Winter Park-Maitland observer

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title:
Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication:
Winter Park FL
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates:
28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID:
UF00091444:00317


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WPMOBSERVER.COM The latest addition to Fleet Peeples Park might be a tribute to Winter Parks fallen furry friends. Members of the citys Parks and Recreation Advisory Board approved the construction of a 1,600-square-foot pet memorial at Fleet Peeples Park last Wednesday, giving locals a potential place to remember their beloved deceased pets. A proposed design approved by the Board shows the memorial will feature up to four columbaria walls holding 48 urns of cremated remains each. Brick pavers in scribed with pet names and a decorative iron fence surrounding the memorial are planned as well. City staff plan to have the trib ute located at the north end of the park beneath a large oak tree. We design our homes to ac commodate our pets and we take vacations based around our pets; theyre a big part of our lives, said Carla Lubet, treasurer and secretary for Friends of Fleet PeeUSPS 00-6186 Publisher statement on page 2. VISIT WPMOBSERVER.COMSUBSCRIBE NOW! HOW TO CELEBRATE AMERICACALENDAR, 2 Youth of the year A big honor for a local bright star LIFESTYLES, 6Dancing away dementiaThe fun way to help your brain CENTRAL FLORIDA SENIOR, B1CALENDAR ................... 2 LIFESTYLES ................... 6 SPORTS ..................... 7 WPV VOICE ................... 8 CULTURE .................... 10 OPINIONS ................... 11 CLASSIFIEDS ................. 36 CENTRAL FLORIDA SENIOR ....... B1 The search for a minor league baseball stadium site continues as Winter Park announced that Harper-Shepherd Field has been ruled out for consideration, ac from the city released on Friday. A proposal to build a new, 2,500-seat stadium at HarperShepherd Field at Rollins College surfaced last month, with the stadium set to be built by spring 2016. The $33 million project would have included a 48-car parking garage and given a new home to the Brevard Manatees, the Sin Brewers. The city is continuing to ex plore other alternatives, the statement read. The announcement came the same day as a Rollins College board of trustees executive com mittee meeting over the fate of the baseball stadium. Under the proposed deal the college would have obtained ownership of the ball games. Rollins College has stated that it will continue to be involved in school had agreed to pay more than $16 million of the building costs in the previous deal that struck out. Winter Park crossed Martin Luther King Jr. Park off its list of stadium sites as well during last weeks City Commission meet ing. Residents had gathered more than 2,000 signatures in hopes of knocking the proposed stadium out of the park for good. There are over 2,000 very happy people being represented by this ordinance, said Winter Park resident Donna Colado be fore the City Commission voted to rule out the park. These are the citizens who want to keep the park in Winter Park. The Orlando area has brought teams to the area for more than a century, but despite the areas growth has seen baseball decline as of late. From 1919-2003 the city had some manner of minor league team for all but 13 years of that span. But with the shuttering of the Class AA Orlando Rays in 2003, the city hasnt seen a minor league team since. The Florida Collegiate Sumsix-team prospect league in the mean time, with college-level players showcasing their skills, but with teams unattached to major-league clubs. Winter Parks Diamond Dawgs, playing PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVERWinter Parks biggest baseball stadium wont become home to a minor league team. Rollins tagged outHarper-Shepherd Field ruled out for new minor league baseball stadiumTIM FREED Observer staff Please see BASEBALL on page 2Potential plans for downtown Maitlands decades-in-the-mak ing downtown redevelopment as city boards evaluate three possible developments for the down town core. Last month the citys Community Redevelopment Agency Advisory Board decided to move forward with all three proposed development plans for the plots of land surrounding city hall. Over the next two months, Mai tland CRA Director Verl Emrick said the citys Planning and Zon ing Commission and Develop ment Review committees will take turns tweaking and reevalu ating those plans to eventually craft developers agreements with each proposed builder. Emrick said the proposals could come before the City Council in Sep tember. The plans include a revised proposal by David Lamm to build mixed-use Independence Lane-fronted retail and residential developments on the New Traditions Bank and old Winn Dixie sites; Frinfrocks plan to build garage on the old city hall site; Three new downtown proposals pass musterSARAH WILSON Observer staff Please see DOWNTOWN on page 3A resting place for mans best friendWinter Park plans pet memorial at Fleet Peeples dog parkTIM FREED Observer staff 407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC Winter Park Recovery CenterComprehensive Drug & Alcohol Treatment Naltrexone for Alcohol & Cocaine Abuse Subutex/Suboxone For Opioids & HeroinExecutive Level ProtocolsPrivacy Guaranteed2056 Aloma Ave, Suite 100, Winter Park, FL 32792 Contact For Free Evaluation at 407-629-0413 www.WinterParkRecoveryCenter.com ARCHIVE PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERA memorial could house hundreds of urns of departed pets. www.wpmobserver.com/enews Please see PET MEMORIAL on page 2 1 989 201425 YEARS

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Page 2 | Thursday, July 3, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer PET MEMORIAL | Tribute could draw estimated $500,000BASEBALL | ples Park. Having this pet memorial is a great thing and a place for people to give sanction. The city of Winter Park pushed for the memorial in response to residents wanting a place to immor talize their pets. The columbarium spaces and tribute bricks could potentially draw nearly $500,000 in revenue, which would all go toward maintaining Fleet Peeples Park, said Brenda Moody, assistant director of Parks and Recreation. Over the years weve heard many times that people would like to see us have some sort of pet memorial at Fleet Peeples Park, Moody said. City management seemed to be very supportive. Its another addition to a park residents feared would close just four years ago. Originally just a dog park, Fleet Peeples Park came the City Commission passed a se ries of fees charging residents for bringing their dogs. Residents had to pay $75 for the al dogs in a household, granting them a year of access to the park. It appeared to be an effort by some Commissioners to have the park shut down, Mayor Ken Bradley told the Observer that year. The fees were later repealed in March 2011 and the park has evolved ever since. In the past four years the park has seen the addi tion of a new playground, a little free library and most recently a designated small dog area, which opened in April. This park has had such an incredible transformation over the years, Lubet said. Adding this new element to the dog section is just fantastic. The memorial would have room for at least 1,800 tribute bricks, Lubet said, and Friends of Fleet Peoples Park already have a head start. park by selling tribute bricks as far back as 2009. Theyve sat collecting dust since then, but a new pet memo rial would mean the long-awaited placement of 136 inscribed bricks, Lubet said. The tribute could potentially become part of the annual Winter Park Canine Memorial, an event where residents walk from Bald win Park to Fleet Peeples Park and Lake Baldwin, Lubet said. Winter Park will celebrate the events second year on July 26 and approval before the City Commis sion at a future meeting date.out of Harper-Shepherd Field, have proven one of the leagues most consistent contenders. That league has sent more than 270 players to major league clubs and With the recent news cutting out potential locations for stadi ums, Winter Parks options have shrunk to two remaining loca tions for minor league baseball: the Ravaudage development off U.S. Highway 17-92 and the Win ter Park Tech location off of Den ning Drive. Both sites would require an additional land cost along with building the stadium. If Ravaudage is a possibil ity, great, Manatees owner Tom Winters told the Orlando Senti nel. And I hope the city of Win ter Park wants us. We dont want to go where no one wants us. CONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE CONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE Thursday, July 3, 2014 PHONE: 407-563-7000 FAX: 407-563-7099 WPMOBSERVER.COMPUBLISHERTracy Craft407.515.2605TCraft@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MANAGING EDITORIsaac Babcock 407.563.7023IBabcock@TurnstileMediaGroup.comASSOCIATE EDITORSSarah Wilson 407.563.7026SWilson@TurnstileMediaGroup.comTim Freed 407.563.7054TFreed@TurnstileMediaGroup.comARTS EDITORJosh Garrick joshgarrick9@gmail.comDESIGNERTom Miller 407.563.7032TMiller@TurnstileMediaGroup.comSTAFF WRITERSBrittni Larson Megan Stokes Allison Olcsvay Kristy VickeryCOLUMNISTSChris JepsonJepson@MediAmerica.usLouis RoneyLRoney@cfl.rr.comADVERTISING SALESDavid Levine407-485-1956 DLevine@TurnstileMediaGroup.comLinda Stern407.376.2434LStern@TurnstileMediaGroup.comLEGAL NOTICE ADVERTISINGAshley McBride 407.286.0807Legal@FLALegals.comSUBSCRIPTIONS/CIRCULATIONLuana Baez 407.563.7013LBaez@TurnstileMediaGroup.comMEMBER OF: -Florida Press Association -Winter Park/Maitland/Goldenrod Chambers of CommerceWinter Park/Maitland Observer is published by Turnstile Media Group. Founded in 1990 and headquartered in Orlando, Fla., Turnstile Media Group is also the parent of Golfweek, Golfweek Custom Media, TurfNet, Professional Artist, Seminole Voice, Baldwin Park Living and Turnstile Connect.TURNSTILE MEDIA GROUPCHAIRMANRance CrainPRESIDENT/CEOFrancis X. FarrellEXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT GENERAL MANAGERPatti Green VICE PRESIDENTJeff BabineauUSPS #00-6186 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:Winter Park / Maitland Observer 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835 Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster CALENDAR JULY 3The Audubon Society Birds of Prey Cen ter will bring owls to the Maitland Public Library and give a demonstration from 2 to 4 p.m. on Thursday, July 3. Meet and learn about these awesome creatures! This event is free and open to the public. JULY 4Come out to Winter Parks Olde Fashioned Community Bulletin Seniors learn driving safety CarFit instructor and senior transporta tion consultant Fran Carlin-Rogers and the Rollins Center for Lifelong Learning conducted a safety program last month designed to help seniors nd out how the t of their personal vehicle affects their driving. Thirty-ve senior drivers brought their vehicles to Rollins College Hamilton Holt School to take part in CarFit, learning to become safer drivers.Rollins College alumnus wins EmmyJohn Kavanaugh, a 1983 graduate from Rollins College, won an Emmy on Friday for his work on the theme song for So a the First, a popular animated series on the Disney Junior channel. The former Rollins music major studied piano and theater while at Rollins and currently re sides in Los Angeles. Florida Community Bank hires new managerAdrian A. Nuo has joined Florida Com munity Bank in Winter Park as a middle market relationship manager. At FCB, he will manage the commercial operations of the Central Florida region. Nuo joins FCB from JP Morgan Chase & Co. where he was a senior relationship manager. He has more than 12 years of retail banking experience in the Orlando area with positions ranging from relationship manager to nancial advisor. FREE ESTATE PLANNING WORKSHOP rfntnbnb f ffnnr nnbb fb nbb btntb tnbnfnn bbntnbrn ntnnf frnb tnnWorkshop Date: Wednesday, July 9th @ 9:30am RSVP @ 407-536-5321Gourmet Coffee & Refreshments will be served, and there will be drawings for Door Prizesnrn*sponsored by First Financial Group rfntbfn JULY SPECIAL START TODAY FOR $49 r rfrntffb tttt fnbb t ff nf ttt fn ftnnf ffn 4th of July Celebration in Central Park from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Friday, July 4. The annual celebration will feature live patriotic music by the Bach Festival Brass Band and the Bach Festival Choir. Horse-drawn wagon rides and free bike valet service will be provided, and the annual bicycle parade will be held at 9 a.m. Free hotdogs, water melon and water will be available. For more information on this free event, call 407599-3463. See reworks and listen to the Orlando Concert Band and the Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra for free at downtown Orlandos Lake Eola Park from 4 to 10 p.m. on Friday, July 4. Food will be available for purchase. Come join the 23rd annual Hunter Vision Watermelon 5K Run/Walk through Winter Parks Central Park at 7 a.m. on Friday, July 4. There will be a watermelon eating com petition. Funds raised from the event will support the Track Shack Foundation. For more information, visit trackshack.com or call 407-896-1160.JULY 5Come shop, eat and play at Baldwin Parks Independence Day Bash from 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. on Saturday, July 5. The festival kicks off with an art sale, festival snacks, face painting, balloon art, interactive activities and reworks. The food and beer garden will feature live entertainment from Jazz artist Eirrin and DJ Bradmaster J. For more information on this free event, visit Bald winParkEvents.com or call 407-923-3849. Enjoy a screening of Sleeping Beauty as performed by the Paris Opera Ballet in 2013 at 11 a.m. on Saturday, July 5, at the Enzian Theater. General admission is $20. For more information visit enzian.orgJULY 6Relive The Beatles lm A Hard Days Night at 1 p.m. on Sunday, July 6, at the Enzian Theater. This lm is part of the Kid Fest Summer Film Series, which plays for free on weekdays and $5 on weekends. For more information, visit enzian.org JULY 7The city of Winter Park will host a city blood drive in front of City Hall on Monday, July 7, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. To donate blood, you must be at least 16 years old, weigh 110 pounds, and be in good health. All donors must bring photo ID. Visit cityofwinterpark. org for more information.JULY 8The General screens at 3 p.m. on Tues day, July 8, at the Enzian Theater, along with The War of the Worlds at 9:30 p.m. Come out to these two lms as part of the theaters KidFest Summer Film Series, for free on weekdays and $5 on weekends. For more information, visit enzian.orgJULY 9Bring the whole family for a screening of Oliver! at 2:30 p.m. on Wednesday, July 9 at the Enzian Theater. This lm is part of the KidFest Summer Film Series, which plays for free on weekdays and $5 on weekends. For more information, visit www.enzian.orgONGOINGMaitlands Summer Youth Tennis Camp is in full swing at Maitland Community Park Monday through Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon now until Aug. 14. Head teaching pro Donnie McGinnis will teach the camp for beginner and intermediate players. Bring a racquet, water, a towel and sun block. Reg istration is available at Maitland Community Park, or by calling 407-539-0042.

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, July 3, 2014 | Page 3DOWNTOWN | bank and specialty grocer on the northwest corner of Horatio Av enue and U.S. Highway 17-92. The three have good propos als. Theres still a lot of issues to work out but the possibilities have a high rate of success in my opinion, Emrick said. CONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE Maitland City TalkBY HOWARD SCHIEFERDECKER MAYOR Did you know? It is faster to drive from Mai tland Boulevard to Horatio Avenue using the slip ramp and U.S. Highway 17-92 rather than using Maitland Avenue during peak ducted to compare the two routes during morning and evening peak to use U.S. 17-92 than it was to use Maitland Avenue. However, dur ing non-peak hours, Maitland Av enue is faster. Drivers are encouraged to take Maitland Boulevard to the slip ramp, and then the slip ramp to U.S. 17-92. It saves time and pro vides a safer route with respect to the railroad tracks. Like Horatio Avenue, there also is a railroad crossing on the slip ramp; howev er, the SunRail trains move much slower at this location due to its proximity to the Maitland SunRail station. The tracks also are farther ating less of a chance for vehicles to get trapped on the crossing. Consider readjusting your route to include the slip ramp and U.S. 17-92. To listen to an audio web cast of a recent presentation and land, please visit: http://bit.ly/ June9CityCouncilMeeting. Click on Select Part 2 and a Windows Media Player window, or the de fault audio playback software, should appear on the screen. You can expand the size of the Windows Me dia Player by clicking on an icon with three squares and an arrow on the upper right corner. Once the window is expanded, there will be a longer timeline and a playhead to skip to different parts of the webcast. The presentation begins at 34:25 and the discussion ends at 01:01:02. Rick Lemke, Director of Public WorksA faster commute ILLUSTRATION COURTESY OF CITY OF MAITLANDDrivers can save time traveling along Maitland Boulevard to U.S. Highway 17/92, in yellow, rather than on Maitland Avenue, at rush hour. RENDERING COURTESY OF CITY OF MAITLAND Maitlands new downtown could feature a new specialty grocer if plans are approved. 1984 W. New Hampshire St., Orlando, Florida 32804Drop In or registration less than 48 hours in advance: $50 / day. Extended Care is $5 / day or $15 / week.Bring your own lunch and snacksCampers will participate in Gymanastics, Obstacle Courses, Rock Wall, Arts and Crafts, Games, and Batting Cages. Campers will participate in Gymanastics, Obstacle Courses, Rock Wall, Arts and Crafts, Games, and Batting Cages. Camp runs from 9:00 am 3:00 pm dailywith extended care options of 7:30 am 6:00 pm $150 for week $40 per day*Must register 3 days in advance 407-745-5661 www.Theorlandoathletics.com407-745-5661 www.Theorlandoathletics.com June 5, 6 June 9 13 June 16 20 June 23 27 July 7 11 July 14 18 July 21 25 July 28 1 Aug. 4 8 Aug. 11 15 Camp Dates: 2826 Shader Rd. Orlando, FL 32808 Your Dogs Destination for All Things Healthy 407-295-3888 RockysRetreat.com Now Oering Boarding and Daycare! 10% o your rst stay! Boarding Dog Daycare Weight loss Aqua therapy Canine massage Fitness and fun swims For more information call 407-659-5701 or visit www.TrustcoBank.com and apply today!Member FDICEQUAL HOUSINGLENDER RYour Home Town Bank TRUSTCO BANK Free Pre-Approvals No Application Fees**No Application Fee available for a limited time only. The value of the application fee is $299.00. Please Note: We reserve the right to alter or withdraw these products or certain features thereof without prior notification. rfnt nb bnn

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Page 4 | Thursday, July 3, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Winter Park City TalkBY RANDY KNIGHT CITY MANAGER Happy 4th of July!On behalf of the city of Winter Park, I wish you a safe and happy Independence Day. Here are some important events and information as it relates to holiday festivities in Winter Park:City Hall closedCity Hall will be closed Friday, July 4, in observance of Indepen open at 8 a.m. on Monday, July 7. Household garbage, yard trash and recycling collection services will not be provided on July 4. Normal services will resume on the next regularly scheduled collection day. Fireworks safetyAs you celebrate Independence Day this weekend, please remem professionals. In Florida, virtually considered illegal and can turn into a tragedy. Keep your friends and family safe this year by let ting professionals do the show. Have a safe and happy 4th of July celebration!4th of July celebrationThe city of Winter Park will present the 19th annual Olde Fashioned 4th of July Celebration on Friday, July 4, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Central Park. Mayor Ken Bradley will lead a special presentation at 9:15 a.m. from the main stage. Wear your red, white and blue, bring a blanket or beach chair, and gather with family and friends to enjoy this Winter Park tradition. The annual celebration will feature live patriotic music per formed by the Bach Festival Brass Band and Bach Festival Choir, horse-drawn wagon rides, Or lando Cloggers, Rockin Roadster Road Show and much more! Chil drens activities will include the annual bicycle parade at 9 a.m. (lineup begins at 8:30 a.m.) from City Hall to Central Park, as well hot dogs, watermelon and water will available for all to enjoy, while supplies last. Remember to support the event vendors when you get your hot dog, buy some chips and a soda. For more infor mation regarding the 19th annual Olde Fashioned 4th of July Celebration, please call 407-599-3463.Museums joining 4th of July celebrationsIn addition to all the festivities, The Charles Hosmer Morse Mu seum of American Art will also present their Independence Day Open House. The museum, which is home to the worlds most com prehensive collection of work by American artist Louis Comfort Tiffany, will provide free admis sion to its galleries from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Winter Park His torical Museum, located at 200 W. New England Ave. (north end of the Farmers Market building) will be open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Please stop by to see the new ex hibition, Whistle in the Distance: The Trains of Winter Park. Muse um admission is free and they will be serving complimentary oldfashioned lemonade to all visitors.New England Avenue streetscape project On Monday, July 7, demolition of the intersection of New Eng land and Interlachen avenues will begin for the installation of bricks, mast arms. The entire intersection signs to assist in navigation. Local business and resident driveway access will remain open along New England and Interlachen av enues. Completion is expected by Thursday, July 31, barring inclem ent weather or unforeseen cir cumstances. Every effort will be made to keep inconvenience to a minimum during this time frame. Thank you for your patience as the city continues to make im provements to its infrastructure. City website gets internal makeoverThe citys most comprehensive resource, cityofwinterpark.org, is transitioning into a new content management system (CMS) and will be launching that system next week. Users will notice a fresher, more up-to-date design with a newer look and feel. It will also be ciently, and provide an even bet ter user experience. A majority of the changes were made to the back-end program ming, organization and manage ment, allowing the citys website to become a more technologically advanced administrative tool for information sharing. Because of the tremendous amount of con tent and initial transitioning pe riod, you may experience broken links. If this occurs, please let us know what page you found the missing link on by emailing We bUpdates@cityofwinterpark.org and our Communications Depart ment will correct it as quickly as possible. By transitioning to this new system, you will also need to update any bookmarks that have been saved previously, as the page address will be different. The Communications Department continually strives to im prove and enhance cityofwinter park.org to make it more effective information. Thank you for your patience and support during this transition. on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, watch us on Vimeo.Celebrate America Storm coming? Were ready.Report an outage: 800.228.8485 duke-energy.com/stormGet preparation tips: twitter.com/ DukeEnergyStormDuke Energys expert storm response teams know exactly how to prepare for storms and keep your lights on year report and track outages, get preparation tips and more. Duke Energy Storm Sidewalk Sale Park AvenueJuly 10 13Save 50 75% at participating retailers Details at experienceparkavenue.com or call 407-644-8281. ARCHIVE PHOTO COURTESY OF CITY OF WINTER PARKRide your bike down Park Avenue to start off the Independence Day in Winter Park.

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Do you know of a home construction horror story involving the City of Maitland? We do. Our home was supposed to be built with concrete block but the Building Inspectors for the City of Maitland allowed it to be built with wood. After discovering their error, they refuse to give us a The City of Maitland claims that they are immune from any responsibility for their errors. Do you think this is fair? We dont. Have the Building Inspectors for the City of Maitland made an error on your project? If so, we would like to know. If you know of any other inspection errors by the building inspectors for the City of Maitland, please call: Doug and Linda Macaw @ 321-228-1167Construction HORROR Story

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Page 6 | Thursday, July 3, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Lifestyles From a very early age Maryah Sullivan knew that achieving her dreams would be a struggle. With eyes wide open she looked around herself at a life of poverty and dis advantage and vowed that her future would be different. She found a second home for herself at the John R. Lee branch of the Boys & Girls Club in Eatonville and spent nearly every afternoon there from the age of 6 on. No matter what was happening at home, with all the encouragement and support she needed to become the vibrant, well-bal anced young woman she is today. Out of hundreds of other deserving young adults, Sullivan was recently named the 2014 Youth of the Year by the Boys & Girls Club for the state of Florida. There has always been something spe cial about Maryah, said Austin Long, ser vice director at the Eatonville branch that Sullivan attends. I have watched her grow up and it does my heart good to see her ex cel as she has. Childhood handed Sullivan little in the way of advantage. Born in Mississippi, Sul livan moved to Eatonville as a toddler and lived with a stepfather who, though well meaning, involved himself in criminal activ ity that endangered the family. As a young child, Sullivan recalled seeing sketchy characters coming and going. And, as recently as a few years ago, experi enced a police raid at her home, which led to her stepfathers incarceration. Moving was a frequent occurrence and the only truly stable thing in her young life was the Boys & Girls Club. Through it all though, Sullivan main tained excellent grades, earning mostly As. She recently graduated from Edgewater High School with a 4.4 GPA. With two younger siblings and a single mom, Sullivan often helped out by cooking, babysitting and taking on adult responsibili ties as a child. I always felt the need to be the strong one, Sullivan said. There was just so much going on at home, someone had to keep it together. Even now, she lives in a home with eight other people, including her uncle, siblings and four young cousins. At school, classmates and teachers know her as the straight-A student who is active in clubs, sports and social life, never guessing what she goes through at home. I walk out the door each morning and leave whats going on at home in the house, Sullivan said. Its the only way I manage. She does her homework at the Boys & Girls Club just as she has every afternoon, except that now she is often found tutoring oth er children, helping to encourage them to keep at it with the same dogged determi nation she comes about so naturally. Nomi nated by her local club for the Youth of the Year honor, she competed against other nominees at the local level. Each nomi nee was required to sub mit essays and present one before a panel, to demon strate a range of character development.Outshining the compe tition, Sullivan was named the regional youth of the year and went on to rep resent her local club at the state level, where she would compete against winners from across Florida.Taking home the state title seemed like a long shot to Sullivan, though. I was so shocked to win because everyone there was so deserv ing, really anyone could have won. They were all so nice, she said. In addition to the title, Sullivan took home $6,000 in scholarship money that she will use to study at the University of South Florida in Tampa where they offer a sevenyear accelerated pre-medicine program.PHOTOS BY ALLISON OLCSVAY THE OBSERVERMaryah Sullivan, with Boys and Girls Clubs Austin Long, found stability helping mentor kids. Eatonville girl wins Youth of the YearCrime surrounded her as a child, but Maryah Sullivan found a future helping othersALLISON OLCSVAY Observer staff rfnnt tbbttff tt trf fnttf tf tntn n tfnt nftf f nt tff ff t fnt nbtttfb ffr btf ntf tft rtn t n tnt nfftt n Mary Manrique Retires at Cornerstone Hospicer fntnb nttrrt t rb tt rrt t r Presented by: Supported by: Join the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce as it hosts the City of Winter Parks CoffeeTalk Featuring Kenneth W. Bradley Mayor Join Mayor Bradley for a cup of great conversation as he shares his perspective on current city topics and opens up the floor for questions Friday, July 11, 2014 7:45 a.m. Networking/8:15 a.m. Program WINTER PARK WELCOME CENTER 151 W. Lyman Avenue, Winter Park, FL 32789 A complimentary continental breakfast will be served. The event is free and open to the public. For more information, call 407644-8281 or visit www.winterpark.org. Please see SULLIVAN on next page

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, July 3, 2014 | Page 7The Sanford River Rats have put together one of the longest winning streaks of the Florida Collegiate Summer League season, and now the Winter Park Diamond Dawgs are struggling to keep up. The Rats entered last week al ready on top of the FCSL, but after edging the College Park Freedom in three straight games they started this week at 14-7 on the season and 7-3 in their last 10 games. Those three straight losses must have added up to frustration for the Freedom, who lost all three by only a combined 21-16 run differential. The frustration peaked on June 29, when the Freedom took a 3-2 lead into the bottom of the ninth inning before watching it go away on a wild throw that turned a Demetrius Sims stolen base into the tying run. After two Einar Muniz score from third in the bottom of the 12th to end it all. That loss would be the fourth straight for the Freedom. Meanwhile the Winter Park Diamond Dawgs were avenging a 5-3 loss to the DeLand Suns with two straight wins. Both of those, back-to-back on June 29, started and ended as blowouts. ed a double to lead off the game. Two batters later Tagg Duce smashed his 10th double of the season. Devin Raftery struck out nine and gave up just two hits in In the second game Duce blast ed yet another double and gave his team a margin that would never narrow, ending 4-1. Devin Pellien gave up just a run on four the win. The Dawgs and Rats played a pair of games each during press time. At 7 p.m. July 3 the Daw gs will host the Winter Garden Squeeze at Alfond Stadium. The Rats host the DeLand Suns at 7 p.m. the same night. At 1 p.m. July 6 the Rats host the Squeeze at Sanford Memorial Stadium. At the same time the Dawgs host the Lightning at home. ARCHIVE PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERAlex Kline has a 1.22 ERA and 30 strikeouts in 22 innings pitched this season.Rats grab third-straight winISAAC BABCOCK Observer staff Rooted & grounded in Jesus Christ. The Learning Tree is a Ministry of First Baptist Church of Winter ParkWe offer Full-Day Infant Care and Childcare Year-Round, Preschool Classes, Summer Camp, and much more! 1021 New York Avenue N., Winter Park, Florida 32789 Established in 1972 we are celebrating 41 years of service this year. Maitland Coin & Currency ShowMaitland Civic Center 641 South Maitland Avenue, Maitland, FL 32751FREE ADMISSIONShow open to the public Buy Sell AppraisalsFor more information call or visitOrlando Coin Exchange 6301 S. Orange Avenue Orlando, FL 32809www.MaitlandCoinShow.comorlandocoinexchange@gmail.com407-730-3116 SUNDAY, July 6th9:00 AM TO 5:00 PM Free coin for all children 12 and under 6 6 SUN Become a member today. SULLIVAN | For as long as I can remember, Ive always been doctoring people, Sullivan said. Its just a part of who I am. Anxious to get started, Sullivan is heading to Tampa early to begin college in the summer term rather than wait for fall. She plans to attend classes every summer to quickly as possible. She already has a specialty in mind, hoping to someday become a neurosurgeon. I became obsessed with how the brain works in my high school psychology class, she said. My interest just grew from there. Sullivan plans to keep in con nect with the Boys & Girls Club throughout college by volunteer ing at a local club in Tampa. I want to stay connected to an organization that has given me so much, she said. As her mentor and surrogate father at the Boys & Girls Club, Long has known Sullivan nearly all her life and has watched her grow up. She has always been a leader and never minded being called smart, like other kids might, he said.She just turned that into a further challenge to show other kids how to do better. Maryah is always encouraging others to not give up. Shes dedicated to her own future, for sure, but she never forgets to stop along the way and help everyone else, thats what re ally makes her special. CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE

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Page 8 | Thursday, July 3, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer WPV Voice Summer is ofcially here and you dont have to go far to enjoy some great summer activities and dining specials. As a wife and a mother I am always looking to nd kidfriendly activities as well as date night specials with the hubby. This summer at Winter Park Village you can discover just that with a va riety of things to do for kids, art lovers and foodies! If youre an art lover you wont want to miss this sum mer event: Barterbys Art Gallery presents Secrets from Behind the Vault. En joy an evening with The Masters as Barterbys reveals never-before-seen original, museum-quality artwork on Friday, July 25, from 6 to 9 p.m. Admission includes: complimentary wine, an exclusive sneak peek with brief art lecture, a rafe ticket with framed art giveaways and more. The cost is $20 in advance with RSVP or $25 at the door with 100 percent of admission proceeds being donated to United Cerebral Palsy of Center Florida. RSVP at bar terbys.com/secrets For those of you who are aspiring poets, singers, story tellers or comedians, check out Tea and Tea for their new open mic series, Tea and Tea Presents: Center Stage. Center Stage is a new weekly open mic event on Thursday nights from 8 to 10 p.m. They also will be offering 10 percent off inhouse and to-go drinks dur ing the event, and everyone is welcome! Parents, are you looking beat the summer heat while the kids are out of school? Come bring the family and enjoy family fun movies playing on Tuesdays and Wednesdays during the summertime at Regal Cinemas. Admission to these movies during the Summer Movie Express is only $1. Tickets must be purchased at the theater, and all mov ies start at 10 a.m. Visit regmovies.com to view the movie schedule. After the movie take a short stroll over to Menchies Frozen Yo-PHOTO BY COURTESY OF REGAL CINEMA FACEBOOK PAGE. REGAL CINEMAS $1 SUMMER MOVIE EXPRESS. PHOTO BY MITCHELLS FISH MARKET FACEBOOK MITCHELLS FISH MARKET SUMMER OF THE GRILL. Summer happenings at WPV Please see VILLAGE on next page ADVERTORIAL Winter Park Village gift cards now available at self-serve kiosk located in the breezeway near White House Black Market 407.571.2700 | www.ShopWinterParkVillage.net Mitchells Fish Market P.F. Changs Ruths Chris Steak House The Cheesecake Factory TAPS WINTER PARK VILLAGEBrio Tuscan GrilleDine DineWPB_WPMobserver_8x10.indd 1 4/26/14 11:09 AM

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, July 3, 2014 | Page 9PHOTO COURTESY OF WINTER PARK VILLAGE THE LESTER FAMILY FROM ALTAMONTE SPRINGS COOLING OFF WITH SOME MENCHIES FROZEN YOGURT. NATHAN, 3, ANDREW, 10 AND MATTHEW, 12 853 South Orlando Ave.Just south of Fairbanks on Hwy. 17-92 (1 mi. east of I-4, Exit 87)Winter Park, FL 32789 (407) 644-454715,000 sq. ft. featuring 140 dealersOPEN 7 DAYSMonSat 10 Sun 12No Magic Words ... Just good old antiques & vintage!Come see why customers LOVE our Mall!Visit us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter. Orange Tree Antiques Mall Orange Tree Antiques Mall July 4th Weekend Sale July 4-7 VILLAGE | Summer dining and happy hour specials can make for a great date night at Winter Park Villagegurt for half-off wafe bowls during Wafe Wednesday! WPV also has some great summer dining and happy hour specials perfect for a date night or just gathering with good friends! Mitchells Fish Market is offering a Summer of the Grill menu which includes a threecourse meal for just $29.99. P.F. Changs is offering a chefs summer seasonal menu which includes six unique dishes, perfect wine pairings and handcrafted cocktails. As always you can wind down with happy hour at se lect WPV restaurants. Lime Fresh Mexican Grill offers two-for-one beers, margari tas and $2 tacos Wednesday through Friday from 4 to 7 p.m. Brio Tuscan Grilles Bar Brioso special is Mon day through Friday at the bar from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. where you can enjoy bar plates and beverages from $4 to $6. And Sakari Sushi offers happy hour rolls and two-for-one sake drink spe cials, just to name a few. Other restaurants offering happy hour specials include Cheesecake Factory, Ruth Chris Steakhouse, Taps Wine & Beer, P.F. Changs China Bistro and Mitchells Fish Market. For more information on WPV events and specials, visit shopwinterparkvillage. net Mary Calcia, WPV Mar keting Corrdinator CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE

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Page 10 | Thursday, July 3, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Tonight July 3 1st Thursdays: Sculpture Heavy MetalWhile the three-dimensionality of sculpture makes it a favorite for art-lovers, most art patrons have little concept of the steps necessary to bring a state. This interactive 1st Thursday tonight at 6 p.m. will include demonstrations of clay sculpting by Steve Pi; Lost Wax Display by Kent Arblaster; wax carving by Rebecca Rose & David Ramos; steel welding by Marcos Cruz; and even choco late sculpting by Paul Joachim. OMArts original art party is at the Orlando Museum of Art in Orlando. Call 407-896-4231 or visit OMART.org July 3 to 8 Columbinus (the play) recalls Columbine H.S. Massacre Columbinus, a play based on the 1999 massacre at Columbine High School in Colorado, ing with the angst of adolescent culture. Exploring the events surrounding the shootings, actual discussions with parents, survivors, community leaders and police reports come together to reveal the dark recesses of American adolescence. Directed by Wade Hair, this play is for mature audiences and will be presented from July 3 to 8 at The Breakthrough Theatre in Winter Park. For reservations, call 407-920-4034 or visit break throughtheatre.com July 4 Orlandos Fireworks at the FountainFireworks at the Fountain is the largest and longest running 4th of July in Central Florida. Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer invites all Central Florida residents and visitors to attend the Fire works on July 4 at Lake Eola Park in downtown Orlando. New this year, guests may enjoy a performance by the Orlando Philharmonic before and accompanying the spectacular Entertainment begins at 4 p.m. throughout the park; the Phil harmonic begins performing at 8:30 p.m.; and the Fireworks begin at 9:10 p.m. Visit cityofor July 7 and 21 The Orlando Philharmonic Sounds of Summer Concert Series With each concert featuring a different theme of instru ments, composers and musi cians, this seasons Sounds of Summer Concert Series will be performed at the Orchestras new home at Plaza Live at 425 N. Bumby Ave in Orlando. July Concerts include: Winds! Chamber ensembles drawn from the wind and string sections of the Or chestra perform the Beethoven Trio, op. 38, the Poulenc Sextet and more. Like A Dame! In an evening of music composed by women and performed by women, Joni Hanze Bjella, Olga Ferroni, Karen Peters and Maureen May perform piano music by Jennifer Higdon, Fanny Mendelssohn, Amy Beach and Cecile Chaminade, along with the songs of Barbra Streisand and Carole King. Visit OrlandoPhil.org or call 407-770-0071. In a career thats entered its third de cade and produced 17 albums, moe enjoys the double whammy of critical acclaim and an international fan base. Progressive rockers Al Schnier, Chuck Garvey, Rob Derhak, Jim Loughlin and Vinnie Amico continue to tour the globe, headline music festivals, and/ or share the stage with performance leg ends. Known for the continuing vitality of their music, its their live, on-stage showmanship that seals the deal. Join them at Plaza Live on July 8 at 8 p.m. Visit plazali veorlando.com July 10 to 28 Ladies of Eola Heights a Wanzie Comedy Director Ken Howard has taken on this re-envisioning of Michael Wanzies wildly successful comedy with a cast of Central Floridas favorite actresses including Peg OKeef, Beth Marshall, Blue Star and Miss Sammy Singhaus. There is more than steel to these Magnolias in this story of sisters who come together after years of being apart, while the comic references to a community within walking distance of the theater should make for some very funny art-imitatinglife moments. In performance from July 10 to 28 at The Abbey, visit abbeyorlando.com for tickets. And looking ahead Through Aug. 31 The Allure of Ancient Rome Showcasing prints, drawings, and an illustrated book from the Cornell Museums permanent collection, the Cor nells new exhibit highlights the uities in Europe and the role played by printed images in sharing knowledge about those antiquities. This exhibit coincides with the loan of a Roman sarcophagus to the Cornell with the print-works dating from 1540 to 1750. Admission is free. Call 407-646-2526 or visit Rollins.edu/cfamAug. 9 Taste of the Nation Orlando On Aug. 9 at 6:45 p.m., Taste of the Nation brings together the areas top chefs who donate their time, talent and passion to end childhood hunger in Central Florida. Along with extraordinary food, guests sample select wines while enjoying auctions and enter tainment. Please know that hunger and homelessness in Central Florida. Tickets are $150. Visit tasteofthenation. org/orlando and/or facebook.com/OrlandoTaste. We can all buy a ticket and help.Aug. 23 Give Kids the Worlds rst-ever MacDown Competition Another foodie event of a ever MacDown (mac & cheese) Give Kids the World the 70acre resort for children with life-threatening illnesses. The competition is open to everyone from professional chefs to home cooks on Aug. 23 at the Orange County Conven tion Center. There will be lots of fun prizes, but the best prize is knowing your efforts will help a tragically sick child achieve a dream. For more information, visit otownmacdown.orgJosh Garrick Culture for your calendar Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906. LADIES OF EOLA HEIGHTS MACDOWN COMPETITION This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORG @EnzianTheater OBVIOUS CHILDA 2014 Florida Film Festival favorite returns to Enzian! Fri Sun 4PM, 6:30, 9PM Mon, Wed, Thurs 6:30, 9PM Tues 6:30KidFest Summer Film Series!Weekdays are FREE. Weekends only $5.A HARD DAYS NIGHTSunday 1PMBuster Keaton in THE GENERALTues 3PMOLIVER!Wed 2:30JAMES AND THE GIANT PEACHThurs 3PMCult Classics: THE WAR OF THE WORLDS (1953)Tues 9:30Popcorn Flicks in the Park: MUSCLE BEACH PARTYFREE in Central Park! Thurs 8PM or SunsetBallet on the Big Screen: SLEEPING BEAUTY (Paris)For discounted admission to all ballet screenings, buy a Series Pass! Sat 11AM www.lilylace.com4TH OF JULY CELEBRATIONPARTY AT THE SHOP WITH REFRESHMENTS AND SPECIALS.VISIT US TODAY AND TEST YOUR ABILITY TO RESIST TEMPTATION

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, July 3, 2014 | Page 11Opinions Chris Jepson PerspectivesA legitimate question that needs asking is, What is in Americas national inter est? As in, why is it in the national inter est to be militarily involved in the Middle offered for continued military involvement in Iraq? Are the old explanations of oil and Israel still applicable today? Is the extent to which we care about the region well as any moral solidarity America has with Israel? Speaking of which, because we broke Iraq, does America have any moral responsibility or culpability in the unfolding events there today? I recall from college history classes the recent example of Yugoslavia be ing held together by the strongman, Marshal Josip Tito. There were four or and until Tito died they functioned as a nation state. Until America overthrew the Iraq government in 2003, Iraqi Sunnis, Shiites and Kurds were operating as a nation state. Granted, any cooperation such as it was, was brutally enforced by the auto cratic despot Saddam Hussein. Nonethe less, Iraq functioned as a nation state until the United States broke it. That is fact. I am continually amazed that with any Middle East crisis whether it is Libya or Syria or Iraq the Republican Party immediately pushes for American military intervention. Why is that? Why are events in these nations any of Americas business? Is it still about oil and Israel? The Of course, oil and Israel are still factors. Radicalized Muslims want to kill Ameri cans in America. That is the rationale for experiencing another New York City 9/11. It is suggested that radicalized Mus lims want to murder Americans because they are at war with our way of life. Pluralism, democracy, minority rights, capitalism and religious freedom are so threatening and egregious that war with action. I question that assessment of Mus lim grievances against the U.S. (the West). Because we have toaster ovens as well as six Catholic Supreme Court Judges and that we try to hold democratic elections, Muslims want to murder us? Hmmm? Surely there must be additional reasons. Surely. I never so much hear Muslims chant ing, Death to the Brazilians! Or, Death to the Chinese! Have you ever wondered why that is? What could be the explana tion? Oh, and what do the Chinese pay for a barrel of oil? I believe autocratic, theocratic tyrants (take your pick) often require an enemy to divert the people from the oppressive (political, economic, social) conditions they live in. What America has done in spades for decades is provide and installed our own (See: Shah of Iran). We invaded and occupied Iraq. Sent troops to Lebanon. Declared war in Afghanistan. Intervened in the Somalia Civil War. We have supported so many oppressive Mid dle East regimes that it is far beyond our ability to count such geopolitical mistakes So ask yourself: if radicalized Muslims want to murder Americans today, to what degree are we culpable in creating such Islamic hatred and animosity? Is it in our national interest to have Muslims wanting to murder Americans? If no, perhaps we should consider, oh, a 50-year hiatus of not pursuing military solutions and not meddling period in the Islamic Middle East. Dear Abby said it best, MYOB. Mind your own business, America. And stay the hell out of Iraq.Why is everybody always picking on me? Jepson is a 27-year resident of Central Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.US Louis Roney Play On! 60 percent of American strong liberals said no when asked if they often feel proud to be American. Well, I am liberal about lots of things, but I never claimed to be a Liberal. I choose to be an old-fashioned patriot when it comes to this land that gives so much to the world and asks only for land to bury its dead. My father served in both World Wars and I served four years in WWII. In the tism; it was in us like the red blood in our veins. The pride I feel at being a red, white and blue American is a quiet inhabiting spirit that never ever leaves me. gress appointed a committee made up of Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Roger Sherman and Robert Livingston to draft a Declaration of Independence. The committee then chose Jefferson to John Adams commented that Jefferson was selected for his happy talent for com position and singular felicity of expression. In the next 17 days, Jefferson drafted one of the most beautiful and powerful testaments to liberty and equality in the history of man kind. The document opens with a Preamble stressing the natural rights of all human grievances against King George III that re lieved the American colonies of any further allegiance to the British Crown. Although the Declaration of Independence adopted on July 4, 1776 underwent a series of revisions from Jeffersons original draft, the celebrated words remain for the most part his own: We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are en dowed by their creator with certain unalien able rights, that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. Jeffersons wisdom spoke: If we can but prevent the government from wasting the labours of the people under the pretence of taking care of them, they must become happy. It would seem that present President Obama was out to lunch when Jeffer sons pertinent sage words were in the air. Obamas entire administration is based on what Jefferson said would end American democracy. No freeman shall ever be debarred the use of arms [within his own lands or tene ments]. The liberty to possess arms is, in Jeffersons words, unequivocal. Jefferson stated: When they get piled upon one another in large cities, as in Europe, we shall become as corrupt as Europe. Could Jefferson have prophetically foreseen our futures politically overcrowd ed Washington? The tree of liberty, said Jefferson, must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants. Well, we have seen enough tyrants and shed plenty of blood! Jefferson continues: I never considered a difference of opinion in politics, in religion, or in philosophy, a cause for withdrawing from a friend. The glow of one warm thought is to me worth more than money To compel a man to furnish contributions of money for the propagation of opinions which he disbelieves and abhors, is sinful and tyrannical. Doesnt this maxim apply to todays ObamaCare? the harder I work the more I have of it. Right on, Jefferson. Educate and inform the whole mass of people ... They are the only sure reliance for the preservation of our liberty. Our greatest happiness does not depend on the condition of life in which chance has placed us, but is always the result of a good conscience, good health, occupation, and freedom in all just pursuits. These words of Thomas Jefferson leave us an inheritance of wise intelligence and valuable morality that, if we heed them, will heed them? Happy Fourth of July! died on the 4th of July in 1826 exactly 50 years after the Declaration of Independence!Thomas Jefferson: Savant About Roney: HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney)SunRail is open for business and is transporting commuters along 32 miles of track from Sand Lake Road to DeBary. The project is the culmination of years of effort from federal, state and local governments to reduce the dependency on Central Floridas congested roadways. Tickets are available at kiosks at each station. A reloadable card is also available for those who plan to ride frequently. Base fares are $2 for one-way tickets and $3.75 for round-trip tickets. Passengers will be charged an additional $1 each time their train crosses a county line. For more information on fares, station locations, or train schedules, visit sunrail.com SunRails total cost is approximately $1.05 billion, with $615 million allocated for construction and $435 million dedicated to right of way acquisition. State and local governments will each pay for 25 percent of total project costs. The federal government will fund the remaining 50 per cent. The state will be respon sible for SunRails operations and maintenance costs for the governments will fully fund the in the eighth year of operations. Costs will be partially offset by fares from SunRails ridership. Trains will run every 30 minutes during the peak hours of 5:30 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. During normal hours trains will depart their home station every two hours in either direction. SunRail will only run on weekdays and no service will initially be offered on weekends. Phase one includes seven stops in Orange County including its southernmost stop at Sand Lake Road. Additional Orange County stops include the Orlando Amtrak station, Church Street, Lynx Central, Florida Hospital Health Village, Winter Park and Maitland. Seminole County has four stops at Altamonte Springs, Longwood, Lake Mary and Sanford. Phase ones northernmost station is located in DeBary in Volusia County. SunRails construction was divided into two phases. When complete, the 61.5-mile line will include 17 stops in four counties. The addition of phase two will nearly double the length of the line. Phase two will add three new stations in Osceola County at Poinciana, the Kissimmee Amtrak station, and Osceola Parkway. Both Orange and Volusia counties will each receive an additional stop at Meadow Woods and DeLand, respectively. I hope that SunRail provides an effective transportation solu tion for many Orange County commuters. My staff and I are available to answer any questions you may have about SunRail, transportation, or any other Orange County issue. We can be reached at 407-836-7350 or by How to get around on your new train system Ted EdwardsCommissioners CornerI never so much hear Muslims chanting Death to the Brazilians!

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Page 36 | Thursday, July 3, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer The Winter ParkMaitland Observer e-newsletter contains a wealth of community news every week. Get it delivered to your inbox. Visit WPMObserver.com and click Subscribe to newsletter The Winter Park Maitland Observer e-newsletter contains a wealth of community news every week. Get it delivered to your inbox. Visit WPMObserver.com and click Subscribe to newsletter SUNDAY 2-4NEW PRICE! POOL HOME IN FANTASTIC LOCATION 914 Moss Lane, Winter Park. 4BD/3BA, 3,335SF. Renovated in 2003. Two master suites downstairs. Expansive great room with vaulted ceilings, wood burning fire place that is surrounded by built-in shelves & cabinets. Large Florida room with built-in bar looks out on to screened pool. $649,900SATURDAY 2-4 UPDATED FURNISHED SEAWARD CONDO 4811 Saxon Drive, New Smyrna Beach. 2BD/2BA, 1,120SF. Open living area locat ed on the no drive section of the beach. Step out on your covered 4th floor balcony and enjoy stunning views of the Atlantic Ocean. Open kitchen and a full size high end washer/dryer in unit. Complex completed $1,100,000+ renovation with major upgrades and make over in 2011. Large oceanfront heated pool with brick paver deck. $339,500 OBSERVER Open Houses THE MARKEt T PLAc C E King Features Weekly ServiceJune 30, 2014 King Features Weekly ServiceJune 30, 2014 King Features Weekly ServiceJune 30, 2014 King Features Weekly ServiceJune 30, 2014 817 Greenwood Street, Orlando, FL 32801 sold by Mary Ann Steltenkamp with Kelly Price & Company 712 London Road, Winter Park, FL 32792 sold by Mary Ann Steltenkamp with Kelly Price & Company 1322 Druid Road, Maitland, FL 32751 sold by Jenni Sloan with Kelly Price & Company OBSERVER Just Sold Homes ANNOUNCEMENTSBE THE 1st Medical Alert Company in your area!Owning your own local distributorship. We do 70% of the work! Unlimited $ re turn. Investment required. Free Call (844) 225-1200.Monthly Parking Available at Village Park Senior Apartments!Covered Parking Available Monthly at Vil lage Park Apartments across the street from Winter Park Village $50/Monthly Call 407-960-3694 Village Park Senior Apartments 407-960-3694 Leasing@ myvillageparkapts.comOnline Only 2-Day Auction,Furniture Liquidation including Rugs, Ta bles, Household Items, Furniture & More, Jamestown, NC, Guilford Co. 7/11 at 8am to 7/18 & 7/21 at 1pm. Iron Horse Auction Co., Inc. 800-997-2248. NCAL3936. www.ironhorseauction.comEDUCATIONAIRLINE JOBS Start Here Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Housing and Job placement assis tance. Call Aviation Institute of Mainte nance 844-210-3935TRAIN FROM HOME:MEDICAL BILLING; ACCOUNTING ASST;CUSTOMER SERVICE. NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED. HS/GED NEEDED TO AP PLY. Sullivan and Cogliano Training Cen ters. 1-800-451-0709 HEALTH & MEDICALPressure Points AcupuncturePressure Points Acupuncture invites you on a journey to Health and Wellness in their new facility in Winter Park by the Ravaudage Development. Enhance your modern life through the ancient healing arts of Acupuncture and Traditional Chi nese Medicine. Start on your path to well ness today. pressurepointsacupuncture. com Karan Landkroon (407) 960-4472 pressurepointsacupuncture@gmail.comHEALTH & MEDICALSummer Martial Arts ClassesOlympic Sport Judo, Ju Jitsu, Self-De fense, and fitness. Certified instructors w/criminal background checks! Improve fitness, strength & flexibility. Appropriate for elite junior athletes and those needing weight loss. Learn respect and self-disci pline! Adult Judo & Ju Jitsu classes also offered. Aloma Ave. Metro Orlando Judo Kai 4079283643 JudokaiOrlando@aol. com HELP WANTEDAVERITT EXPRESSNew Pay Increase For Regional Drivers! 40 to 46 CPM + Fuel Bonus! Also, PostTraining Pay Increase for Students! (De pending on Domicile) Get Home EVERY Week + Excellent Benefits. CDL-A req. 888-362-8608 Apply @ AverittCareers. com Equal Opportunity Employer Fe males, minorities, protected veterans, and individuals with disabilities are en couraged to apply. Driver Trainees Needed Now!Become a driver for Werner Enterprises. Earn $800 per week! Local CDL Training. 1-877-214-3624Now Hiring OTR CDL-A Drivers.New Pay Package and $1500 Sign-On Bonus! Mostly 5-10 days out, full bene fits, achievable bonuses. Call today for details 1-888-378-9691 or apply at www.heyl.netPROFESSIONAL SERVICEHANDYMANNo job too small Licensed and insured Minor repairs A to Z, carpentry, electrical, plumbing, painting, wallpapering, dry wall, pressure washing FREE ESTIMATES Kenneth Bryant 407-463-5111 kdbbry ant1@yahoo.comREAL ESTATE: FOR SALELake Sybelia Real Estate AuctionFriday, July 18th, 7PM Held on-site: 710 Thompson Ave, Maitland, FL. Beautiful 5BR/4.5BA(4,041+/SF) Lakefront home on Lake Sybelia with private boat ramp & dock & lift. Preview: Saturday, July 12th, 11AM-2PM www.higgenbotham.com/ M.E. Higgenbotham FL Lic#AU305AB158 Higgenbotham Auc tioneers 800.257.4161 auction@higgenbotham.com FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now survive DIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922 SUNDAY 1-4NEW LISTING!CUSTOM-BUILT HOME IN BALDWIN PARK4121 Haws Lane, Orlando. 3BD/2.5BA, 2,728SF. Hardwood flooring, high volume coffered ceilings, wood and granite fireplace, built-ins. Gourmet kitchen with cherry cabinets, wine rack and granite counters. Master suite offers jetted tub, dual shower heads, and walk-in closets. $569,900 709 Wilshire Drive, Casselberry, FL 32707 sold by Sherri Dyer with Kelly Price & Company 963 Cherry Branch Court, Lake Mary, FL 32746 sold by Kelly L. Price with Kelly Price & Company 492 Julian Lane, Maitland, FL 32751 sold by Kelly L. Price with Kelly Price & Company 1660 Chase Landing Way, Winter Park, FL 32789 sold by Kelly L. Price & Pamela Ryan with Kelly Price & Company 1700 E. Winter Park Road, Winter Park, FL 32789 sold by Kelly L. Price & Dee Morgan with Kelly Price & Company

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A SUPPLEMENT OF THE WINTER PARK-MAITLAND OBSERVER AND SEMINOLE VOICE JULY 2014 Joan Ray has been a dancer since she was a child. Shed watch the afternoon dance shows on TV, spend three af ternoons a week after school dancing the jitterbug, and whatever else the kids were excited about at the time. When she got older, shed hop up with her girlfriends and do a little line dancing if the mood was right. Her husband Roy has always been a bit of Most of the time it was Joan getting up and dancing with the girls while I sat over and had a beer, or two, and cheered her on, he said. But Joan, 70, hasnt been dancing in a while. The Winter Springs couples life has changed drastically in the diagnosed with Alzheimers in 2009. It was gradual at places she normally wouldnt and then not being able to harder lately. Joan sometimes wanders the house at night and she cant drive anymore. Roy has to do all the cooking and housework. Its been a transition from went on, to now being able to deal with those problems knowing theyre there and theyre not going to go away and its not her, its the disease thats causing the prob lem, Roy said. Their lifestyle has changed considerably, but they still try to do normal couple things. They go out to eat, invite friends over and travel with a motor home group. When Roy saw that the Alzheimers Association was offering ballroom dance classes this summer, he saw another opportunity for he and his wife to connect with each other, friends who understand what theyre going through, and have some fun. The classes, which are free and being held by the Al zheimer Association and the USA Dance Orlando chapter, run every Saturday through July 26 from 2 to 3 p.m. at the Crosby Center YMCA in Winter Park. In 2013 a team of research ers from Nottingham Univer sity in the United Kingdom released a study that shows staying active with your brain and body could be effective in staving off Alzheimers disease. Ballroom dancing activates both. While there is not a 100 percent proven method for slowing progression or prevention with the disease; self stimulated, keeping your mind active and keeping your body active are really the best ways to help slow progression of the disease and help pre vent the decline, said Danny Anez, associate director of programs for the Alzheimers Association Central and North Florida Chapter. So ballroom dancing it has the unique ability to both work out your brain and stimulate your brain in new and novel ways as well as physically working yourself out and working on things like balance, which is a huge issue when it comes to senior populations. And since there is no cure or real treatment for demen tia, an activity like ballroom dancing is worth looking into considering how many Ameri cans the disease impacts. More than 5 million Ameri cans are living with dementia and every 67 seconds another person develops Alzheim ers, according to statistics collected by the Alzheim ers Association. Experts estimate that by the year 2050, 16 million people will have the disease. The symptoms of dementia are incredibly disrupt ing to daily life for the indi vidual. Theres memory loss and decreased problem solv ing and reasoning skills. Sufferers experience confusion with time or place, changes in personality and have trouble joining or following a conver sation. That can make a person affected by dementia with draw from their normal social activities. They stop going to church or having dinner with friends. Anez hopes that the ballroom dance program can keep those people engaged in their community instead. It keeps people living with a purpose in life, he said. John Davis, president of the Orlando chapter of USA Dance, hopes those who come to the dance program create a stronger bond with their caregiver, have fun and allow them to reminisce about hap pier times. Some of the things that Dancing through the fog of dementia PHOTOS BY SARAH WILSON CENTRAL FLORIDA SENIORCaregivers and volunteers twirl their partners through choreographed routines. Please see DANCING on page 3Step by step, dementia patients better their brains and bodies with ballroom dance lessonsBRITTNI LARSON Central Florida Senior Winter Pa rk's Distinctive Retirement Community

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Page 2 Growing up in the South, I always marveled at how adept everyone was at well-man nered hatefulness. If someone made a stupid comment, the response would never be, What an idiot you are! Instead it was, Well, aint that nice? or Why, bless your heart. When it came to social-grace duplicity, we were the champions. Or so I thought. That was before I came to Washington. It takes a little getting used to, but for the most part, you must accept that people mean the opposite of what they say. If most say Nice to see you, they are actually looking over your shoulder at someone more im portant. The really good ones somehow manage to make eye contact with you while looking past you at the same instant. Its pretty amazing. And anyone who has watched the Senate is well aware that the members refer to their most despised ene mies as My friend. That ex tends far beyond the Capitol. If anyone calls you his or her friend, watch your back. Theres nothing new about this, and its not unique to D.C. We all have our moments of not meaning what we say. The normal greeting is How are you doing? The automatic answer is Fine, thank you. But lets face it: We usually couldnt care less, and we certainly dont want to hear when someone is not is Actually terrible. My wife has left me for a younger man, my business is bankrupt, and the bank just foreclosed on my house. What do you say? If you grew up in the South, per haps youd respond with bless your heart, in which case youd mean, Im sorry, did you say something? Or youd escape as fast as you could. Thank you for asking, is sponse to the insincere How you doing? greeting. Thank you for asking translates to, None of your business. The more someone sings your praises to your face, the more he changes his tune behind your back. Perhaps Michael Kinsley is correct, though, with his observation sincere, because the person lavishing compliments thinks youre worthwhile enough to Again, its Washington. Here its barely noticed that the same Republicans who were demanding that the ad ministration bring back Tali ban hostage Bowe Bergdahl at any cost now are raising Cain about the very fact that a deal was made for his return. Its galling how shamewhats really infuriating is how President Barack Obama even lets them bother him. He its always damned if you do, and damned if you dont for him. Deception is accepted as the norm here, and they never have to eat their words. Hillary Clinton shows shes no slouch at this when she chooses her language. My fakery favorite is the expression I wish him well, which is code for condemning someone to a miserable life. the umpteen TV interviews she did to promote her new book, Hillary told ABCs Diane Sawyer she wished not only Rand Paul well, but also Monica Lewinsky. Aint that nice? 2014 Bob Franken Distributed by King Features Synd. Mastering well-mannered hatefulness For people who want to hear better. Make It a Spectacular SummerwithBetter Hearing! For over 26 years, millions of Americans have trusted HearUSA for the best hearing care in America and the only organization providing TotalCare. Call Toll Free today for a FREE Hearing Check-up! 2014 HearUSA, All Rights Reserved. www.hearusa.com Call Toll Free: 855.802.55327512 Dr. Phillips Blvd., Suite 90 Orlando(On Dr. Phillips Boulevard, near Steinmart and between Stefanos Grill and Kekes restaurant in the Dr. Phillips Marketplace.) Total Care ExperienceMost complete and accurate hearing check-up. Total Care Selection HearUSA offers a broad selection of advanced hearing aids from trusted brands.Total Care Technology Video Otoscope examination a look inside your ear to determine if you have ear wax. A LIFETIME OF BETTER HEARING! FIRST CLASS CARE WORLD CLASS TECHNOLOGY FREE Gas Cardwith Hearing Screening* *Must have hearing loss.Financing as low as$33/mo.**Same as cash and 0% APR O.A.C. (on approval of credit). Minimum monthly payments required on all same as cash and 0% contracts. Trade in your old hearing aids and receive$1500 o your next purchase.* *$750 o each hearing aid. Valid on Siemens 5mi and 7mi aids only. Not valid with any other oer or discount. Oer expires 7/31/14. 140701 HearUSA July Ad_Central Florida Senior_10.25x8_to run 7-3_01.indd 1 5/29/14 5:00 PM Savannah Court and Cove Excellence in Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation 1301 W. Maitland Blvd. Maitland, FL 32751407-645-3990www.SavannahCourtMaitland.comAssisted Living Facility License No. 8447 Skilled Nursing Facility License No. 1635096 Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above. You are always welcome!A Senior Living Community where Hospitality is a Way of Life.

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Page 3 Next time dont ignore that AARP invite At some point in our lives, we will get an invitation to join AARP, the organization for seniors. This likely will co incide with our 50th birthday, a point many of us dont want to acknowledge. The AARP mail is ignored, maybe for a week, maybe for 10 years. But at some point we concede: We are seniors. And we need AARP. Ive been taking a closer look at AARP recently, and have concluded that its worth joining. Here are a few of the Need help with estate plan ning, starting a business or your taxes? Its there, as close as your computer. Want good information on local political issues that affect seniors in your state. Its there. AARP is in our corner, with one of the strongest lobby efforts in Washington, D.C. there are two side branches Services provides discounts on many of the things we need, such as travel, legal, entertain ment and supplemental health insurance. AARP Foundation provides on-the-job training, education, legal help and much more. The AARP Driver Safety program can be taken either online or in a class setting. The biggest value is that it teaches about the changes that come with age and how those can affect driving. The bi-monthly magazine is worth the price of the mem bership alone ($16 per year). What I appreciate most is that the articles are straightfor ward, informative and not con descending. With membership you also can read them online. If you have access to a com puter, look around the site at aarp.com. Check the memberalready a member, or ask for one by phone when you sign up by calling 1-888-687-2277. Be sure youre not missing out on anything especially your discounts! Matilda Charles regrets that she cannot personally answer reader questions, but will incorporate them into her column whenever possible. Send email to columnreply2@gmail.com. 2014 King Features Synd. Inc. DANCING | Motion improves memorieshappen when you start with cognitive deterioration is that it does lead to a certain isola tion and loneliness, and cer tainly ballroom dancing with a partner will help them to channel communication on a social level and on a physical level, he said. This might even bring back memories of them swing dancing in the past, or salsa dancing. Joans excited to relive a little bit of her past. Shes a great dancer, Roy said, but hes a little nervous. Im afraid Ill step all over her feet. Oh you will not, youll do When he leaves the room she makes a motion, showing off how shell be doing the leading while theyre there. She wont let him step on her feet. CONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE The Alzheimer Association Central and North Florida Chap ter will be holding free ballroom dance classes for those diagnosed with a dementia and their caregiv ers there are volunteer partners available, too every Saturday in July from 2 to 3 p.m. Classes are at the Crosby Center YMCA in Win ter Park and RSVP is required, call 1-800-272-3900. Life is easier with Home Care Services We have the Skill to Heal. The Spirit to Care. Transitional Care Program Philips Personal Medication Dispenser Philips Lifeline Call today to schedule Private Duty Services (407) 691-8206 P h i l i p s P e r s o n a l M e d i c a t i o n D i s p e n s e r The Personal Medication Dispenser assists with medication management Medications are reviewed and pre-filled by a registered nurse, preventing overor undermedication that could lead to a costly re-hospitalization. Most Older People Have DiverticulosisDEAR DR. DONOHUE:I am a 78-year-old female,active and in good health or so I thought. I eat right and never smoked or drank alcohol. Yesterday,a colonoscopy showed severe diverticulosis. The doctor prescribed Benefiber,then left and never returned. I am stunned. What do I do now? Will I have this forever? Am I unhealthy? How does one develop diverticulosis? What the difference between osisand itis? S.K. ANSWER:Your world isnt collapsing. Youre healthy. Youll have diverticulosis forever. By age 60,half of the people in North America have it. By age 80,two-thirds have it. A diverticulum is a bulge of the inner colon lining through the colons muscular wall to its outer surface. A diverticulum looks like a small soap bubble. Its only 1/5 to 2/5 inches (0.5 to 1 cm) in diameter. You can thank our diet for diverticulosis. We refine flour and throw away its bran the outer coat of grain. In countries where whole grains (including the bran) are commonly used,diverticulosis is a rarity. Bran and other fiber hold water in undigested food. Without fiber,the food residue dries and becomes hard. The colon muscles have to generate a great deal of force to keep it moving. That force causes the colon lining to pop through the colon wall as a diverticulum. For most,diverticulosis is a silent condition that remains silent for life. For a few,the diverticulum breaks and causes a local infection in the colon diverticulitis. The pain of a diverticulitis attack is usually felt in the lower left corner of the abdomen, and sometimes people have fever and chills along with the pain. The attack is treated by resting the tract and by giving antibiotics. Were supposed to get 30 grams of fiber a day. Fruits (especially those with edible skins),many vegetables and whole-grain products are the source of dietary fiber. If people cannot get enough fiber in their diet,then commercial products like the one youre taking fill the gap. Metamucil, Perdiem,Citrucel and Fiberall are other examples. The booklet on diverticulosis explains the ins and outs of this very common disorder. To order a copy, write:Dr. Donohue No. 502W,Box 536475,Orlando,FL 32853-6475. Enclose a check or money order (no cash) for $4.75 U.S./$6 Canada with the recipients printed name and address. Please allow four weeks for delivery. *** DEAR DR. DONOHUE:My husband has chronic blepharitis and frequently develops hard buildups in both eyes that cause great discomfort. The doctor must remove them two times a month. What can be done to prevent them? S.R. ANSWER:Blepharitis (BLEF-uhRYE-tiss) is inflammation of the eyelid margins,which become red and crusty. The crust can build up into hard deposits. A twice-a-day program of lid cleansing might eliminate the crusts. Have your husband apply warm compresses (a wet washcloth) to closed lids for five to 10 minutes and then massage the lids. After the massage,he cleanses the lid margins with a cotton-tipped applicator dipped in a solution of one part baby shampoo and one part water. The doctor might have to prescribe an antibiotic ointment. *** Dr. Donohue regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but he will incorporate them in his column whenever possible. Readers may write him or request an order form of available health newsletters at P.O. Box 536475,Orlando,FL 328536475.2009 North America Synd.,Inc. All Rights ReservedHow Does Your Hospital Rate?It really DOES matter what hospital you go to when you need care. Your life could depend on it. So says the seventh annual study by HealthGrades. This is the same group that tracks doctors,hospitals and nursing homes and assigns a grade for the level of care. Its latest study reveals that your risk of death can be cut as much as 27 percent if you get your care at a Distinguished Hospital for Clinical Excellence.To get that designation,a hospital has to pass a long list of criteria. The HealthGrades Web site [www.healthgrades.com] lists by state all of the Distinguishedhospitals. You can search (for free) for grades on a given hospital for any of dozens of medical conditions. Look for Research Hospitals on the front screen of the Web site. Its when you want a full report on a hospital that you have to pay a fee. Youll also have to pay a fee to check out a specific doctor or nursing home it costs money for the report. A much easier way to check on a hospital or doctor is on the governments Health and Human Services website [www.hospitalcompare.hhs .gov]. The HHS layout lets you compare multiple hospitals,right on the same screen. The information is very comprehensive,too. For example,one question concerns the percent of surgery patients who were given an antibiotic at the right time,within one hour before surgery. This is a small detail maybe,but crucial to ones recovery. To find out if there is a Distinguishedhospital in your area,check the HealthGrades Web site and then search for details at the HHS site. Still,if youre facing a major medical issue,perhaps paying for the HealthGrades report would give you needed extra information. Matilda Charles regrets that she cannot personally answer reader questions,but will incorporate them into her column whenever possible. Write to her in care of King Features Weekly Service,P.O. Box 536475, Orlando,FL 32853-6475,or send email to columnreply@gmail.com.2009 King Features Synd.,Inc. King Features Weekly ServiceMarch 2-8, 2009

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Page 6 DEAR DR. ROACH: I have had lower-back problems almost all my life. Many doctors and therapists have examined it, with almost no success. Recently my attacks have been fewer and milder, even if the bed is not quite right. I can live with it, but a new wrinkle has emerged: If I dont get out of bed as soon as the alarm sounds, Ill have back pain and little mobility all day and partial incapac ity. I am 74 years old, 6-feet 4-inches tall and weigh 230 pounds. Do you have any idea what causes this, and if there is any cure? J.S.B. ANSWER: There are dozens of causes of back pain. It can be impossible, even with the most advanced diagnostic tests, to make a precise diag nosis of the underlying cause. In your case, it sounds like you have had one problem for a long time and now some thing is causing a different kind of back problem. Back pain that gets worse with bed rest and better with exercise is not likely to be a herniated disc or spinal stenosis two serious causes of back pain. I am guessing that there is a component of osteoarthritis in your back now, which would be quite common in a 74-yearold man. Osteoarthritis does tend to get worse with rest and better with exercise. I am impressed by how acutely it gets worse, and its entirely possible that there may be some muscular spasm associ ated with your back pain. Even though you are quite tall, 230 pounds is a lot for your spine to support. You have a BMI of 28, which is in the overweight range. may help relieve pain on your back. And certainly listen to your body, and get up and be active. Stretching, including yoga and tai chi, can be a very effective treatment. The arthritis booklet discusses joint pain found in osteoarthritis, rheumatoid ar thritis and lupus. Order a copy by writing: Dr. Roach No. 301W, Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475. Enclose a check or money order (no cash) for $4.75 U.S. with the recipients printed name and address. Please allow four weeks for delivery. About 60,000 Americans are diagnosed with Parkinsons disease each year. In 2010, the disease was responsible for the deaths of 182 Florida residents between the ages of 65 and 74, and 1,535 Florida residents over the age of 75, accord ing to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Parkinsons disease is a progressive disorder of the nervous system that affects your movement. Early signs may be mild and go unnoticed. Symptoms often begin on one side of your body and usually remain worse on that side, even after symptoms begin to affect both sides. Signs and symptoms may include tremor, slowed movement, rigid mus cles, impaired posture, speech changes and writing changes. In the early stages of Par kinsons disease, your face may show little or no expres sion or your arms may not swing when you walk. Your speech may become soft or slurred. Parkinsons disease symptoms worsen as your condition progresses over time. Although Parkinsons disease cant be cured, medications may improve your symptoms. One of the most disturbing side effects of standard Par kinsons disease treatments are freezing or off episodes. These episodes are character ized by acute immobility, can occur between one and several times daily, and can last from one to several hours cumu latively. These episodes are triggered by L-dopa, a main line treatment for Parkinsons disease. The episodes begin when the levodopa or enzyme inhibitors enter the blood stream too slowly, or wear off quickly, or just do not enter at all. A drug called apomorphine is the only drug approved of these freezing periods. Currently, however, it is only available in the U.S. as an injection. This can result in painful reactions, including irritation and nodules at the injection site. Our company, called Cynapsus Therapeutics Inc., has developed an undertem, called APL-130277 that is similar to Listerine Breath Strips. The strip dissolves in about one to two minutes, delivering the drug into the bloodstream in a similar time interval and concentration as an injectable dose. The treat ment aims at relieving many Parkinsons disease patients of the requirement for selfinjections, along with the injury and stress this entails. Over the next two years, the company plans to conduct hu man clinical trials and expects to submit its drug for approval to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2016. If you would like to learn more about Parkinsons disease, its symptoms and available treatments, speak with your doctor, or contact the Central Florida chapter of the National Parkinson Foundation at 858-414-0459 contact-usAnthony Giovinazzo is president and CEO of Cynapsus Therapeutics Inc. Not all back pain is equalNew drugs may help Parkinsons 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com r fntbt f rtt ftbt bt bnr nr rt b bb f b tb off trtnCoupon redeemable for cash, check or credit card purchases only. Not redeemable for insurance transactions. Excludes custom/special orders & nutritional supplements. May not be combined with any other discounts. Coupon has no cash value. Information www..org www.rrfMEDICARE, MEDICAID, AND MOST COMMERCIAL INSURANCES ACCEPTED 5019096 We come to you! Available 24/7 Medications, equipment and supplies provided A dedicated team of Nurses, Social Workers, Chaplains, Home Health Aides and Volunteers assigned to your care Cornerstones care is covered 100% by Medicare and Medicaid. Regardless of payer source Cornerstone is here to help. Central Florida SeniorJULY 2014PUBLISHER Tracy Craft 407.515.2605 TCraft@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MANAGING EDITOR Isaac Babcock 407.563.7023 IBabcock@TurnstileMediaGroup.com ADVERTISING Linda Stern 407.376.2434 LStern@TurnstileMediaGroup.com ASSOCIATE EDITOR Sarah Wilson 407.563.7026 SWilson@TurnstileMediaGroup.com DESIGNER Tom Miller 407.563.7032 TMiller@TurnstileMediaGroup.com Published by Turnstile Media Group 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835-5705 P: 407.563.7000 F: 407.563.7099

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Page 7 Maitland Senior Center The Maitland Senior Center is located at 345 South Maitland Ave. and is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The schedule is sub ject to change without notice. For more information, please call 407539-6251 or visit itsmymaitland. com. The Maitland Senior Center will be closed on Friday, July 4, for Independence Day and will reopen at 9 a.m. on Monday, July 7. Join us every Monday and Friday in July at 1 p.m. to see your favorite movies! Check our calendar online to see what movies are showing in July. Call to reserve your seat! Join John every Monday, Thursday and Friday in July at 9 a.m. for Yoga. Please wear comfortable clothes and bring your own mat. Cost of the class is $2 to the teacher. Join us every Monday in July at 1 p.m. for our Conversational French group. Spend some time chatting with others and making new friends. Join Esther every Tuesday in July at 9 a.m. for Tai Chi classes. Cost of the class is $10 per month to the teacher. Please wear a white shirt, black pants, and comfortable shoes. Join us every Tuesday in July at 1 p.m. for our Conversational Spanish group. Spend some time chat ting with others and making new friends. Must be uent in Spanish to participate. Join Sherre every Wednesday in July at 10 a.m. for Instructors Choice. This class is a combo of mat and chair yoga that is great for all levels. Cost of the class is $5 to the teacher. Bring a yoga mat. Join Ty every Wednesday in July at 11 a.m. for Yoga Nidra, a sublime conscious sleep (meditation) class. Cost of the class is $5 to the teacher. Please bring a yoga mat, something to cover yourself with (if you tend to get cold), and a small pillow. Join Donna every Thursday in July at 11:30 a.m. for Chair Yoga. Cost of the class is a $2 donation to the teacher. Join Ann every Friday in July for Recorder classes at 12:30 p.m. Les sons are free! Please call the Senior Center at 407-539-6251 for specifics on this class. On July 11 seniors are invited to a Senior Calendar program providing free unbiased counseling about Medicare, Me digap, HMOs, Medicaid, Prescriptions Drug Plans, and Long Term Care staffed by counselors from S.H.I.N.E. (Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders). All counseling is rst-come-rst-served. Bring your list of medications or Rx bottles, insurance card and red, white and blue Medicare card. For more infor mation, email information@elderaf fairs.org, visit FLORIDASHINE.org, or call 1-800-963-5337.Casselberry classesBack 2 Basics is a low-impact workout at noon on Tuesdays and Thursdays, and 8:30 a.m. on Satur days. Its $49.99 a month for unlim ited classes. Chair Yoga is at 10 a.m. every Mon day and will get you moving again! The cost is $2 per class. Gentle/Restorative Yoga is from 8:45 to 10 a.m. on Sundays. The cost is $10 per class. Senior citi zens discount is $5 per class. For more information, contact Alice Gomes at 609-290-8195 or email alice@imagineyoga.net Yoga Technique is 8:45 to 10 a.m. on Saturdays. The cost is $10 per class. Senior citizens discount is $5 per class. Chairobics is from 11:05 a.m. to noon on Mondays and Wednesdays. The class is free. Contact Claudia Laine at 407-718-9066. Tai Chi for Beginners is at 1 p.m. on Tuesdays. Contact Eric Raboy at 407-731-9130. The cost is $5 per class or $20 per month. Tai Chi for Intermediates is at 2 p.m. on Tuesdays. Contact Eric Raboy at 407-731-9130. The cost is $5 per class or $20 per month. Bingo is from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mon days and Wednesdays. The cost is $3 per session. Duplicate bridge is from noon to 4 p.m. on Mondays. Shore up your skills in this classic game. Casual bridge is from noon to 4 p.m. on Tuesdays. Progressive bridge is from noon to 4 p.m. on Thursdays and Fridays. Line Dancing is from 1 to 2 p.m. every Wednesday. For more information on classes and registration, contact Mario Al garin at 407-262-7700, ext. 1576, or malgarin@casselberry.org or visit casselberry.org/registerWinter Springs Senior CenterLearn ceramics from a talented group at ceramics class from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Mondays at the Winter Springs Senior Center at 400 N. Edgemon Ave. in Winter Springs. Call 407-327-6556. Have fun and get moving at yoga classes at 10 a.m. every Friday morning. Chair yoga is also available. Bingo is Wednesday, Friday and the last Sunday of the month. Lunch is served at 11:45 a.m. followed by Bingo at 1 p.m. There is no bingo prior to the last Sunday of the month. A bridge class meets at 10:30 a.m. every Tuesday to help your game. Need to relieve some stress? On Tuesdays at 10:30 a.m. join our 30-minute Guided Meditation.Altamonte Springs programsAARPs Smart Driver program helps refresh driving skills and de velop safer driving habits for drivers aged 50 or older. Its from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. July 12 at Altamonte Mall COPS Center, 415 E. Altamonte Drive. Call 1-888-227-766. Senior SneakersRHETT WICKHAM, CPTen Question 1: I know that I should get more exercise, but I dont know where to start. Mary Boone Question 2: Why do I need to exercise? Im too old to start. John S.I want to address both of you, John and Mary, together, because up front the message is the same: everybody has to start somewhere, sometime. While its never too late to start improving your health, now is the most important time for a mature population are physical, emotional, mental, and yes, The human body is capable of building muscle throughout your lifetime, John, regardless of age. Exercise particularly a regular, focused, programmatic approach means that you see your energy improve almost instantly, as well as sleep, digestive health and car diovascular health. As we mature, many people are concerned with the risk of falling and injuring themselves. Nothing is better for preventing this than a strong core that helps you stay stable example, can improve the muscle strength in their back and abdomi nal muscles as well as their legs, important to improve upper body strength (shoulders and arms.) Re gardless of your gender, the body wants to be equally strong front to back, left to right, top to bot tom. Its the beauty of the human body; it naturally seeks balance. Getting started is simple, Mary. Get up, get in the gym, and select a trainer to guide you. If youre more comfortable with a mature trainer there are plenty of us making a difference for young and mature alike. Going to a gym is like visiting a foreign country without consulting a good guide you risk missing out on the best self. Trainers teach you carefully, slowly, thoughtfully so that you feel comfortable and see results. A trainer can help guide your nutri tion and get rid of the confusions about diet; plus we want you to have the foods you enjoy not just Remember what I said about clients Ive trained have had their doctor reduce or in some instances completely eliminate medications for high blood pressure, cholesterol and other conditions improved by exercise and good nutrition. The potential for money saved on medication and extended, repeat visits to health care specialists is substan tial. Check with your insurance programs to see if they offer a discount or even free member ship to the gym, such as Silver Sneakers. Finally, why start late in life? My favorite quote about health and wellness is from Socrates and I repeat it every day, No citizen has a right to be an amateur in the matter of physical training ... what a crime it is for one to grow old without ever seeing the beauty and strength of which their body is capable. You can have a longer, healthier, happier life. Exercise science is far more advanced now and we know from years of research that people who engage in some form of vigorous exercise, for an hour a day at least three days a week, add years to their life. Not just hours and days, but happier, healthier, more indepen dent years of living. Emerging re search is pointing toward exercise as a way to improve mental health and counter the effects of diseases such as Alzheimers. Women can increase bone density, men can improve their performance in leisure activities such as golf and tennis, and we all improve our sexual health (shhhh ... dont tell the 20-somethings were still ac tive; let it be a surprise.) exercise studio, take a friend or meet new friends, and join the rev olution of age-defying exercisers realizing the unlimited potential of their bodies. Oh, yes, and when in doubt, always ask a trainer! Trainer and Strength and Conditioning Coach at Anytime Fitness in Winter Park and he can be reached at 321972-5833 for both personal and group training. For answers to your health and a day, 365 days a year, Anytime Fitness, Winter Park prides itself on providing a friendly, well-maintained facility featuring top-quality exercise of being able to use any of more than 2,300 Anytime Fitness clubs now open in all 50 states and 19 countries. For more information on Anytime Fitness, PHOTOS COURTESY OF ANYTIME FITNESS Trainers can help seniors plan workouts. ADVERTORIAL

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Page 8 Hepatitis C is a disease that is caused by a virus that affects the liver. Even though the disease often doesnt produce symptoms, it can seriously damage the liver and can be fatal. An estimated 3.2 million Americans have Hepatitis C. Older people are more likely to have been exposed to Hepatitis C, but many older Americans are not aware that they need to be tested for it. A December 2013 report found that Hepatitis C infections are concentrated in the Baby information on that report here: major study of people with the virus, 75 percent of the patients were born between 1945 and 1964.What is Hepatitis C?Hepatitis C is a contagious liver disease that results from infection with the Hepatitis C virus, which is spread primarily through contact with the blood of an infected person. Hepatitis C ranges in sever ity from a mild illness that lasts a few weeks (referred to as an acute infection) to a seri ous, lifelong illness that can destroy the liver (referred to as a chronic infection). Most people with Hepatitis C do not have any immediate symptoms. However, 75 to 85 percent of people who are infected eventually develop a chronic infection. Chronic Hepatitis C is a serious disease that can result in long-term health problems, including liver damage, liver failure, liver cancer, and even death. It is the leading cause of cirrhosis of the liver (liver scarring) and liver cancer, and is the most common reason for liver transplants in the United States. Approximately 15,000 people die every year from Hepatitis C-related liver disease.What are the symptoms of chronic Hepatitis C?Most people with chronic Hepatitis C do not have any symptoms, and they may not have symptoms until years later when they develop liver problems. In people with no symptoms, Hepatitis C is often detected during routine blood tests to measure liver function. Infected people who do develop symptoms may experi ence the following: fatigue, joint pain, abdominal pain, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, fever, dark urine, light-colored stools, or yellowish eyes and skin, called jaundice.Can a person spread Hepatitis C without having symptoms?Yes. Most people who are infected with Hepatitis C do not know they are infected because they do not look or feel sick. An infected person with no symptoms can spread the virus to others. Any activity that exchanges blood between two people can put a person at risk for exposure. Before 1992, Hepatitis C was commonly spread through blood transfusions and organ transplants. Widespread screening of the U.S. blood supply for Hepatitis C began in 1992.Should I be tested for Hepatitis C?Both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Preventive Services Task Force recommend screen ing for the Hepatitis C virus for people born between 1945 and 1964. Talk to your doctor about being tested for Hepatitis C if any of these apply to you: You were born between 1945 and 1964 You were treated for a blood clotting problem before 1987 You received a blood transfusion or organ transplant before July 1992 You are on long-term hemodialysis treatment You have abnormal liver tests or liver disease You work in health care or public safety and were exposed to blood through a needle stick or other sharp object injury You have HIV You engaged in sex that could have caused bleeding You are a current or for mer injection drug user, even if you injected only one time or many years agoCan Hepatitis C be treated successfully?Yes. In about 25 percent of people, an acute infection clears up on its own without treatment. However, if acute hepatitis C is diagnosed, treat ment reduces the risk that it will become a chronic infec tion. There are several medica tions that treat chronic Hepati tis C, including new treatments that appear to be more effective and have fewer side effects than previous options. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) keeps a list of approved treatment can be expensive. Clinical trials of new drug treatments may also be avail able.Hepatitis C and the Affordable Care ActThanks to the Affordable Care Act, hundreds of thousands of Hepatitis C patients have new access to treatment. All insurance must provide free screening for Hepati tis C for anyone born between 1945 and 1964. People with Hepatitis C cannot be turned down for insurance or discriminated against by an insurance com pany. Limits on out-of-pocket costs will make expensive treatment more affordable.Hepatitis C: Older Americans are at riskRON POLLACK Guest columnist shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM here should be more to life than maintenance-free living. To learn more about our community in Kissimmee, call (407) 933-1999. Sunday at 11am at



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WPMOBSERVER.COM The latest addition to Fleet Peeples Park might be a tribute to Winter Parks fallen furry friends. Members of the citys Parks and Recreation Advisory Board approved the construction of a 1,600-square-foot pet memorial at Fleet Peeples Park last Wednes day, giving locals a potential place to remember their beloved de ceased pets. A proposed design approved by the Board shows the memorial will feature up to four columbaria walls holding 48 urns of cremated remains each. Brick pavers in scribed with pet names and a dec orative iron fence surrounding the memorial are planned as well. City staff plan to have the trib ute located at the north end of the park beneath a large oak tree. We design our homes to ac commodate our pets and we take vacations based around our pets; theyre a big part of our lives, said Carla Lubet, treasurer and secretary for Friends of Fleet Pee USPS 00-6186 Publisher statement on page 2. VISIT WPMOBSERVER.COM SUBSCRIBE NOW! HOW TO CELEBRATE AMERICA CALENDAR, 2 Youth of the year A big honor for a local bright star LIFESTYLES, 6 Dancing away dementia The fun way to help your brain CENTRAL FLORIDA SENIOR, B1 CALENDAR .................... 2 LIFESTYLES .................... 6 SPORTS ...................... 7 WPV VOICE .................... 8 CULTURE ..................... 10 OPINIONS .................... 11 CLASSIFIEDS .................. 36 CENTRAL FLORIDA SENIOR ....... B1 The search for a minor league baseball stadium site continues as Winter Park announced that Harper-Shepherd Field has been ruled out for consideration, ac from the city released on Friday. A proposal to build a new, 2,500-seat stadium at HarperShepherd Field at Rollins College surfaced last month, with the stadium set to be built by spring 2016. The $33 million project would have included a 48-car parking garage and given a new home to the Brevard Manatees, the Sin Brewers. The city is continuing to ex plore other alternatives, the statement read. The announcement came the same day as a Rollins College board of trustees executive com mittee meeting over the fate of the baseball stadium. Under the proposed deal the college would have obtained ownership of the ball games. Rollins College has stated that it will continue to be involved in school had agreed to pay more than $16 million of the building costs in the previous deal that struck out. Winter Park crossed Martin Luther King Jr. Park off its list of stadium sites as well during last weeks City Commission meet ing. Residents had gathered more than 2,000 signatures in hopes of knocking the proposed stadium out of the park for good. There are over 2,000 very happy people being represented by this ordinance, said Winter Park resident Donna Colado be fore the City Commission voted to rule out the park. These are the citizens who want to keep the park in Winter Park. The Orlando area has brought teams to the area for more than a century, but despite the areas growth has seen baseball decline as of late. From 1919-2003 the city had some manner of minor league team for all but 13 years of that span. But with the shuttering of the Class AA Orlando Rays in 2003, the city hasnt seen a minor league team since. The Florida Collegiate Sum six-team prospect league in the mean time, with college-level players showcasing their skills, but with teams unattached to major-league clubs. Winter Parks Diamond Dawgs, playing PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVER Winter Parks biggest baseball stadium wont become home to a minor league team. Rollins tagged out Harper-Shepherd Field ruled out for new minor league baseball stadium TIM FREED Observer staff Please see BASEBALL on page 2 Potential plans for downtown Maitlands decades-in-the-mak ing downtown redevelopment as city boards evaluate three pos sible developments for the down town core. Last month the citys Com munity Redevelopment Agency Advisory Board decided to move forward with all three proposed development plans for the plots of land surrounding city hall. Over the next two months, Mai tland CRA Director Verl Emrick said the citys Planning and Zon ing Commission and Develop ment Review committees will take turns tweaking and reevalu ating those plans to eventually craft developers agreements with each proposed builder. Emrick said the proposals could come before the City Council in Sep tember. The plans include a revised proposal by David Lamm to build mixed-use Independence Lane-fronted retail and residen tial developments on the New Traditions Bank and old Winn Di xie sites; Frinfrocks plan to build garage on the old city hall site; Three new downtown proposals pass muster SARAH WILSON Observer staff Please see DOWNTOWN on page 3 A resting place for mans best friend Winter Park plans pet memorial at Fleet Peeples dog park TIM FREED Observer staff 407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC Winter Park Recovery CenterComprehensive Drug & Alcohol Treatment Naltrexone for Alcohol & Cocaine Abuse Subutex/Suboxone For Opioids & HeroinExecutive Level ProtocolsPrivacy Guaranteed2056 Aloma Ave, Suite 100, Winter Park, FL 32792 Contact For Free Evaluation at 407-629-0413 www.WinterParkRecoveryCenter.com ARCHIVE PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER A memorial could house hundreds of urns of departed pets. www.wpmobserver.com/enews Please see PET MEMORIAL on page 2 1 9 8 9 2 0 1 4 25 YEARS

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Page 2 | Thursday, July 3, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer PET MEMORIAL | Tribute could draw estimated $500,000 BASEBALL | ples Park. Having this pet memorial is a great thing and a place for people to give sanction. The city of Winter Park pushed for the memorial in response to res idents wanting a place to immor talize their pets. The columbarium spaces and tribute bricks could potentially draw nearly $500,000 in revenue, which would all go toward maintaining Fleet Peeples Park, said Brenda Moody, assistant director of Parks and Recreation. Over the years weve heard many times that people would like to see us have some sort of pet memorial at Fleet Peeples Park, Moody said. City management seemed to be very supportive. Its another addition to a park residents feared would close just four years ago. Originally just a dog park, Fleet Peeples Park came the City Commission passed a se ries of fees charging residents for bringing their dogs. Residents had to pay $75 for the al dogs in a household, granting them a year of access to the park. It appeared to be an effort by some Commissioners to have the park shut down, Mayor Ken Brad ley told the Observer that year. The fees were later repealed in March 2011 and the park has evolved ever since. In the past four years the park has seen the addi tion of a new playground, a little free library and most recently a designated small dog area, which opened in April. This park has had such an in credible transformation over the years, Lubet said. Adding this new element to the dog section is just fantastic. The memorial would have room for at least 1,800 tribute bricks, Lu bet said, and Friends of Fleet Peo ples Park already have a head start. park by selling tribute bricks as far back as 2009. Theyve sat collecting dust since then, but a new pet memo rial would mean the long-awaited placement of 136 inscribed bricks, Lubet said. The tribute could potentially become part of the annual Winter Park Canine Memorial, an event where residents walk from Bald win Park to Fleet Peeples Park and Lake Baldwin, Lubet said. Winter Park will celebrate the events second year on July 26 and approval before the City Commis sion at a future meeting date. out of Harper-Shepherd Field, have proven one of the leagues most consistent contenders. That league has sent more than 270 players to major league clubs and With the recent news cutting out potential locations for stadi ums, Winter Parks options have shrunk to two remaining loca tions for minor league baseball: the Ravaudage development off U.S. Highway 17-92 and the Win ter Park Tech location off of Den ning Drive. Both sites would require an additional land cost along with building the stadium. If Ravaudage is a possibil ity, great, Manatees owner Tom Winters told the Orlando Senti nel. And I hope the city of Win ter Park wants us. We dont want to go where no one wants us. C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE Thursday, July 3, 2014 PHONE: 407-563-7000 FAX: 407-563-7099 WPMOBSERVER.COM PUBLISHER Tracy Craft 407.515.2605 TCraft@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MANAGING EDITOR Isaac Babcock 407.563.7023 IBabcock@TurnstileMediaGroup.com ASSOCIATE EDITORS Sarah Wilson 407.563.7026 SWilson@TurnstileMediaGroup.com Tim Freed 407.563.7054 TFreed@TurnstileMediaGroup.com ARTS EDITOR Josh Garrick joshgarrick9@gmail.com DESIGNER Tom Miller 407.563.7032 TMiller@TurnstileMediaGroup.com STAFF WRITERS Brittni Larson Megan Stokes Allison Olcsvay Kristy Vickery COLUMNISTS Chris Jepson Jepson@MediAmerica.us Louis Roney LRoney@cfl.rr.com ADVERTISING SALES David Levine 407-485-1956 DLevine@TurnstileMediaGroup.com Linda Stern 407.376.2434 LStern@TurnstileMediaGroup.com LEGAL NOTICE ADVERTISING Ashley McBride 407.286.0807 Legal@FLALegals.com SUBSCRIPTIONS/CIRCULATION Luana Baez 407.563.7013 LBaez@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MEMBER OF: -Florida Press Association -Winter Park/Maitland/Goldenrod Chambers of Commerce Winter Park/Maitland Observer is published by Turnstile Media Group. Founded in 1990 and headquartered in Orlando, Fla., Turnstile Media Group is also the parent of Golfweek, Golfweek Custom Media, TurfNet, Professional Artist, Seminole Voice, Baldwin Park Living and Turnstile Connect. TURNSTILE MEDIA GROUP CHAIRMAN Rance Crain PRESIDENT/CEO Francis X. Farrell EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT GENERAL MANAGER Patti Green VICE PRESIDENT Jeff Babineau USPS #00-6186 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Winter Park / Maitland Observer 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835 Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster CALENDAR JULY 3 The Audubon Society Birds of Prey Cen ter will bring owls to the Maitland Public Library and give a demonstration from 2 to 4 p.m. on Thursday, July 3. Meet and learn about these awesome creatures! This event is free and open to the public. JULY 4 Come out to Winter Parks Olde Fashioned Community Bulletin Seniors learn driving safety CarFit instructor and senior transporta tion consultant Fran Carlin-Rogers and the Rollins Center for Lifelong Learning conducted a safety program last month designed to help seniors nd out how the t of their personal vehicle affects their driving. Thirty-ve senior drivers brought their vehicles to Rollins College Hamilton Holt School to take part in CarFit, learning to become safer drivers. Rollins College alumnus wins Emmy John Kavanaugh, a 1983 graduate from Rollins College, won an Emmy on Friday for his work on the theme song for So a the First, a popular animated series on the Disney Junior channel. The former Rollins music major studied piano and theater while at Rollins and currently re sides in Los Angeles. Florida Community Bank hires new manager Adrian A. Nuo has joined Florida Com munity Bank in Winter Park as a middle market relationship manager. At FCB, he will manage the commercial operations of the Central Florida region. Nuo joins FCB from JP Morgan Chase & Co. where he was a senior relationship manager. He has more than 12 years of retail banking experience in the Orlando area with posi tions ranging from relationship manager to nancial advisor. FREE ESTATE PLANNING WORKSHOP rfntnbnb f ffnnr nnbb fb nbb btntb tnbnfnn bbntnbrn ntnnf frnb tnnWorkshop Date: Wednesday, July 9th @ 9:30am RSVP @ 407-536-5321Gourmet Coffee & Refreshments will be served, and there will be drawings for Door Prizesnrn*sponsored by First Financial Group rfntbfn JULY SPECIAL START TODAY FOR $49 r rfrntffb tttt fnbb t ff nf ttt fn ftnnf ffn 4th of July Celebration in Central Park from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Friday, July 4. The annual celebration will feature live patri otic music by the Bach Festival Brass Band and the Bach Festival Choir. Horse-drawn wagon rides and free bike valet service will be provided, and the annual bicycle parade will be held at 9 a.m. Free hotdogs, water melon and water will be available. For more information on this free event, call 407599-3463. See reworks and listen to the Orlando Concert Band and the Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra for free at downtown Orlandos Lake Eola Park from 4 to 10 p.m. on Friday, July 4. Food will be available for purchase. Come join the 23rd annual Hunter Vision Watermelon 5K Run/Walk through Winter Parks Central Park at 7 a.m. on Friday, July 4. There will be a watermelon eating com petition. Funds raised from the event will support the Track Shack Foundation. For more information, visit trackshack.com or call 407-896-1160. JULY 5 Come shop, eat and play at Baldwin Parks Independence Day Bash from 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. on Saturday, July 5. The festival kicks off with an art sale, festival snacks, face painting, balloon art, interactive activities and reworks. The food and beer garden will feature live entertainment from Jazz artist Eirrin and DJ Bradmaster J. For more information on this free event, visit Bald winParkEvents.com or call 407-923-3849. Enjoy a screening of Sleeping Beauty as performed by the Paris Opera Ballet in 2013 at 11 a.m. on Saturday, July 5, at the Enzian Theater. General admission is $20. For more information visit enzian.org JULY 6 Relive The Beatles lm A Hard Days Night at 1 p.m. on Sunday, July 6, at the Enzian Theater. This lm is part of the Kid Fest Summer Film Series, which plays for free on weekdays and $5 on weekends. For more information, visit enzian.org JULY 7 The city of Winter Park will host a city blood drive in front of City Hall on Monday, July 7, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. To donate blood, you must be at least 16 years old, weigh 110 pounds, and be in good health. All donors must bring photo ID. Visit cityofwinterpark. org for more information. JULY 8 The General screens at 3 p.m. on Tues day, July 8, at the Enzian Theater, along with The War of the Worlds at 9:30 p.m. Come out to these two lms as part of the theaters KidFest Summer Film Series, for free on weekdays and $5 on weekends. For more information, visit enzian.org JULY 9 Bring the whole family for a screening of Oliver! at 2:30 p.m. on Wednesday, July 9 at the Enzian Theater. This lm is part of the KidFest Summer Film Series, which plays for free on weekdays and $5 on weekends. For more information, visit www.enzian.org ONGOING Maitlands Summer Youth Tennis Camp is in full swing at Maitland Community Park Monday through Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon now until Aug. 14. Head teaching pro Donnie McGinnis will teach the camp for beginner and intermediate players. Bring a racquet, water, a towel and sun block. Reg istration is available at Maitland Community Park, or by calling 407-539-0042.

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, July 3, 2014 | Page 3 DOWNTOWN | bank and specialty grocer on the northwest corner of Horatio Av enue and U.S. Highway 17-92. The three have good propos als. Theres still a lot of issues to work out but the possibilities have a high rate of success in my opinion, Emrick said. C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE Maitland City Talk BY HOWARD SCHIEFERDECKER MAYOR Did you know? It is faster to drive from Mai tland Boulevard to Horatio Av enue using the slip ramp and U.S. Highway 17-92 rather than using Maitland Avenue during peak ducted to compare the two routes during morning and evening peak to use U.S. 17-92 than it was to use Maitland Avenue. However, dur ing non-peak hours, Maitland Av enue is faster. Drivers are encouraged to take Maitland Boulevard to the slip ramp, and then the slip ramp to U.S. 17-92. It saves time and pro vides a safer route with respect to the railroad tracks. Like Horatio Avenue, there also is a railroad crossing on the slip ramp; howev er, the SunRail trains move much slower at this location due to its proximity to the Maitland SunRail station. The tracks also are farther ating less of a chance for vehicles to get trapped on the crossing. Consider readjusting your route to include the slip ramp and U.S. 17-92. To listen to an audio web cast of a recent presentation and land, please visit: http://bit.ly/ June9CityCouncilMeeting. Click on Select Part 2 and a Windows Media Player window, or the de fault audio playback soft ware, should appear on the screen. You can expand the size of the Windows Me dia Player by clicking on an icon with three squares and an arrow on the upper right corner. Once the window is expanded, there will be a longer time line and a playhead to skip to different parts of the webcast. The presentation begins at 34:25 and the discussion ends at 01:01:02. Rick Lemke, Director of Public Works A faster commute ILLUSTRATION COURTESY OF CITY OF MAITLAND Drivers can save time traveling along Maitland Boulevard to U.S. Highway 17/92, in yellow, rather than on Maitland Avenue, at rush hour. RENDERING COURTESY OF CITY OF MAITLAND Maitlands new downtown could feature a new specialty grocer if plans are approved. 1984 W. New Hampshire St., Orlando, Florida 32804Drop In or registration less than 48 hours in advance: $50 / day. Extended Care is $5 / day or $15 / week.Bring your own lunch and snacksCampers will participate in Gymanastics, Obstacle Courses, Rock Wall, Arts and Crafts, Games, and Batting Cages. Campers will participate in Gymanastics, Obstacle Courses, Rock Wall, Arts and Crafts, Games, and Batting Cages. Camp runs from 9:00 am 3:00 pm dailywith extended care options of 7:30 am 6:00 pm $1 50 for week $40 per day*Must register 3 days in advance 40 7 -7 45 5661 www.Theorlandoathletics.com40 7 -7 45 5661 www.Theorlandoathletics.com June 5, 6 June 9 13 June 16 20 June 23 27 July 7 11 July 14 18 July 21 25 July 28 1 Aug. 4 8 Aug. 11 15 Camp Dates: 2826 Shader Rd. Orlando, FL 32808 You r Dogs Destination fo r All Things Healthy 407-295-3888 RockysRetreat.com Now Oering Boardi ng and Daycare! 10% o your rst stay! Bo arding Dog Daycare W eight loss Aqu a therap y Canine massage Fitness and fun swims For more information call 407-659-5701 or visit www.TrustcoBank.com and apply today!Member FDICEQUAL HOUSINGLENDER RYour Home Town Bank TRUSTCO BANK Free Pre-Approvals No Application Fees**No Application Fee available for a limited time only. The value of the application fee is $299.00. Please Note: W e r eser ve the right to alte r or w ithdraw these products or certain featu res thereof without prior notification. rfnt nb bnn

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Page 4 | Thursday, July 3, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Winter Park City Talk BY RANDY KNIGHT CITY MANAGER Happy 4th of July! On behalf of the city of Winter Park, I wish you a safe and happy Independence Day. Here are some important events and information as it relates to holiday festivities in Winter Park: City Hall closed City Hall will be closed Friday, July 4, in observance of Indepen open at 8 a.m. on Monday, July 7. Household garbage, yard trash and recycling collection services will not be provided on July 4. Normal services will resume on the next regularly scheduled col lection day. Fireworks safety As you celebrate Independence Day this weekend, please remem professionals. In Florida, virtually considered illegal and can turn into a tragedy. Keep your friends and family safe this year by let ting professionals do the show. Have a safe and happy 4th of July celebration! 4th of July celebration The city of Winter Park will present the 19th annual Olde Fashioned 4th of July Celebra tion on Friday, July 4, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Central Park. Mayor Ken Bradley will lead a special presentation at 9:15 a.m. from the main stage. Wear your red, white and blue, bring a blanket or beach chair, and gather with family and friends to enjoy this Winter Park tradition. The annual celebration will feature live patriotic music per formed by the Bach Festival Brass Band and Bach Festival Choir, horse-drawn wagon rides, Or lando Cloggers, Rockin Roadster Road Show and much more! Chil drens activities will include the annual bicycle parade at 9 a.m. (lineup begins at 8:30 a.m.) from City Hall to Central Park, as well hot dogs, watermelon and wa ter will available for all to enjoy, while supplies last. Remember to support the event vendors when you get your hot dog, buy some chips and a soda. For more infor mation regarding the 19th annual Olde Fashioned 4th of July Cel ebration, please call 407-599-3463. Museums joining 4th of July celebrations In addition to all the festivities, The Charles Hosmer Morse Mu seum of American Art will also present their Independence Day Open House. The museum, which is home to the worlds most com prehensive collection of work by American artist Louis Comfort Tiffany, will provide free admis sion to its galleries from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Winter Park His torical Museum, located at 200 W. New England Ave. (north end of the Farmers Market building) will be open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Please stop by to see the new ex hibition, Whistle in the Distance: The Trains of Winter Park. Muse um admission is free and they will be serving complimentary oldfashioned lemonade to all visitors. New England Avenue streetscape project On Monday, July 7, demolition of the intersection of New Eng land and Interlachen avenues will begin for the installation of bricks, mast arms. The entire intersection signs to assist in navigation. Local business and resident driveway access will remain open along New England and Interlachen av enues. Completion is expected by Thursday, July 31, barring inclem ent weather or unforeseen cir cumstances. Every effort will be made to keep inconvenience to a minimum during this time frame. Thank you for your patience as the city continues to make im provements to its infrastructure. City website gets internal makeover The citys most comprehensive resource, cityofwinterpark.org, is transitioning into a new content management system (CMS) and will be launching that system next week. Users will notice a fresher, more up-to-date design with a newer look and feel. It will also be ciently, and provide an even bet ter user experience. A majority of the changes were made to the back-end program ming, organization and manage ment, allowing the citys website to become a more technologically advanced administrative tool for information sharing. Because of the tremendous amount of con tent and initial transitioning pe riod, you may experience broken links. If this occurs, please let us know what page you found the missing link on by emailing We bUpdates@cityofwinterpark.org and our Communications Depart ment will correct it as quickly as possible. By transitioning to this new system, you will also need to update any bookmarks that have been saved previously, as the page address will be different. The Communications Depart ment continually strives to im prove and enhance cityofwinter park.org to make it more effective information. Thank you for your patience and support during this transition. on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, watch us on Vimeo. Celebrate America Storm coming? Were ready.Report an outage: 800.228.8485 duke-energy.com/stormGet preparation tips: twitter.com/ DukeEnergyStormDuke Energys expert storm response teams know exactly how to prepare for storms and keep your lights on year report and track outages, get preparation tips and more. Duke Energy Storm Sidewalk Sale Park AvenueJuly 10 13Save 50 75% at participating retailers Details at experienceparkavenue.com or call 407-644-8281. ARCHIVE PHOTO COURTESY OF CITY OF WINTER PARK Ride your bike down Park Avenue to start off the Independence Day in Winter Park.

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Do you know of a home construction horror story involving the City of Maitland? We do. Our home was supposed to be built with concrete block but the Building Inspectors for the City of Maitland allowed it to be built with wood. After discovering their error, they refuse to give us a The City of Maitland claims that they are immune from any responsibility for their errors. Do you think this is fair? We dont. Have the Building Inspectors for the City of Maitland made an error on your project? If so, we would like to know. If you know of any other inspection errors by the building inspectors for the City of Maitland, please call: Doug and Linda Macaw @ 321-228-1167Construction HORROR Story

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Page 6 | Thursday, July 3, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Lifestyles From a very early age Maryah Sullivan knew that achieving her dreams would be a struggle. With eyes wide open she looked around herself at a life of poverty and dis advantage and vowed that her future would be different. She found a second home for herself at the John R. Lee branch of the Boys & Girls Club in Eatonville and spent nearly every afternoon there from the age of 6 on. No matter what was happening at home, with all the encouragement and support she needed to become the vibrant, well-bal anced young woman she is today. Out of hundreds of other deserving young adults, Sullivan was recently named the 2014 Youth of the Year by the Boys & Girls Club for the state of Florida. There has always been something spe cial about Maryah, said Austin Long, ser vice director at the Eatonville branch that Sullivan attends. I have watched her grow up and it does my heart good to see her ex cel as she has. Childhood handed Sullivan little in the way of advantage. Born in Mississippi, Sul livan moved to Eatonville as a toddler and lived with a stepfather who, though well meaning, involved himself in criminal activ ity that endangered the family. As a young child, Sullivan recalled see ing sketchy characters coming and going. And, as recently as a few years ago, experi enced a police raid at her home, which led to her stepfathers incarceration. Moving was a frequent occurrence and the only truly stable thing in her young life was the Boys & Girls Club. Through it all though, Sullivan main tained excellent grades, earning mostly As. She recently graduated from Edgewater High School with a 4.4 GPA. With two younger siblings and a single mom, Sullivan often helped out by cooking, babysitting and taking on adult responsibili ties as a child. I always felt the need to be the strong one, Sullivan said. There was just so much going on at home, someone had to keep it together. Even now, she lives in a home with eight other people, including her uncle, siblings and four young cousins. At school, classmates and teachers know her as the straight-A student who is active in clubs, sports and social life, never guessing what she goes through at home. I walk out the door each morning and leave whats going on at home in the house, Sullivan said. Its the only way I manage. She does her homework at the Boys & Girls Club just as she has every afternoon, except that now she is often found tutoring oth er children, helping to encourage them to keep at it with the same dogged determi nation she comes about so naturally. Nomi nated by her local club for the Youth of the Year honor, she competed against other nominees at the local level. Each nomi nee was required to sub mit essays and present one before a panel, to demon strate a range of character development. Outshining the compe tition, Sullivan was named the regional youth of the year and went on to rep resent her local club at the state level, where she would compete against winners from across Florida. Taking home the state title seemed like a long shot to Sullivan, though. I was so shocked to win because everyone there was so deserv ing, really anyone could have won. They were all so nice, she said. In addition to the title, Sullivan took home $6,000 in scholarship money that she will use to study at the University of South Florida in Tampa where they offer a sevenyear accelerated pre-medicine program. PHOTOS BY ALLISON OLCSVAY THE OBSERVER Maryah Sullivan, with Boys and Girls Clubs Austin Long, found stability helping mentor kids. Eatonville girl wins Youth of the Year Crime surrounded her as a child, but Maryah Sullivan found a future helping others ALLISON OLCSVAY Observer staff rfnnt tbbttff tt trf fnttf tf tntn n tfnt nftf f nt tff ff t fnt nbtttfb ffr btf ntf tft rtn t n tnt nfftt n Mary Manrique Retires at Cornerstone Hospicer fntnb nttrrt t rb tt rrt t r Presented by: Supported by: Join the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce as it hosts the City of Winter Parks CoffeeTalk Featuring Kenneth W. Bradley Mayor Join Mayor Bradley for a cup of great conversation as he shares his perspective on current city topics and opens up the floor for questions Friday, July 11, 2014 7:45 a.m. Networking/8:15 a.m. Program WINTER PARK WELCOME CENTER 151 W. Lyman Avenue, Winter Park, FL 32789 A complimentary continental breakfast will be served. The event is free and open to the public. For more information, call 407 6448281 or visit www.winterpark.org. Please see SULLIVAN on next page

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, July 3, 2014 | Page 7 The Sanford River Rats have put together one of the longest winning streaks of the Florida Collegiate Summer League sea son, and now the Winter Park Diamond Dawgs are struggling to keep up. The Rats entered last week al ready on top of the FCSL, but after edging the College Park Freedom in three straight games they start ed this week at 14-7 on the season and 7-3 in their last 10 games. Those three straight losses must have added up to frustration for the Freedom, who lost all three by only a combined 21-16 run dif ferential. The frustration peaked on June 29, when the Freedom took a 3-2 lead into the bottom of the ninth inning before watching it go away on a wild throw that turned a Demetrius Sims stolen base into the tying run. After two Einar Muniz score from third in the bottom of the 12th to end it all. That loss would be the fourth straight for the Freedom. Meanwhile the Winter Park Diamond Dawgs were avenging a 5-3 loss to the DeLand Suns with two straight wins. Both of those, back-to-back on June 29, started and ended as blowouts. ed a double to lead off the game. Two batters later Tagg Duce smashed his 10th double of the season. Devin Raftery struck out nine and gave up just two hits in In the second game Duce blast ed yet another double and gave his team a margin that would never narrow, ending 4-1. Devin Pellien gave up just a run on four the win. The Dawgs and Rats played a pair of games each during press time. At 7 p.m. July 3 the Daw gs will host the Winter Garden Squeeze at Alfond Stadium. The Rats host the DeLand Suns at 7 p.m. the same night. At 1 p.m. July 6 the Rats host the Squeeze at Sanford Memorial Stadium. At the same time the Dawgs host the Lightning at home. ARCHIVE PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Alex Kline has a 1.22 ERA and 30 strikeouts in 22 innings pitched this season. Rats grab third-straight win ISAAC BABCOCK Observer staff Rooted & grounded in Jesus Christ. The Learning Tree is a Ministry of First Baptist Church of Winter ParkWe offer Full-Day Infant Care and Childcare Year-Round, Preschool Classes, Summer Camp, and much more! 1021 New York Avenue N., Winter Park, Florida 32789 Established in 1972 we are celebrating 41 years of service this year. Maitland Coin & Currency ShowMaitland Civic Center 641 South Maitland Avenue, Maitland, FL 32751FREE ADMISSIONShow open to the public Buy Sell AppraisalsFor more information call or visitOrlando Coin Exchange 6301 S. Orange Avenue Orlando, FL 32809www.MaitlandCoinShow.comorlandocoinexchange@gmail.com407-730-3116 SUNDAY, July 6th9:00 AM TO 5:00 PM Free coin for all children 12 and under 6 6 SUN Become a member today. SULLIVAN | For as long as I can remember, Ive always been doctoring peo ple, Sullivan said. Its just a part of who I am. Anxious to get started, Sulli van is heading to Tampa early to begin college in the summer term rather than wait for fall. She plans to attend classes every summer to quickly as possible. She already has a specialty in mind, hoping to someday become a neurosurgeon. I became obsessed with how the brain works in my high school psychology class, she said. My interest just grew from there. Sullivan plans to keep in con nect with the Boys & Girls Club throughout college by volunteer ing at a local club in Tampa. I want to stay connected to an organization that has given me so much, she said. As her mentor and surrogate father at the Boys & Girls Club, Long has known Sullivan nearly all her life and has watched her grow up. She has always been a leader and never minded being called smart, like other kids might, he said. She just turned that into a further challenge to show other kids how to do better. Maryah is always encouraging others to not give up. Shes dedicated to her own future, for sure, but she never forgets to stop along the way and help everyone else, thats what re ally makes her special. C ONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE

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Page 8 | Thursday, July 3, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer WPV Voice S ummer is ofcially here and you dont have to go far to en joy some great summer ac tivities and dining specials. As a wife and a mother I am always looking to nd kidfriendly activities as well as date night specials with the hubby. This summer at Winter Park Village you can discover just that with a va riety of things to do for kids, art lovers and foodies! If youre an art lover you wont want to miss this sum mer event: Barterbys Art Gallery presents Secrets from Behind the Vault. En joy an evening with The Masters as Barterbys re veals never-before-seen original, museum-quality artwork on Friday, July 25, from 6 to 9 p.m. Admission includes: complimentary wine, an exclusive sneak peek with brief art lecture, a rafe ticket with framed art giveaways and more. The cost is $20 in advance with RSVP or $25 at the door with 100 percent of admission proceeds being donated to United Cerebral Palsy of Center Florida. RSVP at bar terbys.com/secrets For those of you who are aspiring poets, singers, story tellers or comedians, check out Tea and Tea for their new open mic series, Tea and Tea Presents: Cen ter Stage. Center Stage is a new weekly open mic event on Thursday nights from 8 to 10 p.m. They also will be offering 10 percent off inhouse and to-go drinks dur ing the event, and everyone is welcome! Parents, are you looking beat the summer heat while the kids are out of school? Come bring the family and enjoy family fun movies playing on Tuesdays and Wednesdays during the summertime at Regal Cin emas. Admission to these movies during the Summer Movie Express is only $1. Tickets must be purchased at the theater, and all mov ies start at 10 a.m. Visit regmovies.com to view the movie schedule. After the movie take a short stroll over to Menchies Frozen Yo PHOTO BY COURTESY OF REGAL CINEMA FACEBOOK PAGE. REGAL CINEMAS $1 SUMMER MOVIE EXPRESS. PHOTO BY MITCH ELLS FISH MARKET FACEBOOK MITCHELLS FISH MARKET SUMMER OF THE GRILL. Summer happenings at WPV Please see VILLAGE on next page ADVERTORIAL Winter Park Village gift cards now available at self-serve kiosk located in the breezeway near White House Black Market 407.571.2700 | www.ShopWinterParkVillage.net Mitchells Fish Market P.F. Changs Ruths Chris Steak House The Cheesecake Factory TAPS WINTER P ARK VILLAGEBrio Tuscan GrilleDine DineWPB_WPMobserver_8x10.indd 1 4/26/14 11:09 AM

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, July 3, 2014 | Page 9 PHOTO COURTESY OF WINTER PARK VILLAGE THE LESTER FAMILY FROM ALTAMONTE SPRINGS COOLING OFF WITH SOME MENCHIES FROZEN YOGURT. NATHAN, 3, ANDREW, 10 AND MATTHEW, 12 853 South Orlando Ave.Just south of Fairbanks on Hwy. 17-92 (1 mi. east of I-4, Exit 87)Winter Park, FL 32789 (407) 644-454715,000 sq. ft. featuring 140 dealersOPEN 7 DAYSMonSat 10 Sun 12No Magic Words ... Just good old antiques & vintage!Come see why customers LOVE our Mall!Visit us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter. Orange Tree Antiques Mall Orange Tree Antiques Mall July 4th Weekend Sale July 4-7 VILLAGE | Summer dining and happy hour specials can make for a great date night at Winter Park Village gurt for half-off wafe bowls during Wafe Wednesday! WPV also has some great summer dining and happy hour specials perfect for a date night or just gathering with good friends! Mitch ells Fish Market is offering a Summer of the Grill menu which includes a threecourse meal for just $29.99. P.F. Changs is offering a chefs summer seasonal menu which includes six unique dishes, perfect wine pairings and handcrafted cocktails. As always you can wind down with happy hour at se lect WPV restaurants. Lime Fresh Mexican Grill offers two-for-one beers, margari tas and $2 tacos Wednesday through Friday from 4 to 7 p.m. Brio Tuscan Grilles Bar Brioso special is Mon day through Friday at the bar from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. where you can enjoy bar plates and beverages from $4 to $6. And Sakari Sushi offers happy hour rolls and two-for-one sake drink spe cials, just to name a few. Other restaurants offering happy hour specials include Cheesecake Factory, Ruth Chris Steakhouse, Taps Wine & Beer, P.F. Changs China Bistro and Mitchells Fish Market. For more information on WPV events and specials, visit shopwinterparkvillage. net Mary Calcia, WPV Mar keting Corrdinator C ONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE

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Page 10 | Thursday, July 3, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Tonight July 3 1st Thursdays: Sculpture Heavy Metal While the three-dimension ality of sculpture makes it a favorite for art-lovers, most art patrons have little concept of the steps necessary to bring a state. This interactive 1st Thurs day tonight at 6 p.m. will include demonstrations of clay sculpting by Steve Pi; Lost Wax Display by Kent Arblaster; wax carving by Rebecca Rose & David Ramos; steel welding by Marcos Cruz; and even choco late sculpting by Paul Joachim. OMArts original art party is at the Orlando Museum of Art in Orlando. Call 407-896-4231 or visit OMART.org July 3 to 8 Columbinus (the play) recalls Columbine H.S. Massacre Columbinus, a play based on the 1999 massacre at Colum bine High School in Colorado, ing with the angst of adolescent culture. Exploring the events surrounding the shootings, actual discussions with parents, survivors, community leaders and police reports come togeth er to reveal the dark recesses of American adolescence. Directed by Wade Hair, this play is for mature audiences and will be presented from July 3 to 8 at The Breakthrough Theatre in Winter Park. For reservations, call 407-920-4034 or visit break throughtheatre.com July 4 Orlandos Fireworks at the Fountain Fireworks at the Fountain is the largest and longest run ning 4th of July in Central Florida. Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer invites all Central Florida residents and visitors to attend the Fire works on July 4 at Lake Eola Park in downtown Orlando. New this year, guests may enjoy a performance by the Orlando Philharmonic before and ac companying the spectacular Entertainment begins at 4 p.m. throughout the park; the Phil harmonic begins performing at 8:30 p.m.; and the Fireworks begin at 9:10 p.m. Visit cityofor July 7 and 21 The Orlando Philharmonic Sounds of Summer Concert Series With each concert featuring a different theme of instru ments, composers and musi cians, this seasons Sounds of Summer Concert Series will be performed at the Orchestras new home at Plaza Live at 425 N. Bumby Ave in Orlando. July Concerts include: Winds! Chamber en sembles drawn from the wind and string sections of the Or chestra perform the Beethoven Trio, op. 38, the Poulenc Sextet and more. Like A Dame! In an evening of music composed by women and performed by women, Joni Hanze Bjella, Olga Ferroni, Karen Peters and Maureen May perform piano music by Jen nifer Higdon, Fanny Mendels sohn, Amy Beach and Cecile Chaminade, along with the songs of Barbra Strei sand and Carole King. Visit OrlandoPhil.org or call 407-770-0071. In a career thats entered its third de cade and produced 17 albums, moe enjoys the double whammy of critical acclaim and an international fan base. Progressive rockers Al Schnier, Chuck Garvey, Rob Derhak, Jim Loughlin and Vinnie Amico continue to tour the globe, headline music festivals, and/ or share the stage with performance leg ends. Known for the continuing vitality of their music, its their live, on-stage show manship that seals the deal. Join them at Plaza Live on July 8 at 8 p.m. Visit plazali veorlando.com July 10 to 28 Ladies of Eola Heights a Wanzie Comedy Director Ken Howard has taken on this re-envisioning of Michael Wanzies wildly successful comedy with a cast of Central Floridas favorite actresses including Peg OKeef, Beth Marshall, Blue Star and Miss Sammy Singhaus. There is more than steel to these Magnolias in this story of sisters who come together after years of being apart, while the comic references to a com munity within walking distance of the theater should make for some very funny art-imitatinglife moments. In performance from July 10 to 28 at The Abbey, visit abbeyorlando.com for tickets. And looking ahead Through Aug. 31 The Allure of Ancient Rome Showcasing prints, draw ings, and an illustrated book from the Cornell Museums permanent collection, the Cor nells new exhibit highlights the uities in Europe and the role played by printed images in sharing knowledge about those antiquities. This exhibit coin cides with the loan of a Roman sarcophagus to the Cornell with the print-works dating from 1540 to 1750. Admission is free. Call 407-646-2526 or visit Rol lins.edu/cfam Aug. 9 Taste of the Nation Orlando On Aug. 9 at 6:45 p.m., Taste of the Nation brings together the areas top chefs who donate their time, talent and passion to end childhood hunger in Central Florida. Along with extraordinary food, guests sample select wines while enjoying auctions and enter tainment. Please know that hunger and homelessness in Central Florida. Tickets are $150. Visit tasteofthenation. org/orlando and/or face book.com/OrlandoTaste. We can all buy a ticket and help. Aug. 23 Give Kids the Worlds rst-ever MacDown Competition Another foodie event of a ever MacDown (mac & cheese) Give Kids the World the 70acre resort for children with life-threatening illnesses. The competition is open to every one from professional chefs to home cooks on Aug. 23 at the Orange County Conven tion Center. There will be lots of fun prizes, but the best prize is knowing your efforts will help a tragically sick child achieve a dream. For more information, visit otownmacdown.org Josh Garrick Culture for your calendar Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906. LADIES OF EOLA HEIGHTS MACDOWN COMPETITION This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORG @EnzianTheater OBVIOUS CHILDA 2014 Florida Film Festival favorite returns to Enzian! Fri Sun 4PM, 6:30, 9PM Mon, Wed, Thurs 6:30, 9PM Tues 6:30KidFest Summer Film Series!Weekdays are FREE. Weekends only $5.A HARD DAYS NIGHTSunday 1PMBuster Keaton in THE GENERALTues 3PMOLIVER!Wed 2:30JAMES AND THE GIANT PEACHThurs 3PMCult Classics: THE WAR OF THE WORLDS (1953)Tues 9:30Popcorn Flicks in the Park: MUSCLE BEACH PARTYFREE in Central Park! Thurs 8PM or SunsetBallet on the Big Screen: SLEEPING BEAUTY (Paris)For discounted admission to all ballet screenings, buy a Series Pass! Sat 11AM www.lilylace.com4TH OF JULY CELEBRATIONPARTY AT THE SHOP WITH REFRESHMENTS AND SPECIALS.VISIT US TODAY AND TEST YOUR ABILITY TO RESIST TEMPTATION

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, July 3, 2014 | Page 11 Opinions Chris Jepson Perspectives A legitimate question that needs asking is, What is in Americas national inter est? As in, why is it in the national inter est to be militarily involved in the Middle offered for continued military involvement in Iraq? Are the old explanations of oil and Israel still applicable today? Is the extent to which we care about the region well as any moral solidarity America has with Israel? Speaking of which, because we broke Iraq, does America have any moral respon sibility or culpability in the unfolding events there today? I recall from college history classes the recent example of Yugoslavia be ing held together by the strongman, Marshal Josip Tito. There were four or and until Tito died they functioned as a nation state. Until America overthrew the Iraq government in 2003, Iraqi Sunnis, Shi ites and Kurds were operating as a nation state. Granted, any cooperation such as it was, was brutally enforced by the auto cratic despot Saddam Hussein. Nonethe less, Iraq functioned as a nation state until the United States broke it. That is fact. I am continually amazed that with any Middle East crisis whether it is Libya or Syria or Iraq the Republican Party immediately pushes for American military intervention. Why is that? Why are events in these nations any of Americas busi ness? Is it still about oil and Israel? The Of course, oil and Israel are still factors. Radicalized Muslims want to kill Ameri cans in America. That is the rationale for experiencing another New York City 9/11. It is suggested that radicalized Mus lims want to murder Americans because they are at war with our way of life. Pluralism, democracy, minority rights, capitalism and religious freedom are so threatening and egregious that war with action. I question that assessment of Mus lim grievances against the U.S. (the West). Because we have toaster ovens as well as six Catholic Supreme Court Judges and that we try to hold democratic elections, Muslims want to murder us? Hmmm? Surely there must be additional reasons. Surely. I never so much hear Muslims chant ing, Death to the Brazilians! Or, Death to the Chinese! Have you ever wondered why that is? What could be the explana tion? Oh, and what do the Chinese pay for a barrel of oil? I believe autocratic, theo cratic tyrants (take your pick) often require an enemy to divert the people from the oppressive (political, economic, social) conditions they live in. What America has done in spades for decades is provide and installed our own (See: Shah of Iran). We invaded and occupied Iraq. Sent troops to Lebanon. Declared war in Afghanistan. Intervened in the Somalia Civil War. We have supported so many oppressive Mid dle East regimes that it is far beyond our ability to count such geopolitical mistakes So ask yourself: if radicalized Muslims want to murder Americans today, to what degree are we culpable in creating such Islamic hatred and animosity? Is it in our national interest to have Muslims wanting to murder Americans? If no, perhaps we should consider, oh, a 50-year hiatus of not pursuing military solutions and not meddling period in the Islamic Middle East. Dear Abby said it best, MYOB. Mind your own business, America. And stay the hell out of Iraq. Why is everybody always picking on me? Jepson is a 27-year resident of Central Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.US Louis Roney Play On! 60 percent of American strong liberals said no when asked if they often feel proud to be American. Well, I am liberal about lots of things, but I never claimed to be a Liberal. I choose to be an old-fashioned patriot when it comes to this land that gives so much to the world and asks only for land to bury its dead. My father served in both World Wars and I served four years in WWII. In the tism; it was in us like the red blood in our veins. The pride I feel at being a red, white and blue American is a quiet inhabiting spirit that never ever leaves me. gress appointed a committee made up of Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Roger Sherman and Robert Liv ingston to draft a Declaration of Indepen dence. The committee then chose Jefferson to John Adams commented that Jefferson was selected for his happy talent for com position and singular felicity of expression. In the next 17 days, Jefferson drafted one of the most beautiful and powerful testaments to liberty and equality in the history of man kind. The document opens with a Preamble stressing the natural rights of all human grievances against King George III that re lieved the American colonies of any further allegiance to the British Crown. Although the Declaration of Independence adopted on July 4, 1776 underwent a series of revisions from Jeffersons original draft, the celebrated words remain for the most part his own: We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are en dowed by their creator with certain unalien able rights, that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. Jeffersons wisdom spoke: If we can but prevent the government from wasting the labours of the people under the pretence of taking care of them, they must become happy. It would seem that present President Obama was out to lunch when Jeffer sons pertinent sage words were in the air. Obamas entire administration is based on what Jefferson said would end American democracy. No freeman shall ever be debarred the use of arms [within his own lands or tene ments]. The liberty to possess arms is, in Jeffersons words, unequivocal. Jefferson stated: When they get piled upon one another in large cities, as in Europe, we shall become as corrupt as Europe. Could Jefferson have prophetically foreseen our futures politically overcrowd ed Washington? The tree of liberty, said Jefferson, must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants. Well, we have seen enough tyrants and shed plenty of blood! Jefferson continues: I never considered a difference of opinion in politics, in religion, or in philosophy, a cause for withdraw ing from a friend. The glow of one warm thought is to me worth more than money To compel a man to furnish contribu tions of money for the propagation of opinions which he disbelieves and abhors, is sinful and tyrannical. Doesnt this maxim apply to todays ObamaCare? the harder I work the more I have of it. Right on, Jefferson. Educate and inform the whole mass of people ... They are the only sure reliance for the preservation of our liberty. Our greatest happiness does not depend on the condition of life in which chance has placed us, but is always the result of a good conscience, good health, occupation, and freedom in all just pursuits. These words of Thomas Jefferson leave us an inheritance of wise intelligence and valuable morality that, if we heed them, will heed them? Happy Fourth of July! died on the 4th of July in 1826 exactly 50 years after the Declaration of Independence! Thomas Jefferson: Savant About Roney: HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney) SunRail is open for business and is transporting commut ers along 32 miles of track from Sand Lake Road to DeBary. The project is the culmination of years of effort from federal, state and local governments to reduce the dependency on Central Floridas congested roadways. Tickets are available at kiosks at each station. A reloadable card is also available for those who plan to ride frequently. Base fares are $2 for one-way tickets and $3.75 for round-trip tickets. Passengers will be charged an additional $1 each time their train crosses a county line. For more information on fares, sta tion locations, or train schedules, visit sunrail.com SunRails total cost is approxi mately $1.05 billion, with $615 million allocated for construction and $435 million dedicated to right of way acquisition. State and local governments will each pay for 25 percent of total project costs. The federal government will fund the remaining 50 per cent. The state will be respon sible for SunRails operations and maintenance costs for the governments will fully fund the in the eighth year of operations. Costs will be partially offset by fares from SunRails ridership. Trains will run every 30 minutes during the peak hours of 5:30 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. During normal hours trains will depart their home station every two hours in either direction. SunRail will only run on weekdays and no service will initially be offered on weekends. Phase one includes seven stops in Orange County including its southernmost stop at Sand Lake Road. Additional Orange County stops include the Orlando Amtrak station, Church Street, Lynx Central, Florida Hospital Health Village, Winter Park and Maitland. Seminole County has four stops at Al tamonte Springs, Longwood, Lake Mary and Sanford. Phase ones northernmost station is located in DeBary in Volusia County. SunRails construction was divided into two phases. When complete, the 61.5-mile line will include 17 stops in four counties. The addition of phase two will nearly double the length of the line. Phase two will add three new stations in Osceola County at Poinciana, the Kissimmee Am trak station, and Osceola Park way. Both Orange and Volusia counties will each receive an ad ditional stop at Meadow Woods and DeLand, respectively. I hope that SunRail provides an effective transportation solu tion for many Orange County commuters. My staff and I are available to answer any ques tions you may have about Sun Rail, transportation, or any other Orange County issue. We can be reached at 407-836-7350 or by How to get around on your new train system Ted Edwards Commissioners Corner I never so much hear Muslims chanting Death to the Brazilians!

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Page 36 | Thursday, July 3, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer The Winter ParkMaitland Observer e-newsletter contains a wealth of community news every week. Get it delivered to your inbox. Visit WPMObserver.com and click Subscribe to newsletter The Winter Park Maitland Observer e-newsletter contains a wealth of community news every week. Get it delivered to your inbox. Visit WPMObserver.com and click Subscribe to newsletter SUNDAY 2-4 NEW PRICE! POOL HOME IN FANTASTIC LOCATION 914 Moss Lane, Winter Park. 4BD/3BA, 3,335SF. Renovated in 2003. Two master suites downstairs. Expansive great room with vaulted ceilings, wood burning fire place that is surrounded by built-in shelves & cabinets. Large Florida room with built-in bar looks out on to screened pool. $649,900 SATURDAY 2-4 UPDATED FURNISHED SEAWARD CONDO 4811 Saxon Drive, New Smyrna Beach. 2BD/2BA, 1,120SF. Open living area locat ed on the no drive section of the beach. Step out on your covered 4th floor balcony and enjoy stunning views of the Atlantic Ocean. Open kitchen and a full size high end washer/dryer in unit. Complex com pleted $1,100,000+ renovation with major upgrades and make over in 2011. Large oceanfront heated pool with brick paver deck. $339,500 OBSERVER Open Houses THE MARKE T PLA C E King Features Weekly ServiceJune 30, 2014 King Features Weekly ServiceJune 30, 2014 King Features Weekly ServiceJune 30, 2014 King Features Weekly ServiceJune 30, 2014 817 Greenwood Street, Orlando, FL 32801 sold by Mary Ann Steltenkamp with Kelly Price & Company 712 London Road, Winter Park, FL 32792 sold by Mary Ann Steltenkamp with Kelly Price & Company 1322 Druid Road, Maitland, FL 32751 sold by Jenni Sloan with Kelly Price & Company OBSERVER Just Sold Homes ANNOUNCEMENTS BE THE 1st Medical Alert Company in your area! Owning your own local distributorship. We do 70% of the work! Unlimited $ re turn. Investment required. Free Call (844) 225-1200. Monthly Parking Available at Village Park Senior Apartments! Covered Parking Available Monthly at Vil lage Park Apartments across the street from Winter Park Village $50/Monthly Call 407-960-3694 Village Park Senior Apartments 407-960-3694 Leasing@ myvillageparkapts.com Online Only 2-Day Auction, Furniture Liquidation including Rugs, Ta bles, Household Items, Furniture & More, Jamestown, NC, Guilford Co. 7/11 at 8am to 7/18 & 7/21 at 1pm. Iron Horse Auction Co., Inc. 800-997-2248. NCAL3936. www.ironhorseauction.com EDUCATION AIRLINE JOBS Start Here Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified stu dents. Housing and Job placement assis tance. Call Aviation Institute of Mainte nance 844-210-3935 TRAIN FROM HOME: MEDICAL BILLING; ACCOUNTING ASST;CUSTOMER SERVICE. NO EXPERI ENCE NEEDED. HS/GED NEEDED TO AP PLY. Sullivan and Cogliano Training Cen ters. 1-800-451-0709 HEALTH & MEDICAL Pressure Points Acupuncture Pressure Points Acupuncture invites you on a journey to Health and Wellness in their new facility in Winter Park by the Ravaudage Development. Enhance your modern life through the ancient healing arts of Acupuncture and Traditional Chi nese Medicine. Start on your path to well ness today. pressurepointsacupuncture. com Karan Landkroon (407) 960-4472 pressurepointsacupuncture@gmail.com HEALTH & MEDICAL Summer Martial Arts Classes Olympic Sport Judo, Ju Jitsu, Self-De fense, and fitness. Certified instructors w/criminal background checks! Improve fitness, strength & flexibility. Appropriate for elite junior athletes and those needing weight loss. Learn respect and self-disci pline! Adult Judo & Ju Jitsu classes also offered. Aloma Ave. Metro Orlando Judo Kai 4079283643 JudokaiOrlando@aol. com HELP WANTED AVERITT EXPRESS New Pay Increase For Regional Drivers! 40 to 46 CPM + Fuel Bonus! Also, PostTraining Pay Increase for Students! (De pending on Domicile) Get Home EVERY Week + Excellent Benefits. CDL-A req. 888-362-8608 Apply @ AverittCareers. com Equal Opportunity Employer Fe males, minorities, protected veterans, and individuals with disabilities are en couraged to apply. Driver Trainees Needed Now! Become a driver for Werner Enterprises. Earn $800 per week! Local CDL Training. 1-877-214-3624 Now Hiring OTR CDL-A Drivers. New Pay Package and $1500 Sign-On Bonus! Mostly 5-10 days out, full bene fits, achievable bonuses. Call today for details 1-888-378-9691 or apply at www.heyl.net PROFESSIONAL SERVICE HANDYMAN No job too small Licensed and insured Minor repairs A to Z, carpentry, electrical, plumbing, painting, wallpapering, dry wall, pressure washing FREE ESTIMATES Kenneth Bryant 407-463-5111 kdbbry ant1@yahoo.com REAL ESTATE: FOR SALE Lake Sybelia Real Estate Auction Friday, July 18th, 7PM Held on-site: 710 Thompson Ave, Maitland, FL. Beautiful 5BR/4.5BA(4,041+/SF) Lakefront home on Lake Sybelia with private boat ramp & dock & lift. Preview: Saturday, July 12th, 11AM-2PM www.higgenbotham.com/ M.E. Higgenbotham FL Lic#AU305AB158 Higgenbotham Auc tioneers 800.257.4161 auction@higgen botham.com FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now survive DIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922 SUNDAY 1-4 NEW LISTING! CUSTOM-BUILT HOME IN BALDWIN PARK 4121 Haws Lane, Orlando. 3BD/2.5BA, 2,728SF. Hardwood flooring, high vol ume coffered ceilings, wood and granite fireplace, built-ins. Gourmet kitchen with cherry cabinets, wine rack and granite counters. Master suite offers jetted tub, dual shower heads, and walk-in closets. $569,900 709 Wilshire Drive, Casselberry, FL 32707 sold by Sherri Dyer with Kelly Price & Company 963 Cherry Branch Court, Lake Mary, FL 32746 sold by Kelly L. Price with Kelly Price & Company 492 Julian Lane, Maitland, FL 32751 sold by Kelly L. Price with Kelly Price & Company 1660 Chase Landing Way, Winter Park, FL 32789 sold by Kelly L. Price & Pamela Ryan with Kelly Price & Company 1700 E. Winter Park Road, Winter Park, FL 32789 sold by Kelly L. Price & Dee Morgan with Kelly Price & Company

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A SUPPLEMENT OF THE WINTER PARK-MAITLAND OBSERVER AND SEMINOLE VOICE JULY 2014 Joan Ray has been a dancer since she was a child. Shed watch the afternoon dance shows on TV, spend three af ternoons a week after school dancing the jitterbug, and whatever else the kids were excited about at the time. When she got older, shed hop up with her girlfriends and do a little line dancing if the mood was right. Her husband Roy has always been a bit of Most of the time it was Joan getting up and dancing with the girls while I sat over and had a beer, or two, and cheered her on, he said. But Joan, 70, hasnt been dancing in a while. The Winter Springs couples life has changed drastically in the diagnosed with Alzheimers in 2009. It was gradual at places she normally wouldnt and then not being able to harder lately. Joan sometimes wanders the house at night and she cant drive anymore. Roy has to do all the cooking and housework. Its been a transition from went on, to now being able to deal with those problems knowing theyre there and theyre not going to go away and its not her, its the dis ease thats causing the prob lem, Roy said. Their lifestyle has changed considerably, but they still try to do normal couple things. They go out to eat, invite friends over and travel with a motor home group. When Roy saw that the Alzheimers Association was offering ballroom dance classes this summer, he saw another opportunity for he and his wife to connect with each other, friends who un derstand what theyre going through, and have some fun. The classes, which are free and being held by the Al zheimer Association and the USA Dance Orlando chapter, run every Saturday through July 26 from 2 to 3 p.m. at the Crosby Center YMCA in Winter Park. In 2013 a team of research ers from Nottingham Univer sity in the United Kingdom released a study that shows staying active with your brain and body could be effective in staving off Al zheimers disease. Ballroom dancing activates both. While there is not a 100 percent proven method for slowing progression or prevention with the disease; self stimulated, keeping your mind active and keeping your body active are really the best ways to help slow progression of the disease and help pre vent the decline, said Danny Anez, associate director of programs for the Alzheimers Association Central and North Florida Chapter. So ballroom dancing it has the unique ability to both work out your brain and stimulate your brain in new and novel ways as well as physically working yourself out and working on things like balance, which is a huge issue when it comes to senior populations. And since there is no cure or real treatment for demen tia, an activity like ballroom dancing is worth looking into considering how many Ameri cans the disease impacts. More than 5 million Ameri cans are living with dementia and every 67 seconds another person develops Alzheim ers, according to statistics collected by the Alzheim ers Association. Experts estimate that by the year 2050, 16 million people will have the disease. The symptoms of dementia are incredibly disrupt ing to daily life for the indi vidual. Theres memory loss and decreased problem solv ing and reasoning skills. Suf ferers experience confusion with time or place, changes in personality and have trouble joining or following a conver sation. That can make a person affected by dementia with draw from their normal social activities. They stop going to church or having dinner with friends. Anez hopes that the ballroom dance program can keep those people engaged in their community instead. It keeps people living with a purpose in life, he said. John Davis, president of the Orlando chapter of USA Dance, hopes those who come to the dance program create a stronger bond with their caregiver, have fun and allow them to reminisce about hap pier times. Some of the things that Dancing through the fog of dementia PHOTOS BY SARAH WILSON CENTRAL FLORIDA SENIOR Caregivers and volunteers twirl their partners through choreographed routines. Please see DANCING on page 3 Step by step, dementia patients better their brains and bodies with ballroom dance lessons BRITTNI LARSON Central Florida Senior Winter Pa rk's Distinctive R etir ement Community

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Page 2 Growing up in the South, I always marveled at how adept everyone was at well-man nered hatefulness. If someone made a stupid comment, the response would never be, What an idiot you are! Instead it was, Well, aint that nice? or Why, bless your heart. When it came to social-grace duplicity, we were the champions. Or so I thought. That was before I came to Washington. It takes a little getting used to, but for the most part, you must accept that people mean the opposite of what they say. If most say Nice to see you, they are actually looking over your shoulder at someone more im portant. The really good ones somehow manage to make eye contact with you while looking past you at the same instant. Its pretty amazing. And anyone who has watched the Senate is well aware that the members refer to their most despised ene mies as My friend. That ex tends far beyond the Capitol. If anyone calls you his or her friend, watch your back. Theres nothing new about this, and its not unique to D.C. We all have our mo ments of not meaning what we say. The normal greeting is How are you doing? The automatic answer is Fine, thank you. But lets face it: We usually couldnt care less, and we certainly dont want to hear when someone is not is Actually terrible. My wife has left me for a younger man, my business is bankrupt, and the bank just foreclosed on my house. What do you say? If you grew up in the South, per haps youd respond with bless your heart, in which case youd mean, Im sorry, did you say something? Or youd escape as fast as you could. Thank you for asking, is sponse to the insincere How you doing? greeting. Thank you for asking translates to, None of your business. The more someone sings your praises to your face, the more he changes his tune behind your back. Perhaps Michael Kinsley is correct, though, with his observation sincere, because the person lavishing compliments thinks youre worthwhile enough to Again, its Washington. Here its barely noticed that the same Republicans who were demanding that the ad ministration bring back Tali ban hostage Bowe Bergdahl at any cost now are raising Cain about the very fact that a deal was made for his return. Its galling how shame whats really infuriating is how President Barack Obama even lets them bother him. He its always damned if you do, and damned if you dont for him. Deception is accepted as the norm here, and they never have to eat their words. Hillary Clinton shows shes no slouch at this when she chooses her language. My fakery favorite is the expression I wish him well, which is code for condemning someone to a miserable life. the umpteen TV interviews she did to promote her new book, Hillary told ABCs Diane Sawyer she wished not only Rand Paul well, but also Monica Lewinsky. Aint that nice? 2014 Bob Franken Distributed by King Features Synd. Mastering well-mannered hatefulness For people who want to hear better. Make It a Spectacular SummerwithBetter Hearing! For over 26 years, millions of Americans have trusted HearUSA for the best hearing care in America and the only organization providing TotalCare. Call Toll Free today for a FREE Hearing Check-up! 2014 HearUSA, All Rights Reserved. www.hearusa.com Call Toll Free: 855.802.55327512 Dr. Phillips Blvd., Suite 90 Orlando(On Dr. Phillips Boulevard, near Steinmart and between Stefanos Grill and Kekes restaurant in the Dr. Phillips Marketplace.) Total Care ExperienceMost complete and accurate hearing check-up. Total Care Selection HearUSA offers a broad selection of advanced hearing aids from trusted brands.Total Care Technology Video Otoscope examination a look inside your ear to determine if you have ear wax. A LIFETIME OF BETTER HEARING! FIRST CLASS CARE WORLD CLASS TECHNOLOGY FREE Gas Cardwith Hearing Screening* *Must have hearing loss.Financing as low as$33/mo.**Same as cash and 0% APR O.A.C. (on approval of credit). Minimum monthly payments required on all same as cash and 0% contracts. Trade in your old hearing aids and receive$1500 o your next purchase.* *$750 o each hearing aid. Valid on Siemens 5mi and 7mi aids only. Not valid with any other oer or discount. Oer expires 7/31/14. 140701 HearUSA July Ad_Central Florida Senior_10.25x8_to run 7-3_01.indd 1 5/29/14 5:00 PM Savannah Court and Cove Excellence in Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation 1301 W. Maitland Blvd. Maitland, FL 32751407-645-3990www.SavannahCourtMaitland.comAssisted Living Facility License No. 8447 Skilled Nursing Facility License No. 1635096 Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above. You are always welcome!A Senior Living Community where Hospitality is a Way of Life.

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Page 3 Next time dont ignore that AARP invite At some point in our lives, we will get an invitation to join AARP, the organization for seniors. This likely will co incide with our 50th birthday, a point many of us dont want to acknowledge. The AARP mail is ignored, maybe for a week, maybe for 10 years. But at some point we concede: We are seniors. And we need AARP. Ive been taking a closer look at AARP recently, and have concluded that its worth joining. Here are a few of the Need help with estate plan ning, starting a business or your taxes? Its there, as close as your computer. Want good information on local political issues that affect seniors in your state. Its there. AARP is in our corner, with one of the strongest lobby efforts in Washington, D.C. there are two side branches Services provides discounts on many of the things we need, such as travel, legal, entertain ment and supplemental health insurance. AARP Foundation provides on-the-job training, education, legal help and much more. The AARP Driver Safety program can be taken either online or in a class setting. The biggest value is that it teaches about the changes that come with age and how those can affect driving. The bi-monthly magazine is worth the price of the mem bership alone ($16 per year). What I appreciate most is that the articles are straightfor ward, informative and not con descending. With membership you also can read them online. If you have access to a com puter, look around the site at aarp.com. Check the memberalready a member, or ask for one by phone when you sign up by calling 1-888-687-2277. Be sure youre not missing out on anything especially your discounts! Matilda Charles regrets that she cannot personally answer reader questions, but will incorporate them into her column whenever possible. Send email to columnreply2@gmail.com. 2014 King Features Synd. Inc. DANCING | Motion improves memories happen when you start with cognitive deterioration is that it does lead to a certain isola tion and loneliness, and cer tainly ballroom dancing with a partner will help them to channel communication on a social level and on a physical level, he said. This might even bring back memories of them swing dancing in the past, or salsa dancing. Joans excited to relive a little bit of her past. Shes a great dancer, Roy said, but hes a little nervous. Im afraid Ill step all over her feet. Oh you will not, youll do When he leaves the room she makes a motion, showing off how shell be doing the leading while theyre there. She wont let him step on her feet. C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE The Alzheimer Association Central and North Florida Chap ter will be holding free ballroom dance classes for those diagnosed with a dementia and their caregiv ers there are volunteer partners available, too every Saturday in July from 2 to 3 p.m. Classes are at the Crosby Center YMCA in Win ter Park and RSVP is required, call 1-800-272-3900. Life is easier with Home Care Services We have the Skill to Heal. The Spirit to Care. Transitional Care Program Philips Personal Medication Dispenser Philips Lifeline Call today to schedule Private Duty Services (407) 691-8206 P h i l i p s P e r s o n a l M e d i c a t i o n D i s p e n s e r The Personal Medication Dispenser assists with medication management Medications are reviewed and pre-filled by a registered nurse, preventing o veror undermedication that could lead to a costly re -hospitalization. Most Older People Have DiverticulosisDEAR DR. DONOHUE:I am a 78-year-old female,active and in good health or so I thought. I eat right and never smoked or drank alcohol. Yesterday,a colonoscopy showed severe diverticulosis. The doctor prescribed Benefiber,then left and never returned. I am stunned. What do I do now? Will I have this forever? Am I unhealthy? How does one develop diverticulosis? What the difference between osisand itis? S.K. ANSWER:Your world isnt collapsing. Youre healthy. Youll have diverticulosis forever. By age 60,half of the people in North America have it. By age 80,two-thirds have it. A diverticulum is a bulge of the inner colon lining through the colons muscular wall to its outer surface. A diverticulum looks like a small soap bubble. Its only 1/5 to 2/5 inches (0.5 to 1 cm) in diameter. You can thank our diet for diverticulosis. We refine flour and throw away its bran the outer coat of grain. In countries where whole grains (including the bran) are commonly used,diverticulosis is a rarity. Bran and other fiber hold water in undigested food. Without fiber,the food residue dries and becomes hard. The colon muscles have to generate a great deal of force to keep it moving. That force causes the colon lining to pop through the colon wall as a diverticulum. For most,diverticulosis is a silent condition that remains silent for life. For a few,the diverticulum breaks and causes a local infection in the colon diverticulitis. The pain of a diverticulitis attack is usually felt in the lower left corner of the abdomen, and sometimes people have fever and chills along with the pain. The attack is treated by resting the tract and by giving antibiotics. Were supposed to get 30 grams of fiber a day. Fruits (especially those with edible skins),many vegetables and whole-grain products are the source of dietary fiber. If people cannot get enough fiber in their diet,then commercial products like the one youre taking fill the gap. Metamucil, Perdiem,Citrucel and Fiberall are other examples. The booklet on diverticulosis explains the ins and outs of this very common disorder. To order a copy, write:Dr. Donohue No. 502W,Box 536475,Orlando,FL 32853-6475. Enclose a check or money order (no cash) for $4.75 U.S./$6 Canada with the recipients printed name and address. Please allow four weeks for delivery. *** DEAR DR. DONOHUE:My husband has chronic blepharitis and frequently develops hard buildups in both eyes that cause great discomfort. The doctor must remove them two times a month. What can be done to prevent them? S.R. ANSWER:Blepharitis (BLEF-uhRYE-tiss) is inflammation of the eyelid margins,which become red and crusty. The crust can build up into hard deposits. A twice-a-day program of lid cleansing might eliminate the crusts. Have your husband apply warm compresses (a wet washcloth) to closed lids for five to 10 minutes and then massage the lids. After the massage,he cleanses the lid margins with a cotton-tipped applicator dipped in a solution of one part baby shampoo and one part water. The doctor might have to prescribe an antibiotic ointment. *** Dr. Donohue regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but he will incorporate them in his column whenever possible. Readers may write him or request an order form of available health newsletters at P.O. Box 536475,Orlando,FL 328536475.2009 North America Synd.,Inc. All Rights ReservedHow Does Your Hospital Rate?It really DOES matter what hospital you go to when you need care. Your life could depend on it. So says the seventh annual study by HealthGrades. This is the same group that tracks doctors,hospitals and nursing homes and assigns a grade for the level of care. Its latest study reveals that your risk of death can be cut as much as 27 percent if you get your care at a Distinguished Hospital for Clinical Excellence.To get that designation,a hospital has to pass a long list of criteria. The HealthGrades Web site [www.healthgrades.com] lists by state all of the Distinguishedhospitals. You can search (for free) for grades on a given hospital for any of dozens of medical conditions. Look for Research Hospitals on the front screen of the Web site. Its when you want a full report on a hospital that you have to pay a fee. Youll also have to pay a fee to check out a specific doctor or nursing home it costs money for the report. A much easier way to check on a hospital or doctor is on the governments Health and Human Services website [www.hospitalcompare.hhs .gov]. The HHS layout lets you compare multiple hospitals,right on the same screen. The information is very comprehensive,too. For example,one question concerns the percent of surgery patients who were given an antibiotic at the right time,within one hour before surgery. This is a small detail maybe,but crucial to ones recovery. To find out if there is a Distinguishedhospital in your area,check the HealthGrades Web site and then search for details at the HHS site. Still,if youre facing a major medical issue,perhaps paying for the HealthGrades report would give you needed extra information. Matilda Charles regrets that she cannot personally answer reader questions,but will incorporate them into her column whenever possible. Write to her in care of King Features Weekly Service,P.O. Box 536475, Orlando,FL 32853-6475,or send email to columnreply@gmail.com.2009 King Features Synd.,Inc. King Features Weekly ServiceMarch 2-8, 2009

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Page 6 DEAR DR. ROACH: I have had lower-back prob lems almost all my life. Many doctors and therapists have examined it, with almost no success. Recently my attacks have been fewer and milder, even if the bed is not quite right. I can live with it, but a new wrinkle has emerged: If I dont get out of bed as soon as the alarm sounds, Ill have back pain and little mobility all day and partial incapac ity. I am 74 years old, 6-feet 4-inches tall and weigh 230 pounds. Do you have any idea what causes this, and if there is any cure? J.S.B. ANSWER: There are doz ens of causes of back pain. It can be impossible, even with the most advanced diagnostic tests, to make a precise diag nosis of the underlying cause. In your case, it sounds like you have had one problem for a long time and now some thing is causing a different kind of back problem. Back pain that gets worse with bed rest and better with exercise is not likely to be a herniated disc or spinal stenosis two serious causes of back pain. I am guessing that there is a component of osteoarthritis in your back now, which would be quite common in a 74-yearold man. Osteoarthritis does tend to get worse with rest and better with exercise. I am impressed by how acutely it gets worse, and its entirely possible that there may be some muscular spasm associ ated with your back pain. Even though you are quite tall, 230 pounds is a lot for your spine to support. You have a BMI of 28, which is in the overweight range. may help relieve pain on your back. And certainly listen to your body, and get up and be active. Stretching, including yoga and tai chi, can be a very effective treatment. The arthritis booklet discusses joint pain found in osteoarthritis, rheumatoid ar thritis and lupus. Order a copy by writing: Dr. Roach No. 301W, Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475. Enclose a check or money order (no cash) for $4.75 U.S. with the recipients printed name and address. Please allow four weeks for delivery. About 60,000 Americans are diagnosed with Parkinsons disease each year. In 2010, the disease was responsible for the deaths of 182 Florida residents between the ages of 65 and 74, and 1,535 Florida residents over the age of 75, accord ing to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Parkinsons disease is a progressive disorder of the nervous system that affects your movement. Early signs may be mild and go unnoticed. Symptoms often begin on one side of your body and usually remain worse on that side, even after symptoms begin to affect both sides. Signs and symptoms may include tremor, slowed movement, rigid mus cles, impaired posture, speech changes and writing changes. In the early stages of Par kinsons disease, your face may show little or no expres sion or your arms may not swing when you walk. Your speech may become soft or slurred. Parkinsons disease symptoms worsen as your con dition progresses over time. Although Parkinsons disease cant be cured, medications may improve your symptoms. One of the most disturbing side effects of standard Par kinsons disease treatments are freezing or off episodes. These episodes are character ized by acute immobility, can occur between one and several times daily, and can last from one to several hours cumu latively. These episodes are triggered by L-dopa, a main line treatment for Parkinsons disease. The episodes begin when the levodopa or enzyme inhibitors enter the blood stream too slowly, or wear off quickly, or just do not enter at all. A drug called apomorphine is the only drug approved of these freezing periods. Currently, however, it is only available in the U.S. as an injection. This can result in painful reactions, including irritation and nodules at the injection site. Our company, called Cynapsus Therapeutics Inc., has developed an undertem, called APL-130277 that is similar to Listerine Breath Strips. The strip dissolves in about one to two minutes, delivering the drug into the bloodstream in a similar time interval and concentration as an injectable dose. The treat ment aims at relieving many Parkinsons disease patients of the requirement for selfinjections, along with the injury and stress this entails. Over the next two years, the company plans to conduct hu man clinical trials and expects to submit its drug for approval to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2016. If you would like to learn more about Parkinsons disease, its symptoms and available treatments, speak with your doctor, or contact the Central Florida chapter of the National Parkinson Foundation at 858-414-0459 contact-us Anthony Giovinazzo is president and CEO of Cynapsus Therapeutics Inc. Not all back pain is equal New drugs may help Parkinsons 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com r fntbt f rtt ftbt bt bnr nr rt b bb f b tb off trtnCoupon redeemable for cash, check or credit card purchases only. Not redeemable for insurance transactions. Excludes custom/special orders & nutritional supplements. May not be combined with any other dis counts. Coupon has no cash value. Information www..org www.rrfMEDICARE, MEDICAID, AND MOST COMMERCIAL INSURANCES ACCEPTED 5019096 We come to you! Available 24/7 Medications, equipment and supplies provided A dedicated team of Nurses, Social Workers, Chaplains, Home Health Aides and Volunteers assigned to your care Cornerstones care is covered 100% by Medicare and Medicaid. Regardless of payer source Cornerstone is here to help. Central Florida Senior JULY 2014 PUBLISHER Tracy Craft 407.515.2605 TCraft@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MANAGING EDITOR Isaac Babcock 407.563.7023 IBabcock@TurnstileMediaGroup.com ADVERTISING Linda Stern 407.376.2434 LStern@TurnstileMediaGroup.com ASSOCIATE EDITOR Sarah Wilson 407.563.7026 SWilson@TurnstileMediaGroup.com DESIGNER Tom Miller 407.563.7032 TMiller@TurnstileMediaGroup.com Published by Turnstile Media Group 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835-5705 P: 407.563.7000 F: 407.563.7099

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Page 7 Maitland Senior Center The Maitland Senior Center is locat ed at 345 South Maitland Ave. and is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The schedule is sub ject to change without notice. For more information, please call 407539-6251 or visit itsmymaitland. com. The Maitland Senior Center will be closed on Friday, July 4, for Independence Day and will reopen at 9 a.m. on Monday, July 7. Join us every Monday and Friday in July at 1 p.m. to see your favorite movies! Check our calendar online to see what movies are showing in July. Call to reserve your seat! Join John every Monday, Thursday and Friday in July at 9 a.m. for Yoga. Please wear comfortable clothes and bring your own mat. Cost of the class is $2 to the teacher. Join us every Monday in July at 1 p.m. for our Conversational French group. Spend some time chatting with others and making new friends. Join Esther every Tuesday in July at 9 a.m. for Tai Chi classes. Cost of the class is $10 per month to the teacher. Please wear a white shirt, black pants, and comfortable shoes. Join us every Tuesday in July at 1 p.m. for our Conversational Span ish group. Spend some time chat ting with others and making new friends. Must be uent in Spanish to participate. Join Sherre every Wednesday in July at 10 a.m. for Instructors Choice. This class is a combo of mat and chair yoga that is great for all levels. Cost of the class is $5 to the teacher. Bring a yoga mat. Join Ty every Wednesday in July at 11 a.m. for Yoga Nidra, a sublime conscious sleep (meditation) class. Cost of the class is $5 to the teacher. Please bring a yoga mat, something to cover yourself with (if you tend to get cold), and a small pillow. Join Donna every Thursday in July at 11:30 a.m. for Chair Yoga. Cost of the class is a $2 donation to the teacher. Join Ann every Friday in July for Re corder classes at 12:30 p.m. Les sons are free! Please call the Senior Center at 407-539-6251 for specif ics on this class. On July 11 seniors are invited to a Senior Calendar program providing free unbiased counseling about Medicare, Me digap, HMOs, Medicaid, Prescrip tions Drug Plans, and Long Term Care staffed by counselors from S.H.I.N.E. (Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders). All counseling is rst-come-rst-served. Bring your list of medications or Rx bottles, insurance card and red, white and blue Medicare card. For more infor mation, email information@elderaf fairs.org, visit FLORIDASHINE.org, or call 1-800-963-5337. Casselberry classes Back 2 Basics is a low-impact workout at noon on Tuesdays and Thursdays, and 8:30 a.m. on Satur days. Its $49.99 a month for unlim ited classes. Chair Yoga is at 10 a.m. every Mon day and will get you moving again! The cost is $2 per class. Gentle/Restorative Yoga is from 8:45 to 10 a.m. on Sundays. The cost is $10 per class. Senior citi zens discount is $5 per class. For more information, contact Alice Gomes at 609-290-8195 or email alice@imagineyoga.net Yoga Technique is 8:45 to 10 a.m. on Saturdays. The cost is $10 per class. Senior citizens discount is $5 per class. Chairobics is from 11:05 a.m. to noon on Mondays and Wednesdays. The class is free. Contact Claudia Laine at 407-718-9066. Tai Chi for Beginners is at 1 p.m. on Tuesdays. Contact Eric Raboy at 407-731-9130. The cost is $5 per class or $20 per month. Tai Chi for Intermediates is at 2 p.m. on Tuesdays. Contact Eric Raboy at 407-731-9130. The cost is $5 per class or $20 per month. Bingo is from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mon days and Wednesdays. The cost is $3 per session. Duplicate bridge is from noon to 4 p.m. on Mondays. Shore up your skills in this classic game. Casual bridge is from noon to 4 p.m. on Tuesdays. Progressive bridge is from noon to 4 p.m. on Thursdays and Fridays. Line Dancing is from 1 to 2 p.m. every Wednesday. For more information on classes and registration, contact Mario Al garin at 407-262-7700, ext. 1576, or malgarin@casselberry.org or visit casselberry.org/register Winter Springs Senior Center Learn ceramics from a talented group at ceramics class from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Mondays at the Winter Springs Senior Center at 400 N. Edgemon Ave. in Winter Springs. Call 407-327-6556. Have fun and get moving at yoga classes at 10 a.m. every Friday morning. Chair yoga is also available Bingo is Wednesday, Friday and the last Sunday of the month. Lunch is served at 11:45 a.m. followed by Bingo at 1 p.m. There is no bingo prior to the last Sunday of the month. A bridge class meets at 10:30 a.m. every Tuesday to help your game. Need to relieve some stress? On Tuesdays at 10:30 a.m. join our 30-minute Guided Meditation. Altamonte Springs programs AARPs Smart Driver program helps refresh driving skills and de velop safer driving habits for drivers aged 50 or older. Its from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. July 12 at Altamonte Mall COPS Center, 415 E. Altamonte Drive. Call 1-888-227-766. Senior Sneakers RHETT WICKHAM, CPT Question 1: I know that I should get more exercise, but I dont know where to start. Mary Boone Question 2: Why do I need to exercise? Im too old to start. John S. I want to address both of you, John and Mary, together, because up front the message is the same: everybody has to start somewhere, sometime. While its never too late to start improving your health, now is the most important time for a mature population are physical, emotional, mental, and yes, The human body is capable of building muscle throughout your lifetime, John, regardless of age. Exercise particularly a regular, focused, programmatic approach means that you see your energy improve almost instantly, as well as sleep, digestive health and car diovascular health. As we mature, many people are concerned with the risk of falling and injuring themselves. Nothing is better for preventing this than a strong core that helps you stay stable example, can improve the muscle strength in their back and abdomi nal muscles as well as their legs, important to improve upper body strength (shoulders and arms.) Re gardless of your gender, the body wants to be equally strong front to back, left to right, top to bot tom. Its the beauty of the human body; it naturally seeks balance. Getting started is simple, Mary. Get up, get in the gym, and select a trainer to guide you. If youre more comfortable with a mature trainer there are plenty of us making a difference for young and mature alike. Going to a gym is like visiting a foreign country without consulting a good guide you risk missing out on the best self. Trainers teach you carefully, slowly, thoughtfully so that you feel comfortable and see results. A trainer can help guide your nutri tion and get rid of the confusions about diet; plus we want you to have the foods you enjoy not just Remember what I said about clients Ive trained have had their doctor reduce or in some instances completely eliminate medications for high blood pressure, cholesterol and other conditions improved by exercise and good nutrition. The potential for money saved on medication and extended, repeat visits to health care specialists is substan tial. Check with your insurance programs to see if they offer a discount or even free member ship to the gym, such as Silver Sneakers. Finally, why start late in life? My favorite quote about health and wellness is from Socrates and I repeat it every day, No citizen has a right to be an amateur in the matter of physical training ... what a crime it is for one to grow old without ever seeing the beauty and strength of which their body is capable. You can have a longer, healthier, happier life. Exercise science is far more advanced now and we know from years of research that people who engage in some form of vigorous exercise, for an hour a day at least three days a week, add years to their life. Not just hours and days, but happier, healthier, more indepen dent years of living. Emerging re search is pointing toward exercise as a way to improve mental health and counter the effects of diseases such as Alzheimers. Women can increase bone density, men can improve their performance in leisure activities such as golf and tennis, and we all improve our sexual health (shhhh ... dont tell the 20-somethings were still ac tive; let it be a surprise.) exercise studio, take a friend or meet new friends, and join the rev olution of age-defying exercisers realizing the unlimited potential of their bodies. Oh, yes, and when in doubt, always ask a trainer! Trainer and Strength and Conditioning Coach at Anytime Fitness in Winter Park and he can be reached at 321972-5833 for both personal and group training. For answers to your health and a day, 365 days a year, Anytime Fitness, Winter Park prides itself on providing a friendly, well-maintained facility featuring top-quality exercise of being able to use any of more than 2,300 Anytime Fitness clubs now open in all 50 states and 19 countries. For more information on Anytime Fitness, PHOTOS COURTESY OF ANYTIME FITNESS Trainers can help seniors plan workouts. ADVERTORIAL

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Page 8 Hepatitis C is a disease that is caused by a virus that affects the liver. Even though the disease often doesnt produce symptoms, it can seriously damage the liver and can be fatal. An estimated 3.2 million Americans have Hepatitis C. Older people are more likely to have been exposed to Hepatitis C, but many older Americans are not aware that they need to be tested for it. A December 2013 report found that Hepatitis C infections are concentrated in the Baby information on that report here: major study of people with the virus, 75 percent of the patients were born between 1945 and 1964. What is Hepatitis C? Hepatitis C is a contagious liver disease that results from infection with the Hepatitis C virus, which is spread primarily through contact with the blood of an infected person. Hepatitis C ranges in sever ity from a mild illness that lasts a few weeks (referred to as an acute infection) to a seri ous, lifelong illness that can destroy the liver (referred to as a chronic infection). Most people with Hepatitis C do not have any immediate symptoms. However, 75 to 85 percent of people who are infected eventually develop a chronic infection. Chronic Hepatitis C is a serious disease that can result in long-term health problems, including liver damage, liver failure, liver cancer, and even death. It is the leading cause of cirrhosis of the liver (liver scarring) and liver cancer, and is the most common reason for liver transplants in the United States. Approximately 15,000 people die every year from Hepatitis C-related liver disease. What are the symptoms of chronic Hepatitis C? Most people with chronic Hepatitis C do not have any symptoms, and they may not have symptoms until years later when they develop liver problems. In people with no symptoms, Hepatitis C is often detected during routine blood tests to measure liver function. Infected people who do develop symptoms may experi ence the following: fatigue, joint pain, abdominal pain, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, fever, dark urine, light-colored stools, or yellowish eyes and skin, called jaundice. Can a person spread Hepatitis C without having symptoms? Yes. Most people who are infected with Hepatitis C do not know they are infected because they do not look or feel sick. An infected person with no symptoms can spread the virus to others. Any activity that exchanges blood between two people can put a person at risk for exposure. Before 1992, Hepatitis C was commonly spread through blood transfusions and organ transplants. Widespread screen ing of the U.S. blood supply for Hepatitis C began in 1992. Should I be tested for Hepatitis C? Both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Preventive Services Task Force recommend screen ing for the Hepatitis C virus for people born between 1945 and 1964. Talk to your doctor about being tested for Hepatitis C if any of these apply to you: You were born between 1945 and 1964 You were treated for a blood clotting problem before 1987 You received a blood transfusion or organ transplant before July 1992 You are on long-term hemodialysis treatment You have abnormal liver tests or liver disease You work in health care or public safety and were exposed to blood through a needle stick or other sharp object injury You have HIV You engaged in sex that could have caused bleeding You are a current or for mer injection drug user, even if you injected only one time or many years ago Can Hepatitis C be treated suc cessfully? Yes. In about 25 percent of people, an acute infection clears up on its own without treatment. However, if acute hepatitis C is diagnosed, treat ment reduces the risk that it will become a chronic infec tion. There are several medica tions that treat chronic Hepati tis C, including new treatments that appear to be more effective and have fewer side effects than previous options. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) keeps a list of approved treatment can be expensive. Clinical trials of new drug treatments may also be avail able. Hepatitis C and the Affordable Care Act Thanks to the Affordable Care Act, hundreds of thou sands of Hepatitis C patients have new access to treatment. All insurance must pro vide free screening for Hepati tis C for anyone born between 1945 and 1964. People with Hepatitis C cannot be turned down for insurance or discriminated against by an insurance com pany. Limits on out-of-pocket costs will make expensive treatment more affordable. Hepatitis C: Older Americans are at risk RON POLLACK Guest columnist shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM here should be more to life than maintenance-free living. To learn more about our community in Kissimmee, call (407) 933-1999. Sunday at 11am at