Citation
Winter Park-Maitland observer

Material Information

Title:
Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title:
Winter Park Maitland observer
Place of Publication:
Winter Park, FL
Publisher:
Turnstile Media Group, Tracy Craft- Publisher
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 44 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates:
28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright G.J.W. Munster. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
26271684 ( OCLC )
sn 92000170 ( LCCN )
1064-3613 ( ISSN )

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BONILLA TO HOST MEETINGOrange County District 5 Commissioner Emily Bonilla will host a Maitland area community meeting from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Monday, July 2, at the Maitland Public Library, 501 S. Maitland Ave., Maitland. Residents in the Maitland area will be able to share their concerns and priorities for the region. For more information, call (407) 836-7350. YOU YOUR NEIGHBORS. YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD. ObserverWINTER PARK/ MAITLAND YOUR TOWNVOLUME 30, NO. 26FREE FRIDAY, JUNE 29, 2018 Celebrate July 4 with our special section. PAGE 7. Feeding Children Everywhere hosts its second Hunger Hero Awards. PAGE 15. Miraculous MidgeHARRY SAYERBLACK TIE REPORTERThe city of Maitland approved the relocation of a critical lift station during a brief City Council meeting Monday, June 26. The council approved a small number of items on the consent agenda before discussing a proposed agreement with the South Seminole North Orange Maitland approves lift station relocationTIM FREEDASSOCIATE EDITORWinter Park city commissioners approved Monday, June 25, a proposal to subdivide the property at 1298 Howell Branch Road to accommodate four single-family homes instead of a controversial memory-care facility project. Property owner Villa Tuscany Holdings LLC previously proposed a memory-care facility for the property back in 2016, but nearby residents feared an increase in traf fic from medical-care providers and visitors. Locals also believed the facility was incompatible with the nearby neighborhoods. After Villa Tuscany Holdings Winter Park leaders nix memory-care facility projectCommissioners also discussed preserving trees around the existing Civic Center in Martin Luther King Jr. Park.SEE NEW PAGE 4 At 107, Midge Ru is the oldest resident of the Mayower retirement community. SEE STORY PAGE 4And the sun cant stop us nowShine in the Limelight stages Greatest Showman musical at Parke House Academy. SEE PAGE 14.REAL BLACK TIE SPIRIT OF AMERICAHarry SayerMidge Ru celebrated her 107th birthday surrounded by friends and family. SEE STATION PAGE 4

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2 WINTER PARK / MAITLAND OBSERVER | FRIDAY, JUNE 29, 2018 Allison Olcsvay Three years ago, Georgia Ellison was facing the same prognosis that she has watched her mother suer with for de cades. The progressive osteopenia would someday develop into osteoporosis, bringing on devastating broken bones and pain. My mother is 93 now, and Ive watched her suer so much; I just dont want that to happen to me, Ellison said. Medication to strengthen her bones never produced signicant results, and after years of taking them, she decided to try a new course of action. Following the recommendation of a friend she signed on with Elite Strength and Fitness of Winter Park and began following a twice-weekly strength-training regimen designed to increase her muscle mass and bone density. At her next DEXA scan to measure density, Ellisons doctor noticed a big change and she was able to stop taking her medication. Success stories like Ellisons dont come easy though; it took months of intense workouts with the guidance of personal trainers to get there. At 64, Les Rinehart, one of Elites trainers, knows the challenges his clients face. After 33 years in the tness industry, the former strength coach for the Charlotte Hornets retired in 2007, only to come out of retirement a few years ago to join Elite be cause, he said, he saw the value in what they oered their clients. The equip ment here is top of the line and the techniques produce results like no other, Rinehart said. At Elite, education is as important as the equipment. Be fore clients spend anytime working out, they share their medical history, goals and concerns with trainers who develop a plan that covers time inside and outside of the gym. Clients needs are evaluated and we give them a detailed analysis of what they need to do, especially at home, to accomplish their goals, said owner Monte Mitchell. Homework might include keeping food and exercise journals to learn more about their habits, especially if weight loss is a goal. The gym also oers a 12-week group nutrition workshop to their members, guaranteeing results for their clients, provided they follow all the recommendations made during their consultation. 70-year-old physician Dr. Maria Bors has been a client of Elite for seven years and nds that training there ts quite nicely into her busy lifestyle. The 20-minute workouts are easy for me to t in and I nd them easy to commit to, Bors said. Rather than working out with sweaty, bulked-up gym rats, Elites clients nd an almost Zen-like atmosphere, with trainers attentive to their every motion. Speaking in tones of calm assurance, trainers oer equal parts encouragement and challenge, pushing clients to new levels. The workouts are physically demanding, but not in the way one might expect. Motions are slow and intensely controlled, demanding maximum eort from muscles while barely breaking a sweat. Many clients dont even change out of oce clothes, Rinehart said. They simply dont need to. Before beginning with Elite, Bors suffered from daily back pain, but after just a few months in the gym, she experienced a noticeable change in pain levels and now rarely suers at all. Its been remarkable for me, she said. I can feel how strong I am, especially when I am traveling carrying luggage. I have a strength I never had before. The strength training is very good for preventing bone loss, said Bors, which is something we all need as we age.ADVERTORIAL 407-740-7750 1312 Palmetto Avenue, Winter Park, FL 32789 www.elitestrengthandtness.comMention this ad for a free consultation. You can schedule this consultation by calling Elite Strength & Fitness at 407-740-7750Strength training at any age can help improve muscle mass and bone density 274774 277836 13906 West Colonial Drive, Winter Garden, FL 34787 Exit 272 from FL Turnpike 407-656-6444 GiantRecreationWorld.com The RV Sale-Abration event continues with over 150 RVs priced to sell! Sale Pricing Extended! Visit our climate-controlled showroom to see why buying your new RV from Giant Recreation World gets you the best deal around. Only Giant Recreation World offers you Lifetime Warranty, VIP Camping Club and Priority RV Network. Get in on the deals before theyre gone June 30th! WG _LateJune.indd 1 6/19/18 12:13 PM WINTER PARKSATURDAY, JUNE 30 FLICKS ON THE FAIRWAY 8:30 p.m. Saturday, June 30, at the Winter Park Golf Course, 761 Old England Ave., Winter Park. Winter Parks Parks & Recreation Department Family Fun Program, the Winter Park Golf Course and the Enzian Theater have teamed up to plan a movie night at the golf course. Enjoy this free screening of Back to the Future. Popcorn and drinks will be provided. For more information, call (407) 599-3342. WEDNESDAY, JULY 4 WATERMELON 5K 2018 6:30 a.m. Wednesday, July 4, at 251 Park Ave. S., Winter Park. Start your Independence Day the right way with a 5K. Join friends, family and neighbors for a morning celebration featuring ice-cold watermelon and American pride. Cost is $33 through July 3 and $38 on race day. Military personnel and family receive a $10 discount and a special bib. For more information, visit trackshack.com/ event/114. 23RD ANNUAL FOURTH OF JULY CELEBRATION 9 a.m. to noon Wednesday, July 4, in Winter Parks Central Park, 150 W. Morse Blvd., Winter Park. City Commissioner Sarah Sprinkel will lead the event from the main stage, which will include an Oath of Allegiance naturalization ceremony. The ceremony will include remarks regarding the history of this monumental day, as well as congratulations to new American citizens on their milestone. The event also will feature performances by Sean Holcomb, the Bach Festival Brass Band and the Bach Festival. The Childrens Bicycle Parade will begin at 11:30 a.m. Children can take their bikes already decorated or they can deck them out at the old bus stop at the corner of Park Avenue and Morse Boulevard in Central Park. The Family Fun Program Kids Zone also will include a touch-a-truck, fun games and inatables. Free hot dogs, watermelon and water will be available for all to enjoy, while supplies last, thanks to the Electric Utility Department. The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art also will celebrate 23 years on Park Avenue with its annual Independence Day Open House. For more, visit cityofwinter park.org/event/23rd-annual-4thof-july-celebration. SATURDAY, JULY 7 LAKE OSCEOLA WATERSHED CLEANUP 8 to 11 a.m. Saturday, July 7, meet ing at north Central Park in Downtown Winter Park. Join a clean-up eort to pick up litter in and around Lake Osceola. Activities may include picking up litter in and around the lake stooping, kneeling and bending. Breakfast, volunteer T-shirt, snacks and water will be provided, as well litter-grabbers, safety vests, gloves and garbage bags. Take a reusable water bottle, wear closed-toe shoes, hats and long pants, and carpool. Kayakers and paddle-boarders are welcome. To register, visit cityofwinterpark. eventbrite.com.MAITLANDTHURSDAY, JULY 5 MARKETING COMMITTEE MEETING 9 to 10 a.m. Thursday, July 5, at the Maitland Chamber of Commerce oce, 110 N. Maitland Ave., Maitland. Make a reserwvation for this monthly event, which takes place on the rst Thursday of each month. Call (407) 644-0741 or visit business.maitlandchamber.com. YOUR CALENDAR

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WINTER PARK / MAITLAND OBSERVER | FRIDAY, JUNE 29, 2018 3 439 Lake Howell Road, Maitland, FL 32751 www.CreeganGroup.comRanked #1 for Homes Sold in 2016 Orlando Magazine Hot 100 Orlando Style Magazine 5 Star Realtor Orlando Style Magazine Top Boutique Brokerage Chris Creegan, Broker/Owner407.622.1111 CREEGAN PROPERTY GROUP 262151 TROY HERRINGASSOCIATE EDITORUnder a glaring sun, volunteers braved the sticky heat of a Florida summer morning to help rebuild the aging garden at Dommerich Elementary. With shovels and tools in hands, the Rotenberger family alongside a handful of others dug away at the earth under them, pouring sweat in the process. The old, rotting garden beds already had been removed to make room for the newer ones which were made from a composite plastic called Lumberock. This year, (the) PTA fundraised for us and gave us the grant for rebuilding, and so we planned it for this summer when school was out, said Lisa Rotenberger, who teaches at the school and serves as the garden coordinator. And David (Rotenburgers husband) works for a construction company, and he was willing to use the same plans we had before to rebuild. By using Lumberock, the hope is the six new garden beds one for each grade at Dommerich hold up better than the pressuretreated wood that was used when the beds were first put in eight years ago. It wont rot in the dirt, so hopefully, we get more than eight years out of it, David Rotenberger said. The planning for the cur rent project which should be complete on Saturday, June 30 started last year. Getting the beds set-up is relatively easy the Rotenberger family and their 12 to 15 volunteers are taking two Saturdays to get the work done but make no mistake, those hours seem a bit long thanks to the unrelenting summer heat. From about 8 a.m. until noon, the volunteers put the garden beds together, while also digging spots to place the wooden legs. Despite the hard work, the reward has meant a lot to the volunteers and the Rotenberger family especially considering they were a part of the first gar den established out in the green space at Dommerich. The original project that started in the summer of 2010 was part of the couples son, Davids, Eagle Scout project. The idea came from one of the teachers on the schools green team, and from there, David decided to make the garden happen. Once the beds are finished and the irrigation system is checked, everything will be in place for the upcoming school year. For students, there will be three different planting seasons throughout the year, which includes; a literature in the garden in the fall; the grow ing of salad greens during the winter; and then an activity that will coincide with their science standards in the spring. To add to the last growing season, there also will be life cycle gardens for butterflies. With those plans already in the works, Lisa Rotenberger said getting the kids out to the new gardens will be worth all the time and sweat put into Dommerichs new green space. It just brings me joy, because the children will have a new and nicer space to learn, Lisa Rotenberger said. We just know that it has done well and that makes me feel very proud, and just thankful to the PTA for all their hard work in helping us raise the money for it. Its just a very peaceful place down here, and it brings a lot to the school.Volunteers dig in for Dommerich garden rebuildHARRY SAYERBLACK TIE REPORTERCaroline Rosendahl, an Audubon Center intern, figured that after a couple months, she would be called upon to rescue an injured bird of prey. She just didnt think her first would be a bald eagle. I felt like a hero, Rosendahl said. I was like, Oh my God, this is my first search-and-rescue, and its a bald eagle. After months of rehabilitation, the Audubon Center for Birds of Prey released that eagle back into the wild from the Maitland Middle School the very same spot where Rosendahl rescued him in March. Maitland Mayor Dale McDonald, birdwatchers and Audubon Center donors all came out for the special occasion it was the 600th rehabilitated bald eagle the center has returned to the wilderness. The source of damage to the bird, also called Eagle No. 20180101, was obvious to Audubon staff after a single look: He had gotten into a fight with another bird of prey. He had just the ugliest, bloodiest face you ever saw, Audubon Center rehabilitation specialist Dianna Flynt said. Somebody just grabbed his face. Birds of prey that end up in ter ritory fights with other raptors often show up at the center, which treats 60 to 80 eagles annually. But Eagle No. 2018-0101 was a particularly nasty case. The bird not only had injuries on its body and feet expected when birds of prey grab each others talons but also punctures on its face and wings. The extent of the birds wing wounds called for special measures. Dr. Caitirine Hellenga, of Winter Park Veterinary Hospital, spent a month using laser repair therapy to essentially feed the eagles cells and accelerate the healing process by focusing lasers on the wounds. She said the procedure formed new blood vessels and skin and cleaned infections. The injuries were very severe around the webbing of the wing, Hellenga said. It has a lot of tendons and if that skin tightens down the (birds) cant extend their wings. The normal scarring process constricts and tightens, and that way it would pull the wing in toward the body and not allow full extension. After he was relatively healed, the center introduced the eagle to flying in increasingly larger cages in a process that Flynt said took longer than normal. We have to consider mental (issues) theyre wild birds, they do not want to be in captivity, Dianna Flynt said. When Eagle No. 2018-0101 was in fighting shape, the center reached out to the Ford family, who has supported the center for years, to do the honors of releasing him back into the wild. Mimi Ford, who ultimately gripped the flapping bird and launched him into the sky, said her initial feeling was one of abject terror. He was a good bird; he was ready to go, Ford said. It was the most moving thing (watching him fly away). Its right up there with a manned space launch. It was just fabulous. Up, up and awayThe Audubon Center for Birds of Prey released its 600th bald eagle last week.The elementary schools garden is receiving an overhaul thanks to a local group of volunteers. Troy HerringDavid Rotenberger worked on one of the garden beds at the school. Harry SayerThe Audubon Center for Birds of Prey released its 600th bald eagle from Maitland Middle School.

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4 WINTER PARK / MAITLAND OBSERVER | FRIDAY, JUNE 29, 2018 HARRY SAYERBLACK TIE REPORTERMildred A. Ruff lived it up for her 100th birthday the Mayflower retirement community resident celebrated with about 50 friends and family members. She never expected, though, the Mayflower to throw her a party with double that number for her 107th birthday. Its all been just fabulous, Ruff said. I never thought or even dreamed of anything like this. Who would even dream of it? More than 100 Mayflower resi dents filled the Standish Center on June 22 to surprise Ruff with a birthday celebration complete with a coronation, piano music and a tenor opera singer to ser enade the crowd.A LIFE WELL LIVEDRuff has a special status among the Mayflower residents. At 107, she is the oldest current resident of the community. Its strange, Ruff said. All of a sudden, Im the oldest person here. How did I get here? With that status comes prestige. While a great number of those Mayflower residents waited in line to congratulate Ruff and wish her a happy birthday, an equally large number approached her with a common question: What exactly does she do to stay in such good health at such a late age? Shes amused by the those seeking counsel but wishes she had a better answer. I dont have a secret (to my age), Ruff said. If I did, Id sell it. She drinks water and takes oneto two-mile walks but doesnt go out of her way to stay healthy. Ruff eats what she likes and said she likes to eat almost everything beef, quail and pheasant, especially. To Ruff, her longevity is simply a matter of genes. Her mother lived to be 97, and her grandfather on her fathers side lived to be 95. By all measures, Ruff has fit a lot of living into her 107 years in the world. She was born and raised in Princeton, Indiana she says her first memory is spitting up grape juice onto her white dress in her parents bathroom when she was just 2 or 3 years old. She went to school at Georgetown for two years and married Leon Ruff, a department director for mines and minerals for a coal operators association, in 1936. They lived in Illinois for many years, excluding a two-year stint in New Orleans during World War Two, before moving to Florida to be closer to family in 1979. Ruff didnt have kids herself but was one of six children and taught elementary school for two decades. Her husband died in 1989, marking a new chapter in her life. I had a friend call me, her name was Ruth, Ruff said. Her husband had just died. She said, Midge, I think its time we trav eled. The pair kicked off a whirlwind tour with a Baltic cruise across Denmark, Sweden, Finland, Russia, Poland and other European countries. Ruff and Ruth managed two to three trips to various countries each year from visiting a still-recovering Russia following the collapse of the Soviet Union to treading on Antarctic glaciers for a decade. Ruth died and Ruff joined the Mayflower community soon after, although she still wishes she had time for a trip to China. QUEEN OF CARDSThe retired folks at the Mayflower use many terms to describe Ruff. Some say shes tough as nails, some say shes quick as a whip, and others say shes sharp as can be. Theres one description, though, that everyone agrees on Ruff is a card shark. Shes 107, shes sharp as a tack, and she knows every single card in everyones hand, said her friend Sandy Gigliotti. Shes amazing. In the 10-plus years Ruff has spent living at the Mayflower, she has cultivated a reputation as a merciless Bridge player. Shes had decades to hone her skills, too: Ruff began playing in high school and became truly committed to the game during the Great Depression. Our big entertainment was to play bridge it didnt cost any money, Ruff said. That was a horrible time imagine going to the bank and not being able to get your money because they were just closed. She makes sure to play a few times each week and makes it a priority to stay engaged at the center. If retirement means you have the time to do anything, Ruff reasons she should do everything. Peggy Moore, Ruffs niece who flew down from Colorado for her birthday, jokes Ruff has to pencil her into her busy schedule. Beyond the cake, the sash and the celebration, Ruffs friends had another gift for her. For her 105th birthday, Mayflower residents had come up with 105 different adjectives describing their friend. For her 107th, they were asked again to come with new terms. By the end of the party, the community had a new word for Ruff miraculous. Count Wastewater Transmission Authority to move a lift station to a new site. The new station, according to Assistant City Manager Mark Reggentin, would provide central sewer service to residents in Dommerich Hills. The current station, which has been placed near the intersection of Deloraine Trail and McGregor Way for more than 50 years, is located in the middle of a suburb neighborhood and rests on one propertys front yard with the control panel in anothers driveway. The proposed location is a vacant piece of city-owned land on Tuscarora Trail. Its reached the end of its useful life, Reggentin said. The problem we have is this location serves the entire eastern portion of the city. This is the last lift station in the city. This is the lift station all the other stations pump to. If anything goes wrong with this lift station, things go very wrong, and they go very quickly. According to Reggentin, also a board member of the author ity, city utility workers often have only have 20 minutes to fix an issue before it affects residents when the station goes down. He said the new station would benefit an additional 40 residences. The proposal has had a long history. The city and the South Seminole and North Orange County Wastewater Transmission Authority started discussion to move the station in 2002. Maitland purchased the Tuscarora property in 2005, but the talks stalled in 2007. The two parties resumed negotiations in 2016 and reached a funding deal in 2018. The city would pay $889,350 in the form of a bid, soil stabilization efforts, landscaping and screen wall aesthetics and more. The SSNOCWTA would pay $1.2 million for the stations construction and a share of the collection/ transmission system costs. The plan will go before the Authority Board of Directors on July 24 and be open to bids follow ing that meeting. Construction is planned to take 10 months. presented several iterations of that project, it opted instead to subdivide the property to allow for four single-family homes. We consider this a success story were optimistic that this is a great outcome for this property to keep the single-family character and scale of the neighborhood, Winter Park resident Nancy Freeman said.CIVIC CENTER PROPOSALResident Todd Weaver addressed the City Commission with a unique proposal during the meeting regarding the new library/event center in Martin Luther King Jr. Park. But instead of the building itself, Weavers suggestion focused on the propertys trees. Weve talked a lot about that site, and we branded it as The Canopy, and we talked about the Library at The Canopy and the Event Center at The Canopy, but we havent talked about the canopy at The Canopy, Weaver said. Right now theres about two dozen big oak trees on that site theres been no talk of sav ing them. I would like to propose that we do that. Weaver said philanthropist Ken Murrah gave an endowment to the city for tree preservation, and that using that in this case would honor his memory. But how would the trees be preserved for the several months during construction? Weaver said he witnessed redevelopment for a housing project in California at which 543 trees were removed from the ground, placed in crates and taken care of for more than five years. The trees were replanted one-by-one in the development. Id like the city to consider saving these trees for replanting next to our new event center and library, Weaver said. He added he would donate the cost of renting a crane to remove the trees. City Commissioner Greg Seidel said Winter Park should explore the idea. What Mr. Weaver talked about with the trees I thought was a pretty interesting idea to investigate, to see what can be done, he said. Mayor Steve Leary agreed. We certainly should look at all options, he said. IN OTHER NEWS A request of Amy Black for subdivision approval to split the property at 1800 Boitnott Lane into three single-family lots of about one acre each in size was approved. A request from Z Properties Group for Development Plan and subdivision approval for a two-story, 5,494-square-foot retail/ oce building, and the associated parking lot, and a two-story residential home for the benet of the Hannibal Square Community Land Trust on the property at 301 N. Pennsylvania Avenue, prospectively zoned C-3, PL, and R-2 was approved. IN OTHER NEWS The council approved free use of the Maitland Community Parks tennis and racquetball courts along with a 25% discount to pavilion reservations by Maitland residents during the week of July 22 to 28 as part of a 25th anniversary initiative with the Parks and Recreation depart ment. The Maitland Community Park was dedicated on July 26, 1993. The city again excused Councilman Mike Thomas from the council meeting, who is expected to return following the July 9 meeting. The council approved the purchase of equipment upgrading the citys phone system. The citys VOIP system, purchased in 2009, is no longer supported by the parent company. City sta has accepted a proposal from Software House International to upgrade the system at a cost not exceeding $75,000.Station to moveNew plan approvedCONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 SWEET SERENADERu is an avid opera fan she used to have season tickets and the Mayower community pulled out all the stops for the big day. John Stephen Murray, an opera tenor, serenaded Ru with various love songs from various opera pieces. (The songs) are uplifting; theres a rise in compassion and overall happiness and love, Murray said. Theyre geared toward being happy at the onsight of love. The feelings evoked by it are that of general happiness.Meet Midge RuShes 107, shes sharp as a tack, and she knows every single card in everyones hand. Shes amazing. Sandy Gigliotti If we are to build a better world, we must remember that the guiding principle is this a policy of freedom for the individual is the only truly progressive policy. Friedrich HayekRoad to Serfdom, 1944 WINTER PARK/MAITLAND Observer 2018 The Observer Media Group Inc. All Rights ReservedObserver Media Group Inc.1970 Main St. Sarasota, FL 34236 941-366-3468Editor and CEO / Matt Walsh Vice President / Lisa Walsh Chairman / David BelilesPublishers of the Longboat Observer, East County Observer, Sarasota Observer, Siesta Key Observer, Palm Coast Observer, Plant City Times & Observer, Ormond Beach Observer, West Orange Times & Observer, Windermere Observer, Winter Park/Maitland Observer, Business Observer, Jacksonville Financial News & Daily Record, Jacksonville Realty-Builder Connection, LWR Life Magazine, Season MagazineOrangeObserver.comWINTER PARK/ MAITLAND OBSERVER The Winter Park/Maitland Observer (USPS #00-6186) is published by the Observer Media Group, 180 S. Knowles, Winter Park, Fl., 32789. Periodical postage paid at Winter Park, Florida. POSTMASTER send address changes to the Winter Park/ Maitland Observer, 180 S. Knowles, Winter Park, FL, 32789.TO ADVERTISEFor display or digital advertising, call Publisher Jackie Fanara at (407) 401-9929. For classied advertising, call (407) 401-9929. Our fax number is (407) 656-6075.LEGAL ADVERTISINGTo place a legal notice for Orange County, please call Kim Martin at (407) 654-5500 or email to legal@businessobserver.com.SEND US YOUR NEWSLet us know about your events, celebrations and achievements. Send your infor mation via email to Michael Eng, meng@ OrangeObserver.com. Mailed letters must be typed and include the authors signature and phone number. Letters to the editor are subject to editing.TO SUBSCRIBEThe Winter Park/Maitland Observer is published weekly, on Fridays. Subscriptions are $40 per year ($50 outside of Orange County). To subscribe for mailed home delivery, call (407) 401-9929; email to subscribe@OrangeObserver.com; visit orangeobserver.com; or visit our oce, 180 S. Knowles, Winter Park, FL, 32789. Publisher / Jackie Fanara, jfanara@OrangeObserver.com Executive Editor / Michael Eng, meng@OrangeObserver.com Design Editor / Jessica Eng, jeng@OrangeObserver.com Associate Editor / Troy Herring, therring@OrangeObserver.com Associate Editor / Tim Freed, tfreed@OrangeObserver.com Black Tie Editor / Danielle Hendrix, dhendrix@OrangeObserver.com Black Tie Reporter / Harry Sayer, hsayer@OrangeObserver.com Multimedia Sales Executive / Laura Rubio, lrubio@OrangeObserver.com Administrative Assistant / Janice Carrion, jcarrion@OrangeObserver.com Creative Services Administrator / Marjorie Holloway, mholloway@yourobserver.com Creative Services Coordinator / Christine Galan, cgalan@yourobserver.com Advertising Graphic Designers / Thom Gravelle, Shawna Polana, Luis Trujillo, Allison Wampole

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WINTER PARK / MAITLAND OBSERVER | FRIDAY, JUNE 29, 2018 5 40 7-734-2971 Call now for your FREE in-home consultation! Or visit online at: RBAFLA.com Buy 2 & Get the 3rd60% OFF PLUS NO Money Down NO Payments NO Interest forONE YEAR ~ Window & Patio Door Sale ~ (Minimum purchase required.) *LIMITED TIME OFFER. Not valid with other offers or prior purchases. Minimum purchase of 3 windows and/or doors required. Offer must be presented to the estimator at initial appointment. No money down, no payments, no interest for one full year financing is available through third-party lender on approved credit only. Offer subject to change without notice. Offer not available in all areas. Renewal by Andersen of Central Florida license CGC#1524135. Renewal by Andersen and all other marks where denoted are marks of Andersen Corporation. Andersen Corporation. All rights reserved. Replacement Windows Gliding Doors French Doors Entry Doors 276405 Caring for Winter Parks Pets and Their People Since 19551601 Lee Road, Winter Park (407) 644-2676247851 278344 To All of Our Veterans:Call our ofce to learn more about what VA Benets may be available to you! 407-961-7100 www.LoreandPhillips.comMention this ad for a complimentary 15 minute phone consultation TIM FREEDASSOCIATE EDITOROnly the best and the bright est can become National Merit Scholars and Winter Park has five of them this year. A list released earlier this year by the National Merit Scholar ship Corporation revealed five local students in the Winter Park area have been named as finalists for National Merit Scholar ships. The five local scholars were among about 15,000 people chosen across the country. They will receive funds for housing, books, food and other living expenses through four years of college in the fall and spring semesters. Local students include Allison Barkdull and Adam DeLoach, of Winter Park High School; Annabel Zinn, of Edgewater High School; and Carolyn Lightsey and Madeleine Myers, of Trinity Preparatory School. Zinn, 18, was offered a sponsor ship by the University of Central Florida, where she will be study ing both biomedical science and electrical engineering. I was honestly surprised when I found out, she said of the scholarship. I found out I was the only one (from Edgewater High School) and I was like, Wow. For me, it was like, This is awesome, because I wasnt actually getting any money from college savings or anything. It was a little over whelming. Its a sigh of relief. From then on it was a huge weight off of my shoulders. In September 2017, a list of National Merit Scholarship semifinalists throughout the country was released all the students who met a certain threshold in their PSAT score during their junior year. More than 1.6 million juniors in more than 22,000 high schools entered the 2018 National Merit Scholarship Program when they took the 2016 PSAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test. Semifinalists then were asked to write an essay, submit a letter of recommendation and send their transcripts. Most of the students who qualify as semifinalists then move on to become finalists including Zinn this year. The Edgewater graduate hopes to use her dual degrees from UCF to create something useful in the medical industry with 3D printing, possibly equipment for sur geries. I wanted to make something and do something and make a dif ference, she said. If you have the power, you should do it. Zinn also offered some advice to high-schoolers looking to make the most of their four years leading up to college. Its choosing your own way to go about your education and giv ing yourself advantages, she said. You just have to look into oppor tunities. You need to go for it and study for the (PSAT), do dual enrollment and prepare yourself for college. If you just never do anything and just follow what the high school tells you to do, their only job is to make you graduate.Local students nab National Merit Scholarships Five students from Winter Park High School, Edgewater High School and Trinity Preparatory School were chosen. LOCAL SCHOLARS Allison Barkdull, Winter Park High School Adam DeLoach, Winter Park High School Annabel Zinn, Edgewater High School Carolyn Lightsey, Trinity Preparatory School Madeleine Myers, Trinity Preparatory SchoolTim FreedAnnabel Zinn was the only Edgewater High School graduate this year to receive a National Merit Scholar ship.

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6 WINTER PARK / MAITLAND OBSERVER | FRIDAY, JUNE 29, 2018 A SENSATIONAL NIGHT THAT YOU DONT WANT TO MISS Proceeds will support Hannibal Square Community Land Trust Housing hannibalsquareclt.org 278087 Volunteers donate time, elbow grease to Kraft Azalea gardenVolunteers pruned, weeded and cleaned up Kraft Azalea Gar den Saturday, June 10. The monthly cleanup event had volunteers and Winter Parks Parks and Recreation department spread mulch and clear debris to keep the garden in shape. HARRY SAYER ONLINESee more photos at OrangeObserver.com Volunteers had to tread carefully around a pair of snakes resting in the shade. The entire team was proud of their accomplishments. Megan Vitale and Pamela Duran worked hard in the hot weather. Nailah Patterson wheeled mulch to the parks plants. Parks and Recreation sta helped tend to the plants.

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SPIRIT OF AMERICA Ive never been aloneIts hard to articulate how much it meant to me and to my family to know that Winter Park and its people and citizens were always there for us. Its been amazing. The support has been amazing. Its hard to process that. I spent my career doing that for other people. Its amazing theyve been there for me and my family. Jimm WalshWinter Park rallied around reghter Jimm Walsh when he needed it most. They were words that Winter Park reghter Jimm Walsh never wanted to hear in his life. Lying on a stretcher in the back of an ambulance racing to Florida Hospital, Walsh overheard the two words spoken into a radio by an EMT at his side. He called me a stroke alert, which is a term we use to let the hospital know that this person is probably having a stroke, Walsh said. We want you to get the operating room ready for him. Get everybody lined up, because were coming in with a bad call. They had to say that for me. That was really tough to hear. Walsh remembers it all so clearly what happened on Aug. 9, 2017 how he suered a hemorrhagic stroke in the middle of a sta meeting at the citys public-safety building at the young age of 41. Jimm Walsh has been recovering since he suered a hemorrhagic stroke last year.Tim FreedFRIDAY, JUNE 29, 2018TIM FREED | ASSOCIATE EDITORSEE STORY PAGE 8

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8 WINTER PARK / MAITLAND OBSERVER | FRIDAY, JUNE 29, 2018 TUESDAY, JULY 3ALTAMONTE SPRINGS RED, HOT & BOOM 4 to 11 p.m. Tuesday, July 3, at Cranes Roost Park, 274 Cranes Roost Blvd., Altamonte Springs. Red, Hot & Boom will feature plenty of live music, food, drinks and a reworks display at 9:30 p.m. Performers include Echosmith, Alyssa Raghu, Lauv, Logan Henderson, MAX, In Real Life, and Jack & Jack. Visit facebook. com/ocialredhotandboom. BALDWIN PARK INDEPENDENCE DAY BASH 6 to 11 p.m. Tuesday, July 3, at Baldwin Park Village Center, New Broad St. The Baldwin Park Joint Committee presents an Independence Bash with a reworks show. This event is a community highlight and features more than 100 vendors, a kiddie fun zone, beer garden, Baldwin Parks own Room2 band, a 15-minute reworks show at 9:15 p.m. and more than 20,000 attendees. This free familyand pet-friendly event starts with a festival on New Broad Street and ends with reworks over Lake Baldwin. Visit baldwinparkevents.com. WEDNESDAY, JULY 4AVALON PARK FOURTH OF JULY CELEBRATION 5 to 9 p.m. Wednesday, July 4, at Town Park, 3651 Avalon Park Blvd. E., Orlando. This event will feature an apple pie bake-o, hot dog-eating contest, bike parade, wet/dry bounce park and per formances. A reworks display begins at 9 p.m. For more, visit eventsatavalonpark.com. CELEBRATION FOURTH OF JULY PARADE 9 a.m. Wednesday, July 4, along Celebration Avenue. This years parade will kick o at 9 a.m. from Town Hall, follow a route along Celebration Avenue to Market Street and conclude at the entrance to Lakeside Park. Civic and service groups, families and individuals all are invited to participate. The most important part of the day is to be patriotic. For more information, contact the Town Hall Lifestyle oce at (407) 566-1200 or lifestyle@celebrationtownhall. com. CALENDAR4TH OF JULY It started with a headache and then it kept getting worse. The pain suddenly became unbear able. He tried to speak up, but his words were slurred. Walsh who had spent his entire career learning the signs of a stroke as an EMT and paramedic suddenly experienced those terrifying symptoms. Unable to speak and with limited movement, Walshs mind still raced. I knew that I was having a stroke, Walsh said. I didnt want to think I was having a stroke. I didnt want to believe I was hav ing a stroke. Once I realized what it was and how quickly it was happening, I was just trying to figure out am I calling too late? he said. Is there something to work with here? Are they going to be able to help me recover? I didnt know how much damage was going to be done.PLAN BGrowing up, Walsh didnt dream of fighting fires and racing through city streets in a fire engine. He actually dreamed of being a fighter pilot flying F-16s in the U.S. Air Force. He even attended a military high school in Melbourne when he was 14. But as Walsh soon found out, you have to have a plan B. I went there and everything, and it was a great opportunity, and I was flying airplanes, he said. When I was doing my flight physical my junior year, the sur geon he just retired from the Air Force he was asking me what I wanted to do. I was like, I want to be an F-16 pilot, and he was like, Yeah, whats your plan B? I was like, There is no plan B, sir. He goes, Well, youre probably going to be too tall. Im like, What? It wasnt long after when Walsh was able to delve into another interest being a fire explorer at the Melbourne Fire Department. He then went to EMT school, followed by fire school at the Central Florida Emergency Services Institute. He signed up to become a volunteer firefighter in Osceola County to gain some experience and also trained to be a fire inspector. He assumed that position in January 1998 with the Winter Park Fire Rescue Department. A year later, he became a firefighter, received paramedic training and discovered a passion for teaching firefighters as captain of training before landing his highest position as division chief thirdin-command over operations. He also fondly remembers getting assigned to drive the ladder truck as an engineer. Man, he loved that truck. It was the best part of my career; I cant tell you how amaz ing it is being a paramedic on the ladder truck, Walsh said. You get to go to all the good calls. You get to do well for people. It was great.ROAD TO RECOVERYIf theres one thing Walsh is thank ful for that day on Aug. 9, 2017, its that his ordeal happened in a room full of first-responders, who moved him quickly to the nearby hospital. That sense of his brothers and sisters in the fire department being by his side would continue all throughout his recovery and his pursuit of finding a new normal. Walsh remembers that highspeed trip to the hospital, but nothing from the two-and-a-half to three weeks he spent there. After recovering from surgery, he began his journey toward rehabilitation at Brooks Rehabilitation Hospital in Jacksonville. He finally came home Sept. 21 2017, with an escort from the fire chief and his fellow firefighters in the ladder truck. That day in August when I left for work I left for work before my kids and wife even got up, Walsh said. I hadnt been back since. I went from work to the hospital to Brooks and now coming home for the first time. Its probably six or seven weeks after the stroke. My kids and wife saw me at Brooks and the hospital, but I hadnt been home with them. His movement was initially limited to a wheelchair, but today, Walsh walks on his own, though with a slight limp and little movement in his right arm. Walshs stroke ultimately forced him to retire June 1, after a 20-year career as a firefighter. His old turnout gear still sits in a box in his garage, and signs of his service like a photograph of his prized ladder truck still fill his house. On a hot day in June, Walsh sits in the living room of his Windermere home and pulls out his phone. He scrolls through old photos and stops at a diagnostic image of his brain before his life-saving surgery. A blood clot the size of an orange can be seen in the blackand-white scan. There was no family history. No warning signs. Hes thankful hes alive.THANKFULThe heart of a public servant beats strong in Walsh. A hemorrhagic stroke hasnt kept the career firefighter away from his passion today hes teaching young firefighters at the Fire Rescue Institute at Valencia College. He recently had his first day teaching in a hands-on class. For me, its part of my recov ery, he said. Its a part of me. Its challenging me to keep going. Teaching firefighters is definitely what I want to do, and I feel like Im really good at it. Its a way for me to continue to give back to the career that has given me so much. Walsh is thankful for so much today: How Winter Park Fire Rescue prepared his familys home for Hurricane Irma while he was still recovering. How Winter Parkers came to visit him at the hospital. How hes back with his wife and two children. How almost one year after he suffered the stroke, Walsh has a chance to walk his son to kindergarten. Through it all, Walsh said the Winter Park community was always by his side from the care packages and letters from resi dents to the close support from the department. The moment Walsh fell into his darkest hour, the community caught him. They caught him and carried him and his family through the struggles. Through the fire. In that moment, the public servant became the served grateful beyond measure. Its hard to articulate how much it meant to me and to my family to know that Winter Park and its people and citizens were always there for us, Walsh said. Its been amazing. The support has been amazing. Its hard to process that. I spent my career doing that for other people. Its amazing theyve been there for me and my family. Ive never been alone, he said. My familys never been alone. People were there for us thats how its supposed to be. It started with a headache CONTINUED FROM PAGE 7 278337 271975 When I DO becomes IM DONE.

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WINTER PARK / MAITLAND OBSERVER | FRIDAY, JUNE 29, 2018 9 GROVELAND STARSPANGLED SPECTACULAR 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. Wednesday, July 4, at Lake Catherine Blueberries, 5849 Lake Catherine Road, Groveland. The event will include dueling reworks, six bands, a BMX stunt show, sanctioned steak cook-o, food trucks, kids zone and more. For more, visit groveland-.gov. KISSIMMEE MONUMENTAL FOURTH OF JULY CELEBRATION 5 to 9:30 p.m. Wednesday, July 4, at Kissimmee Lakefront Park, 201 Lakeview Drive, Kissimmee. Hosted by Joey Fatone, this event will feature live music from Doug E. Fresh, C+C Music Factory and The Gerry Williams Band. A monumental reworks display will close the night. (407) 518-2503 or KissimmeeParks.org. ORLANDO CELEBRATE FOURTH OF JULY AT THE ICON ORLANDO 360 Wednesday, July 4, at the Icon Orlando 360, 8401 International Drive, Suite 100, Orlando. Combine some of the best views of the entire city with a patriotic display of lights for a unique Fourth of July activity. The ICON Orlando 360 Orlando Eye will be illuminated in the classic red, white and blue to celebrate Independence Day. Visit iconorlando.com. FIREWORKS AT THE FOUNTAIN 4 to 10 p.m. Wednesday, July 4, at Lake Eola Park, 195 N. Rosalind Ave., Orlando. Celebrate the Fourth of July at Lake Eola Park. The city of Orlandos Fireworks at the Fountain is a patriotic celebration lled with fun, food and fanfare. Live entertainment will include performances by The Mellow Relics, MoMo-Browne, The Spring and the Orlando Concert Band. The event also features a large childrens play area. Fireworks begin at 9:15 p.m. For more, visit cityoforlando.net/reworks. ORLANDO SCIENCE CENTER FOURTH OF JULY SCIENCE CELEBRATION 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday, July 4, at the Orlando Science Center, 777 E. Princeton St., Orlando. This event will feature a simulation of Paul Reveres midnight ride in the Sphero arena and patriotic games. Attendees also can make his or her own quill to sign a giant Declaration of Independence and see the live show, Kaboom! to learn about the science of reworks. For more information, visit osc.org. ST. CLOUD LAKEFRONT CELEBRATION 3 to 10 p.m. Wednesday, July 4, at Lakefront Park, 1104 Lakeshore Blvd., St. Cloud. The event will feature live music by Little Texas, First Circle and Whiskey Plates, food, games and more. This years Honorary Fireworks Commissioner is Maj. Gen. Jerry Lang. For more, visit stcloudreworks.org. SANFORD SANFORD FIREWORKS AT STARSPANGLED SANFORD ON THE RIVERWALK 4 to 10 p.m. Wednesday, July 4, at Ft. Mellon Park, 600 E. First St., Sanford. Celebrate Independence Day in Sanford with great enter tainment, food and drinks. The event concludes with a reworks display at 9:15 p.m. over Lake Monroe. Sanford Recreation Department, (407) 688-5120. WINDERMERE FOURTH OF JULY PANCAKE BREAKFAST 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, July 4, at Windermere Town Hall, 520 Main St., Windermere. Tickets are $7 for adults and $3 for children. Tickets will be available at the breakfast. WINTER GARDEN ALLAMERICAN KIDS PARADE & BREAKFAST 8 to 10 a.m. Wednesday, July 4, at the Winter Garden Masonic Lodge, 230 W. Bay St., Winter Gar den. Parade through downtown begins at 10 a.m.; lineup starts at 9:45 a.m. The morning includes entertainment, activities and childrens identication opportunities. Breakfast is free for children. (407) 656-3244. PARTY IN THE PARK 6 p.m. Wednesday, July 4, at Newton Park, 29 W. Garden Ave., Winter Garden. Fireworks start at 9:15 p.m. Attendees can take a chair or blanket for this annual tradition, which will include live music, family activities and food. Parking is available at Health Central Park and Dillard Street Elementary. For information, call Winter Garden City Hall at (407) 656-4111. In case of a potential rainout, call the rainout hotline at (407) 877-5432. WINTER PARK 23RD ANNUAL FOURTH OF JULY CELEBRATION 9 a.m. to noon Wednesday, July 4, in Winter Parks Central Park, 150 W. Morse Blvd., Winter Park. City Commissioner Sarah Sprinkel will lead the event from the main stage, which will include an Oath of Allegiance naturalization ceremony. The ceremony will include remarks regarding the history of this monumental day, as well as congratulations to new American citizens on their milestone. The event also will feature performances by Sean Holcomb, the Bach Festival Brass Band and the Bach Festival. The Childrens Bicycle Parade will begin at 11:30 a.m. Children can take their bikes already decorated or they can deck them out at the old bus stop at the corner of Park Avenue and Morse Boulevard in Central Park. The Family Fun Program Kids Zone also will include a touch-a-truck, fun games and inatables. Free hot dogs, watermelon and water will be available for all to enjoy, while supplies last, thanks to the Electric Utility Department. The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art also will celebrate 23 years on Park Avenue with its annual Independence Day Open House. For more, visit cityofwinter park.org/event/23rd-annual-4thof-july-celebration. 2018 FLORIDA HOSPITAL WATERMELON 5K 6:30 a.m. Wednesday, July 4, at 251 Park Ave. S., Winter Park. Start your Independence Day the right way with a 5K. Join friends, family and neighbors for a morning celebration featuring ice-cold watermelon and American pride. Cost is $33 through July 3 and $38 on race day. Military per sonnel and family receive a $10 discount and a special bib. For more information, visit trackshack.com/ event/114. WINTER SPRINGS WINTER SPRINGS CELEBRATION OF FREEDOM 18 5 to 9:30 p.m. Wednesday, July 4, at Central Winds Park, 1000 Central Winds Drive, Winter Springs. The evening will be lled with fun including live entertainment such as the annual Winter Springs Got Talent competition. Enjoy a fun-lled kids area and shop the various vendors. As the night wraps up, the sky will ll with world-class reworks. For more, visit bit.ly/2MNZQcA. 4TH OF JULY *The promotional annual percentage yield (APY) is accurate as of 6/29/2018 (Promotional Rate). The Promotional Rate is guaranteed for 182 days from the date the account is opened. After 182 days, the interest rate and APY will be variable, established by BankUnited, N.A. (Bank) in its sole discretion and may change at any time. The Bank reserves the right to limit the number of accounts opened. The required minimum opening deposit is $2,500. A $15 monthly maintenance fee will be assessed if the minimum daily balance falls below $2,500 any day during a statement cycle. Money market accounts are subject to statement cycle transaction limits. A $15 early closeout fee will be assessed if the account is closed within six months of opening date. Fees may reduce earnings. Additional fees, terms and conditions apply. Please refer to our Depositors Agreement and applicable Schedule of Fees for additional information. BankUnited reserves the right to cancel or modify this oer at any time without notice. Oer is for consumer accounts only. Please contact a BankUnited representative for additional details. Products and services oered by BankUnited, N.A. VISIT US TODAY TO OPEN YOUR ACCOUNT!ALTAMONTE SPRINGS | 510 E. Altamonte Drive | 407-260-7900 1-877-779-BANK www.bankunited.com Guaranteed for 6 monthsPROMOTIONAL MONEY MARKET ACCOUNT$2,500 minimum opening deposit BETTER RATE. BETTER RETURN. Guaranteed for 6 monthsPROMOTIONAL MONEY MARKET ACCOUNT $2,500 minimum opening deposit 1. 50 APY* %*The promotional annual percentage yield (APY) is accurate as of 6/29/2018 (Promotional Rate). The Promotional Rate is guaranteed for 182 days from the date the account is opened. After 182 days, the interest rate and APY will be variable, established by BankUnited, N.A. (Bank) in its sole discretion and may change at any time. The Bank reserves the right to limit the number of accounts opened. The required minimum opening deposit is $2,500. A $15 monthly maintenance fee will be assessed if the minimum daily balance falls below $2,500 any day during a statement cycle. Money market accounts are subject to statement cycle transaction limits. A $15 early closeout fee will be assessed if the account is closed within six months of opening date. Fees may reduce earnings. Additional fees, terms and conditions apply. Please refer to our Depositors Agreement and applicable Schedule of Fees for additional information. BankUnited reserves the right to cancel or modify this offer at any time without notice. Offer is for consumer accounts only. Please contact a BankUnited representative for additional details. Products and services offered by BankUnited, N.A. 1-877-779-BANK www.bankunited.comVISIT US TODAY TO OPEN YOUR ACCOUNT!ALTAMONTE SPRINGS | 510 E. Altamonte Drive | 407-260-7900 BETTER RATE. BETTER RETURN. Guaranteed for 6 monthsPROMOTIONAL MONEY MARKET ACCOUNT$2,500 minimum opening deposit Guaranteed for 6 monthsPROMOTIONAL MONEY MARKET ACCOUNT$2,500 minimum opening deposit Guaranteed for 6 monthsPROMOTIONAL MONEY MARKET ACCOUNT$2,500 minimum opening deposit 278504

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10 WINTER PARK / MAITLAND OBSERVER | FRIDAY, JUNE 29, 2018 277576

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WINTER PARK / MAITLAND OBSERVER | FRIDAY, JUNE 29, 2018 11 278420 TROY HERRINGASSOCIATE EDITORTournaments regardless of the sport are always a grind and test of will and character. Depending on the sport, athletes are asked to play games in consecutive days, or in the case of some of the teams from Winter Park Volleyball Club, several games in a day. That was the case in this years 45th AAU Girls and Boys Junior National Volleyball Championships, which were held in Orlando. Although the tournament is still ongoing for the 16U squad, WPVC has had multiple teams finish in the top five of their respective categories and that truly excites Aaron Phillips, the clubs director and a coach at WPVC. The success is watching them go against the big monster clubs, and you know, theyre showing and placing just like they are, Phillips said. Its just a great tournament. WPVC sent 17 different teams alone from their 11U to 18U teams and each has had a vary ing level of success. The 12U Elite Black squad moved through the first three rounds with relative ease. They went 10-0 before falling in three sets to OTVAs 12U Longwood Cristobal team in the first round of the gold bracket. Despite the exit, the 12Us finished in fifth place out of the 76 teams competing. Along with the 12U team, the 18U Elite Black also a had a strong run through nationals. In the first three days of the tourney, the 18U team reeled off nine consecutive wins before taking a tumble in a two-set loss against the Illinoisbased Sports Performance 18 Blue team in the third round. The loss didnt hamper WPVC long. That same day, the team picked up two more wins. The next day, the 18U squad bowed out of the gold bracket but still finished at 9-2 good enough to land at the No. 5 spot in the field of 71. But of all of WPVCs teams, none had a better tournament than the 15U Elite Black unit, which went 14-1 and won the consolation bracket in an epic three-set match against Lions Woodridge 15-1. After a nine-game win streak to start the tournament, the 15U team fell in a tough game against Goldenest 15 Black in the fourth round challenge, but what happened next was a pure show of will. On Sunday, June 24, the 15U team won five straight games between 8 a.m. and 2 p.m. with the final win coming in the consolation brackets championship game. The 15U side dropped the first set 17-25 but rallied to take the second set by a razor thin 25-22 margin and the third and final set by a 15-9 score. Thanks to its late-tournament rally, the 15U team finished in 18th place out of 171 teams a stat made more impressive when considering the early setback this team had faced going into nationals. The thing that I liked about 15 Black is that we lost a player to a key injury that put her out the rest of the season and then we had another key player just decide that she felt like the team wasnt mak ing her any better, so she decided to quit, Phillips said. And one of our back-up girls her family had a trip planned before they signed up for the club, so this team ends up doing the best as far as finishing for the whole club so far. While the 16U team finishes up at nationals, Phillips and the WPVC will be staying busy as they prepare for upcoming tour naments. I was proud of our girls they played extremely hard and so now we are geared up for USA Nationals in Detroit, Phillips said. So we have our 11 Elite Black, 12 Elite Black and 18 Elite Black all playing in Detroit for the next four days. Then we fly from Detroit to our boys junior national championships, he said. Theres a lot of good things happening right now. WPVC nds success at nationals tournamentCourtesy photoAaron Phillips and his 15 Elite Black team took home the consolation title after going 14-1.The Winter Park Volleyball Club had a strong showing at the 45th AAU Girls and Boys Junior National Volleyball Championships.

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12 WINTER PARK / MAITLAND OBSERVER | FRIDAY, JUNE 29, 2018 Discover ART & NATURE IN YOUR OWN BACKYARD633 OSCEOLA AVENUE WINTER PARK, FL | 407.647.6294 | POLASEK.ORG Visit Albin Polaseks historic home, artist studio, & sculpture gardens located on beautiful Lake Osceola a hidden gem of Winter Park! THIS SUMMERS PASSPORT TO LEARNING, EXPLORATION, AND FUN! 278395 HARRY SAYERBLACK TIE REPORTERJane Casselberry remembers being 5 years old and growing up at the Hotel Alabama in Winter Park. She remembers her father, Har vey Williams, a few years after helping build the hotel in 1921, working as the caretaker and groundskeeper. She remembers playing in the grove and climbing grapefruit trees to grab a snack. She remembers sitting with her family on the Lake Maitland docks to watch the sunset dur ing the summer off-season, and all the fireflies that lit up those nights. She also remembers the day she, along with two hotel bandmembers, had their picture taken on the hotel garden steps. They gave me a ginger ale, Casselberry said. That was quite a treat back then. After 87 years, that photo now rests on a wall of the Winter Park History Museum. Casselberry, along with others who have been witness to centuries of Winter Park history, has shared their knowledge and heirlooms with the museum for the new Wish You Were Here exhibit high lighting nearly 200 years of Winter Parks hotels and motels. CHECKING INAfter a few years displaying a 1940s World War II setting, his tory museum staff members were looking for something more connected to Winter Park residents. The new attraction, which opened June 7 after a full year of planning, highlights Winter Park mainstays such as the Hotel Alabama, the Rogers House, the Langford Hotel, and more. Museum Executive Director Susan Skolfield said the team wanted to highlight most if not all of the hotels in the citys past. Even though these hotels are no longer with us, though the Alabama building is still here, we felt there were still enough people around who remembered the hotels and would bring them joy, Skolfield said. The last exhibit was somber, but this we felt we could have a really good time with it. The exhibit has a warm, inviting color scheme with a Central Florida wildlife audio loop created by a Full Sail University professor playing in the background. The rooms center is an old-fashioned hotel lobby with a five-by-eightfoot wall mural interpretation of the Morse Foundations Genius Preserve designed by Will Setzer. A Park Plaza balcony is recreated with the help of the the Hamilton family, and the Langford Hotels iconic Empire Room nightclub sign hangs in the back corner. Items from the Red Fox lounge are on display next to a recreation of a Winter Park motel living space. The museums entrance has an hanging light installed from the Mt. Vernon hotel, which closed in 2014. Its a lot of information and artifacts to store in the 850-squarefoot museum, which had more than 16,000 visitors in 2017, and much of it has been lent or donated by more than 50 descendants of hotel owners, staff and guests. Museum staff got crafty for other parts of the museum Skolfield said the entrance sideboard was inherited from her family. Some of that history surprised Skolfield herself. Although she has fond memories of playing in the Langford Hotels kiddie pool as a young girl, she didnt realize how much of a nightlife destination spot the hotel was at the same time. The hotel often held ice rink shows with skaters and water ballerinas. Casselberry supplied photos and memories of her 18 years close to the Alabama before she attended Rollins College. While the Alabama Hotel was notorious for hosting many celebrities of the time Sinclair Lewis, Thornton Wilder and Margaret Mitch-Wish you were hereThe Winter Park History Museums new exhibit celebrates centuries of history of the citys lodgings. IF YOU GOWINTER PARK HISTORY MUSEUMSWISH YOU WERE HERE: THE HOTELS & MOTELS OF WINTER PARK WHEN: Through June 6, 2020 WHERE: Winter Park History Museum, 200 W. New Eng land Ave., Winter Park. WEBSITE: wphistory.org WINTER PARK LODGINGS The Rogers House/Seminole Inn/Virginia Inn The Hotel Alabama The Osceola Inn The Batchelor and other Boarding Houses Hotel Seminole The Hamilton Hotel/Park Plaza Hotel Winter Park Hotel The Laughlin Hotel Fortnightly Inn The Alfond Inn The Langford Hotel Various Winter Park Motels Mt. Vernon Inn The new Winter Park History Museums exhibit showcases years of Winter Parks hotels and motels.

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WINTER PARK / MAITLAND OBSERVER | FRIDAY, JUNE 29, 2018 13 266394 ell to name a few Casselberry became acquainted more with the children who would visit dur ing the summer, or the pastry chef who would sneak her macaroons and cakes. She married Leonard Casselberry when she was 19 and moved to the West Coast during World War II. She often joked with her sister how glad they were to finally be able to move past the hotel industry. We knew how tied down our father was working in the hotel business she said. But then of course we end up runnng hotels. Her sister ended up running the Hamilton Hotel with her husband while Casselberry and her husband worked a lodge near the horse tracks in Casselberry. The museum marked the occasion with a grand opening party on June 7 that saw more than 200 guests visit throughout the weekend. Casselberry arrived with her family to see her contributions from her years at the Alabama on display. Jane Casselberry shared her knowledge of the Hotel Alabama with museum sta. Jane Casselberry still has the photo of her time at the Hotel Alabama as a child. FRIDAY, JUNE 29KELLY GREEN TRIO 8 p.m. Friday, June 29, at Blue Bamboo Center for the Arts, 1905 Kentucky Ave., Winter Park. Acclaimed jazz pianist and vocalist Kelly Green will present her trio, featuring musicians Alex Tremblay on upright bass and Evan Hyde on drums. Currently based in New York City, they hold down several weekly residencies and travel the world. They have played in prestigious clubs such as the Jazz Standard, Smalls Jazz Club and Mintons Playhouse. They will play an interactive, tightly arranged and exciting set of material from the great American songbook and jazz classics, including Cole Porter, Jerome Kern, Duke Ellington and Mulgrew Miller, as well as original compositions by Green from her recently released debut album Life Rearranged. Cost is $20. For more information, visit bluebambooartcenter.com.SATURDAY, JUNE 30IRA SULLIVAN WITH RICH WALKER, CLARENCE PALMER AND WALT HUBBARD 8 p.m. Saturday, June 30, at Blue Bamboo Center for the Arts, 1905 Kentucky Ave., Winter Park. These four musicians have known each other for many years and share a unique bond. Each is legendary as a supreme purveyor of jazz. Sullivan, who is equally skilled on trumpet and a variety of reeds, is one of the great talents in jazz. He was a key part of the Chicago jazz scene of the 1950s, jamming with visiting all-stars and, in 1956, spending some time with Art Blakeys Jazz Messengers. He settled in Florida in the early 1960s and, although he has been active locally, he only emerges on the national jazz scene on an irregular basis. His most notable association since the 1960s was with Red Rodney in a quintet that also included pianist Garry Dial. Cost is $20. For more information, visit bluebambooartcenter.com.TUESDAY, JULY 3BALLROOM DANCE LESSONS 7 to 8:30 p.m. for beginners and 8:45 to 9:45 p.m. for intermediates starting Tuesday, June 26, at the Winter Park Farmers Market, 200 W. New England Ave., Winter Park. Keep Winter Park Beautiful presents ballroom dance lessons. Cost is $90 per person per session. This eight-week class is held each Tuesday evening. Arrive 30 minutes early to the rst class to register. Cash or check will be accepted as payment at that door. Students will be introduced to the fox trot, waltz, rhumba, cha-cha and swing. A portion of the proceeds benet Keep Winter Park Beautiful. Text the instructor Stuart Nichols at (321) 662-5565 with questions.ONGOINGHIS HENDERSON, ISRAEL & SIMPSON PROJECT On display through Dec. 31 on the second oor of the Hannibal Square Heritage Center, 642 W. New England Ave., Winter Park. Visit the Hannibal Square Heritage Center to learn of Winter Parks African-American leaders Gus C. Henderson, Frank R. Israel and Walter B. Simpson. For more information, call (407) 539-2680. THE DOMES OF THE YOSEMITE Through Sunday, July 8, at the Morse Museum, 445 N. Park Ave., Winter Park. The Domes of the Yosemite, the largest exist ing painting by Albert Bierstadt (1830-1902), will be exhibited at the Morse through a special loan from the St. Johnsbury Athenaeum in Vermont. The monumental painting, having just received conservation treatment in Miami, will be on view before returning to Vermont. The 1867 oil-on-canvas, almost 10 feet by 15 feet, has not been shown outside the Athenaeum since its rst installation there in 1873. CURATOR TOURS OF LOUIS COMFORT TIFFANYS LAURELTON HALL 11 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays at the Morse Museum, 445 N. Park Ave., Winter Park. Learn more about Louis Comfort Tianys Long Island estate with a Morse curator. Space is limited and there are no advance reservations. Free with admission. For more information, call (407) 645-5311.THIS WEEK

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14 WINTER PARK / MAITLAND OBSERVER | FRIDAY, JUNE 29, 2018 The Annie Russell Theatre PRESENTS THE 86TH SEASON 2018-2019 Twelve Angry Men SEPTEMBER 28 OCTOBER 6, 2018Avenue Q NOVEMBER 16 DECEMBER 1, 2018A New Play (Title TBA) FEBRUARY 15 23, 2019Sweet Charity APRIL 19 27, 2019 Rollins.edu/annie 407.646.2145 276283 MUSIC AT THE CASASundays NOO N-3 P.M.BOOK YOUR EVENT Contact us at 407.628.8200 656 N PARK AVE WINTER PARK, FL CASAFELIZ.US OPEN HOUSETuesdays & Thursdays 10 A.M.-NOO N EXPERIENCE 277987 As the ocial magazine of Central Floridas upscale Baldwin Park community for more than 12 years, Baldwin Park Living is directly mailed monthly to more than 5,000 residents and businesses, with additional copies being distributed via the association oce and businesses. ADVERTISE OR SUBSCRIBE TODAY!Call us at 407-401-9929Email us at jfanara@OrangeObserver.comwww.OrangeObserver.com DONT MISS YOUR OPPORTUNITY TO BE IN THE NEXT ISSUES! BALDWIN PARK LIVING 2783412018 PUBLISHES 1ST WEEK EACH MONTH SPACE DEADLINE COPY DUE August ................... July 12 September .......... August 9 October ................ September 13 November ............ October 11 December ............ November 15 Jan (2019) ............ December 13 And all that was real was left behindAfter ve days of rehearsal, the kids participating in The Greatest Show man Musical Theatre Camp got a chance to show o their chops during the nal show Friday, June 22. Put on by Shine in the Limelight, children entering rst through third grades dressed in costume and sang songs from the popular musical dur ing their performance held at the Parke House Academys gymnasium. TROY HERRING Above: Children performed a song-and-dance number from The Greatest Show man. Top: A child dressed at P.T. Barnum took the stage as he got ready to perform. The performance included song selections from the popular musical. ONLINESee more at OrangeObserver.com

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WINTER PARK / MAITLAND OBSERVER | FRIDAY, JUNE 29, 2018 15 6-28-18 rfntbt rfntb nt t fb t tt t tttt tt t tt t tntt t tftb tt nt t t nt rt r r rrt r r rntt nt nt ttt t t tt f tbt tt n tt fb tt tt rt nt rttt fb tn t t tt t r tt t ttt tt t rtt tn ttn t t t tn rt nt tttt ttt t rt tt t fttb rfb t ttt tt ttn ntt r t fb r r rn rtt rttnt r ttt ttt t t t tt r nt tttn rt tt t t t n nt t r ttt tt t tt t t n nt nt t rt r fntbtntt nt rf r r r 272115 1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE, MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WONT YOU BE MY NEIGHBOR?A documentary about Mister Rogers Fri Sun: 3:30PM, 6:30PM, 9:30PM Mon Thurs: 6:30PM, 9:30PMSpecial Event: FILMMAKER WORKSHOPSun: 10AMKidFest Film Series:FREE and open to the public! Visit Enzian.org for full lineupFANTASTIC MR. FOXSat, July 7th at 1PMSTEAMBOAT BILL, JR.Sun, July 8th at 11AM REAL BLACK TIEThe Feeding Children Everywhere organization honored philanthropic gures in the Central Florida community Friday, June 22, during its second annual Hunger Hero Awards. Guests gathered in a Dr. Phillips ballroom following a cocktail reception and were honored for their actions helping children and families. The producer and cast members of The Florida Project also were recognized. HARRY SAYERFeeding Children Everywheres Second Annual Hunger Hero Awards Sandy Cos, Alexis Montgomery, Mariana Del Ville and Katrina Belle were a gorgeous quartet. Stefanie Scalish, Barbara Latimer and Montana Coleman waited patiently for the show to start. Feeding Children Everywhere Director of Development Nadia Samuel and CEO Dave Green were ready to have a successful night. Dania Rasheed and Maryam Squires were thrilled for the event to start. Amanda Cook and Bill McKay represented the moving company College Hunks.

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16 WINTER PARK / MAITLAND OBSERVER | FRIDAY, JUNE 29, 2018 278477 PUBLIC NOTICENotice is hereby given that public hearings will be held by the City Commission of the City of Winter Park, Florida, on Monday, July 9, 2018, at 3:30 p.m. or as soon thereafter in the Commission Chambers of City Hall, 401 Park Avenue, South, to consider the following:AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF WINTER PARK, FLORIDA VACATING AND ABANDONING A 15 FOOT EASEMENT GRANTED TO THE CITY OF WINTER PARK ON OCTOBER 17, 1995, RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 4964, PAGE 2797 AND OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 4971, PAGE 4989 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF ORANGE COUNTY FLORIDA. (EXHIBIT A); PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED IN EXHIBIT B; PROVIDING FOR CONFLICTS, RECORDING AND AN EFFECTIVE DATE. AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF WINTER PARK, FLORIDA AMENDING CHAPTER 58, LAND DEVELOPMENT CODE, ARTICLE I COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FUTURE LAND USE MAP SO AS TO CHANGE THE FUTURE LAND USE DESIGNATION OF LOW DENSITY RESIDENTIAL TO PARKING LOT ON A PORTION OF THE PROPERTY AT 301 NORTH SOUTH PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED HEREIN, PROVIDING FOR CONFLICTS, SEVERABILITY AND AN EFFECTIVE DATE. AN ORDINANCE AMENDING CHAPTER 58 LAND DEVELOPMENT CODE ARTICLE III, ZONING AND THE OFFICIAL ZONING MAP SO AS TO CHANGE LOW DENSITY RESIDENTIAL (R-2) ZONING TO PARKING LOT (PL) DISTRICT ZONING ON A PORTION OF THE PROPERTY AT 301 NORTH PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED HEREIN, PROVIDING FOR CONFLICTS, SEVERABILITY AND AN EFFECTIVE DATE. AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF WINTER PARK, FLORIDA AMENDING CHAPTER 58, LAND DEVELOPMENT CODE, ARTICLE I COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FUTURE LAND USE MAP SO AS TO CHANGE THE FUTURE LAND USE DESIGNATION OF MEDIUM DENSITY MULTIFAMILY RESIDENTIAL TO CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT ON THE PROPERTIES AT 218 S PENNSYLVANIA AVE AND 217 HANNIBAL SQUARE EAST, AND FROM COMMERCIAL TO CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT ON THE PROPERTY AT 227 HANNIBAL SQUARE EAST, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED HEREIN PROVIDING FOR CONFLICTS, SEVERABILITY AND AN EFFECTIVE DATE. AN ORDINANCE AMENDING CHAPTER 58 LAND DEVELOPMENT CODE ARTICLE III, ZONING AND THE OFFICIAL ZONING MAP SO AS TO CHANGE MEDIUM DENSITY MULTIFAMILY RESIDENTIAL R3 DISTRICT ZONING TO COMMERCIAL C2 DISTRICT ZONING ON THE PROPERTIES AT 218 S PENNSYLVANIA AVE AND 217 HANNIBAL SQUARE EAST, AND TO CHANGE FROM COMMERCIAL C3 TO COMMERCIAL C2 ON THE PROPERTY AT 227 HANNIBAL SQUARE EAST, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED HEREIN, PROVIDING FOR CONFLICTS, SEVERABILITY AND AN EFFECTIVE DATE. AN ORDINANCE AMENDING CHAPTER 58 LAND DEVELOPMENT CODE ARTICLE I, COMPREHENSIVE PLAN SO AS TO MODIFY AND ADD COMPREHENSIVE PLAN POLICIES WITHIN THE TEXT OF THE FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT REGARDING SUBDIVISIONS OF LAKEFRONT PROPERTIES AND ESTATES ON LAKE KILLARNEY, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED HEREIN, PROVIDING FOR CONFLICTS, SEVERABILITY AND EFFECTIVE DATE. All interested parties are invited to attend and be heard. Additional information is available on the Citys website at www.cityofwinterpark.org so that citizens may acquaint themselves with each issue. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he/she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he/she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. (F.S. 286.0105) Persons with disabilities needing at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting./s/ Cynthia S. Bonham, City Clerk, MMC 270461 www.suttonhomes.comAdmissions Director: Kathie Bretz 407.369.3446Assisted Living Facility #8259 For those with memory loss we provide real home living with personalized care Only 5 residents per home allows each resident a sense of well-being in a warm nurturing environment Compassionate staff trained to care for those with Alzheimers, dementia, or memory loss Beautiful homes in tranquil residential neighborhoods Homes located in Orange, Seminole, and Lake Counties Founded in 1994 Central Floridas original memory specialists. 277260 1801 E. Colonial Dr., Suite 112 Friday, June 9, 2017 R E T I R E D C O U P L E providing personal services for individual needs. References available. 407-4912123 6/16fb Announcements Friday, June 9, 2017 R E T I R E D C O U P L E providing personal services for individual needs. References available. 407-4912123 6/16fb Announcements Winter Park/Maitland Observer reserves the right to classify and edit copy, or to reject or cancel an advertisement at any time. Corrections after rst insertion only. *All ads are subject to the approval of the Publisher. *It is the responsibility of the party placing any ad for publication in the Winter Park/Maitland Observer to meet all applicable legal requirements in connection with the ad such as compliance with town codes in rst obtaining an occupational license for business, permitted home occupation, or residential rental property.INFO & RATES: 407-656-2121 Fax: 407-656-6075 EMAIL: classied@orangeobserver.com HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 8:30am-4:30pm DEADLINES: Classied Monday at 10:00AM PAYMENT: Cash Check or Credit Card.LV16204 STAY CONNECTED WITH YOUR COMMUNITY. Sign up for ourFREEENEWSLETTERS!Visit WPMObserver.com/eNews to subscribe. TO ADVERTISE IN OUR CLASSIFIEDS CALL 407-656-2121 Or email us at advertisenow@orangeobserver.com Homes For Sale Positions Wanted Open House Homes For Sale Positions Wanted Open House fanniehillman.comN E W L I S T I N G S 278082 1090 MOJAVE TRAIL, MAITLAND, FL 32751 $430,000 4 Bed 2 Bath 2,030 SF Shirley Jones 407-719-9180 1460 MAYFIELD AVENUE, WINTER PARK, FL 32789 $899,000 3 Bed 3 Bath 2,400 SF Megan Cross + Meg Dolan 407-353-9997 161 TALMEDA TRAIL, MAITLAND, FL 32751 $539,000 5 Bed 3.5 Bath 2,940 SF Lisa Shear + The Bagby Team 407-721-9375 2000 ALAMEDA STREET, ORLANDO, FL 32804 $525,000 3 bed 3 Bath 2,510 SF Sandra Chitty 407-616-3720 1408 SOVEREIGN COURT, ORLANDO, FL 32804 $479,900 4 Bed 2.5 Bath 2,792 SF 1625 S. OSCEOLA AVENUE, ORLANDO, FL 32806 $399,000 3 Bed 2 Bath 1,388 SF Lisa Shear 407-721-9375 151 N. ORLANDO AVENUE #218, WINTER PARK, FL 32789 $149,900 2 Bed 1 Bath 710 SF Megan Cross 407-353-9997 1226 E. RIDGEWOOD STREET, ORLANDO, FL 32803 $479,000 3 Bed 2 Bath 1,844 SF Lisa Shear 407-721-9375 269910 SATURDAY 12-2662 Granville Drive, Winter Park 5 BR | 5.5 BA | 4,462 SF | $1,539,957 Stunning Brand-New Construction SUNDAY 1-31537 Chatfield Place #3, Orlando 3 BR | 2.5 BA | 2,440 SF | $425,000 Beautiful Townhome in Baldwin Park SUNDAY 1-31008 Dunraven Drive, Winter Park 4 BR | 2 BA | 1,642 SF | $295,000 Renovation Opportunity in Kenilworth Shores SUNDAY 2-4181 W. Stovin Avenue, Winter Park 4 BR | 3.5 BA | 3, 537 SF | $1,090,000 Quintessential Winter Park Home New Price SUNDAY 2-4382 Woodstead Circle, Longwood 4 BR | 3 BA | 2,994 SF | $424,900 Gorgeous Home in Longwood SUNDAY 2-42190 Terrace Boulevard, Longwood 4 BR | 3 BA | 2,579 SF | $749,900 Lake Brantley Lakefront Home SUNDAY 2-41000 Anchorage Court, Winter Park 6 BR | 5.5 BA | 6,378 SF | $2,850,000 Gorgeous French Estate with Private Boathouse SUNDAY 2-41315 Woodale Avenue, Winter Park 4 BR | 3.5 BA | 3,308 SF | $1,195,000 Stunning Pool Home in Winter Park New Price 2018 rfn tbbf rfrntf bn tbbf fnrt fn t ft 2018 rfn tbbf rfrntf bn tbbf fnrt fn t ft Friday, June 29, 2018 H i r i n g T e l e m a r k e t i n g Reps Easy Business Travel is hiring telemarketing sales representatives. Make $500 $2500/week. No experience is necessary. We will train you. Work Monday through Friday with weekends and major holidays off. Fun and laid back work environment. This is a commission only job so must be highly motivated and driven to make money. Contact Valerie for more information at 321-413-9800. VP 7.13 Positions Wanted