Title: Seminole voice
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091445/00004
 Material Information
Title: Seminole voice
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Community Media Holdings, LLC
Place of Publication: Oviedo, Fla.
Publication Date: July 18, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00091445
Volume ID: VID00004
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text















www.SeminoleVoice.com


This.Week
Dornslctravet isbooming at:
Orland Sanford lntemational Airport.
........ .... ........ .. .-' '+. .. ......... -._.... ............ .


JENN


Christmas
ish from
budget th
ers adopt
.posed by


Serving Greater Oviedo and Winter Springs for more than 16 years
]- July 18 July 24, 2008 -
m Interests A
Make your own wine and label it
yourself at this Winter Springs shop.


Is city's 'golden age over?

Y ANDREASSON McLemore, alongwith more million to $50.6 million. It will make will in large, part straight jacket" Am
THE VOICE- important things, such as omits community events determine if the golden 1 as the culprit tha
police officers. altogether, and cuts services age of the city of Winter the city's general
s gifts could van- Winter Springs' prelimi- and staff, including seven Springs is over," McLemore revenue by abou
Winter Springs' nary budget for fiscal yeair police department posi- wrote in a memo to the li6n. This is coui
is year if city lead- 2009, beginning Oct. 1, is tions and the city arborist. Commission. cost increases, su(
a list of cuts pro- $10 million leaner, plung- "TheFY2009budgetdeci- He cites the weakened
City Manager Ron ing 16 percent from $60.7 sions that the Commissionr economy and "policy > turn to BUDGET


Just 350


iendment
it reduced
fund tax
t $1 mil-
pled with
:h as a 24

on page A3


Horse's tragic end offers a lesson
JENNY ANDREASSON
THE VOICE


When Carlos was seized,
his hooves were so over-
grown that they curled
over. It pained the young
horse so much to stand
that he just lay all day in
the hot sand, eventually
refusing to eat.
Despite veterinarians'
best efforts to rehabili-
tate him. Carlos had to
be euthanized .Tuesday,
July 15. Because of bone
damage in his legs, the
horse was in too much
pain, they said.
Seminole County.
Animal Services, which
took the horse from his,
Geneva home last week,
said Carlos was between
5 and 7 years old and 200
pounds underweight,
evinced by his protrud-
ing rib cage.
The agency gets about
> turn to HORSE on page A6


PHOTO COURTESY OF MICHELLE AKERS HORSE RESCUE
The emaciated figure of Carlos, a Geneva horse euthanized Tuesday, exhibited the neglect he suffered before his death.


A push for high-profit red-light cameras


JENNY ANDREASSON
THE VOICE
When a traffic light clicks
to yellow, drivers have to
make a split-second deci-
sion go for it or stop.
That decision may soon
become even more cru-
cial for drivers in Winter


Springs, where officials plan
to install red-light cameras
at six of its busy intersec-
tions.
A yellow light lasts, on
average, one second for
every 10 mph of the speed
limit. On a 45 mph road,
that's 4.5 seconds. If a
vehicle does not cross the


line into the intersection
in that time, it has run a
red light a $125 fine if a
police officer sees it.
But as budgets grow
leaner and police depart-
ments are stretched, some
cities are opting to install
unmanned red-light cam-
eras, which take continu-


ous video at intersections,
identifying the red-light
runners.
Winter Springs may
be the next city to green-
light such a program.
Its Commission voted
to approve a contract

> turn to RED LIGHT on page A3


Happy

news for

Scottish

family

JENNY ANDREASSON
THE VOICE

The rain is falling lighter
these days for Miriam Beck,
the Scottish woman who
was unable to get medical
care for her unborn child
due to delays in her appli-
cation for
U.S. citizen-
ship.
She is now
receivingcare
for her high-
risk pregnan-
cy from Win-
nie Palmer Beck
Hospital. She
also received the shot of
Rhogam she needed to pre-
vent her body from produc-
ing antibodies that could
have killed her baby.
Miriam, whose husband,
Stuart, is an American citi-
zen, applied for citizen;
ship more than three years
ago, initially filling out
the wrong form, which
she didn't know until 18
months later.
She is still working
toward getting her U.S. citi-
zenship but now has the
help of a skilled law firm,
which is offering its servic-

> turn to SCOTS on page A2


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***************ALL FOR ADC 320
2350
WILL CANOVA
UF SMATHERS LIBRARY
PO BOX 117007
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007


INDEX
Stetson's Corner....................................A4
Weather............-................................. A8
Cinema ...........................................All....
Athletics....... ......................... A12
Letters to the Editor............................A13
Our Voice......................................... A13
Classifieds and Games .................... A15


v


d





Page A2 July 18 July 24, 2008 The Voice

THIS WEEK in history

The Disneyland theme park in Anaheim, Calif., had its opening day.
Special invitations were sent out to specific guests weeks before,
however the invitations were quickly counterfeited. The overload of
IrH 1 E E K Special invitations were sent out to specific guests weeks before,
people almost made the first day a disaster, as food and drinks ran
S' out, the Mark Twain Steamboat nearly capsized from overloading
Sand a woman lost her shoe in wet asphalt.




Juice It Up gets the boot in Oviedo


JENNY ANDREASSON
THE VOICE

Oviedo's Juice It Up shop will be
closing by order of a Seminole
County judge.
Circuit Judge Donald
Marblestone issued a writ of posses-
sion July 7, which gives law enforce-
ment officers the right to physi-,


cally remove 'the business from-the
Alafaya Square plaza on State Road
434.
Requests for comment from the
shop owner were not returned.
The plaza's owner, Weingarten
Realty Investors, filed to evict the
business June 3. According to court
records, a motion for default was
entered June 30, meaning that


either Juice It Up owner Rene
Orellana failed to respond to the
complaint within the time allowed,
or he failed to attend the hearing. In
this case, the court enters a "default
judgment."
Orellana is being investigated by
the .State Attorney's Office based
on allegations that he videotaped
a female employee changing her


clothes in his office in April.
"There are no charges yet," Office
spokeswoman Lynne Bumpus-
Hooper said Monday. "It's an ongo-
ing investigation."
Should the state attorney pursue
a video voyeurism charge, which is
a misdemeanor sex offense, punish-
ment could be a year in a jail and
registration as a sex offender.


SCOTS I Community generosity helped mom save baby


< continued from the front page

es for free. Turns out, Miriam was
still filing forms she didn't qualify
for.
"If there's one form that you do
wrong, you've just ruined every-
thing, for yourself," said Mayra
Uribe, head paralegal at the law
firm of NeJame, LaFay, Jancha,
Barker & Joshi, which has set the
Becks on the right track.
If Miram had listened to an
aide in Congressman Tom
Feeney's office, who told her to go
to England and apply there, she
would have been barred from the
U.S. for 10 years, Uribe said.
Miriam was able to submit
a new citizenship application
thanks to about $1,000 in com-
munity donations. U.S. Senator
Bill Nelson is even working to
expedite her work permit appli-
cation, Uribe said.
Two local churches have
donated baby clothes for Amber,
who is due in September. The
couple has also received a crib,
carriage and all the baby items
they will ever need from a couple
who learned about their story on
WFTV Channel 9.
There's one hurdle left they
have personal belongings in a
-storage container in Scotland,



Published Friday,


July 18, 2008


Phone 407-628-8500
PUBLISHER
Kyle Taylor, extension 302
kyle@observernewspipers.com
EDITOR "
Alex Babcock, extension 304
alexb@theoviedevoice.com
DESIGNER
Lacy Rushin, extension 306
lacyr@observernewspapers.com
CHIEF REPORTER
Isaac Babcock of Winter Springs
isaacb@theoviedovoice.com
ADVERTISING SALES
Pat Lovaglia, extension 305
advertising@theovledovoice.com


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE VOICE ARCHIVE
The Beck family of Scotland is happier in Oviedo these.days with help from friends and strangers.


including personal papers, pho-
tos and their three children's toys.
"It's our life, basically," Miriam
said. She was quoted $4,000 to get
the contents shipped to Oviedo.
So far the Becks can't believe
the outpour of support they've


".,vq1)oiWce


received from the community.
"I have no words that can
describe the love, kindness and .
generosity of people who were
once strangers to us. Thank you
just is not enough y miles,"
Miriam wrote in an e-mail.


Volume 18
Issue No. 29


- SeminoleVoice.com Fax 407-628-4053
REPORTERS
Jenny Andreasson of Oviedo jennya@observernewspapers.com
Porter Maerz of Oviedo porterm@theoviedovoice com
Karen Phillips of Geneva- karenp@theoviedovoice.com
Amy K.D. Tobik of Winter Springs- amyt@theoviedovoice.com
COLUMNISTS
Janet Foley of Oviedo janetf@lheoviedovoice.com
Jay Getty of Oviedo jayg@theoviedovoice.com
Denise Tucker of Oviedo mrsdenisetucker@yahoo.com
Sandi Vidal of Casselberry sandi@christianhelp.org
Ben Wheeler nf Chuluota benw@lheoviedovoice.com
COPY EDITOR
Jonathan Gallagher Extension 309
jgallagher@observernewspapers.com
INTERNS
Raisa Camargo and Justine Griffin


The Beck family of Oviedo would like to
thank some of the people who have helped
them through their troubles with immigra-
tion and a difficult pregnancy. In the Becks'
words: Sandy and David Ribakoff for being
our emotional support and the only family
we have. Michele and Tim Major. There are
no words to describe the amount of kind-
ness they have shown us, and the things
they have provided for us. Richard and
Nancy Woodruff. These two have been there
for us in a way in which we can never repay
them. Stephan and Lisa Burkey for their
kindness and their help.
Pastor Tim Harris of Trinity Assembly of
God Church and all the people who prayed
for us and what they provided for us. All the
parents of my son Sam's classmates for
their kindness and help. Holly and the people
at The Metro Church. They have provided
so much for us in the short time we have
known them. Mr. Dan Sadler for his heartfelt
generosity. Dale Ziglear for always support-
ing us. Miss Lynn for becoming a friend and
helping us with her kindness and love. Joan
and Dave Micelli for comforting us and help-
ing us in their own way. The Brinkman fam-
ily for helping so much and supporting us.
Mr. Guy who put us in touch with the church
and Joanne and Nanci for their emotional
support and kindness.
Stuart Miriam Beck


The Oviedo-Winter Springs Voice publishes on Fridays ior readers in Oviedo,
Winner Springs, Geneva, Chuluota and their neighbors
Randy Noles founded The Voice in 1991. Its current owner is Observer Newspa-
pers, which also publishes the Winter Park-Maitland Observer.
The publisher is Kyle Taylor.


Talk with us about news stories at
407-628-8500
Ask for Editor Alex Babcock.

Write to us at:
voices@theoviedovoice.com or at:
P.O. Box 2426, Winter Park, FL 32790

Help us correct mistakes by writing
to corrections@theoviedovoice.com or
by calling 407-628-8500 and asking
for Editor Alex Babcock.

If you think we can do a better job
serving you, please let us know.
Renew your subscription or start a
new one by calling 407-628-8500. A
year's subscription costs just $24.80.

Advertise in The Voice by calling Pat
Lovaglio 407-628-8500.


The Voice cares about environmen-
tal health. The newspaper you hold
comes from a mixture of recycled con-
tent. Unsold copies of the newspaper
are archived or recycled. We also re-
cycle all in-office paper waste, bottles
and cans.

Stop by the office in Oviedo sometime.
We take walk-in guests each Thursday
- and also by appointment. We're at
1401 W. Broadway St.:


-Th Oviedo-Winter Springs Voice is published on Fridays POSTMASTER: Send address
S'.Community Media Holdings, LLC. USPS #008-093 changes to The Voice,
Periodicals postage-is paid at Oviedo, Florida. P.O. Box 2426, Winter Park, FL 32790


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$1,000 if you'll conserve water


ISAAC BABCOCK
THE VOICE

Oviedo last Thursday night
told citizens how they could
earn up to $1,000 by turning
off their sprinklers.
City Council members
met with homeowners asso-
ciations to read over the


details of a program offering
cash incentives to residents
who either shrink their
lawns or replace them with
less thirsty types of grass.
"It's a good idea for lots of
reasons," Councilman Steve
Henken said. "All you 'have
to do is put in grass that
doesn't need as much water.


You get $1,000, and we don't
waste as much water."
H2Oviedo was designed
to get Oviedians to conserve
water and help the aquifer
and city water supply at the
same time. Aside from the
cash benefit for putting in
better grass, the city also
offers a reward for install-


ing a well to take irrigation
from groundwater instead
of potable water.
The process involves hav-
ing a city employee come
to the home to inspect the
current yard and make rec-
ommendations for saving
water. Rain gauges can be
installed to turn off sprin-


klers during rainy days, and
irrigation systems will be
checked for efficiency.
The program will go to a
final vote in August. -
"It's pretty vanilla and it's
not very sexy," Henken said,
"but it helps."


RED LIGHT I Cameras could net city $310,000 in 2009 alone


< continued from the front page

Monday, July 14, with American
Traffic Solutions. The company oper-
ates camera programs in 18 Florida
municipalities, including Apopka
and Orange County, and soon also
Casselberry, which unanimously
approved a red-light camera propos-
al Monday night, July 14.
Winter Springs has entered into
a contract, but a final vote is still
needed. If approved, it is projected to
bring in $3'10,000 in revenue during
fiscal year 2009.
American Traffic Solutions will
now perform studies at the .six pro-
posed intersections all on State
Road 434 to confirm there is a need
for the cameras, company regional
vice president Greg Parks said.
Parks said the- program is self-
funding, American Traffic Solutions
will install the system in exchange
for a portion of each $125 citation
issued $40 is proposed, with the
city getting the remaining $85.-
Once the cameras are installed,
there will be a 30-day period when
drivers will only receive warnings.
After that period is over, citations
issued will include two color photos
- one of the car clearly behind the
intersection line when the light is red
and one of the car in the intersec-
tion.
"To be cited, the light has to be
100 percent red when they enter the
intersection," he said.
Violators will then be directed to
the Winter Springs Police Web site,
where they can examine digital ver-
sions of the photos and even watch
a 12-second video clip of violation.
Then they can choose to pay the cita-


tion or contest it, Parks said.
Winter Springs officials hope the
program will decrease the number of
red-light accidents in the city.
"The system dramatically reduc-
es crashes, fatalities and violations,"
Parks told the Commission.
But there is data that suggests red-
light cameras- actually increase acci-
dents mainly oversensitive drivers
stopping abruptly at yellow lights,
causing other cars to slam into their
rears.
A study by researchers at the
University of South Florida deter-
mined that installing cameras in
Florida could increase the crash and
injury rates even more because of its
large elderly population. "The elderly
have slower average reaction times
and may be less likely to stop abrupt-
ly as other drivers do at camera inter-
sections," the study states.
Commissioner Joanne Krebs said
that while there is a potential for
drivers to stop abruptly or even speed
up when a light turns yellow, the
cameras will ultimately make people
drive safer.
"If you know you've got a camera
at the next intersection, you're not
going to approach the intersection
at 70 miles per hour so you can make
that stop," she said.
She said she doesn't discount the
USF study, but wahts the city to do its
own analysis. "I think we just have to
be cautious and review it and see if
it's doing what we want it to do."
In 2005, about 800 people died as
a result of red-light running, accord-
ing to the National Highway Traffic
Safety Administration.
Winter Springs Police Chief Dan
Kerr said the department issues about


1........Vistawilla Drive
2........ Tuskawilla Road
3........ Winding Hollow Boulevard
4........ State Road 419
5........ Hayes Road
6........ Edgemon Avenfue


1,500 citations a year for intersection
violations such as red-light running
and rolling through stop signs.
"It's a 24-hour, 365-days-a-year
operation," Kerr said, citing the espe-
cially problematic intersection of 434
and Tuskawilla Road. "Officers can't
be out there all the time."
Itiscurrentlyillegalforlawenforce-
ment officers to issue moving viola-
tions for data gathered by red-light
cameras. It is OK, however, if a city
changes its ordinance to define red-
light running as a code violation, the
same type of law-breaking as having
an overgrown lawn. Winter Springs
will have its new ordinance drafted
within 30 days for the Commission's
review.
But there are some risks, City
Manager Ron McLemore said, as state
lawmakers set their sights on the sys-
tem. "They're looking into prohibiting
or taking a portion of the revenues,"
he said of the Florida Legislature.


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BUDGET
Concern as city

considers cuts

< continued from the front page

percent hike in fuel, oil and
electricity prices.
City Commissioner Don
Gilmore said on Wednesday
that he is concerned about
a proposal to save money
by not giving employees
cost-of-living pay increas-
es and another that would
alter their medical coverage.
"We have to taP care of our
employees," he said. "They
are the most valuable asset
we have."
While the proposed prop-
erty tax rate shows a 30 per-
cent reduction from 2008,
residents will likely see an
increase in their overall
property tax bill. The Winter
Springs proposed tax rate is
2.3785 mills, roughly trans-
lated to $2.38 per $1,000
of taxable property value.
The county's rate is 2.3299,
which now includes a fire
service tax because the city
merged its fire services with
the county. The total prop-
erty tax rate is proposed to
be 4.5984 miJls a 5 percent
increase from last year.


Proposed cuts from
general fund and
savings garnered:

Staff
4 sworn police officers and
3 non-sworn officers: $390K
City arborist
Michael Mingea: $50K
Multimedia technician
(currently vacant): $36K
Telephone operator: $10.5K
2 Public Works employees: $60K

Community services
Senior Center bus service: $37.4K
Operate Senior Center
only 3 days a week: $40K
Neighborhood and community
grants, such as WMFE and
Meals on Wheels: $37K
Reduce newsletter: $17K
Winter Springs-Oviedo
Chamber of Commerce: $3.75K
Seminole County
Chamber of Commerce: $850

Staff services
Employee Christmas gifts: $8.2K
Employee awards: $7.3K


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July 18 July 24, 2008 Paae


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Reminiscin







By Karen McEnany-Phillips


When Christopher
Stapleton and company
proposed turning the his-
toric Geneva School into a
rural heritage center, it was
about much more than a
building.
Stapleton said, "Our ini-
tial socialization outside of
our families comes when
we attend our first day of
class in elementary school.
We are all alone without
our familiar surroundings
of home, church and our
parents standing by to pro-
tect us alone, scared and
excited all at once.
"There is an all-new
expectation of us. We will
discover the history of our
culture, fthe expanse of our
world, and the potential of
our future. A community's
elementary school is where
the past, present and future
of a community's heritage
becomes real, especially in


rural America. It is central
to all of our memories of
our hometown."
On July 4, at the Geneva
School reunion, I listened
to some great stories and
comments from students,
staff and teachers, so in
this and in future columns,
I plan to share them with
you. I hope you will enjoy
how some things change
and some stay the same
even after more than 30 '
years.
Students Janese and
Rick Evans were among
those who shared their
memories. Janese gradu-
ated with the class of 1985.
She said, "Because we still
Live here, we keep in touch
with our friends, but some
of the teachers we haven't
seen in a while. I loved Miss
Celones, our art teacher
with her art cart. When I
saw her today I asked her,


g about
'Do you have glue for us to
schmear?'"
Rick graduated with the
class of 1976. He said, "I
went to the school from
.1970 to '76 and there were
only three school buses. It
was a good country school;
you knew everybody. I
remember Miss Crill and
also Miss Bonnie, who was
the only custodian. Our
class named the school
mascot, The Mustangs.
"It was an older school,
and as a boy, it seemed to
me that we had a lot of
recess, but we still learned.
There were only 10 or 11
kids in a class. I walked
through the orange groves,
picked oranges and some-
times I was kind of a mess
once I got to school."
Boys will be boys, right?
Ms. Adele Dorman
taught second grade and
recalls when she first saw
the old school building. "It
was the saddest building
you've ever seen," she said.
"There wasn't a plant or a
flower, even the flagpole
was bent."
Dorman remem-
bered that after Principal
McNamara arrived,
improvements were made.


old Geneva


She also recalled the day
when some cows got loose
from a nearby pasture and
wandered into the play-
ground. Mrs. McNamara
and her teachers came
running out, brandishing
brooms, swishing their
skirts and yelling "Shoo!
Shoo!"
Yes, these ladies were
educators and cowgirls!
Said Dorman, "Seeing
other faculty has been so
fun! Some of our students
are in their 30s now."
If you attended the old
Geneva School and have
stories to share, I would
love to hear from you. We
will collect as many as pos-
sible to help showcase the
impact of this school as it
transforms into the Island
and Village of Geneva
Heritage Center.
Stapleton beautifully
described the significance:
"The importance of the
school and the alumni is
that the memories that
were made in that same
schoolhouse have followed
its graduates around the
world. This is why the ele-
mentary school, its alumni
.and the Rural Heritage
Center are so important to


each other.
"We don't have a city
hall, high school, entertain-
ment center so the ele-
mentary school has been
central to our common
heritage."
For more information
on the center and to learn
about how you can help
the fundraising efforts,
e-mail RuralHeritage@simi-
osys.com. Commemorative
bricks are currently avail-
able for sale.
Next week:
Remembering Deputy
Sheriff Eugene "Stetson"
Gregory, 10 years after the
end of his watch.


TA KAREN
Please share your thoughts about
Geneva at 407-221-7002, kar-
enp@theoviedovoice.com with
"Stetson's Corner" in the sub-
ject line, or fax 407-349-2800.
Thanks!
This column is dedicated to
Deputy Sheriff Gene "Stetson"
Gregory, killed in the line of duty
on July 8, 1998. Geneva will never
be the same because of Deputy
Gregory it will be better.


As year shoots by, 'distant' events loom


I know the year is flying by
and soon the topic of some
discussions will be the
primary election on Aug.
26. Believe me, the poll
workers are really gearing
up for that as the state law
requires now three hours of
class training.
We also have special
instructions regarding
online disability sensitivity
training. When you sign in
at the school for instruc-
tion classes on Thursday,
July 24, you will be asked
to sign an affidavit stating
that you have completed
the online portion of your
training.


I have been working at
the polls for 10-plus years
and it seems to me that
the class and instructions
get almost longer than
the polling time. I do this
because it is my personal
duty and I enjoy meeting
my neighbors as they come
in to vote. But some of us
that have done poll work
year after year get rather
tired of the same instruc-
tions.
Hey, we can teach the
class and earn the extra 5
cents we get paid. Just kid-
ding of course.
Speaking of kids -
traveling around town, I


noticed it seems to be the
style to start purchasing
school supplies halfway
through July. I would do it
now, as you know the mess
the week before school
opens. Those lines are
something else.
Perhaps if I wait a little
longer, I'll be in time for
Halloween stuff. Once
school starts, the holiday
decorations start appearing
and the year will be over
before you know it. I am
still enjoying summer -
heat, rain and all.
Pushing ahead, the .
Oviedo Woman's Club is
in full swing, planning its
big day the 35th annual
Great Day in the Country
on Saturday, Nov. 8. If you
wish to be a crafter in our
show, you may send two
non-returnable pictures
of your craft to Great Day
in the Country, P.O. Box
621607, Oviedo, 32762,
or check our Web site,


OviedoWomansClub.org.
Tire Amnesty Day is from
8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday,
July 19, at the Central
Transfer Station on State
Road 419 or the County
Landfill in Geneva. Both
are excellent facilities to
rid your house of unwanted
tires and the like. I had
my kids a fewv years back
use the facility for me.
I so enjoy getting rid of
unwanted clutter. If you
have questions, please call
407-665-2260.
Know somebody that
is getting married? You
may want to check out this
bit of information. There
will be a Magical Bridal
Show with exhibitors and
refreshments from 1 p.m.
to 4 p.m. Sunday, July 20, at
the Dubsdread Golf Course,
549 W. Par St., Orlando.
Free admission. For more
information, please call
407-296-5882.
Don't forget this


Saturday's charity soft-
ball game at 4 p.m. at the
Oviedo Sports Complex,
1251 E. Broadway St., when
the first inaugural police
vs. fire softball challenge
will take place. It will ben-
efit children's programs
offered through the Oviedo
Optimist Club. Admission
is free. You can purchase
the challenge T-shirts by
calling 407-971-5736. Only
food and beverages will be
on sale at the game.
A thought Besides the
noble art of getting things
done, there is the noble art
of leaving things undone.
The wisdom of life consists
in the elimination of non-
essentials.

TALK ANET
TO
>TO JANET
Send word to Janet Foley about
events and let her know what's
going on around town by e-mailing
janetf@theoviedovoice.com.


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(Located at the base of the Nelson & Co. water tower)


Merry Luiz, 55, of Winter Springs,
Fla., died Friday, July 11, 2008, in
Altamonte Springs. She was born
to Albert F. and Mildred F. Luiz on
March 7,1953, in Rochester, N.Y.
Merry was a hotel supervisor.
She is survived by sisters
Patricia Luiz and Theresa Randall
and brother Robert Luiz.


The Voice


P.qnp A4 hilv 1R -.hilv 24 20f)R






1y luJ 8 July 24 2008 Page A5


ImIe VUoI -------



Know what they'll see


Social networking sites,
such as Facebook and
MySpace, are a sexu-
al predator's dream come
true, Winter Springs Police
Captain Kevin Brunelle
explained to parents at his
July 8 Internet safety class.
During the two-hour
class, he focused on what
parents can do to protect
their children online, and
how to tell if their child is
being stalked or bullied on
the net.
As of July 2007, MySpace
has booted more than
29,000 registered sex
offenders from its site. In
2006, there were about 100
criminal incidents involving
adults who used MySpace to
prey or attempt to prey on
children, he said.
But there are precautions
parents and children can
take to not become victims.


"These sites are
as dangerous as
you allow them
to be," Brunelle
said.


For instance, f l
parents can
now prevent Aug. 5 an
their child from each fr
ever creating a to 9
MySpace pro- .
file by submit- Winter
ting their child's Police S
e-mail address to Moss
the site. Parents
can check if
their child already has a
profile by visiting MySpace.
com/ParentCare.
But children can safely
be online. Brunelle recom-


mends keeping dialogue
open about potential dan-
gers, limiting the posting of
personal information and
time spent online, and look-
ing at their e-mail accounts
and profiles on a regular
basis which means know-
ing their children's screen
names and passwords.
Some children, however,
will create asecondMySpace
or Facebook profile called
a "shadowing page," which
shows no signs of inappro-
priate behavior. Their other
profile will have the stuff
they don't want their par-
ents to see. So, to be sure,
he recommends a type of
Internet-monitoring soft-
ware, such as Net Nanny.
Also, he said if the com-
puter is kept in the kitchen
or the living room and not
a child's bedroom, they are
less likely to get into trouble


ind Aug. 19,
om 7 p.m.
m. at the
* Springs
Station on
s Road.


or be targeted
by a predator. A
predator who is
grooming or
manipulating -
a child will often
ask where his
computer is in
the house. If it's
in an area where
parents are likely
to be, the preda-
tor cuts off all
contact with the
child, he said.
Parents must


also become familiar with
"net lingo" in chat rooms.
For^example, POS means
"parent over shoulder"
- the youth is telling the


Parents at an Internet education
class hosted at Winter Springs Police
Headquarters learned about the tactics
sexual predators use online to victimize
children, and how they might prevent this.
Police Capt. Kevin Brunelle, standing at
right, taught the class.
PHOTOS BY JENNY ANDREASSON THE VOICE

person that she is chatting
with not to type anything
he wouldn't want her par-
ents to read. Similarly, PIR
means "parent In room"
and P911 "parent alert." Go
to NetLingo.com for more
definitions.
"The kids hate me for
divulging these secrets,"
Brunelle said to the 10
parents in attendance. "I
thank them for hating me.
Of course, they're going to
come up with new lingo
now that you're becoming
educated."
The presentation also
contained information
about how to take per-
sonal information off the
Web. Brunelle advised the
parents to type their names


into a search engine such as
Google. "You'll be amazed at
what comes back on you,"
he said. Predators use infor-
mation such as favorite
music lists or for-sale post-
ings to target children.
Winter Springs residents
Jeff and Laurie Fortune
attended the class to learn


about Internet safety
because they have five chil-
dren, some of whom are
approaching their teenage
years. They were stunned by
how much personal infor-
mation can be dug up on
the Web.
"The scary thing is you
can't stop them," Jeff said.


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Police offer parents classes on

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THE VOICE


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Truth would've avoided an arrest


BE ON THE LOOKOUT!
Crime, arrests and
public safety news from
the Oviedo Police Department

By Lt. George Ilemsky


Let's be honest ... it's
best to. be honest!
...especially if you are talk-
ing to the police! On July 9,
police stopped a car because
a license tag light was out in
the area of County Road 419
and Lockwood Boulevard. It
seems this would be a rela-
tively harmless encounter
between an officer and a
driver.
The truth of the matter
for the police is that there
is always an element of risk.
The difference is whether it
is high risk or not. There's
always the element of the
unknown. In this inci-
dent a valuable lesson was
learned by the driver, who
attempted to lie his way out
of a situation. That little lie
>


backfired and resulted in an
additional charge.
When the officer asked
for the driver's license and
vehicle paperwork, the
driver advised he had a
license but did not have it
with him. The officer asked
the driver to write his name
down. He then wrote down
the name of his brother in
order to avoid the officer
learning that his license was
suspended. Well, the officer
checked the name out and
the information revealed
that the name the driver
provided had an outstand-
ingowarrant out of Brevard
County. Oops!
Once the officer con-
firmed this information, the
driver decided it would be
better to give the officer his


real name. The driver told
the officer 'that he knew his
license was suspended and
knew his brother's was valid.
Unfortunately, he was not
aware his brother had an
outstanding warrant. The
driver was then placed in
custody and charged with
driving while his license
was suspended or revoked,
resisting the officer without
violence, and representing
himself as someone else. It
would have been better just
to be honest ... do we agree?

Stolen cars and dirt bikes;
one vehicle recovered
On July 7, a couple of dirt
bikes were stolen from an
unsecured garage on Crystal
Avenue. Making things easi-
er, both bikes were parked
side by side with the keys.
We would like to remind
everyone to secure your
property and not let your-
selves become easy targets
for those deviant opportun-
ists!
July 8 brought the mis-
fortune of a couple of vic-
tims reporting their cars
stolen. One of the victims


reported his car stolen
from the parking lot of the
Oviedo Grove Apartments,
while the other was sto-
len from Manigan Avenue.
Coincidentally enough,
both victims reported to
police that this was the
second time these vehicles
were stolen. You might say
that luck was not on their
side as they are examples.
that lightning can strike
twice!
On July 8, a vehicle that
was reported stolen in
Orange County was recov-
ered but was stripped. It was
at Massey Services on Evans
Street in Oviedo.

Theft and vehicle
burglaries
On July 8,. a gym bag left in
a locker at LA Fitness by a
patron was reported stolen.
A wallet containing several
gift cards and a bank card
were among the items miss-
ing. The victim contacted
the bank about the theft
and was advised that the
card had already been used
at Circuit City and Best Buy
in the Orlando area.


A couple of vehicle bur-
glaries were reported on
July 10. In one of the vehicle
burglaries, a Nintendo Game
Boy, a couple of bank cards
and personal information
were among the items sto-
len. In this incident the vic-
tim had the vehicle parked
at the Oviedo Bowling
Center.
The other occurred in the
parking lot of LA Fitness. In
this particular incident,
the vehicle had the front
driver's side window bro-
ken out. Two women's
handbags that contained
gift cards, credit cards, a cell
phone and a pair of Oakley
sunglasses were among the
items stolen.

Cop.talk-- may law
and order prevail!
Remember to be courte-
ous, honest and helpful.
As citizens, our commu-
nity will prosper when we
all take responsibility for
our actions. Let's look out
for each other because ...
together we can make a dif-
ference!


HORSE I Services hope to increase awareness of options to improve horses' lives


< continued from the front page the care of rescue groups.
The rest were euthanized or
half a dozen horse neglect left to suffer, the AAEP esti-


cases a year, said Animal
Services shelter
supervisor Mary
Beth Lake. "Feet- "When
wise, this is one is think
of the worst that breedin
we've seen," she perhaps
said.
Carlos is a to bu
prime example Or the
of an unwanted consider
horse. In 2007, rather tt
there were about th
170,000 unwant- Euthan
ed horses in the than diO
U.S., according
to the American Chaim
Association of Wel
Equine Practitio-
ners, or AAEP.
About 140,000 were pro-
cessed for meat. or other
uses. About 20,000 were in


mated.
Horses can become


unwanted for
many reasons:
they get sick,
injured, old, dan-
gerous, are no
longer athletic or
get too expensive
for the owner.
Carlos' owner, for
instance, was an
84-year-old man
who was no lon-
ger able to care
for the horse, the
county agency
said.
The AAEP esti-
mates that it can


a person
:ing about,
g a horse,
they ought
y one...
ey might
r adopting
ian buying.
ize rather
scarding."
- Dr. Tom Lenz,
man of the AAEP
Afare Committee


easily cost-$5,000 a year to
care for a horse, including
food, veterinary, horse shoe-


.6......... ..........


Bernard S. Zeffren, MD -
Eugene F. Schwartz, MD
Winnie Whidden, MSN, ARNP-C
Voted Best Doctors of Central FL,
Orlando Magazine
-for 6 consecutive years


IONSULTinTS
OF CENTRAL FLORIDA

Diplomates American Board of
Allergy and Immunology


407-366-7387 w
7560 Red Bug Lake Rd., Ste. 2064 Oviedo, FL 32765
www.orlandoallergy.comr
Additional Offices in Altamonte, Waterford Lakes, Hunters Creek & Orange City


ing and boarding expenses.
The rising prices of diesel,
gas and grain aren't helping,
said Dr. Tom Lenz, chair-
man of the AAEP Welfare
Committee, in a May 14 My
Horse University live Web
presentation, titled "The
Unwanted Horse." "It's real-
ly having a dramatic affect
on the lower end of the
horse industry," he said.
Seminole County Horse
Association founder Betsy
LaBelle said the cost of horse
care has also spiked because
of a drought the Southeast
experienced in 2007, which
.caused the price .of normal
bales of hay to increase
from $6 to $20.
While Lenz said the U.S.
cannot completely elifni-
nate unwanted horses,
there are ways to minimize
them. "When a person
is thinking about breed-
ing a horse, perhaps they
ought to buy one," he said.
"Or they might consider
adopting rather than buy-
ing. Euthanize rather than
discarding."
There are many rescue
and retirement facilities
in the U.S., but the capac-
ity of most is 30 horses
or less, according to the
AAEP, and the number of
unwanted horses exceeds
their resources.
There are four or five
rescues in the Orlando
area. LaBelle's associa-
tion is working to bring
the rescue leaders togeth-
er to address their indus-
try's problems. She said, "If
someone's horse is starv-
ing, they can call and be
helped."


Neglected horses in Florida and elsewhere
need help just as do common house pets.
Visit UnwantedHorseCoalition.org
or AAEP.org for more information.
Visit SeminoleCountyHorseAssociation.org
for information on how to help locally.
One nearby rescue is Michelle Akers Sundance Horse Rescue
and Outreach at 214 E. Lucerne Circle in Orlando.
Visit MichelleAkersHorseRescue.com
or call 407-670-8130 for more information.


The Voice


'LLERGY 6


11STO-11


I T IbMAKMEW .







Snfors airport grows .



Sanford's airport grows


JUSTINE GRIFFIN ,
THE VOICE
Tyler Rayburn never
enjoyed spending
time in an airport.
Rayburn, a 21-year-old
Oviedo resident, always
hated the hours he spent in
crowded airport terminals,
until he found an alterna-
tive. Rayburn recently flew
out of the Orlando Sanford
InternationalAirport tovisit
his uncle in Grand Rapids,
Mich., and was surprised by
his experience there.
"[The Sanford Airport]
is great because it's never
crowded and it's less of a
hassle in the airport termi-
nals," Rayburn said.
The airport, located just
off Highway 41 7 in Sanford,
offers both national and
international flights with-
out the hustle and bustle
of the much larger Orlando
International Airport, said
Sharon Sears, the executive
director of the Seminole.
County Convention and
Visitor's Bureau.
The Sanford Airport
offers 11 different airlines,
including their only domes-
tic airline, Allegiant Air.
Rayburn flew Allegiant Air
to and from Grand Rapids
with no complaints.
"[Allegiant Air] flights
are usually cheaper out of
Sanford too, which is defi-
nitely a plus," Rayburn said.
Allegiant Air services 27
small airports nationwide,
including Sanford. It was
also one of the top three
profiting airlines, alongwith
Atlantic Southeast Airlines
and SkyWest Airlines,
according to a Bureau of
Transportation Statistics
report.
Even though Sanford is a
much smaller airport -than
Orlando International, it
has experienced an over-
whelming growth over the
past few years, said the vice
president of administra-
tion of the Sanford Airport
Authority, Diane Crews.
In the past, the Sanford
Airport catered mostly to
international passengers
coming into Sanford, but
within the last year, the
amount of domestic pas-
sengers has surpassed
international passengers
by more than 50 percent,
Crews said.
Although Allegiant Air is
the only current domestic
airline offered, it may riot
be the only one .for long.
"This is a very competi-
tive industry. We are always
looking to attract new air
carriers, and there are defi-
nitely new opportunities on
the horizon," Crews said.
Though the Sanford
Airport has room to grow
as its passenger numbers
and amount -of air carriers
continue to increase, Crews
said it has no plans to rival
Orlando's biggest airport.
"We will never be at the
same capacity as Orlando


International, though .1 do
consider us an alternative
to that airport," Crews said.
The two have even
been partners Orlando
International has worked
with the Sanford Airport
to help prevent collisions
between birds and planes
on the runway.
Last year, the Sanford
Airport confronted the nui-
sance of eagles nesting near
its runways. The airport
worked with the Audubon
Center for Birds of Prey in
'Maitland to relocate young
eaglets.
"Eagles are site-faithful,
which means that their ter-
ritory is important to them
and they will continue to
come back there," said the
eagle watch coordinator
of the Audubon Center for
Birds of Prey, Linda White.
Since then, the airport
hired a full-time wildlife
officer to help maintain
clear runways, Crews said.
"We are working to make
the runways and property
around them less attrac-
tive to wildlife," Crews said.
"The last thing we want are
hurt animals, humans, or
property damage."
The Sanford Airport will
be hosting the 10th-annual
bird strike committee meet-
ing this August. More than
400 people from around
the nation plan to attend
the event.
Besides hosting nation-
al meetings, the Sanford
Airport also brings in pas-
sengers interested in see-
ing Central Florida's attrac-
tions.
"There are millions of
international passengers
who come through the air-
port alone," Sears said. "The
airport is definitely bring-
ing tourism into Seminole
County."
The Sanford Airport


PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE VOICE
Orlando-Sanford International Airport has seen a swell in domestic travel after years of catering mostly to charter airlines from
Europe. The airport offers an alternative to Orlando International, including cheaper.parking, shorter lines and a convenient location
to Seminole County residents. The airport hosts commercial airliners, at top being loaded with baggage, as well as private planes.


offers an alternative to
Orlando International
Airport for access to
Central Florida attractions,
such as Disney World and
Universal Studios, but it
also allows people to see
what Seminole County has
to offer.
Sears said that the
Seminole County
Convention and Visitor's
Bureau is working on a
marketing plan with other
Allegiint Air destina-
tions to promote tourism
in'Seminole County. Sears
also said they are looking to
promote Seminole County
as a great place for business
meetings because of the
warmer weather Central
Florida has to offer.
"The Visitor's Bureau is
a proud partner of the air-
port. We just want people
to experience the beautiful
Seminole County for what it
is: Florida's natural choice,"
Sears said.
As for Rayburn, he said
that his trip to and from


Grand Rapids won't be the
last time he uses the Sanford
Airport.


"It's just much quiet-
er and nicer at Sanford,"
Rayburn said.


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July 18 July 24, 2008 Page


e hT Voice







Paue A8 July 18 July 24. 2008 The Voice


Recycle bulbs and
batteries with online service
You can now recycle universal
household hazardous waste; such as
compact fluorescent light bulbs and
batteries, at ThinkGreenFromHome.
com. Customers can order pre-paid
postage kits online for $14.95. For
that price, you can recycle 15 bulbs
or about 4 pounds worth of batteries.
The boxes can be shipped directly
from home or at any post office.
The federal government is phasing
out incandescent bulbs by mandat-
ing new bulbs be 30 percent more
efficient. In 2012, 100-watt bulbs will
need to meet the standard, tapering
to 40-watt bulbs by 2014.

W.S. woman and UCF grad
finishes basic training
Army Sergeant Veronica L. Shinkle
graduated with honors from basic
combat training at Fort Jackson,
Columbia, S.C.
Shinkle is the daughter of Charles
Shinkle of Winter Springs.
Shinkle received a bachelor's


degree in 2004 from the University of
Central Florida and graduated in 2000
from Winter Springs High School.

Casselberry man graduates
from Army basic training
Army Private Tlomas E. Childers
graduated from basic combat training
at Fort Jackson, Columbia,-S.C.
He is the son of Cindy Childers of
Casselberry.

Oviedo man graduates
from Army basic training
Army Private First Class Clarence
W. Philpott IV graduated from basic
infantry training at Fort Benning,
Columbus, Ga.
He is the nephew of Jeffrey
Gammons of Oviedo.
Philpott graduated in 2003 from
Oviedo High School.

Oviedo High grad finished
basic infantry training
Army Reserve Private Christopher W.
Stanhope-Scott graduated from basic


NOTES


infantry training at Fort Benning,
Columbus, Ga.
Stanhope-Scott is the son of Dona
Hohensee of Chuluota.
Stanhope-Scott graduated in 2007
from Oviedo High School.

Find out what it's
like to be a police officer
The free annual Citizen Police
Academy will begin in August, meet-
ing every Tuesday from 6:30 p.m. to
10 p.m. for 11 weeks, and is limited
to 35 students. Adults who are inter-_
ested in learning about becoming a
police officer will learn about basic
laws, investigative techniques and
defensive tactics, and operate fire-
arms at the gun range.
Tie course is free of charge, and
graduates are eligible to apply for the
Citizens on Patrol program. Applicants
must be at least 21 years of age and
pass a criminal background check.
Applications are available at the
Oviedo Police Department. For more
information, contact Lieutenant Travis
Cockcroft at 407-971-5710.

Police will be stopping and
checking vehicles for safety
The Winter Springs Police Department


A Family Company
& Tradition for
Over 35 Years


407-509-1243
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'Licensed Bonded Insured


WEATHER


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740 870 900 740
6 a.m. I Noon 3 p.m. I 6 a.m.


TODAY: Afternoon thunder-
storms with a 50% chance
of rain during the day and
69% humidity.


UV INEX Extreme



MORNING LOW 740
DAYTIME HIGH 900
40% chance of rain.


Sunset
8:23 p.m.


13:50 hours
of sunlight


Wind
ESE 6 mph


MORNING LOW 74
DAYTIME HIGH 900
40% chance of rain.


Sunset
8:22 p.m.


13:48 hours
of sunlight


Wind
E 6 mph


MORNING LOW 73
DAYTIME HIGH 890
40% chance of rain.


Sunset
8:22 p.m.


13:48 hours Wind
of sunlight ESE 6 mph


MORNING LOW 740
DAYTIME HIGH 890
40% chance of rain.


Sunrise Sunset 13:46 hours
6:41 a.m. 8:21 p.m. of sunlight


Wind
SE 6 mph


Friday Sat.


Washington, D.C. 73/95


Seattle
San Francisco


75/90


55/70 56/76
*53/64 56/66
71/94 72/91


*01





I m o ing tor ado ap .are


GAINESVILLE
720 1890


MARINE FORECAST
Cocoa Beach tide schedule
Time High Low
Saturday 9:01 a.m. 2:58 a.m.
July 19 9:33 p.m. 3:08 p.m.


Sunday
July 20


9:43 a.m.
10:10 p.m.


3:36 a.m.
3:47 p.m.


FLORIDA FORECAST


City
Tampa


Friday Sat.
76/91 76/91


-Jacksonville 76/90 76/93
Gainesville 72/89 73/92


Ft. Lauderdale
Miami
Naples


TAMPA,
7601 91


72/88


80/88 80/89
75/89 75/90


Tallahassee 71/88 73/90



INTERNATIONAL


NATIONAL FORECAST


Atlanta
New York
Chicago


Friday Sat.
68/84 69/87
72/95 74/93
71/90 71/88


City
London
Paris
Tokyo


Friday Sat.
57/69 58/69
56/71 56/69
78/86 78/89


Los Angeles 65/80 64/80 Houston


will be conducting a vehicle safety -:-- .. -
checkpoint from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Friday, July 25, at the intersection
of Sheoah Boulevard and MacDuff .,..-..
Lane. *102% Financing Available
They'll be checking vehicles to 1st Time Home Buyers
ensure all safety equipment is work- FHA/VA Loans
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Vehicles will be flagged into a des- Kimberly Williams
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This checkpoint is being conducted 407-745-7875
as part of the Department's ongo- KWilliams@goffmc.com
ing effort to promote 'driver safety
through awareness and education. -
Call Lieutenant Matt Tracht at 407- Fidelity
327-7997 for more information. F ......... ..
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No Job Too Large or Small


Sunrise
6:39 a.m.


Sunrise
6:40 a.m.


- Sunrise
,6:40 a.m.


79/88


[R I E - S 0 D D I N G I


ILANDSCAPE
[SKMALIST
-1


PPMm"PwMmR


Page A8 July 18 July 24, 2008


. The Voice


RRIGATION


IMORNING


IPEAK TO L


pr


Mexico City 53/71 52175






The Voice July 18 July 24, 2008 Page A9

THIS WEEK in human history

Neil Armstrong became the first human on the moon. Buzz Aldrin
joined him on the surface and they conducted some simple
S | scientific tests. Finally, they planted a U.S. flag and a plaque that
read "Here men from the planet Earth first set foot on the moon
I NEE ,.- July 1969 A.D. We came in peace for all mankind."


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raoyn Al iu l.myu uy .z-,tij .- pouun e



Shops text savings to your phone


JENNY ANDREASON
THE VOICE
he days of clipping
coupons and carry-
ing around customer
loyalty cards may soon be
over.
Some businesses, such as
some-Planet Smoothie loca-
tions, are ditching the paper
stuff and turning to mobile
text messaging to get the
word out about promotions
and discounts.
The smoothie shops
in Casselberry on Howell.
Branch Road and in Oviedo
on State Road 434 are two
of four Orlando-area loca-
tions testing out a mobile
marketing system, which.
instructs customers to input
their mobile phone num-
bers into a small hand-held
machine.
This logs their visits -
the 11lth visit warrants a
free smoothie eliminating
the need to tote a loyalty
card. They also have the op-
tion to enroll in a program
to receive coupons and dis-
counts via text message.
Coupons include a buy-
one-get-one-free offer and a
$2-off offer. Planet Smooth-
ie will also send out infor-
mation, such as a reminder
of its monthly 99-cent-
smoothie day. But it typical-
ly doesn't send more than


one or two messages per
week, Oviedo owner Adam
Bermudez said.
Jonathan Goodyear, pres-
ident of PlumReward, the
mobile marketing firm that
supplied the shop's tech-
nology, said paper coupons
are on their way out. Mobile
marketing is more efficient
and "green" for compa-
nies, eliminating paper and
printing costs, and more
convenient for consumers.
A watchdog organiza-
tion regulates this industry,
the Mobile Marketing As-
sociation, to make sure un-
wanted text messages don't
slam phones like unwanted
e-mails pour into a spam
folder nowadays, he said..
Per its rules, a company can-
not send coupons without
the customer's consent and
a customer can cancel at
any time.
According to PlumRe-
ward research, if a store
sends out a one-day-only
coupon, about 15 to 18 per-
cent of the people who re-
ceive the message will come
into the store that day. For a
coupon that's valid for two
or three days, the return
boosts to 25 percent.
Oviedo resident Kaitlee
Tate visited Planet Smooth-
'ie for the 10th time Monday,
and she said she's excited to
receive her free smoothie on


WINE I Pick your own wines, even blend your own grape choices


< continued from the last page

Shopping Center in Winter Springs.
"We get our wines from Mondavi
Vineyards and Constellation Brands,
and they are some of the best in
the world," Gordon said. Wine lBy
Design offers more than 30 varieties
of wine, from reds, whites, sweets
and oaks. to a shiraz from Australia
and a sauvignon blanc from New
Zealand.
The fermentation process
requires only one third of the usual
amount of preservatives, which is
also good news for wine lovers sen-
sitive to the sulfites traditionally
used.
The entrant to the Wine By
Design business has been tastefully
decorated in warm tones, with a
wine-tasting bar and hand-painted
high top tables and stools. Unique
gifts, such as decorative bags,
trendycoasters, wine stem jewelry
markers, high-end picnic baskets
and gourmet crackers have been
tastefully displayed.-The handmade
wine racks artfully used for display
are also available for sale.
Allowing customers to taste a
selection while educating them
about the wine-making process has
added to their success. "People are
intimidated when they go to buy
wine and they buy wine by label,"
Gordon said. "We try to educate
them. They come in and they taste
it."
Customers may choose a wine to
taste from the Masterpiece Vintage
Gallery, where every wine has been
cleverly coined with an artistic or
musical name. Wines are classified
into three pricing groups, ranging
from $11.50 to $15.50 with a few
specialty wines priced at $22.50 per


bottle.
Every wine listing also carries a
brief description indicating ingre-
dients and aromas so customers can
identify favorites. The Blackberry
Maestro, for example, is a unique
blend of blackberries and merlot
while the Watercolor White is a dry
chardonnay with a hint of apple
and honey. Gordon said the distinc-
tive names reflect the "fine art of
winemaking."
"You can go into [another store]
and buy a merlot or a cabernet,
but we have wine they have never
seen,"- Gordon said. "[Customers]
like the idea that it is made here
and then they find out they can
actually make it."
With a wedding on the horizon,
Suki Conrad and David Flanders
were looking for a distinctive way
to highlight their special bond. This
summer, the engaged Orlando cou-
ple turned to the romantic art of
winemaking.
Together, they selected a special
blend of grapes, waited for them to
ferment, and then returned to the
store a few weeks later to bottle,
cork and seal their personalized
wine.
"We thought the wine was a neat
idea, for both gifts and just to add
another level of personalization to
our event," Suki, now a newlywed,
said. "We made 28 bottles, and we
did give most of it away to family
and at the wedding.
"The most exciting part of the
process was bottling the wine and
seeing everything come together."
Customers takepleasureinchoos-
ing their unique labels, Gordon said,
nearly as much as making the wine.
Conrad and Flanders chose an ele-
gant beach scene for their label and


named the wine, "0 Ke Aloha Ka
Ju," Hawaiian for "Love is Paradise."
A standard personalized label
costs $3 per bottle and $5 if a pho-
tograph or logo is added. If a cus-
tomer buys a canvas of wine, which
consists of 28 of the large bottles or
56 of the small, the labels are free,
Gordon said.
The private labeling has also
attracted -corporate customers
including Saks Fifth Avenue, the
Renaissance Hotel and Brentwood
Homes. In addition to bridal par-
ties, Wine By Design hosts private
wine tasting and corporate team-
building events.
Gordon, who balances his work
at Wine By Design with his job as a
construction superintendent, said
he values his time spent at the store
because of the remarkable people
he meets.
"Everyone who comes in is pretty
much happy, and then they taste the
wine and they are happy," Gordon
said, adding with a smile, "and then-
they leave happy."


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE VOICE
Mitchell Gordon and wife Sharon co-own Wine By
Design, offering customers the chance to custom-
make wines in the store. The boast offering flavor
combinations that can't be found at any store. They
offer wine tasting and host special events.


~b.


The Voice


P.qnp Al (I h i1v 1-A h ilv 94 9008









CALENDAR


Police vs. firefighters in
charity softball game
The Oviedo Police-Fire Charity Softball
Challenge debuts at 4 p.m. Saturday,
July 19, at the Oviedo Sports Complex
at 1251 E. Broadway St. Oviedo police
officers will compete with Oviedo
firefighters for bragging rights in a
softball game to benefit the Oviedo
Optimist Club.
Watching the event is free --and
there will be food and drinks for pur-
chase to raise funds for local youth
programs.

Free tire disposal for
Seminole County residents
There will be free disposal of up to 10
tires for residents of Seminole County
on Saturday, Jufy 19, from 8 a.m. to
,2 p.m. at.the Central Transfer Station,
located at 1950 State Road 419 in


Longwood, or the Seminole County
Landfill, located at 1930 E. Osceola
Road in Geneva. The Tire Amnesty
Day event is for private households
only; businesses are not eligible to
participate. For more information,
please call 407-665-2260.

School supplies for
families in need
For its second year, the East Coast
Believers Church will distribute
$25,000-$3.0,000 in backpacks filled
with school supplies in time for the
2008-2009 school year to families
in need.
From 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. on
Aug. 9, the East Coast Believers will
hold Operation Backpack at 555
State Road 436 in Casselberry. The
church is planning attractions as part
of this event in order to create a fun


and safe atmosphere for children and
their parents.
The cost of this event is being paid
by donations from local individu-
als and corporations, as well as the
church family.
. East Coast Believers Church is
an independent, non-denomination-
al church founded by Pastor Norm
Dubois.
Visit www.EastCoastBelievers.org
or call 407-774-3222 for more infor-
mation.

The oldies get covered
in downtown Sanford
Timejam, an Orlando-based classic
rock band, will be playing Saturday,
July. 19, from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. at
Palmetto Street and Second Street in
downtown Sanford. The band plays
classic rock, rhythm and blues, funk


and soul songs, including covers of
artists such as Chicago, Santana and
more.

Brief engagement of
'Thoroughly Modern Millie'
"Thoroughly Modern Millie" will be
playing at the Dinner Theatre in Winter


Springs on weekends from Friday,
July 25, to Aug. 3. It's a production of
St. Stephen Catholic Church.
The stage play is a high-spirited
musical romp set in the roaring '20s.
Showtimes. and ticket prices, vary.
Call 407-699-5683 for more infor-
mation.


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Remodeling Home Repairs
Restoration Termite Repair
Water Intrusion/Mold/Moisture Repair
Call Ron Suberman
RUBV 407-595-4526 (cell) or
BUILDERS 407-293-8217 ext. 104
S B0oo0687 WWW.RUBYBUILDERS.COM VISA


Area moie tims forsFrida, ul1


Oviedo Marketplace
1500 Oviedo Marketplace Blvd.
Oviedo
407-977-1107
THE DARK KNIGHT (PG-13)
9:00am, 9:30am, 10:00am;
10:30am,11:20am, 11:50am,
12:20,12:50, 1:20, 1:50,2:40,
3:10, 3:40, 4:10, 4:40,5:10, 6:00,
6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 8:30, 9:20,
9:50,10:20, 10-50,11:20, 11:50,
12:40am, 1:10am

MAMMA MIA! (PG-13) 9:05am,
10:45am, 11:40am, 1:30, 2:20,
4:15, 5:00, 7:05, 7:40, 9:40,10:30,
12:30am, 1:00am

SPACE CHIMPS (G) 9:45am,
12:00, 2:05, 4:25, 7:45,10:15,
12:55am

HELLBOY II: THE GOLDEN
ARMY (PG-13) 9:20am, 12:10,
1:00, 2:55, 4:00,5:35,7:25, 8:10,
10:05,10:50,12:50am

JOURNEY TO THE CENTER
OF THE EARTH (PG) 9:15am,
11:45am, 2:15, 4:35, 7:20, 9:50,
12:20am

MEET DAVE (PG) 9:25am, 12:35,
1:15, 3:30, 7:05, 9:25, 12:05am

HANCOCK (PG-13) 9:35am,
12:15, 2:30, 3:55, 5:05, 6:35,7:35,
9:30,10:00, 12:00am, 12:35am

KIT KITTREDGE: AN AMERI-
CAN GIRL (G) 9:10am, 12:05,
2:35, 4:50

WALL-E (G) 9:40am, 11:55am,
.12:45, 2:25, 3:25, 4:55, 6:45, 9:35,
12:10am

WANTED {R) 9:55am, 1:05, 4:05,
6:40, 9:55, 12:40am

GET SMART (PG-13) 9:50am,
-1:40, 4:20, 6:50, 10:10, 12:45am

THE INCREDIBLE HULK (PG-13)
7:10, 9:45, 12:25am


KUNG FU PANDA (PG) 11:40am,
2:10, 4:45, 6:55, 9:15, 11:55

SEX AND THE CITY (R) 12:40,
3:50, 7:25,10:45

INDIANA JONES AND THE
KINGDOM OF THE CRYSTAL
SKULL (PG-13) 7:15,10:40




Waterford Lakes Town Center
541 N. Alafaya Trail
Orlando,
S 407-207-4603
THE DARK KNIGHT (PG-1 3)
9:00am, 9:30am, 10:00am,
10:30am, 11:20am, 11:50am,
12:20,12:50,1:20,1:50, 2:40,
3:10, 3:40, 4:10, 4:40, 5:10,6:00,
6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 8:30, 9:20,
9:50,10:20,10:50,11:20,11:50,
12:40am, 1:10am,1:30am

MAMMA MIA! (PG-13) 9:15am,
10:15am, 1:00, 2:00, 3:50,-
4:50, 7:20, 8:20, 10:00, 10:45,
12:45am

-SPACE CHIMPS (G) 9:45am,
12:00, 2:10, 4:30, 7:40, 10:05,
12:35am

HELLBOY II: THE GOLDEN
ARMY (PG-13) 10:20am,
11:55am, 1:05, 2:40, 4:15, 5:25,
7:15, 8:15,10:30, 12:50am,
1:20am

JOURNEY TO THE CENTER
OF THE EARTH (PG) Digital 3D
showtimes- 9:40am, 12:10,
2:35, 7:35,10:15, 12:30am

MEET DAVE (PG) 9:55am, 12:35,
1:25, 4:00, 7:45,10:10, 12:25am

HANCOCK (PG-13) 10:25am,
2:50, 4:35, 5:15, 8:10, 9:55,
11:45, 12:30am-Open captioned
showtimes- 12:40, 7:25

WANTED (R) 9:35am, 12:15, 2:45,
5:20, 8:15,10:55, 1:25am
_________


'The Dark Knight' Opening Friday


Ploo, c,:unriey or arner Bro. Er, ai nmrrreir
Batman, with the help of the law enforcement, sets out to destroy
organized crime in Gotham for good. Their plan seemingly effective, the trio
soon find themselves prey to the Joker, a bankrobbing-criminal mastermind
whose crimes grow more and more deadly. The psychotic Joker forces Bat-
Sman ever closer to the thin line between being a hero and a vigilante.
152 minutes- PG-13
,.-


'Mamma Mia!'


108 minutes PG- 13


WALL-E (G) 9:05am, 11:45am,
12:45,2:20,3:55,4:55,7:05,
8:05,10:35,12:20am

GET SMART (PG-13) 10:55am,
1:45, 4:25, 7:10, 9:40,12:10 am

THE INCREDIBLE HULK (PG-13)
6:55,10:25


Sophie doesn't know
who her real father is
but she intends to find
out by inviting three
men from her mother's
past to her wedding
in this story told using
popular 70s hits from
the musical group
ABBA.


KUNG FU PANDA (PG) 1:10,
10:45am, 1:10, 3:45

INDIANA JONES AND THE
KINGDOM OF THE CRYSTAL
SKULL (PG-13) 9:35


'Space Chimps'
,, Three NASA chimps,
si-4 :are on a mission to a
galaxy tar away. Ham
III, grandson of the
first chimp astronaut,
learns the meaning of
courage as he and his
crewmates embark on a
Fantastic journey to save
81n s G p its Inhabitants from a
. .. '..Jyranlic~l leader.


C.INEM A*


The Voice


July 18 July 24, 2008 Page Al 1


ENZIAN THEATER
Mainland
1300 S. Orlando Avenue
Mainland, FL 32751
407-629-0054
CHICAGO 10 (R) 9:30






The Voice


Pnnt Al) 9 i.I h i~v R- .Iiiki 24-92008


LOa4UAIZ MUUY 1 M ,, I


THIS WEEK in sports history


I' Red Sox were the last team in Major League
from the Negro League into their roster. In 194
T for then-rookie Jackie Robinson, but ultimately
A T H L E TC players. Robinson then led the Brooklyn Dodge


Baseball to integrate players
45, the Red Sox held a tryout
decided not to sign any black
rs to six pennant wins.


Kraze close to claiming crown


ISAAC BABCOCK
THE VOICE

It took two days and a week
in between for the Kraze
soccer team to settle one of
their most important scores
in the season clinching a
spot in the playoffs.
But they did just that, and
in one of the most dramatic
ways possible. They tied the
Bradenton Academics 0-0
last Thursday, giving them a
statistically insurmountable
advantage in the chase for
the Premier Development
League Southeast Division
Championship.
"We knew it could hap-
pen coming into the game,
even if we tied," Coach
Joe Avallone said, "but
Bradenton is a very hard-
team to beat."
That's just what the
Kraze did Thursday, restart-
ing a game that had been
rain delayed the week


before, opening play in the
39th minute with a score
of nil-nil belying the action
that had left many bodies
bruised on the field.
Scuffles and brutal play
got worse as the game wore
on past halftime, as neither
team could keep the ball in
the other's box.
The yellow cards were
flying at the midfield as the
Kraze found themselves
near a brawl after a dis-
puted call turned flagrant,
but both teams managed
to calm down and get back
into the game.
The Academics attacked
the Kraze net midway
through the second half,
sending several scary shots
off the crossbar and the
uprights, but none into the
net, thanks to the Kraze's
strong defense and the
brick wall of goalie David
Gorrick.
As the clock ticked to


zero, the Kraze were cele-
brating an undefeated sea-
son at home, even with a
long weekend looming.
"It feels great to keep the
streak going," midfielder
Tanner Wolfe said. "But it
was a tough game."
The Kraze took the six-
hour ride to Panama City
last weekend to face-the
Pirates for the last time this
season. They would split the
series, losing the first game
3-0, but bouncing back
4-2 to end the series on a
high note and cement their
place in the 16-team playoff
series.
But. they did more than
that with their most recent
win. They became a rare
team to win their district
and conference titles. The
team hasn't done that since
2004, when they were the
PDL national champions.
With a win in their final
game and some help from


.. ..
Fri'ij ,. ISAAC BABCOCK '-IE VO;E
The Central Florida Kraze soccer team has dominated in the southeast division this year,
and just won its district and conference. Now Kraze is destined for the playoffs. .


other teams, they could
carry the regular-season
crown.
The Kraze get one final
grudge match against
Bradenton before the play-
offs come. At 5:30 p.m.
Friday, July 18, they'll be in
Bradenton for the last game
of the season, with hopes of


avenging a 0-3 loss against
the Academics the last time
they traveled there.
After that, the Kraze
return home for the play-
offs, extending their home
schedule on July 25 and 26.
"It doesn't get any easier
from here," Wolfe said.


Oviedo trio dominate wrestling
SISAAC BABCOCK
THE VOICE -


It's rare for anyone from
Florida to become a nation-
al champion in wrestling.
Just ask J.D. Robbins. He's
coached most of them in
the last five years.
But even his eyebrows'
raised a bit when two of his
wrestlers finished on top of
the nation July 4, another
missed a championship by
only two places, and they
all had the same last name.
The Meeks brothers may
very well be the answer to
a prayer Robbins had said
silently since his amateur
wrestling club began to see.
declining scores in the last
two years.
For the JETS, a string
of also-rans on state and
national level stages could
be over, he said.
"They really look like the
future of this program," he
said.
And if Dylan Meeks has
anything to do with it, that
future could extend a long
way. He's not even in middle
school and he's already a
national champion in both
Greco-Roman and freestyle
wrestling.
His older brothers Colby
andAlton both standpoised
to dominate in national
competition for the rest
of the year. At the Asics
National Championships at
the beginning of July, Colby
didn't just win once, but
twice, becoming a double
national champion in both


Colby Meeks, 12, of the Oviedo JETS Wrestling Team, took on the country's best wrestlers at the Kids' National Championships on July 4 in
Orem, Utah. He won in both Greco-Roman and Freestyle wrestling, along with brother Dylan, 10. Brother Alton, 14, took third in both styles.


disciplines.
Alton placed third in
both disciplines, in heav-
ily stacked brackets at the
160-pound weight class.
That's hefty for a boy who
hasn't even entered high
school yet, hinting at a pos-
sible future in the 215- or
275-pound classes.
But one of the boys' big-
gest challenges of their
careers could already be
upon them. By press time
they'll be in Fargo, N.D.
Why would the boys and
their JETS teammates trav-
el to one of the coldest cit-
ies in the country in the
middle of the summer?
"It's the biggest national
championship in amateur


wrestling," Assistant Coach
Tom Coffman said.
The tournament brings
together the best wrestlers
from across the country,
all hoping to walk away as
an outright champion, or
to finish in the top eight
as All-Americans. For the
Meeks boys, that'll be noth-
ing of a formality with a
national-level champion-
ship already within reach.
And for college recruit-
ing scouts, who rarely
look as far back as mid-
dle school for their future
wrestlers, it's time to take
a look at a smorgasbord of
the best talent in the coun-
try. They may just have to
take a second look at the


Meeks boys, even as other
top-level wrestlers descend
upon the Fargodome by the
thousands.
"It's the toughest tour-
nament they'll go to this
year," Coffman said. The
JETS aren't unfamiliar with
becoming national cham-
pions at Fargo, but it's still
a rarity. The team averag-
es less than two per year
- more than most but
Florida is sending a contin-
gent of more than 60 wres-
tlers.
By next Thursday, the
Meeks boys, along with
teammate and current
national champion Jayden
Semrad, could be champi-
ons all over again.


Dawgs on


a seven-


game skid

ISAAC BABCOCK
THE VOICE

Rain muddied the field for
the Winter Park Diamond
Dawgs, but they kept nearly
even in the standings, win-
ning two and losing three in
the past week.
The Dawgs' most recent
loss Monday night in
Clermont, by a score of 9-6,
further dampened their sea-
son outlook, despite offen-
sive fireworks from the
Dawgs to keep it close.
They started this week at
12-17, struggling to keep up
with the Belleview Bulldogs,
who grabbed the FCSL
league lead with eight wins
in a row to catapult them to
an 18-9 record.
That puts the Dawgs
seven games out with 10
games left in the season as of
Wednesday. Barring a long
winning streak of their own,
they're a long shot for the
regular season crown.
Their longest streak of the
season was their first three
games June 5, 6 and 7. The
team they beat to open the
season: Belleview.
The Dawgs return home
at 7 p.m. Friday, July 18,
against Leesburg, and again
at 7 p.m. Tuesday, July 22,
against Orlando. Then they'll
hit the road for the final six
games.


m.






The Voice July 18 July 24, 2008 Page A13

THIS WEEK in political history


D. Roosev wasrn.m i sparfbi an unprecetee _mrc
term in office. He would be reelected in 1944 for a fourth term, dying
in office only a year into it. Two years after his death, Congress would
SI j pass the 22nd Amendment, limiting presidencies to two terms.


OUR VIEW


Good communities come at a price


The creativity that's sprung
forth from local govern-
ments in the face of tax
cuts and a weakened
economy is interesting.
Note what Winter Springs
is considering, at least as
proposed by City Manager
Ron McLemore: cutting
its police force, which is
already the leanest in the
county, operating on fewer
dollars per capital than any
other city.
Why? City taxes aren't
enough to pay for govern-
ment services.
Sure, it's easy for most to
stomach the notion of, say,
cutting down on tree-trim-
ming, which is also on the
idea list, but police? It's not
an acceptable solution. It'll
be worth noting how the


City Commission responds
to this recent proposal
from the City Manager's
office hopefully by giving
serious consideration to a
tax increase, which is the
only conscionable way to
fix a problem of too little
income for already cheaply
run city departments.
Winter Springs lives in an
unnatural world, charging
its residents so little that
it must now seriously con-
sider laying off police as its
population continues to
grow.
This is a careful balanc-
ing act. You can keep taxes
where they're at, which will
undoubtedly sound great
to home and business own-
ers, b1ut it's only great until
suffering sets in. If fewer


cops leads to more crime,
it won't be great anymore.
If city employees, unhappy
with a reduction in ben-
efits, start fleeing the city
for better-funded burgs, it
won't be great anymore. If
city festivals disappear, it
won't be great anymore.
These are all real pos-
sibilities, unfortunately
facing off against another
real possibility: that since
it's an election year, there
won't be the political will
to say yes to a tax increase.
Naturally, any sitting City
Commissioner who takes
such a stance will be over-
whelmed with criticism
from an opponent who
can take the easy way out
by demonizing the tax
increase. The trouble with


calling a tax increase a bad
thing, of course, is that it's
based on the big assump-
tion that the tax rate was
where it should be in the
first place.
Thinking about what
you're willing to tolerate
in a government budget is
kind of like considering the
features of a car. They're
both pretty complicated,
and full of things that you
both want and need.
Imagine walking into
a dealership to buy a new
car. You have the insurance
money from your last car,
which was crushed by a
tree. You want the same car,
but a year younger. Yours
was top of the line, but
when you look at a car that
costs the same as yours did,


it doesn't have as many fea-
tures. It makes you ask, just
what features did you really
need, and what did you
just want? What if you have
to sacrifice cup holders to
keep the old price? What
about cruise control? Did
you need that? How about
side-impact air bags? Are
they a need, or just a want?
Back when you had the
old car, you might have
thought of some of its fea-
tures as luxuries that you
didn't need to have.,When
you're sitting in that entry-
level car at the dealership,
though, you might realize
it's not worth having. You
might think, even if it costs
more to keep the cup hold-
ers, it's worth it to pay the
extra.


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR


Toy planes and
complicated drugs
A toy plane has a handful
of parts. A Boeing 747 has
several million.
This makes sense. Toy
planes are small, simple
models, while 747s are
large, high-performance


aircraft. The model costs a
few dollars because it's easy
to manufacture. The 747
costs about $225 million
due to its complexity.
This comparison is
worth keeping in mind in
the debate over "follow-on
biologics." Biologics are
today's most complex and,


cutting-edge medicines for
treating diseases such as
-cancer and multiple scle-
rosis. Follow-on biologics
are inexact copies of these
drugs.
Congress is currently
considering legislation that
would allow the sale of fol-
low-on biologics without


requiring extensive test-
ing essentially treating
follow-ons like traditional
generic drugs.-
Unfortunately, confusing
a generic with a follow-on
is like confusing a 747 with
a model airplane.
Here's why: Most drugs
we're familiar with are


"small-molecule" drugs.
Aspirin, for example, is
composed of just 21 atoms.
So they are easily manufac-
tured and can be identical-
ly copied by generic drug
manufacturers. Since the


> turn to LETTERS on next page


Mentally prepare: getting a new job is hard work


EMPLOYMENT

Ask

Sandli

The official number for
the unemployment rate is
5 percent. In reality, that
number is higher because
it does not count anyone
who is off the unemploy-


ment rolls. So what does
that mean for you?
I suggest keeping your
options open.
You may have to work .
harder and be more cre-
ative. If you are employed,
learn all you can to expand
your role and make your-
self as valuable as possible.
And my favorite network!
One problem I see is that
people don't seem to real-
ize how much work finding
a job can be. It used to be


easy but it isn't anymore.
Sending a resume and wait-
ing for the phone to ring
is not good enough. You
have to work at finding a
job. Attend open houses
and job fairs any face-
to-face exposure you can
get is ideal. Join industry
networking groups, go to
chamber meetings, and talk
to people at your church or
religious organization. You
may even consider going
back to school.


After sending out a
resume, follow up send
e-mails, call or send a short
note. Don't be annoying
and don't let the hiring
manager know you are des-
perate, even if you are.
It may take longer and
you may have to dig in,
but there are still jobs out
there.
Best of luck.
-Sandi Vidal,
executive director,
Christian HELP/CFEC


TALK SANDI

Please send questions about
employment by fax 407-260-2949,
sandi@christianhelp.org, or mail .
Ask Sandi C/0 Christian HELP
450 Seminola Blvd.
Casselberry, FL 32707
Subjects may include employ-
ment search, resumes, networking
and promotion opportunities.
Employers: E-mail your job leads to
cfec@cfec.org and we will share
them with Christian HELP clients.


This is what students at
Stenstrom Elementary in
Oviedo had to say about
,* where they would like to
0 go on summer vacation.

/ /


I'm going with
my dad to Busch
Gardens in Tampa.
We're also going to
Ohio, and I'm going
fishing with my
grandpa. Fishing is
fun; I've been to Ohio
before.
-Austin J.
7 years old


I'd like to go to Tokyo
because they have
futuristic things there,
[such as] hi-tech
video games and
smart computers.
I'd also like to go to
Alaska and go to the
junior husky races.
-Shamar V.
10 years old


I'd like to go to
Washington, D.C.,
where the president
lives. I'd like to meet
him and visit the
White House and see
all the things inside.
I've seen the presi-
dent on TV.
-Grace C.
6 years old


I'd like to go to New York to see my
grandma, my aunt, cousins and the
new baby. Also I'd like to go back to
Mexico. We stayed at a hotel near
the ocean.
-Olivia D., 8 years old


o We would

I'd like to go back to '
Key West. I like the to /
beach and digging / fr-
holes in the sand. / from
Some people build
big sandcastles. It
is a long, eight-hour / U ,-
drive. I saw fish and /
went swimming too. Y O -
--Christopher M. Call editor Alex Babcock at 407-628-8500
9 years old
,_ to have The Voice visit your class or group.








LETTERS I Your voices, your issues


< continued from the last page
generic forms are identical
to their brand-name pre-
decessors, they don't need
their own safety tests.
Biologics, on the other
hand, are complex, much
larger compounds made
from living organisms. .
Herceptin, for instance, a
widely used cancer drug, is
composed of 25,000 atoms.
This size, and the varia-
tion of living cells making
the drug, makes biologics
impossible to copy exactly.
That's why follow-on bio-
logics can differ significant-
ly from the original drug -
and induce unpredictable
adverse reactions.
For example, several
years ago, a fully tested
biologic created here was
licensed to be made in
Europe using shared tech-
nology. But the European
version resulted in patients
suffering "pure red cell
aplasia," where their bodies
couldn't make red blood
cells. Patients died, and
many were permanently
injured.
Today, even after eight
years of research, the cause
of these reactions is still


unknown.
The challenge for law-
makers is to create a policy
that ensures that all follow-
on biologics that enter the
market are safe. presently,
the technology to map
out the exact nature of .
one large biologic versus
another is not available.
That makes safety reviews
inexact.
If biologics licensed
from one company to
another can produce
adverse reactions, then fol-
low-on forms that don't use
shared technology should
be of concern. Recognizing
this, the European Union
has developed a system of
assessment that requires
clinical testing before fol-
low-ons are approved. The
U.S. should do the same.
Congress should also
work to support cutting-
edge innovation in biotech-
nology. Since biologic drugs
are so complex, it costs,
on average, 50 percent
more to develop a biologic
than a conventional drug.
As a result, it is extremely
expensive to invest the
time and capital to create
new, breakthrough biologic
drugs.


Thankfully, we already
employ a method to pro-
vide incentives for this
investment in the small
molecule medicine world.
The strategy is called "data
exclusivity." This is a legal
mechanism that allows a
company to keep the data
associated with a drug's
development confiden-
tial for several years. Data
exclusivity has spurred
small molecule drug inno-
vation, and should be
applied to biologic drugs as
well.
U.S. policymakers should
require relevant clinical
data and testing to ensure
safety of all follow-on bio-
logics. And appropriate
data exclusivity should be
put in place to foster inno-
vation.
If chemical drugs were
toy planes, biologics
would be 747s. We need to
remember that when we
consider what systems to
employ to ensure follow-on
biologic safety.
Bryan A. Liang, MD
Executive director, Institute
of Health Law Studies
California Western
School of Law


Our oil companies are not allowed to drill off our
coasts but communist China and Cuba reportedly are
allowed to drill off our shores in the Gulf of Mexico,


and we shouldn't allow it.


Do as Chuck Norris says
drill for more oil
Drill for American oil
now! as Chuck Norris
(of "Walker, Texas Ranger"
fame) is demanding -- and
leave the oil companies
alone. This is the answer to
our oil and gas crisis.
We can do it only if we
get the government off the
backs of the big and espe-
cially the small oil com-
panies and let them drill
where they want. Private
enterprise in the oil indus-
try is the answer and it
always has been.
Government restrictions
stopping oil drilling and
production have caused the
present gas crisis, not the
oil companies.
We have a hundreds-of-
years supply of American
oil and gas in our country
and we should develop it
now. Our oil companies
are not allowed to drill-off


our coasts but communist
China and Cuba report-
edly are allowed to drill off
our shores in the Gulf of
Mexico, and we shouldn't
allow it.
We should go to JBS.org
and search: "gas gone wild"
to see Congressman Ron
Paul's bill H.R. 2415, the
"Affordable Gas Price Act"
that will get oil production
going again in our country
big time and bring down
the price of oil, natural gas
and gasoline.
This is critical to our
everyday life and national
security. We should con-
tact our congressmen and
demand they cosponsor
and support Congressman
Paul's H.R 2415 "Affordable
Gas Price Act" immediately
to restore oil production
now.
Ed Nemechek
Landers, Calif.


Find your Voice!


T he Oviedo-Winter Springs Voice publish-
es each Friday please .
stop by a local store or res-
taurant and pick up a copy.
We're honored when a business
chooses to carry our newspaper.
This list of locations doubles as a
thank-you to those businesses and also a ,
handy guide to help you find your Voice. L



Downtown Oviedo and Oviedo Marketplace

Ace Hardware State Road 426 downtown
Tack Shack State Road 426 just west of Lockwood Boulevard
Sunoco State Road 426, aka Geneva Drive, east of downtown
Discount Beverage State Road 426 near downtown
Discount Pharmacy State Road 426 downtown
Town House Restaurant (vending box) Downtown Oviedo
Big John's (vending box) Just north of the downtown intersection
Oviedo Quick Stop Downtown across from the Post Office
Niki Food Store North of downtown at Artesia Street
Sunoco State Road 426 aka West Broadway Street, north of Winter Springs Boulevard
Publix State Road 426 aka West Broadway Street, north of Winter Springs Boulevard
Toucan Willie's State Road 426 north of Mitchell Hammock Road
Oviedo Marketplace At the information desk
Bill's Elbow South North side of the Oviedo Marketplace mall
Border's Red Bug Lake Road at Highway 417 in Oviedo


Page Al 4 July 18 July 24, 2008


The Voice






July 18 July 24. 2008 Paae A15


TheMarketplace


REALTORS:
Licensed Real Estate Professionals need-
ing to earn additional income. Become
a part time or full time loan officer. Con-
trol your own closings. Gain access to
hundreds of mortgage programs. Save
your clients thousands of dollars. Call
Maitland Mortgage Lending Company
(407)629-5626

GARDEN CENTER AND GIFT STORE
Part Time help needed for new garden cen-
ter and gift store located in Geneva. Must
have plant, retail knowledge and sunny
disposition! Please fax resume to: 407-349-
2208.







PRICE REDUCED
Price reduced, motivated seller. 3-2, move-
in ready, 1005 Whittier Circle, Alafaya
Woods. For a walkthrough, apply next door,
1007.850-329-7370.



WINTER PARK CONDO "
Winter Park condo. 1 bedroom, 1 bath.
Ground floor. Four Seasons Condominium.
$850/month. 321-217-5688

MAITLAND EFFICIENCY
Efficiency in 1927 Maitland home. 500
square feet. Walking distance to public
transportation and shopping centers. Park
view from patio. 650 a month + 300 secu-,
rity. 407-461-5884

MOBILE HOME
2/1, on canal to Lake Jesup. Private lot, one.
mile to 417. $650. 407-365-1586

APT FOR RENT
Cheerful, spacious; & serene 1BR/1BA:
$700/mo. cathedral ceilings, bonus loft,
W/D, carport. No dogs, no smoking. Email
kjanisz@gmail.com for info/pics 407-716-
8649


OFFICE SUITES
Tuskawilla Executive Office Suites offer
a professional office and presentation,
while accomadating a budget for your
growing business. Rates from $900/
month. 321-229-238

FOR RENT
Oviedo Office Space, great frontage; 750
to 1,050 sf available. $1,070 to $1,350 per
month. 1401 Broadway St. Contact Megan
at (407) 687-3524.

OVIEDO OFFICES
New offices available, 1 or 2 (10x12) plus
shared reception, conference, kitchen areas.
Flexible terms. Great marquee location at
2441 SR426. Contact Eddie 407-222-8911

COMMERCIAL SPACE IN OVIEDO
1,300 sq. ft. brand-new commercial space
available. Located within the beautiful new
Oviedo Town Center community. This com-
munity is part of the new Oviedo on the
Park major mixed-use development. This
space can be used for: hair salon, nail salon,
or other personal service. Please* contact
Denisse at 407-741-8600.



Your

classified

here.

Advertise in

The Marketplace

for as low as

$15/week!


Call

407-628-8500







Reading volunteers NEEDED Jackson
Heights Middle School in Oviedo is looking
for adults who are interested in serving as a
Reading Mentor to assist students who are
reading below grade level. Volunteers work
one-on-one with an assigned student before
school for 30 minutes, one or more times
a week through the end of the school year
to build fluency and comprehension skills.
Sessions are from 8:30-9:00 a.m., M-F
Please contact Connie O'Hanlon for more
infnrmatfinn An7-..R-75RR


HANDYMAN/CARPENTRY
Let me take care of the chores you don't
have time to do .-- yard work, carpentry,
painting, (whole house or interior rooms),
driveways, repairs, pressure washing, and
more. No job too small. Local. Prompt. Af-
fordable. Call Scott at 321-460-3905.

KITCHEN/BATHROOM SURFACES
Repair and resurface bathtubs, ceramic
tile, vanities, kitchen countertops, cabi-
nets, appliances and much more. No dust
and dirt and very little down time.- Have a
new factory-like finish and save up to four
times the replacement cost. Licensed/in-
sured/member BBB. All Surface Technology,
407-691-0062

PRESSURE WASH
Houses, Driveways/Walks, Pool Decks, Out-
door Furniture, Exterior Windows, Gutters.
Call for Estimate 352-214-8409(rim) or
407-592-5524(Erin). Owned and Operated
by Rrefighters

HOUSE CLEANING
Licensed, insured; references available. For
an estimate, call 407-953-2454.

CHHA/CNA WILL TAKE CARE
OF YOUR LOVED ONE'
CHHA/CNA is seeking a job to take care
of your loved one. 24 hrs a day/5 days a
week or daily. Over 10 yrs. exp. Call Lucy
Valladares, 407-384-5626 or 305-308-
7812




BEDS FOR SALE
Bed, pillow top mattress sets w/ 5 year
warranty.-Never Used! Twin $95, Full $145,
Queen $155, King $195. Can deliver. 407-
831-1322

HOT TUB
Hot Tub w/ fiber optic waterfall and therapy
jets. Never Used in crate! $1,995.407-831-
1322

POOL TABLE
Pool Table, Gorgeous all wood with 1 inch
slate leather pockets. New incrate. Cost 4K,
sell $1,350. 407-831-1322


HOW TO DETOX FOR
OVERNIGHT RELIEF
Natural herbal patches, overnight detoxifica-
tion, pain relief: knees, back, foot, gout, sci-
atic, lumbago, carpal tunnel, cancer treat-
ment. Attach to foot great night's sleep.
http://www.ebook-detox-patches.com
(407) 970-1483



WEBUY


HOUSES!
Sell Your Home
for CASH
On the Day of Your Choice
"As-Is" with NO Repairs!

Call Now:

407-297-8749




IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION .
File No. 2008-CP-1151
IN RE: ESTATE OF
KENNETH N. BERGOUIST,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of KENNETH N.
BERGQUIST, deceased, whose date of death was
April 21, 2008, is pending in the Circuit Court for
Seminole County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 301 N. Park Avenue, Sanford,
Florida 32771-8099. The names and addresses of
the personal representative and the personal repre-
sentative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN,
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED. '
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MOREAFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is
7/18/2008.
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE:
EVELYN W. CLONINGER
Florida Bar No.: 210382
CLONINGER & FILES
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
1519W. Broadway
Oviedo, Florida 32765 .
Telephone: (407) 365-5696
Facsimile: (407) 365-8919
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE:
PRISCILLA E. D'AMOURS-BERGQUIST
1913 Spruce Court, Maitland, FL, 32792
7/11 7/9r


Sh ul t 1e1 (klas'e ffd' ad'ver t'z'ing) Noun. Advertising
Should it C 'compactly arranged, as in newspaper
ESC] $ I] ] I A columns, according to subject, under such
C A SSIFIEDF listings as help wanted and for sale


m- -


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2008 CP 0864
IN RE: ESTATE OF
OTTIS A.SJ.OBLOM
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of OTTIS A.
SJOBLOM, deceased, whose date of death was
May 19, 2006 and whose social security number
is XXX-XX-3282, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Seminole County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is: Post Office.Box 8099, Sanford,
FL 32772-8099. The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth below..
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having, claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice is required
to be served must file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBUCATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
-DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE- OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate, must file their claims with this Court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE. FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice
is July.11.2008,
Attorney for Personal Representative:
JOSEPH P. DUDLEY, ESO.
Florida Bar No. 650293
403 Downing Street
Tl.I-i.. i. 1 F
Personal Representative:
Otis C. Sjoblom
271 Lakeshore Drive
Lake Mary, FL 32746
7/11,7/18
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2008CP1217
IN RE: ESTATE OF
WALTER A. GOLASZEWSKI
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Walter A.
Golaszewski, deceased, whose date of death was
April 25, 2008, is pending in the Circuit Court for
Seminole County, Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is PO Box 8099, Sanford, FL 32772-
8099. The names and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of thismnotice is requiredto be
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING-THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is
7/18/2008.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Karl A. Burgunder
Attomey for Petitioner
1490 Swanson Drive
Suite 200
Oviedo, FL 32765
Telephone: (407) 366-3555
Fax: (407) 706-0372
Florida Bar No. 980935


Personal Representative:
Christine M. Golaszewski
2940 Grandeville, Apt 104
Oviedo, FL 32765


7/WI 7/9


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The Voice




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