Winter Park-Maitland observer

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title:
Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication:
Winter Park FL
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates:
28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID:
UF00091444:00315


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WPMOBSERVER.COM Winter Park said goodbye to a piece of city history on June 1 as demolition workers tore down the 52-year-old Amtrak train sta tion in Central Park abandoned by the heavy rail system in favor of the new SunRail station next door. Winter Park City Commission ers Steven Leary, Tom McMacken and Sarah Sprinkel, City Manager Randy Knight and U.S. Congress man John Mica sported hard hats at the faded structure, chipping away at the front pillars with sledge hammers and pocketing broken slabs of rock as keepsakes. An excavator vehicle made quick work of the building after wards, pressing down on the roof with its long mechanical arm and leveling the station to a dusty pile of rubble in less than 20 minutes. The old [station] was quaint and great for its time, but the new USPS 00-6186 Publisher statement on page 4. VISIT WPMOBSERVER.COM SUBSCRIBE NOW! EVER CELEBRATED GIRAFFE DAY? CULTURE, 17 Mother and son grads Rollins degrees together LIFESTYLES, 6 Fighting the fat, deliciously This restaurant takes food straight out of its own garden. HEALTHY LIVING, 8 COMMUNITY BULLETIN ............ 4 CALENDAR .................... 4 LIFESTYLES .................... 6 HEALTHY LIVING ................. 8 CULTURE ..................... 17 OPINIONS .................... 19 CLASSIFIEDS .................. 21 The Orange County Sheriffs June 3 and one arrest on June 6 in Winter Park related to the dealing of stolen cell phones at the We Fix Phones at 595 W. Fairbanks Ave. the result of a yearlong investigation of the business by the Winter Park Po lice Department. We Fix Phones owner Hunter Sanders and employees Lisa Jo Sanders, Adam Sanders and Mi chael Chaney were charged with multiple counts of dealing in stolen property, money launder ing, dealing in stolen property over the Internet, engaging in a pattern of racketeering activity, conspiracy to commit racketeer ing and operating a secondhand dealer without a registration or license. Winter Park Police received a tip last year that the location was buying stolen cell phones and selling them on the Inter net, starting an investigation last June. Police later conducted a series of controlled sales over a six-month period, sending a as a customer selling several phones believed to be stolen. The store obliged the cus tomer and bought the phones without resistance, said Sgt. Tim Volkerson of the Winter Park Police Street Crimes Unit. Through that information gathering we learned that most probably that tip was pretty ac curate, Volkerson said. At that point we began the active inves tigation. They participated regardless of whether we told them it was stolen. Police are unsure of how long the business may have been dealing in stolen phones, Volk erson said. We Fix Phones has been serv ing Winter Park residents for more than 14 years, according PHOTOS COURTESY OF ORANGE COUNTY SHERIFFS OFFICE The owner and three employees of We Fix Phones have been charged with mutiple counts related to the alleged purchase of stolen cellphones at the Winter Park business. PHOTO BY TIM FREED THE OBSERVER A bulldozer smashed the 52-year-old station on June 1, with the help of commissioners. Phone store foul play Four arrested following yearlong phone racketeering investigation TIM FREED Observer staff Please see PHONES on page 2 Please see ROADS on page 2 The city of Maitland is getting on track to make changes to traf moving freely on the roads and more importantly off of the railroad right-of-ways. The city put up two propos als to the Florida Department of Transportation in recent weeks it hopes will make the railroad intersection at Horatio Avenue safer for commuters, said Mayor is for a preemption system that would clear out backed up cars in between Maitland Avenue headed toward U.S. Highway 1792 when a train approaches. The second is to retroactively re-stripe Horatio back to two through lanes removing the new parallel parking spaces on the same stretch of road, and also converting the left-turn-only lane onto northbound 17-92 from Horatio into a left-or-straight-op tion lane, which would take the road back to how it was prior to place earlier this year. Plans for the construction ear lier this year were based on a traf take into account the increased Schieferdecker said. These proposed changes, he said, are helping to bring that 2004 study up to date with this Maitland backtracks on roads SARAH WILSON Observer staff A stations last stop Winter Park demolishes Amtrak train station TIM FREED Observer staff Please see STATION on page 2 407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC Winter Park Recovery CenterComprehensive Drug & Alcohol Treatment Sinclair Method of Alcohol Extinction Subutex/Suboxone For Opioid AbuseSpring Special 10% Off All Protocols2056 Aloma Ave, Suite 100, Winter Park, FL 32792 www.WinterParkRecoveryCenter.com 407-629-0413 www.wpmobserver.com/enews ADAM SANDERS HUNTER SANDERS MICHAEL CHANEY LISA JO SANDERS

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Page 2 | Thursday, June 19, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer station is something the commu nity can be proud of, McMacken said. Its a farewell to the station that commuted Winter Park residents and dime stores lined Park Av enue and locals parked their Ford Fairlanes and Chevrolet Impalas on a downtown street then made of asphalt. Park Avenue Elementary sat where the SunTrust bank sits today, while the sidewalks were clear of the winding maze of res taurant tables and chairs. Residents were just starting to mark their calendars for the an nual Winter Park Sidewalk Art Festival only in its third year at the time. The 1962 station also meant the extension of Morse Boulevard from Park Avenue all the way to U.S. 17-92, giving residents a much needed route to travel east and west, according to records kept by the Winter Park History Museum. Debbie Komanski, execu tive director of the Albin Polasek Museum and Sculpture Garden, fondly remembers walking Park Avenue as a child at the time, fre quently stopping by Hogues Five and Dime to see the small pet tur tles for sale. She remembered the station built that year along Central Park, but admitted she wasnt sad to see the station go. Komanski had already grown attached to the one it replaced: the old Atlantic Coast Line Railroad station built back in 1912. The one that just left didnt have a lot of sentimental value to me, Komanski said. That was never the station of my childhood. But the now retired train stop did hold value for resident Peter Schreyer, execu tive director of Cre alde School of Art. He still remembers back in 1978 when he traveled on vaca tion from his home in Switzerland to see the east coast of the United States. Schreyer took the train from Washington, D.C. all the way to Orlando, passing through a quaint town with trees and small shops It kind of looked like the lay out of a model train underneath a Christmas tree, Schreyer said. I just always saw it as so cool that Winter Park has a train station for a small town. You could get on the train and go all the way up the east coast. The charming city called Win ter Park would become Schreyers new home a year later as he emi grated from Switzerland to the city of culture and heritage. He continued to take the train on day trips to Tampa with his young daughter, creating fond memories at the station. Its unfortunate that the train stop was torn down, Schreyer said. The station looked really bad in the past few years, but thats only because of neglect no one took care of it, Schreyer said. Its just like a lot of things in America: it doesnt get taken care of that well, it gets really bad and then its decided, It looks really aw ful; weve got to tear it down and build a new one. [My daughter and I] had a sentimental connection with it. I guess I was one of the few people who liked the old station. PHONES | Local business had allegedly bought stolen phones STATION | W inter Park commissioners grabbed sledgehammers to take down long-standing train station to a post on the stores Facebook page. It goes to show that any busi ness could be capable of operat ing a crime enterprise, said Sgt. John Bologna of the Winter Park Police Department. Theyve done repairs; theyve helped people out, Bo logna said. They were a legiti mate business doing legitimate business. How they got into what they were doing with the alleged charges against them and how that started, I dont know. Bologna said he didnt know of any other pending arrests in the area related to the alleged crimes. The suspects have since posted bail and continue to run their store, Volkerson said. The state will decide whether theres enough evidence to proceed with a trial. The suspects defense attor ney didnt respond to requests for comment before press time. C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE The old [station] was quaint and great for its time, but the new station is something the community can be proud of. PHOTO BY TIM FREED THE OBSERVER Winter Parks We Fix Phones was already back in business after the arrests were made. PHOTOS BY TIM FREED THE OBSERVER Winter Park Vice Mayor Steven Leary takes a swing at the foundation of the citys railroad station, which had helped send travelers on journeys across the country since when John F. Kennedy was president. The farewell doubled as a demolition party for commissioners. FREE ESTATE PLANNING WORKSHOPIs your estate headed for Probate Court? Or, do you have the proper legal documents in place to avoid Probate? Do you know that even if you have an up-to-date Will, it may still be subject to the Probate process? Do you have a current Power of Attorney? For Business? For Healthcare decisions? Learn how you can get your Estate Planning Documents written by highly specialized attorneys and save thousands of dollars on unnecessary court and legal costs, while at the same time eliminating the possible hardships on those you love. You are invited to a short, relaxed workshop where you can get all of the answers you need and more!Workshop Date: Wednesday, July 9th @ 9:30am RSVP @ 407-536-5321Gourmet Coffee & Refreshments will be served, and there will be drawings for Door Prizes*sponsored by First Financial Group ROADS | decade. Its an ongoing process, Schieferdecker said. The citys Transportation Ad visory Board and Planning & Zoning Commission held a joint meeting last week to encourage public input regarding the pres ent and future state of downtown Maitland Avenue. Planning & Zoning Chair man Dale McDonald said the city needs to get working on its vision for its roads in the future, espe cially with downtown develop ment deals queuing up. We cant keep doing what were doing, he said. C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, June 19, 2014 | Page 3 Maitland City Talk BY HOWARD SCHIEFERDECKER MAYOR As a new grandparent, Ive found I needed to review and re member how to deal with the safe ty of a small child all over again. During my research, Ive revisited some tips and information that I thought would be useful for other new parents and grandparents. Most of the information is simple, but in our fast-paced lives we all have a tendency to get distracted and forget these things. For starters, dont forget the child when you get out of the vehicle! A vehicles interior tem perature in Florida can reach 120 degrees Fahrenheit and heat stoke can set in very quickly. Every year we hear of a family experiencing the pain and anguish of losing a child, so please double check. Car seats are required to be used in passenger vehicles in the state of Florida. But, not everyone knows the rules governing their use and installation. Before pur chasing or accepting a car seat, check the label on the seat to make sure its appropriate for your childs age, weight and height. If youre being given a car seat, check the label on the seat to make sure it is still safe. Like milk, car seats have an expiration date. Its best to check and make sure it is up to current safety standards. Kids are VIPs, just ask them. We know all VIPs ride in the back seat, so keep all small children in the back seat. Youll want to keep your child or grandchild in a rearfacing car seat for as long as pos sible, usually until around age 2. When he or she outgrows the seat, move your child to a forward-fac ing car seat. To ensure your car seat is prop erly installed, please seek out a individuals have been trained in the installation of many different types of child car seats. One loca tion in Central Florida is the Chil drens Safety Village; visit child html for more information. Last but not least, if you leave your car seat in the car, please cover it with a towel or blanket. The sun beating through a wind shield can heat metal parts to a very high temperature, no need to hurt the little ones by accident. From vehicle safety we now transition to water safety. The hard truth of the matter is drown ing is the leading cause of injuryrelated death among children be tween 1 and 4 years old. And its the third leading cause of death among children. Never leave your child unat tended around water. We know it sounds strict, but there is no room for compromise on this one. Ba bies can drown in as little as one inch of water. Please put the cell phone away, forget about all the other things you have to do and give young children 100 percent of your atten tion when they are near or around water. Other water safety steps in clude: empty all tubs, buckets, containers and wading pools im mediately after use. Store them upside down and out of childrens reach. And if you have a spa, a will also want to check and make sure all of your pool safety devices are working properly. Particularly if its been a while since youve had little ones around. It may seem strange, but there Safety tips for new parents and grandparents For more information call 407-659-5701 or visit www.TrustcoBank.com and apply today!Member FDICEQUAL HOUSINGLENDER RYour Home Town Bank TRUSTCO BANK Free Pre-Approvals No Application Fees**No Application Fee available for a limited time only. The value of the application fee is $299.00. Please Note: W e r eser ve the right to alte r or w ithdraw these products or certain featu res thereof without prior notification. rfnt nb bnn Rooted & grounded in Jesus Christ. The Learning Tree is a Ministry of First Baptist Church of Winter ParkWe offer Full-Day Infant Care and Childcare Year-Round, Preschool Classes, Summer Camp, and much more! 1021 New York Avenue N., Winter Park, Florida 32789 Established in 1972 we are celebrating 41 years of service this year. have been instances of children accessing toilets. Keeping toilet lids closed and the use of toilet seat locks can prevent drowning. Its also a good idea to keep doors to bathrooms and laundry rooms closed. Parents and grandparents have a million things to do, but learn ing CPR should be on the top of the list. Maitland Fire Rescue does have CPR training available to our citizens and businesses. Knowing CPR will give you tremendous peace of mind and the more peace of mind you have as a parent or grandparent, the better. If you have any questions on child safety matters you may con tact your Maitland Fire Rescue Department at 407 539-6226. Our family helping yours whatever it takes. Dennis Marshall, Fire Mar shal PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Winter Parkers sipped and strolled along Park Avenue June 12 at the summer Sip, Shop and Stroll hosted by the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce. Sip, Shop & Stroll Sip, Shop & Stroll

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Page 4 | Thursday, June 19, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Thursday, June 19, 2014 PHONE: 407-563-7000 FAX: 407-563-7099 WPMOBSERVER.COM PUBLISHER Tracy Craft 407.515.2605 TCraft@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MANAGING EDITOR Isaac Babcock 407.563.7023 IBabcock@TurnstileMediaGroup.com ASSOCIATE EDITORS Sarah Wilson 407.563.7026 SWilson@TurnstileMediaGroup.com Tim Freed 407.563.7054 TFreed@TurnstileMediaGroup.com ARTS EDITOR Josh Garrick joshgarrick9@gmail.com DESIGNER Tom Miller 407.563.7032 TMiller@TurnstileMediaGroup.com STAFF WRITERS Brittni Larson Megan Stokes Allison Olcsvay Kristy Vickery COLUMNISTS Chris Jepson Jepson@MediAmerica.us Louis Roney LRoney@cfl.rr.com ADVERTISING SALES Linda Stern 407.376.2434 LStern@TurnstileMediaGroup.com LEGAL NOTICE ADVERTISING Ashley McBride 407.286.0807 Legal@FLALegals.com SUBSCRIPTIONS/CIRCULATION Luana Baez 407.563.7013 LBaez@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MEMBER OF: -Florida Press Association -Winter Park/Maitland/Goldenrod Chambers of Commerce Winter Park/Maitland Observer is published by Turnstile Media Group. Founded in 1990 and headquartered in Orlando, Fla., Turnstile Media Group is also the parent of Golfweek, Golfweek Custom Media, TurfNet, Professional Artist, Seminole Voice, Baldwin Park Living and Turnstile Connect. TURNSTILE MEDIA GROUP CHAIRMAN Rance Crain PRESIDENT/CEO Francis X. Farrell EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT GENERAL MANAGER Patti Green VICE PRESIDENT Jeff Babineau USPS #00-6186 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Winter Park / Maitland Observer 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835 Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster JUNE 19 Learn about and meet some Florida bats at Maitland Public Librarys Summer Reading event Bat Belfrys, from 2 to 4 p.m. on Thursday, June 19. This event is free and open to the public. Children must be in third grade or above to attend. Visit maitlandpubliclibrary.org for more infor mation. JUNE 20 Maitland Public Library will host E-Gam ing days every Friday during the summer from 1 to 4 p.m. starting on Friday, June 20. Play current and retro video games at this free event. Visit maitlandpubliclibrary. org for more information. JUNE 21 The Maitland Historical Museum will host its monthly Family Day from 1 to 4 p.m. on Saturday, June 21. This Saturdays theme will be Whats Your Legacy? Learn about Maitlands legacy and par ticipate in a scavenger hunt in and around the museum to uncover clues of Mait lands past. For more information, visit artandhistory.org JUNE 22 The Orlando JCC will host Summer Sun days: Sportypalooza from 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Sunday, June 22 at their Mai tland campus. The Sportypalooza sched ule includes themed swim games, family tennis, laser tag and more. Lunch will be supplied. The event is free for JCC mem bers or $5 per person. For more informa tion, contact Jackie Ravinoff at JackieR@ orlandojcc.og or 407-645-5933. ONGOING Maitlands Summer Youth Tennis Camp is now in full swing at Maitland Commu nity Park and runs Monday through Thurs day from 9 a.m. to noon now until Aug. 14. Head teaching pro Donnie McGinnis will teach the camp, with levels available for beginner and intermediate players. Bring a racquet, water, a towel and sun block. The cost is $110 for Maitland residents and $120 for non-residents. Registration is available at Maitland Community Park, or by calling 407-539-0042. The REP (Orlando Repertory Theatre) Youth Academy will be offering more than 80 summer camps from June 9 to Aug. 15. The camps will be held at three locations, including the theaters threestage facility in Orlandos Loch Haven Park, as well as Celebration K-8 School in downtown Celebration and the Univer sity of Central Florida in east Orlando. The camps and productions are designed to foster self-condence, creative thinking and problem-solving skills through the medium of the performing arts. For a full listing of the camps, visit orlandorep.com FAMILY CALENDAR Community Bulletin Local YMCA swimmers make big splash Andy Kroupa and Rich Mercer of the Winter Park YMCA and Rick ODell of the Downtown Orlando YMCA won big last month at the United States Masters Swimming Short Course meet in Santa Clara, Calif., where 2,250 swimmers from around the nation gathered to compete. Mercer won a national championship in the 50 Free for ages 50 to 54 with a time of 23.05. Particularly notable was that four of the other age group winners were former Olympians. Mercer also placed fourth in the 100 Breast, fourth in the 100 Free and seventh in the 200 Breast stroke. In the 45 to 49 age group, Kroupa had many masters personal best times, placing fourth in the 200 Fly, 10th in the 500 Free, 12th in the 100 Fly, 23rd in the 100 Free and 24th in the 50 Free. Also in the 45 to 49 age group, ODell was 11th in the 100 Free, 12th in the 50 Free, 13th in the 50 Fly, 14th in the 100 IM, and 16th in the 500 Free. Florida Bar Foundation names new executive director Orlando attorney Bruce Blackwell was recently named executive director of The Florida Bar Foundation, a statewide charitable organization that works on behalf of Floridas legal profession to pro vide greater access to justice. A founding shareholder with King, Blackwell, Zehnder & Wermuth P.A. in Orlando, Blackwell is a past president of the Foundation, the 2011 recipient of its Medal of Honor Award and the 2013 recipient of the American Bar Associations Pro Bono Pu blico Award for outstanding service. Prior to becoming president, Blackwell served on The Florida Bar Foundations board for 10 years and on The Florida Bar Board of Governors for four years. Rollins outelder nabs SSC honors Junior outelder Christian Coburn capped off his rst season at Rollins last month by earning Second Team All-Sunshine State Conference Baseball Team honors. A to tal of 34 student-athletes were named All-SSC in 2014. Joining the team in the fall, Coburn made an immediate impact as he led the lineup with a .291 batting average. He led the team in multiple statistical categories, including hits (44), runs (31), triples (two), home runs (one), walks drawn (18) and stolen bases (19). He also nished third in doubles (ve) and fourth in RBI (12). His 19 stolen bases also ranked 82nd in the country. The Windermere native made the transi tion into the outeld only 11 games into the season, but did not disappoint. The junior ended the season with 14 multi-hit and three multi-RBI games. Calendar JUNE 21 The Enzian Theater starts off its Opera on the Big Screen series with the 2012 Salzburg Festival production of La Bo hme at 11 a.m. on Saturday, June 21. Led by conductor Daniele Gatti, the production stars opera performers Anna Netrebko and Piotr Beczala. General admission is $20. For more information and other ticket packages, visit enzian. org Come out and hang by the pool for an old school party from 5 to 8 p.m. on Saturday, June 21, at the Winter Park Community Center, located at 721 W. New England Ave. This party is 18 and up for all of the hard working adults ready to enjoy the weekend. No alcohol is allowed. Winter Park residents get in free. For more information, call 407599-3275 or visit cityofwinterpark.org/ wpcc ONGOING Come out for live music, art demonstra tions and exhibits on Friday Nights at the Morse Museum from 4 to 8 p.m. General admission is free. For more information, visit morsemuseum.org or call 407-645-5311. Come out to the Crosby YMCA in Win ter Park every Thursday at 6 p.m. for exercise and advice at their eight-week Walk with a Doc program. Residents can get their health questions answered by Florida Hospital physicians and take a 30-minute walk to receive a prize. Con tact the Crosby YMCA at 407-644-3606 or visit HealthyCentralFlorida.org for more information. In partnership with the Orlando Chapter of USA Dance, the Alzheimers Associa tion Central and North Florida Chapter is bringing a free ballroom dance program to the community. Ballroom for the Brain runs from 2 to 3 p.m. on Satur days from June 21 through July 26 at the Crosby YMCA in Winter Park. Trained dance instructors from USA Dance will teach Swing, Rumba, Merengue and the Waltz to early and middle stage in Winter Parks New L uxury Home Store Furniture | Home Dcor | Interior Design 558 W New England Av e. Ste 140 Hannibal Square *Next to Dexters* 407.401. 9770 www.gildedhome. com dividuals and their care partners. RSVP is required. For more information or to register, call 1-800-272-3900. Every Saturday starting at 7 p.m., An Tobar Pub will hold a trivia session featuring cash prizes. The trivia will be three rounds, 10 questions each. In ad dition to 10 general-knowledge ques tions, the second round will feature ve Hunger Games and ve Mad Men alternative questions. An Tobar Pub is located at 600 N. Lake Destiny Road in Maitland. Entry fee is $5 per person.

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, June 19, 2014 | Page 5 Winter Park City Talk BY RANDY KNIGHT CITY MANAGER June 23 City Commission meeting There will be a City Commis sion meeting Monday, June 23, at 3:30 p.m. in City Hall Commis sion Chambers located at 401 S. Park Ave. For the most up-to-date agenda, please visit cityofwinter park.org under Whats New. Be low are a few topics of interest: Mayors Report Geraldine Thompson reation Month Advisory Board Action Items Requiring Discussion Task Force Consent Agenda 9, 2014. Agreement with Seminole County Sheriff to utilize law enforcement software for records management and reports; authorize the mayor to execute the agreement and is sue a subsequent purchase order. ecute an agreement to pay Motor ola to connect Winter Park Public Safety Communications dispatch system to the master site owned by Orange County. resolution authorizing the use of BankUnited as a depository for the city. Public Hearings Investments Winter Park, LLC: Conditional use approval to redevelop the former Corporate Square and Winter Park Dodge properties with a 40,000-squarefoot Whole Foods Grocery and a 36,000 square foot retail building with three outparcel develop ment sites on the properties at Galloway Drive and 967 Cherokee Ave. Second reading of the or dinance amending the compre hensive plan to change the Fu ture Land Use Designation at 967 Cherokee Ave. Second reading of the ordi ing map at 967 Cherokee Ave. Advisors, LLC: Second reading of the or dinance amending the Compre hensive Plan on the 0.64 acres of vacant property at the northeast corner of Schultz and Michigan avenues. Second reading of the or zoning map on the 0.64 acres of vacant property at the northeast corner of Schultz and Michigan avenues. TGG, Ltd: Second reading of the or dinance amending the Compre hensive Plan to change the Future Land Use Map Designation at 298 and 313 W. New England Ave. Second reading of the ordi ing map to change the existing zoning designations at 298 and 313 W. New England Ave. Second reading of the ordi nance vacating and abandoning a portion of Loren Avenue within the Ravaudage Planned Develop ment and Home Acres Subdivi sion area. Group: First reading of the ordi nance amending the comprehen sive plan to change the Future Land Use Map Designation for the property at 421 W. Morse Blvd. First reading of the ordi ing map to change the existing zoning designation for the prop erty at 421 W. Morse Blvd. Conditional use approval to redevelop the properties at 403 and 421 W. Morse Blvd. into eight, three-story residential units. establishing the West Fairbanks Deferral Program prohibiting the construction of a professional minor league base ball stadium in Martin Luther King, Jr. Park. Remember, if you are unable to attend City Commission meet ings, you can watch them live, gavel-to-gavel as they happen. During the meeting, simply log city business. Possible changes to citys recycling and garbage program? The citys Keep Winter Park Beautiful & Sustainable Advisory Board has drafted a Sustainability Action Plan focusing on efforts to make the city more sustainable in the next 10 to 20 years. Topics include discussion on sustainable initiatives related to recycling, composting, water and energy usage and alternative transporta tion, to mention a few. The city is looking for public feedback on these goals and others as outlined in the draft SAP to ensure they align with the residents and busi nesses of Winter Park. Please help the city shape this plan and enter to win great prizes by sharing your feedback at one or more of the following opportunities: SAP Take survey by Monday, June 30. Survey participants will be entered into a random drawing for a chance to win a $50 Cocina 214 gift card. Public Forum Tuesday, June 24, 6 to 7:30 p.m., Winter Park Community Center, 721 W. New England Ave. Attendees who have com pleted the survey will also be eligible to win a KindleFire and other great sustainable items that (must be present to win). Light food and beverages will be provided. For more information regard ing the Sustainability Program, sustainability or call 407-599-3364. 4th of July celebration The city of Winter Park will present the 19th annual Olde Fashioned 4th of July Celebra tion Friday, July 4, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Central Park. Mayor Ken Bradley will lead a special presentation at 9:15 a.m. from the main stage. Wear your red, white and blue, bring a blanket or beach chair, and gather with family and friends to enjoy this Winter Park tradition. The annual celebration will feature live patriotic music per formed by the Bach Festival Brass Band and Bach Festival Choir, horse-drawn wagon rides, Or lando Cloggers, Rockin Roadster Road Show and much more! Chil drens activities will include the annual bicycle parade at 9 a.m. (lineup begins at 8:30 a.m.) from City Hall to Central Park, as well hotdogs, watermelon and wa ter will available for all to enjoy, while supplies last. Remember to support the event vendors. When you get your hotdog, buy some chips and a soda. Families and friends are also invited to stroll along Park Avenue and in Hanni bal Square to shop and dine at the wide selection of shops and eater ies. In addition, The Charles Hos mer Morse Museum of American Art will present its Independence Day Open House. The museum, which is home to the worlds most comprehensive collection of work by American artist Louis Comfort Tiffany, will provide free admis sion to its galleries from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Winter Park His torical Museum, located at 200 W. New England Ave. (north end of the Farmers Market building) will be open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Please stop by to see the new ex hibition, Whistle in the Distance: The Trains of Winter Park. Muse um admission is free and they will be serving complimentary oldfashioned lemonade to all visitors. Please note that City Hall will be closed Friday, July 4, in obser vance of Independence Day. City day, July 7. The city of Winter Park wishes everyone a safe and happy Independence Day. For more infor mation regarding the 19th annual Olde Fashioned 4th of July Cel ebration, please call 407-599-3463. on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, watch us on Vimeo. Earth-friendly goals

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Page 6 | Thursday, June 19, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Lifestyles Holly Tanyhill watched as one-by-one her children grew up a dream both she and her hus band had for their children, but one they themselves had not yet achieved. It was as her two youngest children, twins Eric and Aaron, were preparing to go to Rollins that Holly began wondering what the future held for her now that the nest was about to be empty. As I watched them all head off to college, there was pride, but also a little envy at the new adven tures before them and I thought to myself, What do I do now? For Holly, the next step was right before her eyes. Working as an admissions specialist at Ka plan University at the time, she was constantly encouraging other people to follow their higher-edu cation dreams. I did not even know going back to school was an option, Holly said. I thought that time had passed for me, but as I helped others enroll in school I realized I had hopes and dreams too, and it was time to follow them. She enrolled at Valencia Col lege, earning her associate degree, and then enrolled at Rollins, just like her children before her. I knew it was a good school, and with three of my children having graduated and two en she said. On Mothers Day weekend Holly and her son Aaron took turns watching each other gradu a bachelors in communications, then Aaron on Sunday with a bachelors in critical media and cultural studies. I kept having to tell myself, This is me doing this; this is me sitting here. This is not the kids this time, Holly said. Aaron watched from the stands, just as proud of his mom as he was of himself. It was really good to see all of her hard work come to fruition, he said. For Holly, watching her son graduate took on new meaning after she had so recently crossed the stage herself. It was more exciting for me because now I knew how it felt, she said. Before I was just a by stander, now we were all a part of the same club you might say. Hollys husband was disap pointed to miss the big day due to hospitalization, but he did get to watch a live stream of the event online cheering so loud that nurses thought someone was watching a football game. If all goes as planned, hell have another chance to catch the pair cross the stage, as both Holly and Aaron have plans to attend law school after Rollins. I want to be an advocate for voiceless people in our commu nity, Holly said. She helped her own family keep its voice even while facing the hurdle of homelessness by always encouraging her kids to ward higher education. I told the kids, If you guys want to get out of this poverty, you are going to have to go to school and do well. Today, the family of seven of whom have gone on to earn advanced degrees. Next semester Hollys other son Eric is due to graduate Rollins, adding another Tar to the roster. After her hus he also plans to attend Rollins, be coming the latest to join the fam ily tradition. Weve been homeless, been to work with no lunch and faced many struggles, but now were looking forward to life, Holly said. Im so ready for that upward climb. I keep waiting for the downturn, but I know the down isnt coming this time. Holly is keeping her eyes on sky, instilling the importance on education on the next generation. Plans are already in the works for 1-year-old granddaughter Sophia to join the Rollins family. Shes already got her Rollins onesie, Holly joked. PHOTO BY ALLISON OLCSVAY THE OBSERVER Holly Tanyhill and her son Aaron crossed the graduation stage at Rollins on Mothers Day weekend with bachelors degrees in hand. An unusual graduation for mom and son ALLISON OLCSVAY Observer staff Storm coming? Were ready.Report an outage: 800.228.8485 duke-energy.com/stormGet preparation tips: twitter.com/ DukeEnergyStormDuke Energys expert storm response teams know exactly how to prepare for storms and keep your lights on year report and track outages, get preparation tips and more. Duke Energy Storm www.wpmobserver.com/subscribe KEEP UP WITH MAITLAND NEWS AND EVENTS!www.IndependenceLane.com Facebook.com/ItsMyMaitland

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, June 19, 2014 | Page 7 PHOTOS BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVER Congressman John Mica, top left, joined local residents to take a bite out of the best of Goldenrod at this years Tastefully Golden rod event on Friday, June 6. Tastefully Goldenrod Tastefully Goldenrod Battling for the lead in the league standings heading into the meat of the season, the Winter Park Diamond Dawgs were even with the Winter Garden Squeeze before the series began. They would end the series with a 7-5 record, just a game behind their new rival. Collegiate Summer League, the competition. It started June 13 when the when Peter Nicoletto hit his second triple of the game and was singled in by Kyle Cavanaugh. Then it all fell apart in the seventh when the Dawgs pitcher Colton Freeman walked the bases loaded, walked in a run, then threw a wild pitch that scored two runs when a Three Stooges act ensued at home plate. They would lose that game 4-2. The Dawgs would lose the next On June 15 the Dawgs had their revenge on the Squeezes Squeeze 8-4 thanks to timely hit ting by every starter in the lineup. After a pair of games at press at 7 p.m. June 19 against the Lees burg Lightning. Then its over to Sanford Memorial Stadium against the Rats at 7 p.m. June 20 and back home against the Rats at 7 p.m. June 21. Dawgs rout Squeeze ISAAC BABCOCK Observer staff

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Page 8 | Thursday, June 19, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Healthy Living When the James Beard Foun dation nominates a chef for Best Chef of the South, and that chef goes on to open a restaurant on the border between Baldwin Park and Audubon Park, local foodies start salivating. The new restaurant called Txokos (cho-kos) Basque Kitchen pays homage to a people whose history is lost in time, but whose culture is largely sustained through the txokos, or gastro nomic societies, that honor the act of cooking and sharing com munal meals. Thats news wor thy of the cover of a magazine. For more than 2,000 years, Basques have lived between Spain and France on the west ern foothills of the Pyrenees mountains. Even pre-Roman authors record the Basques their autonomy in individual farmsteads, called casero, the isolation of which resulted in a strong sense of family. Centuries of would-be conquerors have failed to encroach upon their local privileges, as the Basques managed to retain some degree of local autonomy. Today, it is the sacred quality of these Basque kitchens that results in respect for the preparation and sharing of food, allowing people to gather in celebration of their heritage. In February, the James Beard Foundation announced the rant and Chef Awards. Fifthgeneration Floridian Chef Henry Salgado was a nominee, out of 40,000 entries. Chef Henry, who grew up cooking with his Cuban grandmother in his hometown of Tampa, was nominated based on what he created in a legend ary New Smyrna restaurant called the Spanish River Grill. Now Chef Henry and his residents of Baldwin Park, and were lucky enough to have this level of talent cooking in a beautiful and welcoming new restaurant at the East End Mar ket where they grow some of their fresh ingredients right in the garden that fronts on Cor rine Drive. With all of that history old and new in my head as I entered the Txokos Basque Kitchen, my expectations were admittedly high. Im thrilled to say that all of my expectations were exceeded in every way by the dining experience in this new space. My din ing partner and I arrived during happy hour (Tuesday through Sun day, 4 to 7 p.m.) and enjoyed $3 and $4 wines and ciders. That includes the Santo Cristo Garnacha a rich pinot noir that is a steal at $4 a glass. True to the Basque cul ture, guests can experi ence authentic pintxos (the Basque version of the small plate menu). We began with Pulpo de Gallego, which is a surpris ingly tender grilled octopus served with caramelized onion in a peppery Bilbao sauce. I love octopus, and Im accustomed to the time it takes to chew it. This was a whole new experience, one that allowed me to enjoy tender octopus, with the added taste sensation of a (new-to-me) We moved on to the Mussels, steamed in a traditional lemon juice, but served here with Greek gigante beans and little chunks of ham and sausage. Its amazing how much taste these additions added to this alwaysfavorite dish. And I should also mention that while this is called small plate, the portions are enough to share happily. We then treated ourselves by ordering what is simply called FOIE on the menu, with the sub-heading duck two ways. I sincerely believe that ordering duck liver is an act of decadence that Im known PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVER Chef Henry Salgado already has won accolades in the Spanish River Grill in New Smyrna Beach. He brings a love of Basque food to the new Txokos Basque Kitchen at the East End Market in Audubon Park. Please see TXOKOS on next page From the Corner Table JOSH GARRICK Observer staff Top chef pays homage to Basque food

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, June 19, 2014 | Page 9 to give in to. The two ways on this item is an offering that includes not only duck liver, but a duck egg in the center with pieces of porcini mushroom over a potato puree. It was incred ible and worth the calories that were already adding up in my head. My dining partner declared simply, That is out of control. (It was that good.) After an appropriate foie digestion time, we ordered the Oxtail Matador and the Co bia Brandada as our entrees. Knowing the wondrous things that can happen with oxtail on a Spanish menu, my taste buds were thrilled with the fall-offthe-bone meat braised in sherry and served over goat-cheeseenhanced grits. Each taste enhanced the other, and I loved the result. The ultimate surprise taste treat, however, is the Cobia Brandada. Now, cobia can have a rich, sweet taste, but in the however, wraps his cobia in serrano ham, which is a whole Perhaps I should have put a spoiler alert on this one, but I dont think Ive ever tasted ham especially a ham that was considered a delicacy even in ancient Rome. So if you are ham trust me on this one its a winner. As a matter of fact, every part of dining at Txokos is a winning experience, from the walk past the fresh garden in front, to the wait-staff that sincerely cares about your experience. And then theres the award-winning food. Glory hallelujah, theres an other great restaurant in Central Florida. Go and enjoy with my highest recommendation. Life is easier with Home Care Services We have the Skill to Heal. The Spirit to Care. Transitional Care Program Philips Personal Medication Dispenser Philips Lifeline Call today to schedule Private Duty Services (407) 691-8206 P h i l i p s P e r s o n a l M e d i c a t i o n D i s p e n s e r The Personal Medication Dispenser assists with medication management Medications are reviewed and pre-filled by a registered nurse, preventing o veror undermedication that could lead to a costly re -hospitalization. 1984 W. New Hampshire St., Orlando, Florida 32804Drop In or registration less than 48 hours in advance: $50 / day. Extended Care is $5 / day or $15 / week.Bring your own lunch and snacksCampers will participate in Gymanastics, Obstacle Courses, Rock Wall, Arts and Crafts, Games, and Batting Cages. Campers will participate in Gymanastics, Obstacle Courses, Rock Wall, Arts and Crafts, Games, and Batting Cages. Camp runs from 9:00 am 3:00 pm dailywith extended care options of 7:30 am 6:00 pm $1 50 for week $40 per day*Must register 3 days in advance 40 7 -7 45 5661 www.Theorlandoathletics.com40 7 -7 45 5661 www.Theorlandoathletics.com June 5, 6 June 9 13 June 16 20 June 23 27 July 7 11 July 14 18 July 21 25 July 28 1 Aug. 4 8 Aug. 11 15 Camp Dates: TXOKOS | Get to know an exotic region through healthy food C ONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE In honor of Fathers Day last weekend Ive been doing some reminiscing about my own fa ther, who died in 1975. My father was born in 1895 in a small village in Greece. In 1909, at the age of 14, he was put on a boat togeth er with his 11-year-old cousin. They traveled to America for economic opportu nity and went to work for their much older brother. fathers classmates taught him every swear word in English they knew. When his older brother asked him what he had learned, he obliged by repeating his vo cabulary lesson and was soundly thrashed. While I admire the adventur ous spirit of my father, I often wonder what is was like for him to leave home at 14, never to see his parents again. He had broth ers who supported him but no parents. For my father this led to the endless wandering of a 20th century Odysseus, always look ing for his fortune, and always looking for home. It took him a he was 58 or so when he married my much younger mother. Im not sure he ever found his for tune. I believe his years of wander make a home for his children. At best, he was distant and disen gaged. Sometimes it was worse. At the time, it made me angry because it stirred up in me an un requited longing for home. As a pastor I have encountered many people with similar struggles about fathers and home. Some stories were similar to mine; some, much worse. By the grace of God, I was eventually able to experience Gods father-love for me, which cit and learn to share a fathers love with my children. Some where along the way of my heal ing I happened across a book by John Trent called The Blessing. The books main thesis is that, like many people in the Old Tes tament, people today are looking for a blessing from their parents, especially their fathers, and if they dont get that blessing they can spend a whole lifetime look ing for it in a frustrated way. Fa thers especially need to remem ber the power in their blessing and the devastation that comes from withholding it. The book acknowledges that it is much easier to give a blessing to the next generation if youve already received one from your own parents. However, in cases where the blessing has been miss ing, it is easier to get it reactivat ed if we are willing to bless back up the generations: to offer to our parents what they could not give us. It seems counter-intuitive, but I discovered that it has a power all its own. When I discovered the power of blessing, I offered it back to that little boy who got on a boat in 1909. Of course, it did not have any tangible effect on my father, who had long since passed away, but it changed my life and my ability to offer a blessing to my kids. This Fathers Day, I would want to ask, Have you blessed your kids lately? Have you told them that youre proud of them and believe they will do great things? It could make all the dif ference in the world. And if you are still looking for a blessing yourself, why not try speaking that blessing back up the gen erations to your parents? You just always looking for. A fathers blessing Jim Govatos Reality Lines

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Page 10 | Thursday, June 19, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Q. I do a ton of crunches, but Im not losing my belly fat. What should I do differently? Brian G. If your primary goal is to belly fat, crunches are the last thing you want to do! First of all, training a muscle builds, or at least maintains, the muscle. This is why it isnt un common for people just starting ing from ab machine to crunches and back again to actually notice their pants getting a little tighter (especially if nutrition isnt on point)! Secondly, the more lean mus cle you have overall, the higher your meta bolic rate will be; the higher your metabolic rate is, the more fat you will burn at rest includ ing, but not limited to, that belly. In a nutshell, do yourself a huge favor and trade those cute little crunches for compound strength-training! Not only will incorporating movements such as squats, deadlifts, bench press and chin-ups condition your entire body by working the large muscle groups, but also you will get more calorie-burning bang for your buck both during and after your workout. Just make sure you have an experienced coach or trainer help you get started with proper form if you are new to these kinds of exer cises. (Keep in mind; comple menting nutrition is certainly vital to ensure optimal fat loss!) P.S. Ladies, this applies to you, too! Q. Ive recently cut carbs out of my diet, but I end up tired and in a bad mood as the day goes on. How do I avoid crashing? Emily F. A. Oh boy, the carb debate. First of all, there is no legiti mate reason to demon ize and permanently avoid any single macronutrient from your diet especially if your goal is sustainable fat loss. Completely cutting out a food group is not term, but it can lead to yo-yo dieting and an anxious relation ship with food in general (not to mention, an eventual binge-fest of said food down the road). Many times restrictive dieters end up craving crazy processed foods they never even craved one?). This is usually followed by drowning their sorrows in an entire box of cookies after a particularly stressful event or day at work. Ask yourself this, whats worse: having no energy, feeling emotional, and then with a high-sugar, high-fat, pro cessed food only to feel guilty and discouraged afterwards... Or enjoying fruit for breakfast, a huge salad with lunch, and oven-baked potato wedges with dinner while progressing Your body naturally runs on glucose, something that carbo As a major advocate of listening to your body for true holistic suggest bringing those glorious carbs back into your routine Information www..org www.rrfMEDICARE, MEDICAID, AND MOST COMMERCIAL INSURANCES ACCEPTED 5019096 We come to you! Available 24/7 Medications, equipment and supplies provided A dedicated team of Nurses, Social Workers, Chaplains, Home Health Aides and Volunteers assigned to your care Cornerstones care is covered 100% by Medicare and Medicaid. Regardless of payer source Cornerstone is here to help. JASMIN BEDRIA Anytime Fitness Ask a Trainer: Week 1 Q&A PHOTOS COURTESY OF ANYTIME FITNESS Training for overall tness can reap bigger improvements to troublesome spots com pared to trying to spot train them. Doing a lot of crunches can actually grow your waist. ADVERTORIAL Please see FITNESS on next page C M Y CM MY CY CMY K ad_innerscientist.pdf 1 2/12/14 12:06 PM The Parke House Academy has been involved in the Winter Park community since the school opened 17 years ago. This past May, PHA held its rst annual Sizzling Outdoor Safety Fair in Central Park. Visitors enjoyed twenty informative booths, including Family Medicine of Baldwin Park with Dr. Diana Jamie. There were also bounce houses, music, and delicious drink samples from Skyebird Juicebar & Experimental Kitchen. The Winter Park Fire department brought a re truck and an inatable walk-through safety house and the Winter Park Police Department brought a SWAT tank! Visitors even learned some self-defense moves courtesy of a special demonstration from Victory Martial Arts. Hun dreds of families enjoyed the event and walked away with plenty of summer safety tips. The Parke House Academy will host the safety fair again next year. See you there! Beth Hawley

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, June 19, 2014 | Page 11 and simply focusing on making better choices. Vegetables, fruits, and potatoes are great options; not only because they are whole foods, but also because they are high water content! Especially in the scorching Florida summers, making sure you are hydrated is key (dehydration is the main culprit of headaches, migraines, poor digestion, and low energy). Why not kill two nutritional birds with one juicy stone by eating your water? It is also important to remind yourself that certain food groups are not necessarily bad. Food doesnt have moral value and any diet promoting complete constraint from one macronutri ent group is not realistic or sus tainable for most people. Not all carbs are created equal when it comes down to it, and although options (yum, sweet potato) are more obvious than the unfavorable choices (yum, Cadbury Egg), there is still a time and place for everything. Do yourself a favor and reintroduce those better options back into your diet. Your body, mind, work outs and loved ones will thank you. P.S. Each gram of carbohydrate at tracts about 3 grams of water, which is why quick waterweight-loss (read: not fat-loss, which is what you want) oc curs when you stop eating them; keep this in mind and allow your body to adjust and balance out once you add them back in. GET AFFORDABLE DENTAL INSURANCE FOR AS LITTLE AS Dental plans are offered by Florida Combined Life Insurance Company, Inc., an affiliate of Florida Blue. Florida Blue is a trade name of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida. These companies are Independent Licensees of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. 81259 0614 floridabluecenters.comOrlando area 321-441-2020 Located in Winter Park Village 434 N. Orlando Avenue Winter Park, FL 32789 Visit a Florida Blue Center or call us to find the best dental plan for you! ENJOY YOUR NEW SMILE!Overall wellness starts with good dental health that helps prevent diseases.* Calculations based on $143.88 annual premium which must be paid in full at the time of enrollment. There is a one-time, non-refundable enrollment fee of $35. Premiums and enrollment fees may vary depending on location, see a representative for complete details. FITNESS | Yes, theres a time and place for all food groups C ONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE Jasmin Bedria is an experienced health and tness expert and a Certied Personal Trainer and Nutrition Specialist at Anytime Fitness, Winter Park. Open 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, Anytime Fitness, Winter Park prides itself on providing a friendly, well-maintained facility featuring top-quality exercise equipment. Members enjoy the benet of being able to use any of more than 2,300 Anytime Fitness clubs now open in all 50 states and 19 countries. For answers to your health and tness related questions, email: askatrainer@anytimetness.com and for more information on Anytime Fitness, visit www.anytimetness.com.

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Page 12 | Thursday, June 19, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer The traveler took a long sip of his coffee, and then another fork ful of syrup-slogged pancakes. I dont know what it is about these pancakes, but I can never duplicate them at home, he said. I even bought the same exact batter from the gift shop up front. His traveling companion wasnt paying much attention; his focus was on the sports section. They cut Langdon Donovan, he said, still reading. They did? Yeah. Whos Langdon Donovan? Hes Americas best soccer player. The World Cup coach cut Whyd they do that? The new American coach is a German guy ... Jurgen Klins mann. Hes kind of old fashioned, is thought to have a big ego. He won the World Cup as a player and coached Germany to the parently, Donovan took a leave of absence from the team last year while he was in the process of re building the American program, and that didnt sit well with him. He cut him in favor of a few kids ... one of em is 18 ... Julian Green. Oh. How are we supposed to do this year? Not looking good. We have to win two games or outpoint the other three teams in our group to advance to the knockout round. Were ranked 14th in the world but we drew Germany and Por tugal. Germany is ranked second and Portugal is third. The other team is Ghana ... they beat us in the last two World Cups. We play its not gonna be pretty. Then therell be a lot of second-guessing about Langford, right? Langdon. Donovan. Ameri cas all-time leading scorer, he corrected. He folded the newspa per. I think the focus will be on Klinsmanns ego. He married a California. Hes considered one of the best living players in the world. He just coached the team through their best qualifying season ever. They beat Germany, Italy, Mexico ... the guy is really putting a stamp on the program. He looked at the travelers plate, now devoid of pancakes. Ever have a German pan cake? The traveler shook his head. Germans bake? Ever have a pretzel? Oh, yeah ... right. Ever wonder why you cant make a good pretzel at home? He didnt wait for the answer. Its because the Germans put lye shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM here should be more to life than maintenance-free living. To learn more about our community in Kissimmee, call (407) 933-1999. The pancake recipe for World Cup goals Please see WORLD CUP on page 15 HOME CARE CORNERSenior Home Safety: Is your home safe? Follow these helpful safety tips, not just for the month of June, but throughout the year, to ensure optimum security. For additional information on Home Care Services call Florida Hospital Home Care at 407-691-8202 today and receive a brochure and magnet.Winter Park Senior Observer As seniors age, they become more susceptible to suffering an accident in their daily life. With June being Senior Safety Month, seniors and their loved ones should take extra preventative measures to promote fall Fall Prevention and halls are well lit. backing. bars. installing a medical alert such as Lifeline to give you the peace of mind you need. Fire Prevention keeping hallways clean and making sure all clutter is cleared from the house. areas and batteries should be checked every spring and fall. and put in an easily accessible location. Drug Safety pharmacist and when you take new medication. health complications.

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, June 19, 2014 | Page 13 Savannah Court and Cove Excellence in Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation 1301 W. Maitland Blvd. Maitland, FL 32751407-645-3990www.SavannahCourtMaitland.comAssisted Living Facility License No. 8447 Skilled Nursing Facility License No. 1635096 Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above. You are always welcome!A Senior Living Community where Hospitality is a Way of Life. DEAR DR. ROACH: I became extremely sick and was taken to the hospital. My physician thought I had regular pneumo nia. I was so dehydrated that intubated and had trouble getting enough oxygen. I had dialysis. My family was told I probably would not live. They discovered that my illness was Legionella, and with treatment, I woke up from paralysis. My recovery has been easy and fast, although I was told it would take a year at the least. therapy. My blood work and scan show everything is back to normal. But I have scarring in my lungs. I am a 47-year-old woman. What should I expect for my fu ture? Are my kidneys at risk? Do I have a greater risk of contract ing pneumonia in the future? What about my lungs? Is there permanent damage? What about allergy medicines and ibuprofen? I am afraid to have a glass of wine! C.K. ANSWER: Legionella is a bac teria that can cause pneumonia. It is classically found in fresh water, such as air-conditioning cooling towers and condensers. It was thought to be the cause of the original outbreak among Ameri can Legionnaires back in 1976 in Philadelphia, hence the popular name of Legionnaires disease. Once considered rare, increased awareness and better diagnostic tests have led to a greater under standing of this important cause of pneumonia. It may look just like any other kind of pneumonia, but diarrhea and very high fever are clues that it might be Legionella. Liver problems are more common in Legionella infections, but the dialysis you received likely was due to kidney failure from severe shock and sepsis. Intubation having a breathing tube inserted into your windpipe and pa ralysis are reserved for only the very most severe pneumonias, and it is really great news that you are recovering so quickly and completely. Being young (47) and female are good signs for recovery. Since your blood tests are normal, your kidneys apparently recovered completely. There is no reason not to use the same OTC medications you used before the pneumonia, and an occasional glass of wine is Some scarring after pneumo nia is common, and this indeed puts you at somewhat increased risk for future pneumonias. A vaccination for pneumonia will reduce the risk of the most com mon bacteria. DEAR DR. ROACH: Why do heart attacks occur mostly in the morning and on Mondays? J.V. ANSWER: Your statements are quite true. Heart attacks are three times more likely in the morning than in the evening, and 15 percent to 20 percent more likely on Mondays than on other days. Nobody knows exactly why. Mornings are thought to be more likely due to several factors: increased blood pressure, an increase in cortisone and having stickier platelets in the morn ing. There are two main theories for the Monday phenomenon but recently there has been some evidence that it may be excess alcohol intake over the weekend. These are good arguments for stress reduction and avoiding Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@ med. cornell.edu. To view and order health pamphlets, visit www.rbmamall. com, or write to P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475. Key signs indicate Legionella bacteria TITLE Boxing Club Winter Park is located in the heart of Winter Park next to Whole Foods Market. Title Boxing has a 7,500-square-foot facility with 54 heavy bags. Owner Homaira Mirzai plans to open two more locations in the metro Orlando area, Altamonte Springs in late 2014 and a Lake Mary location in 2015. For more information about Title Boxing Club Win ter Park, visit titleboxingclub.com or call 407-790-4001. T here are a plenty of ways to stay men Want to be tter? Lets go boxing ADVERTORIAL

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Page 14 | Thursday, June 19, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer $10.00 OFF Initial Purchase $100 or more CANADIAN MEDS SAVE UP TO 80% on Prescription Drug PricesORDER by phone No Store Visit required Advair Benicar Celebrex Cialis Crestor Cymbalta Flomax Levitra Lexapro Lipitor Nexium Spiriva Viagra Zetia CALL for a FREE Quote! We Ship Anywhere in the U.S.A. Locally owned & operated. 744 South US Hwy 441 Lady Lake, FL 32159(352) 633-3301 Run to TrackShack.com Special entry fee for active and retired military service personnel $2 OFF Use Discount Code WPO2014 Its that time of the year the season of the tomato! Red, green or gold ... sweet or tart ... but always plump and juicy, just-ripe tomatoes are what we dream of when the season is lean and the weather cold. And many of us, picky, and with strict standards about the quality of our fresh tomatoes, often just do without, or open a can and count the days. Yes, there are greenhouse tomatoes and hydroponic toma toes, and with sunny weather somewhere, theres always a supply. Still, tomatoes at the peak of their early summer best are unmatched. Although the Italians have been growing tomatoes since the 1500s, you might be surprised to learn that tomatoes are native to America. The word tomato is a used by the Indians of Mexico. Many historians believe Thomas Jefferson brought tomato seeds back from Europe to plant at Monticello, although its not entirely clear. It is documented, though, that Jefferson grew and served tomatoes at his Virginia estate. Early colonists believed toma toes to be poisonous, as the plant is a member of the nightshade family, which has some poison ous species. Fortunately for us, at some point in our agricultural history, a brave forager discov ered that tomatoes would not kill you. By 1824, there were 17 recipes for tomatoes included in books, The Virginia Housewife by Mary Randolph. It included a recipe for Gaspacha, a dish from Spain. So how did it get to Virginia? Food historian Karen Hess says that Mary Randolphs sister lived in Spain and probably passed it on to her. Gazpacho is a cold tomato soup associated with Spanish cui sine, with its beginnings traced back to the Andalusian region. Interestingly, a fundamental ingredient of this ancient soup, with versions dating to early Greece and Rome, is not tomato, but bread. Many early recipes for gazpacho are a white version containing bread, water, garlic, vinegar and oil. These primi tive recipes represent a poetic example of the beginnings of the art of food, of making something delicious out of almost noth ing. Around the 16th century, tomato seeds arrived in Spain. Since then, red gazpacho, made delicious with the absolute best tomatoes, has become the most popular version. Like so many popular foods, gazpacho can have a bad image when presented as a bland bowl of tomato juice or an equally disappointing combination of chopped unripe tomatoes and spongy cucumbers. The real deal is a celebration of freshness and simplicity. In the summertime, when the star of this dish is at its peak and the heat can discourage even going near a stove, its time to give my recipe for Gazpacho with Avocado and Bell Pepper Relish a try. 1. In a large bowl, stir together tomatoes, onion, cucumber, bread, almonds, bell peppers, scallions, garlic, salt, pepper, paprika and sugar. Working in 2-cup batches, whirl the mixture but not pureed. 2. Return mixture to the bowl and stir in oil, vinegar and hot pepper sauce. Add enough chilled tomato juice or cold water, a tablespoon at a time, to make the gazpacho soupy but not too thin. 3. Cover bowl and refrigerate soup until very cold, at least a couple of hours or up to 2 days. Stir gazpacho and ladle into bowls, or pour it at the table from a wide-mouth pitcher. Garnish with Avocado and Bell Pepper Relish. Serves 6 to 8. AVOCADO AND BELL PEP PER RELISH 1 ripe peeled avocado, diced bell pepper 2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro purple onion 1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice Mix all ingredients together until well-combined. Top soup with the relish. Angela Shelf Medearis is an awardwinning childrens author, culinary historian and the author of seven cookbooks. Her website is www.divapro. com. To see how-to videos, recipes and much, much more, Like Angela Shelf Medearis, The Kitchen Diva! on Facebook. Read Gina Harlows Blog at peachesandprosciutto.blogspot. com. Recipes may not be reprinted without permission from Angela Shelf Medearis. 2014 King Features Synd. Inc. Tomatoes: once bitten, forever loved or one 28-ounce can of quality plum tomatoes, chopped Walla Walla, coarsely chopped SPANISH GAZPACHO WITH RELISH Turning the Body into a Cancer-Fighting MachineBy Kimberly M. Hicks, Pharm.D., M.H.A., Clinical Pharmacy Specialist at BioPlus Specialty Pharmacy and OWC DirectorThe bodys immune system possesses all the tools it needs to kill cancer cells, so why does cancer sneak past our defenses so many times? Cancer cells in an elaborate game of cat and mouse employ numerous techniques to cloak themselves as invisible to the immune system. This means that the immune systems call to arms often doesnt happen until it is too late. Heres just one example of the intrigue between cancer cells and the immune system: Natural killer cells are one of the key parts of the immune systems arsenal for seeking out and destroying damaged cells in the body, including tumor cells. Yet in response, tumors pump out a certain protein (called TGF-beta) that dials down the activity of natural killer cells in the body. lung cancer cells do in fact evade detection by natural killer cells and think ing ahead to how this can be counteracted in cancer treatment these scien tists are exploring ways that patients with lung cancer might be able to stop the evasion. In other words, it might be possible in the future to take away this malicious tool of cancer cells and get the immune system to destroy those rogue cells. Similarly, researchers at the Cedars-Sinai Samuel Oschin Compre hensive Cancer Institute are working in an animal model to ramp up the im mune response in mice with lung or pancreas tumors. So far, this is resulting in cell death of the tumors. The immune-stimulating compounds in this research are an mTOR inhibitor and CD4 antibody. When used, they make it so the once-invisible tumor cells are seen by the immune system and thus targeted for destruction. ers are getting closer all the time. With lung cancer as the current leading cancer killer in both men and women in the United States, any progress against this killer cant come soon enough. to establish relationships and share resources resulting in innovative programs that inspire, motivate and educate individuals in their pursuit of optimal health. For more information on Our Whole Community, please visit ourwholecommunity.org. Our Whole Community is pleased to contribute monthly to the Winter Park Observer. Email owc_ed@me.com for inquiries about OWC.

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, June 19, 2014 | Page 15 rfntbfn JUNE SPECIAL START TODAY FOR $49 r rfrntffb tttt fnbb t ff nf ttt fn ftnnf ffn BEACH BODY CHALLENGE 6 WEEK PROGRAM We just fester with prejudice. As deep-seated as racial and sexual biases are at least were dealing with them, and most of us understand that theyre wrong. But when it comes to our intoler ance of weight, we dont give a second thought. Our body bigotry is so ingrained that we consider it completely acceptable to make fun of fat people and to consider those who are overweight to be lesser people. Whats really ridiculous is that the contempt is aimed at an awful lot of us. A brand-new study tallies the rate of obesity in the United States at nearly a third of the popula tion, more than 87 million Ameri cans. Not only do all of us suffer terrible hits to our self-esteem, but there are the physical dangers of that excess poundage: diabetes, heart problems, cancer, the list goes on. Obesity itself is a disease, often brought on by an addiction not just to food but, more insidi ously, to the toxic concoctions the processors prepare and constantly advertise. Any attempts to intervene are crushed by the conglomer pushing their narcotic morsels on us. They particularly target our children. Woe be to the political ask Michelle Obama. ladys Lets Move campaign and its stated goal of helping our be all that controversial. What would make more sense than replacing unhealthy fare with healthy? No deep-fried stuff, no empty calories. Instead, offer up tasty, nutritious choices. But the purveyors of the bad stuff dont like that. So theyve enlisted their GOP buddies in Congress to take Lets Move and stop it dead in its tracks. Educators some of them, anyway have been recruited to complain that the kiddies just wont eat their veggies and fruits. They want pizza with tomato sauce to be declared a vegetable. Washington by school-nutrition associations that claim laudable purpose until you look closely and discover that a bulk of their Thats all the House Republi cans need. So now theyre trying to pass legislation that would al low local districts to get a waiver from requirements that they serve healthy meals. Pardon the pun, but that would gut the campaign. Wouldnt a better idea be for them to work harder to come up with selections that students like even though theyre good for them? To her credit, Ms. Obama is writing back. There she was on The New York Times op-ed page telling us that, Our kids deserve so much more than this. She was referring to the usual game that our politicians play where the well-being of citizens is complete ly ignored. Obesity is right up there with cigarette smoking when it comes to habits that can kill us, habits break. Clearly, though, the better way would be to develop healthy eating routines in our children, which, along with encouraging exercise is what Lets Move is about. The question is, will it sur vive the Washington swamp? You know the answer: Fat chance. 2014 Bob Franken Distributed by King Features Synd. H ave any or all of these excuses popped up when youve tried cook ing? Well, think again. Cooking can be faster, cheaper and far more fun with these simple tips to get you started. 1. Involve everybody Cooking is boring and drab when youre slaving away in the kitchen and everyone else is watching TV. In fact, for many couples and families, cooking is the least enjoyable way of spending time together. Well, you can change all that! Buy fun aprons for each person, play some happy music, and get everyone involved. Turn it into a creative project that requires everyones contribution. If youre single, organize a cookout, invite your friends, and bond over food! Often we assume that were alone until we reach out and simply ask. 2. Prepare the basics Once or twice a week, chop and store veg gies such as zucchini, onions, garlic, ginger, broccoli, etc. in zip lock bags or air-tight containers. This will help you whip up meals much faster. With the basics ready, and along with the cooked grains (see below), youll be able to prepare meals in 15 to 20 minutes. Yes, yummy, healthy and wholesome meals. I encourage you your list of basic ingre dients, chop, and keep them ready and available for the week. Youre much more likely to cook at home when you know you dont have to start from scratch. 3. Cook the grains What is the most time-consuming aspect of cooking your own meals? Getting those grains ready, right? Be it a stir-fry, pilaf or pulao, the base carbs usually take a long time to cook. So, once a week, take an hour to cook these grains. Soak your brown rice, quinoa, barley or any other grains, and cook them! Do you know what this does? This saves you time throughout the week when you return home tired, and ordering in is oh-so tempting. You remind yourself about the cooked grains and the chopped basics in your fridge, and suddenly getting a meal ready doesnt seem so daunting. 4. Find your special chefs knife This investment is so worth it. A good chefs knife does most of the chopping for you, saving you lots of time and hassle. Do you know what its biggest contribution is, though? It keeps you in the kitchen. Chop ping becomes such a joyful experience that you want to cook (anything!), because you get to use this amazing piece of stainless steel. There are tons of good quality options and I highly recommend you go to a store rather than order online, so you can get a feel for the knife. 5. Condiments are your friends You dont have to learn every recipe in the cookbook to make delicious, healthy meals. Condiments are a great way to personalize meals as well as add variety. I often make the same base dish: quinoa or brown rice stir fry with veggies. But by seasoning it differently each time herbs and nuts, tamari, Srira cha, Biryani powder, Asian ginger sauce it never tastes the same. So, go ahead and pick a few condiments next time you go grocery shopping. The kitchen is your sandbox play at will. If youve been feeling in a rut or simply de-motivated to cook more at home, I hope these tips will get you enthused! Washington ghting the fat of the land WORLD CUP | Klinsmann plan not unlike a German bakers on the dough. Its what makes them all brown like that. How could you know to do that? They paid their bill. Klinsmann is a baker ... owns a bakery in Germany. The guy probably knows a thing or two about ingredients and probably has some time-tested recipes. Maybe thats why you cant make a good pancake. You may have the same ingredients but you dont have the right griddle ... remove the lumps. They walked back to their truck. Well ... lets see what this guy can cook up, then. Mark Vasto is a veteran sportswriter who lives in Kansas City. 2014 King Features Synd. Inc. C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 12 ADVERTORIAL Puja Madan is a womens health coach, writer and speaker. She has received her training from the world-renowned Institute for Integrative Nutrition, New York. Puja offers powerful health and wellness programs for young women, in person or online, empowering them through healthier food and lifestyle choices. Puja practises Yoga and meditation daily and believes that all inner growth starts with a love affair with oneself! For more information visit www.innerscientist.com or www.facebook. com/innerscientist Five ways to make quick, creative, tasty meals I dont know how to cook Cooking is for boring people Id love to, but just dont have the time! Healthy food just doesnt taste delicious

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Page 16 | Thursday, June 19, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Before Before Before 407.680.4263www.180DegreeFitness.com1595 Meeting Place, Orlando, FL 32814After After After Are you ready for summer? Get your beach body now!Before After Call me directly 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com r fntbt f rtt ftbt bt bnr nr rt b bb f b tb off trtnCoupon redeemable for cash, check or credit card purchases only. Not redeemable for insurance transactions. Excludes custom/special orders & nutritional supplements. May not be combined with any other dis counts. Coupon has no cash value. One Senior Place ... See our full Calendar of Events at OneSeniorPlace.com407.949.6733715 Douglas Avenue Altamonte Springs, FL 32714M-F 8:30am 5pmFUN & EXERCISE SENIOR CLUB Every Monday 10am-12pm By Family Physicians GroupJune 23rd Special Bingo June 30th Casino CRAFTS & CONVERSATION Friday, June 20th 1:30pm-2pm By VITAS Innovative Hospice Care. RSVP 407.599.2522 CHAIR PILATES Friday, June 20th 1:30pm-2pm By VITAS Innovative Hospice Care. RSVP 407.599.2522 EDUCATIONAL MEMORY LOSS BY DR. CHELSEA MABRY Tuesday, June 24th 9:30am-11am By Compass Research. RSVP 407.218.6220 HEALTH RELATED BENEFITS OF TESTOSTERONE THERAPY Monday, June 23rd 3pm-4pm By More T Clinics. RSVP 407.949.0222 HEARING AIDS USERS IMPROVE RELATIONSHIPS & SELF IMAGE! Wednesday, June 25th 3pm-4:30pm By Harmony Hearing. RSVP 407.949.6737 INSURANCE & REAL ESTATETHE REAL ESTATE SPECIALISTS ARE IN! Monday, June 23rd & 30th 10am-1pm By Exit Real Estate Results. Appointment Only 407.949.6714 UNITED HEALTHCARE MEDICARE/ MEDICAID SPECIAL NEEDS PLAN Tuesday, June 24th 2pm-3:30pm By LTC Advisors. RSVP 407.949.6722 LEGAL & FINANCIAL RMD MISTAKES TO AVOID Tuesday, June 24th 10am-11am By Estate & Business Planning Group. RSVP 407.389.1122 TRUTH ABOUT ESTATE PLANNING Thursday, June 26th 9:30am-12pm By The Law Ofces of Hoyt & Bryan. RSVP 407.977.8080 TRUTH ABOUT MEDICAID PLANNING Thursday, June 26th 2pm-4pm By The Law Ofces of Hoyt & Bryan. RSVP 407.977.8080Calendar of Events June 2014 Considering the culture and climate from where many of the herbs we favor originate (dry, mild Mediter ranean), it is no surprise that growing them through our hot, wet Summers can be a task destined with troubles! Even with encouragement emanating from legends of music, grow ing parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme can be problematic. Most of our concerns originate with excessive afternoon rain, leaving the plants wet through the over night hours and then the morn ing dew. Toss in weed pressures, insect hoards, neglect from vaca tion scheduling, and the periodic dry spell; is it no wonder that tak ing a hiatus from herb gardening is highly recommended? But we do have some options. Both low growing oregano and thyme have proven prob lematic, succumbing to moisture driven leaf diseases. Rescue transplanting to nursery con tainers has kept fresh quantities available for culinary use and then to replant back to the garden in Autumn. After several years, this routine has become a chore, almost devolving into real work. As an alternative to both herbs montana) has proven to be a wonderful discovery. It survives through Summers rain, contin ues to produce from the original planting, and propagates easily from rooted stems. Winter savory is not commonly found at most retail outlets, so mail order seeds may be the best source. Rosemary grows as an up right bush. With some judicious pruning, the base and trunk can be kept open and ventilated, encouraging dispersal of accumu lated moisture. Harvest branch quantities to both manicure the plant and provide for fresh use and preservation drying. Mint will grow better in wetter conditions than dry. With due diligence, it will produce quan tity enough to use as a vegetable, peppermint and spearmints vigorous root growth belies their future destiny of strangling themselves from the center of the planting, emboldening under ground stems to explore the terrain beyond the designated growing bed. As decline becomes evident, exhume some volumes of root and stem portions and transplant to new areas. By staggering this cycle, perpetual harvests will be the norm. The ultimate taste of Summer is the green goodness of basil. Just about any plant exposed to the pounding rain of a thunder storm will take a beating, but even more so for tender basil. Luckily, basil excels while grow ing in a container. I have been known to procure a plant at the grocery produce department and upon arriving home, separate the individual sprouts to pots of their own. Grown under a canopy in partial shade, starting a new batch every few weeks will keep the kitchen sweet with the lus cious smells of Summer. Summer herbs for Florida gardens Tom Carey From my garden to yours Tom Carey is the owner of Sundew Gardens, a you-pick gardening business in Oviedo. Visit the Sundew Gardens Facebook page and email him at sundewgardens@gmail.com WHO IS CAREY > PHOTO BY TOM CAREY THE OBSERVER Rosemary can be surprisingly hardy, especially if pruned regularly to keep the trunk and base open and ventilated to get rid of excess damaging moisture.

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, June 19, 2014 | Page 17 Through June 29 Elton Johns AIDA Following the story line of Verdis famous opera, Elton John and Tim Rice took the timeless love story from Egypt and creat ed a rock musical that won both Tony and Grammy awards on Broadway. Now Director Derek Critzer has created a new production be ing presented at The Venue at 511 Virginia Drive through June 29. This is a special opportunity to see a Broadway musical with extraordinary local talent. Tickets at clandestineor lando.com Through Aug. 18 Summer Nights at Orlando Science Center The Orlando Sci ence Center will stay open late on Friday and Saturday nights this summer giving guests the opportu nity to immerse in laser light shows; see planets in the Observatory; explore hands-on challenges in Sportsology; see a Hollywood Aug. 16 the Science Center will be open until 9 p.m. (the 28,000 watts of lights and sounds of laser light shows can be experi enced at 9 p.m. for the Beatles, 10 p.m. for Led Zeppelin, and 11 p.m. for Pink Floyd). Call 407514-2000 or visit osc.org Through July 27 Rapunzel at Orlando Shakespeare In a playful adaptation by Brandon Roberts from the story by the Brothers Grimm, Orlando Shakespeare offers a summer time tale for the whole family. Shut away in a lonely tower, Ra punzel grows, and so does her hair! Will Rapunzel escape the clutches of her evil captor? Find out in this contemporary adap tation with an Orlando Shakes twist. Arrive early and Shake Out The Sillies as members of the cast offer pre-show fun for the whole family. Call 407-4471700 or visit orlandoshakes.org June 20 to Sept 7 OMART offers the Florida Prize in Contemporary Art The Orlando Museum of Art will offer a preview of the new exhibit: Orlando Museum of Art Florida Prize in Contempo rary Art in a reception June 20 beginning at 7 p.m. The exhibit presents 10 artists working in diverse mediums, combining materials, and creating work from reclaimed materials along dynamic and challenging nature of art today. Admission is $5. Call 407-896-4231 or visit omart.org June 20 Calling London: Two Sides of the Best of British Music More than 100 orchestra and rock musicians will come togeth er to present an eclectic concert featuring some of the best music ever to come out of England as Central Florida Community Arts (CFCArts) presents Calling London: Two Sides of the Best of British Music. Focused on symphonic compositions of the early 1900s and rock n roll from the late 20th century, this concert features everything from Pomp and Circumstance to the great est hits of The Beatles. Set for June 20 at 8 p.m. at Northland Church in Longwood, tickets are $10. Visit cfcarts.com or call 407-937-1800. June 20 to 30 Breakthrough Theatre presents Once On This Island From the Tony Award-win ning songwriting team of Lynn Ahrens and Stephen Flaherty (Seussical, Ragtime) comes the Olivier Award-winning Once On This Island, the mu sical adaptation of the popular fairy tale The Little Mermaid. Directed by Wade Hair with musical direction by Justin Scarlat, Island will be per formed from June 20 to 30 at The Breakthrough Theatre in Winter Park. For reservations call 407920-4034. June 20 to July 20 Cock at the Mad Cow Theatre Cock is the adults-only story of what happens to John and his troubled relationship with his boyfriend as John meets a woman who is more than the best friend a gay man could hope for. Facing a new kind of guilt, John decides to straighten it out in this playful look at one mans sexuality and choices that challenge the status quo. Performed at the Mad Cow Theatre from June 20 to July 20, call 407-297-8788 or visit madcowtheatre.com June 20 to July 19 Back by popular demand SHOUT! The Mod Musical In one of the fun niest musicals ever presented at the Winter Park Playhouse, SHOUT! The Mod Musi cal returns to the Playhouse from June 20 to July 19. The hit women coming of age in 1960s London and features an incred ible collection of s classics by LuLu and more. The production features a powerhouse cast and is highly recommended. Call 407-645-0145 or visit winterpark playhouse.org June 21 World Giraffe Day at Central Florida Zoo The Central Florida Zoo will celebrate its newest residents in on June 21 beginning at 10 a.m. The longest day of the year is the perfect day to celebrate the worlds tallest animal, and the celebration will include games, childrens crafts, face painting, and animal encounters. Included with zoo admission, donations support the Giraffe Conserva tion Foundation. Call 407-323idazoo.org Josh Garrick Culture for your calendar FLORIDA PRIZE IN CONTEMPORARY ART WORLD GIRAFFE DAY SHOUT! THE MOD MUSICAL RAPUNZEL Please see CULTURE on page 18 This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORG @EnzianTheater COLD IN JULYStarring Michael C. Hall, Don Johnson, and Sam Shepard ONE WEEK ONLY! Fri Mon, Wed, Thurs 6:30, 9:30 Tues 6:30Opera on the Big Screen: LA BOHEMESat 11AMPeanut Butter Matinee Family Film: JUMANJICome early for a special animal encounter brought to you by the Central Florida Zoo! Sunday 12PMCult Classics: CROUCHING TIGER, HIDDEN DRAGONTues 9:30Popcorn Flick in the Park: TOY STORYFREE in Central Park! Thurs 8PMIDAFinal 3 Shows! Fri-Sun 4PM

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Page 18 | Thursday, June 19, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer CULTURE | Its a welcome home party with a night full of brass musics greatest hits at Plaza Live June 21 Brian Regan Live at the Bob Carr Critics and audiences agree that Brian Regan is one of the premiere comedians in the country. With the perfect balance of sophisticated writing and physicality, Regan will perform at the Bob Carr PAC on June 21 at 8 p.m. Regan, whose fans span generations, recently made his 25th appearance on Late Night with David Letterman, the most of any comedian. Tickets are available at the Amway Cen ter, Ticketmaster.com, or charge-by-phone at 800-745-3000. June 21 to 23 Chicken of the Sea Mermaid brings goodness to Orlando Celebrating 100 years as an iconic American brand, Orlando is the next stop on the Chicken of the Sea Great American Gratitude Tour a 56-city journey honor include the Florida Mall on June 21 from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.; June 22 from noon to 8 p.m.; and on June 23 at Wal-Mart at 11250 E. Colonial Drive from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Visitors can have their pictures taken with the Mermaid and take home themed giveaways. At some point in the tour 10 lucky participants will win $10,000 to use for the community service project of their June 22 Orlando Jazz Orchestra presents Big Band Classics Under Musical Director Greg Parnell, former drummer for the Glenn Miller Orchestra, the Orlando Jazz Orchestra performs authentic selections from the libraries of Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Benny Goodman, Glenn Miller, Stan Kenton, Woody Herman, Artie Shaw, Harry James, and other luminaries. The Orchestra will perform classics from the 1950s and s at the Plaza Live at 425 N. Bumby Ave. in Orlando on June 22 at 3 p.m. Tickets are $15. Visit plazaliveor lando.com June 23 Sovereign Brass in a new home Celebrating 20 years of appearances on the Orlando Philharmonics Sounds of Summer Series, the Sovereign Brass will of the Philharmonic groups to perform in what will soon be the Orchestras new home at Plaza Live at 425 N. Bumby Ave. Works to be performed include the groups greatest hits, spanning the brass repertoire from Gabrielli to Bern stein. Join the group for hors doeuvres before the performance, welcome them to their new home, and enjoy highlights of their extraordinary 20-year musical jour ney. Call 407-770-0071 or visit Orlando Phil.org C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 17 COMMUNITY CLIPS ARE JUST A CLICK AWAY. Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-5223906. SOVEREIGN BRASS BRIAN REGAN LIVE

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, June 19, 2014 | Page 19 Opinions Chris Jepson Perspectives An old man should have more care to end life well than to live long. Captain J. Brown For you, Gentle Reader, is there a specif ic moment in life when you cross that inev itable line and become, well, uh, old? How do you know when that benchmark has been achieved? When the band plays and you pass on dancing? When FOX News is on and your mind isnt? When your thoughts are narrower, more constricted than your arteries? How about when you receive a mailer, out-of-the-blue, on planning your funeral? Yes, thats the ticket, literally, a free din ner to a pre-planning seminar on owning with the wording on the mailer. It literally reads, We all make plans: wedding, vaca tions, retirement. Its an important part of life. And it makes a difference, especially ments and memorial service. I prefer my I embrace the perspective of Epicurus when he offered, Death does not concern us, because as long as we exist, death is not here. And when it does come, we no with that line of reasoning is, sure, if you do not exist, it would be a challenge to be concerned with dying and, yes, when you no longer exist, how can death be a concern? The rub, my fellow traveler, is while we are alive dying most assuredly concerns us. I confess to disappointment over hu man lifespans. Some turtles, lots of trees, even some spongesSPONGES!have longer lifespans, years longer than human beings. Wheres the fairness in that? I regularly offer a toast to More. More art. More camaraderie. More beauty. More life. More. A fun philosophical question for the Would you rather die in complete control of your faculties, rationally managing your end, or be reduced, for example, to walk ing vegetable matter because of Alzheim ers disease? I was prompted by a corporate mailer to consider my arrangements by plan ning for death. Thats nice. One problem: Any planning is for after-the-fact, after I scenario. I am much more interested, particularly for my loved ones, on the circum stances of my death, rather than how inexpensively they get the old man (thats me) in the ground. If I do it right, I will own my death as I owned my life. My thoughtful corporate death-plan ning partner emphasized in their promo tional materials the idea of Dignity. Not necessarily dying with dignity, but rather being put in the ground with dignity. What a hoot. If I was stuffed and ultimately mounted on the wall as a venerable can dleholder, I could care less; I am after all dead. No, where death and dignity meet is when you are still alive and lucid. I recommend Boomers make a gift to America (spare the U.S. Treasury the hor rendous Medicare costs associated with future generations and die with dignity, die on your own terms. Own your death as you lived your life. Dying isnt the question. Never is. Its when. Its how. Make the living will. Have DNR tattooed in four-inch letters on your chest. Have the phenobarbital and Jack Daniels readily accessible. Have people around who share your values and your reverence for quality of life. Live life well until you choose otherwise. The end of your choice Jepson is a 27-year resident of Central Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.US Louis Roney Play On! Most of the time, most people seem to know the answers to most of the questions they ask most other people. Writing Play On! through several decades, I have dared to express my opin ion on many questions, knowing that all arguable. Arguments have been wellprejudices. Politicians know well the value of setting up their ideas by asking themselves loaded questions and then answering them publicly! These days there are many questions about the president and his presi the political air we breathe. I dont claim to have the answers to many of lifes questions, but I have been asked a plethora: Do I like the president? Thats quite a question. I have noth ing against the man personally, however, as to whether I like the way he is leading our country? I do not! In general terms, I would say Obama solves few, if any, problems and leaves us weaker and at the must deal. Should we have known better before we elected this man? Barack Obama has no experience with any of our armed services and yet as president he is commander in chief of all of them. He promised to get the troops out of Afghanistan and seems to be doing so at the peril of the local Afghan people. Did we promise to rescue Iraq, or to help them rescue themselves? Are American inter ests being better served now in Iran, Iraq, Syria, Egypt, Libya anywhere? On the home front, is Obama reducing raises for our troops? Our military is very perturbed by agreements that Obama is making limiting our service commands to levels below those of WWII. At the same worst terrorists-criminals from Guanta namo to return to their murderous trade. Why, pray tell? Did Obama break our laws re: not dealing with terrorists? Where do Obamas interests lie? Why do our military leaders remain silent? Meanwhile our veterans are languish ing for months at a time waiting for well-deserved urgent medical attention promised them. Obama knew of this fact when he was a candidate for president and vowed that as president this would Is Obama calling for yet another projected study? Of what? He knew of the prob lems over six years ago! the Obama regime was Fast and Furious our running of guns to Mexico. What did we solve in Mexico? Where are those guns now? Are Mexi can cartels still powerful and ing across the border as usual? What is Attorney General Eric Holder doing about illegal aliens and goods crossing our borders? Speaking of crossing the Mexican border: I remember that a promised wall Has it been built? American ranchers have been killed on their own U.S. property. Has anyone been caught and punished for these killings? And are we Americans supposed to be so dumb as to swallow the idiotic story that a video was the cause of our ambas sador and three other Americans being killed, and our embassy burned, in Ben gazi?! Who thought up that stupid idea? Where was the president? Where was Secretary of State Hillary Clinton? Arent U.S. embassies actions under the secretary of states purview? Lastly: We Americans are told not to judge all Muslims by the behavior of a few lunatics among them, and yet we are told to judge all gun owners by the doings of a few wackos! Nonsensical isnt it? Let me ask...? About Roney: HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney) I will own my death as I owned my life. Letters to the editor Send your thoughts (400 words or less) to Managing Editor Isaac Babcock at ibabcock@turnstilemediagroup.com This letter, written recently by Winter Park resident Lisa Everett to some of her friends and neighbors, is being printed at the request of the Observer. Dear friends and neighbors: As of [the June 9] City Commission meeting, Winter Park embarked on a course of dramatic growth to allow build ings with vastly increased density and separate parking garages to be constructed in and around our city. If you are plan ning on remaining a Winter Park resident for the foreseeable future, this change will impact your quality of life, so I am asking you to please read this and consider get ting involved. Reduced to its essence, narrowly passing by a vote of 3-2, last night the city announced its intention to permit developers to apply for triple the amount of Floor Area Ratio (the square footage that is allowed in relation to the lot size) from what is presently allowed under our Comprehensive Plan. Importantly (and of particular concern to those of us who dis like the aesthetic of the concrete monoliths that have sprung up recently), the devel opers will be permitted to build parking garages and not include the square footage of those garages in the Floor Area Ratio equation, thereby exponentially increasing the square footage of their main build ing and encouraging separate multi-story parking garages. If that doesnt bother you, then consider that developers of these dense projects, which had previously been limited to certain areas west of U.S. Highway 17-92 (toward Interstate 4), will now be invited to apply to build their large structures and parking garages within a few blocks of many of our homes on any four-lane road in Winter Park (Denning, Aloma, Morse, Fairbanks, parts of Lakemont, parts of Webster) where zoning allows. About 25 citizens (an economically and racially diverse group from various Winter Park neighborhoods) spoke at the meeting and asked the mayor and commissioners to vote against the Comprehensive Plan amendments. A lone real estate agent spoke in favor. Faced with this overwhelmingly nega tive response from the citizens, Mayor Bradley, Commissioners Steven Leary and Commissioner Sarah Sprinkel nevertheless voted in favor of amending our Compre hensive Plan to allow developers to apply for these PDs (Planned Developments). Commissioners McMacken and Cooper voted against. Despite the issue having been raised by numerous citizens, those voting in favor of amending the Comp Plan did not articulate any reason why they supported growth which will increase the number of cars on our already failing Winter Park crease could be ameliorated. Another ques tion raised but left unaddressed is who or what is driving this change, since there is no evidence to show that the citizens of Winter Park are in favor of this. Finally, we need to understand why the city is forging ahead with these changes without incorporates input from the citizenry. I encourage you to email Mayor Bradley and Commissioners Sprinkel and Leary and ask for direct answers to these straightforward questions. IMPORTANT: The issue here is the density increase, not Planned Develop ments per se. We are not afraid of Planned Developments. We recognize that Planned Developments can be excellent tools for a city to use in controlling development; however, we believe our city leaders must stantial increase in density without taking time to help us understand how this will and explain ing how the city will accommodate the The Comprehensive Plan amendment voted on last night will be sent to Tallahas see for approval and then will be sent back Winter Park residents were in attendance at the meeting urging the Mayor and Com mission to vote against Comprehensive Plan change. My husband, Dykes Everett, also asked the Mayor and Commissioners to vote against the change. Thank you for your time. Lisa Simonton Everett, Winter Park What is Eric Holder doing about illegal aliens and goods crossing our borders?

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Page 20 | Thursday, June 19, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer King Features Weekly ServiceJune 16, 2014 King Features Weekly ServiceJune 16, 2014 King Features Weekly ServiceJune 16, 2014 King Features Weekly ServiceJune 16, 2014 King Features Weekly ServiceJune 16, 2014 King Features Weekly ServiceJune 16, 2014 ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Get your facts together and become familiar with them before you have to face up to that interview. The better prepared you are, the easier it will be to make that important impression. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) New information might warrant changing your mind about a recently made decision. Never mind the temporary confusion it might cause. Acting on the truth is always preferable. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Creat ing a loving atmosphere for those you care for could pay off in many ways. Expect to hear some unexpected but very welcome news that can make a big difference in your life. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Step ping away from an old and seemingly insoluble problem might be helpful. Use the time to take a new look at the situation and perhaps work out a new method of dealing with it. LEO (July 23 to August 22) Youre still in a favorable goal-setting mode. However, you might need to be a lit tle more realistic about some of your aims. Best to reach for what is current ly doable. The rest will follow. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) A setback is never easy to deal with. But it could be a boon in dis guise. Recheck your proposal, and strengthen the weak spots. Seek advice from someone who has been there and done that. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Coming up with a new way of handling a tedious job-regulated chore could lead to more than just a congrat ulatory memo once the word reaches the right people. Good luck. SCORPIO (October 23 to Novem ber 21) What you might call determination someone else might regard as stubbornness. Look for ways to reach a compromise that wont require a major shift of views on your part. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Youre still in a vulner able mode vis-a-vis offers that sound too good to be true. So continue to be skeptical about anything that cant be backed up with provable facts. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Thrift is still dominant this week. What you dont spend on what you dont need will be available for you to draw on should a possible (albeit temporary) money crunch hit. AQUARIUS (January 20 to Febru ary 18) Staying close to home early in the week allows for some introspec tion about your social life. Sort out your feelings before rejoining your fun-time fellows on the weekend. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) It can be a bit daunting as well as exciting to find yourself finally taking action on a long-delayed move for a change. It helps to stay with it when others rally to support you. BORN THIS WEEK: Your love of home and family provide you with the emotional support you need to find success in the outside world. 2014 King Features Synd., Inc. July 4, 1776, in Philadelphia, the Continental Congress adopts the Declaration of Independence, which proclaims the independence of a new United States of America from Great Britain. The declaration came 442 days after the first shots of the Ameri can Revolution. July 1, 1916, 25-year-old Army Lt. Dwight D. Eisenhower marries 19-year-old Mamie Geneva Doud. He would go on to lead the Allies to victory in Europe in World War II and later become the nations 34th president. The couple lived in 33 homes during Eisenhowers 37-year military career. July 6, 1933, Major League Baseballs first All-Star Game takes place at Comiskey Park in Chicago. The event was designed to bolster the sport during the darkest years of the Great Depression. Fans who could still afford tickets migrated from the more expensive box seats to the bleachers, which cost 50 cents. June 30, 1953, the first produc tion Corvette is built at the General Motors facility in Flint, Mich. All 300 Corvettes were white convertibles with red interiors and black canvas tops. The 1953 Corvette was outfitted with a six-cylinder engine and a twospeed automatic transmission. July 5, 1975, Arthur Ashe defeats the favored Jimmy Connors to become the first black man ever to win Wimbledon. While the confident Connors strutted around the tennis court, Ashe rested between sets. Finally, with the shocked crowd cheering him on, Ashe finished Connors off in the fourth set, 6-4. July 3, 1985, the blockbuster Back to the Future, starring Michael J. Fox, opens in theaters. The timetravel device in the film was a DeLorean DMC-12 sports car outfitted with a nuclear reactor that would achieve the 1.21 gigawatts of power necessary to travel through time. July 2, 1990, a stampede of religious pilgrims in a pedestrian tun nel in Mecca leaves more than 1,400 people dead. This was the most deadly of a series of incidents over 20 years affecting Muslims making the trip to Mecca. Hundreds die each year in this pilgrimage, in stonings, stampedes or fires. 2014 King Features Synd., Inc. King Features Weekly ServiceJune 16, 2014



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WPMOBSERVER.COM Winter Park said goodbye to a piece of city history on June 1 as demolition workers tore down the 52-year-old Amtrak train sta tion in Central Park abandoned by the heavy rail system in favor of the new SunRail station next door. Winter Park City Commissioners Steven Leary, Tom McMacken and Sarah Sprinkel, City Manager Randy Knight and U.S. Congressman John Mica sported hard hats at the faded structure, chipping away at the front pillars with sledge hammers and pocketing broken slabs of rock as keepsakes. An excavator vehicle made quick work of the building after wards, pressing down on the roof with its long mechanical arm and leveling the station to a dusty pile of rubble in less than 20 minutes. The old [station] was quaint and great for its time, but the new USPS 00-6186 Publisher statement on page 4. VISIT WPMOBSERVER.COMSUBSCRIBE NOW! EVER CELEBRATED GIRAFFE DAY?CULTURE, 17Mother and son grads Rollins degrees together LIFESTYLES, 6Fighting the fat, deliciouslyThis restaurant takes food straight out of its own garden. HEALTHY LIVING, 8COMMUNITY BULLETIN ........... 4 CALENDAR ................... 4 LIFESTYLES ................... 6 HEALTHY LIVING ................ 8 CULTURE .................... 17 OPINIONS ................... 19 CLASSIFIEDS ................. 21 The Orange County Sheriffs June 3 and one arrest on June 6 in Winter Park related to the dealing of stolen cell phones at the We Fix Phones at 595 W. Fairbanks Ave. the result of a yearlong investigation of the business by the Winter Park Po lice Department. We Fix Phones owner Hunter Sanders and employees Lisa Jo Sanders, Adam Sanders and Michael Chaney were charged with multiple counts of dealing in stolen property, money launder ing, dealing in stolen property over the Internet, engaging in a pattern of racketeering activity, conspiracy to commit racketeer ing and operating a secondhand dealer without a registration or license. Winter Park Police received a tip last year that the location was buying stolen cell phones and selling them on the Inter net, starting an investigation last June. Police later conducted a series of controlled sales over a six-month period, sending a as a customer selling several phones believed to be stolen. The store obliged the cus tomer and bought the phones without resistance, said Sgt. Tim Volkerson of the Winter Park Police Street Crimes Unit. Through that information gathering we learned that most probably that tip was pretty accurate, Volkerson said. At that point we began the active inves tigation. They participated regardless of whether we told them it was stolen. Police are unsure of how long the business may have been dealing in stolen phones, Volkerson said. We Fix Phones has been serv ing Winter Park residents for more than 14 years, according PHOTOS COURTESY OF ORANGE COUNTY SHERIFFS OFFICEThe owner and three employees of We Fix Phones have been charged with mutiple counts related to the alleged purchase of stolen cellphones at the Winter Park business. PHOTO BY TIM FREED THE OBSERVERA bulldozer smashed the 52-year-old station on June 1, with the help of commissioners.Phone store foul playFour arrested following yearlong phone racketeering investigationTIM FREED Observer staff Please see PHONES on page 2 Please see ROADS on page 2The city of Maitland is getting on track to make changes to trafmoving freely on the roads and more importantly off of the railroad right-of-ways. The city put up two propos als to the Florida Department of Transportation in recent weeks it hopes will make the railroad intersection at Horatio Avenue safer for commuters, said Mayor is for a preemption system that would clear out backed up cars in between Maitland Avenue headed toward U.S. Highway 1792 when a train approaches. The second is to retroactively re-stripe Horatio back to two through lanes removing the new parallel parking spaces on the same stretch of road, and also converting the left-turn-only lane onto northbound 17-92 from Horatio into a left-or-straight-op tion lane, which would take the road back to how it was prior to place earlier this year. Plans for the construction ear lier this year were based on a traf take into account the increased Schieferdecker said. These proposed changes, he said, are helping to bring that 2004 study up to date with this Maitland backtracks on roadsSARAH WILSON Observer staffA stations last stopWinter Park demolishes Amtrak train stationTIM FREED Observer staff Please see STATION on page 2 407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC Winter Park Recovery CenterComprehensive Drug & Alcohol Treatment Sinclair Method of Alcohol Extinction Subutex/Suboxone For Opioid AbuseSpring Special 10% Off All Protocols2056 Aloma Ave, Suite 100, Winter Park, FL 32792 www.WinterParkRecoveryCenter.com 407-629-0413 www.wpmobserver.com/enews ADAM SANDERS HUNTER SANDERS MICHAEL CHANEY LISA JO SANDERS

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Page 2 | Thursday, June 19, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer station is something the commu nity can be proud of, McMacken said. Its a farewell to the station that commuted Winter Park residents and dime stores lined Park Avenue and locals parked their Ford Fairlanes and Chevrolet Impalas on a downtown street then made of asphalt. Park Avenue Elementary sat where the SunTrust bank sits today, while the sidewalks were clear of the winding maze of res taurant tables and chairs. Residents were just starting to mark their calendars for the an nual Winter Park Sidewalk Art Festival only in its third year at the time. The 1962 station also meant the extension of Morse Boulevard from Park Avenue all the way to U.S. 17-92, giving residents a much needed route to travel east and west, according to records kept by the Winter Park History Museum. Debbie Komanski, execu tive director of the Albin Polasek Museum and Sculpture Garden, fondly remembers walking Park Avenue as a child at the time, fre quently stopping by Hogues Five and Dime to see the small pet tur tles for sale. She remembered the station built that year along Central Park, but admitted she wasnt sad to see the station go. Komanski had already grown attached to the one it replaced: the old Atlantic Coast Line Railroad station built back in 1912. The one that just left didnt have a lot of sentimental value to me, Komanski said. That was never the station of my childhood. But the now retired train stop did hold value for resident Peter Schreyer, executive director of Cre alde School of Art. He still remembers back in 1978 when he traveled on vaca tion from his home in Switzerland to see the east coast of the United States. Schreyer took the train from Washington, D.C. all the way to Orlando, passing through a quaint town with trees and small shops It kind of looked like the lay out of a model train underneath a Christmas tree, Schreyer said. I just always saw it as so cool that Winter Park has a train station for a small town. You could get on the train and go all the way up the east coast. The charming city called Win ter Park would become Schreyers new home a year later as he emi grated from Switzerland to the city of culture and heritage. He continued to take the train on day trips to Tampa with his young daughter, creating fond memories at the station. Its unfortunate that the train stop was torn down, Schreyer said. The station looked really bad in the past few years, but thats only because of neglect no one took care of it, Schreyer said. Its just like a lot of things in America: it doesnt get taken care of that well, it gets really bad and then its decided, It looks really aw ful; weve got to tear it down and build a new one. [My daughter and I] had a sentimental connection with it. I guess I was one of the few people who liked the old station.PHONES | Local business had allegedly bought stolen phonesSTATION | Winter Park commissioners grabbed sledgehammers to take down long-standing train stationto a post on the stores Facebook page. It goes to show that any business could be capable of operat ing a crime enterprise, said Sgt. John Bologna of the Winter Park Police Department. Theyve done repairs; theyve helped people out, Bologna said. They were a legiti mate business doing legitimate business. How they got into what they were doing with the alleged charges against them and how that started, I dont know. Bologna said he didnt know of any other pending arrests in the area related to the alleged crimes. The suspects have since posted bail and continue to run their store, Volkerson said. The state will decide whether theres enough evidence to proceed with a trial. The suspects defense attor ney didnt respond to requests for comment before press time. CONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE CONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE The old [station] was quaint and great for its time, but the new station is something the community can be proud of. PHOTO BY TIM FREED THE OBSERVERWinter Parks We Fix Phones was already back in business after the arrests were made.PHOTOS BY TIM FREED THE OBSERVERWinter Park Vice Mayor Steven Leary takes a swing at the foundation of the citys railroad station, which had helped send travelers on journeys across the country since when John F. Kennedy was president. The farewell doubled as a demolition party for commissioners. FREE ESTATE PLANNING WORKSHOPIs your estate headed for Probate Court? Or, do you have the proper legal documents in place to avoid Probate? Do you know that even if you have an up-to-date Will, it may still be subject to the Probate process? Do you have a current Power of Attorney? For Business? For Healthcare decisions? Learn how you can get your Estate Planning Documents written by highly specialized attorneys and save thousands of dollars on unnecessary court and legal costs, while at the same time eliminating the possible hardships on those you love. You are invited to a short, relaxed workshop where you can get all of the answers you need and more!Workshop Date: Wednesday, July 9th @ 9:30am RSVP @ 407-536-5321Gourmet Coffee & Refreshments will be served, and there will be drawings for Door Prizes*sponsored by First Financial Group ROADS | decade. Its an ongoing process, Schieferdecker said. The citys Transportation Advisory Board and Planning & Zoning Commission held a joint meeting last week to encourage public input regarding the pres ent and future state of downtown Maitland Avenue. Planning & Zoning Chair man Dale McDonald said the city needs to get working on its vision for its roads in the future, especially with downtown development deals queuing up. We cant keep doing what were doing, he said. CONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, June 19, 2014 | Page 3 Maitland City TalkBY HOWARD SCHIEFERDECKER MAYOR As a new grandparent, Ive found I needed to review and remember how to deal with the safe ty of a small child all over again. During my research, Ive revisited some tips and information that I thought would be useful for other new parents and grandparents. Most of the information is simple, but in our fast-paced lives we all have a tendency to get distracted and forget these things. For starters, dont forget the child when you get out of the vehicle! A vehicles interior temperature in Florida can reach 120 degrees Fahrenheit and heat stoke can set in very quickly. Every year we hear of a family experiencing the pain and anguish of losing a child, so please double check. Car seats are required to be used in passenger vehicles in the state of Florida. But, not everyone knows the rules governing their use and installation. Before pur chasing or accepting a car seat, check the label on the seat to make sure its appropriate for your childs age, weight and height. If youre being given a car seat, check the label on the seat to make sure it is still safe. Like milk, car seats have an expiration date. Its best to check and make sure it is up to current safety standards. Kids are VIPs, just ask them. We know all VIPs ride in the back seat, so keep all small children in the back seat. Youll want to keep your child or grandchild in a rearfacing car seat for as long as pos sible, usually until around age 2. When he or she outgrows the seat, move your child to a forward-fac ing car seat. To ensure your car seat is properly installed, please seek out a individuals have been trained in the installation of many different types of child car seats. One loca tion in Central Florida is the Childrens Safety Village; visit childhtml for more information. Last but not least, if you leave your car seat in the car, please cover it with a towel or blanket. The sun beating through a wind shield can heat metal parts to a very high temperature, no need to hurt the little ones by accident. From vehicle safety we now transition to water safety. The hard truth of the matter is drown ing is the leading cause of injuryrelated death among children be tween 1 and 4 years old. And its the third leading cause of death among children. Never leave your child unat tended around water. We know it sounds strict, but there is no room for compromise on this one. Babies can drown in as little as one inch of water. Please put the cell phone away, forget about all the other things you have to do and give young children 100 percent of your attention when they are near or around water. Other water safety steps include: empty all tubs, buckets, containers and wading pools im mediately after use. Store them upside down and out of childrens reach. And if you have a spa, a will also want to check and make sure all of your pool safety devices are working properly. Particularly if its been a while since youve had little ones around. It may seem strange, but there Safety tips for new parents and grandparents For more information call 407-659-5701 or visit www.TrustcoBank.com and apply today!Member FDICEQUAL HOUSINGLENDER RYour Home Town Bank TRUSTCO BANK Free Pre-Approvals No Application Fees**No Application Fee available for a limited time only. The value of the application fee is $299.00. Please Note: We reserve the right to alter or withdraw these products or certain features thereof without prior notification. rfnt nb bnn Rooted & grounded in Jesus Christ. The Learning Tree is a Ministry of First Baptist Church of Winter ParkWe offer Full-Day Infant Care and Childcare Year-Round, Preschool Classes, Summer Camp, and much more! 1021 New York Avenue N., Winter Park, Florida 32789 Established in 1972 we are celebrating 41 years of service this year. have been instances of children accessing toilets. Keeping toilet lids closed and the use of toilet seat locks can prevent drowning. Its also a good idea to keep doors to bathrooms and laundry rooms closed. Parents and grandparents have a million things to do, but learn ing CPR should be on the top of the list. Maitland Fire Rescue does have CPR training available to our citizens and businesses. Knowing CPR will give you tremendous peace of mind and the more peace of mind you have as a parent or grandparent, the better. If you have any questions on child safety matters you may con tact your Maitland Fire Rescue Department at 407 539-6226. Our family helping yours whatever it takes. Dennis Marshall, Fire Mar shal PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERWinter Parkers sipped and strolled along Park Avenue June 12 at the summer Sip, Shop and Stroll hosted by the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce. Sip, Shop & Stroll Sip, Shop & Stroll

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Page 4 | Thursday, June 19, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Thursday, June 19, 2014 PHONE: 407-563-7000 FAX: 407-563-7099 WPMOBSERVER.COMPUBLISHERTracy Craft407.515.2605TCraft@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MANAGING EDITORIsaac Babcock 407.563.7023IBabcock@TurnstileMediaGroup.comASSOCIATE EDITORSSarah Wilson 407.563.7026SWilson@TurnstileMediaGroup.comTim Freed 407.563.7054TFreed@TurnstileMediaGroup.comARTS EDITORJosh Garrick joshgarrick9@gmail.comDESIGNERTom Miller 407.563.7032TMiller@TurnstileMediaGroup.comSTAFF WRITERSBrittni Larson Megan Stokes Allison Olcsvay Kristy VickeryCOLUMNISTSChris JepsonJepson@MediAmerica.usLouis RoneyLRoney@cfl.rr.comADVERTISING SALESLinda Stern407.376.2434LStern@TurnstileMediaGroup.comLEGAL NOTICE ADVERTISINGAshley McBride 407.286.0807Legal@FLALegals.comSUBSCRIPTIONS/CIRCULATIONLuana Baez 407.563.7013LBaez@TurnstileMediaGroup.comMEMBER OF: -Florida Press Association -Winter Park/Maitland/Goldenrod Chambers of CommerceWinter Park/Maitland Observer is published by Turnstile Media Group. Founded in 1990 and headquartered in Orlando, Fla., Turnstile Media Group is also the parent of Golfweek, Golfweek Custom Media, TurfNet, Professional Artist, Seminole Voice, Baldwin Park Living and Turnstile Connect.TURNSTILE MEDIA GROUPCHAIRMANRance CrainPRESIDENT/CEOFrancis X. FarrellEXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT GENERAL MANAGERPatti Green VICE PRESIDENTJeff BabineauUSPS #00-6186 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:Winter Park / Maitland Observer 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835 Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster JUNE 19Learn about and meet some Florida bats at Maitland Public Librarys Summer Reading event, Bat Belfrys, from 2 to 4 p.m. on Thursday, June 19. This event is free and open to the public. Children must be in third grade or above to attend. Visit maitlandpubliclibrary.org for more infor mation.JUNE 20Maitland Public Library will host E-Gaming days every Friday during the summer from 1 to 4 p.m. starting on Friday, June 20. Play current and retro video games at this free event. Visit maitlandpubliclibrary. org for more information.JUNE 21The Maitland Historical Museum will host its monthly Family Day from 1 to 4 p.m. on Saturday, June 21. This Saturdays theme will be Whats Your Legacy? Learn about Maitlands legacy and par ticipate in a scavenger hunt in and around the museum to uncover clues of Mait lands past. For more information, visit artandhistory.orgJUNE 22The Orlando JCC will host Summer Sundays: Sportypalooza from 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Sunday, June 22 at their Maitland campus. The Sportypalooza schedule includes themed swim games, family tennis, laser tag and more. Lunch will be supplied. The event is free for JCC mem bers or $5 per person. For more informa tion, contact Jackie Ravinoff at JackieR@ orlandojcc.og or 407-645-5933.ONGOINGMaitlands Summer Youth Tennis Camp is now in full swing at Maitland Commu nity Park and runs Monday through Thurs day from 9 a.m. to noon now until Aug. 14. Head teaching pro Donnie McGinnis will teach the camp, with levels available for beginner and intermediate players. Bring a racquet, water, a towel and sun block. The cost is $110 for Maitland residents and $120 for non-residents. Registration is available at Maitland Community Park, or by calling 407-539-0042. The REP (Orlando Repertory Theatre) Youth Academy will be offering more than 80 summer camps from June 9 to Aug. 15. The camps will be held at three locations, including the theaters threestage facility in Orlandos Loch Haven Park, as well as Celebration K-8 School in downtown Celebration and the Univer sity of Central Florida in east Orlando. The camps and productions are designed to foster self-condence, creative thinking and problem-solving skills through the medium of the performing arts. For a full listing of the camps, visit orlandorep.com FAMILY CALENDAR Community Bulletin Local YMCA swimmers make big splashAndy Kroupa and Rich Mercer of the Winter Park YMCA and Rick ODell of the Downtown Orlando YMCA won big last month at the United States Masters Swimming Short Course meet in Santa Clara, Calif., where 2,250 swimmers from around the nation gathered to compete. Mercer won a national championship in the 50 Free for ages 50 to 54 with a time of 23.05. Particularly notable was that four of the other age group winners were former Olympians. Mercer also placed fourth in the 100 Breast, fourth in the 100 Free and seventh in the 200 Breast stroke. In the 45 to 49 age group, Kroupa had many masters personal best times, placing fourth in the 200 Fly, 10th in the 500 Free, 12th in the 100 Fly, 23rd in the 100 Free and 24th in the 50 Free. Also in the 45 to 49 age group, ODell was 11th in the 100 Free, 12th in the 50 Free, 13th in the 50 Fly, 14th in the 100 IM, and 16th in the 500 Free.Florida Bar Foundation names new executive directorOrlando attorney Bruce Blackwell was recently named executive director of The Florida Bar Foundation, a statewide charitable organization that works on behalf of Floridas legal profession to pro vide greater access to justice. A founding shareholder with King, Blackwell, Zehnder & Wermuth P.A. in Orlando, Blackwell is a past president of the Foundation, the 2011 recipient of its Medal of Honor Award and the 2013 recipient of the American Bar Associations Pro Bono Pu blico Award for outstanding service. Prior to becoming president, Blackwell served on The Florida Bar Foundations board for 10 years and on The Florida Bar Board of Governors for four years.Rollins outelder nabs SSC honorsJunior outelder Christian Coburn capped off his rst season at Rollins last month by earning Second Team All-Sunshine State Conference Baseball Team honors. A to tal of 34 student-athletes were named All-SSC in 2014. Joining the team in the fall, Coburn made an immediate impact as he led the lineup with a .291 batting average. He led the team in multiple statistical categories, including hits (44), runs (31), triples (two), home runs (one), walks drawn (18) and stolen bases (19). He also nished third in doubles (ve) and fourth in RBI (12). His 19 stolen bases also ranked 82nd in the country. The Windermere native made the transi tion into the outeld only 11 games into the season, but did not disappoint. The junior ended the season with 14 multi-hit and three multi-RBI games.Calendar JUNE 21 The Enzian Theater starts off its Opera on the Big Screen series with the 2012 Salzburg Festival production of La Bohme at 11 a.m. on Saturday, June 21. Led by conductor Daniele Gatti, the production stars opera performers Anna Netrebko and Piotr Beczala. General admission is $20. For more information and other ticket packages, visit enzian. org Come out and hang by the pool for an old school party from 5 to 8 p.m. on Saturday, June 21, at the Winter Park Community Center, located at 721 W. New England Ave. This party is 18 and up for all of the hard working adults ready to enjoy the weekend. No alcohol is allowed. Winter Park residents get in free. For more information, call 407599-3275 or visit cityofwinterpark.org/ wpccONGOINGCome out for live music, art demonstra tions and exhibits on Friday Nights at the Morse Museum from 4 to 8 p.m. General admission is free. For more information, visit morsemuseum.org or call 407-645-5311. Come out to the Crosby YMCA in Win ter Park every Thursday at 6 p.m. for exercise and advice at their eight-week Walk with a Doc program. Residents can get their health questions answered by Florida Hospital physicians and take a 30-minute walk to receive a prize. Con tact the Crosby YMCA at 407-644-3606 or visit HealthyCentralFlorida.org for more information. In partnership with the Orlando Chapter of USA Dance, the Alzheimers Associa tion Central and North Florida Chapter is bringing a free ballroom dance program to the community. Ballroom for the Brain runs from 2 to 3 p.m. on Satur days from June 21 through July 26 at the Crosby YMCA in Winter Park. Trained dance instructors from USA Dance will teach Swing, Rumba, Merengue and the Waltz to early and middle stage in Winter Parks New Luxury Home Store Furniture | Home Dcor | Interior Design 558 W New England Ave., Ste 140 Hannibal Square *Next to Dexters* 407.401.9770 www.gildedhome.com dividuals and their care partners. RSVP is required. For more information or to register, call 1-800-272-3900. Every Saturday starting at 7 p.m., An Tobar Pub will hold a trivia session featuring cash prizes. The trivia will be three rounds, 10 questions each. In ad dition to 10 general-knowledge ques tions, the second round will feature ve Hunger Games and ve Mad Men alternative questions. An Tobar Pub is located at 600 N. Lake Destiny Road in Maitland. Entry fee is $5 per person.

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, June 19, 2014 | Page 5 Winter Park City TalkBY RANDY KNIGHT CITY MANAGER June 23 City Commission meeting There will be a City Commis sion meeting Monday, June 23, at 3:30 p.m. in City Hall Commis sion Chambers located at 401 S. Park Ave. For the most up-to-date agenda, please visit cityofwinter park.org under Whats New. Be low are a few topics of interest:Mayors Report Geraldine Thompson reation Month Advisory BoardAction Items Requiring Discussion Task ForceConsent Agenda 9, 2014. Agreement with Seminole County Sheriff to utilize law enforcement software for records management and reports; authorize the mayor to execute the agreement and is sue a subsequent purchase order. ecute an agreement to pay Motor ola to connect Winter Park Public Safety Communications dispatch system to the master site owned by Orange County. resolution authorizing the use of BankUnited as a depository for the city.Public Hearings Investments Winter Park, LLC: Conditional use approval to redevelop the former Corporate Square and Winter Park Dodge properties with a 40,000-squarefoot Whole Foods Grocery and a 36,000 square foot retail building with three outparcel development sites on the properties at Galloway Drive and 967 Cherokee Ave. Second reading of the or dinance amending the comprehensive plan to change the Future Land Use Designation at 967 Cherokee Ave. Second reading of the ordi ing map at 967 Cherokee Ave. Advisors, LLC: Second reading of the or dinance amending the Compre hensive Plan on the 0.64 acres of vacant property at the northeast corner of Schultz and Michigan avenues. Second reading of the or zoning map on the 0.64 acres of vacant property at the northeast corner of Schultz and Michigan avenues. TGG, Ltd: Second reading of the or dinance amending the Compre hensive Plan to change the Future Land Use Map Designation at 298 and 313 W. New England Ave. Second reading of the ordi ing map to change the existing zoning designations at 298 and 313 W. New England Ave. Second reading of the ordi nance vacating and abandoning a portion of Loren Avenue within the Ravaudage Planned Develop ment and Home Acres Subdivision area. Group: First reading of the ordi nance amending the comprehensive plan to change the Future Land Use Map Designation for the property at 421 W. Morse Blvd. First reading of the ordi ing map to change the existing zoning designation for the prop erty at 421 W. Morse Blvd. Conditional use approval to redevelop the properties at 403 and 421 W. Morse Blvd. into eight, three-story residential units. establishing the West Fairbanks Deferral Program prohibiting the construction of a professional minor league base ball stadium in Martin Luther King, Jr. Park. Remember, if you are unable to attend City Commission meet ings, you can watch them live, gavel-to-gavel as they happen. During the meeting, simply log city business.Possible changes to citys recycling and garbage program?The citys Keep Winter Park Beautiful & Sustainable Advisory Board has drafted a Sustainability Action Plan focusing on efforts to make the city more sustainable in the next 10 to 20 years. Topics include discussion on sustainable initiatives related to recycling, composting, water and energy usage and alternative transportation, to mention a few. The city is looking for public feedback on these goals and others as outlined in the draft SAP to ensure they align with the residents and businesses of Winter Park. Please help the city shape this plan and enter to win great prizes by sharing your feedback at one or more of the following opportunities: SAP Take survey by Monday, June 30. Survey participants will be entered into a random drawing for a chance to win a $50 Cocina 214 gift card. Public Forum Tuesday, June 24, 6 to 7:30 p.m., Winter Park Community Center, 721 W. New England Ave. Attendees who have com pleted the survey will also be eligible to win a KindleFire and other great sustainable items that (must be present to win). Light food and beverages will be provided. For more information regard ing the Sustainability Program, sustainability or call 407-599-3364. 4th of July celebrationThe city of Winter Park will present the 19th annual Olde Fashioned 4th of July Celebration Friday, July 4, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Central Park. Mayor Ken Bradley will lead a special presentation at 9:15 a.m. from the main stage. Wear your red, white and blue, bring a blanket or beach chair, and gather with family and friends to enjoy this Winter Park tradition. The annual celebration will feature live patriotic music per formed by the Bach Festival Brass Band and Bach Festival Choir, horse-drawn wagon rides, Or lando Cloggers, Rockin Roadster Road Show and much more! Chil drens activities will include the annual bicycle parade at 9 a.m. (lineup begins at 8:30 a.m.) from City Hall to Central Park, as well hotdogs, watermelon and water will available for all to enjoy, while supplies last. Remember to support the event vendors. When you get your hotdog, buy some chips and a soda. Families and friends are also invited to stroll along Park Avenue and in Hanni bal Square to shop and dine at the wide selection of shops and eater ies. In addition, The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art will present its Independence Day Open House. The museum, which is home to the worlds most comprehensive collection of work by American artist Louis Comfort Tiffany, will provide free admis sion to its galleries from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Winter Park His torical Museum, located at 200 W. New England Ave. (north end of the Farmers Market building) will be open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Please stop by to see the new ex hibition, Whistle in the Distance: The Trains of Winter Park. Muse um admission is free and they will be serving complimentary oldfashioned lemonade to all visitors. Please note that City Hall will be closed Friday, July 4, in obser vance of Independence Day. City day, July 7. The city of Winter Park wishes everyone a safe and happy Independence Day. For more infor mation regarding the 19th annual Olde Fashioned 4th of July Celebration, please call 407-599-3463. on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, watch us on Vimeo.Earth-friendly goals

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Page 6 | Thursday, June 19, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Lifestyles Holly Tanyhill watched as one-by-one her children grew up a dream both she and her hus band had for their children, but one they themselves had not yet achieved. It was as her two youngest children, twins Eric and Aaron, were preparing to go to Rollins that Holly began wondering what the future held for her now that the nest was about to be empty. As I watched them all head off to college, there was pride, but also a little envy at the new adven tures before them and I thought to myself, What do I do now? For Holly, the next step was right before her eyes. Working as an admissions specialist at Kaplan University at the time, she was constantly encouraging other people to follow their higher-edu cation dreams. I did not even know going back to school was an option, Holly said. I thought that time had passed for me, but as I helped others enroll in school I realized I had hopes and dreams too, and it was time to follow them. She enrolled at Valencia Col lege, earning her associate degree, and then enrolled at Rollins, just like her children before her. I knew it was a good school, and with three of my children having graduated and two enshe said. On Mothers Day weekend Holly and her son Aaron took turns watching each other gradu a bachelors in communications, then Aaron on Sunday with a bachelors in critical media and cultural studies. I kept having to tell myself, This is me doing this; this is me sitting here. This is not the kids this time, Holly said. Aaron watched from the stands, just as proud of his mom as he was of himself. It was really good to see all of her hard work come to fruition, he said. For Holly, watching her son graduate took on new meaning after she had so recently crossed the stage herself. It was more exciting for me because now I knew how it felt, she said. Before I was just a by stander, now we were all a part of the same club you might say. Hollys husband was disappointed to miss the big day due to hospitalization, but he did get to watch a live stream of the event online cheering so loud that nurses thought someone was watching a football game. If all goes as planned, hell have another chance to catch the pair cross the stage, as both Holly and Aaron have plans to attend law school after Rollins. I want to be an advocate for voiceless people in our commu nity, Holly said. She helped her own family keep its voice even while facing the hurdle of homelessness by always encouraging her kids toward higher education. I told the kids, If you guys want to get out of this poverty, you are going to have to go to school and do well. Today, the family of seven of whom have gone on to earn advanced degrees. Next semester Hollys other son Eric is due to graduate Rollins, adding another Tar to the roster. After her hushe also plans to attend Rollins, becoming the latest to join the fam ily tradition. Weve been homeless, been to work with no lunch and faced many struggles, but now were looking forward to life, Holly said. Im so ready for that upward climb. I keep waiting for the downturn, but I know the down isnt coming this time. Holly is keeping her eyes on sky, instilling the importance on education on the next generation. Plans are already in the works for 1-year-old granddaughter Sophia to join the Rollins family. Shes already got her Rollins onesie, Holly joked.PHOTO BY ALLISON OLCSVAY THE OBSERVERHolly Tanyhill and her son Aaron crossed the graduation stage at Rollins on Mothers Day weekend with bachelors degrees in hand. An unusual graduation for mom and sonALLISON OLCSVAY Observer staff Storm coming? Were ready.Report an outage: 800.228.8485 duke-energy.com/stormGet preparation tips: twitter.com/ DukeEnergyStormDuke Energys expert storm response teams know exactly how to prepare for storms and keep your lights on year report and track outages, get preparation tips and more. Duke Energy Storm www.wpmobserver.com/subscribe KEEP UP WITH MAITLAND NEWS AND EVENTS!www.IndependenceLane.com Facebook.com/ItsMyMaitland

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, June 19, 2014 | Page 7 PHOTOS BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVERCongressman John Mica, top left, joined local residents to take a bite out of the best of Goldenrod at this years Tastefully Golden rod event on Friday, June 6.Tastefully Goldenrod Tastefully GoldenrodBattling for the lead in the league standings heading into the meat of the season, the Winter Park Diamond Dawgs were even with the Winter Garden Squeeze before the series began. They would end the series with a 7-5 record, just a game behind their new rival. Collegiate Summer League, the competition. It started June 13 when the when Peter Nicoletto hit his second triple of the game and was singled in by Kyle Cavanaugh. Then it all fell apart in the seventh when the Dawgs pitcher Colton Freeman walked the bases loaded, walked in a run, then threw a wild pitch that scored two runs when a Three Stooges act ensued at home plate. They would lose that game 4-2. The Dawgs would lose the next On June 15 the Dawgs had their revenge on the Squeezes Squeeze 8-4 thanks to timely hit ting by every starter in the lineup. After a pair of games at press at 7 p.m. June 19 against the Lees burg Lightning. Then its over to Sanford Memorial Stadium against the Rats at 7 p.m. June 20 and back home against the Rats at 7 p.m. June 21. Dawgs rout SqueezeISAAC BABCOCK Observer staff

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Page 8 | Thursday, June 19, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Healthy Living When the James Beard Foun dation nominates a chef for Best Chef of the South, and that chef goes on to open a restaurant on the border between Baldwin Park and Audubon Park, local foodies start salivating. The new restaurant called Txokos (cho-kos) Basque Kitchen pays homage to a people whose history is lost in time, but whose culture is largely sustained through the txokos, or gastro nomic societies, that honor the act of cooking and sharing com munal meals. Thats news wor thy of the cover of a magazine. For more than 2,000 years, Basques have lived between Spain and France on the western foothills of the Pyrenees mountains. Even pre-Roman authors record the Basques their autonomy in individual farmsteads, called casero, the isolation of which resulted in a strong sense of family. Centuries of would-be conquerors have failed to encroach upon their local privileges, as the Basques managed to retain some degree of local autonomy. Today, it is the sacred quality of these Basque kitchens that results in respect for the preparation and sharing of food, allowing people to gather in celebration of their heritage. In February, the James Beard Foundation announced the rant and Chef Awards. Fifthgeneration Floridian Chef Henry Salgado was a nominee, out of 40,000 entries. Chef Henry, who grew up cooking with his Cuban grandmother in his hometown of Tampa, was nominated based on what he created in a legendary New Smyrna restaurant called the Spanish River Grill. Now Chef Henry and his residents of Baldwin Park, and were lucky enough to have this level of talent cooking in a beautiful and welcoming new restaurant at the East End Mar ket where they grow some of their fresh ingredients right in the garden that fronts on Cor rine Drive. With all of that history old and new in my head as I entered the Txokos Basque Kitchen, my expectations were admittedly high. Im thrilled to say that all of my expectations were exceeded in every way by the dining experience in this new space. My dining partner and I arrived during happy hour (Tuesday through Sun day, 4 to 7 p.m.) and enjoyed $3 and $4 wines and ciders. That includes the Santo Cristo Garnacha a rich pinot noir that is a steal at $4 a glass. True to the Basque culture, guests can experience authentic pintxos (the Basque version of the small plate menu). We began with Pulpo de Gallego, which is a surprisingly tender grilled octopus served with caramelized onion in a peppery Bilbao sauce. I love octopus, and Im accustomed to the time it takes to chew it. This was a whole new experience, one that allowed me to enjoy tender octopus, with the added taste sensation of a (new-to-me) We moved on to the Mussels, steamed in a traditional lemon juice, but served here with Greek gigante beans and little chunks of ham and sausage. Its amazing how much taste these additions added to this alwaysfavorite dish. And I should also mention that while this is called small plate, the portions are enough to share happily. We then treated ourselves by ordering what is simply called FOIE on the menu, with the sub-heading duck two ways. I sincerely believe that ordering duck liver is an act of decadence that Im known PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVERChef Henry Salgado already has won accolades in the Spanish River Grill in New Smyrna Beach. He brings a love of Basque food to the new Txokos Basque Kitchen at the East End Market in Audubon Park. Please see TXOKOS on next page From the Corner TableJOSH GARRICK Observer staffTop chef pays homage to Basque food

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, June 19, 2014 | Page 9to give in to. The two ways on this item is an offering that includes not only duck liver, but a duck egg in the center with pieces of porcini mushroom over a potato puree. It was incred ible and worth the calories that were already adding up in my head. My dining partner declared simply, That is out of control. (It was that good.) After an appropriate foie digestion time, we ordered the Oxtail Matador and the Cobia Brandada as our entrees. Knowing the wondrous things that can happen with oxtail on a Spanish menu, my taste buds were thrilled with the fall-offthe-bone meat braised in sherry and served over goat-cheeseenhanced grits. Each taste enhanced the other, and I loved the result. The ultimate surprise taste treat, however, is the Cobia Brandada. Now, cobia can have a rich, sweet taste, but in the however, wraps his cobia in serrano ham, which is a whole Perhaps I should have put a spoiler alert on this one, but I dont think Ive ever tasted ham especially a ham that was considered a delicacy even in ancient Rome. So if you are ham trust me on this one its a winner. As a matter of fact, every part of dining at Txokos is a winning experience, from the walk past the fresh garden in front, to the wait-staff that sincerely cares about your experience. And then theres the award-winning food. Glory hallelujah, theres an other great restaurant in Central Florida. Go and enjoy with my highest recommendation. Life is easier with Home Care Services We have the Skill to Heal. The Spirit to Care. Transitional Care Program Philips Personal Medication Dispenser Philips Lifeline Call today to schedule Private Duty Services (407) 691-8206 P h i l i p s P e r s o n a l M e d i c a t i o n D i s p e n s e r The Personal Medication Dispenser assists with medication management Medications are reviewed and pre-filled by a registered nurse, preventing overor undermedication that could lead to a costly re-hospitalization. 1984 W. New Hampshire St., Orlando, Florida 32804Drop In or registration less than 48 hours in advance: $50 / day. Extended Care is $5 / day or $15 / week.Bring your own lunch and snacksCampers will participate in Gymanastics, Obstacle Courses, Rock Wall, Arts and Crafts, Games, and Batting Cages. Campers will participate in Gymanastics, Obstacle Courses, Rock Wall, Arts and Crafts, Games, and Batting Cages. Camp runs from 9:00 am 3:00 pm dailywith extended care options of 7:30 am 6:00 pm $150 for week $40 per day*Must register 3 days in advance 407-745-5661 www.Theorlandoathletics.com407-745-5661 www.Theorlandoathletics.com June 5, 6 June 9 13 June 16 20 June 23 27 July 7 11 July 14 18 July 21 25 July 28 1 Aug. 4 8 Aug. 11 15 Camp Dates: TXOKOS | Get to know an exotic region through healthy food CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE In honor of Fathers Day last weekend Ive been doing some reminiscing about my own fa ther, who died in 1975. My father was born in 1895 in a small village in Greece. In 1909, at the age of 14, he was put on a boat togeth er with his 11-year-old cousin. They traveled to America for economic opportu nity and went to work for their much older brother. fathers classmates taught him every swear word in English they knew. When his older brother asked him what he had learned, he obliged by repeating his vo cabulary lesson and was soundly thrashed. While I admire the adventur ous spirit of my father, I often wonder what is was like for him to leave home at 14, never to see his parents again. He had brothers who supported him but no parents. For my father this led to the endless wandering of a 20th century Odysseus, always look ing for his fortune, and always looking for home. It took him a he was 58 or so when he married my much younger mother. Im not sure he ever found his for tune. I believe his years of wander make a home for his children. At best, he was distant and disen gaged. Sometimes it was worse. At the time, it made me angry because it stirred up in me an un requited longing for home. As a pastor I have encountered many people with similar struggles about fathers and home. Some stories were similar to mine; some, much worse. By the grace of God, I was eventually able to experience Gods father-love for me, which cit and learn to share a fathers love with my children. Somewhere along the way of my heal ing I happened across a book by John Trent called The Blessing. The books main thesis is that, like many people in the Old Testament, people today are looking for a blessing from their parents, especially their fathers, and if they dont get that blessing they can spend a whole lifetime look ing for it in a frustrated way. Fa thers especially need to remem ber the power in their blessing and the devastation that comes from withholding it. The book acknowledges that it is much easier to give a blessing to the next generation if youve already received one from your own parents. However, in cases where the blessing has been miss ing, it is easier to get it reactivat ed if we are willing to bless back up the generations: to offer to our parents what they could not give us. It seems counter-intuitive, but I discovered that it has a power all its own. When I discovered the power of blessing, I offered it back to that little boy who got on a boat in 1909. Of course, it did not have any tangible effect on my father, who had long since passed away, but it changed my life and my ability to offer a blessing to my kids. This Fathers Day, I would want to ask, Have you blessed your kids lately? Have you told them that youre proud of them and believe they will do great things? It could make all the dif ference in the world. And if you are still looking for a blessing yourself, why not try speaking that blessing back up the gen erations to your parents? You just always looking for.A fathers blessing Jim Govatos Reality Lines

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Page 10 | Thursday, June 19, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Q. I do a ton of cr unches, but Im not losing my belly fat. What should I do differently? Brian G. If your primary goal is to belly fat, crunches are the last thing you want to do! First of all, training a muscle builds, or at least maintains, the muscle. This is why it isnt un common for people just starting ing from ab machine to crunches and back again to actually notice their pants getting a little tighter (especially if nutrition isnt on point)! Secondly, the more lean muscle you have overall, the higher your metabolic rate will be; the higher your metabolic rate is, the more fat you will burn at rest including, but not limited to, that belly. In a nutshell, do yourself a huge favor and trade those cute little crunches for compound strength-training! Not only will incorporating movements such as squats, deadlifts, bench press and chin-ups condition your entire body by working the large muscle groups, but also you will get more calorie-burning bang for your buck both during and after your workout. Just make sure you have an experienced coach or trainer help you get started with proper form if you are new to these kinds of exer cises. (Keep in mind; comple menting nutrition is certainly vital to ensure optimal fat loss!) P.S. Ladies, this applies to you, too! Q. Ive recently cut carbs out of my diet, but I end up tired and in a bad mood as the day goes on. How do I avoid crashing? Emily F. A. Oh boy, the carb debate. First of all, there is no legiti mate reason to demonize and permanently avoid any single macronutrient from your diet especially if your goal is sustainable fat loss. Completely cutting out a food group is not term, but it can lead to yo-yo dieting and an anxious relation ship with food in general (not to mention, an eventual binge-fest of said food down the road). Many times restrictive dieters end up craving crazy processed foods they never even craved one?). This is usually followed by drowning their sorrows in an entire box of cookies after a particularly stressful event or day at work. Ask yourself this, whats worse: having no energy, feeling emotional, and then with a high-sugar, high-fat, pro cessed food only to feel guilty and discouraged afterwards... Or enjoying fruit for breakfast, a huge salad with lunch, and oven-baked potato wedges with dinner while progressing Your body naturally runs on glucose, something that carboAs a major advocate of listening to your body for true holistic suggest bringing those glorious carbs back into your routine Information www..org www.rrfMEDICARE, MEDICAID, AND MOST COMMERCIAL INSURANCES ACCEPTED 5019096 We come to you! Available 24/7 Medications, equipment and supplies provided A dedicated team of Nurses, Social Workers, Chaplains, Home Health Aides and Volunteers assigned to your care Cornerstones care is covered 100% by Medicare and Medicaid. Regardless of payer source Cornerstone is here to help. JASMIN BEDRIA Anytime FitnessAsk a Trainer: Week 1 Q&A PHOTOS COURTESY OF ANYTIME FITNESSTraining for overall tness can reap bigger improvements to troublesome spots com pared to trying to spot train them. Doing a lot of crunches can actually grow your waist. ADVERTORIAL Please see FITNESS on next page C M Y CM MY CY CMY K ad_innerscientist.pdf 1 2/12/14 12:06 PM The Parke House Academy has been involved in the Winter Park community since the school opened 17 years ago. This past May, PHA held its rst annual Sizzling Outdoor Safety Fair in Central Park. Visitors enjoyed twenty informative booths, including Family Medicine of Baldwin Park with Dr. Diana Jamie. There were also bounce houses, music, and delicious drink samples from Skyebird Juicebar & Experimental Kitchen. The Winter Park Fire department brought a re truck and an inatable walk-through safety house and the Winter Park Police Department brought a SWAT tank! Visitors even learned some self-defense moves courtesy of a special demonstration from Victory Martial Arts. Hun dreds of families enjoyed the event and walked away with plenty of summer safety tips. The Parke House Academy will host the safety fair again next year. See you there! Beth Hawley

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, June 19, 2014 | Page 11and simply focusing on making better choices. Vegetables, fruits, and potatoes are great options; not only because they are whole foods, but also because they are high water content! Especially in the scorching Florida summers, making sure you are hydrated is key (dehydration is the main culprit of headaches, migraines, poor digestion, and low energy). Why not kill two nutritional birds with one juicy stone by eating your water? It is also important to remind yourself that certain food groups are not necessarily bad. Food doesnt have moral value and any diet promoting complete constraint from one macronutrient group is not realistic or sus tainable for most people. Not all carbs are created equal when it comes down to it, and although options (yum, sweet potato) are more obvious than the unfavorable choices (yum, Cadbury Egg), there is still a time and place for everything. Do yourself a favor and reintroduce those better options back into your diet. Your body, mind, workouts and loved ones will thank you. P.S. Each gram of carbohydrate attracts about 3 grams of water, which is why quick waterweight-loss (read: not fat-loss, which is what you want) occurs when you stop eating them; keep this in mind and allow your body to adjust and balance out once you add them back in. GET AFFORDABLE DENTAL INSURANCE FOR AS LITTLE AS Dental plans are offered by Florida Combined Life Insurance Company, Inc., an affiliate of Florida Blue. Florida Blue is a trade name of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida. These companies are Independent Licensees of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. 81259 0614 floridabluecenters.comOrlando area 321-441-2020 Located in Winter Park Village 434 N. Orlando Avenue Winter Park, FL 32789 Visit a Florida Blue Center or call us to find the best dental plan for you! ENJOY YOUR NEW SMILE!Overall wellness starts with good dental health that helps prevent diseases.* Calculations based on $143.88 annual premium which must be paid in full at the time of enrollment. There is a one-time, non-refundable enrollment fee of $35. Premiums and enrollment fees may vary depending on location, see a representative for complete details. FITNESS | Yes, theres a time and place for all food groups CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE Jasmin Bedria is an experienced health and tness expert and a Certied Personal Trainer and Nutrition Specialist at Anytime Fitness, Winter Park. Open 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, Anytime Fitness, Winter Park prides itself on providing a friendly, well-maintained facility featuring top-quality exercise equipment. Members enjoy the benet of being able to use any of more than 2,300 Anytime Fitness clubs now open in all 50 states and 19 countries. For answers to your health and tness related questions, email: askatrainer@anytimetness.com and for more information on Anytime Fitness, visit www.anytimetness.com.

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Page 12 | Thursday, June 19, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer The traveler took a long sip of his coffee, and then another forkful of syrup-slogged pancakes. I dont know what it is about these pancakes, but I can never duplicate them at home, he said. I even bought the same exact batter from the gift shop up front. His traveling companion wasnt paying much attention; his focus was on the sports section. They cut Langdon Donovan, he said, still reading. They did? Yeah. Whos Langdon Donovan? Hes Americas best soccer player. The World Cup coach cut Whyd they do that? The new American coach is a German guy ... Jurgen Klins mann. Hes kind of old fashioned, is thought to have a big ego. He won the World Cup as a player and coached Germany to the parently, Donovan took a leave of absence from the team last year while he was in the process of rebuilding the American program, and that didnt sit well with him. He cut him in favor of a few kids ... one of em is 18 ... Julian Green. Oh. How are we supposed to do this year? Not looking good. We have to win two games or outpoint the other three teams in our group to advance to the knockout round. Were ranked 14th in the world but we drew Germany and Por tugal. Germany is ranked second and Portugal is third. The other team is Ghana ... they beat us in the last two World Cups. We play its not gonna be pretty. Then therell be a lot of second-guessing about Langford, right? Langdon. Donovan. Americas all-time leading scorer, he corrected. He folded the newspaper. I think the focus will be on Klinsmanns ego. He married a California. Hes considered one of the best living players in the world. He just coached the team through their best qualifying season ever. They beat Germany, Italy, Mexico ... the guy is really putting a stamp on the program. He looked at the travelers plate, now devoid of pancakes. Ever have a German pancake? The traveler shook his head. Germans bake? Ever have a pretzel? Oh, yeah ... right. Ever wonder why you cant make a good pretzel at home? He didnt wait for the answer. Its because the Germans put lye shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM here should be more to life than maintenance-free living. To learn more about our community in Kissimmee, call (407) 933-1999. The pancake recipe for World Cup goals Please see WORLD CUP on page 15 HOME CARE CORNERSenior Home Safety: Is your home safe? Follow these helpful safety tips, not just for the month of June, but throughout the year, to ensure optimum security. For additional information on Home Care Services call Florida Hospital Home Care at 407-691-8202 today and receive a brochure and magnet.Winter Park Senior Observer As seniors age, they become more susceptible to suffering an accident in their daily life. With June being Senior Safety Month, seniors and their loved ones should take extra preventative measures to promote fall Fall Prevention and halls are well lit. backing. bars. installing a medical alert such as Lifeline to give you the peace of mind you need. Fire Prevention keeping hallways clean and making sure all clutter is cleared from the house. areas and batteries should be checked every spring and fall. and put in an easily accessible location. Drug Safety pharmacist and when you take new medication. health complications.

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, June 19, 2014 | Page 13 Savannah Court and Cove Excellence in Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation 1301 W. Maitland Blvd. Maitland, FL 32751407-645-3990www.SavannahCourtMaitland.comAssisted Living Facility License No. 8447 Skilled Nursing Facility License No. 1635096 Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above. You are always welcome!A Senior Living Community where Hospitality is a Way of Life. DEAR DR. ROACH: I became extremely sick and was taken to the hospital. My physician thought I had regular pneumo nia. I was so dehydrated that intubated and had trouble getting enough oxygen. I had dialysis. My family was told I probably would not live. They discovered that my illness was Legionella, and with treatment, I woke up from paralysis. My recovery has been easy and fast, although I was told it would take a year at the least. therapy. My blood work and scan show everything is back to normal. But I have scarring in my lungs. I am a 47-year-old woman. What should I expect for my future? Are my kidneys at risk? Do I have a greater risk of contract ing pneumonia in the future? What about my lungs? Is there permanent damage? What about allergy medicines and ibuprofen? I am afraid to have a glass of wine! C.K. ANSWER: Legionella is a bacteria that can cause pneumonia. It is classically found in fresh water, such as air-conditioning cooling towers and condensers. It was thought to be the cause of the original outbreak among Ameri can Legionnaires back in 1976 in Philadelphia, hence the popular name of Legionnaires disease. Once considered rare, increased awareness and better diagnostic tests have led to a greater under standing of this important cause of pneumonia. It may look just like any other kind of pneumonia, but diarrhea and very high fever are clues that it might be Legionella. Liver problems are more common in Legionella infections, but the dialysis you received likely was due to kidney failure from severe shock and sepsis. Intubation having a breathing tube inserted into your windpipe and paralysis are reserved for only the very most severe pneumonias, and it is really great news that you are recovering so quickly and completely. Being young (47) and female are good signs for recovery. Since your blood tests are normal, your kidneys apparently recovered completely. There is no reason not to use the same OTC medications you used before the pneumonia, and an occasional glass of wine is Some scarring after pneumonia is common, and this indeed puts you at somewhat increased risk for future pneumonias. A vaccination for pneumonia will reduce the risk of the most common bacteria. DEAR DR. ROACH: Why do heart attacks occur mostly in the morning and on Mondays? J.V. ANSWER: Your statements are quite true. Heart attacks are three times more likely in the morning than in the evening, and 15 percent to 20 percent more likely on Mondays than on other days. Nobody knows exactly why. Mornings are thought to be more likely due to several factors: increased blood pressure, an increase in cortisone and having stickier platelets in the morning. There are two main theories for the Monday phenomenon but recently there has been some evidence that it may be excess alcohol intake over the weekend. These are good arguments for stress reduction and avoiding Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@ med. cornell.edu. To view and order health pamphlets, visit www.rbmamall. com, or write to P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475. Key signs indicate Legionella bacteria TITLE Boxing Club Winter Park is located in the heart of Winter Park next to Whole Foods Market. Title Boxing has a 7,500-square-foot facility with 54 heavy bags. Owner Homaira Mirzai plans to open two more locations in the metro Orlando area, Altamonte Springs in late 2014 and a Lake Mary location in 2015. For more information about Title Boxing Club Win ter Park, visit titleboxingclub.com or call 407-790-4001.There are a plenty of ways to stay men Want to be tter? Lets go boxing ADVERTORIAL

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Page 14 | Thursday, June 19, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer $10.00 OFF Initial Purchase $100 or more CANADIAN MEDS SAVE UP TO 80% on Prescription Drug PricesORDER by phone No Store Visit required Advair Benicar Celebrex Cialis Crestor Cymbalta Flomax Levitra Lexapro Lipitor Nexium Spiriva Viagra Zetia CALL for a FREE Quote! We Ship Anywhere in the U.S.A. Locally owned & operated. 744 South US Hwy 441 Lady Lake, FL 32159(352) 633-3301 Run to TrackShack.com Special entry fee for active and retired military service personnel $2 OFF Use Discount Code WPO2014 Its that time of the year the season of the tomato! Red, green or gold ... sweet or tart ... but always plump and juicy, just-ripe tomatoes are what we dream of when the season is lean and the weather cold. And many of us, picky, and with strict standards about the quality of our fresh tomatoes, often just do without, or open a can and count the days. Yes, there are greenhouse tomatoes and hydroponic tomatoes, and with sunny weather somewhere, theres always a supply. Still, tomatoes at the peak of their early summer best are unmatched. Although the Italians have been growing tomatoes since the 1500s, you might be surprised to learn that tomatoes are native to America. The word tomato is a used by the Indians of Mexico. Many historians believe Thomas Jefferson brought tomato seeds back from Europe to plant at Monticello, although its not entirely clear. It is documented, though, that Jefferson grew and served tomatoes at his Virginia estate. Early colonists believed toma toes to be poisonous, as the plant is a member of the nightshade family, which has some poison ous species. Fortunately for us, at some point in our agricultural history, a brave forager discovered that tomatoes would not kill you. By 1824, there were 17 recipes for tomatoes included in books, The Virginia Housewife by Mary Randolph. It included a recipe for Gaspacha, a dish from Spain. So how did it get to Virginia? Food historian Karen Hess says that Mary Randolphs sister lived in Spain and probably passed it on to her. Gazpacho is a cold tomato soup associated with Spanish cui sine, with its beginnings traced back to the Andalusian region. Interestingly, a fundamental ingredient of this ancient soup, with versions dating to early Greece and Rome, is not tomato, but bread. Many early recipes for gazpacho are a white version containing bread, water, garlic, vinegar and oil. These primi tive recipes represent a poetic example of the beginnings of the art of food, of making something delicious out of almost noth ing. Around the 16th century, tomato seeds arrived in Spain. Since then, red gazpacho, made delicious with the absolute best tomatoes, has become the most popular version. Like so many popular foods, gazpacho can have a bad image when presented as a bland bowl of tomato juice or an equally disappointing combination of chopped unripe tomatoes and spongy cucumbers. The real deal is a celebration of freshness and simplicity. In the summertime, when the star of this dish is at its peak and the heat can discourage even going near a stove, its time to give my recipe for Gazpacho with Avocado and Bell Pepper Relish a try. 1. In a large bowl, stir together tomatoes, onion, cucumber, bread, almonds, bell peppers, scallions, garlic, salt, pepper, paprika and sugar. Working in 2-cup batches, whirl the mixture but not pureed. 2. Return mixture to the bowl and stir in oil, vinegar and hot pepper sauce. Add enough chilled tomato juice or cold water, a tablespoon at a time, to make the gazpacho soupy but not too thin. 3. Cover bowl and refrigerate soup until very cold, at least a couple of hours or up to 2 days. Stir gazpacho and ladle into bowls, or pour it at the table from a wide-mouth pitcher. Garnish with Avocado and Bell Pepper Relish. Serves 6 to 8. AVOCADO AND BELL PEPPER RELISH 1 ripe peeled avocado, diced bell pepper 2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro purple onion 1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice Mix all ingredients together until well-combined. Top soup with the relish. Angela Shelf Medearis is an awardwinning childrens author, culinary historian and the author of seven cookbooks. Her website is www.divapro. com. To see how-to videos, recipes and much, much more, Like Angela Shelf Medearis, The Kitchen Diva! on Facebook. Read Gina Harlows Blog at peachesandprosciutto.blogspot. com. Recipes may not be reprinted without permission from Angela Shelf Medearis. 2014 King Features Synd. Inc. Tomatoes: once bitten, forever loved or one 28-ounce can of quality plum tomatoes, chopped Walla Walla, coarsely chopped SPANISH GAZPACHO WITH RELISH Turning the Body into a Cancer-Fighting MachineBy Kimberly M. Hicks, Pharm.D., M.H.A., Clinical Pharmacy Specialist at BioPlus Specialty Pharmacy and OWC DirectorThe bodys immune system possesses all the tools it needs to kill cancer cells, so why does cancer sneak past our defenses so many times? Cancer cells in an elaborate game of cat and mouse employ numerous techniques to cloak themselves as invisible to the immune system. This means that the immune systems call to arms often doesnt happen until it is too late. Heres just one example of the intrigue between cancer cells and the immune system: Natural killer cells are one of the key parts of the immune systems arsenal for seeking out and destroying damaged cells in the body, including tumor cells. Yet in response, tumors pump out a certain protein (called TGF-beta) that dials down the activity of natural killer cells in the body. lung cancer cells do in fact evade detection by natural killer cells and think ing ahead to how this can be counteracted in cancer treatment these scientists are exploring ways that patients with lung cancer might be able to stop the evasion. In other words, it might be possible in the future to take away this malicious tool of cancer cells and get the immune system to destroy those rogue cells. Similarly, researchers at the Cedars-Sinai Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute are working in an animal model to ramp up the immune response in mice with lung or pancreas tumors. So far, this is resulting in cell death of the tumors. The immune-stimulating compounds in this research are an mTOR inhibitor and CD4 antibody. When used, they make it so the once-invisible tumor cells are seen by the immune system and thus targeted for destruction. ers are getting closer all the time. With lung cancer as the current leading cancer killer in both men and women in the United States, any progress against this killer cant come soon enough. to establish relationships and share resources resulting in innovative programs that inspire, motivate and educate individuals in their pursuit of optimal health. For more information on Our Whole Community, please visit ourwholecommunity.org. Our Whole Community is pleased to contribute monthly to the Winter Park Observer. Email owc_ed@me.com for inquiries about OWC.

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, June 19, 2014 | Page 15 rfntbfn JUNE SPECIAL START TODAY FOR $49 r rfrntffb tttt fnbb t ff nf ttt fn ftnnf ffn BEACH BODY CHALLENGE 6 WEEK PROGRAM We just fester with prejudice. As deep-seated as racial and sexual biases are at least were dealing with them, and most of us understand that theyre wrong. But when it comes to our intoler ance of weight, we dont give a second thought. Our body bigotry is so ingrained that we consider it completely acceptable to make fun of fat people and to consider those who are overweight to be lesser people. Whats really ridiculous is that the contempt is aimed at an awful lot of us. A brand-new study tallies the rate of obesity in the United States at nearly a third of the popula tion, more than 87 million Americans. Not only do all of us suffer terrible hits to our self-esteem, but there are the physical dangers of that excess poundage: diabetes, heart problems, cancer, the list goes on. Obesity itself is a disease, often brought on by an addiction not just to food but, more insidiously, to the toxic concoctions the processors prepare and constantly advertise. Any attempts to intervene are crushed by the conglomer pushing their narcotic morsels on us. They particularly target our children. Woe be to the political ask Michelle Obama. ladys Lets Move campaign and its stated goal of helping our be all that controversial. What would make more sense than replacing unhealthy fare with healthy? No deep-fried stuff, no empty calories. Instead, offer up tasty, nutritious choices. But the purveyors of the bad stuff dont like that. So theyve enlisted their GOP buddies in Congress to take Lets Move and stop it dead in its tracks. Educators some of them, anyway have been recruited to complain that the kiddies just wont eat their veggies and fruits. They want pizza with tomato sauce to be declared a vegetable. Washington by school-nutrition associations that claim laudable purpose until you look closely and discover that a bulk of their Thats all the House Republicans need. So now theyre trying to pass legislation that would allow local districts to get a waiver from requirements that they serve healthy meals. Pardon the pun, but that would gut the campaign. Wouldnt a better idea be for them to work harder to come up with selections that students like even though theyre good for them? To her credit, Ms. Obama is writing back. There she was on The New York Times op-ed page telling us that, Our kids deserve so much more than this. She was referring to the usual game that our politicians play where the well-being of citizens is completely ignored. Obesity is right up there with cigarette smoking when it comes to habits that can kill us, habits break. Clearly, though, the better way would be to develop healthy eating routines in our children, which, along with encouraging exercise is what Lets Move is about. The question is, will it sur vive the Washington swamp? You know the answer: Fat chance. 2014 Bob Franken Distributed by King Features Synd. Have any or all of these excuses popped up when youve tried cooking? Well, think again. Cooking can be faster, cheaper and far more fun with these simple tips to get you started.1. Involve everybodyCooking is boring and drab when youre slaving away in the kitchen and everyone else is watching TV. In fact, for many couples and families, cooking is the least enjoyable way of spending time together. Well, you can change all that! Buy fun aprons for each person, play some happy music, and get everyone involved. Turn it into a creative project that requires everyones contribution. If youre single, organize a cookout, invite your friends, and bond over food! Often we assume that were alone until we reach out and simply ask. 2. Prepare the basicsOnce or twice a week, chop and store veggies such as zucchini, onions, garlic, ginger, broccoli, etc. in zip lock bags or air-tight containers. This will help you whip up meals much faster. With the basics ready, and along with the cooked grains (see below), youll be able to prepare meals in 15 to 20 minutes. Yes, yummy, healthy and wholesome meals. I encourage you your list of basic ingre dients, chop, and keep them ready and available for the week. Youre much more likely to cook at home when you know you dont have to start from scratch. 3. Cook the grainsWhat is the most time-consuming aspect of cooking your own meals? Getting those grains ready, right? Be it a stir-fry, pilaf or pulao, the base carbs usually take a long time to cook. So, once a week, take an hour to cook these grains. Soak your brown rice, quinoa, barley or any other grains, and cook them! Do you know what this does? This saves you time throughout the week when you return home tired, and ordering in is oh-so tempting. You remind yourself about the cooked grains and the chopped basics in your fridge, and suddenly getting a meal ready doesnt seem so daunting. 4. Find your special chefs knifeThis investment is so worth it. A good chefs knife does most of the chopping for you, saving you lots of time and hassle. Do you know what its biggest contribution is, though? It keeps you in the kitchen. Chop ping becomes such a joyful experience that you want to cook (anything!), because you get to use this amazing piece of stainless steel. There are tons of good quality options and I highly recommend you go to a store rather than order online, so you can get a feel for the knife. 5. Condiments are your friendsYou dont have to learn every recipe in the cookbook to make delicious, healthy meals. Condiments are a great way to personalize meals as well as add variety. I often make the same base dish: quinoa or brown rice stir fry with veggies. But by seasoning it differently each time herbs and nuts, tamari, Sriracha, Biryani powder, Asian ginger sauce it never tastes the same. So, go ahead and pick a few condiments next time you go grocery shopping. The kitchen is your sandbox play at will. If youve been feeling in a rut or simply de-motivated to cook more at home, I hope these tips will get you enthused!Washington ghting the fat of the land WORLD CUP | Klinsmann plan not unlike a German bakerson the dough. Its what makes them all brown like that. How could you know to do that? They paid their bill. Klinsmann is a baker ... owns a bakery in Germany. The guy probably knows a thing or two about ingredients and probably has some time-tested recipes. Maybe thats why you cant make a good pancake. You may have the same ingredients but you dont have the right griddle ... remove the lumps. They walked back to their truck. Well ... lets see what this guy can cook up, then. Mark Vasto is a veteran sportswriter who lives in Kansas City. 2014 King Features Synd. Inc. CONTINUED FROM PAGE 12 ADVERTORIAL Puja Madan is a womens health coach, writer and speaker. She has received her training from the world-renowned Institute for Integrative Nutrition, New York. Puja offers powerful health and wellness programs for young women, in person or online, empowering them through healthier food and lifestyle choices. Puja practises Yoga and meditation daily and believes that all inner growth starts with a love affair with oneself! For more information visit www.innerscientist.com or www.facebook.com/innerscientistFive ways to make quick, creative, tasty mealsI dont know how to cook Cooking is for boring people Id love to, but just dont have the time! Healthy food just doesnt taste delicious

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Page 16 | Thursday, June 19, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Before Before Before 407.680.4263www.180DegreeFitness.com1595 Meeting Place, Orlando, FL 32814After After After Are you ready for summer? Get your beach body now!BeforeAfter Call me directly 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com r fntbt f rtt ftbt bt bnr nr rt b bb f b tb off trtnCoupon redeemable for cash, check or credit card purchases only. Not redeemable for insurance transactions. Excludes custom/special orders & nutritional supplements. May not be combined with any other discounts. Coupon has no cash value. One Senior Place ... See our full Calendar of Events at OneSeniorPlace.com407.949.6733715 Douglas Avenue Altamonte Springs, FL 32714M-F 8:30am 5pmFUN & EXERCISE SENIOR CLUB Every Monday 10am-12pm By Family Physicians GroupJune 23rd Special Bingo June 30th Casino CRAFTS & CONVERSATION Friday, June 20th 1:30pm-2pm By VITAS Innovative Hospice Care. RSVP 407.599.2522 CHAIR PILATES Friday, June 20th 1:30pm-2pm By VITAS Innovative Hospice Care. RSVP 407.599.2522 EDUCATIONAL MEMORY LOSS BY DR. CHELSEA MABRY Tuesday, June 24th 9:30am-11am By Compass Research. RSVP 407.218.6220 HEALTH RELATED BENEFITS OF TESTOSTERONE THERAPY Monday, June 23rd 3pm-4pm By More T Clinics. RSVP 407.949.0222 HEARING AIDS USERS IMPROVE RELATIONSHIPS & SELF IMAGE! Wednesday, June 25th 3pm-4:30pm By Harmony Hearing. RSVP 407.949.6737 INSURANCE & REAL ESTATETHE REAL ESTATE SPECIALISTS ARE IN! Monday, June 23rd & 30th 10am-1pm By Exit Real Estate Results. Appointment Only 407.949.6714 UNITED HEALTHCARE MEDICARE/ MEDICAID SPECIAL NEEDS PLAN Tuesday, June 24th 2pm-3:30pm By LTC Advisors. RSVP 407.949.6722 LEGAL & FINANCIAL RMD MISTAKES TO AVOID Tuesday, June 24th 10am-11am By Estate & Business Planning Group. RSVP 407.389.1122 TRUTH ABOUT ESTATE PLANNING Thursday, June 26th 9:30am-12pm By The Law Ofces of Hoyt & Bryan. RSVP 407.977.8080 TRUTH ABOUT MEDICAID PLANNING Thursday, June 26th 2pm-4pm By The Law Ofces of Hoyt & Bryan. RSVP 407.977.8080Calendar of Events June 2014 Considering the culture and climate from where many of the herbs we favor originate (dry, mild Mediter ranean), it is no surprise that growing them through our hot, wet Summers can be a task destined with troubles! Even with encouragement emanating from legends of music, growing parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme can be problematic. Most of our concerns originate with excessive afternoon rain, leaving the plants wet through the over night hours and then the morning dew. Toss in weed pressures, insect hoards, neglect from vacation scheduling, and the periodic dry spell; is it no wonder that tak ing a hiatus from herb gardening is highly recommended? But we do have some options. Both low growing oregano and thyme have proven prob lematic, succumbing to moisture driven leaf diseases. Rescue transplanting to nursery containers has kept fresh quantities available for culinary use and then to replant back to the garden in Autumn. After several years, this routine has become a chore, almost devolving into real work. As an alternative to both herbs montana) has proven to be a wonderful discovery. It survives through Summers rain, continues to produce from the original planting, and propagates easily from rooted stems. Winter savory is not commonly found at most retail outlets, so mail order seeds may be the best source. Rosemary grows as an upright bush. With some judicious pruning, the base and trunk can be kept open and ventilated, encouraging dispersal of accumu lated moisture. Harvest branch quantities to both manicure the plant and provide for fresh use and preservation drying. Mint will grow better in wetter conditions than dry. With due diligence, it will produce quantity enough to use as a vegetable, peppermint and spearmints vigorous root growth belies their future destiny of strangling themselves from the center of the planting, emboldening under ground stems to explore the terrain beyond the designated growing bed. As decline becomes evident, exhume some volumes of root and stem portions and transplant to new areas. By staggering this cycle, perpetual harvests will be the norm. The ultimate taste of Summer is the green goodness of basil. Just about any plant exposed to the pounding rain of a thunder storm will take a beating, but even more so for tender basil. Luckily, basil excels while grow ing in a container. I have been known to procure a plant at the grocery produce department and upon arriving home, separate the individual sprouts to pots of their own. Grown under a canopy in partial shade, starting a new batch every few weeks will keep the kitchen sweet with the lus cious smells of Summer.Summer herbs for Florida gardens Tom CareyFrom my garden to yoursTom Carey is the owner of Sundew Gardens, a you-pick gardening business in Oviedo. Visit the Sundew Gardens Facebook page and email him at sundewgardens@gmail.com WHO IS CAREY >PHOTO BY TOM CAREY THE OBSERVERRosemary can be surprisingly hardy, especially if pruned regularly to keep the trunk and base open and ventilated to get rid of excess damaging moisture.

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, June 19, 2014 | Page 17Through June 29 Elton Johns AIDAFollowing the story line of Verdis famous opera, Elton John and Tim Rice took the timeless love story from Egypt and creat ed a rock musical that won both Tony and Grammy awards on Broadway. Now Director Derek Critzer has created a new production being presented at The Venue at 511 Virginia Drive through June 29. This is a special opportunity to see a Broadway musical with extraordinary local talent. Tickets at clandestineor lando.comThrough Aug. 18 Summer Nights at Orlando Science Center The Orlando Sci ence Center will stay open late on Friday and Saturday nights this summer giving guests the opportunity to immerse in laser light shows; see planets in the Observatory; explore hands-on challenges in Sportsology; see a Hollywood Aug. 16 the Science Center will be open until 9 p.m. (the 28,000 watts of lights and sounds of laser light shows can be experienced at 9 p.m. for the Beatles, 10 p.m. for Led Zeppelin, and 11 p.m. for Pink Floyd). Call 407514-2000 or visit osc.orgThrough July 27 Rapunzel at Orlando ShakespeareIn a playful adaptation by Brandon Roberts from the story by the Brothers Grimm, Orlando Shakespeare offers a summer time tale for the whole family. Shut away in a lonely tower, Ra punzel grows, and so does her hair! Will Rapunzel escape the clutches of her evil captor? Find out in this contemporary adaptation with an Orlando Shakes twist. Arrive early and Shake Out The Sillies as members of the cast offer pre-show fun for the whole family. Call 407-4471700 or visit orlandoshakes.orgJune 20 to Sept 7 OMART offers the Florida Prize in Contemporary ArtThe Orlando Museum of Art will offer a preview of the new exhibit: Orlando Museum of Art Florida Prize in Contemporary Art in a reception June 20 beginning at 7 p.m. The exhibit presents 10 artists working in diverse mediums, combining materials, and creating work from reclaimed materials along dynamic and challenging nature of art today. Admission is $5. Call 407-896-4231 or visit omart.orgJune 20 Calling London: Two Sides of the Best of British MusicMore than 100 orchestra and rock musicians will come togeth er to present an eclectic concert featuring some of the best music ever to come out of England as Central Florida Community Arts (CFCArts) presents Calling London: Two Sides of the Best of British Music. Focused on symphonic compositions of the early 1900s and rock n roll from the late 20th century, this concert features everything from Pomp and Circumstance to the great est hits of The Beatles. Set for June 20 at 8 p.m. at Northland Church in Longwood, tickets are $10. Visit cfcarts.com or call 407-937-1800. June 20 to 30 Breakthrough Theatre presents Once On This IslandFrom the Tony Award-win ning songwriting team of Lynn Ahrens and Stephen Flaherty (Seussical, Ragtime) comes the Olivier Award-winning Once On This Island, the mu sical adaptation of the popular fairy tale The Little Mermaid. Directed by Wade Hair with musical direction by Justin Scarlat, Island will be per formed from June 20 to 30 at The Breakthrough Theatre in Winter Park. For reservations call 407920-4034.June 20 to July 20 Cock at the Mad Cow Theatre Cock is the adults-only story of what happens to John and his troubled relationship with his boyfriend as John meets a woman who is more than the best friend a gay man could hope for. Facing a new kind of guilt, John decides to straighten it out in this playful look at one mans sexuality and choices that challenge the status quo. Performed at the Mad Cow Theatre from June 20 to July 20, call 407-297-8788 or visit madcowtheatre.comJune 20 to July 19 Back by popular demand SHOUT! The Mod MusicalIn one of the funniest musicals ever presented at the Winter Park Playhouse, SHOUT! The Mod Musi cal returns to the Playhouse from June 20 to July 19. The hit women coming of age in 1960s London and features an incredible collection of s classics by LuLu and more. The production features a powerhouse cast and is highly recommended. Call 407-645-0145 or visit winterparkplayhouse.orgJune 21 World Giraffe Day at Central Florida ZooThe Central Florida Zoo will celebrate its newest residents in on June 21 beginning at 10 a.m. The longest day of the year is the perfect day to celebrate the worlds tallest animal, and the celebration will include games, childrens crafts, face painting, and animal encounters. Included with zoo admission, donations support the Giraffe Conserva tion Foundation. Call 407-323idazoo.org Josh Garrick Culture for your calendar FLORIDA PRIZE IN CONTEMPORARY ART WORLD GIRAFFE DAY SHOUT! THE MOD MUSICAL RAPUNZEL Please see CULTURE on page 18 This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORG @EnzianTheater COLD IN JULYStarring Michael C. Hall, Don Johnson, and Sam Shepard ONE WEEK ONLY! Fri Mon, Wed, Thurs 6:30, 9:30 Tues 6:30Opera on the Big Screen: LA BOHEMESat 11AMPeanut Butter Matinee Family Film: JUMANJICome early for a special animal encounter brought to you by the Central Florida Zoo! Sunday 12PMCult Classics: CROUCHING TIGER, HIDDEN DRAGONTues 9:30Popcorn Flick in the Park: TOY STORYFREE in Central Park! Thurs 8PMIDAFinal 3 Shows! Fri-Sun 4PM

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Page 18 | Thursday, June 19, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer CULTURE | Its a welcome home party with a night full of brass musics greatest hits at Plaza LiveJune 21 Brian Regan Live at the Bob Carr Critics and audiences agree that Brian Regan is one of the premiere comedians in the country. With the perfect balance of sophisticated writing and physicality, Regan will perform at the Bob Carr PAC on June 21 at 8 p.m. Regan, whose fans span generations, recently made his 25th appearance on Late Night with David Letterman, the most of any comedian. Tickets are available at the Amway Cen ter, Ticketmaster.com, or charge-by-phone at 800-745-3000. June 21 to 23 Chicken of the Sea Mermaid brings goodness to OrlandoCelebrating 100 years as an iconic American brand, Orlando is the next stop on the Chicken of the Sea Great American Gratitude Tour a 56-city journey honor include the Florida Mall on June 21 from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.; June 22 from noon to 8 p.m.; and on June 23 at Wal-Mart at 11250 E. Colonial Drive from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Visitors can have their pictures taken with the Mermaid and take home themed giveaways. At some point in the tour 10 lucky participants will win $10,000 to use for the community service project of their June 22 Orlando Jazz Orchestra presents Big Band Classics Under Musical Director Greg Parnell, former drummer for the Glenn Miller Orchestra, the Orlando Jazz Orchestra performs authentic selections from the libraries of Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Benny Goodman, Glenn Miller, Stan Kenton, Woody Herman, Artie Shaw, Harry James, and other luminaries. The Orchestra will perform classics from the 1950s and s at the Plaza Live at 425 N. Bumby Ave. in Orlando on June 22 at 3 p.m. Tickets are $15. Visit plazaliveor lando.comJune 23 Sovereign Brass in a new homeCelebrating 20 years of appearances on the Orlando Philharmonics Sounds of Summer Series, the Sovereign Brass will of the Philharmonic groups to perform in what will soon be the Orchestras new home at Plaza Live at 425 N. Bumby Ave. Works to be performed include the groups greatest hits, spanning the brass repertoire from Gabrielli to Bern stein. Join the group for hors doeuvres before the performance, welcome them to their new home, and enjoy highlights of their extraordinary 20-year musical jour ney. Call 407-770-0071 or visit OrlandoPhil.org CONTINUED FROM PAGE 17 COMMUNITY CLIPS ARE JUST A CLICK AWAY. Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-5223906. SOVEREIGN BRASS BRIAN REGAN LIVE

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, June 19, 2014 | Page 19Opinions Chris Jepson PerspectivesAn old man should have more care to end life well than to live long. Captain J. Brown For you, Gentle Reader, is there a specif ic moment in life when you cross that inev itable line and become, well, uh, old? How do you know when that benchmark has been achieved? When the band plays and you pass on dancing? When FOX News is on and your mind isnt? When your thoughts are narrower, more constricted than your arteries? How about when you receive a mailer, out-of-the-blue, on planning your funeral? Yes, thats the ticket, literally, a free din ner to a pre-planning seminar on owning with the wording on the mailer. It literally reads, We all make plans: wedding, vacations, retirement. Its an important part of life. And it makes a difference, especially ments and memorial service. I prefer my I embrace the perspective of Epicurus when he offered, Death does not concern us, because as long as we exist, death is not here. And when it does come, we no with that line of reasoning is, sure, if you do not exist, it would be a challenge to be concerned with dying and, yes, when you no longer exist, how can death be a concern? The rub, my fellow traveler, is while we are alive dying most assuredly concerns us. I confess to disappointment over hu man lifespans. Some turtles, lots of trees, even some spongesSPONGES!have longer lifespans, years longer than human beings. Wheres the fairness in that? I regularly offer a toast to More. More art. More camaraderie. More beauty. More life. More. A fun philosophical question for the Would you rather die in complete control of your faculties, rationally managing your end, or be reduced, for example, to walking vegetable matter because of Alzheim ers disease? I was prompted by a corporate mailer to consider my arrangements by planning for death. Thats nice. One problem: Any planning is for after-the-fact, after I scenario. I am much more interested, particularly for my loved ones, on the circumstances of my death, rather than how inexpensively they get the old man (thats me) in the ground. If I do it right, I will own my death as I owned my life. My thoughtful corporate death-plan ning partner emphasized in their promotional materials the idea of Dignity. Not necessarily dying with dignity, but rather being put in the ground with dignity. What a hoot. If I was stuffed and ultimately mounted on the wall as a venerable candleholder, I could care less; I am after all dead. No, where death and dignity meet is when you are still alive and lucid. I recommend Boomers make a gift to America (spare the U.S. Treasury the hor rendous Medicare costs associated with future generations and die with dignity, die on your own terms. Own your death as you lived your life. Dying isnt the question. Never is. Its when. Its how. Make the living will. Have DNR tattooed in four-inch letters on your chest. Have the phenobarbital and Jack Daniels readily accessible. Have people around who share your values and your reverence for quality of life. Live life well until you choose otherwise.The end of your choice Jepson is a 27-year resident of Central Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.US Louis Roney Play On!Most of the time, most people seem to know the answers to most of the questions they ask most other people. Writing Play On! through several decades, I have dared to express my opinion on many questions, knowing that all arguable. Arguments have been wellprejudices. Politicians know well the value of setting up their ideas by asking themselves loaded questions and then answering them publicly! These days there are many questions about the president and his presithe political air we breathe. I dont claim to have the answers to many of lifes questions, but I have been asked a plethora: Do I like the president? Thats quite a question. I have nothing against the man personally, however, as to whether I like the way he is leading our country? I do not! In general terms, I would say Obama solves few, if any, problems and leaves us weaker and at the must deal. Should we have known better before we elected this man? Barack Obama has no experience with any of our armed services and yet as president he is commander in chief of all of them. He promised to get the troops out of Afghanistan and seems to be doing so at the peril of the local Afghan people. Did we promise to rescue Iraq, or to help them rescue themselves? Are American inter ests being better served now in Iran, Iraq, Syria, Egypt, Libya anywhere? On the home front, is Obama reducing raises for our troops? Our military is very perturbed by agreements that Obama is making limiting our service commands to levels below those of WWII. At the same worst terrorists-criminals from Guantanamo to return to their murderous trade. Why, pray tell? Did Obama break our laws re: not dealing with terrorists? Where do Obamas interests lie? Why do our military leaders remain silent? Meanwhile our veterans are languishing for months at a time waiting for well-deserved urgent medical attention promised them. Obama knew of this fact when he was a candidate for president and vowed that as president this would Is Obama calling for yet another projected study? Of what? He knew of the prob lems over six years ago! the Obama regime was Fast and Furious our running of guns to Mexico. What did we solve in Mexico? Where are those guns now? Are Mexican cartels still powerful and ing across the border as usual? What is Attorney General Eric Holder doing about illegal aliens and goods crossing our borders? Speaking of crossing the Mexican border: I remember that a promised wall Has it been built? American ranchers have been killed on their own U.S. property. Has anyone been caught and punished for these killings? And are we Americans supposed to be so dumb as to swallow the idiotic story that a video was the cause of our ambas sador and three other Americans being killed, and our embassy burned, in Bengazi?! Who thought up that stupid idea? Where was the president? Where was Secretary of State Hillary Clinton? Arent U.S. embassies actions under the secretary of states purview? Lastly: We Americans are told not to judge all Muslims by the behavior of a few lunatics among them, and yet we are told to judge all gun owners by the doings of a few wackos! Nonsensical isnt it?Let me ask...? About Roney: HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney)I will own my death as I owned my life.Letters to the editorSend your thoughts (400 words or less) to Managing Editor Isaac Babcock at ibabcock@turnstilemediagroup.com This letter, written recently by Winter Park resident Lisa Everett to some of her friends and neighbors, is being printed at the request of the Observer. Dear friends and neighbors: As of [the June 9] City Commission meeting, Winter Park embarked on a course of dramatic growth to allow buildings with vastly increased density and separate parking garages to be constructed in and around our city. If you are plan ning on remaining a Winter Park resident for the foreseeable future, this change will impact your quality of life, so I am asking you to please read this and consider getting involved. Reduced to its essence, narrowly passing by a vote of 3-2, last night the city announced its intention to permit developers to apply for triple the amount of Floor Area Ratio (the square footage that is allowed in relation to the lot size) from what is presently allowed under our Comprehensive Plan. Importantly (and of particular concern to those of us who dis like the aesthetic of the concrete monoliths that have sprung up recently), the devel opers will be permitted to build parking garages and not include the square footage of those garages in the Floor Area Ratio equation, thereby exponentially increasing the square footage of their main build ing and encouraging separate multi-story parking garages. If that doesnt bother you, then consider that developers of these dense projects, which had previously been limited to certain areas west of U.S. Highway 17-92 (toward Interstate 4), will now be invited to apply to build their large structures and parking garages within a few blocks of many of our homes on any four-lane road in Winter Park (Denning, Aloma, Morse, Fairbanks, parts of Lakemont, parts of Webster) where zoning allows. About 25 citizens (an economically and racially diverse group from various Winter Park neighborhoods) spoke at the meeting and asked the mayor and commissioners to vote against the Comprehensive Plan amendments. A lone real estate agent spoke in favor. Faced with this overwhelmingly negative response from the citizens, Mayor Bradley, Commissioners Steven Leary and Commissioner Sarah Sprinkel nevertheless voted in favor of amending our Comprehensive Plan to allow developers to apply for these PDs (Planned Developments). Commissioners McMacken and Cooper voted against. Despite the issue having been raised by numerous citizens, those voting in favor of amending the Comp Plan did not articulate any reason why they supported growth which will increase the number of cars on our already failing Winter Park crease could be ameliorated. Another question raised but left unaddressed is who or what is driving this change, since there is no evidence to show that the citizens of Winter Park are in favor of this. Finally, we need to understand why the city is forging ahead with these changes without incorporates input from the citizenry. I encourage you to email Mayor Bradley and Commissioners Sprinkel and Leary and ask for direct answers to these straightforward questions. IMPORTANT: The issue here is the density increase, not Planned Developments per se. We are not afraid of Planned Developments. We recognize that Planned Developments can be excellent tools for a city to use in controlling development; however, we believe our city leaders must stantial increase in density without taking time to help us understand how this will and explaining how the city will accommodate the The Comprehensive Plan amendment voted on last night will be sent to Tallahassee for approval and then will be sent back Winter Park residents were in attendance at the meeting urging the Mayor and Com mission to vote against Comprehensive Plan change. My husband, Dykes Everett, also asked the Mayor and Commissioners to vote against the change. Thank you for your time. Lisa Simonton Everett, Winter Park What is Eric Holder doing about illegal aliens and goods crossing our borders?

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Page 20 | Thursday, June 19, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer King Features Weekly ServiceJune 16, 2014 King Features Weekly ServiceJune 16, 2014 King Features Weekly ServiceJune 16, 2014 King Features Weekly ServiceJune 16, 2014 King Features Weekly ServiceJune 16, 2014 King Features Weekly ServiceJune 16, 2014 ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Get your facts together and become familiar with them before you have to face up to that interview. The better prepared you are, the easier it will be to make that important impression. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) New information might warrant changing your mind about a recently made decision. Never mind the temporary confusion it might cause. Acting on the truth is always preferable. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Creat ing a loving atmosphere for those you care for could pay off in many ways. Expect to hear some unexpected but very welcome news that can make a big difference in your life. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Step ping away from an old and seemingly insoluble problem might be helpful. Use the time to take a new look at the situation and perhaps work out a new method of dealing with it. LEO (July 23 to August 22) Youre still in a favorable goal-setting mode. However, you might need to be a lit tle more realistic about some of your aims. Best to reach for what is current ly doable. The rest will follow. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) A setback is never easy to deal with. But it could be a boon in dis guise. Recheck your proposal, and strengthen the weak spots. Seek advice from someone who has been there and done that. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Coming up with a new way of handling a tedious job-regulated chore could lead to more than just a congrat ulatory memo once the word reaches the right people. Good luck. SCORPIO (October 23 to Novem ber 21) What you might call determination someone else might regard as stubbornness. Look for ways to reach a compromise that wont require a major shift of views on your part. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Youre still in a vulner able mode vis-a-vis offers that sound too good to be true. So continue to be skeptical about anything that cant be backed up with provable facts. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Thrift is still dominant this week. What you dont spend on what you dont need will be available for you to draw on should a possible (albeit temporary) money crunch hit. AQUARIUS (January 20 to Febru ary 18) Staying close to home early in the week allows for some introspec tion about your social life. Sort out your feelings before rejoining your fun-time fellows on the weekend. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) It can be a bit daunting as well as exciting to find yourself finally taking action on a long-delayed move for a change. It helps to stay with it when others rally to support you. BORN THIS WEEK: Your love of home and family provide you with the emotional support you need to find success in the outside world. 2014 King Features Synd., Inc. July 4, 1776, in Philadelphia, the Continental Congress adopts the Declaration of Independence, which proclaims the independence of a new United States of America from Great Britain. The declaration came 442 days after the first shots of the Ameri can Revolution. July 1, 1916, 25-year-old Army Lt. Dwight D. Eisenhower marries 19-year-old Mamie Geneva Doud. He would go on to lead the Allies to victory in Europe in World War II and later become the nations 34th president. The couple lived in 33 homes during Eisenhowers 37-year military career. July 6, 1933, Major League Baseballs first All-Star Game takes place at Comiskey Park in Chicago. The event was designed to bolster the sport during the darkest years of the Great Depression. Fans who could still afford tickets migrated from the more expensive box seats to the bleachers, which cost 50 cents. June 30, 1953, the first produc tion Corvette is built at the General Motors facility in Flint, Mich. All 300 Corvettes were white convertibles with red interiors and black canvas tops. The 1953 Corvette was outfitted with a six-cylinder engine and a twospeed automatic transmission. July 5, 1975, Arthur Ashe defeats the favored Jimmy Connors to become the first black man ever to win Wimbledon. While the confident Connors strutted around the tennis court, Ashe rested between sets. Finally, with the shocked crowd cheering him on, Ashe finished Connors off in the fourth set, 6-4. July 3, 1985, the blockbuster Back to the Future, starring Michael J. Fox, opens in theaters. The timetravel device in the film was a DeLorean DMC-12 sports car outfitted with a nuclear reactor that would achieve the 1.21 gigawatts of power necessary to travel through time. July 2, 1990, a stampede of religious pilgrims in a pedestrian tun nel in Mecca leaves more than 1,400 people dead. This was the most deadly of a series of incidents over 20 years affecting Muslims making the trip to Mecca. Hundreds die each year in this pilgrimage, in stonings, stampedes or fires. 2014 King Features Synd., Inc. King Features Weekly ServiceJune 16, 2014