderful
chance to really make a difference in
the reading ability of a child. It's only


30 minutes out of your week, but it
will make a difference to that child
for the rest of their lives.
Call Cherie Brinkman at 407-542-
6495 or e-mail crbrinks@cfl.rr.com
for more information-and to sign up.

Money management tips
offered free of charge
To help families struggling to make
ends meet, the University of Florida's
Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences has published a new bot-
tom-line guide to personal finances.
Titled "Managing in Tough Times,"
the 40-page booklet is available free
at county extension offices and online
at fycs.ifas.ufl.edu.
The booklet was created in
response to recent economic woes,
said Nayda Torres, a professor and
chairwoman of UF's Family, Youth and
Community-Sciences Department.
The booklet contains 18 chapters,
addressing topics from savings and
teen employment to stress and low-
cost entertainment.
Seminole County's extension office
is at 250 W. County Home Road in
Sanford. Call 407-665-5551 for more
information.


Central Florida Zoo names
wild monkey "Sanford"
The Central Florida Zoo and Botanical
Gardens has exhibited the critically
endangered species cotton-top tam-
arin since 1995. Cotton-top tamarins
are small primates, about the size of
a squirrel, native only to the tropical
forests of Columbia.
In May 2008, the Zoo presented
Anne Savage, founder of a tamarin-
saving organization, with a donation
of more than $1,600. With the con-
tribution, the Zoo was given naming
rights to a wild troop monkey in the
field program in Columbia. The staff
voted to name it "Sanford" after the
city where the Zoo is located.
Visit CentralFloridaZoo.org or call
407-323-4450 for more information
about the zoo.

Watch for decreasing
speed limits on 1-4
Drivers on Interstate 4 could see
smoother traffic flow starting Monday,
Sept. 15. A 10-mile stretch of the
highway is now equipped with vari-
able speed limit signs that change
based on weather, crash reports and
usual rush-hour slowdowns.


I Oviedo's Full Service Law Firm 1


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The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements.
Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information about our qualifications and experience.


. Notes


The Voice


PageA etebr1 -Spebe 820









Gender stereotypes don't quite fit 'canes


Well, what will this com-
ing week be like? My oldest
son Bill's comments about
the female-named tropi-
cal storms or hurricanes
are dandy, as they act like
a typical woman who can't
make up her mind which
way to come or go. The
male-named storms, on the
other hand, are more direct
and determined to not be
wishy-washy. Well, Bill, Ike
did indeed veer south and
did not hit the Miami gen-
eral area; so male storms
can change also. I will be
glad when this is all over.
I am trying to get repairs
done on my house and as
you know this weather is
not conducive for outdoor
painting or repair.
It is very disappoint-
ing to see our part of the
Chamber of Commerce
moving up the road to
Winter Springs. I have been
visiting with my friend Nita
Rawlson, the Chamber's
executive assistant, for a
long time, and she is alone
in that big room, carry-
ing on her usual Oviedo
Chamber work. We shall
miss her assistance and-
guidance to what is going
on in the city. She has been
a tremendous help to the
Woman's Club, and me
especially this time of year
as Great Day in the Country


is approaching on Nov. 8.
Did you mark your-cal-
endar for the Sanlando
Depression Glass Show on
Sept. 19, 20 and 21 at the
Sanford Civic Center, 401 E.
Seminole Blvd.? The special
guest for the show will be
Christine Brewer, collector
of Frye Glass; don't forget
to visit her display. Tickets
are $4.50; for more infor-
mation, please call 407-
298-3355 or e-mail mil-
liesglass@webtv.net.
All are welcome to
the first general meeting
of the Oviedo Historical
Society at 7 p.m. Tuesday,
Sept. 16, to be held in the
Fellowship Hall of the
First United Methodist
Church, 263 King St. The
guest speaker for the eve-
ning will be Ed L'Heureux,
a novelist who teaches a
course at the Seminole
Community College on The
Four Henrys: Plant, Flagler,
Sanford and DeLand.
L'Heureux will speak about
Henry Sanford and Henry
Deland at the society's
meeting. Doors open at 7
p.m. and light refreshments
will be served. Please come
and bring a friend.
There will be a Health
Fair from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
on Thursday, Sept. 18, at
the Lake Mary Community
Center, 260 N. Country


Madeleine M. Snyder, 94, of Oviedo, Fla., died Friday, Sept. 5,
2008, in Winter Park. She was born to Paul and Jeanne Marie
Gaillard on Jan. 19,1914, in Paris, France. Madeleine was a domes-
tic homemaker.
She is survived by sons Philip Snyder and Gerald Snyder, grand-
sons Sean Snyder, Mark Snyder and Bryon Snyder, and great-
grandchild Cameron Snyder.
Madeleine's funeral will be held at 11 a.m. Friday, Sept. 19, at St.
Stephen Catholic Church at 575 Tuskawilla Road in Winter Springs.




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Screenings include balance,
blood pressure, glucose,
cholesterol, memory and
bone density. There will
also be free haircuts, food,
live music, massages and
door prizes. Free admission.
For more information, call
407-585-1466.
NewComers of Central
Florida invites all ladies to
lunch the third Thursday
of each month at various
restaurants. We have many
different and fun inter-
est groups. "There are not
strangers... just friends."
If you are new to the area
or have been here and just
want to meet new friends,



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407-682-6306 or visit
NewComersCFL.org.
Popcorn flicks: There's
an outdoor screening of
"E.T." at 8 p.m. on Thursday
evening, Sept. 18, in Shady
Park, 721 W. New England
Ave., Winter Park. Free
admission. For more-infor-
mation, call 407-629-1088.
Sunshine Community
Thrift Store in our fair city
needs help sorting and
organizing donations from
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday
through Saturday. Call 407-
366-3422 to volunteer.
Coming soon: Oct. 3
and 4 the Whale of a Sale is
going to be bigger and bet-


ter than before. The First
United Methodist Church
of Oviedo is promoting the
sale. There will be a plant
sale, baked goods, a silent
auction and many more
exciting activities.
A thought: "If you're
going to do something
tonight that you'll be sorry
for tomorrow morning,
sleep late."
Henry Youngman

TALKJANET

Send word to Janet Foley about
events and let her know what's
going on around town by e-mailing
janetf@theoviedovoice.com.


209 Geneva Ave., Oviedo (407) 977-9800


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The Voice


Septmber12 -Sepembe 18,008 Page A5









A hitch in a smoker thief's plans


BE ON THE LOOKOUT!
Crime, arrests and
public safety news from
the Oviedo Police Department

By Lt. George Ilemsky


Let's barbecue ... but first
we need a smoker!
On Sept. 3, the barbecue
smoker parked .in front of
Woody's Bar-B-Q restau-
rant appeared to be. tam-
pered with as if someone
attempted to steal it. The
smoker was moved from
its original location and
the chain securing it was
cut. Management called the
police to document the inci-
dent. It appeared as though
the perpetrator did not have
the correct hitch to pull the
smoker away. I guess they:
will have to resort to anoth-
er option if they still want
to have a barbecue.

Stolen car and
auto burglaries
On Sept. 3, a vehicle bur-
glarywas reported in Round
Lake Park when a woman
took her dog for a walk
and left the window to her
vehicle open. Stolen was the
victim's purse, which con-.
tained credit cards, her son's
birth certificate, social secu-
rity cards and her driver's
license. Once again, it is of
paramount importance to
secure your property even if


it is only for a few minutes.
On Sept. 5, a vehicle bur-
glary was reported in the
parking lot near Beef '0'
Brady's. The victim reported
some damage to the passen-
ger door and his car's ste-
reo system missing from the
center of his dashboard.
Also a vehicle bur-
glary was reported on the
1000 block of West Riviera
Boulevard whereby the vic-
tim reported his HP Pavilion
laptop computer was sto-
len. The victim stated he
was uncertain whether or
not he secured the vehicle.
On Sept. 6, a vehicle
burglary was reported in
the parking lot of Boston
Hill Park. The victim stated
that the driver's side win-
dow was shattered and a
woman's purse containing
credit cards was among the
items reported missing.
On Sept. 7, a stalled
vehicle ended up- getting
stolen when the victim left
the vehicle on the side of
the road near Lindsey Lane
and Wood Street. Evidently,
the victim left the keys
in the vehicle thinking it
would not run and went


DARE I About more than drugs


< continued from page A2

is the information that the
program gives to the ele-
mentary school kids in our
community," he said.
"A lot of times the major-
ity of people have contact
with police officers in one
of two ways: either during
a traffic stop or something
bad happens and they call,"
Chudnow said.
"So to have officers start-
ing early with the positive
contact with the kids in the
community, whether at the
elementary, middle or high
[school level], it is impor-
tant to show them that offi-
cers are not only there for
an issue but to see the posi-
tive side of officers and that
they are people just as they
are," he added.
There is a misconception
with some people, Duffy
said, that the DARE program
only focuses on drug pre-
vention. While abstention
from drugs is part of the
program, Duffy also teach-
es the children life skills,
such as making good deci-
sions and picking the right
friends. They spend their
10-week sessions discussing
the DARE principles of cour-
age, honesty and integrity
and how to use the DARE
decision-making model.
"We try to get them to prac-


tice those simple things
to set them up for success
when they go to middle
school," Duffy said.
Once the fifth-graders
enter middle school and
are confronted with big-
ger decisions, Duffy hopes
it will be second nature to
stop and think before tak-
ing action.
One of the most reward-
ing aspects of the job,
Duffy said, is building the
rapport with children. At
the beginning of every
new DARE class, Duffy
gives every student her
phone number and e-mail
address and tells them, "If
you need me, call me, and
I will be there for you. If
you find yourself in a situa-
tion where you don't know
what to do, call me, and we
will work through it. Don't
do anything stupid," Duffy
said she advises.
Today, Duffy receives an
average of 10 to 15 e-mails
per week from current and
past students, sharing both
their victories and their
defeats. Even college stu-
dents reach out. for advice
and a helping hand in
times of need.
"It makes me hopeful
because they are communi-
cating to someone," Duffy
said. "It makes me feel like
I am doing my job."


home, which was near the
area, and called an acquain-
tance that is familiar with
working on autos. When
the mechanic showed up to
where he was told the vehi-
cle was supposed to be, the
vehicle was gone. Oviedo
Fire Department found
the vehicle after it struck
a water main pump at the
intersection of Lindsey Lane
and South Central Avenue,
causing the water main to
break. The vehicle was not
occupied and there were
no witnesses to the traffic
crash. It is still of utmost
importance to take the time
to secure your vehicle and
take the keys with you.

Outdoor electrical
equipment stolen
On. Sept. 2, a backflow
and water meter that was
attached to a fire hydrant
in the area of Aulin Avenue
and West Broadway Street


Becky Funke
AVP/Branch Manager'
Main Office
156 Geneva Drive
407-365-6611
Laura Rountree
Branch Manager
Longwood Office
410 S. Myrtle St.
407-622-7142
Jessica Sokoly
AVP/Branch Manager
Red Bug Office
8305 Red Bug Lake Rd.
407-366-4868
Janell Harburn
Branch Manager
Aloma Office
7250 Aloma Avenue
407-679-7000
Jolene Burns
AVP/Branch Manager
Alafaya Office
10 Alafaya Woods Blvd
407-365-2212


was reported stolen.
On Sept. 4, two air con-
ditioning units and some
copper line were reported
stolen from a
home under con-
struction in the
900 block of Holly
Springs Terrace. --


Too much to
drink =
more than a
headache
OnSept. 2, anargu-
ment over liquor
led to the sub-
Sject being placed
under arrest for
domestic battery.
Was it worth the
headache and a
ride to jail?
On Sept. 6,
a female was


arriving home in the early
morning hours after an eve-
ning of drinking. When will
they ever learn?


uviedo police will
be looking for traffic
violators between
Sunday, Sept. 14,
and Saturday, Sept.
20 at Pine Avenue
for speeders and
stop-sign runners
and State Road 434
for speeders.


Watch ou
school zoi
bus stops e
is in ses


arrested for domestic vio-
lence for striking her live-
in boyfriend. Evidently she
was very agitated at him for


Cop talk: don't
tip off thieves
Leave a light
on when not at
home and keep
your shrubbery
trimmed and cut
away. Secure your
homes and vehi-
cles and don't
let yourselves
become easy tar-
gets. Use common
sense and report


it near suspicious activ-
nes and ity. Join a neigh-
is school borhood watch
ssion, and get involved.
"I claim not to
have controlled
events, but confess plainly
that events have controlled
me."
Abraham Lincoln


EXPERTS.


At Citizens Bank of Florida, we learned long ago
that our people make the difference. They're smart.
They're friendly. They're willing to work extra hard
to make your banking easier. They're people like
Becky, Laura, Jessica, Janell and Jolene. Our branch
managers are ready to help you. We have a full array
of accounts and services tailored to meet your every
need. We're waiting to welcome you, so what are
you waiting for? Stop by today and see how we can
help you!


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Page A6 Setme12-Spebr1,08


The Voice





The Voice September 12 September 18,2008 Page A7




THIS WEEK in human history


Spanned marking the ft'contact between oon a
Human object. Before it crashed, the probe sent data to Earth that
IT Jconfirmed the moon had no magnetic field or radiation belts.




Geneva family redefines 'cabin fever'


AMY K.D. TOBIK
THE VOICE

T here it stood off in the dis-
tance, beckoning the woman
to take a chance. It was all she
ever wanted quaint and charm-
ing with a strong frame it was an
early 20th century log cabin.
For Trish Deer, a single mom look-
ing for a place to call home 17 years
ago, owning a 1,300-square-foot log
home was an opportunity of a life-
time. The picturesque brown cabin,
crafted from local cypress trees and
crowned with a shingle roof, had
caught Deer's attention while look-
ing at a neighboring rental property
one day.
"I always wanted to live in a log
cabin, ever since I was a little girl,"
she said with a grin. "I was stand-
ing there staring at it, and the.man
who owned it came out and said it
was sold but to come in and take a
look."
Deer said her prayers were an-
swered when the prospective buy-
ers backed out of the deal, and she
was able to buy her first home. It
was her chance to create a haven
from a fast-paced world and settle
in Geneva with her young son.
"I just love the old house," Deer
said. "I love the feel of it and doing
old-fashioned things."
While the cabin, located on Flor-
ida Avenue, is not quite the oldest
structure in town, it is believed to be
the oldest log home, dating back to
the early 1900s. It was built during a
time when the town supported the
logging industry and sent materials
down the St. John's River to the fast-
growing city of Sanford.
Mal Martin of the Geneva His-
torical Society said since the town
was designated a Rural Heritage
Area last year, any.structure older
than 50 years is considered "histor-
ic," making preservation even more
important.
While quaint, Deer explained,
the cabin wasn't quite "move-in


ready."
"You could see down to the
ground through the floorboards,"
Deer said with a laugh. The main
floor was seriously sloped, the
chinking material used to seal out
the elements and bugs between the
logs was in need of restoration, and
tree limbs shored up the old shingle
roof. With the help of her father,
Deer built special boxes-along the
floor and the wall to seal the ,large
gaps. She also realized the need to
makethe steep attic-like stairs func-
tional since the owners relied on a
rope ladder to climb to the second.
floor. Throughout the years, con-
stant restoration became a labor of
love.
"You should have seen me at
Home Depot asking if they had any
chinking," Deer said. Since log cabin
materials were not readily available,
Deer improvised. "I ended up using
plaster and a spoon, and it worked
fine," she said. Eventually damage to
the front wall of the house required
a new facade to be built using wood
siding cleverly crafted to match.
Because. of the small size of the
log cabin, Deer has taken special
care to utilize every square inch.
When kitchen renovations became
necessary a few years ago, Deer opt-
ed to keep the shelves open to artis-
tically display her large collection
of jarred dry goods used to make
recipes from scratch. A small addi-
tion built off the kitchen created a
place to eat and housed additional
cabinetry. A small bedroom and
bath were also added to provide
more space.
'Ceiling fans have been strategi-
cally placed throughout the house
to heat and cool it since there is
no room to run central-air ducting
with the open architecture and ex-
posed beams. A large heater in the
living room housed within a fire-
place facade keeps the family warm
during the winter months.
"There is nothing modern about
it, not even the furniture," Deer said.


.. .. .. ,-"
PHOTO BY AMY K.D. TOBIK THE VOICE
A fateful encounter led Trish Deer to buy the Geneva log cabin in which she now lives with her husband, Bob.
She said she yearned to live in a log cabin since she was a little girl.


There is no need for a television ei-
ther, she added, because she and her
husband, Bob, prefer to read in their
quiet living room at night..
What the house lacked in obvi-
ous conveniences, Deer said, it nade
up for with personality and charm.
And with some tender care, the log
house would soon be a welcoming


home for friends in need. Deer, who
grew up in a large historic home
outside Boston, said she learned so
many.lessons from living a simplis-
tic life. Through old-fashioned liv-
ing and values, she has discovered
she doesn't require an oversized

> turn to LOG CABIN on the next page


Marriage secrets


from the source


AMY K.D. TOBIK
S THE VOICE
Every few years, Heather
Walsh goes to Vegas and gets
married. It's become one of
her favorite traditions.
Walsh and her husband,
David Sigalow, are currently
planning their next visit to
Las Vegas for their 20th an-
niversary, when they renew
their vows for the fifth time.
Once again, the _Maitland
couple will celebrate with
their closest friends and
family.
"When we go back, we
are remembering the past -


we're having
a great time
in the pres-
s ent and shar-
ing that with
people we
love and we
Kurland are thinking
about our fu-
ture," Heather
said. "We have a good mar-
riage, so it is not that we feel
that we have to renew, we
enjoy the renewing and it's
something to look forward
to."
To Sheryl Kurland, author.

> turn to MARRIAGE on next page





. ..u OUP V.,UM.. If YVUPIIILJUI .. .-,v v


LOG CABIN 117 years of repairs made it a home


PHOTO BY AMY K.D. TOBIK THE VOICE
This historic cabin features few modern conveniences it has no air conditioner or even a television. For the Deers, though, it's a cozy home.
< continued from the last page


house to be content. Instead, her happi-
ness is derived from creating a ministry for
others within her old-fashioned home.
Through time, the three-bedroom, two-
bath house has become a haven for family
and friends in need. including a neighbor
-suffering from Alzheimer's disease and
a friend sick vith cancer. Nine exchange
students!from all over the world have even
called the log cabin home.
"V'When I first moved in, people said I
should just knock it down and build an-
other house, and I thought, 'are you out of
your mind?'" Deer said.
She still cringes when she hears people
refer to house as a great "starter home."
"I think we are missing something in
this country by having everything so dis-
posable," she said. "I want to start here
and finish here. I feel so blessed."


S"The log cabin-was built around 1930 or so. Mr. Wade Raulerson hauled.
in the-cypress logs and put up the walls for us after my brother and I had
skinned all the bark off the logs With drawknives. A roof was put up with '-
a 'temporary' tarpaper surface, which served us well. We had a vegetable
garden and chickens, sharing the labor and harvests with Gramma Sheldon,
or she with us. The inside walls of the cabin were papered with old news--
.papers, of which we had a surplus since my brother had the Orlando
Sentinel paper route, the deliveries of which we all shared too. We had a
wood-burning stove made outof an old oil drum and heated water for baths-
on it as well as bricks to take tO bed with us toward our-feetl My father
died in 1934 so eventhe sporadic:'child support"-he sometimes provided
was gone andwe all had to pitch-in to get by..1 ::- -
SExcerpt from "Refleclons otieso EarlierFe aGeneva, Flodda,"
written by Eleanor Jane Marshall White, daughter of Jeanetta Helen
S Mackey-Shelton White, fhe original builders and owners of the house.I
Information obtained from Geneva Histdrical Society


MARRIAGE
Traditions keep
the bond strong

< continued from the last page
of the book "Everlasting Matrimony:
Pearls of Wisdom From Couples Mar-
ried 50 Years or More," it's marriage
traditions like Heather and David's
that keep a couple joined for life.
"It's important because we are all
running through our busy daily sched-
ules and you start taking for granted
the most special relationship in your
life. Having a tradition between you
and your mate keeps you connected,"
Kurland said.
"Everlasting Matrimony," pub-
lished three years ago and now in its
fourth printing, focuses on the mag-
ic between couples who have been
married for 50 years or more. The de-
voted and insightful couples she in-
terviewed in the process inspired the
Longwood writer to begin research on
a new book, called "101 Marriage Tra-
ditions."
"In going over the material (for the
book) I realized there were traditions
between the two of them," Kurland
said. Much to her surprise, when Kur-
land asked younger couples to share
their marriage traditions, they could
,only name family traditions. "They
were stumped. That's when I realized
there was a need for a book," she said.
While the search for couples with
traditions has proved more difficult
than anticipated, Kurland expects
her book, which will be designed to
look like a handbook, will be ready to
publish within a year. "It has been a
> story ends at MARRIAGE on the next page


PAGE PRIVATE SCHOOL


1908 -

6elerwatinq


2008

/00 5feas/


OPEN HOUSE

Saturday, September 20th

10:00 a.m. 12:00 p.m.
Free Enrollment Fee
(New Students'Only)


Tuscawilla welcomes NEW members!


Paae! A8 etme 2-SAebr1.20


The Voice






T ip 1 S b 2e


MARRIAGE I Lighting candles, secret messages


< continued from the last page

challenge, but I want to do
it because the fact that it is
so difficult shows there is a
need for it."
With divorce rates hov-
ering around 50 percent,
Kurland said she is con-
cerned that couples are
not maintaining their vital
connection and friendship.
"Divorces crumble the fam-
ily and the people around
them, and my life passion is
to help people get it right,"
Kurland said. "Having some-
one special in your life adds
a whole new dimension to
your life."
Traditions keep that
bond going, Kurland said.
"It shows you still love each
other unconditionally.
And it makes your relation-
ship different from anyone
else's. It is a sense of identi-
fication that your relation-
ship is unique," she said.
Kurland said she always





Sheryl Kurland's new book
project explores marriage
traditions of these in long-
term relationships. Share your
own marriage tradition at
EverlastingMatrimony.com or
call 407-786-7747.


gets excited when a couple
calls her to share one of
their special traditions. "I
can hear in their voice the
elation and the happiness
that doing their tradition
brings them, no matter
what it is. It's their thing.'It
provides continuity in the
relationship," she said.
One couple, Kurland
said, lights a special candle
from their 1977 wedding
the first day of every month
to express their gratitude.
Another husband and wife
made it a tradition to bring
home a rock from their
travels and write the date
and origin on the back and
add it to their expansive
rock garden. A man who
has worked as a painter and
set designer for the past 35
years told Kurland that he
has always included a spe-
cial love message to his
wife in an inconspicuous
spot in his work. Kurland
proudly shared that her
husband of 19 years, Steve,
has caught on to her love
for hearts and gives her
beautiful handmade anni-
versary cards with hearts,
which she frames.
"What people don't re-
alize is that it's. not rocket
science. It's based on- ba-
sic principles of showing
you care that makes the
relationship work or not
work." It's the effort that


makes it special, Kurland
said; it doesn't have to cost
a lot of money.
Couples can create spe-
cial traditions at any time
in their relationship, Kur-
land added. "Instead of
looking at what is wrong,"
she said, "do things that
makes things right."


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Denmark I 2 215 3/3/2-Car 16 $231 195
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RE-SDDIN


The Voice


Septmber12 -Sepembe 18,008 Page A9











G.O. Familiu


Family

Calendar


Bring a friend and join
Clover Kids 4-H Club
Youth ages 5 through 12 are
invited to the Clover Kids 4-H
Club. Enrollment and the first
meeting will be held from 5:30
p.m. to 7 p.m. on Monday, Sept.
22, at the Extension Auditorium
at 250 W. County Home Road in
Sanford.
Clover Kids 4-H meetings will
be held twice a -month from 5:30
p.m. to 7 p.m. Monday. This
year's club projects will include
photography, ecology, and foods
and nutrition. Youth can work on
additional projectspn their own.
Club dues are $20 per year for
the first child, which includes a
club T-shirt and project supplies,
and $15 for each additional
child.
Call 407-665-5560 for more
information.

Bingo at Riverside Park
in Oviedo
Bring the family for an evening
of bingo at Riverside Park in
Oviedo at 7 p.m. Friday, Sept.
26. Prizes will be awarded to
the winners. Cards cost $2 each,
with a maximum of five cards
per purchase per person. Call
Sal Rovetto at 407-971-5579 or
e-mail srovetto@cityofoviedo.net
for more information.

Aquatic adventure
promised in Geneva
Join an aquatic expert as he takes
you through the world underwater
on an Aquatic Adventures hike!
Meet up at 8 a.m. Saturday, Sept.
27 at Lake Proctor Wilderness
Area at 920 E. State Road 46 in
Geneva. This is an interactive
hike where you have the chance
to learn what is found in the
waters of Seminole County,.
You do not have to go in the
water to participate in this hike.
Reservations are required! Call
Amy Raub at 407-349-0959 or
e-mail araub@seminolecountyfl.
gov to sign up and for more
information.

Fun Day for kids in
Oviedo this month
When school is out, Riverside Park
is in! Come to 1600 Lockwood
Blvd. for a Fun Day program Sept.
30 hosted by the city. This fun-
filled program is for children ages
5-12. Program hours at Riverside
Park are 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Children must bring a lunch, two
snacks, a bathing suit and towel.
The cost is $25 for residents and
$45 for non-residents.
Call Sal Rovetto at 407-
971-5579 or e-mail srovetto@
cityofoviedo.net for more
information.


Keeping disease at bay


Vigilance


pays in fight


against


measles


C righd Material




Syndicated Content


Available fromCommercial News Providefr


AMY K.D. TOBIK
THE VOICE


New mothers and
fathers are often
inundated by the
dos and don'tsof parenting.
Families are typically faced
with countless decisions
on a daily basis, especially
when it comes to a child's
health.
While some people may
dispute whether immuniza-
tions are vital when statis-
tics show a rapid decrease
in a particular disease, the
Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention, or CDC,
recommends parents fol-
low the most recent statis-
tics closely.
The CDC received 131
reports of measles from
January through July this
year, the highest number
since 1996. While measles,
also known as rubeola, was
declared eradicated in the
United States in 2000, the
disease exists in other parts
of the world. With 20 mil-
lion cases reported each
year, the virus is still eas-
ily imported into the U.S.
by travelers. The most sus-
ceptible, experts say, are the
children who have not been
vaccinated.
Becky Redfield, Seminole
County School Board


nurse, said, "MMR (measles,
mumps and rubella) are dis-
eases that are preventable
by vaccine and are required
by Florida law. It's because
of this vaccine that we don't
see measles, mumps and
rubella in the United States,
and we would like to keep
it that way to protect our'
kids."
It is recommended chil-
dren be given the MMR vac-
cine between the ages of
12 and 15 months witl a
second dose administered
between the ages of 4 and 6
years old. Adults who have
not been vaccinated, doc-
tors say, should be inocu-
lated as well.
While immunizations
for measles, along with
other communicable dis-
eases, are required by the
Department of Health for
school entrance, the state
of Florida allows certain
exemptions for religious
and philosophical reasons.
Precautions should be
taken, however, because
measles is the most deadly
of all childhood rash and
fever illnesses. It can be rap-
idly spread by direct con-
tact with nasal or throat
secretions of the infected,


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typically through cough-
ing or sneezing. In 2005,
311,000 children younger
than 5 died from the disease
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According to a Web
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Foundation, it is estimated
that 90 percent of people
who have not been vacci-
nated will get the disease if
they live with an infected
person. Symptoms include
an all-over body rash and
flu-like symptoms such
as fever, cough and runny
nose. The illness lasts seven
to 10 days. The disease can
lead to more serious infec-


who fail to comipl with
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the greater the risk to both
those individuals and the
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The long-term impli-
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Deichen said. "Clearly, more
frequent outbreaks involv-
ing greater numbers of per-
sons would be inevitable.
Vaccine-preventable diseas-
es are for the most part very
significant illnesses.
"As such, we must avoid
becoming complacent."


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'Page Al 0 etme 2-Spebr1,20


The Voice


fit 4 i. b -




The Voic Seotmbe 12~ _~~_ -___ Setme 1.20 Pa


CALENDAR


Oviedo and American Legion
to host soldiers' families
Is your Oviedo family member actively
deployed overseas or soon to be
deployed? Would you like to meet
other Oviedo residents with actively_
deployed family members? If so, mark
Saturday, Sept. 27, on your calendar.
Half-a-Heart-Away is a social and
support networking event for Oviedo
families who have a family member
deployed or soon to be deployed
in the military oversees. Attendees
will receive information about military
resources and benefits, and receive a
networking directory.
The event is from 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. at Oviedo's Riverside Park on
Lockwood Boulevard. This is a free
event co-sponsored by Oviedo and
American Legion Post 243.
A special appearance will be made
by Oviedo's very own "Mayor of Camp
Victory, Baghdad" Lieutenant
Colonel Sean L. Clark.
Visit geocities.com/halfheartaway/
Deployed.html for more information.


Food drive hosted by
Vine this Saturday
At The Vine thrift store on Saturday,
Sept. 13, there will be a food drive.
Please drop by food, and The Vine will
be handing out food for free and host-
ing a barbecue. Call Cindy Cook at
407-971-8135 for more information.
JJpdate on Seminole realty
this Tuesday
The Central Florida Association of
Commercial Realtors will provide a
Seminole County update at 5 p.m.
Tuesday, Sept. 16, at Winter Springs
City Hall. The event includes network-.
ing time followed by a panel discus-
sion. The cost is $30 for the event,
followed by more wine and appetizers
at Wine Styles. Hollywood Bistro will
provide food.
Sanford theater performs
"Annie Get Your Gun"
The Seminole County Repertory
Company presents the well-known


and loved musical "Annie "Get Your
Gun" for the next two weekends.
Annie Oakley is the best shot around,
and ends up joining Buffalo Bill's Wild
West Show. She falls head over heels
with shooting ace Frank Butler, but
ends up pitted against him in a final
shootout. The rousing finale hits the
mark every time in a testament to the
power of female ingenuity.
The show will run weekends Sept.
12-14 and Sept. 19-21. Friday and
Saturday performances begin at 7:30
p.m.; Sunday shows are at 2 p.m.,
Tickets are $23-15, depending on
seating; $10 for students.
Call 407-321-8111 or visit
WayneDenschPerformingArtsCenter.
com for more information.
Torps band returns to
Harry's in Oviedo
The Smokin' Torpedoes will play at
Harry's Cigar and Brew at 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, Sept. 13. Harry's is at 1954
W. State Road 426 in Oviedo, in the
Home Depot shopping center.


The Sign Man


160 East Broadway
PO Box 622143


Phone: (407) 365-3722
Fax: (407) 365-7786


Oviedo, FL 32765 www.signman.net
Computerized Laser & Rotary Engraving Picture ID Name Badges
Vinyl Lettered Banners & Signs Self-Inking Rubber Stamps
Magnetic Signs Plaques & Awards Large Format Printing
Phone: (407) 365-3722 Fax: (407) 365-7786
(Located at the base of the Nelson & Co. water tower)





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f- -


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The Voice


Septmbe 12- Sptemer 8, 008 Page Al 1


- "I





Page A12 September12- September 18,2008 The Voice


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BABYLON A.D. (PG-13) 12:45,
2:55, 5:05, 7:30,9:50, 12:20am
COLLEGE (R) 9:30, midnight
DISASTER MOVIE (PG-13) 1:00,
3:35, 7:35, 9:45,11:55
MAMMA MIA! SING-ALONG
(PG-13). 12:30, 4:05, 6:55,10:15
TRAITOR (PG-13) 12:40, 4:35,
7:50,10:30
DEATH RACE (R) 1:20, 3:55,
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6:30, 9:30, 12:20am
DEATH RACE (R) 1:05, 4:25,
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MUMMY 3 (PG-13)1:25, 8:10


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PageAl 2 September 12 -September 18, 2008


The Voice




The Voice September 12 September 18, 2008 Page A13









ATHLETsIComeback falls jut




Knights comeback falls just short


ISAAC BABCOCK
THE VOICE

A year after suffering their biggest
blowout in their tenure in Division
One football, the Knights shocked
the No. 19-ranked USF Bulls by
sending a game into overtime
before falling just short of a victory.
The Knights fell behind 24-10
with less than three minutes to play
in the game when they launched
into a furious comeback that tied
the score just before the clock ran
out. But in "sudden-death" over-
time, the Bulls scored and the
Knights couldn't respond, losing
31-24.
The game was to be the last in
an annual rivalry between the two
schools that started in 2005. The
Knights were hoping for a change
after three straight losses to USF,
including a 64-12 drubbing by the
Bulls last year.
"We're going to have some fun
this year," defensive end and kick
returned Joe Burnett said before the
start of the season.
And Burnett did, returning a
kickoff 91 yards for -a touchdown
just seconds after the Bulls put the
first score on the board in the first
quarter.
The Knights remained neck-and-
neck with the Bulls in the first half,
going into halftime tied 10-10, but
when the Bulls came out onto the
field they exploded for two touch-
downs in a row in the third quarter
to go up 24-10.
That deficit would stand for a
full quarter until UCF. defensive
end Bruce Miller intercepted a Matt


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE VOICE
Knights quarterback Michael Greco made a critical pass in the waning seconds of the fourth quarter to wide receiver Rocky Ross, tying the game 24-24.


Grothe pass, then tight end Corey
Rabazinski caught a 13-yard pass
from suddenly reinvigorated quar-
terback Michael Greco and tiptoed
into the end zone.
Then after the UCF defense
forced the Bulls to turn over the
ball, Burnett worked his magic
again, racing 35 yards on the punt
return to bring UCF deep inside USF
territory.
Two plays later Greco found
receiver Rocky Ross up the middle
and Ross took off for 31 yards to tie
the game and send the near-capaci-


ty crowd to its feet.
"I think the kid finally threw it
where he should," Coach George
O'Leary said of Greco's fourth-quar-
ter performance.
But in the ensuing overtime
period USF scored quickly on the
Knights to put the score up to 31-24.
When the Knights took the field,
penalties, which added up to 149
yards lost during the game, haunted
them again. Greco tried to scram-
ble for a fourth-down conversion
after a false start 5-yard setback, but
officials placed the ball just inches


short.
Not all was lost in the game,
senior linebacker Cory Hogue said.
"That was the most fun I've had
in four years," he said. "It was a great
comeback."


The Knights take a break this week and
prepare to face Boston College on the
Eagles' turf at 1 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 20,
in Chestnut Hill, Mass. The game will be
broadcast live on ESPNU.


Lions, Huskies, Hawks and Bears


ISAAC BABCOCK
THE VOICE

Hagerty High's football
team got a bit of deja vu last
Friday. They were blown out
by Seminole High School
42-0, a repeat of a disastrous
first game last year.
This time the Seminoles
ran away from the Huskies
again on offense, with three
touchdowns in their first 10
plays on offense.
And it just got worse for
the Huskies from there. The
Seminole defense held the
Huskies nearly stationary
on offense for the entire
game, allowing only 49 total
yards.
The lack of Huskies'
quarterback Jeff Driscoll
due to a preseason concus-
sion didn't help the team's
chances. The four backup
quarterbacks used in the
game threw three intercep-
tions and moved the ball
forward only 19 yards.


The Huskies get their first
chance at redemption this
week as they host Oviedo at
7:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 12.

Winter Springs High Bears
For Winter Springs things
were a lot more tense in
a 21-14 win over Wekiva
High. The visiting Mustangs
were fielding their first-
ever senior class against the
Bears and managed to hold
the score to 14-14 late in
the fourth quarter.
But with the ball in the
Mustangs' hands and less
than a minute left on the
clock, the Bears capitalized
on an interception and a
touchdown to win the game
in the final seconds.
Winter Springs travels
to Winter Park at 7:30 p.m.
Friday.

Oviedo Lions vs. Lake Howell
It took .Oviedo four quar-
ters to gain traction against
visitors Lake Howell Friday


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE VOICE
The Oviedo Lions parade onto the field Friday night before facing a tough fight against Lake Howell. The Lions won 34-12.


night, as the teams fought
back and forth until the
Lions began pulling away
in the fourth quarter for a
34-12 win.
But a win didn't look in
sight for the Lions in the


first half, as they allowed
the Silver Hawks to march
down the field over and
over against a seemingly
powerless defense.
At one point the Hawks
had a 12-7 lead, but a defen-


sive and offensive collapse
let the Lions score 27 unan-
swered points and grab the
ensuing victory.
Lake Howell next hosts
Colonial at 7:30 p.m. Friday.






PageAl Sepembr 12- Spteber 8, 008 he oic


.I I V -- Thomas Jefferson ('1743-1826), American president


EMPLOYMENT

Ask

Sandi



Been hired?


Tell us how!

Last Wednesday, I was one of over
6,000 people at the Governor's Job
Fair in Orlando. It was insane how
many people were there, from
business professionals some
from the circles I network in to
the very entry level.
I found myself thinking about
how challenging it is to be unem-
ployed right now. The job mar-
ket numbers just came out; the
stock market took a bit of a dive.
Companies are waiting for the
presidential election to decide
whether or not to hire.
I have been giving advice for
more than a year now and I am
even finding it challenging when
a professional person with a great
resume sits at my desk and tells me
that they have not had any luck in
their two-month search.
I wanted to reach out to read-
ers and ask you something: If you
have recently landed a new job,
would you please share your story?
Was there anything special you
did with your follow-up or your
resume? I would love to be able to
share successes with other readers.
Thank you, and best wishes.


-Sandi


^>SANDI
Sandi Vidal is the executive director for Christian
HELP and the Central Florida Employment Council,
with more than 10 years of recruiting and human
resources experience. Please send questions
about employment-by fax 407-260-2949, sandi@
christianhelp.org, or mail Ask Sandi C/O Christian
HELP, 450 Seminola Blvd., Casselberry, FL 32707.
Subjects may include employment search,
resumes, networking and promotion opportunities.
Employers: E-mail your job leads to cfec@cfec.org
and we will share them with Christian HELP clients.


LETTER TO THE EDITOR

U.S. shouldn't follow U.K.'s lead


Britain's National Health Service
is no longer in the business of
saving lives. The British agency
tasked with deciding which treat-
ments the government will cover
just ruled that if a life-saving drug
costs too much, itshouldn't be
prescribed even if it's the only
treatment option.
For those familiar with the
British agency disingenuously
called the National Institute for
Health and Clinical Excellence
or NICE the announcement
wasn't surprising. Since its cre-
ation in 1999, NICE has been used
as a tool for denying cutting-edge
medicines to countless patients.
Just a few weeks ago, for
example, NICE determined that
four breakthrough kidney can-
cer drugs were too expensive for
the British government to cover.
And last year, NICE ruled that two
treatments for the eye condition
macular degeneration were too


pricey. While deliberating over
the details of that decision, as
many as 10,000 patients with the
condition may have gone blind.
Despite these horror stories,
Congress is trying to create a
similar agency right here in the
United States. In August, Senators
Max Baucus (D-Mont.) and Kent
Conrad (D-N.D.) introduced
the Comparative Effectiveness
Research Act of 2008. It would
create a new government body to
evaluate the relative effectiveness
of different medical treatments.
While conducting side-by-side
comparisons of various treat-
ments sounds like a worthwhile
endeavor, it will almost certainly
be abused for the purposes of
saving the government money.
When health care is financed
with the government's finite
resources, the government has an
interest in cutting corners wher-
ever it can.


That's why Britain is willing
to sacrifice lives if medical treat-
ment comes with too high a price
tag. Considering that the U.S. gov-
ernment foots more than half the
nation's health care bill thanks
to Medicare, Medicaid and other
programs it's all but certain
that U.S. agencies tasked with
comparing medical treatment
would have a similar mandate.
Britain's health care injustices
are atrocious and unnecessary. A
nation that refuses to protect the
lives of its citizens is not worthy
of emulation by the United States.
With any luck, U.S. lawmakers will
come to realize this before it's
too late. If they don't, American
patients will be much worse off.

PeterJ. Pitts
President of the Center for
Medicine in the Public Interest


Here's what students at
Double R Private School.
shad to say about what
*S they are looking forward
C to this school year.
~/


Playing is fun and so
is doing paperwork.
We write and we
draw pictures of all
kinds of fun things.
I have made new
friends this year.
-Dean W.
6 years old


I really like my
- teacher she is
creative and fun and
sometimes she is
strict to help-us learn.
My favorite subject is
science it is very
interesting.
-Jordan B.
9 years old


I'm looking forward
to the fun trips we
* are going to take this
year. It's good'for our
teacher to push us
to do better. I have
the best teacher at
Double R; she helps
us learn lots of facts.
-Shawn S.
10 years old


I'm looking forward
to seeing all my
friends and getting
know my teachers
I'm really glad to b
back in school wit
my friends.
-Kayr
8 years


3.._ f Ialike learning with my teacher Mrs.
.- ".. -. Matthews. I am in kindergarten and





SWe would

dt I 0' t re
gto




old
Call editor Alex Babcock at 407-628-8500
to have The Voice visit your class or group.


, - Am . . .


Page Al etmer1 etmbr1,20


The Voice


ri






September 12 September 18, 2008 Page A15


TheMarketplace


REALTORS:
-Licensed Real Estate Professionals needing
to earn additional income. Become a
part time or full time loan officer. Control
your own closings. Gain access to
hundreds of mortgage programs. Save
your clients thousands of dollars. Call
Maitland Mortgage Lending Company
(407)629-5626

CAREGIVER
Caregiver F/T or Live-In Energetic &
responsible person to care for residents at
Faith House Assisted Living 407-366-9961

SECRETARY/CLERK/SALES REP
Raymond World seeking an individual
to work as secretary/clerk and sales
representative. Qualifications verbal/
written communication skills, extremely
organized, legal background helpful.
Interested candidate should contact
pphotocopy@gmail.com

DELIVERY DRIVERS
Drivers: 95% Home Time, Sign On. Benefits,
Orlando, FL CDL-A3YRS Exp. Local/Regional
Deliveries. Johnny: 407-704-0283






OVIEDO HOUSE FOR RENT
4BR/1BA two-story house with a large
remodelled kitchen, wood flooring and
spacious screened porches. Located 1 block
from N. Lake Jesup Ave and SR426. $1,000/
mo. Contact Kellyn at 407-716-8649.



FOR RENT.
Oviedo Office Space, great frontage. 750
to 1,050 sf available, $1,070 to $1,350 per
month. 1401 Broadway St. Contact Megan
at (407) 687-3524.

COMMERCIAL SPACE IN OVIEDO
1,300 sq. ft. brand-new commercial space
available. Located within the beautiful
new Oviedo Town, Center community. This
community is part of the new Oviedo on the
Park major mixed-use development. This
space can be used for: hair salon, nail salon,
or other personal service. Please contact
Denisse at 407-741-8600.


CMT



Get fast same or next day service!

Repairs, upgrades, build-to-spec,
wireless networking, maintenance
or virus removal.

Need training?
No problem!
We provide that too.

Over 25 years experience.'

Call 917-803-2440
Code 4






Services start at $11/hr.
Review website at:
www.LeanOnMeHCS.com
or call 407-401-8308
for more info.








Find out what your
home is worth on-line
OrlandoHomeHunting.com
Free Recorded Message
1-_77_-Qi-_10Rn7 ......


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HANDYMAN/CARPENTRY
Let me take care of the chores you don't
have time to do yard work, carpentry,
painting, (whole house or interior rooms),
driveways, repairs, pressure washing, and
more. No job too small. Local. Prompt.
Affordable. Call Scott at 321-460-3905.

KITCHEN/BATHROOM SURFACES
Repair and resurface bathtubs, ceramic
tile, vanities, kitchen countertops, cabinets,
appliances and much more. No dust and
dirt and very little down time. Have a new
factory-like finish and save up to four times
the replacement cost. Licensed/insured/
member BBB. All Surface Technology, 407-
691-0062

PERSONAL ASSISTANT
Personal assistant, Winter Park/Maitland
area. Complete home cleaning, shopping,
errands, senior support, pet assistance.
Experienced. Trustworthy. Private. Resume
and references available. 407-647-9211




COMMUNITY GARAGE SALE
Whispering Oaks community garage sale.
Saturday, Sept. 13; 8 a.m. 8-10 families.
Follow the signs from 426 and Clark Street

HUGE RUMMAGE SALE
The Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd.
331 Lake Avenue, Maitland. From 17-92, go
west one block on Lake Avenue. Sept 19-20
from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.




Reading volunteers NEEDED Jackson
Heights Middle School in Oviedo is looking
for adults who are Interested in serving as a
Reading Mentor to assist students who are
reading below grade level. Volunteers work
one-on-one with an assigned student before
school for 30 minutes, one or more times
a week through the end of the school year
to build fluency and comprehension skills.
Sessions are from 8:30-9:00 a.m., M-F.
Please contact Connie O'Hanlon for more
information, 407-365-7585.




HOW TO DETOX FOR
OVERNIGHT RELIEF
Natural herbal patches, overnight
detoxification, pain relief: knees, back, foot,
gout, sciatic, lumbago, carpal tunnel, cancer
treatment Attach to foot great night's
sleep. http://www.ebook-detox-patches.
com. (407) 970-1483


WE BUY

HOUSES!
Sell Your Home
for CASH
On the Day of Your Choice
"As-Is" with NO Repairs!

Call Now:

407-297-8749




Notice Under
Rctiious Name Statute
To Whom It May Concern *.
Notice is hereby given that the undersigned,
pursuant to the "Fictitious Name Statute," Chapter
865.09, Florida Statutes will register with the
Division of Corporations, Department of State,
State of Florida, upon receipt of proof of the publl-
. cation of this notice, the fictitious name, to wit
The Battery Post / batteriesyouneed.com
under which the below named party/parties will
engage in business at:
1610 EAgle Nest Circle
Winter Springs, FL 32708
That the party/parties interested In said business
enterprise is/are as follows:
S.W. Uoyd LLC
Dated at Winter Park, Orange County, Florida:
Sept. 12, 2008.
9/12

req i-


-g


i


How
"plIace

-ad


W ft upt1. u.i'22 words rt'yul a80,xltJG GIOVES i yure.ii-1i
w.Iyu.3r ',miirq Sa*' g ied uu.4 t- bn Lk,-,,n Tu' n~ii,
Gi.' 1 vi.? w:.ra title. vgl td rteahwdird n .ol~ 5- i~ir i. Irjr, S500

Include a contact H.ie iw o-s qoIoseora..'i
ii p m ~ i w cd r W -i u n w :m i. ',i" r


VLi A ~IF7~ T~(f~WH r~
LJLJ _


...Or suggest your own!

Call 407-628-8500 or e-mail classifieds@observerhewspapers.com


I


Copyrighted Material 3




Syndicated Content.%,




Available from Commercial News Providers


IN THE EIGHTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN THE
CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 2008-CP-1595
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ELIZABETH R. O'BRYAN,
DECEASED.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of ELIZABETH R.
O'BRYAN, deceased, whose date of death was July
20, 2008, File Number 2008-CP-1595 is pending
in the Circuit Court for Seminole Cousty, Rorida,
Probate Division, the address of which is 301 N.
Park Ave., Sanford, Florida 32772. The names
and addresses of the Personal Representative
and the Personal Representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice is served
must file.their claims with this'Court WITHIN THE
LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBUCATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE TIME OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the Decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against the
Decedent's estate must file their claims, Including
unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, with
this Court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBUCATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice
is Sept. 5,2008.
Paul Stanley West, Attorney At Law
Florida Bar Number 0286620
600S. Orlando Ave., Suite 301
Maitland, FL 32751
Phone: (407) 678-9111
FAX: (407) 679-9911
'KATHLEEN A. MILLER
310 Pervis Lane
Osteen, Florida 32764
9/5,9/12
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File Number. 2008-CP-1594
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JAMES R. ASHWELL;
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of JAMES R.
ASHWELL, deceased, whose date of death was July
31, 2008, File Number 2008-CP-1594, is pending
in the Circuit Court for Seminole County, Florida,
Probate Division, the'address of which is 301 N.
Park Avenue, Sanford, FL 32771, P.O. Box 8099
Sanford, FL 32772-8099. The names and address-
es of the personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against the decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice is required
to be served must file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN -
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBU-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is
Sept 12, 2008.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Richard 0. Baxter, Esq.
Florida Bar Number. 277231
Miller, South & Milhausen, P.A..
1000 Legion Place, Suite 1200
Orlando, Florida 32801
(407) 539-1638
Personal Representative:
David Ashwell
293 Albacore Place
Melbourne Beach, FL 32951
9/12,9/19


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Sh ou ld it b e (klase fid'adver tizing) Noun. Advertising
compactly arranged, as in newspaper
TT 'TT columns, according to subject, under such
JL'i. listings as help wanted and for sale


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Page A16 September 12 September 18, 2008


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