Title: Seminole voice
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091445/00011
 Material Information
Title: Seminole voice
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Community Media Holdings, LLC
Place of Publication: Oviedo, Fla.
Publication Date: September 5, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Seminole -- Oviedo
United States -- Florida -- Seminole -- Winter Park
Coordinates: 28.659722 x -81.195833 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00091445
Volume ID: VID00011
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text





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www.SeminoleVoice.com


Serving Greater Oviedo and Winter Springs for more than 17 years!
September 5 September 11,2008 -


This Week
An Olympian in our midst offers aspiring
gymnasts a chance for fun and fitness.


Interests
Al Ferrer details Florida's thankfully
few venomous snakes.


Geneva fights to


JENNY ANDREASSON
THE VOICE
ack Procell coated his
arms, neck and legs with
ug spray on the week-
end beginning Friday, Aug.
29, before stepping into a
canoe with his father-in-
law, Larry Appleton, who
would see his house for the
first time since Lake Har-
ney started to spill over a
week earlier.
FEMA declared Seminole
; County a disaster area late
Sunday as the lake final-
ly crested at 11.09 feet, a
foot above the previous
record set in 1924. The area
reached flood level, 8.5 feet,
on Aug. 23, the tail end of
lingering Tropical Storm
Fay. Since then, the lake,
104 more like a bloated area of
the St. Johns east of Gene-
va, has been slowly rising.
"Creep is all it is," Pro-
cell said above the buzz of
insects that festered on the
water's surface. "It's creep-
ing in."
Appleton had been for-
tunate so far. Two hundred
sandbags have successful-
ly kept the water dumped
by Fay out of his house.
"From what I hear, it's kind
of on an island," he said.
"We have about four or


PHOTO BY JENNY ANDREASSON THE VOICE
Jack Procell pushes a canoe into the
floodwaters spilling across a road near the
home of his father-in-law, Larry Appleton,
seated. Lake Harney east of Geneva has
flooded its banks from heavy rains brought
by Tropical Storm Fay.
five inches until the water
comes over."
Many county residents
are holding their breath as
they watch Hanna, a tropi-
cal storm as of Wednesday,
when the lake level had


dry


Seminole County said if conditions worsen because of Tropical
Storm Hanna this week, they would mandate evacuations in low-
lying areas. For updates on weather conditions and where to find
sandbags and open shelters, visit PrepareSeminole.org.


receded to just 10.9.5 feet.
If her rain bands hit the
county this week, it could
make sandbag fortresses
obsolete.


The west side of Cross-
over Lane, about 1,000 feet
from the lake, has been act-
> turn to FLOOD on page A6


'Oviedo'

Chamber

packs up,

goes north

JENNY ANDREASSON
THE VOICE

The Oviedo-Winter Springs
Regional Chamber of
Commerce opened up shop
in -Winter Springs Tuesday,
Sept. 2.
It will still have limited
hours at its Oviedo loca-
tion, the Lawton House near
downtown, but the majority
of business will be conduct-
ed in its new offices with-
in the University of Central
Florida's Incubator at the
Vistawilla Office Center,
Chamber President Charles
Lacey said.
The new offices, at State
Road 434 and Highway 417,
are "technically in Winter
Springs, but are equal dis-
tance to the cities' town cen-
ters," Lacey said. "This way,
we are more central to our
client cities."
Also the location is in the
heart of the Seminole Way, a
planned high-tech corridor

> turn to CHAMBER on page A5


JENNY ANDREASSON
THE VOICE
Political campaigns in Winter Springs
are gaining momentum with just two
months left before the Nov. 4 elec-
tion. The period for candidates to
qualify to run ended Friday at noon,
when Commissioner Joanne Krebs
learned she was elected unopposed
to a second term. She was also elect-
ed unopposed in 2004.
Bill Poe qualified to run for term-


limitedCommissioner Robert Miller's
seat. And seemingly out of nowhere,
Poe had an opponent in Jean Hovey,
who qualified the day before the win-
dow closed, without any prior public
announcement. Next week The Voice
will introduce these candidates vying
for seat one.
But now, the battle for seat three,
which pits an incumbent against a
resident calling for change:

> turn to CANDIDATES on page A2


VIEONS: i I "R R I


Some businesses on the brink got a
good sign Tuesday from the Oviedo.-
City Council, which agreed on a com-
promise that would allow businesses
to put larger signs streetside.
"We made a great deal here,"
Deputy Mayor Dominic Persampiere
said. "It's going to be very helpful for
businesses."
The problem was too little visibility
for some businesses due to strict sign
ordinances that had kept them from
advertising near the road.
Now thanks to a proposal that will


go to first vote Sept. 15, businesses
may soon be allowed 6-square-foot
,signs at the front of their lots, and up
to 32 square feet of banner space.
Those would be temporary signs
allowed once per quarter for up to 17
days, allowing businesses to promote
for three weekends in a row.
Residents wanting to advertise
garage sales can also pick up permit-
ting stickers for free to put on signs to
avoid having them removed by code
enforcement.
Isaac Babcock, The Voice


0'




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***************ALL FOR ADC 320
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INDEX
Stetson's Corner..................................... A4
Celery Stalks ........................................A4
Police Log......................................... A5
Weather.............................................. All
Athletics................................... A13
Voices.............................................. A14
Classifieds and Games ....... ....... ...... A15


Copyrighted Material




Available from Commercial News Providers


Just 35


Athletics > Al 3
UCF's Knights topped South Carolina
State in the first football game of the year.


Meet the candidates

Bonner and Gilmore duel in Winter Springs






Page A2 September 5 September 11, 2008 The Voice




SQUOTEABLE history
T HJ i' WE E Remember that as a teenager you are at the last stage of your life
when you will be happy to hear that the phone is for you.
Fran Lebowitz, U.S. writer and humorist
IJHI 10 WEEK


Presidential candidate Barack
Obama's new campaign office
in Winter Park hosts a grand
opening party from 6 p.m.
to 8 p.m. Friday, Sept. 5 at
200 N. Denning Drive, where
Denning intersects Morse
Boulevard. Obama, a senator
from Illinois, will not attend the
event, though Winter Park and
Maitland area supporters and
campaign organizers will host.
The Democratic candidate
last appeared in the area at
a Maitland private fundraising
event in May at the Maitland
Sheraton Hotel.
On Friday, Jacqueline Jones
and her band will provide a
concert of jazz, blues and
patriotic songs. The event is
free and open to the public.
Obama souvenirs will be avail-
able for purchase, and there
will be a sign-up sheet for
volunteer activities.
Call 407-975-9111 for more
information.
Ale.\ BaDcock
The Vtoice


CANDIDATES I Race pits experience against a businessman


< continued from the front page

Gary Bonner, a 15-year
resident and business
owner, aims to replace
CommissionerDonGilmore
on the Winter Springs
dais this year. Gilmore has
served one full term and a
partial term prior, to which
he was appointed.
Bonner said what the
Commission is doing to
reduce the tax burden for
residents isn't working, and
the residents are losing con-
fidence in their elected offi-
cials as a result. He said he
has the experience needed
to expand the city's com-
mercial tax base the city
is 93 percent residential -
and ensure its government
is accountable and given
clear direction as to the
management of tax dollars.
"We have live, play and
retire," Bonner said. "That
work piece is missing."
Bonner grew up around
local politics, with his father
serving as mayor and coun-
cilman of his hometown of
Palm Beach Gardens. He is
a retired Cingular Wireless
executive who owns two
businesses in the city.
He earned his MBA from
Rollins College and said he
has managed budgets "well
beyond" that of the city.
He said he would use his
marketing expertise to fos-
ter economic development.
He said the key is to attract
businesses with high-pay-
ing jobs that will bring with
them "destination employ-
ees," or employees that are
also new neighbors and cus-
tomers to city businesses.
While lowering taxes
for residents, he said he


would also ensure commu-
nity events do not suffer.
Many residents opposed
the fire assessment fee but
were also upset when the
city canceled the remaining
community events in order
to reduce the fee. "I have
the experience to make
these events profitable ... it
doesn't have to be on the
back of the taxpayer," he
said.
He said Gilmore, who
has a background in engi-
neering, doesn't have that
ability to attract the right
kind of businesses. "It's not
an engineering challenge,"
he said. "It's a leadership,
partnering and marketing
challenge."
Bonner said he has
great respect for his fellow
Rotarian but he's the right
man for this job. "It's my
time."

Don Gilmore, Winter
Springs' District 3 commis-
sioner, said the city needs
him on the dais more than
ever in this delicate eco-
nomic time.
Gilmore offers a different
perspective as a profession-
al engineer than the other
commissioners, he said. He
asks the right questions in
order to determine if the
city is headed in the right
direction with its projects.
"Buildings, roads, secu-
rity, fire ... I had all these
things in my past life,"
he said, referring to his
40-plus years spent design-
ing, building and maintain-
ing facilities for companies
such as General Electric and
Siemens-Westinghouse.
Gilmore, a 27-year resi-
dent of the Tuscawilla neigh-


PHOTOS BY JENNY ANDREASSON THE VOICE
Winter Springs City Commission candidates Gary Bonner, at left, and Don Gilmore,
at right, will face off for the right to Gilmore's current seat in November.


borhood, was appointed
in April 2004 after a com-
missioner resigned; he was
elected in November 2004.
As deputy mayor, he runs
the meetings in the mayor's
absence.
If elected to serve for
another four years, Gilmore
has set goals. He, like his
opponent, is interested in
alleviating residents' tax
burdens with economic
development, in areas such
as the Village Walk on the
east side of the city between
Sheoah Boulevard and Moss
Road. He is vested in com-
pleting the Town Center,
but knows patience must
be exercised.
He is also committed
to moving forward with
Seminole Way, the proposed
high-tech Highway417 cor--
ridor.
He said he has his degree
in engineering but through-


out his career has gathered
a wealth of business expe-
rience. "I managed a $20
million budget where our
electric bill was $50,000 a
month," he said. "I think
my business background is
greater than any of them
(the city commissioners)."
To protect the commu-
nity and its residents, he
said he will push for more
sidewalks, and to make sure
parks, recreational areas
and the Senior Center con-
tinue to be well-maintained.
"Times are tough, and we
can't bury our heads in the
sand," he said.
Gilmore said he would
make better-educated deci-
sions than Bonner when it,
comes to protecting Winter
Springs' citizens and their
investments.
"Gary is a salesman," he
said, "but I think I bring
more experience."


Volume 18
Issue No. 36


Phone 407-628-8500 SeminoleVoice.com Fax 407-628-4053


PUBLISHER
Kyle Taylor, extension- 302
kyle@observernewspapers.com
EDITOR
Alex Babcock, extension 304
alexb@theoviedovoice.com
DESIGNER
Lacy Rushin, extension 306..
lacyr@observernewspapers.com
CHIEF REPORTER
Isaac Babcock of Winter Springs
isaacb@theoviedovoice.com .
ADVERTISING SALES -
Pa 06ngi extension 30
- advertisrig@thepviedioeecom.e n


REPORTERS
Jenny Andreasson of Oviedo jennya@observernewspapers.com
Porter Maerz of Oviedo-- porterm@theoviedovoice.com
Karen Phillips of Geneva-- karenp@theoviedovoice.com
Amy K.D. Tobik of Winter Springs amyt@theoviedovoice.com
COLUMNISTS
Janet Foley of Oviedo janetf@theoviedovoice.com
Jay Getty of Oviedo jayg@theoviedovoice.com
Denise Tucker of Oviedo mrsdenisetucker@yahoo.com
Sandi Vidal of Casselberry sandi@christianhelp.org
Ben Wheeler of Chuluota benw@theoviedovoice.com
COPY EDITOR
Jonathan Gallagher Extension 309
jgallagher@observernewspapers.com
'INTERNS
;.aisa Camargo and Justine Griffin


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POSTMASTER: Send address
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The Oviedo-Winter Springs Voice publishes on Fridays for readers in Oviedo,
Winter Springs, Geneva, Chuluota and their neighbors.
Randy Noles founded The Voice in 1991. Its current owner is Observer Newspa-
pers, which also publishes the Winter Park-Maitland Observer.
The publisher is Kyle Taylor.


Talk with us about news stories at
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Ask for Editor AleK Babcock.
Write to us at:
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Help us correct mistakes-by writing
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comes from a mixture of recycled con-
tent. Unsold copies of the newspaper
are archived or recycled. We also re-
cycle all in-office paper waste, bottles
and cans.

Stop by the office in Oviedo sometime.
We take walk-in guests each Thursday
- and also by appointment. We're at
1401 W. Broadway St.:


Published Friday,
September 5,2008


" '


~i~3mih~










Local Olympian a traveling coach

AMY K.D. TOBIK r '.- .. ...--
THE VOICE P7-" -' ^ .


Scott Johnson's eyes were
glued to his television set
for weeks this summer. He
couldn't help it. As Olympic
hopefuls faced tough com-
petition in China, the fel-
low Olympian didn't want
to miss a second cheering
on the American men's
gymnastics team to bronze
medal victory.
Johnson, a 1984 Olympic
gold medalist, national all-
around champion and sev-
en-time NCAA collegiate
national champion, said
he felt almost as if he was
on the competition floor
with them as he watched.
He could well-appreciate
the struggle and personal
triumphs.
"I relate to those athletes
we watched at the Olympics
and know what many of
them went through to get
to that point in their career
- so much hard work, com-
mitment and dedication,"
Johnson said.
Today, the 47-year-old
Winter Springs resident
takes his success one step
further by sharing his pas-
sion for sport and inspir-
ing children to reach for the
stars.
After moving to Florida
after the 1988 Olympic


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE VOICE
Scott Johnson, at right, who won Olympic gold in men's gymnastics in 1984, now teaches the sport locally, including at YMCAs and at The Master's Academy in Oviedo.


games, Johhson retained his
enthusiasm for gymnastics
by teaching classes locally
and giving motivational
speeches at both the youth
and corporate level.
The transition from
accomplished gymnast to
effective coach was smooth
for Johnson, who had a-
natural ability to connect
with children. Not all ath-
letes, he said, automatically


liave the ability to effective-
ly communicate with and
instruct children, especially
at a beginner level. Johnson
said his goal is to create a
program that is structured
yet enjoyable. "I think I did
find that balance and the
kids have a great time," he
said. -
Johnson opened a gym-
*nastics facility in Oviedo
several years ago, but


recently chose to redirect.
his efforts to a broader audi-
ence in the Central Florida
area by traveling to differ-
ent Central Florida loca-
tions. Currently, Johnson
splits his time between
teaching tumbling at sever-
al YMCA locations and Gold
Medal Athletics located on
State Road 434 in Oviedo.
He also trains The Master's
Academy junior and varsity


cheerleading teams.
While possessing a dream
is key, Johnson is first to
encourage parents to expose
children to an assortment
of activities before focusing
on just one. Johnson played
baseball and football and
swain on a team as a child.
"I love the sport of gymnas-
tics; I am passionate about

> turn to GYMNAST on page A5


For more information about our services, or to find a physician, call 1-800-445-3392


Sentmber5 enteber 1 2008 Pa! A3?


The VniceF


I










Help aplenty for soaked Genevans


ShBy Karen McEnany-Phillips


Fay has brought us an extra
12 inches of river water,
and all the stress, inconve-
nience and heartache that
comes with it.
Pastures and ponds,
driveways, ditches and
docks are submerged.
Moving possessions to
higher ground was a priori-
ty that became increasingly
difficult as the water con-
tinued to rise. Four-wheel-
drive vehicles that could
get to a home on Sunday
found it impossible by
Friday. Transport by truck
turned to boat as the river
rose. Pasture animals had
to be relocated to higher
ground and boats were tied
off at front gates for the
ride back home. Red ants
even took up residence in,
some mailboxes.
Help is available in many
forms, and I hope you will


continue to help spread
the word to those who
may not have Internet or
e-mail access. The Geneva
Citizens Association shares
that anyone who needs
help or can provide help
should call 407-349-0115.
Whether it is moving pos-
sessions or relocating ani-
mals, there are neighbors
and community folks avail-
able to help.
The Red Cross has an
open shelter at the First
Baptist Church of Geneva
while the Seminole County
Sheriffs Office has a critical
incident van in front of the
Geneva General Store on
State Road 46. Free sand-
bags are available through
the county at Focal Point
Landscaping please
bring a shovel. The Sheriffs
Office may be able to deliv-
er sandbags to your door if


needed using their two-ton
trucks.
The silver lining of this
situation is the gener-
ous spirit of community.
People are pitching in
to help with their time,
-equipment, storage areas,
expertise, and shoulders
to the wheel and to cry on.
Strangers, neighbors, col-
leagues, friends and fam-
ily are all helping without
being asked, taking the
helm when they see a need.
Thanks to Mary Jo
Martin for sending the
Geneva e-mail news with
such helpful information
regarding all the assistance
available. FEMA decided
late Sunday to include
Seminole County in the
individual assistance fund-
ing. County residents can
apply for aid by visiting
FEMA.gov and clicking
on "Disaster Assistance"
or by calling 1-800-621 -
FEMA(3362).
I also want to thank
Dick Creedon for contact-
ing me promptly regarding
an incorrect statement I
made in last week's col-
umn regarding the Geneva
Lens or Bubble. We actually


do need to be concerned'
about the recharge of the
Geneva Lens, regardless of
the floodwaters. The Lens
water is drinkable while
the water that surrounds
us now is river water, com-
pletely different from what
the Geneva Bubble pro-
vides.
Someone said to me
recently, "You have a lot to
write about since you live
on Lake Harney and are
experiencing the flooding."
Honestly, it will take me
some time to process this
event. I thought I was fairly
tough in 2004, walking
through water in knee-high
boots from the road back
to the house for a month
or so. But what a difference
another foot of water can
make. Now we must boat
back and forth!
Dealing with pump-
ing water out of my foyer,
watching minnows swim
around inside, monitoring
hoses and pumps to keep
the water flow balanced,
watching the afternoon
skies cloud up, hovering
over the laptop iin between
tasks to check thie river lev-
els, and spraying for ants,


spiders and assorted crea-
tures also displaced it's
been quite the adventure.
We found a catfish in the
driveway and a crawdad!
There have been OK days
and bad days. But every bad
day has also had a comfort-
ing phone call, someone
offering assistance, check-
ing on our well-being, and
amazing generosity that
makes me weep. And then I
remember my literary hero,
Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings,
who came to Florida with-
out air conditioning, bug
repellent and river fore-
casts. She made her home
in this simple and wild
Florida, accepting and lov-
ing it in its tropical serenity
and fury.

TALK ARENA

Please share your thoughts about
Geneva at 407-221-7002,
karenp@theoviedovoice.com
with "Stetson's Corner" in the sub-
ject line, or fax 407-349-2800.
Thanks!
This column is dedicated to
Deputy Sheriff Gene "Stetson"
Gregory, killed in the line of duty
on July 8, 1998. Geneva will never
be-the same because of Deputy
_Gregory '. iiill better.


Liquid sunshine couldn't spoil a game


Wow! September is here
and the big Labor Day
weekend has passed. I
hope you all had a safe and
somewhat sane three days.
I did. My friend Anne Dyer
invited me to the Gator
game in Gainesville on
Saturday, Aug. 30. Florida
beat Hawaii 56 to 10. We
did have a fun time dodg-
ing the liquid sunshine
during the game but hey,
we were there to see some


football and cheer for our
team, and we enjoyed our-
selves immensely.
I have been a poll work-
er for more than 15 years
and the voting Tuesday,
Aug. 26, was a lot different
this time. Our work was
very slow and the people
came in t6 vote and chat-
ted with some of us (if you
work in the same precinct
long enough, you know
everybody), but this was


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the first time I can remem--
ber that several citizens
came up to the workers
and thanked us for doing
our job that day. It made
us feel good and helped us
forget we were in one room
for more than 12 hours on
a very slow day.
The first general meet-
ing of the Oviedo Historical
Society will be held at the
First United Methodist
Church in the Fellowship
Hall on Tuesday, Sept. 16.
The speaker for the evening
will be Ed L'Heureux, a poet
and novelist who teaches
a course at Seminole
Community College on The
Four Henrys: Plant, Flagler,
Sanford and DeLand. Mr.
L'Heureux will speak about
Henry Sanford and Henry
DeLand at the society's
meeting. Doors open at 7
p.m. and light refreshments
will be served. All are wel-
come; come and bring a
friend.
The first general meet-
ing of the Oviedo Woman's
Club will be held 9:30 a.m.
Friday, Sept. 12, at their
clubhouse at 414 King
St., located between the


Oviedo high school and the
Methodist church.
Help celebrate
Grandparents' Day
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Saturday, Sept. 6, at the
Environmental Studies
Center, 2985 Osprey Trail,
Longwood. Admission
is free; visit the Natural
History Museum and take
nature walks. For more
information, please call
407-320-0467.
The City of Casselberry
welcomes runners and
walkers participating in
the Autumn Rock 'n' Run
5K presented by Florida
Hospital featuring live
entertainment that run-
ners and walkers love. The
5K run and walk starts at
7:30 a.m. on Saturday, Sept.
13. For registration and
to download forms visit
TrackShack.com.
Insect program is avail-
able from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.
on Saturday, Sept. 20, at
the Ed Yarborough Nature
Center, 3485 N. County
Road 426, Geneva. Insect
expert RayJarrett will pres-
ent the program "Insects:
The Good, the Bad and the


Ugly." Admission is free, but'
reservations are required.'
To reserve a space please
call 407-349-0959.
St. Luke's Concert Series
2008-2009 begins this
coming Saturday, Sept. 13,
with matinee at 2 p.m. and
an evening performance
at 7 p.m. being held at the
St. Luke's Lutheran Church,
2021 W. State Road 426,
Oviedo. The Brass Band of
Central Florida will start
the series off with Michael
J. Garasi.and the band
taking you on an excit-
ing International Musical
Journey. No passports are
needed, as admission is
free. One can always visit
the Web site: StLukes-
Oviedo.org.
There will be a jazz con-
cert at 2:30-p.m. until 5
p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 14,
at the Mdose Lodge, 5001
N. Orange Blossom Trail,
Orlando. The first concert
of the Central Florida Jazz
Society 2008-2009 season
will feature Bill Alfred's
Classic Jazz band. Tickets
are $8 for members and
$12 for non-members. For
more information, please
call 407-539-2357.
A thought Flowers
always make people better,
happier and more helpful;
they are sunshine, food and
medicine to the soul.
Luther Burbank


>0JANET
Send word to Janet Foley about
events and let her know what's
going on around town by e-mailing
janetf@theoviedovoice.com.


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The Voice


PacieA4 S~ebr5-S~ebr1,20






.. .. Vnice t 5 .I


GYMNAST I Pride in a pressure-free experience


< continued from page A3

it, but I think it is important that kids
experience as many different things in
life as a youngster so they can find out
what their true passion and desire is. You
are only going to be successful if you find
something you truly love to do," he said.
Johnson didn't discover gymnastics
until he was 10 years old, which may be
considered "too old" by today's regiment-
ed standards. "I was real little, the small-
est at my school and often made fun of.
I think I had a complex when I was little
and always thought some day I would be
important," Johnson said. "I was a fearless
little kid."
Today, Johnson said, there is way too
much pressure on children to become
the best. "There are a lot of gym clubs out
there that are so structured that they run
their team program like a boot camp and
the kids aren't having any fun," he said.
Michelle Pesut of Winter Springs said
her 17-year-old daughter, Caitlin, will not
work with any other coach after spending
three years with Johnson. "He makes it
fun while using discipline and order, and
yet the kids don't even realize it," Pesut
said. "It must go along with his heart of
gold he loves what he does. It's like a
natural instinct for Scott.
"[Johnson] is always encouraging; even
if one time it's not perfect, it doesn't have
to be perfect. It's a stepping-stone for
the next tumble. Her self confidence and
esteem has really grown."
Pushing kids and
- e requiring them to par-
ticipate in a competitive-
sport can also be dam-
aging, Johnson warned.
Contact Scott "A majority of those kids
Johnson who have been involved
Johnson for in the sport for four or
class times: five years are going to be
407-497-8033 emotionally and physi-
cally burned out. I've
seen clubs where they are
training these kids so many hours a week
- they are just babies in a sense and
by the time they are 13 or 14 years did,
they are all beat up and cannot continue,"
Johnson said.
"That is why the international Olympic
Committee made it a rule that you have
to be 16 to compete in gymnastics in the
Olympic games," he added. Olympic selec-
tion is also very exclusive: There are sev-
eral hundred thousand gymnasts in the


Olympian Scott Johnson helps a student practice a backflip
move, useful in multiple Olympic events, and also a skill stu-
dents simply enjoy mastering..


United States and every four years only six
of them make it to the Olympics.
- Johnson said people often ask him why
a gymnast of his caliber doesn't concen-
trate on coaching Olympic hopefuls. "I
have coached elite gymnasts before and
there is a lot more stress on the athletes
and the coach," Johnson said. Instead, he
prefers to pass on his passion for the sport
to a younger crowd.:
"I get more excitement about a kid
learning how to do a cartwheel or learn-
ing how to do a back handspring," he said.
"Teaching them those skills gives me a
sense of accomplishment.
"This is what I try to instill in my stu-
dents: Love what you are doing and your
dreams may come true."


CHAMBER I Move meant to split the difference


< continued from the front page

along 417. The Chamber is renting space
from the UCF Incubator, a program that
helps nurture young technological com-
panies. Lacey said the Chamber will be
able to offer support to these companies,
as well.
The Chamber's phone, fax and mailing


address will stay the same. It has attempt-
ed to notify all of its members of the
new offices, a move that was unanimously
approved at a July meeting and advertised
in the Chamber's newsletter.
"We may run across people (who didn't
hear the news) who are shocked and
amazed, but we've been talking about it
publicly for a couple months," Lacey said.


PHOTO BY JENNY ANDE
The Chamber of Commerce's new headquarters is in the technology corridor planned along Highway 417.


Not your house?



Don't break in.


This isn't
where I live!
On Aug. 31, a subject who
drank too much alcohol evi-
dently got confused, kicked
in a door and entered a
Sharon Court apartment,
falling asleep in a bathtub.
The subject stated he was
confused and entered the
wrong residence, which he
did not have permission to
enter.
When questioned by
police he gave a name and
understood he was wrong
in entering the wrong apart-
ment, but did not know his
age or his date of birth. He
was subsequently arrested
as John Doe until his identi-
fication could be verified.

Where are the
bleacher braces?
On Aug. 25, an anonymous
caller reported the theft of
aluminum braces off the
bleachers at the Oviedo
High School football field.
The portion of the bleach-
ers that were affected was
located on the visitor side
of the football field, on cam-
pus.
The braces were missing
from one side of the entire
length of the upper and
lower section- of the bleach-
ers. Authorities at Oviedo
High School were notified
so that precautions may be
taken, including repairing
the bleachers and inspect-
ing them for safety.

No pot luck when mom
calls the cops
On Aug. 25, a domes-
tic disturbance call at the
Oviedo Grove Apartments
resulted in a male juvenile
being taken into custody for
striking his mother and for
possession of marijuana.
The mother, who was vis-
ibly shaken as a result of
her son's behavior, report-
~ed to police that her son
would frequently smoke
marijuana in his bedroom.
Unfortunately for the son,
Mom gave police consent to
search the room and they
discovered evidence of the
activity.
It was not so lucky for
the son, who was taken into
custody not only for domes-
tic battery but also for pos-
session of marijuana and
drug paraphernalia.

eBay and
Buckeyes tickets
On Aug. 27, a person
tried to purchase four sea-


son tickets to Ohio State
Football through eBay.
According to the victim, the
Seller of the tickets, identi-
fied as "Rosl949," claimed
he was having trouble with
his PayPal account, and
the victim, being a devout
Buckeyes fan, sent over
a cashier's check .in the
amount of $5,500 directly to
the seller in Ohio but never
received the tickets.
We do things and we
hope to trust people and
most folks are genuine and
do the right things for the
right reasons but we also
must protect our own inter-
ests. It just makes sense!

Burglary and thefts;
both virtual and otherwise
On Aug. 29, a burglary was
reported at the Oviedo City
Cleaners on West Broadway
Street. Evidently the front-
door glass was pried off and
entry was made, with cash
stolen from the register.
A computer crime was
reported to the Oviedo
Police from a business
located on Executive Drive.
Evidently, a security breach
in the company's Web site
caused customers' cred-
it card information to be
accessed.
A suspect .entered the
Oviedo Jewelry and Pawn
and removed a necklace
from behind the counter
while the attendee was dis-
tracted. A patron witnessed
the theft and the matter is
under investigation.
A man was arrested for
stealing a bottle of Bacardi
rum from the Albertsons
Liquor Store. The individ-
ual was apprehended and
charged with the theft and
the property was recovered.
On Aug. 31, a subject was
arrested for stealing mer-
chandise from the Winn-
Dixie Supermarket located
on Lockwood Boulevard.
Evidently, the shoplifter,
after passing all points of
purchase, got a guilty con-
scious and returned all the
merchandise back to the
manager. I wonder if police
presence prompted him to
do that.

Cop talk: a wise man
once said ...
"History teaches us that
men and nations behave
wisely once they have
exhausted all other alterna-
tives."
Abba Eban, an Israeli
-diplomat and politician


Sepembr eptmbr 1, 208 Page A5


The Voice






Page A6 Spebr5-Spebr1,20 h oc


FLOOD I Waters receding an inch at a time as residents endure


ing as a "boat launch" for
Appleton and other Whit--
comb Drive residents. Vehi-
cles. lined the edges of Jun-
gle Road on Friday morning
as residents paddled back
and forth to check on their
homes some underwater,
some not, at least not yet.
A rifle lay across the mid-
dle seat of Procell's boat,
protection against the
12-foot alligator lurking in
front of his father-in-law's
house, shakes, and whatev-
er else had been carried in
by the rising waters. Pro-
cell said he had to shoot
a water moccasin the day
before that got too close
to him while he was wad-
ing through the 2-feet-deep
water by the house.
Insects are also a prob-
lem. Ant colonies, looking
for higher ground, have
invaded homes. An elderly
Chuluota man died from red
ant bites after the insects
invaded his home to escape


Residents are using paddles more than gas pedals to get around in parts of East Seminole County; at left, a friendly offering between nei


. the water.
Mosquitoes are thriving
in the waters. On Saturday,
the county, hoping to con-
trol the insects' population,
doused puddles and pools
between Oviedo and the
shores of Lake Jesup with
larvae-killing chemicals.
Yet another threat: skit-
tish homeowners. One
Geneva resident who pad-
dled in at the launch said a


'-Red Bud


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A Family Company
& Tradition for
Over 35 Years


Call John Bea1hanl


LO~rifled 0e &'ntaei sInsureta


homeowner threatened to
shoot him and a friend ear-
lier that week. The gun-tot-
ing man mistook the neigh-
bors for looters, he said.
As of Aug. 28, 460 Sem-
inole County homes have
reported damage as a result
of Fay. That amounts to
about $9.5 million in losses,
the county estimated. That
price would likely rise once
the water recedes and offi-


cials can better assess the
damage.
Lake Monroe and Lake
Jesup are also spilling over.
In the Black Hammock, res-
idents are frustrated with
the county, which they say
has neglected the drainage
canals that go to the lake,
making things worse.
"It flooded everybody
twice as bad," said Don
Peterson, resident and presi-


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dent of the Black Hammock
Association. "The county
treats us like a red-headed
stepchild."
As for the lakefront resi-
dents in Genevga, they don't
know when they'll be able
to move back into their
homes.
"It could be a month,"
said Appleton, who's lived
there since 1974. "It's beau-
tiful 99 percent of the time,
but that 1 percent ..."




Seminole County residents are
eligible for federal aid to help
with damage caused by Tropical
Storm Fay. Please call 1-800-
621-FEMA(3362) or visit FEMA.
gov and click on "Disaster
Assistance" to apply.


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Page A6 Spebr5-Spebr1,20


V 1 g


The Voice


w


rj
.",)j I'l-, "i
i -- --j


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0-F
------------





Sentemher 9; Spn~tmhpr 11-9 Paae A7


Florida's r alr fUeW dllltlI (rpllll I If eVal rentsI,


Florida's rare few deadly serpents


Contrary to their unde-
served reputation, of the
67 species and sub-species
of snakes in Florida, only
six are venomous. They live
in just about any habitat,
from coastalTmangroves
to freshwater wetlands;
therefore, it's probable that
you'll encounter them.
Snakes are reptiles, like
lizards, turtles and alliga-
tors. Snakes are carnivores
and play an important
ecological role, especially
because they keep in check
rodents, which destroy
crops and carry diseases.
About half of our snakes
are born alive; the others
lay eggs.
There are two types of
venomous snakes in Flori-
da the pit vipers, which
includes the diamondback
rattlesnake, canebrake
rattlesnake, pygmy rattle-
snake, cottonmouth, and
the copperhead; the other
group is represented by the


coral snake. The pit vipers
are identified by the facial
pits, one located between
the eye and nostril on each
side of the head. They also
have an elliptical eye pu-
pil and a broad, V-shaped
head. Their venom is hae-
motoxic, which destroys
the red blood cells and
walls of the blood vessels of
the victim. The coral snake
has a neurotoxic venom,
which acts on the nervous
system, causing paralysis.

Diamondback rattlesnake
The largest and deadlier
poisonous snake in North
America can be recognized
by the yellow-bordered,
diamond-shaped markings
on the back, and rattles on
the end of its tail. When
disturbed, the rattler as-
sumes a defensive position
with the body coiled upon
itself, and head and neck
raised in an S-position


S 1 Seminole

Gardening
--- BY AL FERRER
SEMINOLE COUNTY URBAN
a HORTICULTURIST


from which it will strike
its enemy. The head is
wider than the neck, and
the mouth has the typical
fangs, lying folded inside
the roof of the mouth. Its
food is mostly rabbits and
cotton rats. It can grow to
about 8 feet in length and
can be found statewide.
Canebrake rattlesnake
This large snake, usually
about 4 feet long, is not as
common as the diamond-
back. It has a pink buff col-
or with sooty black bands
and a rusty stripe down the
middle of the back. Its tail
is brown to black, and ends
in a rattle. It's found in
north Florida as far south
as Alachua County.

Pygmy rattlesnake
Also called ground rattler,
this snake is fairly common
in Florida. It is gray in color
and marked with rounded,
dusky spots. Reddish spots
alternate with the black
along the middle of the
back, starting at the base of
the head all the way to the
tail. It feeds on frogs and
small rodents and can mea-
sure up to 2 feet in length.

Cottonmouth moccasin
Also called water moccasin,
this snake is found all over
Florida, usually around
stream banks, in swamps,


Coral snake:
A small snake, usually less
than 2 feet in length, with
patterns of red, yellow and
black rings. The character-
istic black nose is used to
identify this snake from
the'red nose of the non-
poisonous scarlet king
snake and northern scarlet
snake. The red rings of the
coral snake border the yel-
low, while the red rings of
the king snake border the
black.


S.We would like to welcome

1 our nelVest addition to

.cBaifield- The Pet Hospital ofOviedo...


Tuscawilla welcomes NEW members!


Dr. Colleen Nicklin!!!

D r. Nicklin grew up on the New Jersey shore and is
a 2008 graduate of the Oklahoma State University
College of Veterinary Medicine where she was a member of
the Phi Zeta Honor Society. Dr. Nicklin moved to Central
Florida with her husband, Tom, and her furry family mem-
bers (two dogs, Kermit and Tila, and two cats, Austin Power
and Jasmine). Besides practicing all aspects of small-animal
medicine, Dr. Nickldin has a special interest in non-traditional
species medicine. When not practicing veterinary medicine,
Dr. Nicklin also enjoys traveling, yoga and horseback riding.

Please stop in and help us welcome
Dr. Colleen Nicklin to our Banfield Hospital team!

Located in the Oviedo Petsmart
1115 Vidina Place, Ste. 195 I 407-359-7831


tBanfield
SHEI PET HO4 H Al + S*I'kCE I'Q',


Copperhead
The copperhead is a me-
dium-sized snake, pinkish.
tan with reddish-brown
cross-bands. These bands
are wide along the sides
and narrow along the
back to form an hourglass
shape. It's found only in the
Apalachicola River drain-
age of Gadsen, Liberty, Cal-
houn and Jackson coun-
ties. It lives in fields and
hammocks, and is fairly
rare within its range. The
average length is 2 1/2 feet.


ThT Voice


r






Page A8September 5 September 11, 2008 The Voice


i


On Friday, Sept. 5, the Oviedo High School Athletic
Hall of Fame will welcome five new members to
the elite grouping of outstanding Lions as a part
of the pre-game ceremonies at John Courier Field. The
induction will precede the contest between the Lions
and the Lake Howell Silver Hawks. The 2008 ceremony is
at 7:10 p.m.; game time is 7:30 p.m.


T bis year's Hall of Fame class includes six new mem-
bers representing the '70s, '80s, '90s and 2000s.
Included in the group are Coach Arthur Scott,
Barry Coleman, Samantha "Mandy" Ehrhart, Scarlett
"Ashley" Ehrhart, Herbert Washington and Shawn
Witherspoon. For these fine new inductees, welcome to
the OHS Athletic Hall of Fame!


Class of 2007 Hall of Fame
Bob Ward Class of 1950
Larry Whipper Class of 1970
Cheryl Morley Class of 1980
Lisa Rieman Class of 1990
Joe Montgomery Head Coach


Class of 2006 Hall of Fame
Dave Miller Head Coach
Keith Malcolm Class of 1956
Kenneth Sparks Class of 1961
Jimmy Riddle Class of 1974
Darren Reichle Class of 1984
Ben Knapp Class of 1998


Class of 2005 Hall of Fame
Howard Mabie Head Coach
Fenell Beasley Class of 1939
Ed Duda Class of 1950
Wayne Jacobs Class of 1965
Darrell Tossie Class of 1982
Chad Duncan Class of 1989
Frank Diaz Class of 1990
Stephanie Noiseux Class of 1995
Jason Robbins Class of 2005
Jennifer Barringer Class of 2005


Class of 2004 Hall of Fame
Fred Wheaton Class of 1956
Brian Smith Class of 1985
Chris Tabscott Class of 1991
Todd Bellhorn Class of 1994
Jack Blanton Head Coach


Page A8 September 5 -September 11, 2008


The Voice











G. O.a




Carrying a healthy


AMY K.D. TOBIK
THE VOICE

Choosing just the right
backpack can be the
highlight of back-to-
school shopping. The pack not
only shuttles books and home-
work to and from school, it also
represents a child's personality
- a fashion statement of sorts.
As the homework levels
increase during this first month
of school, so will the weight of
the backpack, posing a greater
risk for strained muscles and
pain.
Chiropractor John Tenpenny
of Access Healthcare in Oviedo
said he treats many children
with what he classifies as back-
pack injuries. "Children can
suffer from long-term postural
problems like excessive for-
ward head tilt. They can also
suffer from improper spinal
alignment as well as spinal disk
injuries," Tenpenny said.
Generally, he said, injuries
occur early in the school year
when a child is not yet familiar
with the backpack. "Children.
can suffer from sprains' and
strains of the shoulders, neck
and back as well as bruises from
backpacks that are too heavy
or don't fit properly," Tenpenny


added.
If a backpack is too heavy for
a student, the child is more like-
ly to try to compensate for that
weight and bend forward at the
hips or arch the back, which
can compresses the spine. If the
backpack is worn incorrectly,
the child may end up leaning to
one side to offset the unequal
weight, which could lead to bad
posture, lower and upper back
as well as shoulder pain.
"Children will generally carry
a backpack on their dominant
side. This can cause an imbal-
ance of shoulder and spinal
muscle strength. It is important
for children to carry a backpack
evenly on both shoulders with
the contents of the backpack
evenly distributed within and
compact to the body," Tenpenny
said.
It is recommended that chil-
dren carry no more than 10 to 15
percent of their body weight.
As some schools move away
from having hallway lockers,
students are forced to carry
everything they may need dur-
ing the school day on their
backs and shoulders. Despite
the effort to lighten the load
by allowing students to keep a
set of textbooks at home, the
backpack is quickly filled with


thick notebooks, binders, acces-
sories, and sometimes even
a lunch.
The American
Academy of Pediatrics
recommends parents
help a child choose a
lightweight pack, so
as to not add to the
overall weight. Two
wide, padded shoulder :
straps help stabilize
the weight and prevent
the pack from digging
into the shoulders. A
waist belt will also help
distribute the weight
more evenly across the
body, especially when
walking a distance.
In order to lighten the
load, students should be
encouraged to eliminate
any unnecessary items
from the backpack on a
regular basis. Clean out old
homework and unneeded
materials and remember to
always place heavier items, suc
as textbooks, at the back of the
pack so the weight is carried
closest to the body.
Heavy bookbags can be packed in a way
that will minimize back stress and keep your
bookworm healthy.
PHOTO COURTESY OF
WWW.iSTOCKPHOTO.COMF


The big OH!'
.: ~ ~- ', ., ...' .' :' -,' : 'S .";':-


Crazy

parental reflex

GINA DiPAOLO
CONTRIBUTING COLUMNIST

What a great day. We'd left
the Sierra National Forest
where we'd taken the chil-
dren to see the largest tree
in the world: The General.
Sherman. This majestic
sequoia is something to
behold. And after descend-
ing a half mile down well-
maintained trails, you
wonder how anyone ever
found it. Our drive back to
Los Angeles went through
some amazing farmland.
Do you know how much of
our nation's food is grown
in California? Neither do I,
but I know this much after
driving down the "food
corridor" otherwise known
/ as the 5 freeway: a lot.
We returned to my sis-
ter's home and unpacked
the car. Several days in a
cabin and/or car tended
to make everyone want
to find their inner peace:
alone. We were spread out
over the backyard and
driveway just doing our
own thing. My thing was
sweeping the pool deck.


The monotony of it allows
your mind to wander. My
son and daughter were
skateboarding with their
uncle in the front. The
baby was enjoying her free-
dom from the car seat and
exploring the backyard. I
heard the crew from the
front come through the
g~ite and could feel their
presence as the "calm" in
the backyard quickly disap-
peared.
Sweep. Sweep. Sweep. I
took another stroke with
the broom, took note of a
-scream and heard a splash.
In an instant, I whirled
around to see my 2-year-
old baby slowly sinking to
the bottom of the deep end
of the pool. I saw my son
standing at the lip of the
pool looking down at his
sister, baying, "Oh my good-
ness." I slung the broom
aside and made what
seemed like a super-human
leap to cross the shallow
end of the pool to get to my
child. And during this slow-
motion, unbelievable leap, I
distinctly remember having
two thoughts: I don't think
I remember CPR and why
on Earth was my boy stand-
ing at the lip of the pool
looking at his sister as she
sunk?
I landed in the water and


quickly reached my target,
grabbed it and hauled it to
the surface. I realized some-
thing in the two seconds it
took me to do this. My head
popped above the water, I
looked at my son, who said
"Congratulations, Mama,
you just saved the skate-
board."
I looked past my boy
only to realize that my
brother is holding my
daughter and the baby is
standing next to her sis-
ter, trying to console her.
Apparently, my daughter
had a mishap while riding
the skateboard; she fell and
it ended up careening into
the pool.-I got out of the
water with the skateboard
and I am shaking. I am
soaked and I am scared.
I'm snapped back to
reality by my brother's
voice. "Hey, dough-dee, (an
affectionate name for silly
sisters) what are you doing?
Your daughter is hurt over
here."
"Oh my gosh, I thought
the baby fell in the pool!"
"OK, once again, your
daughter is hurt, the baby's
fine... a little help here."
I got my daughter.ban-
daged, loved and then
went to change my clothes.
I finally stopped shak-
ing. I returned and the


'questions/teasing began.
Questions were OK right
then, but the teasing had
to wait for about an hour.
I was overwhelmed at the
thought of what could have


happened.
"I watched you fly into
the water and I could not
understand why you would

> turn to BIG OH! on next page


SAT prep for students seeking dramatic
score improvements.


LEARNING CENTER
Winer ar OI 99 AloaAve140-7-2ig 3 00


Assessing Needs. Increasing Scores.


Septmbe 5 Setemer 1, 008 Page A9


The Voice






Paoe Al 0 Seotember 5 Seotember 11. 2008 The Voice


This week's art comes from art students
at Layer Elementary in Winter Springs.


Portrait


Watercolor
on paper


Illustrated by
Kemar Simpson
3rd grade


Hands


Watercolor and
crayon on paper


Illustrated by

Brandon Taft

3rd grade


Life and Art


Mixed photo
and drawing


Illustrated by
Bennett Miller
5th grade


Familv rierfs


Passing the hat in style
for children with cancer
Hats and martinis and hope, combine them and
Central Florida children with cancer will have
the chance at a cure. So ladies, on Saturday,
Sept. 6 don your finest hat and slip on your
dancing shoes for a cause that will give life
back to children battling cancer. Gentlemen,
slip on your tux and take your favorite lady to a
fun evening for a great cause.
The theme of Kids Beating Cancer's Fourth
Annual Hats and Martinis for Hope gala is


Bring a friend and join
Clover Kids 4-H Club
Youth ages 5 through 1-2 are invited to the
Clover Kids 4-H Club. Enrollment and the first
meeting will be held from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. on
Monday, Sept. 22, at the Extension Auditorium
at 250 W. County Home Road in Sanford.
Clover Kids 4-H meetings will be held twice a


Cary Grant's most romantic movie, "An Affair
to Remember." The party, a fantasy cruise to
the top of the Empire State Building, because,
according to the movie "It's the closest thing to
heaven." .
The event at Rosen Plaza hotel, at 9700
International Drive in Orlando, will take place
aboard a replica of the USS Constitution where
guests arrayed in their most fabulous hats will
be served gourmet hors d'oeuvres.and des-
serts, sip pink champagne, and a variety of
martinis while dancing to Central Florida's cool- -


month from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Monday. This
year's club projects will include photography,
ecology, and foods and nutrition. Youth can
work on additional projects on their own.
Club dues are $20 per year for the first child,
which includes a club T-shirt and project sup-
plies, and $15 for each additional child.
Call 407-665-5560 for more information.


est crooner, Michael Andrew, and his 18-piece
Atomic Big Band.
Visit KidsBeatingCancer.com for tickets and
more information.

Jazz, a picnic and honors for
police and firefighters
The Second Annual Honor the Badge Festivities
will be held Saturday, Sept. 6, (rain or shine) at
the Asbury United Methodist Church at 220 W.
Horatio Blvd. in Maitland.
Organized as an event to celebrate the dedi-


Aquatic Adventure promised
in Geneva wilderness
Join an aquatic expert as he takes you through
the world underwater on an Aquatic Adventures
hike! Meet at 8 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 27 at Lake
Proctor Wilderness Area at 920 E. State Road 46
in Geneva. This is an interactive hike where you
have the chance to learn what is found in the


cation and service of the Maitland Police and
Fire Departments, Honor the Badge is free to
the community and includes a jazz concert
by the lake, picnic lunch provided by the
Maitland Men's Club, a ceremony featuring the
Police and Fire Chiefs as well as the mayor of
Maitland, and activities for the kids.
Honor the Badge is a non-denominational
program open to the community. The festivities
begin at 11 a.m. and conclude at 3 p.m. Call
Keri Burns at 407-256-7660 for more informa-
tion.


waters of Seminole County!
You do not have to go in the water to partici-
pate in this hike. Reservations are required!
Call Amy Raub at 407-349-0959 or e-mail
araub@seminolecountyfl.gov to sign up and for
more information.


BIG OH! I In an instant, skateboards and little girls can look the same... sorta


< continued from the last page
go after the skateboard
when your daughter was
hurt," queried my brother.
"I saw this shape in the
water and I thought it was
the baby."
"How does the baby
resemble a skateboard?" he
pondered.
You know,. I really didn't
know. I just knew I had to
make a split-second deci-
sion. I had to jump.
So, I had a wakeup call.
I jumped, but I didn't have
the knowledge to save. a
life. Did you know that
about seven million adults


and children suffer dis-
abling injuries in their own
homes and backyards each
year, things such as heart
attacks, drowning, allergic
reactions, lightning strikes
and suffocation. Accidental
injuries, including choking
and drowning, are the lead-
ing cause of death among
children. Often, these acci-
dents require CPR. Statistics
show that the earlier CPR
is initiated, the greater the
chances of survival. When
a person stops breathing
or the heart stops beating,
they typically can survive
four to six minutes before


a lack of oxygen can result
in brain damage or death. If
you can artificially circulate
oxygen to the brain until
professional help arrives,
you can buy the victim
precious time. There are
two Web sites that can
help you to find a class in
the area. You can also take
the course online. Check
out the American Red
Cross Web site at RedCross.
org and The American
Heart Association at
AmericanHeart.org.
I've always liked the
saying, "better safe than
sorry." I can safely assume


that I will be teased merci-
lessly about my heroic leap
at every family gathering
from now until eternity.
"Hey, Gina's here, safe to


No Cor
flMAEd


Starting at $35


use the skateboards by the
pool now." But I'm not
sorry I jumped into that
pool.


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Page Al 2 September 5 September 11, 2008 The Voice


Bingo comes to
Riverside Park
Bring the family for an evening of
Bingo at Riverside Park in Oviedo at
7 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 26. Prizes will
be awarded to the winners. Cards
cost $2 each, with a maximum of five
cards per purchase per person. The
park is'at 1600 Lockwood Blvd.
Call Sal Rovetto at 407-971-5579,
or e-mail srovetto@cityofoviedo.net
for more information.

Carnival atmosphere
welcomes Hispanic exhibit
The Maitland Art Center will kick
off the 2008-2009 exhibition season
with Mascaras in conjunction with
Hispanic Heritage Month. The exhibi-
tion opens on Friday, Sept. 12 and
runs through Sunday, Oct. 26.
The opening night celebration on
Sept. 12 will feature a typical car-


nival atmosphere with contagious,
rhythmic sounds of folkloric dance
company "Bomba y Plena Lanz6,"
flavorful food and drink. Admission
is $5. Call 407-539-2181 or visit
www.maitlandartcenter.org for more
information.

Toxic Audio celebrates their
10th anniversary
Toxic Audio brings two days of a-cap-
pella sensations to their hometown
of Orlando. The event is at 7:30 p.m.
Friday, Sept. 12 and at 2:30 p.m. and
7:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 13 at the
Plaza Theatre, at 425 N. Bumby Ave.
Tickets cost $25-$30.
Toxic Audio features five vocal-
ists who use no other instruments
other than the human voice to cre-
ate complex sonic textures, rhythmic
drumbeat, thumping bass lines and
searing guitar-like solos.


CALENDAR


Call 407-228-1220 for tickets or
visit www.toxicaudio.com for more
information.

Elderly facility celebrates
special week
Join Summerville to celebrate
National Assisted Living Week from
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 11.
Summerville's ninth-annual Health
Fair will be held then, at 1725 Pine
Bark Point in Oviedo. Call 407-977-
5250 for more information.

Learn how to plant
an easy-care yard
A Florida-friendly landscape class
will be held from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30
p.m. Thursday, Sept. 11 at the UF/
IFAS Extension Auditorium at 240
. W. County Home Road in Sanford.
Florida-friendly landscapes incorpo-
rate low maintenance plants to save
money, extra work and water.
The class is free. Call 407-665-5575
or e-mail fyn@seminolecountyfl.gov
to register.


CINEMA


Area movie tims forFridy, Spt.*


Oviedo Marketplace
1500 Oviedo Marketplace Blvd.
407-977-1107
BANGKOK DANGEROUS (R)
1:40,4:45,7:20; 9:55, 12:25am

BABYLON A.D. (PG-13) noon,
12:35, 2:20, 2:50, 4:30, 5:20,7:30,
8:00, 9:50,10:40, 12:20am
COLLEGE (R) 12:20, 2:35, 5:15,
7:35, 9:50, 12:05am

DISASTER MOVIE (PG-13)
1:10,3:30, 5:00,5:35,7:55,10:05,
10:50, 12:35am

MAMMA MIA! SING-ALONG
EDITION (PG-1i3)-:35, 4:55, 7:50,
10:50

TRAITOR (PG-13) 12:40, 4:15,
7:45, 10:30

DEATH RACE (R) 1:20, 3:55,
7:00, 9:30, midnight

HAMLET 2 (R) 12:05, 2:25, 4:40,
7:05, 9:35, 12:15am

THE HOUSE BUNNY (PG-13)
12:10,1:05, 2:30, 3:45, 6:40, 7:40,
9:10, 11:40

THE LONGSHOTS (PG) 12:30,
2:45, 5:10, 7:40, 9:55,12:10am

THE ROCKER (PG-13) 1:30, 4:10,
6:45, 9:20,11:50

MIRRORS (R) 12:55, 4:35, 7:25,
10:15, 12:55am

STAR WARS: THE CLONE
WARS (PG) 1:25, 4:50, 7:20, 9:45,
12:30am

TROPIC THUNDER (R) noon,
1:00, 2:40, 3:35, 5:30, 6:55, 8:05,
9:40,10:45, 12:40am

PINEAPPLE EXPRESS (R) 12:50,
3:50, 6:50, 10:10, 12:50am

THE MUMMY (PG-13) 12:45,
4:25,7:10,10:20 '


STEP BROTHERS (R) 6:35, 9:15,
11:55

THE DARK KNIGHT (PG-13)
12:15, 3:40, 7:00,10:25

TRANSSIBERIAN (R) 1:15, 4:05,
7:15,10:00, 12:45am

WALL-E (G) 12:25, 2:55



Waterford Lakes Town Center
541 N. Alaraya Trail
407-207-4603
BANGKOK DANGEROUS (R)
12:00, 2:40, 5:10, 7:40,10:35,
1,:00am

BABYLON A.D. (PG-13)
11:50am, 12:30, 2:30, 3:00, 4:55,
5:25, 7:25, 8:10,10:00,10:45,
12:30am

COLLEGE (R) 11:45am, 2:25,
4:50, 7:20,10:05, 12:35am

DISASTER MOVIE (PG-13)
12:05, 2:45, 5:15,8:05, 9:55,
10:30, 12:50am

MAMMA MIA! SING-ALONG
EDITION (PG-13) 11:40am, 2:10,
4:40, 7:15,10:10

TRAITOR (PG-13) 11:30am, 2:05,
4:45, 7:35,10:15, 12:45am

DEATH RACE (R) 1:35, 4:25,
7:50,10:20

HAMLET 2 (R) 12:50, 3:15, 7:05,
9:40, 12:50am

THE HOUSE BUNNY (PG-13)
12:10,1:00,4:10,5:05,6:50,
7:30, 9:25, 12:40am

THE LONGSHOTS (PG) 12:20,
2:50" 5:20, 8:00,10:50

FLY ME TO THE MOON 3-D (G)
11:35, 2:15, 4:35, 12:00am

MIRRORS (R) 1:30, 5:00, 7:55,
10:40


--


-- -- -





A beo








AaCmme


STAR WARS: THE CLONE
WARS (PG) 1:25,4:15,6:45,
9:15,11:45

TROPIC THUNDER (R) 12:15,
1:20, 2:55, 4:20, 7:00, 7:45, 9:30,
10:25,11:55, 12:55am
PINEAPPLE EXPRESS (R)
12:25, 3:10, 6:40, 9:20, 12:05AM


THE MUMMY 3 (PG-13) 12:40,
3:20,'6:55, 9:35, 12:10am

STEP BROTHERS (R) 9:10 pm

THE DARK KNIGHT (PG-13)
11:55am, 3:05, 6:35, 9:50

JOURNEY TO THE CENTER OF
THE EARTH 3-D (PG) 7:10, 9:45


The Sign Man

160 East Broadway Phone: (407) 365-3722
PO Box 622143. Fax: (407) 365-7786
Oviedb, FL 32765 www.signman.net
Computerized Laser & Rotary Engraving Picture ID Name Badges
Vinyl Lettered Banners & Signs Self-Inking Rubber Stamps
Magnetic Signs Plaques & Awards Large Format Printing
Phone: (407) 365-3722 Fax: (407) 365-7786
(Located at the base of the Nelson & Co. water tower)


Free Coney Island Hot Dogs for our
Customers Every Saturday, 9ami-5pm

J & B U-Pull-It Auto Parts
10 acres ofA utos for Parts
Entry 17105 E Hwy 50, Bithlo, FL Entry
Fee (407)ntry568-2131 Entry
Fee (407) 568-2131 Fee


Maitland
1300 S.Orlando Avenue
Maitland, FL 32751
407-629-0054
MAN ON WIRE (PG-13)
3:45,6:30, 9:15


I~ -- I


PageAl 2 September 5 September 11, 2008


The Voice






Th.. VIie o e I 2


QUOTABLE history



ATHLETICS




Knights top S.C. for first win


ALEX BABCOCK
THE VOICE
D despite the march
of rain bands over
Bright House
Stadium Saturday night,
the University of Central
Florida Knights played
on in their home opener,
soundly defeating the South
Carolina State Bulldogs
17-0. Both teams showed
signs of offensive weakness
in the matchup, something
UCF Coach George O'Leary
said is typical of the first
game of the season.
"Overall (it was) a good
First win and typical mis-
takes for a first game,"
O'Leary said. "Defensively I
think we played very well. I
think they tackled very well
for the first game," he said,
adding, "each year your
second game is better than





UCF's Knights football team
faces its in-state rivals, the USF
Bulls, at 7 p.m. Saturday, Sept.
6, at Bright House Stadium on
the UCF main campus, just
south of Oviedo. The game will
be broadcast live on ESPN2.
Tickets are close to sold out
and may be gone by press
time. Call 407-823-1000 or
visit UCFAthletics.com for more
information.


your first game."
The Knights trotted out
a squad that's practiced for
wet weather, though they
normally use an indoor
practice field surrounded by
a warehouse. O'Leary said
the game field had absorbed
14 inches of rain in the week
leading up to the game; the
half-time marching band
act was called off for field
conditions, O'Leary and
wide receiver Rocky Ross
said the moisture didn't
hurt performance much.
"I think the ball got wet
a little bit," the coach said.
Ross managed 58 yards
receiving on the night.
The Knights got their first
touchdown early, at 11:18
in the second quarter. That
came after a failed 37-yard
field goal attempt in the first
.quarter by Daren Daly. That
kick went wide to the left'
and met with groans from
the student section of the
stadium the most densely
packed section,, checkered
with yellow ponchos of fans
enduring the drizzle. More
than 42,000 fans attend-
ed the game, according to.
UCFAthletics.com.
Daly got his legs as the
game progressed, mak-
ing two extra points and a
27-yard field goal. The Dogs
had few opportunities to
score riot even making
a field goal on the night -
and fell victim to an inter-
ception at midfield by free
safety Jason Venson at the
end of the first quarter.


I, H ,,7 ALEX BABCOCK ,
The Knights' defense dominated in their win over South Carolina State Saturday. It was the first shutout for the team since 2001.


By the end of the game,
the Knights seemed com-
fortably in command,
keeping control with a run
offense that totaled 228
yards to just 90 passing in
the game. Running back
Ronnie Weaver dominat-
ed on offense with 84 net
yards, followed by Ross and
then quarterback Michael
Greco with 57 yards.
UCF's players each wore
a sticker on their helmets
bearing "E.P." for Ereck
Plancher, who died during
a practice in March from
a blood disorder exacerbat-


ed by physical stress. The
field also bore the marking,
painted on the grass, as a
silent memorial. Neither
O'Leary nor players would
talk about the matter, other
than to say they wanted to
remember him.
The Knights will play a
celebrated and nearly sold-
out contest (which may be
sold out by the time this
newspaper hits the stands)
against the University of
South Florida Bulls, UCF's
geographically closest
rivals. The Knights haven't
won a game against the


Bulls since the rivalry began
in 2005. The Bulls trampled
the Knights last season in
Tampa, 64-12. When the
Knights last played USF in
Orlando in 2006, they were
closer losing 24-17.
The upcoming game will.
be at 7 p.m. Saturday, Sept.
6, at Bright House Stadium
on the UCF main campus,
just south of Oviedo. It will
be broadcast live on ESPN2.
Ross, the wide receiver,
said of the coming rival
match, "We've got 'em at our
place. It's going to be excit-
ing. It's going to be fun."


Seasons get under way for high school football


ISAAC BABCOCK
THE VOICE


A risky first-game match-up
for the Winter Springs ,Bears
proved disastrous against
Boone Friday, as the foot-
ball team was beaten 31-7 in
the kickoff classic. That was
sweet revenge for Boone,
which had lost to the Bears
last year but went on to a
perfect regular season.
Three other local teams
found answers to early
season questions on fields
across Central Florida, as
high school football kicked
off statewide last weekend.
But this weekend the first
official games will light up
the Friday night lights.
For Hagerty, which
shocked Lake Brantley in
its spring game, there was
no victory to be had against
Wekiva High School at last
weekend's kickoff classic.


The Mustangs won 37-14.
That was a welcome score
for the fledgling. Mustangs,
who struggled throughout
last season to stay com-
petitive with other teams,
building momentum but
still ending with a winless
season.
-The Huskies "travel to
high-ranked Seminole at
7:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 5.
And the Wekiva Mustangs
will be the Bears' first offi-
cial opponent in the 2008
season, kicking off in Bear
country at 7:30 p.m. Friday.
"Both teams are still 0-0,"
Coach Mike Kintz said. "The
season starts with game
one."
But Kintz showed some
trepidation about the
Mustangs, who have done
some well-publicized inten-
sive training to prepare for
their second season after a
building first year.


"Wekiva is well-coached,"
Kintz said. "You look at them
last year, and they were
more and more competitive
as the year went on."
Al-Terek McBurse is hop-
ing to rush for 2,000 yards
this year, and that all starts
tonight.
"These kids were fresh-
men the last time we were
in the playoffs," Kintz said.
"There's been the sense that
it was going to happen, but
it didn't. Now for the seniors
it's their last chance."
Two defensive teams will
meet up in Oviedo at 7:30
p.m. Friday with the hope of
trying out some new offen-
sive weapons in the pro-
cess.
After an impressive pre-
season the Lions are expect-
ed to dominate the Lake
Howell Silver Hawks on
the field. Both teams had to
retool offensively this year


after losing key players in
the run game.
Both return with good
defensive fundamentals in
tact, but minus some line-
men.
Trinity Prep could make
an interesting watch next
weekend with former UCF


head coach Mike Kruczek
taking the offensive coor-
dinator position. He'll
be on the sidelines as the
team faces The Master's
Academy.


S -0 -


-'." FI.T,

.% ? ~lF


Bernard S. Zeffren, MD
Eugene F. Schwartz, MD
Winnie Whidden, MSN, ARNP-C
L'Oted Best Doctors ot Central FL
Orlinao Mlagaz,ne
for t conS'Cut'i e e r3rs


:-L FLORFJD-.


Diplomatie~s Arntvican Broard 0of
A I/ergq ard nIrrirnuolngy

407-366-7387
'561-1 Ned13,ILake I .iic N., Sic. 21164 (-)'ictio. FL 32765
www.oriandoallergy.com
-I71v1bIt1031 C'flc~- z 17411Jm,7voe iI iteui ri L~jA.r' muir -/1fWSCr,'6h 0.-anO ik10-


September eptmber11, 008 Page Al 3


ThF Vnice


I





Page A14 September 5 September 11, 2008 The Voice




QUOTABLE history
If man does find the solution for world peace it will be the most
revolutionary reversal of his record we have ever known.
George C. Marshall (1880-1959), U.S. secretary of defense



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Commissioners need to show staff respect

The level of acumen of sioners berate staff in sioners must get off this make money at any cost. So please, get off your
some of our junior city public because they are merry-go-round instilling It is a known fact that if high horse and praise and
commissioners insofar as doing exactly what their in the minds of many that you wish to do business in support the staff, for they
evaluating the valuable per- job descriptions call for, to ours is @@not a business- Winter Springs, you must are the folks that make it
formance by members of apply code to any applica- friendly city@@ because we abide by the code fath- possible for you to make
the city staff has dwindled tion or project brought have a code to keep the city omed to suit the lifestyle of sound decisions for the
recently. Lambasting work- forth for approval by the free from vermin, our residents. good of all. If you choose
ing people who have been Commission. We have been a bed- The Town Center was to support the holier-than-
performing at expected The Commission must room community, whose designed with the thought thou folks, stand tall and
levels, if not higher, for the put an end to this unfriend- resident love and as in mind to develop a be honest and refrain from
sake of blurring your com- ly and holier-than-thou such have maintained a commercial tract to grow your snide remarks, simply
mitments does not high- behavior, which is exposing certain level of traditional a commercial tax base to thank staff and proceed to
light a high-level of sup- them to the belief by con- living that helps create alleviate the load of the ris- waive code and rules and
port and confidence for a stituents that certain proj- an ambiance that has ing taxes on our residents procedures on your own.
professional group and the ect applicants must receive catapulted the city to great while advocating social and EdwardMartinezJr.
best our city ever had since special treatment while heights. civic interaction. Five years Winter Springs
its inception, processing their applica- We certainly do not wish later they are still gawk-
It is min4-boggling to tions. to bring in rinky-dinky ing at the sky, hoping for a
listen to some commis- The mayor and commis- businesses whose goal is to miracle.



Don't under-sell experience on a resume

EMPLOYMENT working, but I am having no luck. need to gain experience as well.
SCan you help? Look for m anagem ent-training -....--................................................................ ..- ............
A il, -Not Hired programs, assistant manager jobs
Ask and more entry-level supervi-
Dear Not Hired: sory positions where you have the W
lSand-,, rThank you for reading the col- opportunity to grow. Continue
umn! I am really glad you sent your your education by reading great SandiVidal is the executive director for Christian
resume too so I could see your leadership books and taking man- HELP and the Central Florida Employment Council,
Dear Sandi: experience as well as the format. agement seminars. Have you talked with more than 10 years of recruiting and human
I just graduated from college with It looks like you had some basic to your current employer about resources experience. Please send questions
a degree in management. I would supervisory experience in a hotel growth opportunities now that about employment by fax 407-260-2949, sandi@
christianhelp.org, or mail Ask Sandi C/O Christian
like to find a supervisory job, but while you were in school. You need you are out of school? HELP, 450.Seminola Blvd., Casselberry, FL 32707.
no one is calling me back. I have to highlight those skills on your Any experience you can gain Subjects may include employment search,
read tips in your column, and I resume and in your cover letter. in a supervisory role will help you resumes, networking and promotion opportunities.
have tried to make sure my resume A degree is a great achievement achieve your goals. Employers: E-mail your job leads to cfec@cfec.org
is error-free and that I am net- and will help you to go far, but you Best wishes. and we will share them with Christian HELP clients.


Here's what students
at Geneva Elementary
had to say about
*- staying safe on the
O Internet.


I CM
=i ~^.^
= -^^^ >
o '' J


i


-l:


If something inap- Ask your mom to Don't have a
propriate pops up, go block off the bad MySpace because
get your parents. Ask sites. Don't type in hackers can look at
your parents what bad words on your your, personal infor-
Web sites to avoid. computer. mation. Never inter-
Hailey J. Jacob W. act with a bad person
10 years old 10 years old on the Internet.
Accept your parents'
help.
Dalton H.
11 years old


7


Don't trust anyone
on the Internet. Don't
listen if someone
is mean to you and
don't answer strange
e-mails.
Erica H.
9 years old


Tell your parents when you see
warning messages on a site. People
who try to steal your identity may
seem nice but they are not.
Zack M.
9 years old


love-
to
/ t0
/ 0 from

/Young .


We would


/ .,
/Call editor Alex Babcock at 407-628-8500
to have The Voice visit your class or group.


HONEST& RELIABLE LOCAL REFERENCES KNOW WHO YOU LET IN YOUR HOME


* truck mounted steam cleaner
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House Plans
Custom Home Design
Room Additions
Kitchen-Bathroom Design
Interior-Exterior Design Service
Construction Management
407-366-7748







September 5 Seotember 11,2008 Page A15


Marketplace


Sh ou ld it (klas'e fd'ad'veriz'ing) Noun. Advertising
Shnou ld i be compactly arranged, as in newspaper
,:-- ? ,7 -. T I columns, according to subject, under such
., .:___...._. J L, L listings as help wanted and for sale


REALTORS:
Licensed Real Estate Professionals needing
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call 407-468-3088.

CAREGIVER
Caregiver F/T or Live-In Energetic &
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SECRETARY/CLERK/SALES REP
Raymond World seeking an individual
to work as secretary/clerk and sales
representative. Qualifications verbal/
written communication skills, extremely
organized, legal background helpful.
Interested candidate should contact
pphotocopy@gmail.com






LAKEFRONT APARTMENT
Quiet area, private road, historic building.
Very clean 1B/1B. Central A/G. Utilities and
Cable included. Laundry. $750./mo. NS, NP.
407-971-4052

OVIEDO HOUSE FOR RENT
4BR/1BA two-story house with a large
remodelled kitchen, wood flooring and
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block from N. Lake Jesup Ave and SR 426.
Contact Kellyn at 407-716-8649.



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Oviedo Office Space, great frontage.* 750
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Park major .mixed-use development: This
space can be used for: hair salon, nail salon,
or other personal service. Please contact
Denisse at 407-741-8600.




Reading volunteers NEEDED Jackson
Heights Middle School in Oviedo is looking
for adults who are interested in serving as a
Reading Mentor to assist students who are
reading below grade level. Volunteers work
one-on-one with an assigned student before
school for 30 minutes, one or more times
a week through the end of the school year
to build fluency and comprehension skills.
Sessions are from 8:30-9:00 a.m., M-F.
Please contact Connie O'Hanlon for more
information, 407-365-7585.




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IN THE EIGHTH CIRCUIT COURT FOR SEMINOLE
COUNTY, FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 2008-CP-1591
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARJORIE H. STAIR, Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of MARJORIE
H. STAIR, deceased, whose date of death was July
28, 2008, File Number 2008-CP-1591 is pending
in the Circuit Court for Seminole County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of which is 301 N.
Park Avenue, Sanford, Florida 32771. The name
and address of the Personal Representative and
of the Personal Representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate, on whom a copy of this notice is served
must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE
LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against the
decedent's estate must file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
'THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
Date of the first publication of this notice of
administration: August 29, 2008.
W E Winderweedle, JR.
Attorney
219W Comstock Avenue
Winter Park, Fl. 32790-2997
Telephone: (407) 628-4040
Florida Bar No. 0116626
BEVERLY J. BECKEL
Personal Representative -
8/29, 9/5


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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
Case Number: 2008 CP 1197
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LELAND WADE JACOBSON, SR.,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of LELAND
WADE JACOBSON, SR, deceased, whose date
of death was March 1st, 2008; is pending in the
Circuit Court for Seminole County, Florida, Probate
Division; File Number: 2008-CP-1197; the address
of which is 301 North ParkAvenue, Sanford, Florida
32772. The names and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All the creditors of the decedent or other per-
sons, who have claims or demands against dece-
i, iie, including unmatured, contingent, or
.1,q,,,,1 claims, and who have been served a
copy of this notice, must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons who have claims or demands against the de-
cedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or
unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
SALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED. .
The date of first publication of this notice is Au-
gust 29; 2008.
Burke L Randa
Attorney for the Personal Representative
-Florida Bar Number: 132292
BURKE L RANDA, PRA.
800 Westwood Square, Suite A
Oviedo, Florida 32765
(407) 365-4300
DeNita Umland, personal representative
14830 Limonite Street, NW
Ramsey, MN 55303
8/29,9/5
IN THE EIGHTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN THE
CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File Number: 2008-CP-1595
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ELIZABETH R. O'BRYAN,
DECEASED.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of ELIZABETH R.
O'BRYAN, deceased, whose date of death was July
20, 2008, File Number 2008-CP-1595, is pending
in the Circuit Court for Seminole County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of which is 301 N.
Park Ave., Sanford, Florida 32772. The names
and addresses of the Personal Representative
and the Personal Representative's attorney are
set forth berow.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice is served
must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE
LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE TIME OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the Decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against the
Decedent's estate must file their claims, including
unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, with
this Court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of.this Notice
is Sept. 5, 2008.
Paul Stanley West, Attorney At Law
Florida Bar Number: 0286620
600 S. Orlando Ave., Suite 301
Maitland, FL 32751
Phone: (407) 678-9111
FAX. (407) 679-9911
KATHLEEN A. MILLER
31.0 Pervis Lane
Osteen, Florida 32764
9/5, 9/12


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SOUTH SEMINOLE HOSPITAL




ORLANDO HEALTH


For information or a physician referral, call 407.767.1200 or visit southseminolehospital.com
555 W. State Road 434, Longwood, FL 32750 1 South Seminole Hospital is part of the Orlando Health family of hospitals.


PageAl 6 September 5 -September 11, 2008









SeniorOserver


Volume 18. No. 9


Est. 1990


iCroque t lives on i Wnter Park


Croquet lives on in Winter Park


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK SENIOR OBSERVER
Jim Spoonhour of the Winter Park Croquet Club lines up a shot through a wicket on the croquet lawn near Casa Feliz in downtown Winter Park. The club boasts 40 members and hopes to grow with younger players.


AMY K.D. TOBIK
THE OBSERVER
As the humidity steadily
rises on the manicured
grass by historic Casa
Feliz, four men, each dressed in
crisp white linens, carefully mas-
termind their upcoming moves.
Croquet mallets in hand, they
quietly move from side to side,
checking out all possible angles.


When the 16-ounce ball effort-
lessly glides through the wicket,
they all share in the good fun,
despite the heat.
The tranquil Winter Park
scene is reminiscent of anoth-
er place in time, when athletes
didn't have six-figure contracts,
and the pleasure of the game
was found in peaceful surround-
ings and a good challenge.
Members of the Winter


Park Croquet Club spend their
Saturday mornings immersed
in nature while sharpening
their minds. Club president Jim
Spoonhour, who has been play-
ing croquet for 15 years, said
American six-wicket, is not like
the typical game of nine-wicket
backyard croquet most people
remember playing as children.
The American regulations
differ somewhat from the


International, Golf and Backyard
versions of the game. The six-
wicket game has two teams, the
blue and black balls -versus the
red and yellow balls, according
to the United States Croquet
Association. Using a mallet, play-
ers maneuver the balls through
the course of iron wickets clock-
wise. and then again counter-
see CROQUET on page B5


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SObserver
NEWS SENIORS CAN USE, SINCE 1990

Kyle P. Taylor
Publisher
kyle@observernewspapers.com

Alex Babcock
Editor
alexb@observernewspapers.com


Lacy Rushin
Designer
lacyr@observernewspapers.com

Jenny Andreasson
Reporter
jennya@observernewspapers.com

Isaac Babcock
Reporter
isaacb@observernewspapers.com


609 Executive Drive, Winter Park, FL 32789

Observer Newspapers is a member of:
*Winter Park Chamber of Commerce
*Maitland Chamber of Commerce
*The Florida Press Association
*Central Florida Press Club


Jonathan Gallagher
Copy Editor
jgallagher@observernewspapers.com

Tracy Craft
Advertising Sales
tcraft@observernewspapers.com

Pat Lovaglio
Advertising Sales
plovaglio@observernewspapers.com


I 407-628-8500 I WPMObserver.com

Published monthly by Observer Newspapers,
publishers of the:
*Winter Park/Maitland Observer
*Oviedo/Winter Springs Voice


The publisher reserves the right to refuse or edit advertisements, its content or
letters to the editor for reasons of libel or space availability.
We encourage you to send us your opinion.
All material is subject to copyright the Senior Observer.


Beardall Senior Center
800 S. Delaney Ave.
Orlando
407-246-2637


St. Cloud Senior Center
Indiana Ave. & 8th St.
St. Cloud
407-892-2533


Marks Street Senior Center Osceola Senior Center
99 E. Marks St. 1099 Shady Lane
Orlando Kissimmee
407-245-0921 407-846-8532
Maitland Senior Center Sanford Senior Center
345 S. Maitland Ave. 401 E. Seminole Blvd.
Maitland Sanford
407-539-6251 407-302-1010

RSVP Senior Volunteers Senior Resource Alliance
407-422-1535 407-228-1800
Alzheimer Resource Center Seminole County
407-843-1910 Better Living for Seniors
407-228-1800


I orSeiors


T T Pm,


Sen~siorObserver


September 2008


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September 2008


SeniorObserver


Rare cold allergy puts life on hold


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CAPS (Allergy to Cold) Is Often
Undiagnosed or Misdiagnosed
Are you or someone you know
suffering in silence?
Have you experienced a cluster of symptoms
that include some or all of the following:
Rash
Fever/chills
*Joint pain
Eye redness/pain
*Fatigue
Is this a response to exposure to cooling
temperatures (such as a cool breeze, air-
conditioning, going outside) or, in some
patients, to stress or exercise?
Haye these symptom flares, on average, lasted
several hours to days?
Have these flares occurred several times per
month for most of your life?
Do these symptoms interfere with your ability
to participate in normal daily activities?
If you answered yes to these questions,
please talk to your doctor about a CAPS
diagnostic assessment.
For more information, please visit
www.capscommunity.com.


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----`-


I 'i '


SenioarObserver


September 2008








CROQUET I Simple game harkens to a time before sporting was a business


< continued from the front page

clockwise before reaching the
multi-colored stake placed at
the center.
Points are earned by hitting
the balls through the wicket
in the correct direction and
sequence. Colored clips that
correspond with the balls are
used to show which wicket the
,ball needs to go through next.
Each wicket is worth one point,
and extra strokes are earned
when the striker ball, the player
whose turn it is, hits another
ball. The first team to reach 26
points wins, unless a time limit
has been set.
"We play a 75-minute game
and at the end of the time, each
ball has one more turn and at the
end of that turn, we see who has
the most wickets and the lead-
er wins the game," Spoonhour
said. The real challenge begins
when a player, during play, hits
an opponent's ball further away
from a wicket, making it more
difficult for the other team to
earn points. Balls can be hit out
of bounds and removed from
play, adding to the challenge.
"It's not really a strength sport
by and large it's kind of like
billiards and chess on a lawn.
You are always thinking several
moves ahead like chess, but like
billiards, you are trying to hit
balls where you can use them,"
Spoonhour said. "It's very defen-
sive and mental."
What makes the l CL
sport of croquet
unique, Spoonhour
explained, is both The club mee
men and women and Whipple av
Feliz in W
play together; there Call Jim Spooni
are no separate 6300 for moi
leagues like in other
sports such as golf.
Players at all levels can play with
each other using the handicap-
system.
The sport of croquet, which
many historians date back to the
mid-1800s in the British Isles,
opened the doors for women
to participate in the Olympics.
In 1900, seven men and three
women competed in the Paris
games according to Sports-
Reference.com.
Some historians say its origins
can be linked to the French game
of paille-maille, meaning "ball-


PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK SENIOR OBSERVER
Playing croquet requires little in the way of equipment just a mallet, a few balls and six "wickets"
which can be made from plastic, wire or more substantial materials. It's a defensive, tactical game.


mallet." The game evolved over
the years as adaptations were
made in Ireland and Britain, and
eventually America.
The Winter Park Croquet Club
formed more than 20 years ago
and currently has close to 40
active members. Membership
runs $125 year and the club pro-
vides all the equipment except
the mallet. The croquet lawn,
also known as the greensward,
is one of only six publicly owned
croquet spaces in the country.
The standard green measures
105 feet by 84 feet, although the
Winter Park club
LTEis currently scaled
E down to two-
thirds' size because
ts at North Park of current summer
venues near Casa turf conditions.
/inter Park.
hour at 407-418- When the meticu-
re information. lously manicured
Bermuda grass
needs replacing,
club members proudly chip in,
Spoonhour said.
Spoonhour said the cama-
raderie between fellow players
at different venues makes the
sport most pleasurable. "When
you go play tournaments, you
usually stay at someone's house
you make friends all over,"
he said.
Lee Thomas of Eustis said
he always looks forward to his
Saturday croquet games. "My
grandmother taught me how
to play backyard croquet when


I was a little kid in 1969 and I
played for 65 years. I have been
playing this type of croquet (six-
wicket) for about 12 years."
The exercise and the strat-
egy, Thomas said, helps keep his
mind sharp. "You have to think
about three turns ahead all of
the time. I have to think what
would happen if I left a ball in
one place," he said.
Thomas said he hopes the
club will continue to grow in
the coming years and the next
generation will keep it going.
"People just don't understand
croquet and should try to play
it," Thomas said, adding with a
hearty laugh, "Right now I am
enjoying getting whooped."


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Chuluota/Oviedo


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Winter Springs (Opening Soon)


I


SeniorObserver


September 2008


ve
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SeniorObserver September 2008


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SenioorObserver


September 2008


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1802 NORTH ALAFAYA TRAIL
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HOME CARE 407.273.4577 (OFFICE)
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"Change Is Inevitable, But You Can
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As an experienced financial planner,
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SI. "-.I I . I, J.,.,


Seni~orObserver


September 2008


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SeniorObserver September 2008


commaarm&


Emergency Meals on Wheels
wins award
On Aug. 14, Seniors First won a state
award for its Meals on Wheels program.
The Florida Association of Aging Services
Providers, which supports organizations
that provide services for elders, present-
ed its Most Innovative Program award to
Seniors First Emergency Meals on Wheels.
The program provides immediate home
delivered meals and case management
assistance for older adults who may be
returning home from a hospital or nurs-
ing facility, receiving hospice care, have a
sudden loss of a caregiver, or experiencing
other high-risk conditions.
In 2007, the Emergency Meals on Wheels
program served more than 14,000 meals to
seniors in crisis and received the National
Association of Nutrition and Aging Services
Program 2007 Star Award presented to
innovative programs.

Help needed caring for
the most vulnerable
Samaritan Care Hospice nonprofit organi-
zation is looking for caring, loving and com-
mitted volunteers who can assist terminally
ill patients and their caregivers. Volunteers
can assist in various ways: respite (adult-
sitting while the caregiver runs errands,
doctors' appointments, etc.), reading books,
writing letters, providing, emotional support
and companionship, and more.
Volunteer positions are in direct patient care,


indirect care and administrative roles.
There is a great need for volunteers in
Orlando, Winter Park, Oviedo, Maitland,
Apopka, Ocoee, Winter Haven and Zellwood.
Call Damaris Johnson-Santos at 407-514-
1320 or e-mail damaris.johnson@samari-
tancarehospice.com for more information.

Oviedo offers
S.E.N.I.O.R. bracelet program
The Oviedo Police Department would like
to invite you to participate in its S.E.N.I.O.R.
Bracelet Program. S.E.N.I.O.R. is an acro-
nym for Senior Emergency Notification
Information On Record.
This program is designed to provide
first responders immediate access to your
important medical information as well as
your emergency contacts at no cost.
How to get started: Complete an enroll-
ment form; get issued a bracelet with
an engraved access number; informa-
tion is maintained at the Oviedo Police
Communications Center 24 hours a day,
every day.
In emergency situations, the first respond-.
er contacts the Oviedo Police Department
and provides the bracelet access number,
and your information is immediately avail-
able. This program is available to any
citizen of Oviedo including children with
special needs that may benefit.
Call Betty Kelly at 407-971-5703 or
e-mail at ekelly@cityofoviedo.net for more
information..


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Sen~iorObserver


September 2008




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