Winter Park-Maitland observer

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title:
Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication:
Winter Park FL
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates:
28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID:
UF00091444:00300


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WPMOBSERVER.COM Talks of a minor league base ball team in Winter Park contin ued to take shape over the past 30 days as the City Commission and the citys advisory boards looked at bringing Americas pastime to the city on a professional level. Winter Park would be looking to build a 2,500to 3,500-seat stadium and have a minor league team sign a lease of at least 20 years, City Manager Randy Knight said. Rollins College and a Florida Collegiate Summer League team would potentially use the stadium as well. City staff has been in communication with the Brevard Mana the Milwaukee Brewers. Team owner and Winter Park resident Tom Winters hopes to bring the Manatees to the city, eyeing a stadium opening at the start of the spring 2015 season. But the City Commission mutually agreed 2015 may be too soon at their work session on Monday, hoping to avoid rushing into a major agreement by sticking with 2016 instead. Im worried about the tail wagging the dog, City Com missioner Steve Leary said. I want to make sure were doing whats right for the city. If we want minor league baseball and we think baseball is important for the citizens of Winter Park and the region, I think it needs to go where we want it to go in the timeframe we want it to go in. Commissioners looked at what they believed to be the four strongest sites for a baseball sta dium: Rollins Harper Shepherd Field, Martin Luther King Jr. Park, the incoming Ravaudage development, and the Votech property owned by Orange County Public Schools along U.S. Highway 17-92. The Ravaudage property seemed most appealing to City Commissioner Carolyn Cooper despite it being the most expen USPS 00-6186 Publisher statement on page 4. VISIT WPMOBSERVER.COMSUBSCRIBE NOW! A WILD NIGHT AND A WRECKING BALLLIFESTYLES, 10Hows your health? Checkups go higher tech. HEALTHY LIVING, 14A trip to BusytownRichard Scarrys stories hit the stage at the Orlando Rep. CULTURE, 15COMMUNITY BULLETIN ........... 4 CALENDAR ................... 4 LIFESTYLES ................... 8 SPORTS .................... 12 HEALTHY LIVING ............... 14 CULTURE .................... 19 OPINIONS ................... 22 CLASSIFIEDS ................. 23 A sewer pipe beneath the fu ture site of the historic Capen House may slow down the ef fort to reunite the split home on its new foundation a potential holdup that would hang on do nations from local residents. Plans to place the house on the grounds of the Albin Polasek Mu seum and Sculpture Garden hit a snag as early as December when construction workers discovered the 60-year-old manhole and sewer line. Future concerns about repair ing the old clay pipes with the house already in place forced general contractor Frank Roark to pursue installing new piping, which would circumvent the Polasek Museum Executive Director Debbie Komanski said that estimates to redirect the sewer line range from $12,000 to $50,000, which would need to be raised before the pipe can be ad dressed. That obviously wasnt a bud get item that anybody foresaw back last August when we started this, Komanski said. The manhole had been cov ered up for years. The Polasek Museum raised more than $400,000 in donations since last summer to move the house from its original location by Dec. 31 and save it from demo lition. The extra funding needed to move the sewer pipe shouldnt take long to raise, Komanski said. But fundraising has slowed down since the Capen House arrived on the Polasek Museum grounds in December. The project still needs between $100,000 and $150,000 to get the house com pletely rebuilt and refurbished, Komanski said. The remaining funding need ed for the project back in De cember sat within that range at $120,000 to $130,000, the Observ er reported Dec. 11. The projects success in saving the home from demolition may be the reason fundraising has slowed down since then, Koman ski said. The real crisis of the demoli tion ball was passed, Komanski said. Fundraising has gone rather quiet as of the years end. People who were going to make donations have made them ear lier. PHOTO BY TIM FREED THE OBSERVERTwo halves of the Capen House wait for a foundation after nding a buried obstacle. Capen hits snagA sewer line buried for decades threatens the moving houses TIM FREED Observer staff Please see SEWER on page 2With hopes of spurring development interest in the citys yet-to-be-realized downtown district, the Maitland City Coun cil declared two more city-owned plots of land open for business last week. The site of the old city hall building and the parking lot just north of it across Horatio Avenue were declared open for develop ment at a special Community Re development Agency meeting on Feb. 12. Adding the two addition al parcels to the re-developable area, the city hopes, will spur new interest in the downtown areas other available plots, such as the dilapidated Winn-Dixie out front of City Hall and up and down U.S. Highway 17-92. I see that property as useful to the extent of increasing other development, Councilman John Lowndes said. I dont see it as a If I build it they will come development. In addition to approving the sites for redevelopment, Lowndes included four suggestions for developers interested in the proper ties in his unanimously approved motion: that developers consider the strong public sentiment in favor of leaving some or all of the old city hall site property as open Maitland tries to sell downtown to developersSARAH WILSON Observer staff Please see DOWNTOWN on page 2A league of Winter Parks own? Minor league baseball stadium takes a step forward. Could it be the Brewers? TIM FREED Observer staff Please see BASEBALL on page 2 407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC Winter Park Recovery CenterExecutive Drug & Alcohol Treatment Protocols Sinclair Method For Alcohol Extinction Suboxone/Subutex For Opioid Abuse Privacy and Confidentiality AssuredMedically Managed Dual Diagnosis Evidenced Based Programs2056 Aloma Ave, Suite 100, Winter Park, FL 32792 www.WinterParkRecoveryCenter.com 407-629-0413

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Page 2 | Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer baseball as a potential boost dur ing the slower summer months for Park Avenue merchants. Time could be of the essence; Another city will likely take the opportunity if Winter Park doesnt, Mayor Ken Bradley said. The City Commission will make a formal decision at its next meeting on Feb. 24 of whether or period of pursuing minor league baseball.SEWER | Pipe could set back projectDOWNTOWN | Paradise could be paved to put up parking lotMayor Ken Bradley expressed concerns during last weeks City Commission meeting with the current pace of major projects within in the city, including the Capen House relocation effort. I dont want to be a year from now looking at two halves to a Capen House, Bradley said. I dont know what we have to do to encourage or if theres anything we can doit seems like some thing should give at some point. Komanski contacted City Man ager Randy Knight earlier that day to see if the city would be willing to move the pipe if the museum reimbursed them for the cost. The city likely wouldnt use any taxpayer dollars to assist with the sewer line work, but Winter Parks help would be the quickest, most ideal route, Komanski said. Winter Park could potentially step in and redirect the pipe for $12,000, Knight said, giving the museum a much better value than the other estimates theyve received. An item requesting approval to help the museum with the sewer line and be reimbursed afterward will go before the City Commis sion at their next meeting, Knight said. Roark should obtain the of putting the house on its founda tion by the end of this week, Ko manski said. The team hopes to solve the sewer line issue quickly and have both pieces of the house on their proper foundation by the end of March. space; that the development plans include one or more adjacent par cels; that there be priority given to plans with retail frontage facing Independence Lane; and that the community favors plans that in clude structured parking. We want to give comfort to the citizens and also be fair to de velopers, whod be wasting their time if they were to come in with something much different than what Ive offered, Lowndes said. Even prior to the Councils approval, CRA director Verl Emrick said two developers have been working on preliminary plans for both parcels, one that would in on the old city hall site, and anoth er with plans for small retail shops and a specialty grocer Earth Fare taking up the Horatio-fronted parking lot and the land from there east to U.S. Highway 17-92. Residents speaking out at the meeting were split over the idea of allowing the park-adjacent old city hall property currently serv ing as a parking lot to be redeveloped or whether it should be converted into additional open parkland. Resident Lisa Lewenthal warned the city with the lyrical words of Joni Mitchell about paving paradise and putting up a parking lot. We havent created Maitland as a destination, a place where people want to come and spend time. We really have the begin nings of a beautiful central park, Lewenthal said. I really feel we need to think so hard about the decisions we make today and how its going to impact future generations. This is like a game of chess, resident Barry Crooks said. If you make this move of destroy ing this gem of land, youve just check-mated yourself. Others residents argued that with the already-limited amount of land available in the citys downtown district, eliminating the additional land from potential development would further restrict ways for the city to increase its tax base. Resident June Flowers said with Lake Lily and Quinn Strong Park just around the corner, theres no shortage of parkland in the downtown vicinity. To say we need another park instead of getting more tax base, instead of getting someone to of fer money to our city Its crazy, she said. We have such a small foot print to develop our business core, we dont have the luxury of giving that up, resident Renee Stein Charlan added. The vote to open the parcels for business didnt resolve the de bate either way, Mayor Howard Schieferdecker said, it just opens the opportunity for interested de velopers to come in and submit proposals for the property. Every proposed project, he said, will still be subject to full vetting by the City Council and staff. CONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE CONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE ARCHIVE PHOTO BY REBECCA MALES THE OBSERVERWinter Park ofcials are deciding if the city loves baseball enough to build a stadium. BASEBALL | City reticent to play ballsive. A chance to build off the Millers Ale House and the sur rounding future developments without agitating any nearby neighborhoods seemed like an obvious choice, Cooper said. A more cost-effective approach would be Harper Shepard Field, Knight said, which wouldnt have any land costs and would mean additional stadium funding from Rollins College. The locations lack of parking remains the biggest disadvantage. It would cost the city at least $20 million to build a new baseball stadium. The City Commission would only move ahead with the concept if it were funded through multiple partners, Knight said. Commissioner Sarah Sprinkel scrambled to make it clear that the city wont be using taxpayer dollars to fund a stadium. We are not going to tax our citizens to do this, Sprinkel said. The 45-day baseball discussion period that began last month, made its way to two of the citys advisory boards. Economic Development Advisory Board Chairman Marc Reicher saw CONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014 | Page 3 City National Bank is a full service commercial bank. We lent more than $1.75 billion during the last two years.Please visit any of our banking centers from Miami to Orlando or contact us at 1-800-435-8839. Business Term Loans Equipment/Inventory Financing Accounts Receivable Lending Capital Improvement Loans Professional Lines of Credit Small Business Lending Owner-Occupied Commercial Mortgages SBA Loans Residential Mortgages* Home Equity Lines of Credit* citynational.com Member FDIC* Loans are subject to credit and collateral approval. We are really lending We make business happen. 0106-3 CNreallyLndng.indd 1 1/10/14 11:19 AM Maitland City TalkBY HOWARD SCHIEFERDECKER MAYOR More than 50 people attended Maitlands annual Volunteer Appreciation Celebration event taking place at the Maitland City Hall Chambers on Tuesday, Feb. 11. The yearly event, one of my personal favorites, celebrates vol unteers serving on the city of Mai tlands boards. We are very appreciative of our volunteers who devote countless hours of service to the city of Maitland. Without the unwavering commitment of the volunteer members of our city boards, we would not be able to achieve the goals of our city. Three individuals were recog nized for their service to the Mai tland community. Marc P. Walch received the 2013 Volunteer of the Year Award for his 11 years of service to the Lakes Advisory Board. During his time as chair man and vice chairman of the board, he has been closely involved with numerous projects improving Lake Maitland, Lake Eulalia and Lake Nina. He likewise actively participated in the development of the 2006 and 2011 versions of the citys Stormwater Lake Management Plan. The second award, the Mayors Community Award, honors individuals, who are non-city board members, for giving countless hours of their time for the betterment of Mai tland. Renee Stein Charlan and Butch Charlan were recognized for their dedication and com mitment to the city of Maitland through years of involvement with the Maitland Civic Center, the Performing Arts of Maitland, the Art & History Museums Mait land, and the Mait land Womans Club. Additionally, they have opened their home on numerous occasions to the community as a venue for events and recep tions, including hosting holiday dinners responders and their families. Any Maitland resident is welcome and encouraged to serve on any of the citys volun teer boards. If you are interested in serving and helping to shape our citys future, please contact the city clerk at 407-539-6219.Appreciating volunteers For more information call 407-659-5701 or visit www.TrustcoBank.com and apply today!Member FDICEQUAL HOUSINGLENDER RYour Home Town Bank TRUSTCO BANKNot available for cash out refinances. *PMI Private Mortgage Insurance. Trustco Bank pays Private Mortgage Insurance on customers behalf. Please note: We reserve the right to alter or withdraw these products or certain features thereof without prior notification. 95% Financing NO Broker Fees NO Points NO Private Mortgage Insurance* Now Available All the Same Great Benefits! Pay Principal, Not PMI. PHOTOS COURTESY OF CITY OF MAITLANDMark P. Walch, left, and Renee and Butch Charlan shake hands with Mayor Howard Schieferdecker after being awarded for ther service Feb. 11.

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Page 4 | Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014 PHONE: 407-563-7000 FAX: 407-563-7099 WPMOBSERVER.COMPUBLISHERTracy Craft407.515.2605TCraft@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MANAGING EDITORIsaac Babcock 407.563.7023IBabcock@TurnstileMediaGroup.comASSOCIATE EDITORSarah Wilson 407.563.7026SWilson@TurnstileMediaGroup.comDESIGNERTom Miller 407.563.7032TMiller@TurnstileMediaGroup.comSTAFF WRITERSBrittni Larson Megan Stokes Tim Freed Allison Olcsvay Kristy VickeryCOLUMNISTSChris JepsonJepson@MediAmerica.usLouis RoneyLRoney@cfl.rr.comJosh GarrickJoshGarrick9@gmail.comADVERTISING SALESLinda Stern407.376.2434LStern@TurnstileMediaGroup.comLEGAL NOTICE ADVERTISINGAshley McBride 407.286.0807Legal@FLALegals.comSUBSCRIPTIONS/CIRCULATIONLuana Baez 407.563.7013LBaez@TurnstileMediaGroup.comMEMBER OF: -Florida Press Association -Winter Park/Maitland/Goldenrod Chambers of CommerceWinter Park/Maitland Observer is published by Turnstile Media Group. Founded in 1990 and headquartered in Orlando, Fla., Turnstile Media Group is also the parent of Golfweek, Golfweek Custom Media, TurfNet, Professional Artist, Seminole Voice, Baldwin Park Living and Turnstile Connect.TURNSTILE MEDIA GROUPCHAIRMANRance CrainPRESIDENT/CEOFrancis X. FarrellVICE PRESIDENTSPatti Green & Jeff BabineauUSPS #00-6186 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:Winter Park / Maitland Observer 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835 Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster FAMILY CALENDAR Calendar FEB. 20 Learn the right and wrong way to build your dream home in Winter Park at an open forum on building and single-family zoning standards. Its at 3 p.m. Feb. 20 at Winter Park City Hall. Visit cityofwinter park.org for more information. Business after Hours will help you network and get to know your community at the same time. Join Orlando City Soccer for a pre-season tailgate event. Meet the team, mingle with fellow members and get ready for the 2014 season. Plus, en ter to win a signed 2014 USL pro jersey! Its from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce, 151 W. Ly man Ave. in Winter Park. RSVP for this not-to-be-missed event at tinyurl.com/ wpccsoccerFEB. 22 Want to make a hydroponic vegetable garden in your back yard but dont know how? Come to the Winter Park Welcome Center for a tutorial on how to get your futuristic garden growing. Its from 10 to 11:30 a.m. on Feb. 22. Visit cityofwinter park.org for more information. FEB. 23The local alumni chapter of Sigma Alpha Iota is hosting a free concert at Rollins College at 2 p.m. on Feb. 23 at Tietdke Hall. The goal is to raise funds for college scholarships for women students attend ing local colleges who are pursuing careers in music. FEB. 26The Rotary Club of Winter Park is pleased to host its annual celebration of chili at the third annual Chili for Charity presented by Mayower Retirement Commu nity on Wednesday, Feb. 26, at the Winter Park Farmers Market. The events features chili creations by more than a dozen lo cal restaurants and caterers and enables the clubs foundation to continue its effort to support more than 30 local non-prot organizations each year. Other event highlights include live entertainment by The Papa Jack Express and a live auction. Tickets are available for $25 each or $225 for 10 in advance or $30 at the door. Pur chase tickets online at chiliforcharity.org and stay up-to-date with event details at facebook.com/chiliforcharity FEB. 22The Great Duck Derby is back at Mead Garden! The Duck Derby is a wonder ful opportunity to discover or rediscover Winter Parks hidden treasure. Enjoy the duck races and a host of fun family activities. See and experience what makes Mead one of the most beloved spots in Winter Park for kids and families, from its running creek and wildlife critters to the beautiful camellia and buttery gardens. Adopt a racing duck for only $5. Its from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Mead Garden at 1300 S. Denning Drive. Run through nature at the Wekiwa Springs 5K and 10K this weekend. Its the only race run entirely off road within a state park and there will be cash prizes for the fastest overall times in the 10K. Registration begins at 7 a.m. Races start at 8:30 a.m. To register online go to ac tive.com FEB. 23The Peanut Butter Matinee at the Enzian this week features My Dog Skip at noon. Visit enzian.org for more information. MARCH 1Its the sixth annual Fiddlers Green 5K! Get ready for an outdoor race through Winter Parks historic Mead Garden start ing at 7:30 a.m. on March 1. Its at 1300 S. Denning Drive in Winter Park. From there, the runners are invited back for a beer and some fun at Fiddlers Green Irish Pub. Fiddlers 5K is not a chipped race. The Fiddlers 5K is stroller friendly. Pro ceeds from the event will benet Habitat for Humanity of Winter Park-Maitland and Conductive Education Center of Orlando. Visit ddsgives.org for more information. MARCH 2The 35th annual St. Patricks Day Pa rade in Winter Park will march down Park Avenue starting at 2 p.m. on March 2. Its a few weeks early, but kicks off two weeks of Irish festivities. MARCH 4Get ready. Get set. And go to IHOP restaurants on National Pancake Day, March 4, to enjoy a free short stack of buttermilk pancakes and help raise money for charity! IHOP restaurants will again serve up free short stacks of its famous buttermilk pancakes on National Pancake Day on Tuesday, March 4. IHOP hopes to raise more than $3 million for Childrens Miracle Network Hospitals, Shriners Hospitals for Children and other local charities this year. It runs from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. at your local IHOP, with voluntary donations to Childrens Miracle Network encouraged. Community Bulletin Top scholars Chantal Cowie of Maitland has been named to the University of WisconsinMadisons deans list for the fall semester of the 2013-14 academic year. Manuel Lugo of Maitland, son of Dr. Eduardo and Zulma Lugo, made the deans list for Fur man University for the 2013 fall semester. Hamilton K. Bright of Maitland was named to the Deans Academic Honor List for the fall 2013 semester at Baylor Uni versity. Help your communityOrange County residents who want to make a difference in their community while enjoying tremendous reward are invited to register for volunteer train ing at Cornerstone Hospice and Pal liative Care. Hospice volunteers provide a variety of services including staying with patients to give caregivers a break, run ning errands, walking a patients dog or even helping out with community events or ofce ling. Volunteer opportunities are also available at Cornerstone Suites at Winter Park Towers, a 10-bed inpatient unit housed within the Winter Park retirement community. All Cornerstone Hospice volunteers are required to complete 16 hours of volunteer training. For more information or to register for training, contact Diane Klebanow, volunteer specialist, at 407-304-2604 or dklebanow@cshospice.org; ( or Lisa Gray, volunteer manager, at 888-728-6234 or volunteer@cshospice.org Freedom to ... All the fun, none of the hassles of ownership. Full access to hundreds of boats. Membership privileges at 70 locations in the U.S. www.FreedomBoatClub-TB.com Bring a copy of this ad and receive Mt. Dora Now open Mt. Dora Now open

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Page 6 | Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Congratulations, Mayor!Winter Park Mayor Kenneth W. Bradley was recently induct ed into the University of Central Florida College of Business Administration Hall of Fame. He graduated from UCF in 1985 with a masters in business adminis tration. The induction ceremony was held Feb. 6 at the 15th annual Business Hall of Fame Awards Banquet at the Rosen Shingle Creek Hotel. Mayor Bradley has been serving the Central Florida area for decades. With 28 years of Central Florida healthcare experience, he also serves as the Campus CEO of Winter Park Memorial Hospital and has acted as Campus CEO (and COO) of Florida Hospital Kissimmee and COO of Florida Hospitals Celebration Health. Bradley is a member of the Winter Park Public Library Board and the Wells Fargo Central Florida Community Bank Board. He has received numerous awards within the community, including the Orlando Business Journals Central Floridas Most in 2010, and the 2011 Crystal Angel award from Adventist Health System. The UCF Business Hall of Fame consists of 64 members who have careers, business and communities they serve. Each member has made a substantial impact on the UCF community by improving the institutions reputation by their success, professionalism and service to our community.Feb. 24 City Commission meeting There will be a City Commis sion meeting Monday, Feb. 24, at 3:30 p.m. in City Hall Commis sion Chambers located at 401 S. Park Ave. For the most up-to-date agenda, please visit cityofwinter park.org under Whats New. Be low are a few topics of interest:Consent Agenda 2/10/14. (for a complete listing, please visit cityofwinterpark.org/ccpackets). ecute the Interlocal Agreement between the city and the city of Gainesville d/b/a Gainesville Regional Utilities.Action Items Requiring Discussion Assistance Panel scope and fund ing for the U.S. Highway 17-92 corridor. league baseball stadium in Winter Park. sewer relocation to accommodate the Capen House at the Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gar dens location. Board for the Tuesday, March 11, election. Monday, May 26, City Commis sion meeting due to the Memorial Day holiday.Public Hearings declaring that the city is to fund capital improvements to under ground electric/CATV (BHN) along Seminole Drive; to be par tially paid by special assessments levied against real property spespecial assessments. 1873 Glencoe Road as a historic resource on the Winter Park Reg ister of Historic Places. Park: dinance amending Chapter 58 Land Development Code creat ing a non-compete window of 30 days before or after the citys an nual spring and fall art festivals (relating to non-residential zoning districts and the conditions re quired for a special event). nance authorizing the issuance of its outstanding electric revenue bonds. Swoope Investment, LLC, and Village Park Senior Housing Partners, Ltd., to amend the con ditional use and development agreement for the Village Park Senior Housing project at 550 N. Denning Drive, to add the prop erty at 796 W. Swoope Ave., to the project; permitting an increase in density from 105 to 108 apart ments. Park: amending certain provisions of Article IV, Sign Regulations to add clarity; and amending Section 1-24, Schedule of Violations and Penalties relating to signs. sions full agenda on the home page of cityofwinterpark.org un der Whats New. Remember, if you are unable to attend the City Commission meetings, you can watch them live, gavel-to-gavel as they happen. During the meeting, simply log cityofwinterpark.org and click on Government > Live Video Broadcasts to easily stay tuned-in to of Mayors memories videoThe Communications Department has been partnering with Full Sail Universitys SPARK pro gram to produce videos featuring unique aspects of the city. Their latest creation is a walk down memory lane with the citys pres ent and past mayors. To view this latest video, Through the Eyes of Our Mayors, please visit cityof winterpark.org/videos and select Mayors Memories.Electric undergrounding mapsThe city has posted a series of maps from Fiscal Year 2013 to 2023 to visually show when the various areas of the city are scheduled for electric undergrounding. These maps are subject to change, however, can be used as an ap proximate indication of where you are in the citys long-term un dergrounding plan. If you are cu rious about when undergrounding is planned for your street, please visit cityofwinterpark.org/ electricmaps. If you have addi tional questions, please call 407599-3400.Irrigating twice a weekSunday, March 9, through Sun day, Nov. 2 Tuesday & Friday: Irrigation permitted for non-residential properties Wednesday & Saturday: Irriga tion permitted for odd/non-num bered addresses Thursday & Sunday: Irrigation permitted for even-numbered ad dresses Before 10 a.m. and after 4 p.m. Water only when needed, no more than one hour per zone. on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, watch us on Vimeo. rf ntbrrtb brfbrrntbbr tbrrtftrbrrbrrr brrr trrrbrbrrf brrbr brrrttrr trbr rbr fftbbtfb tr r r r fntbtfbbftftbtrfnr fn Winter Park City TalkBY RANDY KNIGHT CITY MANAGER Know your water

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rfntb ttrttn trbrrbrbrrbrbrrbrbrrrrrrrf ftrrf btrbnnrbbrrnr rr rrr brrrrr rrr rrrrrr ttrbr brfbrnr brfbrr bbr btbrbbrf rr bbbrbrr bnrr brfrrr nrfrrr brtrnrrtrrtrnrrnrbrnbbrTD Bank is TD Bank, N.A., a wholly-owned U.S. subsidiary of The Toronto-Dominion Bank. Member FDIC. Accounts issued by TD Bank, N.A. are not insured by Canada Deposit Insurance Corporation. 1 Money transferred by wire transfer only. Incoming wire fees may apply and will be rebated the next business day. Foreign exchange conversion rates may apply. 2 Assets are only considered for mortgage applications. 3 Subject to credit approval and other conditions. Mortgages limited to property located in U.S. state where TD Bank, N.A. has locations. Equal Housing Lender 4 Credit cards issued by TD Canada Trust or TD Bank, N.A. Subject to credit approval. Applicants for a TD Bank, N.A. issued card must have a U.S. address within the TD Bank, NA footprint (PA, NY, NJ, CT, NH, ME, MA, FL, VT, DE, MD, DC, NC, SC, VA or RI). Other restrictions apply. 5 TD Bank, N.A. is located in the United States and its support line, Stores, products and services are primarily serviced in English. The TD logo and other trade-marks are the property of The Toronto-Dominion Bank. Canadians in Florida can nd a TD Bank as easy as they can nd a beach.To open an account, visit a TD Bank Store near you or call 1 -877-700-2913 anytime .5Great service and convenience for Canadians at nearly 1,300 TD Bank locations in the U.S. No-fee wire transfers of up to $100,000 daily between your Canadian and U.S. based TD accounts over the phone.1 View your Canadian and U.S. based TD accounts on the same webpage or mobile device. Pay your U.S. bills online or on your mobile device. Use your Canadian and U.S. assets,2 income and credit history to apply for a U.S. mortgage3 or a U.S. credit card.4 0003506_N4106_5A.indd 1 12/12/13 4:10 PM

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Page 8 | Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Lifestyles Zach Brown took a long, treacherous route to adulthood. At age 5 he was adopted by his grandparents, but when his be havior both at home and school got out of hand, he was sent back into foster care. Separated from his half-sisters, he was again adopted at the age of 12. A troubled kid, Brown admits he was hard to handle. I was always rebelling, getting into trouble at school, he said. At home I just couldnt seem to bond with my new mom. Just after his 18th birthday, he mom over some of his belongings that were missing. He went to school, believing everything was place to live. With no place else to turn, the Winter Park High School senior spent time at friends houses, even sleeping in a friends closet, until he ended up being invited to stay with his girlfriends family. He stayed there for a couple of months until a spot opened up for him at Covenant House, a group home facility for homeless teens and young adults. Then Robin McLeod, of Walk Their Shoes Inc., came into his life. McLeod is a volunteer guardian ad litem for the 18th Judicial Court and said she personally knows the needs of teens aging out of foster care. She herself was once a ward of the courts, and knows well the tion to adulthood with little to no help. The mission of Oviedo-based Walk Their Shoes is to provide individualized assistance to teens ageing out of foster care in the way of transportation, childcare, or help getting or furnishing an apartment. Everyone who receives assistance is also required to pay it for ward in some way, by speak ing to middle or high school kids or volunteering at local charities. While Zach did not strictly age out of foster care, he still needed a lot of help ing in life, McLeod said. The state of Florida recently recognized the needs of kids like Brown by passing new legislation that went into effect Jan. 1. The law, called the Nancy C. Detert Common Sense and Compassion Independent Living Act, allows kids in foster care to remain there until age 21 (previ ously 18) as long as they meet cer tain conditions, the goal being to give them more time to progress into adulthood while still having a stable home base. While Browns situation is dif ferent from those in foster care, his needs are not. McLeod stepped in during one of Browns darkest hours and helped him take important steps toward a good future. I wasnt expecting anyone to help, Brown said. Then sudden ly she was there. She just has this vibe, this attitude that says every thing is going to be OK. I realized I cant do this by myself, I need support, and Ms. Robin was there for me. Nearly a year after entering Covenant House, Brown moved December. McLeod provided Brown with living room furniture and took him shopping for essentials like dishes and clothes to furnish his new place. Just a few weeks ago, he Cobalt. Brown still has the bike he received through McLeod from an anonymous donor. Until he got the car, his trusty bike was what got him back and forth to his job washing cars at Fields BMW. Now 19 years old, Brown dreams of moving up at the car dealership, perhaps going into management. He got his GED while at Cov enant House a month earlier than he would have graduated from high school and hasnt ruled out going to college one day. With a steady job, a stable home and a vehicle, things are looking up for Brown, but there is one important element missing in his life. Id still like to have the kind of family I always wanted. Id like to be a good dad someday and raise a family the way I wish I had been raised, he said. Until then, McLeod and her family have taken Brown under their wing. We still talk or text at least once a day, she said. Ms. Robin treats me like fam ily, Brown said. I can always come back to her, knowing she will be there. Brown said just knowing that someone is there for him makes all the difference.PHOTO COURTESY OF ROBIN MCLEODZach Browns new life is a big departure from his old path thanks to Walk Their Shoes, which is having a charity cookoff Feb. 22. A long, dangerous route to a new lifeALLISON OLCSVAY Observer staff Walk Their Shoes is having a chili cookoff, hosted by Hourglass Brewery of Longwood on Saturday, Feb. 22, from 4 to 6 p.m. with all proceeds cost is $10 to enter the con test, $5 to taste the entries. You also get $1 off beer with admission. The grand prize is $250. Visit walktheirshoes. com for more information on the cause. Run, Walk, Train. MARCH 15 (Sat) Zimmerman Kiser Sutcliffe Winter Park Road Race 10k & 2 Mile*...........Park Avenue Presented by Florida Hospital 24 (Mon) Beginning Walk-Run Program Begins ..........Blue Jacket Park Presented by Track Shack Fitness Club 25 (Tue) Five & Dime 5k and 10k Training Begins ....Blue Jacket Park Presented by Track Shack Fitness ClubAPRIL 26 (Sat) Run for the Trees 5k ......................................Showalter FieldJULY 4 (Fri) Hunter Vision Watermelon 5k ............................Park AvenueDates are subject to change. *T rack Shack Running Series Event Track Shack Distance Dare Event WPO2014 The State of Business After the Great Recession Presented in partnership by Observe r Winter Park / Maitland Additional support provided by Thursday, March 6, 2014 Reservations at winterpark .org or call (407) 644-8281

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Page 10 | Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer rfrfn fnrtrbtnrnrtr rf nt rbft tbt rfrnr rfftbrnrrrrf rnrtr nrfrfff rfbnrrfnrrrrfntrbr f ftf t nrn f rbrfntbnbnbbrf tn n bb Its been two months since thirsty regulars stepped inside the shabby bar on 17-92, but the red neon sign outside Tom and Jerrys Bar and Lounge continues the night sky. The buzzing letters are the only sign of life from the run-down cinder block building. Visitors would have guessed it shut down years ago if it werent for its glowing calling card. A deserted, cracked parking lot leads to the bars back entrance. The locked iron gate keeps wan dering locals out, but a closer look between the bars reveals a chalk board sign tossed aside on the concrete. The dusty surface reads Big Celebration: December 19 in fad ed letters. The old dive will be torn down by the end of February to make way for Winter Parks Ravaudage development, putting an end to an era that began in 1946. But not before local residents could celebrate one more last call. Its a cold Thursday night in December as the parking lot be with locals mingling and sipping regulars can visit the local water ing hole. Customers cycle in and out of the bar with beer and mixed drinks to chat with friends and total strangers. But everyone has something in common tonight: refusing to miss the historic bars last hurrah. Orlando rock band The World Famous Trans Ams give the night a rock-and-roll soundtrack from the rickety wooden platform out side the bar, jamming through a set of classic hits from AC/DCs Highway to Hell to Motley Crues Girls, girls, girls. But customers inside can barely hear the Trans Ams rowdy sound over the scramble for drinks. Its a full house inside the smoky, dim taproom. Locals line up elbow-tothe bustling bartenders. The ales, stouts and lagers run out quickly theres hardly any thing left by 10 p.m. Longwood resident John Nolan squirms his way to the front and orders one of the last frosty bottles. It had been years since he last visited the Win ter Park bar, but he wouldnt miss tonight for the world. Nolan knew the bar well. He remembers the glowing sign outside even from his childhood, watching it pass by from a back seat window as his father brought him along on business trips to Winter Park. I would see Tom and Jerrys and I would think Tom and Jerry cartoons, Nolan said. As a kid you think Oh, Tom and Jerrys. I want to go in there. My dad was like No, not quite. Its beer. The run-down bar reminds him decades later of something the areas lost over the years, he said. If you look elsewhere, they have places with heritage Or lando just doesnt have that, No lan said. Its all strip malls and prefab concepts. History is knocked down for billions of dollars.PHOTOS BY TIM FREED THE OBSERVEROrlando rock band The World Famous Trans Ams plays classic rock and metal while bargoers belly up for a nal beer at Tom and Jerrrys, one of the Orlando areas oldest bars. It will be leveled before the end of February, said bar owner Dan Bellows. One last call before the wrecking ballTIM FREED Observer staff wild night, Tom and Jerrys prepares to turn off the neon lights Please see BAR on next page

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014 | Page 11 rfntbtnnn bbnfntnt bbbrbnnntfn rnr rf 2826 Shader Rd. Orlando, FL 32808 Have a dog with lots of energy? We can help! 407-295-3888 BarkingDogFitness.com A tired dog is a happy dog! And a happy YOU! Conveniently located at... Ask About our FREE Trial! Customized workouts Training Fun play time with other dogs 1 on 1 attention ORLANDOS ONLY DOGGIE DAYCARE WITH A GYM! BAR | Tom and Jerrys could find a rebirth along New England Avenue in Winter Parks Hannibal SquareThe bar celebrated by hundreds of locals that cold December years ago back when World War II was in its aftermath and the tense Cold War began to emerge. Tom and Jerrys rolled with the times. It served as a packaging house in the s, where customers could pull up to a drive-through window, order a six-pack and drive off. The increasing aware ness of drunk driving throughout the s and s eventually led to the window being sealed off. But much of the bar remains the same as it was back in the 1940s and s. The counters and walls have been repainted and touched up, but the taverns origi nal cinder block skeleton under neath still stands. Black-and-white photos on the walls of Frank Sinatra and the Rat Pack hint at the bars early years: a decade when big bands led by the likes of Benny Goodman and Duke Ellington dominated Amer icas music scene. Its the bars thick layer of char acter and atmosphere that keeps Winter Park resident Jud French coming back. Hed been a regular at the bar since the mid-s, but his group of friends were stepping near a row of dimly lit dartboards across from the bar, taking in the joints dingy, rough vibe. This is, as far as Im concerned, historic, said French, looking around the dark, crowded room. I like the atmosphere and I like coming here. Its kind of sad; I understand progress, but its go ing to be replaced by something bright and shiny. You cant create this. When it grows organically and its been here and it has a history, a lot of people have a lot of memories tied up in it. door set to roaring applause and raised drinks. Most of the turnout has left by 1 a.m. and the remain ing few dozen night owls still out side make their way back into the bar as the night air gets colder and colder. dry. Toby Keiths low key I Love this Bar calmly moseys out of the jukebox bolted to the wall beside the bar. We got winners, we got los ers, chain smokers and boozers. And we got yuppies, we got bik ers, we got thirsty hitchhikers... Emotions start set ting in for bar manager Lucy Miller. Tom and Jerrys had always been a meeting place. From Central Floridas local music scene making a showing at open mic nights to groups of college students hit ting a night on the town, the bar had a way of bringing people to gether. Miller even remembers a cus tomer popping the question to his lady during her tenure behind the counter. Plans are now in motion to res urrect Tom and Jerrys later this year at a new location in Hannibal Square. Bar owner Dan Bellows plans to bring the neon sign, the original liquor license and some of the old photos and decor to the new spot. But while Miller intends to con tinue working at the new Tom and Jerrys, she cant shake the feeling that shes saying goodbye. A new bar means new faces perhaps re placing some familiar ones. Its heartbreaking, Miller said. All of your regulars be come like your friends. utes of business as the bartend ers shout last call at 1:28 a.m. The remaining dozen or so customers rush to the bar to buy whatevers left. Just a few bottles of Crown Royal, Jack Daniels and Bacardi sit on the back shelf. Winter Park resident Ted Zaf fran gulps down his last drink. foot in Tom and Jerrys as a college student. He was a long way from Florida State University, but felt right at home. The tall, gray-haired customer lays a hand on a nearby high table and points at two sets of initials carved into the wood more than 20 years ago TZ + J.J. My lady back in the day, Zaf fran said. The carving recalls a fond memory for Zaffran, who enjoys the table so much that he picks it up and starts to walk out the door. Some of the bartenders spot him and cry foul as a much younger customer with a shaved head and a black polo shirt stops him and puts the table back. Zaffran eagerly challenges him to an arm wrestling match over the table and they lock hands above the faded carving. The older man appears stron ger than many expected. Hed kept much of his forearm strength since his days as a tight end on the Florida State football team. Zaffran makes the pin after a 10-second struggle, but then hard feelings turn more serious before a doorman can rush in to stop it. Everyone who hasnt already gotten the hint is ushered out. Its a jarring ending to the last night of Tom and Jerrys, a bar that no doubt had seen plenty of tussles in its 67 years of business. The sentimental celebration ended in a brawl like a long, drawnout goodbye suddenly met with a door slammed in its face. But the conclusion seemed as chaotic and imperfect as the cracked, broken-down tavern itself its coarse, rich character making it something worth cel The taproom on 17-92 may not be standing by March, but locals can take solace in one thing: it didnt go quietly. CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE PHOTOS BY TIM FREED THE OBSERVERAn eventful night closed out Tom and Jerrys after a long run on U.S. 17/92.

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Page 12 | Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer INVITE YOU AND A GUEST TO ATTEND AN ADVANCE SCREENINGTO DOWNLOAD YOUR PASS FOR TWO, GO TO WWW.GOFOBO.COM/RSVP & ENTER RSVP CODE: WPMOZ0M4Supplies are limited! Passes received through this promotion do not guarantee you a seat at the theatre. Seating is on a rst come, rst served basis, except for members of the reviewing press. Theatre is overbooked to ensure a full house. 20TH Century Fox and their af liates accept no responsibility or liability in connection with any loss or accident incurred in connection with use of a prize. Tickets cannot be exchanged, transferred or redeemed for cash, in whole or in part. Not responsible for lost, delayed or misdirected entries. No purchase necessary. Participating sponsors, their employees & family members and their agencies are not eligible. OPENS NATIONWIDE FEB 28THwww.sonofgodmovie.com The Knights got revenge and righted their season in one game on the hard court at the Univer sity of South Florida on Feb. 15. After losing in overtime 10 days earlier to the Bulls, the Knights edged them 75-74 and snapped a nine-game losing streak at the same time. Isaiah Sykes needed 27 points to keep the Knights within a shot seconds, his last shot would seal the deal. I think this is the best game weve played as a team, Sykes told UCFKnights.com after the than a month the Knights shot better than 50 percent as a team, with four players entering double digits. Justin McBride would again prove himself a scoring machine from the bench, dropping 13 points in the basket in just 14 For the Knights, it was only their second win in 11 games of American Athletic Conference play. Their two wins have come by a cumulative three-point margin. Thankfully their wins over USF and Temple the other two teams in the bottom of the conference have kept them out of last place. Wednesday night at press time they faced the AACs top team, No. 7 Cincinnati (23-3, 12-1), at home. Rollins The mens basketball team rose to 12-11 overall and 6-7 in the Sunshine State Conference with an 84-59 thrashing of Florida Tech on Feb. 12 and an 81-72 win over Nova Southeastern on Feb. 15. since December comes courtesy of double-digit shooting by most rained 20 points against Florida Tech, with Chris Uhle dropping 17 in the basket. Against Nova, Alex Blessig hit 23 points with Adam Allens 22 close behind. Woods nailed 17 points in that game while grabbing nine assists. The Tars played Lynn on Wednesday at press time, just after the Lady Tars (21-4) edged out Nova 74-71 in overtime Feb. 15. Both teams will head to Miami Shores on Feb. 22 to face Barry, which is struggling at mid-pack in the SSC on both the women and mens teams. High school basketballThe Winter Park boys basket ball team edged Fort Pierce Cen basketball Feb. 13 with a 70-63 score. Starting the week the boys were 25-3 on the year, with only one loss at home all season. They played Tuesday night at press time, hosting Oak Ridge win, they could be taking on the winner of the Wharton versus St. Petersburg game in the regional plus point blowouts. That game would be at 7 p.m. Feb. 22, with the location dependent upon the teams playing. Knights, Tars hit their strideISAAC BABCOCK Observer staff PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERThe Knights had reason to celebrate after a revenge win over the USF Bulls Feb. 15. 5900 Oleander Dr., Orlando, FL 32807Thursday, Feb. 27th5 p.m. 11 p.m.Good Shepherd Night$15 all you can rideFriday, Feb. 28th5 p.m. 11 p.m.$15 all you can rideSaturday, Mar. 1st12 p.m. 11 p.m.$25 all you can ride (12 p.m. 11 p.m.) Sunday, Mar. 2nd12 p.m. 6 p.m. PHOTOS BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVERPark Avenue hosted its seasonal Sip, Shop & Stroll offering tastes of the streets best wine and cusine offerings on Feb. 6. Sip & Stroll

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Page 14 | Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Winter Park residents have a new opportunity to take a look into their healths future. At the Winter Park Health Assessment program at the Florida Hospital for Women Winter Park, clients can get their DNA tested for potential health issues. Its called genomic testing and clients can choose from several areas of health to have tested, including nutrition and weight loss, overall This is new technology, and while not totally detailed, does give an overall view, or a blue print, of the category of DNA tested, said Guita Kurd, registered nurse and director of operations for the WPHA. People go read their palm, cally and see what to expect in the future, Kurd said. After the test, which is not cov ered by insurance, clients get to sit down and discuss their results with a physician, where theyll create a health plan of action based on the clients results and goals. Kurd said that for example, if someone chose nutrition and weight loss, the test could tell if the person had an obesity gene, and what kind of diet and exercise would be effective for that per son. While for one person cardio exercise would be best for losing weight, for another lifting weights would be more effective the test can give the information neces You can turn on a gene based on your lifestyle, said Herminio Alamo, a registered nurse and WPHA clinical manger. Genes are like bullets, they load the gun, and the lifestyle pulls the trigger. The main focus of the WPHA ens health. There, they also do all day assessments on clients, where physicians evaluate their over blood work, a stress test, an EKG and womens health tests such as mammograms and pap smears, among more than a dozen other tests. The assessments are not covered by insurance and are not inexpensive, but offer tests that in a regular healthcare situation would take up to two months to schedule and get results from. With the WPHA, clients get the tests and results in one day and spend an average of three hours talking with a physician about their health. Im like a medical detective all day, Alamo said. Im looking for trouble, I tell the clients, Im PHOTO COURTESY OF FLORIDA HOSPITAL FOR WOMENHigh-tech testing can reveal secrets hidden in a patients genes, thanks to genomic sequencing at the Winter Park Health Assessment Program, offered by Florida Hospital for Women. The program also offers tness checks, such as cardiovascular capacity, shown above. Test gives a look into your healths futureAt the Winter Park Health Assessment program, clients can get their DNA tested to discover health issues before they happenBRITTNI LARSON Observer staff Please see GENETICS on page 16

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FOURTH PRIZE: Gift certicate dinner for two at Jacks Steakhouse and a few rounds of virtual golf at Virtual Golf Caddy Shanks. FIFTH PRIZE: Gift certicate to Farris and Foster and Planet Smoothie. ENTRY FOR CONTEST REQUIREMENTS: Start date 2/01/2014 end date 6/01/14 Have at least 30 lbs. to lose Train 3 times a week Ready for change (do I have a surprise for you to overcome every obstacle and fear!) Nutrition Shopping tour through our very own Publix. Biweekly weigh-ins and measurementsEveryone who has followed the 180 Method Training Course has seen great results. I guarantee it!BALDWIN PARKPRIVATE PERSONAL TRAINING 407.680.4263www.180DegreeFitness.com1595 Meeting Place, Orlando, FL 32814When you take the rst step to success, youll be starting a new journey: rejuvenated and refreshed angina increased condence, be able to wear the clothes you always desired and have people continually gushing over how great you look!Committed to your tness success! C M Y CM MY CY CMY K ad_innerscientist.pdf 1 2/12/14 12:06 PM Several years ago, National Geographic produced an article on the chemistry of love. Researchers had shown that fall ing in love produced elevated levels of dopamine, the chemical that produces feelings of intense energy and exhilaration. Maybe dopamine is why people in love so of ten act dopey! The bad news is that a dopa mine-rush tops out at 18 months or so. That is why people fall out of love after a while. Unless, of course, oxytocin, the chemical of bonding and wellbeing kicks in in the meantime. Then the re lationship could last for years, though perhaps without the dopamine kick. So, what causes the dopaminevary. Some researchers believe it is visual (waist-to-hip ratio in females, rugged lookswhatever those arein males). An even more fascinating theory has to do with smell. A Swiss scientist had a sample of 49 women smell the sweaty T-shirts of a variety of men with a range of genotypes (genetic variations). The women tended to pick the shirts of men who had very different genotypes from them as best smelling. I guess opposites really do attract! With all this biological infor mation now available about love, I was wondering how it might change some of our love songs: Killing Me Softly with His Smell Ill Be There, as Long as the Oxytocin Holds Out I Just Called to Say My Neu ro-receptors Are Going Wild Always in My Nose Crazy (cant improve on this one since Serotonin levels in lovers and OCD people are the same) Well, you get the idea. Im glad scientists are doing so much to help us understand how the human brain works. Im not so sure that all human experience is reducible to chemistry, though. I just participated in the renewal of vows for a couple who have been married for 61 years. Their take on love was a little different than National Geographics. The man wrote: Understanding and respect ing each others strengths and weaknesses, accepting and loving each other, just as we are, without criticizing or trying to change the other is really our secret for 61 years of loving, living, and looking forward to eternity together. With Gods help, they built a life that has survived the ups and downs of dopamine and oxytocin, and thrived. Kind of makes you wonder if love isnt really more about theology than biology? For a tongue-in-cheek look at the chemistry of love check out Lauren Slaters article: http://bit. ly/1gNQibWThe chemistry of chemistry Jim Govatos Reality LinesLike a vampire, high blood pressure can be silent and destructive, yet manageable. Hypertension, or high blood pressure, means the pressure on the walls of your arter ies is high. Think of what happens to a garden hose with pro longed high pressure. The hose gets stiff, cracks, and leaks. Or explodes, which is what can happen with a stroke. Over time, the high pressure damages the elasticity of the blood vessels, so the pressure increases and the heart has to pump harder, leading to a cascade of risks for bad medical events as you age. In general, normal, healthy blood pressure is lower than 120/80 (with both numbers lower). The first number (systolic) is the pressure when your heart beats. The second number (diastolic) is the pressure when the heart rests between beats. Blood pressures that are usually between 120/80 and 140/90 are considered prehyperten sion a warning that now is a good time to bring that pressure down. A consistent blood pressure at or above 140/90 is high and may need both lifestyle changes and medications to bring the pressure down. People with other health conditions, such as diabetes, may need to aim for lower blood pressures. About one in three adults have high blood pressure. As we age, more of us develop it. Your kidneys, hormones, nervous system, blood vessels, and water and salt in your body all influence your blood pressure. Having a relative with high blood pressure, being overweight, no physical activity, smoking, and drinking too much alcohol raise your risks of hypertension. Diabetes, gout, and kidney disease also raise your high blood pressure risks. Foods high in sodium, like just about anything canned and any frozen entrees, increase your blood pressure. Reading the sodium content on food labels is usually shocking. The good news is that the medications for high blood pressure work well, once you and your health care provider have the right medication and dose figured out. Fresh fruits and vegetables, low fat diet, drinking in moderation and regular physical activity can help lower your blood pressure or prevent it from rising. Exercise and healthy eating can make a big difference. Even a small weight loss can bring the numbers down. It helps to keep a record of your blood pressures and bring it to your medical appointments. That way your health care provider can see what your blood pressure has been in your daily life, not just when you are in his or her office. You can purchase a home blood pressure monitor at drugstores and medical supply stores. You can also get it checked at most firehouses and drugstores. Think of it as akin to a speedometer that tells you how you are doing. Tips to help you calm hypertension Dr. Nancy Rudner LugoHealth Action

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Page 16 | Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer More than 300 attendees at Healthy Liv ing Expo, earlier this month Our Whole Community, a collaborative of faith-based organizations that shares resources and promotes health and wholeness in the community, recently held its second annual Healthy Living Expo earlier this month. More than 300 people attended, an increase from last years event. OWC administered almost 100 free health assessments from the University of Central Florida College of Nursing and other health professional community volunteers, provided healthy eating, dance and gardening demonstrations, as well as had speakers present on mind, body and spirit. More than 30 healthy living vendors were also present to speak to attendees about products and services. OWC thanks Healthy Living Expo sponsors and partners: the city of Winter Park, UCF College of Nursing, VHB planning With the support of these partners and volunteers, OWC was able to provide a day full of education, experiences and fun, all based on health and wholeness. With OWCs signature event over, OWC will now concentrate on projects such as the development and distribution of a free healthy ministry manual, garden programs for the community and the sharing of resources for OWC partners. If your faithbased organization is interested in becoming a partner, visit OurWholeCommunity. org or email owc_ed@me.com. Please visit OurWholeCommunity.org for a calendar of programs, seminars, etc. Here are the spring garden programs: at the Our Whole Community Garden at Winter Park Presbyterian Church, 400 S. Lakemont Ave., Winter Park. Garden entrance is on Dundee Drive. 9 11 a.m., Our Whole Community Garden, 550 W. Morse Blvd., Winter Park. Garden entrance is on Welbourne Avenue St. Mary Magdalen Learning Garden, 869 Maitland Ave., Altamonte Springs. Garden is by the Annex. For more information, email Leah Nash at owc_ed@me.com, or call 407-758-5324. Our Whole Community, a 501(c)(3) noncommunities together to establish rela tionships and share resources resulting in innovative programs that inspire, motivate and educate individuals in their pursuit of optimal health. For more information on OWC, please visit ourwholecommunity. org. Our Whole Community is pleased to contribute monthly to the Winter Park Ob server. Email owc_ed@me.com for inqui ries about OWC.It takes more than Sudoku and a bowl of blueberries to build a healthy brain. While both are good for you, chances are people dont know why, or even if what they hear about these or other brain boosters are true. That is why the Alzheim ers Association Central and North Florida Chapter, with a grant from the Winter Park Health Foundation, launched an innovative brain health initiative focused on providing information that separates myth from sciencesupported facts so people at any age can become knowledgeable and motivated to make brain health a priority throughout life. On March 15, family members of all ages will get the chance to celebrate the brain and all its wonders at BrainFest, a free, day-long event be ginning at 10 a.m. at the Rachel D. Murrah Civic Center located at 1050 W. Morse Blvd. in Winter ment and activities, the program will promote the six pillars of brain health: healthy eating, exercise, socialization, stress reduction, lifelong learning and purposeful living. Florida Hospital is sponsoring the keynote speaker, Chris Nowinski, a former professional wrestler and author of the book, Head Games: Footballs Concussion Crisis. Mr. Nowinski is the founder of the Sports Legacy Institute created to advance the study, treatment and prevention of the effects of brain trauma in athletes and other at-risk groups. He is nationally known for his work in raising awareness of the connection between brain trauma in sports (primarily concussion) and the subsequent development of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a form of neurodegenerative disease leading to dementia. His work gained additional national attention on the recently aired PBS news show, Frontline. An expert on concussion related research, Mr. Nowinskis message is a must for parents, students and coaches involved in team sports activities. In addition to Chris Nowinski who speaks at 10 a.m., the BrainFest has a full schedule of activities offering attendees a variety of ways to challenge their minds and boost their brainpower. Creative catalyst and master facilitator, Bob Kodzis, of Flight of Ideas, will lead a series of interactive games and chal lenges, including improvisational acting that explores present moment awareness and quick thinking. Dr. Ariel Cole of the Centre for Aging and Wellness at Florida Hospital will speak on the Prevention of Dementia from a Medical Perspective at 1 p.m., and Beverly Engel from the Alzheimers Association, Central & North Florida Chapter will present How to Become Your Own Brain Health Coach at 3 p.m. Throughout the day attendees will learn tips and tricks for keeping the brain healthy by participating in the Brain Olympics, challeng ing yourself and your friends in the Big Room of Brain Teasers or by participating in a myriad of mind-bending activities such as bio-feedback, exercise challenges, meditative practices, drumming circles, guided games and much more. Dont miss out! To register for this event, go to: act.alz.org/brainfest or call 1-800-272-3900. By Beverly Engel, program coordinatorOver 300 attendees at Healthy Living Expo, earlier this monthCelebrate the brain and all its wonders at BrainFestGENETICS | Finding hidden health problemslooking for something wrong with you or something that we can improve. Then, they create an action plan to im prove the clients health and make any necessary appointments with specialists they might need for that day or the next. Health is really important right now, and if you could identify any issues or problems ahead of time and prevent it from happening, thats the best way to live your life, said Krystle Nguyen, health ambassa dor at WPHA. Kurd underwent the assessment herself and found that she had a heart abnormal ity. She had no symptoms or family history, and without the tests probably wouldve found out when it was too late to make a difference in her health, she said. Because of her results, shes exercising and eating better to keep her heart healthy. And thats what they hear from most clients that theyve been motivated to get healthier because of the assessment. Some even say it saved their lives, especially those who found they had cancer only because of go ing to their WPHA appointment. The staff said they are happy to be in a position to help people improve their health before they get sick, not after. Kurd said that preventative care is the future of healthcare. Preventative care gives you a better quality of life, and you are more productive at the end of the day, and thats the bottom line, Alamo said. CONTINUED FROM PAGE 14 at Winter Park Towers Your room is waiting for you if you need Pain and Symptom Management Hospital Follow-up Complex Treatments, or Crisis Care Referrals 866-742-6655#5019096 www.cornerstonehospice.org www.SeriousIllness.org/cornerstoneMedicare, Medicaid, most commercial insurances accepted DEAR PAWSS CORNER: I read a report this week that said more and more pets are being treated for marijuana poison ing from accidentally ingesting their owners medically prescribed marijuana. Is this true? Why havent we heard more about it? Con cerned in CaliforniaDEAR CONCERNED: As the number of states that allow medical marijuana to be prescribed increases, its likely you will hear more stories about pets being affected by ingesting this drug. A recent NBC News report estimated that calls to the ASPCAs Animal Poison Control Center reporting pet poisonings increased 30 percent between 2009 and 2013. However, TIME magazine disputes that report, noting that the actual number of calls increased from 213 in 2009 to about 320 last year a very small percentage of the 18,000 total calls the APCC gets each year from own ers. My take on the issue is this: Marijuana is a drug, so owners need to use common sense. You wouldnt leave other prescriptions lying around for the dog or cat to eat. So dont leave your stash lying around. Further, many patients use baked goods to ingest mari juana rather than smoking it. Pot brownies, for example, contain chocolate, which is severe symptoms when eaten. The APCC gets far more calls about poisoning from chocolate ingestion than from any other substance, TIME noted. That said, pet owners who see or suspect their dog or cat has ingested marijuana should contact their veterinarian for advice. They also should watch their pet for unusual symp toms, such as lethargy, excessive drooling, diarrhea or incontinence, and take them to the vet immediately if they begin experiencing these or any other problems. Send your questions or comments to ask@ pawscorner.com. Did you know mosquitos can transmit heartworm larvae to dogs, but eas dont? Find out more in my new book, Fighting Fleas, available now. 2013 King Features Synd. Inc.Pets, pot dont mix

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014 | Page 17 One Senior Place ... See our full Calendar of Events at OneSeniorPlace.com407.949.6733715 Douglas Avenue Altamonte Springs, FL 32714M-F 8:30am 5pmHEALTHY LIVING DAY! At One Senior Place Friday, February 21 10am 1pm *Information & resources, health screenings, lectures, u shots, hearing tests and more. MONDAY, FEBRUARY 24 Senior Club Sponsored by Family Physicians Group Every Monday, 10am 12pm February 24th Casino Day The Real Estate Specialists are IN! 10am-1pm Presented by EXIT Real Estate Results By Appointment Only 407.949.6714 TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 25 Truth about Estate Planning 9:30am-12noon By The Law Ofces of Hoyt & Bryan RSVP 407.977.8080 Truth about Medicaid Planning 2pm-4pm By The Law Ofces of Hoyt & Bryan RSVP 407.977.8080 WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 26 Health Care Reform 2pm-3:30pm By LTC Advisors RSVP 407.949.6722 Is it Memory Loss or Something More? 9:30am-10:30am By Compass Research RSVP 407.218.5974 Hearing Aids Users Improve Relationships & Self Image! 3pm-4:30pm Presented by Harmony Hearing Centers of America RSVP 407.949.6737 THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 27 Matter of Balance 2:30pm-4:30pm By VITAS Innovative Hospice Care RSVP 407.599.2522 Daughters Missing Mothers 6pm-7:30pm By VITAS Innovative Hospice Care RSVP 407.691.4548Calendar of Events February 2014 Mindfulness and meditation are gaining traction in 2014. TIME magazines February cover story is about the practice, searches for the terms have doubled in less than two years, and corporations are increasingly adding mindfulness practices into their well ness programs. This is really good news. If theres one thing our stressed out, ex hausted, emotionally wrought, hyper cul ture needs today, its the practice of mind fulness. Mindfulness gives us the courage to live our truth, and the inner guidance to deal with day-to-day stresses. Life goes on but with the help of mindfulness, there is more joy, clarity, creativity and energy. But mindfulness needs a few solid foundations. If any of the three main pil lars of mindfulness are weak, then going within and touching that blissful silence is not only challenging but also impos sible. Lets take a look at these three aspects and what we can do to balance them in our lives.The right foodThere are two aspects to this that need addressing. First, lets talk about the kind of foods that steer us away from our center. Foods that sedate, numb or intoxi cate are going to come in the way. While alcohol comes right up on top, there are other foods that add to the acidity of the body, creating hurdles to our experience of higher consciousness. These include chemical-laden, heavy foods. If you eat something and dont feel vibrant and alive a few hours after eating it, then its probably the wrong food for you. The journal and track what you eat and how you feel. The second thing about food is the state of our mind when eating, which is equally, if not more important that the food itself. The same food, eaten joyously, lovingly and in gratitude will have a different impact on the body-mind than eating with sadness, anxiety and/or stress. Sharing a meal with loved ones will nourish us differently from a meal eaten in the car on the way to work. The right movementLack of physical activity has com pletely disconnected us from our bod ies and the intuition it brings with it. This disconnect is costing us dearly, from physical ailments to psychological issues. Add to that the tremendous amount of food (not necessarily nu trition-dense) that we have access to 24/7, and we are an unhealthy bunch of people. For mindfulness, movement has cause movement allows for centering opportunities. Energy from the brain starts moving downwards and with that, balance and harmony within our being are possible. If youre a runner, you know that in those moments when your body is in motion, there is no room for thought, contemplation or worry. Movement lets the experience of nomind occur and is therefore a very pow erful building block for mindfulness. Movement can range from simple household activities (doing the dishes, carrying children around, taking the stairs) to more active styles such as running and working out at the gym. Dance, yoga, Pilates, Tai Chi, Chi Gong are all forms of movement that support the energy to move from the head to the navel, also called our second brain. I often us the analogy of dating: you have to try out a bunch of different few classes or try some DVDs at home to see which style resonates with you and makes you feel vibrant and energetic. The right sleepWith disorganized food and exercise patterns, is it any surprise that were a nation (and planet) riddled with sleep disorders? According to the Centers for Dis ease Control and Prevention, Persons also more likely to suffer from chronic diseases such as hypertension, diabetes, depression, and obesity, as well as from cancer, increased mortality, and reduced quality of life and productivity. Theres a reason for that. The liver carries out some serious work in our sleep, especially between 10 p.m. and 2 that we ingest during the day. If the liver isnt able to complete its job, the toxins return to the blood stream and circulate, causing imbalances and in turn a host of disorders. This capacity to regain and recoup during the night, what has been lost in the day, is central to our physical and psychological health. While there are guidelines for how much sleep is required, every body is different and other factors, such as age, play a role as well. Eastern wisdom recommends waking up with the sun because with the rising sun the bodys temperature begins to rise as well, but I recommend experimentation and com ing to your own conclusions. By balancing these areas in our lives we have a good shot at enjoying the bliss of mindfulness. Hows your foundation looking?The three pillars of mindfulness $10.00 OFF Initial Purchase $100 or more CANADIAN MEDS SAVE UP TO 80% on Prescription Drug PricesORDER by phone No Store Visit required Advair Benicar Celebrex Cialis Crestor Cymbalta Flomax Levitra Lexapro Lipitor Nexium Spiriva Viagra Zetia CALL for a FREE Quote! We Ship Anywhere in the U.S.A. Locally owned & operated. 744 South US Hwy 441 Lady Lake, FL 32159(352) 633-3301 shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM here should be more to life than maintenance-free living. To learn more about our community in Kissimmee, call (407) 933-1999. Savannah Court and Cove Excellence in Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation 1301 W. Maitland Blvd. Maitland, FL 32751407-645-3990www.SavannahCourtMaitland.comAssisted Living Facility License No. 8447 Skilled Nursing Facility License No. 1635096 Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above. You are always welcome!A Senior Living Community where Hospitality is a Way of Life. Puja Madan is a womens health coach, writer and speaker. She has received her training from the world-renowned Institute for Integrative Nutrition, New York. Puja offers powerful health and wellness programs for young women, in person or online, empowering them through healthier food and lifestyle choices. Puja practises Yoga and meditation daily and believes that all inner growth starts with a love affair with oneself! For more information visit www. innerscientist.com or www.facebook. com/innerscientist

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014 | Page 19Tonight through March 30 Busytown (for children of all ages) Richard Scarrys stories and characters come to life in Busy town through March 30 at the Orlando Repertory Theatre. Using imaginative music and movement, Huckle Cat takes the audience on a tour of his neighborhood introducing Farmer Pig and Grocer Cat, Construc tion Worker, and Fire Chief all working together to keep Busytown busy. For children of all ages, call 407-896-7365 or visit orlandorep.comFeb. 21 to March 2 The Orlando Premiere of Terminus The Empty Spaces Theatre Co(llaboration) will present Mark ORowes darkly visceral and very Irish work Terminus at the Shakespeare Center from Feb. 21 to March 2. The often hilarious and always-surprising lonely young woman, a guiltyoung man living in a world of singing serial killers, avenging angels and lovesick demons. First produced at the Abbey Theatre in Dublin in 2007, call 407-328-9005 for reservations.Feb. 21 and 22 Concertos by Candlelight: Vivaldi and BachThe 2014 Concertos by Candlelight presents a playful and passionate program featuring Vivaldis Bassoon Concerto and Credo for choir coupled with violinist Lara St. John performing Bachs Violin Concerto No. 1 and Violin Concerto No. 2 with the Bach Festival Orchestra. Per formances are set for Feb. 21 and 22 at 7:30 p.m. at Rollins College. Call 407-646-2182 or visit bachfesFeb. 22 A tribute to Louis Armstrong Since 1989 Byron Striplings tribute to Louis Satchmo Armstrong has been performed before 50 orchestras throughout the United States. Striplings trumpet virtuosity and vocal stylings have brought classics like Sweet Georgia Brown and Minnie the Moocher to audiences at Lincoln Center and Carnegie Hall. In two perfor mances, on Feb. 22 at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m., Stripling will join the Orlando Philhar monic at the Bob Carr PAC to celebrate the musicianship, wit and showmanship of Louis Armstrong. Call 407-477-1700 or visit orlandophil.org Feb. 22 Live from Orlando Its Science Night Live!Us grown-ups get to take over the Orlan do Science Center when its reserved strictly for adults at Science Night Live on Feb. 22 at 8 p.m. Guests will celebrate Thomas Edisons birth day by witnessing the electrifying High Voltage show; experience the premiere of Flight of the view stars and planets through the giant telescope in the Obser vatory; conduct lab experiments in Dr. Dares Laboratory; delight in food and adult beverages; and engage in science trivia to win prizes. Dress code is casual science nerd. Call 407-514-2000 or visit osc.org/snlFeb. 22 Cocina 214s Margarita Madness Recipe ContestFrozen, on the rocks or straight up with a salted rim margaritas are the libation of choice on Feb. 22 at 6:30 p.m. as Cocina 214 celebrates National Josh Garrick Culture for your calendar Please see CULTURE on page 20 Porte Noire is a community of independent cosmetology, health and wellness professionals. Now Reserving Private Studios 407-472-3732 PorteNoire.com Register before our Grand Opening on March 1st and receive 25% Off your first months registration. Call Now: 407-745-5661 March 1st 11:00AM 2:00PM Bring the kids to try out our gymnastics, batting cages, and rock wall. Tour our facility, meet our profesional staff, and enjoy drawings every 30 minutes for free classes, parties, boot camps, sports nutrition products, and MUCH MORE! www The o rlan d o athletics com 1984 W. New Hampshire St. Orlando, Florida 32804 College Park Its TAX time. Appointments Available 7 Days a Week!Tax Form Processing LLC4070 Aloma Ave., Suite 1010 Winter Park, FL 32792Tel: (407) 657-6336www.TaxFormProcessing.com Proudly Serving the Orlando Area for 19 years! Scan QR Code 40$00OffTax PreparationMust present this coupon at time service is provided. Offer valid for one-time use. Cannot be combined with any other offer. Expires April 15, 2014Offer Code: CFS14 CONCERTOS BY CANDLELIGHT TRIBUTE TO ARMSTRONG

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Page 20 | Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Margarita Day with the Margari ta Madness Recipe Contest. Con tenders submit margarita recipes for a chance to win a $100 gift card and have their recipe fea tured on the drink menu. The top three contestants will go headto-head, making their margarita recipes at the celebration with complimentary samples offered from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Cocina 214 is at 151 E. Welbourne Ave. in Winter Park. Visit Cocina214.com or call 407-790-7997.Feb. 22 and 23 Downtown (Orlando) Food & Wine Fest The annual Downtown Food & Wine Fest is set for Feb. 22 (noon to 9 p.m.) and Feb. 23 (noon to 7 p.m.) for the thousands of foodies and wine-lovers who wish to experience unique cuisine paired with wines from around the globe. Located in Orlando at Lake Eola, the twoday Fest features tastings from 40 of Orlandos premier restaurants, wine tastings, and live entertainment. New for 2014 are ticket choices that include the Ultimate Fest Experience, the Wine Tast ers Club, and the VIP Bottle Service at The Liquid Lounge. Call 407-919-1048 or visit DowntownFoodAndWineFest.comFeb. 23 Youth Orchestra presents Celebration of Music Education Concert In a concert featuring perfor mances from three of the orga nizations orchestras, the Florida Symphony Youth Orchestra will honor music educators for the life-changing work they do every day. By celebrating the key role music education plays in the lives of youths, the audience can experience and appreciate the merits of the players and the educators that have inspired them. The Celebration of Music Education Concert will take place on Feb. 23 at 3 p.m. at the College Park Baptist Church at 1914 Edgewater Drive in Orlando. Tickets are $8 to $16. Call 407-999-7800. CULTURE | Like food and wine? This is your weekend to try the best stuff that Orlando has to offer CONTINUED FROM PAGE 19 Please see CULTURE on next page E and caterers, as well as beer, wine and desserts r A DIVISION OF VS MEDIA GROUP, INC. rfrntbtnrfntrbtntrrrnfnrttrrn rfnbbffrbbfbrrfbfbnnrbfnbtbnbtbbfrb bfbttrfbrbrtbf btfrbrbtnfrnfrnrnbff frnbbrbfrbffrfrbbfrbfrbrrffb fbn rfntbttbbttttttb Rooted & grounded in Jesus Christ. The Learning Tree is a Ministry of First Baptist Church of Winter ParkWe offer Full-Day Infant Care and Childcare Year-Round, Preschool Classes, Summer Camp, and much more! 1021 New York Avenue N., Winter Park, Florida 32789 Established in 1972 we are celebrating 41 years of service this year. WAR HORSE

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014 | Page 21Feb. 25 to March 2 War Horse on the Broadway Series War Horse is a World War I drama of courage, loyalty and friendship, playing for one week on the Orlando Broadway Series. Joey, young Alberts beloved horse, is sold to the cavalry and caught up in an extraordinary journey as Albert, too young to enlist, embarks on a treacher ous mission to bring him home. music and song, packed theaters in London and New York. With the theatricality of life-sized pup pets that bring to life galloping horses, call 800-448-6322 for your tickets. Feb. 26 Chili for Charity The Rotary Club of Winter Parks Chili for Charity event returns with creative chili recipes with a Winter Park attitude. Local restaurants, caterers and businesses compete for the coveted Peoples Choice award while having their dishes evaluated by a panel of judges as live entertainment, drinks, dessert and a live auction round out the evening at the Winter Park Farm ers Market. 4 Rivers Smokehouse, Marlows Tavern, and The Meat House are three of the more than dozen competitors in this upscale chili cook-off set for Feb. 26 beginning at 5:30 p.m. Feb 26 Wine & Wit: A roast celebrating Dick BatchelorRaise your glasses to toast (and roast) one of Central Floridas most respected and ad mired community leaders Dick Batchelor, a former member of the Florida House of Representatives and current businessman, political analyst, and child advocate. The evening will include live music, a special menu from 4Rivers Smokehouse and The COOP with live cooking demonstration by Chef John Rivers, silent auction and the entertaining roast honoring Dick Batchelor. Beginning at 6 p.m. at Quantum Leap Winery in Orlando, the Roastmaster is Scott Maxwell of the Orlando Sentinel. Other roasters include Mayor Teresa Jacobs, Mayor Buddy Dyer, Congressman Lou Frey, Mark NeJame and more. Call 407-2150095, ext. 211, or email mdearth@ Feb. 28 Don Quixote by the Moscow Festival BalletRich in Spanish tradition (and Russian ballet bravado), Don Quixote (the ballet) brings Cer vantes masterpiece to life in the timeless story of an aging knight and his imaginary adventures. Setting out to rescue the lady of his dreams, Don Quixote leads a charge against invisible rivals, puppets and windmills. The Moscow Festival Ballet merges the highest classical elements of the great Bolshoi and Kirov Ballet companies at the Peabody Auditorium in Daytona Beach for one performance only at 7 p.m. on Feb. 28. Call 386-253-2901 or visit dbss.org Looking ahead with the gener ous chefs of Central Florida March 1 Appetite for the Arches On March 1, Central Floridas creativity for a great cause at Ronald McDonald House Charities of Central Floridas Appetite for the Arches fundraising event. At this event, participating chefs from more than a dozen restaurants will use McDonalds ingredients to create palate-pleasing dishes for guests to sample. In addition to the food, guests will enjoy drinks, live music, a silent and a live auction. Ronald McDonald House provides a home and care to families with children receiving treatment at local hospitals in Orlando. Visit ronaldmcdonaldhouseorlando. org/events.March 6 Books and Cooks to benet the Winter Park Public LibraryThe Alfond Inn is the setting for an evening of celebrity chefs signing their books to support the Winter Park Public Library. Featuring John Rivers of 4 Rivers Smokehouse, Brandon Mc Glamery of Prato and Luma on Park, Norman Van Aken of Normans at the Ritz-Carlton, Richard Gonzmart of Columbia Restaurants, and Hollis Wilder of Sweet By Holly. The $25 ticket includes the authors panel at The Alfond Inn, a bourbon cocktail (recipe by John Rivers), and gourmet snacks by Luma on Park and Sweet By Miss Holly. Contact P. Corkum at pcorkum@wppl.org or call 407-623-3277.CULTURE | Come out and enjoy Wine and Wit, a comedy roast featuring former Florida Rep. Dick Batchelor CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906. KEEP UP WITH MAITLAND NEWS AND EVENTS!www.IndependenceLane.com Facebook.com/ItsMyMaitland BATCHELOR This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORG @EnzianTheater FLORIDA FILM FESTIVAL April 4-13, 2014 Passes and Packages on sale now! Floridalmfestival.com THE PAST Winner! Best Actress, Cannes Film Festival Berenice Bejo Winner! Best Foreign Language Film National Board of Review Fri, Sat, Sun 3:15, 6:30, 9:30 Mon, Wed, Thurs 6:30, 9:30 Tues 6:30Peanut Butter Matinee Family Film: MY DOG SKIPIt is family friendly, only $5, and a special Kids Menu will be offered! Sun 12PM Cult Classics: WATERMELON MAN Tues 9:30

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Page 22 | Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Opinions Chris Jepson PerspectivesOftentimes in life the question is not whether it is going to hurt, but rather how much. The vague sense of unease Ive experi enced the past 45 years over the decline of Happy Days idiom, jumped the shark. deck chairs on the Titanic was of small consolation as the ship sank. How provincial. That is so yesterday. What were Krug 1988, a little orchestral background music and laughter. And, why not? The party aint nearly over. How does one balance what one under stands about Earths ecology, that there are too many humans at the trough and that what we call progress for our species has been unequivocally devastating to the planet? On one hand, the Industrial Revolution has made toaster-ovens and SUVs oh-so essential, but at great expense to our air, land and water. Whether or not you be lieve in climate change is incidental to me denial is indeed an option no one, how ever, can legitimately argue that human activity is not eliminating entire species of I was watching The Daily Show with Jon Stewart last week as he interviewed Elizabeth Kolbert, author of The Sixth Extinction. Granted, The Daily Show is comedy, yet Stewarts topics are seldom funny. Stewart uses humor, sarcasm and derision to comment on todays political, social and economic realities. I recommend his show. Elizabeth Kolbert was making the point that human activity is leading to a sixth extinction. It is a sobering account of what we humans have wrought for the planet and that we continue do so at our peril. Environmentalist Paul Ehrlich described human activity thusly: In pushing other species to extinction, humanity is busy sawing off the limb on which it perches. Hahaha! Too funny, the human condition. Stewart made an observation about Kolberts premise (human activity/specie loss) and then, sarcastically under his breath, said something to the effect that we might as well, Laugh our way to extinction. And, I thought, Hey, uncork the champagne! conversation suggested that 1) A mass extinction caused by human activity is underway; 2) Its inexorable, we really cant stop it even if we try; and 3) What the hell, we might as well laugh about it. No one up to this point in any conversation Ive ever listened to suggested chuckling might be an appropriate response to our killing the planet. I suppose it is gallows humor. Were all gonna swing, might as well hope it doesnt rain, huh? Part of me greatly admires that most human of qualities, the ability to laugh at the tragic. I do. We humans are a resilient lot. I could list what weve lost, what were losing and some will say, Ho-hum, I was never going to make it to the Great Barrier Reef, anyway, or, Hey, Im recycling, what more can I do? And that is the cruel rub, even if we scrubbed clean the envi ronment of our Industrial Revolution(s), 2 billion more human beings are coming on line (this century) wanting their toaster ovens, SUVs, air-conditioning and lipstick. No amount of laughter will make the world more palatable when the monarch whether, but rather.Laughing our way to extinction Jepson is a 27-year resident of Central Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.US Louis Roney Play On! his wife Linda at the home of a good friend. The next time we saw the Russells was at a birthday party where Randy dis played his formidable musical talents both as a singer and saxophonist. Highly versatile, Mr. Russell recently made us a present of no less than a book he has published. The book is a compact history of the United States called American History in No Time, labeled A Quick and Easy Read for the Essentials by Randolph G. Russell (it is purchasable at AmericanHistory InNoTime.com). In my opinion, Russells book would be an asset to anyone who is interested in our national biography. And it might well suit to a T anyone who could be helpful in the hands of those who are seeking citizenship in our country. Mr. Russells brief 108 pages miss few if any tricks in covering all the important historical events in our history and encapsulate everything one would need who is looking for a fact reviewing pre-exam pony. places and well never know the reasons why! When Mark Twain quoted his friend Charles Dudley Warner saying, Everybody talks about the weather but nobody does anything about it, he started many an idle conversation. I have yet to under stand the compelling reason that so many people live in North Dakota. If you live in Florida, you are often inclined to mention the bright warm winter days we enjoy as our usual fare, but you may be ashamed to crow much about the obvious. I think the folks in North Dakota already know the plusses of living in our Sunshine State! When I used to concertize for community concerts all over the U.S., I often won dered why, with so many roads running in all directions, people settled in so many places without any obvious selling points. Still, theres some person at least who lives where theres a house anywhere on the map. seem to know the answers to the questions they ask of most other people but the answers may not be the ones they seek. Writing Play On! through several de cades, I have dared to express my opinion on myriad subjects, knowing that all opinments are famously called, restatements of long-held prejudices. The human mind is amazingly spacious and, concomitantly, amazingly self-serving. Politicians know well the value of setting up their ideas by publicly asking themselves the proper questions. These days, there are many questions about the president and his air we breathe. I dont claim to have the answers to many of lifes conundrums, but I have a plethora of questions: Do I like the president? Thats quite another question. Does it really matter? people which preserve a republic in vigor. A degeneracy in these is a canker which soon eats to the heart of its laws and con stitution. Thomas Jefferson recently, was seven years younger than I, and I remember seeing her in my early teens when she was a prodigious child movie actress. At that time I cared little for girls especially little girl movie stars. W.C. Fields often said, Never go on stage with a dog or a child. Shirley proved the wisdom of that saying many times. A friend of my b.w.s, musical composer Jay Gorney, set Shirley on the top of his piano in a Hollywood movie studio in 1934 and told the producer, Here is your new child Stand Up and Cheer. The rest is history. Everything Shirley did in her long useful life was the real McCoy, and she had no diminishing vulnerabilities. She delivered the goods powerfully as an actress and later as a diplomat for her country. Along the way she worked for presidents Nixon, Ford, Reagan and H. W. Bush, and in their service she was never called upon to sing or to tap dance. government than is necessary, too many parasites living on the labor of the industrious. Thomas Jefferson In no time, et al. About Roney: HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney) Sometimes there is no greater pleasure than spending an afternoon reading a good book. I read as much as I can, partic broken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption by Laura Hillenbrand. The book details the struggle of American airman Louis Zamperini who during the Second World War. Another great book is Patrick D. Smiths book A novel chronicles three generation of a family that settled in Florida in the 1850s and gradually left their rural lifestyle behind as their success and wealth grew. It is one of my favorite books and a must read for every Florida resident. You can read great books like these and many others at one of the Orange County Library Systems many branches countywide. Our library system has items for nearly every interest. Our librarys collection houses more than 1.7 million individual cals. You can download e-books, music, videos and 250 magazines titles from the librarys website, ocls.info You can even have items dropped off at your doorstep free of charge. Simply check out items via the library website or by phone at 407-8357323. To return an item, simply mail it back or drop it off at your nearest branch. the Albertson Library opened in 1920. Since then, the library system has expanded to 15 branches. The current main library in downtown Orlando was opened in 1966 and has grown to the size of a city block. The number of library branches has doubled since 1980 to meet the needs of Orange Countys ever growing popula tion. Today, the library system has a staff of 350 and a budget of $35.3 million per year. The library offers many other services as well. Our library system has the largest Finding a good book Ted EdwardsCommissioners Cornergenealogy collection in the Southeastern United States. The library also runs the Orlando Memory archive to document stories, images, and personal recollec tions of Orlando residents of years past. The library hosts approximately 1,000 seminars and educational programs per month across all of its 15 locations ranging from arts and cultural events, activities for children and teens, technology classes, and musical programs. Earlier this month, the downtown library opened the Dorothy Lumley Melrose Center for Technology, Innovation & Creativity. The center provides hands on experience with audio and video recording and mixing, fabrication using a 3D printer, and various computer programs from QuickBooks to Photoshop. The Orange County Library System has branches within easy reach of most District 5 residents. Residents of the northwestern part of the district, including Maitland, the west side of Winter Park, and College Park can access the Eatonville branch at 200 E. Kennedy Blvd. and the Edgewater branch at 5049 Edgewater Drive. Downtown, Baldwin Park, and southern Winter Park residents are within a short distance away from the downtown main library at 101 E. Central Blvd. and the Herndon Branch at 4324 E. Colonial Drive. Residents on the east side can visit the Alafaya branch at 12000 E. Colonial Drive. Additionally, both the City of Winter Park and the City of Maitland operate their own libraries, which offer similar services. They are located at 460 East New England Ave. in Winter Park, and 501 S. Maitland Ave. in Maitland, respectively. With so many locations and programs available, I hope you will take advantage of all our public libraries have to offer. Our library is a symbol of Orange Countys commitment to improving the quality of life for our residents. If you need assis obtaining a library card, or have any other questions or concerns about county government, please feel free to contact me or my staff, Edgar Robinson and Lynette Rummel. We can be reached at 407-836-

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014 | Page 23 WPMObserver.com OBSERVERJust Sold Homes SUNDAY 12-3 NEW PRICE! BEAUTIFULLY UPDATED WP HOME 1689 Hibiscus Ave, Winter Park. 4BD/3BA, 2,851 SF. New kitchen with granite 2007, 3 new ACs in 2007, 2nd master suite downstairs, wood floors, spacious updated master bath with 2 sinks, gran ite, shower & separate tub plus bonus room off master! Large screened porch opens to backyard. Screened porch off front downstairs bedroom & off master suite upstairs. $499,000 SUNDAY 1-4 MEDITERRANEAN TOWNHOME ON TREE LINED STREET 541 Fairfax Avenue, Winter Park. 3BD/2.5BA, 2,095SF. Light and bright townhome with vaulted ceilings, wood floors, bonus loft and a private court yard. Large downstairs master bedroom with fireplace and French door access to courtyard. Large eat-in kitchen with breakfast nook. New interior paint, new carpet and refinished wood floors. Over sized two car garage. Great location just blocks from Park Avenue. $450,000 OPEN AND UPDATED LAKEFRONT HOME 520 Lake Shore Drive, Maitland. 3BD/3BA, 2,463SF. Magnificent views of Lake Faith! Custom kitchen opens to living and dining areas with vaulted pine ceilings for ideal open floor plan. Enor mous Florida room with brick and granite bar. Large windows and bamboo flooring throughout. Beautiful open back porch and paver patio. Move-in ready! $499,000 GREAT HOME IN AVALON PARKS SOUTH VILLAGE 4145 Cummings Street, Orlando. 3BD/2BA, 2,339SF. Open kitchen with stainless steel appliances. Wonderful tile flooring throughout all the living areas. Spacious master suite with walk in closet and garden tub. Tremendous bonus room upstairs. Fantastic outdoor space with pavered patio area, pergola, built-in fire pit and relandscaped backyard. $295,000 SECLUDED MAITLAND POOL HOME 431 W Sybelia Avenue, Maitland. 5BD/4.5BA, 3,903SF. Large master suite opens to the pool area. Split floor plan. Hardwood and Mexican tile flooring. Gor geous kitchen with granite countertops. Two bedrooms are upstairs with shared bath. Privacy wall behind home. $579,000 Sunday, February 23rd 405 Lakewood Drive, Winter Park FL 32789 4 BR | 3 BA | 4,208 SF | $3,220,000 Exquisite lakefront estate on the Winter Park Chain of Lakes. Designer gourmet kitchen, private master retreat, Travertine tile & Brazilian walnut floors. Incredible outdoor living space with fireplace over looking the lake. No expense was spared in the design and creation of this mag nificent home. Hosted by: Rhonda Chesmore with Kelly Price & Company from 1-4 PM 1700 E. Winter Park Road, Winter Park FL 32789 3 BR | 2 BA | 1,438 SF | $349,000 Two story home on a tree lined street in Winter Park! Corner lot with a driveway on Lake Sue Road. Hardwood floors and updated master bath. Cozy kitchen has stainless steel appliances and granite counter tops. Hosted by: Renee Dee Morgan with Kelly Price & Company from 2-4 PM 1003 Fleck Avenue, Orlando FL 32804 2 BR | 1 BA | 986 SF | $132,000 Enjoy a quiet, College park neighbor hood with access to Big Lake Fairview! Situated on a corner lot, this home fea tures hardwood flooring, fresh paint, new kitchen appliances, new plumbing and updated electrical. Lake access for an amazing price! Hosted by: Jennifer JJ Mackle with Kelly Price & Company from 1-4 PM 1531 Mizell Avenue, Winter Park FL 32789 2 BR | 2 BA | 1,265 SF | $849,999 One of a kind property on a perfectly manicured double lot in sought-after Syl van Lake Shores neighborhood! Nestled on the west side of the property is a two bedroom, two full bath bungalow and sparkling pool. The east side of the prop erty has been transformed into a tranquil park-like setting including hidden garden arbor, and rose bushes. Hosted by: Amanda Geller with Kelly Price & Company from 1-4 PM 323 Hermitage Drive, Altamonte Springs FL 32701 4 BR | 2 BA | 1,962 SF | $275,000 Spectacular pool home on a picturesque street! Open kitchen has been remod eled with an under-counter wine fridge, designer lighting, Silestone countertops and custom cherry wood cabinets. Fam ily room has sliding glass doors that lead Wendy Williams Crumit 788 Brightwater Cir, Maitland $575,000. 02/11/2014 Catherine DAmico 1510 Mizell Ave, Winter Park $450,000. 02/12/2014 Wendy Williams Crumit 2097 Poinciana Road, Winter Park $252,000. 02/12/2014 John McDade 908 Sweetbriar Road, Orlando $272,000. 02/13/2014 MaryStuart Day/Megan Cross 1736 Bar celona Way, Winter Park $438,500. 02/13/2014 Maria Van Warner 1924 Meeting Place, Orlando $465,000. 02/14/2014 Maria Van WarnerMaria Van Warner 1236 Waterwitch Cove, Orlando $433,000. 02/14/2014 Melissa Woodman 5512 Chenault Ave, Orlando $190,000. 02/14/2014 Maria Van Warner 329 Bahia Cir, Long wood $198,500. 02/14/2014 263 Minorca Beach Way Unit 802, New Smyrna Beach FL 32169 sold by Kelly L. Price with Kelly Price & Company 1691 Palm Avenue, Winter Park FL 32789 sold by Padgett McCormick with Kelly Price & Company 3348 Lakeview Oaks Drive, Long wood FL 32779 sold by Kelly L. Price with Kelly Price & Company 520 Ruffel Street, Maitland FL 32751 sold by Cindy Watson with Kelly Price & Company OBSERVEROpen Houses THE MMARKEt T PLAc C E MindGym February 17, 2014 MindGymFebruary 17, 2014 ANNOUNCEMENTSAbsolute Auction.Ponce de Leon FL. 11+/acres, 21,000+/sq. ft. of improvements near US Hwy 90, offered in 7 parcels February 27, 1:00pm, gtauctions.com, 205.326.0833, Granger,Thagard & Asso ciates, Inc. G.W.Thagard AU2846,AB2100,BK3009116. FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now survive DIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922 rfff ntb t nrrffrnftbrr b brn brrfn bnrr brrfrntnbnnnnbbnnbn frnrfnnrnnttfrftfrfft nnnnfrtfrnb rfntb rf ntand soreness nb naches THG-13903 out to the sunny Florida room. Formal living and dining rooms complete this beautiful home! Hosted by: Debbie Tassell with Kelly Price & Company from 1-4 PM ANNOUNCEMENTSWinter Park Benefit Shop:at 140 Lyman Avenue, Winter Park needs items to sell: clothing, bedding, jewelry, kitchenware/bric-a brac. Need volunteers contact Elizabeth Comer 407647-8276. Open 9:30am-2pm every Tues & Fri (and Sat 10am-2PM). Pro ceeds support childrens programs and the Orlando Blind Assoc.EDUCATIONYou can becomean expert in HVAC installation and repair. Pinnacle Career Institute Online HVAC education in as little as 12 months. Call us today: 1-877-651-3961 or go online: www.HVAC-Online-Education.comFINANCIAL SERVICESAngel Oak Funding has branched out to Winter Park, FLSpecializing in Mortgage Financing. Outside the box products include: Conven tional, FHA, VA & a full suite of Jumbo products all in-house! Equity lines up to 90%. Exclusive product for borrowers one day out of short sale, foreclosure & bankruptcy. Angel Oak Funding, LLC 321-689-8402 lee.foster@angeloakfunding.com HEALTH & MEDICALLiberation by American Standard Walk-In BathDont Struggle Getting Out Of A Normal Bathtub. Stay in your home longer, safely, independently. Liberation Walk-In Baths Commended by the Arthritis Foundation. Best Lifetime Warranty in the industry. Hydrotherapy, Chromatherapy, Aromatherapy no extra cost. Installation Included!Get $1,000 Off Call Toll-Free Today 1-866-583-1432.HELP WANTEDCDL-A Team Owner Operators:$2,500 Lease Incentive! Team Dedicated Routes. Great Revenue & Regular Weekly Home Time! 888-486-5946 NFI Industries nfipartners.com Now Hiring OTR CDLA Drivers.New Pay Package and $2500 Sign-On Bonus! Mostly 5-10 days out, full bene fits, achievable bonuses. Call for details 1-888-978-3791/apply www.heyl.netMISCELLANEOUSAIRLINE CAREERS begin here Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Finan cial aid for qualified students. Job place ment assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-741-9260 www. FixJets.com MISCELLANEOUSDISH TV Retailer.Starting $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) Broadband Internet starting $14.95/ month (where available.) Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL Now! 1-800-980-6193REAL ESTATE: FOR RENTSANFORD Free standing retail/ office building,2640 SF, great signage & visibility. Lease for $2800 per month (also for sale). Call John, owner/broker, 407-492-7111Winter Park Real Estate Offices for rent(Winter Park/Goldenrod/University). Doc tors office w/5 exam rooms + extra features. Other office units available from 800-3000 SF. New Orleans style bldg; great prices. Call Ann 407-293-1934. an npolasek@cfl.rr.comREAL ESTATE: FOR SALEMobile Homes with acreage.Ready to move in. Seller Financing (sub ject to credit approval). Lots of room for the price, 3Br 2Ba. No renters. 850-3086473 VMFhomes.com New Log Home*on 10+ acres only $89,900 3 Bed, 2 bath log home w direct river access. Convenient to downtown Jacksonville. Excel lent financing. Call now 877-525-3033, x.19 *Constructed weather-tight log home shell. EHO Spectacular Blue Ridge Mtn View.1+ Acre only $14,900! Gorgeous corner parcel in prime No. Georgia location w/ spectacular Blue Ridge Mountain view. Next to U.S. National Forest. Paved roads, municipal water & underground power. Mild restrictions, RV friendly. Call & ask about our FREE overnight stay with tour. Excellent low rate financing. Call now 1-866-952-5303, Ext. 169

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Page 24 | Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer MindGym February 17, 2014 MindGymFebruary 17, 2014 MindGym February 17, 2014 MindGym February 17, 2014 MindGym February 17, 2014 ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Your efforts in behalf of a colleague do not go unnoticed, let alone unappreciated. Meanwhile, arrange to spend more time investigating that troubling fact you recently uncovered. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Devoting a lot of time to a current career move means having less time for those in your private life. But once you explain the circumstances, they should understand and be supportive. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Organizing your many duties in order of importance should help you get through them pretty quickly. Addi tional information puts that still-to-bemade decision in a new light. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Lin gering bad feelings over a recent misunderstanding should fade as recon ciliation efforts continue. Meanwhile, vacation plans might need to be revised because of new developments. LEO (July 23 to August 22) Love dominates the Lions heart this week, with Cupid shooting arrows at single Leos and Leonas looking for romance. Partnered pairs also enjoy strengthened relationships. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Getting to Know You should be the single Virgos theme song as you and that special person discover more about one another. That workplace situation needs looking into. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) You might be upset at having your objectivity questioned in the handling of a dispute. But it would be wise to re-examine your feelings to make sure youre being fair with both sides. SCORPIO (October 23 to Novem ber 21) A family dispute creates mixed feelings about how you hope it will be ultimately resolved. Best advice: Stay out of it and let the involved parties work it through by themselves. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Making an effort to smooth over even the smallest obstacles now will go a long way to assuring that things run smoothly once youre set to move on with your plans. CAPRICORN (December 22 to Jan uary 19) A challenge to your authority can be upsetting, but your longtime supporters want you to defend your position so you can win over even your most adamant detractors. AQUARIUS (January 20 to Febru ary 18) Being unable to get involved in a friends problem calls for an honest approach. Provide explanations, not excuses. Another friend might be able to offer support for your decision. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) You find yourself swimming in circles, looking for some way to get back on a straight course. But things get easier once youre able to refocus your ener gies. BORN THIS WEEK: Youre known for your charm and your wis dom, and theres no one who wouldnt want you to be part of his or her life. 2014 King Features Syndicate March 6, 1475, Michelangelo Buonarroti, the greatest of the Italian Renaissance artists, is born in the vil lage of Caprese. His most important early work was the Pieta (1498), which showed the body of Christ in the lap of the Virgin Mary. He extracted the two perfectly balanced figures of the Pieta from a single block of marble. March 8, 1862, the Confederate ironclad Virginia wreaks havoc on a Yankee squadron off Hampton Roads, Va., when it attacked the U.S.S. Cum berland. Other Union ships fired back, but the shots were, in the words of one observer, having no more effect than peas from a pop-gun. March 3, 1931, President Her bert Hoover signs a congressional act making The Star-Spangled Banner the official national anthem of the United States. In 1814, Francis Scott Key composed the lyrics after witnessing the massive overnight British bombardment of Fort McHenry in Maryland during the War of 1812. March 4, 1944, Louis Lepke Buchalter, the head of Murder, Inc., is executed at Sing Sing Prison in New York. Lepke was the leader of the countrys largest crime syndicate throughout the 1930s. His downfall came when several members of his notorious killing squad became witnesses for the government. March 9, 1959, the first Barbie doll goes on display at the American Toy Fair in New York City. Barbie was the first mass-produced toy doll in the United States with adult features. Barbies appearance was modeled on a doll named Lilli, based on a German comic-strip character, and originally was marketed as a racy gag gift to adult men. March 5, 1977, the Dial-aPresident radio program, featuring President Jimmy Carter and CBS news anchorman Walter Cronkite, airs for the first time. Approximately 9 million calls flooded the radio studio during the two-hour broadcast. March 7, 1987, Mike Tyson defeats James Bonecrusher Smith to unify the WBA and WBC heavy weight titles. At age 20, Tyson became the youngest undisputed heavyweight champion in boxing history. 2014 King Features Synd., Inc. King Features Weekly ServiceFebruary 17, 2014 Its FREE to place estate sales, garage sales and yard sales on this page! Visit WPMObserver .com and click Create Your Classified



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WPMOBSERVER.COM Talks of a minor league base ball team in Winter Park contin ued to take shape over the past 30 days as the City Commission and the citys advisory boards looked at bringing Americas pastime to the city on a profes sional level. Winter Park would be looking to build a 2,500to 3,500-seat sta dium and have a minor league team sign a lease of at least 20 years, City Manager Randy Knight said. Rollins College and a Florida Collegiate Summer League team would potentially use the stadium as well. City staff has been in commu nication with the Brevard Mana the Milwaukee Brewers. Team owner and Winter Park resident Tom Winters hopes to bring the Manatees to the city, eyeing a stadium opening at the start of the spring 2015 season. But the City Commission mutually agreed 2015 may be too soon at their work session on Monday, hoping to avoid rush ing into a major agreement by sticking with 2016 instead. Im worried about the tail wagging the dog, City Com missioner Steve Leary said. I want to make sure were doing whats right for the city. If we want minor league baseball and we think baseball is important for the citizens of Winter Park and the region, I think it needs to go where we want it to go in the timeframe we want it to go in. Commissioners looked at what they believed to be the four strongest sites for a baseball sta dium: Rollins Harper Shepherd Field, Martin Luther King Jr. Park, the incoming Ravaudage development, and the Votech property owned by Orange County Public Schools along U.S. Highway 17-92. The Ravaudage property seemed most appealing to City Commissioner Carolyn Cooper despite it being the most expen USPS 00-6186 Publisher statement on page 4. VISIT WPMOBSERVER.COM SUBSCRIBE NOW! A WILD NIGHT AND A WRECKING BALL LIFESTYLES, 10 Hows your health? Checkups go higher tech. HEALTHY LIVING, 14 A trip to Busytown Richard Scarrys stories hit the stage at the Orlando Rep. CULTURE, 15 COMMUNITY BULLETIN ............ 4 CALENDAR .................... 4 LIFESTYLES .................... 8 SPORTS ..................... 12 HEALTHY LIVING ................ 14 CULTURE ..................... 19 OPINIONS .................... 22 CLASSIFIEDS .................. 23 A sewer pipe beneath the fu ture site of the historic Capen House may slow down the ef fort to reunite the split home on its new foundation a potential holdup that would hang on do nations from local residents. Plans to place the house on the grounds of the Albin Polasek Mu seum and Sculpture Garden hit a snag as early as December when construction workers discovered the 60-year-old manhole and sewer line. Future concerns about repair ing the old clay pipes with the house already in place forced general contractor Frank Roark to pursue installing new piping, which would circumvent the Polasek Museum Executive Director Debbie Komanski said that estimates to redirect the sewer line range from $12,000 to $50,000, which would need to be raised before the pipe can be ad dressed. That obviously wasnt a bud get item that anybody foresaw back last August when we started this, Komanski said. The manhole had been cov ered up for years. The Polasek Museum raised more than $400,000 in donations since last summer to move the house from its original location by Dec. 31 and save it from demo lition. The extra funding needed to move the sewer pipe shouldnt take long to raise, Komanski said. But fundraising has slowed down since the Capen House arrived on the Polasek Museum grounds in December. The project still needs between $100,000 and $150,000 to get the house com pletely rebuilt and refurbished, Komanski said. The remaining funding need ed for the project back in De cember sat within that range at $120,000 to $130,000, the Observ er reported Dec. 11. The projects success in saving the home from demolition may be the reason fundraising has slowed down since then, Koman ski said. The real crisis of the demoli tion ball was passed, Koman ski said. Fundraising has gone rather quiet as of the years end. People who were going to make donations have made them ear lier. PHOTO BY TIM FREED THE OBSERVER Two halves of the Capen House wait for a foundation after nding a buried obstacle. Capen hits snag A sewer line buried for decades threatens the moving houses TIM FREED Observer staff Please see SEWER on page 2 With hopes of spurring de velopment interest in the citys yet-to-be-realized downtown district, the Maitland City Coun cil declared two more city-owned plots of land open for business last week. The site of the old city hall building and the parking lot just north of it across Horatio Avenue were declared open for develop ment at a special Community Re development Agency meeting on Feb. 12. Adding the two addition al parcels to the re-developable area, the city hopes, will spur new interest in the downtown areas other available plots, such as the dilapidated Winn-Dixie out front of City Hall and up and down U.S. Highway 17-92. I see that property as useful to the extent of increasing other development, Councilman John Lowndes said. I dont see it as a If I build it they will come devel opment. In addition to approving the sites for redevelopment, Lowndes included four suggestions for de velopers interested in the proper ties in his unanimously approved motion: that developers consider the strong public sentiment in fa vor of leaving some or all of the old city hall site property as open Maitland tries to sell downtown to developers SARAH WILSON Observer staff Please see DOWNTOWN on page 2 A league of Winter Parks own? Minor league baseball stadium takes a step forward. Could it be the Brewers? TIM FREED Observer staff Please see BASEBALL on page 2 407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC Winter Park Recovery CenterExecutive Drug & Alcohol Treatment Protocols Sinclair Method For Alcohol Extinction Suboxone/Subutex For Opioid Abuse Privacy and Confidentiality AssuredMedically Managed Dual Diagnosis Evidenced Based Programs2056 Aloma Ave, Suite 100, Winter Park, FL 32792 www.WinterParkRecoveryCenter.com 407-629-0413

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Page 2 | Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer baseball as a potential boost dur ing the slower summer months for Park Avenue merchants. Time could be of the essence; Another city will likely take the opportunity if Winter Park doesnt, Mayor Ken Bradley said. The City Commission will make a formal decision at its next meeting on Feb. 24 of whether or period of pursuing minor league baseball. SEWER | P ipe could set back project DOWNTOWN | Paradise could be paved to put up parking lot Mayor Ken Bradley expressed concerns during last weeks City Commission meeting with the current pace of major projects within in the city, including the Capen House relocation effort. I dont want to be a year from now looking at two halves to a Capen House, Bradley said. I dont know what we have to do to encourage or if theres anything we can doit seems like some thing should give at some point. Komanski contacted City Man ager Randy Knight earlier that day to see if the city would be willing to move the pipe if the museum reimbursed them for the cost. The city likely wouldnt use any taxpayer dollars to assist with the sewer line work, but Winter Parks help would be the quickest, most ideal route, Komanski said. Winter Park could potentially step in and redirect the pipe for $12,000, Knight said, giving the museum a much better value than the other estimates theyve received. An item requesting approval to help the museum with the sewer line and be reimbursed afterward will go before the City Commis sion at their next meeting, Knight said. Roark should obtain the of putting the house on its founda tion by the end of this week, Ko manski said. The team hopes to solve the sewer line issue quickly and have both pieces of the house on their proper foundation by the end of March. space; that the development plans include one or more adjacent par cels; that there be priority given to plans with retail frontage facing Independence Lane; and that the community favors plans that in clude structured parking. We want to give comfort to the citizens and also be fair to de velopers, whod be wasting their time if they were to come in with something much different than what Ive offered, Lowndes said. Even prior to the Councils ap proval, CRA director Verl Emrick said two developers have been working on preliminary plans for both parcels, one that would in on the old city hall site, and anoth er with plans for small retail shops and a specialty grocer Earth Fare taking up the Horatio-fronted parking lot and the land from there east to U.S. Highway 17-92. Residents speaking out at the meeting were split over the idea of allowing the park-adjacent old city hall property currently serv ing as a parking lot to be rede veloped or whether it should be converted into additional open parkland. Resident Lisa Lewenthal warned the city with the lyrical words of Joni Mitchell about pav ing paradise and putting up a parking lot. We havent created Maitland as a destination, a place where people want to come and spend time. We really have the begin nings of a beautiful central park, Lewenthal said. I really feel we need to think so hard about the decisions we make today and how its going to impact future generations. This is like a game of chess, resident Barry Crooks said. If you make this move of destroy ing this gem of land, youve just check-mated yourself. Others residents argued that with the already-limited amount of land available in the citys downtown district, eliminating the additional land from potential development would further re strict ways for the city to increase its tax base. Resident June Flowers said with Lake Lily and Quinn Strong Park just around the corner, theres no shortage of parkland in the downtown vicinity. To say we need another park instead of getting more tax base, instead of getting someone to of fer money to our city Its crazy, she said. We have such a small foot print to develop our business core, we dont have the luxury of giving that up, resident Renee Stein Charlan added. The vote to open the parcels for business didnt resolve the de bate either way, Mayor Howard Schieferdecker said, it just opens the opportunity for interested de velopers to come in and submit proposals for the property. Every proposed project, he said, will still be subject to full vetting by the City Council and staff. C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE ARCHIVE PHOTO BY REBECCA MALES THE OBSERVER Winter Park ofcials are deciding if the city loves baseball enough to build a stadium. BASEBALL | City reticent to play ball sive. A chance to build off the Millers Ale House and the sur rounding future developments without agitating any nearby neighborhoods seemed like an obvious choice, Cooper said. A more cost-effective approach would be Harper Shepard Field, Knight said, which wouldnt have any land costs and would mean additional stadium funding from Rollins College. The loca tions lack of parking remains the biggest disadvantage. It would cost the city at least $20 million to build a new baseball stadium. The City Com mission would only move ahead with the concept if it were funded through multiple partners, Knight said. Commissioner Sarah Sprinkel scrambled to make it clear that the city wont be using taxpayer dollars to fund a stadium. We are not going to tax our citizens to do this, Sprinkel said. The 45-day baseball discussion period that began last month, made its way to two of the citys advisory boards. Economic Development Advisory Board Chairman Marc Reicher saw C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014 | Page 3 City National Bank is a full service commercial bank. We lent more than $1.75 billion during the last two years.Please visit any of our banking centers from Miami to Orlando or contact us at 1-800-435-8839. Business Term Loans Equipment/Inventory Financing Accounts Receivable Lending Capital Improvement Loans Professional Lines of Credit Small Business Lending Owner-Occupied Commercial Mortgages SBA Loans Residential Mortgages* Home Equity Lines of Credit* citynational.com Member FDIC* Loans are subject to credit and collateral approval. We are really lending We make business happen. 0106-3 CNreallyLndng.indd 1 1/10/14 11:19 AM Maitland City Talk BY HOWARD SCHIEFERDECKER MAYOR More than 50 people attended Maitlands annual Volunteer Ap preciation Celebration event tak ing place at the Maitland City Hall Chambers on Tuesday, Feb. 11. The yearly event, one of my personal favorites, celebrates vol unteers serving on the city of Mai tlands boards. We are very ap preciative of our volunteers who devote countless hours of service to the city of Maitland. Without the unwavering commitment of the volunteer members of our city boards, we would not be able to achieve the goals of our city. Three individuals were recog nized for their service to the Mai tland community. Marc P. Walch received the 2013 Volunteer of the Year Award for his 11 years of service to the Lakes Advisory Board. During his time as chair man and vice chairman of the board, he has been closely involved with numerous projects improving Lake Mait land, Lake Eulalia and Lake Nina. He likewise actively participated in the development of the 2006 and 2011 versions of the citys Stormwater Lake Management Plan. The second award, the Mayors Commu nity Award, honors individuals, who are non-city board members, for giving countless hours of their time for the betterment of Mai tland. Renee Stein Charlan and Butch Charlan were recognized for their dedication and com mitment to the city of Maitland through years of involvement with the Maitland Civic Center, the Performing Arts of Maitland, the Art & History Museums Mait land, and the Mait land Womans Club. Additionally, they have opened their home on numerous occasions to the com munity as a venue for events and recep tions, including host ing holiday dinners responders and their families. Any Maitland resident is welcome and encouraged to serve on any of the citys volun teer boards. If you are interested in serving and helping to shape our citys future, please contact the city clerk at 407-539-6219. Appreciating volunteers For more information call 407-659-5701 or visit www.TrustcoBank.com and apply today!Member FDICEQUAL HOUSINGLENDER RYour Home Town Bank TRUSTCO BANKNot available for cash out refinances. *PMI Private Mortgage Insurance. Trustco Bank pays Private Mortgage Insurance on customers behalf. Please n ote: W e r eser ve the right to alte r or w ithdraw these products or certain featu res thereof without prior notification. 95% Financing NO Broker Fees NO Points NO Private Mortgage Insurance* Now Available All the Same Great Benefits! Pay Principal, Not PMI. PHOTOS COURTESY OF CITY OF MAITLAND Mark P. Walch, left, and Renee and Butch Charlan shake hands with Mayor Howard Schieferdecker after being awarded for ther service Feb. 11.

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Page 4 | Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014 PHONE: 407-563-7000 FAX: 407-563-7099 WPMOBSERVER.COM PUBLISHER Tracy Craft 407.515.2605 TCraft@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MANAGING EDITOR Isaac Babcock 407.563.7023 IBabcock@TurnstileMediaGroup.com ASSOCIATE EDITOR Sarah Wilson 407.563.7026 SWilson@TurnstileMediaGroup.com DESIGNER Tom Miller 407.563.7032 TMiller@TurnstileMediaGroup.com STAFF WRITERS Brittni Larson Megan Stokes Tim Freed Allison Olcsvay Kristy Vickery COLUMNISTS Chris Jepson Jepson@MediAmerica.us Louis Roney LRoney@cfl.rr.com Josh Garrick JoshGarrick9@gmail.com ADVERTISING SALES Linda Stern 407.376.2434 LStern@TurnstileMediaGroup.com LEGAL NOTICE ADVERTISING Ashley McBride 407.286.0807 Legal@FLALegals.com SUBSCRIPTIONS/CIRCULATION Luana Baez 407.563.7013 LBaez@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MEMBER OF: -Florida Press Association -Winter Park/Maitland/Goldenrod Chambers of Commerce Winter Park/Maitland Observer is published by Turnstile Media Group. Founded in 1990 and headquartered in Orlando, Fla., Turnstile Media Group is also the parent of Golfweek, Golfweek Custom Media, TurfNet, Professional Artist, Seminole Voice, Baldwin Park Living and Turnstile Connect. TURNSTILE MEDIA GROUP CHAIRMAN Rance Crain PRESIDENT/CEO Francis X. Farrell VICE PRESIDENTS Patti Green & Jeff Babineau USPS #00-6186 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Winter Park / Maitland Observer 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835 Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster FAMILY CALENDAR Calendar FEB. 20 Learn the right and wrong way to build your dream home in Winter Park at an open forum on building and single-family zoning standards. Its at 3 p.m. Feb. 20 at Winter Park City Hall. Visit cityofwinter park.org for more information. Business after Hours will help you net work and get to know your community at the same time. Join Orlando City Soccer for a pre-season tailgate event. Meet the team, mingle with fellow members and get ready for the 2014 season. Plus, en ter to win a signed 2014 USL pro jersey! Its from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce, 151 W. Ly man Ave. in Winter Park. RSVP for this not-to-be-missed event at tinyurl.com/ wpccsoccer FEB. 22 Want to make a hydroponic vegetable garden in your back yard but dont know how? Come to the Winter Park Welcome Center for a tutorial on how to get your futuristic garden growing. Its from 10 to 11:30 a.m. on Feb. 22. Visit cityofwinter park.org for more information. FEB. 23 The local alumni chapter of Sigma Alpha Iota is hosting a free concert at Rollins College at 2 p.m. on Feb. 23 at Tietdke Hall. The goal is to raise funds for college scholarships for women students attend ing local colleges who are pursuing ca reers in music. FEB. 26 The Rotary Club of Winter Park is pleased to host its annual celebration of chili at the third annual Chili for Charity pre sented by Mayower Retirement Commu nity on Wednesday, Feb. 26, at the Winter Park Farmers Market. The events features chili creations by more than a dozen lo cal restaurants and caterers and enables the clubs foundation to continue its effort to support more than 30 local non-prot organizations each year. Other event highlights include live entertainment by The Papa Jack Express and a live auction. Tickets are available for $25 each or $225 for 10 in advance or $30 at the door. Pur chase tickets online at chiliforcharity.org and stay up-to-date with event details at facebook.com/chiliforcharity FEB. 22 The Great Duck Derby is back at Mead Garden! The Duck Derby is a wonder ful opportunity to discover or rediscover Winter Parks hidden treasure. Enjoy the duck races and a host of fun family ac tivities. See and experience what makes Mead one of the most beloved spots in Winter Park for kids and families, from its running creek and wildlife critters to the beautiful camellia and buttery gardens. Adopt a racing duck for only $5. Its from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Mead Garden at 1300 S. Denning Drive. Run through nature at the Wekiwa Springs 5K and 10K this weekend. Its the only race run entirely off road within a state park and there will be cash prizes for the fastest overall times in the 10K. Registration begins at 7 a.m. Races start at 8:30 a.m. To register online go to ac tive.com FEB. 23 The Peanut Butter Matinee at the Enzian this week features My Dog Skip at noon. Visit enzian.org for more information. MARCH 1 Its the sixth annual Fiddlers Green 5K Get ready for an outdoor race through Winter Parks historic Mead Garden start ing at 7:30 a.m. on March 1. Its at 1300 S. Denning Drive in Winter Park. From there, the runners are invited back for a beer and some fun at Fiddlers Green Irish Pub. Fiddlers 5K is not a chipped race. The Fiddlers 5K is stroller friendly. Pro ceeds from the event will benet Habitat for Humanity of Winter Park-Maitland and Conductive Education Center of Orlando. Visit ddsgives.org for more information. MARCH 2 The 35th annual St. Patricks Day Pa rade in Winter Park will march down Park Avenue starting at 2 p.m. on March 2. Its a few weeks early, but kicks off two weeks of Irish festivities. MARCH 4 Get ready. Get set. And go to IHOP restaurants on National Pancake Day March 4, to enjoy a free short stack of buttermilk pancakes and help raise money for charity! IHOP restaurants will again serve up free short stacks of its famous buttermilk pancakes on National Pancake Day on Tuesday, March 4. IHOP hopes to raise more than $3 million for Childrens Miracle Network Hospitals, Shriners Hospitals for Children and other local charities this year. It runs from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. at your local IHOP, with voluntary donations to Childrens Miracle Network encouraged. Community Bulletin Top scholars Chantal Cowie of Maitland has been named to the University of WisconsinMadisons deans list for the fall semester of the 2013-14 academic year. Manuel Lugo of Maitland, son of Dr. Eduardo and Zulma Lugo, made the deans list for Fur man University for the 2013 fall semes ter. Hamilton K. Bright of Maitland was named to the Deans Academic Honor List for the fall 2013 semester at Baylor Uni versity. Help your community Orange County residents who want to make a difference in their community while enjoying tremendous reward are invited to register for volunteer train ing at Cornerstone Hospice and Pal liative Care. Hospice volunteers provide a variety of services including staying with patients to give caregivers a break, run ning errands, walking a patients dog or even helping out with community events or ofce ling. Volunteer opportunities are also available at Cornerstone Suites at Winter Park Towers, a 10-bed inpatient unit housed within the Winter Park retire ment community. All Cornerstone Hospice volunteers are re quired to complete 16 hours of volunteer training. For more information or to regis ter for training, contact Diane Klebanow, volunteer specialist, at 407-304-2604 or dklebanow@cshospice.org; or Lisa Gray, volunteer manager, at 888-728-6234 or volunteer@cshospice.org Freedom to ... All the fun, none of the hassles of ownership Full access to hundreds of boa ts. Membership privileges at 70 locations in the U.S. www.FreedomBoatClub-TB.com Bring a copy of this ad and receive Mt. Dora Now open Mt. Dora Now open

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Page 6 | Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Congratulations, Mayor! Winter Park Mayor Kenneth W. Bradley was recently induct ed into the University of Central Florida College of Business Ad ministration Hall of Fame. He graduated from UCF in 1985 with a masters in business adminis tration. The induction ceremony was held Feb. 6 at the 15th annual Business Hall of Fame Awards Banquet at the Rosen Shingle Creek Hotel. Mayor Bradley has been serving the Central Florida area for decades. With 28 years of Central Florida healthcare experience, he also serves as the Campus CEO of Winter Park Memorial Hospital and has acted as Campus CEO (and COO) of Florida Hospital Kissimmee and COO of Florida Hospitals Celebration Health. Bradley is a member of the Winter Park Public Library Board and the Wells Fargo Central Florida Community Bank Board. He has received numerous awards within the community, including the Orlando Business Journals Central Floridas Most in 2010, and the 2011 Crystal Angel award from Adventist Health System. The UCF Business Hall of Fame consists of 64 members who have careers, business and communi ties they serve. Each member has made a substantial impact on the UCF community by improving the institutions reputation by their success, professionalism and service to our community. Feb. 24 City Commission meeting There will be a City Commis sion meeting Monday, Feb. 24, at 3:30 p.m. in City Hall Commis sion Chambers located at 401 S. Park Ave. For the most up-to-date agenda, please visit cityofwinter park.org under Whats New. Be low are a few topics of interest: Consent Agenda 2/10/14. (for a complete listing, please visit cityofwinterpark.org/ccpackets). ecute the Interlocal Agreement between the city and the city of Gainesville d/b/a Gainesville Re gional Utilities. Action Items Requiring Discussion Assistance Panel scope and fund ing for the U.S. Highway 17-92 corridor. league baseball stadium in Winter Park. sewer relocation to accommodate the Capen House at the Albin Po lasek Museum & Sculpture Gar dens location. Board for the Tuesday, March 11, election. Monday, May 26, City Commis sion meeting due to the Memorial Day holiday. Public Hearings declaring that the city is to fund capital improvements to under ground electric/CATV (BHN) along Seminole Drive; to be par tially paid by special assessments levied against real property spe special assessments. 1873 Glencoe Road as a historic resource on the Winter Park Reg ister of Historic Places. Park: dinance amending Chapter 58 Land Development Code creat ing a non-compete window of 30 days before or after the citys an nual spring and fall art festivals (relating to non-residential zoning districts and the conditions re quired for a special event). nance authorizing the issuance of its outstanding electric revenue bonds. Swoope Investment, LLC, and Village Park Senior Housing Partners, Ltd., to amend the con ditional use and development agreement for the Village Park Senior Housing project at 550 N. Denning Drive, to add the prop erty at 796 W. Swoope Ave., to the project; permitting an increase in density from 105 to 108 apart ments. Park: amending certain provisions of Article IV, Sign Regulations to add clarity; and amending Section 1-24, Schedule of Violations and Penalties relating to signs. sions full agenda on the home page of cityofwinterpark.org un der Whats New. Remember, if you are unable to attend the City Commission meet ings, you can watch them live, gavel-to-gavel as they happen. During the meeting, simply log cityofwinterpark.org and click on Government > Live Video Broad casts to easily stay tuned-in to of Mayors memories video The Communications Depart ment has been partnering with Full Sail Universitys SPARK pro gram to produce videos featuring unique aspects of the city. Their latest creation is a walk down memory lane with the citys pres ent and past mayors. To view this latest video, Through the Eyes of Our Mayors, please visit cityof winterpark.org/videos and select Mayors Memories. Electric undergrounding maps The city has posted a series of maps from Fiscal Year 2013 to 2023 to visually show when the various areas of the city are sched uled for electric undergrounding. These maps are subject to change, however, can be used as an ap proximate indication of where you are in the citys long-term un dergrounding plan. If you are cu rious about when underground ing is planned for your street, please visit cityofwinterpark.org/ electricmaps. If you have addi tional questions, please call 407599-3400. Irrigating twice a week Sunday, March 9, through Sun day, Nov. 2 Tuesday & Friday: Irrigation permitted for non-residential properties Wednesday & Saturday: Irriga tion permitted for odd/non-num bered addresses Thursday & Sunday: Irrigation permitted for even-numbered ad dresses Before 10 a.m. and after 4 p.m. Water only when needed, no more than one hour per zone. on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, watch us on Vimeo. rf ntbrrtb brfbrrntbbr tbrrtftr brrbrrr brrr trrrbrbrrf brrbr brrrttrr trbr rbr fftbbtfb tr r r r fntbtfbbftftbtrfnr fn Winter Park City Talk BY RANDY KNIGHT CITY MANAGER Know your water

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rfntb ttrttn trbrrbrbrrbrbrrbrbrrrrrrrf ftrrf btrbnnrbbrrnr rr rrr brrrrr rrr rrrrrr ttrbr brfbrnr brfbrr bbr btbrbbrf rr bbbrbrr bnrr brfrrr nrfrrr brtrnrrtrrtrnrrnrbrnbbrTD Bank is TD Bank, N.A., a wholly-owned U.S. subsidiary of The Toronto-Dominion Bank. Member FDIC. Accounts issued by TD Bank, N.A. are not insured by Canada Deposit Insurance Corporation. 1 Money transferred by wire transfer only. Incoming wire fees may apply and will be rebated the next business day. Foreign exchange conversion rates may apply. 2 Assets are only considered for mortgage applications. 3 Subject to credit approval and other conditions. Mortgages limited to property located in U.S. state where TD Bank, N.A. has locations. Equal Housing Lender 4 Credit cards issued by TD Canada Trust or TD Bank, N.A. Subject to credit approval. Applicants for a TD Bank, N.A. issued card must have a U.S. address within the TD Bank, NA footprint (PA, NY, NJ, CT, NH, ME, MA, FL, VT, DE, MD, DC, NC, SC, VA or RI). Other restrictions apply. 5 TD Bank, N.A. is located in the United States and its support line, Stores, products and services are primarily serviced in English. The TD logo and other trade-marks are the property of The Toronto-Dominion Bank. Canadians in Florida can nd a TD Bank as easy as they can nd a beach.To open an account, visit a TD Bank Store near you or call 1 -877-700-29 1 3 anytime .5Great service and convenience for Canadians at nearly 1,300 TD Bank locations in the U.S. No-fee wire transfers of up to $100,000 daily between your Canadian and U.S. based TD accounts over the phone.1 View your Canadian and U.S. based TD accounts on the same webpage or mobile device. Pay your U.S. bills online or on your mobile device. Use your Canadian and U.S. assets,2 income and credit history to apply for a U.S. mortgage3 or a U.S. credit card.4 0003506_N4106_5A.indd 1 12/12/13 4:10 PM

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Page 8 | Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Lifestyles Zach Brown took a long, treacherous route to adulthood. At age 5 he was adopted by his grandparents, but when his be havior both at home and school got out of hand, he was sent back into foster care. Separated from his half-sisters, he was again ad opted at the age of 12. A troubled kid, Brown admits he was hard to handle. I was always rebelling, getting into trouble at school, he said. At home I just couldnt seem to bond with my new mom. Just after his 18th birthday, he mom over some of his belongings that were missing. He went to school, believing everything was place to live. With no place else to turn, the Winter Park High School senior spent time at friends houses, even sleeping in a friends closet, until he ended up being invited to stay with his girlfriends family. He stayed there for a couple of months until a spot opened up for him at Covenant House, a group home facility for homeless teens and young adults. Then Robin McLeod, of Walk Their Shoes Inc., came into his life. McLeod is a volunteer guard ian ad litem for the 18th Judicial Court and said she personally knows the needs of teens aging out of foster care. She herself was once a ward of the courts, and knows well the tion to adulthood with little to no help. The mission of Oviedo-based Walk Their Shoes is to provide individualized assistance to teens ageing out of foster care in the way of transportation, childcare, or help getting or furnishing an apartment. Everyone who receives assistance is also required to pay it for ward in some way, by speak ing to middle or high school kids or volun teering at local charities. While Zach did not strictly age out of foster care, he still needed a lot of help ing in life, McLeod said. The state of Florida recently recognized the needs of kids like Brown by pass ing new legislation that went into effect Jan. 1. The law, called the Nancy C. Detert Common Sense and Compassion Independent Living Act, allows kids in foster care to remain there until age 21 (previ ously 18) as long as they meet cer tain conditions, the goal being to give them more time to progress into adulthood while still having a stable home base. While Browns situation is dif ferent from those in foster care, his needs are not. McLeod stepped in during one of Browns darkest hours and helped him take important steps toward a good future. I wasnt expecting anyone to help, Brown said. Then sudden ly she was there. She just has this vibe, this attitude that says every thing is going to be OK. I realized I cant do this by myself, I need support, and Ms. Robin was there for me. Nearly a year after entering Covenant House, Brown moved December. McLeod provided Brown with living room furniture and took him shopping for essentials like dishes and clothes to furnish his new place. Just a few weeks ago, he Cobalt. Brown still has the bike he received through McLeod from an anonymous donor. Until he got the car, his trusty bike was what got him back and forth to his job washing cars at Fields BMW. Now 19 years old, Brown dreams of moving up at the car dealership, perhaps going into management. He got his GED while at Cov enant House a month earlier than he would have graduated from high school and hasnt ruled out going to college one day. With a steady job, a stable home and a vehicle, things are looking up for Brown, but there is one important element missing in his life. Id still like to have the kind of family I always wanted. Id like to be a good dad someday and raise a family the way I wish I had been raised, he said. Until then, McLeod and her family have taken Brown under their wing. We still talk or text at least once a day, she said. Ms. Robin treats me like fam ily, Brown said. I can always come back to her, knowing she will be there. Brown said just knowing that someone is there for him makes all the difference. PHOTO COURTESY OF ROBIN MCLEOD Zach Browns new life is a big departure from his old path thanks to Walk Their Shoes, which is having a charity cookoff Feb. 22. A long, dangerous route to a new life ALLISON OLCSVAY Observer staff W alk Their Shoes is having a chili cookoff, hosted by Hourglass Brewery of Longwood on Saturday, Feb. 22, from 4 to 6 p.m. with all proceeds cost is $10 to enter the con test, $5 to taste the entries. You also get $1 off beer with admission. The grand prize is $250. Visit walktheirshoes. com for more information on the cause. Run, Walk, Train. MARCH 15 (Sat) Zimmerman Kiser Sutcliffe Winter Park Road Race 10k & 2 Mile*........... Park Avenue Presented by Florida Hospital 24 (Mon) Beginning Walk-Run Program Begins .......... Blue Jacket Park Presented by Track Shack Fitness Club 25 (Tue) Five & Dime 5k and 10k Training Begins .... Blue Jacket Park Presented by Track Shack Fitness ClubAPRIL 26 (Sat) Run for the Trees 5k ...................................... Showalter FieldJULY 4 (Fri) Hunter Vision Watermelon 5k ............................ Park AvenueDates are subject to change. *Track Shack Running Series Event Track Shack Distance Dare Event WPO2014 The State of Business After the Great Recession Presented in partnership by Observe r Winter Park / Maitland Additional support provided by Thursday, March 6, 2014 Reservations at winterpark .org or call (407) 644-8281

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Page 10 | Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer r f r f n fn rtrb tn r nrtr r f nt rb f t t b t r f r nr r f ft b rnr r r rf r n r t r n rf r f f f r f b nr r f nr r r rf ntr br f f t f t nr n f r b rf n t b n b nb b r f t n n bb Its been two months since thirsty regulars stepped inside the shabby bar on 17-92, but the red neon sign outside Tom and Jerrys Bar and Lounge continues the night sky. The buzzing letters are the only sign of life from the run-down cinder block building. Visitors would have guessed it shut down years ago if it werent for its glowing calling card. A deserted, cracked parking lot leads to the bars back entrance. The locked iron gate keeps wan dering locals out, but a closer look between the bars reveals a chalk board sign tossed aside on the concrete. The dusty surface reads Big Celebration: December 19 in fad ed letters. The old dive will be torn down by the end of February to make way for Winter Parks Ravaudage development, putting an end to an era that began in 1946. But not before local residents could celebrate one more last call. Its a cold Thursday night in December as the parking lot be with locals mingling and sipping regulars can visit the local water ing hole. Customers cycle in and out of the bar with beer and mixed drinks to chat with friends and total strangers. But everyone has something in common tonight: refusing to miss the historic bars last hurrah. Orlando rock band The World Famous Trans Ams give the night a rock-and-roll soundtrack from the rickety wooden platform out side the bar, jamming through a set of classic hits from AC/DCs Highway to Hell to Motley Crues Girls, girls, girls. But customers inside can barely hear the Trans Ams rowdy sound over the scramble for drinks. Its a full house inside the smoky, dim taproom. Locals line up elbow-tothe bustling bartenders. The ales, stouts and lagers run out quickly theres hardly any thing left by 10 p.m. Longwood resident John No lan squirms his way to the front and orders one of the last frosty bottles. It had been years since he last visited the Win ter Park bar, but he wouldnt miss tonight for the world. Nolan knew the bar well. He remembers the glowing sign out side even from his childhood, watching it pass by from a back seat window as his father brought him along on business trips to Winter Park. I would see Tom and Jerrys and I would think Tom and Jerry cartoons, Nolan said. As a kid you think Oh, Tom and Jerrys. I want to go in there. My dad was like No, not quite. Its beer. The run-down bar reminds him decades later of something the areas lost over the years, he said. If you look elsewhere, they have places with heritage Or lando just doesnt have that, No lan said. Its all strip malls and prefab concepts. History is knocked down for billions of dollars. PHOTOS BY TIM FREED THE OBSERVER Orlando rock band The World Famous Trans Ams plays classic rock and metal while bargoers belly up for a nal beer at Tom and Jerrrys, one of the Orlando areas oldest bars. It will be leveled before the end of February, said bar owner Dan Bellows. One last call before the wrecking ball TIM FREED Observer staff wild night, Tom and Jerrys prepares to turn off the neon lights Please see BAR on next page

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014 | Page 11 rfntbtnnn bbnfntnt bbbrbnnntfn rnr rf 2826 Shader Rd. Orlando, FL 32808 Have a dog with lots of energy? We can help! 407-295-3888 B arkingDogFitness.com A tired dog is a happ y do g! And a happy YOU! Conveniently located at... Ask About our FREE Trial! Customized workouts Training Fun p lay time with other dogs 1 on 1 attention ORLANDOS ONLY DOGGIE DAY CARE WITH A GYM! BAR | Tom and Jerrys could find a rebirth along New England Avenue in Winter Parks Hannibal Square The bar celebrated by hun dreds of locals that cold December years ago back when World War II was in its aftermath and the tense Cold War began to emerge. Tom and Jerrys rolled with the times. It served as a packaging house in the s, where customers could pull up to a drive-through window, order a six-pack and drive off. The increasing aware ness of drunk driving throughout the s and s eventually led to the window being sealed off. But much of the bar remains the same as it was back in the 1940s and s. The counters and walls have been repainted and touched up, but the taverns origi nal cinder block skeleton under neath still stands. Black-and-white photos on the walls of Frank Sinatra and the Rat Pack hint at the bars early years: a decade when big bands led by the likes of Benny Goodman and Duke Ellington dominated Amer icas music scene. Its the bars thick layer of char acter and atmosphere that keeps Winter Park resident Jud French coming back. Hed been a regular at the bar since the mid-s, but his group of friends were stepping near a row of dimly lit dartboards across from the bar, taking in the joints dingy, rough vibe. This is, as far as Im con cerned, historic, said French, looking around the dark, crowded room. I like the atmosphere and I like coming here. Its kind of sad; I understand progress, but its go ing to be replaced by something bright and shiny. You cant create this. When it grows organically and its been here and it has a history, a lot of people have a lot of memories tied up in it. door set to roaring applause and raised drinks. Most of the turnout has left by 1 a.m. and the remain ing few dozen night owls still out side make their way back into the bar as the night air gets colder and colder. dry. Toby Keiths low key I Love this Bar calmly moseys out of the jukebox bolted to the wall beside the bar. We got winners, we got los ers, chain smokers and boozers. And we got yuppies, we got bik ers, we got thirsty hitchhikers... Emotions start set ting in for bar manager Lucy Miller. Tom and Jerrys had always been a meeting place. From Central Floridas local music scene mak ing a showing at open mic nights to groups of college students hit ting a night on the town, the bar had a way of bringing people to gether. Miller even remembers a cus tomer popping the question to his lady during her tenure behind the counter. Plans are now in motion to res urrect Tom and Jerrys later this year at a new location in Hannibal Square. Bar owner Dan Bellows plans to bring the neon sign, the original liquor license and some of the old photos and decor to the new spot. But while Miller intends to con tinue working at the new Tom and Jerrys, she cant shake the feeling that shes saying goodbye. A new bar means new faces perhaps re placing some familiar ones. Its heartbreaking, Miller said. All of your regulars be come like your friends. utes of business as the bartend ers shout last call at 1:28 a.m. The remaining dozen or so customers rush to the bar to buy whatevers left. Just a few bottles of Crown Royal, Jack Daniels and Bacardi sit on the back shelf. Winter Park resident Ted Zaf fran gulps down his last drink. foot in Tom and Jerrys as a col lege student. He was a long way from Florida State University, but felt right at home. The tall, gray-haired customer lays a hand on a nearby high table and points at two sets of initials carved into the wood more than 20 years ago TZ + J.J. My lady back in the day, Zaf fran said. The carving recalls a fond memory for Zaffran, who enjoys the table so much that he picks it up and starts to walk out the door. Some of the bartenders spot him and cry foul as a much younger customer with a shaved head and a black polo shirt stops him and puts the table back. Zaffran eagerly challenges him to an arm wrestling match over the table and they lock hands above the faded carving. The older man appears stron ger than many expected. Hed kept much of his forearm strength since his days as a tight end on the Florida State football team. Zaffran makes the pin after a 10-second struggle, but then hard feelings turn more serious before a doorman can rush in to stop it. Everyone who hasnt already gotten the hint is ushered out. Its a jarring ending to the last night of Tom and Jerrys, a bar that no doubt had seen plenty of tussles in its 67 years of business. The sentimental celebration end ed in a brawl like a long, drawnout goodbye suddenly met with a door slammed in its face. But the conclusion seemed as chaotic and imperfect as the cracked, broken-down tavern it self its coarse, rich character making it something worth cel The taproom on 17-92 may not be standing by March, but locals can take solace in one thing: it didnt go quietly. C ONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE PHOTOS BY TIM FREED THE OBSERVER An eventful night closed out Tom and Jerrys after a long run on U.S. 17/92.

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Page 12 | Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer INVITE YOU AND A GUEST TO ATTEND AN ADVANCE SCREENINGTO DOWNLOAD YOUR PASS FOR TWO, GO TO WWW.GOFOBO.COM/RSVP & ENTER RSVP CODE: WPMOZ0M4Supplies are limited! Passes received through this promotion do not guarantee you a seat at the theatre. Seating is on a rst come, rst served basis, except for members of the reviewing press. Theatre is overbooked to ensure a full house. 20TH Century Fox and their af liates accept no responsibility or liability in connection with any loss or accident incurred in connection with use of a prize. Tickets cannot be exchanged, transferred or redeemed for cash, in whole or in part. Not responsible for lost, delayed or misdirected entries. No purchase necessary. Participating sponsors, their employees & family members and their agencies are not eligible. OPENS NATIONWIDE FEB 28THwww.sonofgodmovie.com The Knights got revenge and righted their season in one game on the hard court at the Univer sity of South Florida on Feb. 15. After losing in overtime 10 days earlier to the Bulls, the Knights edged them 75-74 and snapped a nine-game losing streak at the same time. Isaiah Sykes needed 27 points to keep the Knights within a shot seconds, his last shot would seal the deal. I think this is the best game weve played as a team, Sykes told UCFKnights.com after the than a month the Knights shot better than 50 percent as a team, with four players entering double digits. Justin McBride would again prove himself a scoring machine from the bench, dropping 13 points in the basket in just 14 For the Knights, it was only their second win in 11 games of American Athletic Conference play. Their two wins have come by a cumulative three-point margin. Thankfully their wins over USF and Temple the other two teams in the bottom of the conference have kept them out of last place. Wednesday night at press time they faced the AACs top team, No. 7 Cincinnati (23-3, 12-1), at home. Rollins The mens basketball team rose to 12-11 overall and 6-7 in the Sunshine State Conference with an 84-59 thrashing of Florida Tech on Feb. 12 and an 81-72 win over Nova Southeastern on Feb. 15. since December comes courtesy of double-digit shooting by most rained 20 points against Florida Tech, with Chris Uhle dropping 17 in the basket. Against Nova, Alex Blessig hit 23 points with Adam Allens 22 close behind. Woods nailed 17 points in that game while grabbing nine assists. The Tars played Lynn on Wednesday at press time, just af ter the Lady Tars (21-4) edged out Nova 74-71 in overtime Feb. 15. Both teams will head to Miami Shores on Feb. 22 to face Barry, which is struggling at mid-pack in the SSC on both the women and mens teams. High school basketball The Winter Park boys basket ball team edged Fort Pierce Cen basketball Feb. 13 with a 70-63 score. Starting the week the boys were 25-3 on the year, with only one loss at home all season. They played Tuesday night at press time, hosting Oak Ridge win, they could be taking on the winner of the Wharton versus St. Petersburg game in the regional plus point blowouts. That game would be at 7 p.m. Feb. 22, with the location dependent upon the teams playing. Knights, Tars hit their stride ISAAC BABCOCK Observer staff PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER The Knights had reason to celebrate after a revenge win over the USF Bulls Feb. 15. 5900 Oleander Dr., Orlando, FL 32807Thursday, Feb. 27th5 p.m. 11 p.m.Good Shepherd Night$15 all you can rideFriday, Feb. 28th5 p.m. 11 p.m.$15 all you can rideSaturday, Mar. 1st12 p.m. 11 p.m.$25 all you can ride (12 p.m. 11 p.m.) Sunday, Mar. 2nd12 p.m. 6 p.m. PHOTOS BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVER Park Avenue hosted its seasonal Sip, Shop & Stroll offering tastes of the streets best wine and cusine offerings on Feb. 6. Sip & Stroll

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Page 14 | Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Winter Park residents have a new opportunity to take a look into their healths future. At the Winter Park Health As sessment program at the Florida Hospital for Women Winter Park, clients can get their DNA tested for potential health issues. Its called genomic testing and clients can choose from several areas of health to have tested, including nutrition and weight loss, overall This is new technology, and while not totally detailed, does give an overall view, or a blue print, of the category of DNA tested, said Guita Kurd, registered nurse and director of operations for the WPHA. People go read their palm, cally and see what to expect in the future, Kurd said. After the test, which is not cov ered by insurance, clients get to sit down and discuss their results with a physician, where theyll create a health plan of action based on the clients results and goals. Kurd said that for example, if someone chose nutrition and weight loss, the test could tell if the person had an obesity gene, and what kind of diet and exercise would be effective for that per son. While for one person cardio exercise would be best for losing weight, for another lifting weights would be more effective the test can give the information neces You can turn on a gene based on your lifestyle, said Herminio Alamo, a registered nurse and WPHA clinical manger. Genes are like bullets, they load the gun, and the lifestyle pulls the trigger. The main focus of the WPHA ens health. There, they also do all day assessments on clients, where physicians evaluate their over blood work, a stress test, an EKG and womens health tests such as mammograms and pap smears, among more than a dozen other tests. The assessments are not covered by insurance and are not inexpensive, but offer tests that in a regular healthcare situation would take up to two months to schedule and get results from. With the WPHA, clients get the tests and results in one day and spend an average of three hours talking with a physician about their health. Im like a medical detective all day, Alamo said. Im looking for trouble, I tell the clients, Im PHOTO COURTESY OF FLORIDA HOSPITAL FOR WOMEN High-tech testing can reveal secrets hidden in a patients genes, thanks to genomic sequencing at the Winter Park Health Assessment Program, offered by Florida Hospital for Women. The program also offers tness checks, such as cardiovascular capacity, shown above. Test gives a look into your healths future At the Winter Park Health Assessment program, clients can get their DNA tested to discover health issues before they happen BRITTNI LARSON Observer staff Please see GENETICS on page 16

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C M Y CM MY CY CMY K ad_innerscientist.pdf 1 2/12/14 12:06 PM Several years ago, National Geographic produced an article on the chemistry of love. Re searchers had shown that fall ing in love produced el evated levels of dopamine, the chemical that produces feelings of in tense energy and exhilara tion. Maybe dopamine is why people in love so of ten act dop ey! The bad news is that a dopa mine-rush tops out at 18 months or so. That is why people fall out of love after a while. Unless, of course, oxytocin, the chemical of bonding and wellbeing kicks in in the meantime. Then the re lationship could last for years, though perhaps without the do pamine kick. So, what causes the dopaminevary. Some researchers believe it is visual (waist-to-hip ratio in fe males, rugged lookswhatever those arein males). An even more fascinating theory has to do with smell. A Swiss scientist had a sample of 49 women smell the sweaty T-shirts of a variety of men with a range of genotypes (genetic variations). The women tended to pick the shirts of men who had very different genotypes from them as best smelling. I guess op posites really do attract! With all this biological infor mation now available about love, I was wondering how it might change some of our love songs: Killing Me Softly with His Smell Ill Be There, as Long as the Oxytocin Holds Out I Just Called to Say My Neu ro-receptors Are Going Wild Always in My Nose Crazy (cant improve on this one since Serotonin levels in lovers and OCD people are the same) Well, you get the idea. Im glad scientists are doing so much to help us understand how the human brain works. Im not so sure that all human experience is reducible to chemistry, though. I just participated in the renewal of vows for a couple who have been married for 61 years. Their take on love was a little different than National Geographics. The man wrote: Understanding and respect ing each others strengths and weaknesses, accepting and loving each other, just as we are, without criticizing or trying to change the other is really our secret for 61 years of loving, living, and look ing forward to eternity together. With Gods help, they built a life that has survived the ups and downs of dopamine and oxytocin, and thrived. Kind of makes you wonder if love isnt really more about theology than biology? For a tongue-in-cheek look at the chemistry of love check out Lauren Slaters article: http://bit. ly/1gNQibW The chemistry of chemistry Jim Govatos Reality Lines Like a vampire, high blood pressure can be silent and destructive, yet manageable. Hypertension, or high blood pressure, means the pressure on the walls of your arter ies is high. Think of what hap pens to a garden hose with pro longed high pressure. The hose gets stiff, cracks, and leaks. Or explodes, which is what can happen with a stroke. Over time, the high pressure damages the elasticity of the blood vessels, so the pres sure increases and the heart has to pump harder, leading to a cascade of risks for bad medical events as you age. In general, normal, healthy blood pressure is lower than 120/80 (with both numbers lower). The first number (sys tolic) is the pressure when your heart beats. The second number (diastolic) is the pressure when the heart rests between beats. Blood pressures that are usually between 120/80 and 140/90 are considered prehyperten sion a warning that now is a good time to bring that pressure down. A consistent blood pres sure at or above 140/90 is high and may need both lifestyle changes and medications to bring the pressure down. People with other health conditions, such as diabetes, may need to aim for lower blood pressures. About one in three adults have high blood pressure. As we age, more of us develop it. Your kidneys, hormones, nervous system, blood vessels, and water and salt in your body all influence your blood pres sure. Having a relative with high blood pressure, being overweight, no physical activ ity, smoking, and drinking too much alcohol raise your risks of hypertension. Diabetes, gout, and kidney disease also raise your high blood pressure risks. Foods high in sodium, like just about anything canned and any frozen entrees, increase your blood pressure. Reading the sodium content on food labels is usually shocking. The good news is that the medications for high blood pressure work well, once you and your health care provider have the right medication and dose figured out. Fresh fruits and vegetables, low fat diet, drinking in moderation and regular physical activity can help lower your blood pres sure or prevent it from rising. Exercise and healthy eating can make a big difference. Even a small weight loss can bring the numbers down. It helps to keep a record of your blood pressures and bring it to your medical appoint ments. That way your health care provider can see what your blood pressure has been in your daily life, not just when you are in his or her office. You can purchase a home blood pres sure monitor at drugstores and medical supply stores. You can also get it checked at most fire houses and drugstores. Think of it as akin to a speedometer that tells you how you are doing. Tips to help you calm hypertension Dr. Nancy Rudner Lugo Health Action

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Page 16 | Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer More than 300 attendees at Healthy Liv ing Expo, earlier this month Our Whole Community, a collaborative of faith-based organizations that shares resources and promotes health and whole ness in the community, recently held its second annual Healthy Living Expo earlier this month. More than 300 people attended, an increase from last years event. OWC administered almost 100 free health as sessments from the University of Central Florida College of Nursing and other health professional community volunteers, pro vided healthy eating, dance and gardening demonstrations, as well as had speakers present on mind, body and spirit. More than 30 healthy living vendors were also present to speak to attendees about prod ucts and services. OWC thanks Healthy Living Expo spon sors and partners: the city of Winter Park, UCF College of Nursing, VHB planning With the support of these partners and volunteers, OWC was able to provide a day full of education, experiences and fun, all based on health and wholeness. With OWCs signature event over, OWC will now concentrate on projects such as the development and distribution of a free healthy ministry manual, garden programs for the community and the sharing of resources for OWC partners. If your faithbased organization is interested in becom ing a partner, visit OurWholeCommunity. org or email owc_ed@me.com. Please visit OurWholeCommunity.org for a calendar of programs, seminars, etc. Here are the spring garden programs: at the Our Whole Community Garden at Winter Park Presbyterian Church, 400 S. Lakemont Ave., Winter Park. Garden en trance is on Dundee Drive. 9 11 a.m., Our Whole Community Garden, 550 W. Morse Blvd., Winter Park. Garden entrance is on Welbourne Avenue St. Mary Magdalen Learning Garden, 869 Maitland Ave., Altamonte Springs. Garden is by the Annex. For more information, email Leah Nash at owc_ed@me.com, or call 407-758-5324. Our Whole Community, a 501(c)(3) noncommunities together to establish rela tionships and share resources resulting in innovative programs that inspire, motivate and educate individuals in their pursuit of optimal health. For more information on OWC, please visit ourwholecommunity. org. Our Whole Community is pleased to contribute monthly to the Winter Park Ob server. Email owc_ed@me.com for inqui ries about OWC. It takes more than Sudoku and a bowl of blueberries to build a healthy brain. While both are good for you, chances are people dont know why, or even if what they hear about these or other brain boosters are true. That is why the Alzheim ers Association Central and North Florida Chapter, with a grant from the Winter Park Health Foundation, launched an innovative brain health initiative focused on providing information that separates myth from sciencesupported facts so people at any age can become knowledgeable and motivated to make brain health a priority throughout life. On March 15, family members of all ages will get the chance to celebrate the brain and all its wonders at BrainFest, a free, day-long event be ginning at 10 a.m. at the Rachel D. Murrah Civic Center located at 1050 W. Morse Blvd. in Winter ment and activities, the program will promote the six pillars of brain health: healthy eating, exercise, socialization, stress reduction, lifelong learning and purposeful living. Florida Hospital is sponsoring the keynote speaker, Chris Nowinski, a former professional wrestler and author of the book, Head Games: Footballs Concussion Crisis. Mr. Nowinski is the founder of the Sports Legacy Institute created to advance the study, treatment and prevention of the effects of brain trauma in athletes and other at-risk groups. He is nationally known for his work in raising awareness of the connec tion between brain trauma in sports (primarily concussion) and the subsequent development of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a form of neurodegenerative disease leading to dementia. His work gained additional national attention on the recently aired PBS news show, Frontline. An expert on concussion related research, Mr. Nowinskis message is a must for parents, students and coaches involved in team sports activities. In addition to Chris Nowin ski who speaks at 10 a.m., the BrainFest has a full schedule of activities offering attendees a variety of ways to challenge their minds and boost their brainpower. Creative catalyst and master facilitator, Bob Kodzis, of Flight of Ideas, will lead a series of interactive games and chal lenges, including improvisational acting that explores present moment awareness and quick thinking. Dr. Ariel Cole of the Centre for Aging and Wellness at Florida Hospital will speak on the Prevention of Dementia from a Medical Perspective at 1 p.m., and Beverly Engel from the Alzheimers Association, Central & North Florida Chapter will present How to Become Your Own Brain Health Coach at 3 p.m. Throughout the day attendees will learn tips and tricks for keeping the brain healthy by participating in the Brain Olympics, challeng ing yourself and your friends in the Big Room of Brain Teasers or by participating in a myriad of mind-bending activities such as bio-feedback, exercise challenges, meditative practices, drum ming circles, guided games and much more. Dont miss out! To register for this event, go to: act.alz.org/brainfest or call 1-800-272-3900. By Beverly Engel, program coordinator Over 300 attendees at Healthy Living Expo, earlier this month Celebrate the brain and all its wonders at BrainFest GENETICS | Finding hidden health problems looking for something wrong with you or something that we can improve. Then, they create an action plan to im prove the clients health and make any nec essary appointments with specialists they might need for that day or the next. Health is really important right now, and if you could identify any issues or problems ahead of time and prevent it from happening, thats the best way to live your life, said Krystle Nguyen, health ambassa dor at WPHA. Kurd underwent the assessment herself and found that she had a heart abnormal ity. She had no symptoms or family history, and without the tests probably wouldve found out when it was too late to make a difference in her health, she said. Because of her results, shes exercising and eating better to keep her heart healthy. And thats what they hear from most clients that theyve been motivated to get healthier because of the assessment. Some even say it saved their lives, especially those who found they had cancer only because of go ing to their WPHA appointment. The staff said they are happy to be in a position to help people improve their health before they get sick, not after. Kurd said that preventative care is the future of healthcare. Preventative care gives you a better quality of life, and you are more productive at the end of the day, and thats the bottom line, Alamo said. C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 14 at Winter Park Towers Your room is waiting for you if you need Pain and Symptom Management Hospital Follow-up Complex Treatments, or Crisis Care Referrals 866-742-6655#5019096 www.cornerstonehospice.org www.SeriousIllness.org/cornerstoneMedicare, Medicaid, most commercial insurances accepted DEAR PAWSS CORNER: I read a report this week that said more and more pets are being treated for marijuana poison ing from accidentally ingesting their owners medically prescribed marijuana. Is this true? Why havent we heard more about it? Con cerned in California DEAR CONCERNED: As the number of states that allow medical marijuana to be prescribed increases, its likely you will hear more stories about pets being affected by ingesting this drug. A recent NBC News report estimated that calls to the ASPCAs Animal Poison Control Center reporting pet poisonings increased 30 percent between 2009 and 2013. However, TIME magazine disputes that report, noting that the actual number of calls increased from 213 in 2009 to about 320 last year a very small percentage of the 18,000 total calls the APCC gets each year from own ers. My take on the issue is this: Marijuana is a drug, so owners need to use common sense. You wouldnt leave other prescriptions lying around for the dog or cat to eat. So dont leave your stash lying around. Further, many patients use baked goods to ingest mari juana rather than smok ing it. Pot brownies, for example, contain chocolate, which is severe symptoms when eaten. The APCC gets far more calls about poisoning from chocolate ingestion than from any other substance, TIME noted. That said, pet owners who see or suspect their dog or cat has ingested marijuana should contact their veterinarian for advice. They also should watch their pet for unusual symp toms, such as lethargy, excessive drooling, diarrhea or incontinence, and take them to the vet immediately if they begin experiencing these or any other problems. Send your questions or comments to ask@ pawscorner.com. Did you know mosquitos can transmit heartworm larvae to dogs, but eas dont? Find out more in my new book, Fighting Fleas, available now. 2013 King Features Synd. Inc. Pets, pot dont mix

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014 | Page 17 One Senior Place ... See our full Calendar of Events at OneSeniorPlace.com407.949.6733715 Douglas Avenue Altamonte Springs, FL 32714M-F 8:30am 5pmHEALTHY LIVING DAY! At One Senior Place Friday, February 21 10am 1pm *Information & resources, health screenings, lectures, u shots, hearing tests and more. MONDAY, FEBRUARY 24 Senior Club Sponsored by Family Physicians Group Every Monday, 10am 12pm February 24th Casino Day The Real Estate Specialists are IN! 10am-1pm Presented by EXIT Real Estate Results By Appointment Only 407.949.6714 TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 25 Truth about Estate Planning 9:30am-12noon By The Law Ofces of Hoyt & Bryan RSVP 407.977.8080 Truth about Medicaid Planning 2pm-4pm By The Law Ofces of Hoyt & Bryan RSVP 407.977.8080 WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 26 Health Care Reform 2pm-3:30pm By LTC Advisors RSVP 407.949.6722 Is it Memory Loss or Something More? 9:30am-10:30am By Compass Research RSVP 407.218.5974 Hearing Aids Users Improve Rela tionships & Self Image! 3pm-4:30pm Presented by Harmony Hearing Centers of America RSVP 407.949.6737 THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 27 Matter of Balance 2:30pm-4:30pm By VITAS Innovative Hospice Care RSVP 407.599.2522 Daughters Missing Mothers 6pm-7:30pm By VITAS Innovative Hospice Care RSVP 407.691.4548Calendar of Events February 2014 Mindfulness and meditation are gaining traction in 2014. TIME maga zines February cover story is about the practice, searches for the terms have doubled in less than two years, and corporations are increasingly adding mindfulness practices into their well ness programs. This is really good news. If theres one thing our stressed out, ex hausted, emotionally wrought, hyper cul ture needs today, its the practice of mind fulness. Mindfulness gives us the courage to live our truth, and the inner guidance to deal with day-to-day stresses. Life goes on but with the help of mindfulness, there is more joy, clarity, creativity and energy. But mindfulness needs a few solid foundations. If any of the three main pil lars of mindfulness are weak, then going within and touching that blissful silence is not only challenging but also impos sible. Lets take a look at these three aspects and what we can do to balance them in our lives. The right food There are two aspects to this that need addressing. First, lets talk about the kind of foods that steer us away from our center. Foods that sedate, numb or intoxi cate are going to come in the way. While alcohol comes right up on top, there are other foods that add to the acidity of the body, creating hurdles to our experience of higher consciousness. These include chemical-laden, heavy foods. If you eat something and dont feel vibrant and alive a few hours after eating it, then its probably the wrong food for you. The journal and track what you eat and how you feel. The second thing about food is the state of our mind when eating, which is equally, if not more important that the food itself. The same food, eaten joyous ly, lovingly and in gratitude will have a different impact on the body-mind than eating with sadness, anxiety and/or stress. Sharing a meal with loved ones will nourish us differently from a meal eaten in the car on the way to work. The right movement Lack of physical activity has com pletely disconnected us from our bod ies and the intuition it brings with it. This disconnect is costing us dearly, from physical ailments to psychologi cal issues. Add to that the tremendous amount of food (not necessarily nu trition-dense) that we have access to 24/7, and we are an unhealthy bunch of people. For mindfulness, movement has cause movement allows for centering opportunities. Energy from the brain starts moving downwards and with that, balance and harmony within our being are possible. If youre a runner, you know that in those moments when your body is in motion, there is no room for thought, contemplation or worry. Movement lets the experience of nomind occur and is therefore a very pow erful building block for mindfulness. Movement can range from simple household activities (doing the dishes, carrying children around, taking the stairs) to more active styles such as running and working out at the gym. Dance, yoga, Pilates, Tai Chi, Chi Gong are all forms of movement that support the energy to move from the head to the navel, also called our second brain. I often us the analogy of dating: you have to try out a bunch of different few classes or try some DVDs at home to see which style resonates with you and makes you feel vibrant and energetic. The right sleep With disorganized food and exercise patterns, is it any surprise that were a nation (and planet) riddled with sleep disorders? According to the Centers for Dis ease Control and Prevention, Persons also more likely to suffer from chronic diseases such as hypertension, diabetes, depression, and obesity, as well as from cancer, increased mortality, and reduced quality of life and productivity. Theres a reason for that. The liver carries out some serious work in our sleep, especially between 10 p.m. and 2 that we ingest during the day. If the liver isnt able to complete its job, the toxins return to the blood stream and circulate, causing imbalances and in turn a host of disorders. This capacity to regain and recoup during the night, what has been lost in the day, is central to our physical and psychological health. While there are guidelines for how much sleep is required, every body is different and other factors, such as age, play a role as well. Eastern wisdom recommends waking up with the sun because with the rising sun the bodys temperature begins to rise as well, but I recommend experimentation and com ing to your own conclusions. By balancing these areas in our lives we have a good shot at enjoying the bliss of mindfulness. Hows your foundation looking? 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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014 | Page 19 Tonight through March 30 Busytown (for children of all ages) Richard Scarrys stories and characters come to life in Busy town through March 30 at the Orlando Repertory Theatre. Using imaginative music and movement, Huckle Cat takes the audience on a tour of his neigh borhood introducing Farmer Pig and Grocer Cat, Construc tion Worker, and Fire Chief all working together to keep Busytown busy. For children of all ages, call 407-896-7365 or visit orlandorep.com Feb. 21 to March 2 The Orlando Premiere of Terminus The Empty Spaces Theatre Co(llaboration) will present Mark ORowes darkly visceral and very Irish work Terminus at the Shakespeare Center from Feb. 21 to March 2. The often hilarious and always-surprising lonely young woman, a guiltyoung man living in a world of singing serial killers, avenging angels and lovesick demons. First produced at the Abbey Theatre in Dublin in 2007, call 407-328-9005 for reservations. Feb. 21 and 22 Concertos by Candlelight: Vivaldi and Bach The 2014 Concertos by Can dlelight presents a playful and passionate program featuring Vivaldis Bassoon Concerto and Credo for choir coupled with violin ist Lara St. John performing Bachs Violin Concerto No. 1 and Violin Concerto No. 2 with the Bach Festival Orchestra. Per formances are set for Feb. 21 and 22 at 7:30 p.m. at Rollins College. Call 407-646-2182 or visit bachfes Feb. 22 A tribute to Louis Armstrong Since 1989 Byron Striplings tribute to Louis Satchmo Arm strong has been performed before 50 orchestras throughout the United States. Striplings trum pet virtuosity and vocal stylings have brought classics like Sweet Georgia Brown and Min nie the Moocher to audi ences at Lincoln Center and Carnegie Hall. In two perfor mances, on Feb. 22 at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m., Stripling will join the Orlando Philhar monic at the Bob Carr PAC to cel ebrate the musi cianship, wit and showmanship of Louis Armstrong. Call 407-477-1700 or visit orlandophil.org Feb. 22 Live from Orlando Its Science Night Live! Us grown-ups get to take over the Orlan do Science Center when its reserved strictly for adults at Science Night Live on Feb. 22 at 8 p.m. Guests will celebrate Thomas Edisons birth day by witnessing the electrifying High Voltage show; experience the premiere of Flight of the view stars and planets through the giant telescope in the Obser vatory; conduct lab experiments in Dr. Dares Laboratory; delight in food and adult beverages; and engage in science trivia to win prizes. Dress code is casual science nerd. Call 407-514-2000 or visit osc.org/snl Feb. 22 Cocina 214s Margarita Madness Recipe Contest Frozen, on the rocks or straight up with a salted rim margaritas are the libation of choice on Feb. 22 at 6:30 p.m. as Cocina 214 celebrates National Josh Garrick Culture for your calendar Please see CULTURE on page 20 Porte Noire is a community of independent cosmetology, health and wellness professionals. Now Reserving Private Studios 407-472-3732 PorteNoire.com Register before our Grand Opening on March 1st and receive 25% Off your first months registration. Call Now: 407-745-5661 March 1st 11:00AM 2:00PM Bring the kids to try out our gymnastics, batting cages, and rock wall. Tour our facility, meet our profesional staff, and enjoy drawings every 30 minutes for free classes, parties, boot camps, sports nutrition products, and MUCH MORE! www The o rlan d o athletics com 1984 W. New Hampshire St. Orlando, Florida 32804 College Park Its TAX time. Appointments Available 7 Days a Week!Tax Form Processing LLC4070 Aloma Ave., Suite 1010 Winter Park, FL 32792Tel: (407) 657-6336www.TaxFormProcessing.com Proudly Serving the Orlando Area for 19 years! Scan QR Code 40$ 00OffTax PreparationMust present this coupon at time service is provided. Offer valid for one-time use. Cannot be combined with any other offer. Expires April 15, 2014Offer Code: CFS14 CONCERTOS BY CANDLELIGHT TRIBUTE TO ARMSTRONG

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Page 20 | Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Margarita Day with the Margari ta Madness Recipe Contest. Con tenders submit margarita recipes for a chance to win a $100 gift card and have their recipe fea tured on the drink menu. The top three contestants will go headto-head, making their margarita recipes at the celebration with complimentary samples offered from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Cocina 214 is at 151 E. Welbourne Ave. in Winter Park. Visit Cocina214.com or call 407-790-7997. Feb. 22 and 23 Downtown (Orlando) Food & Wine Fest The annual Downtown Food & Wine Fest is set for Feb. 22 (noon to 9 p.m.) and Feb. 23 (noon to 7 p.m.) for the thousands of foodies and wine-lovers who wish to experience unique cuisine paired with wines from around the globe. Located in Orlando at Lake Eola, the twoday Fest features tastings from 40 of Orlandos premier restaurants, wine tastings, and live entertain ment. New for 2014 are ticket choices that include the Ultimate Fest Experience, the Wine Tast ers Club, and the VIP Bottle Service at The Liquid Lounge. Call 407-919-1048 or visit Down townFoodAndWineFest.com Feb. 23 Youth Orchestra presents Celebration of Music Education Concert In a concert featuring perfor mances from three of the orga nizations orchestras, the Florida Symphony Youth Orchestra will honor music educators for the life-changing work they do every day. By celebrating the key role music education plays in the lives of youths, the audience can expe rience and appreciate the merits of the players and the educators that have inspired them. The Celebration of Music Education Concert will take place on Feb. 23 at 3 p.m. at the College Park Baptist Church at 1914 Edgewater Drive in Orlando. Tickets are $8 to $16. Call 407-999-7800. CULTURE | Like food and wine? This is your weekend to try the best stuff that Orlando has to offer C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 19 Please see CULTURE on next page E and caterers, as well as beer, wine and desserts r A DIVISION OF VS MEDIA GROUP, INC. r f r n t b t n r f n t r b t n t r r r n f n r t t r r n r f n b b f f r b b f b r r f b f b n n r b f n b t b n b t b b f r b b f b t t r f b r b r t b f b t f r b r b t n f r n f r n r n b f f f r n b b r b f r b f f r f r b b f r b f r b r r f f b f b n rfntbttbbttttttb Rooted & grounded in Jesus Christ. The Learning Tree is a Ministry of First Baptist Church of Winter ParkWe offer Full-Day Infant Care and Childcare Year-Round, Preschool Classes, Summer Camp, and much more! 1021 New York Avenue N., Winter Park, Florida 32789 Established in 1972 we are celebrating 41 years of service this year. WAR HORSE

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014 | Page 21 Feb. 25 to March 2 War Horse on the Broadway Series War Horse is a World War I drama of courage, loyalty and friendship, playing for one week on the Orlando Broadway Series. Joey, young Alberts beloved horse, is sold to the cavalry and caught up in an extraordinary journey as Albert, too young to enlist, embarks on a treacher ous mission to bring him home. music and song, packed theaters in London and New York. With the theatricality of life-sized pup pets that bring to life galloping horses, call 800-448-6322 for your tickets. Feb. 26 Chili for Charity The Rotary Club of Winter Parks Chili for Charity event returns with creative chili recipes with a Winter Park attitude. Local restaurants, caterers and businesses compete for the coveted Peoples Choice award while having their dishes evalu ated by a panel of judges as live entertainment, drinks, dessert and a live auction round out the evening at the Winter Park Farm ers Market. 4 Rivers Smokehouse, Marlows Tavern, and The Meat House are three of the more than dozen competitors in this upscale chili cook-off set for Feb. 26 beginning at 5:30 p.m. Feb 26 Wine & Wit: A roast celebrating Dick Batchelor Raise your glasses to toast (and roast) one of Central Floridas most respected and ad mired community leaders Dick Batchelor, a former member of the Florida House of Representa tives and current business man, politi cal analyst, and child advocate. The evening will include live music, a special menu from 4Rivers Smokehouse and The COOP with live cook ing demonstration by Chef John Rivers, silent auction and the entertaining roast honoring Dick Batchelor. Beginning at 6 p.m. at Quantum Leap Winery in Orlando, the Roastmaster is Scott Maxwell of the Orlando Sentinel. Other roasters include Mayor Teresa Jacobs, Mayor Buddy Dyer, Congressman Lou Frey, Mark NeJame and more. Call 407-2150095, ext. 211, or email mdearth@ Feb. 28 Don Quixote by the Moscow Festival Ballet Rich in Spanish tradition (and Russian ballet bravado), Don Quixote (the ballet) brings Cer vantes masterpiece to life in the timeless story of an aging knight and his imaginary adventures. Setting out to rescue the lady of his dreams, Don Quixote leads a charge against invisible rivals, puppets and windmills. The Moscow Festival Ballet merges the highest classical elements of the great Bolshoi and Kirov Ballet companies at the Peabody Auditorium in Daytona Beach for one performance only at 7 p.m. on Feb. 28. Call 386-253-2901 or visit dbss.org Looking ahead with the gener ous chefs of Central Florida March 1 Appetite for the Arches On March 1, Central Floridas creativity for a great cause at Ronald McDonald House Chari ties of Central Floridas Appetite for the Arches fundraising event. At this event, partici pating chefs from more than a dozen restaurants will use McDonalds ingredients to create palate-pleas ing dishes for guests to sample. In addition to the food, guests will enjoy drinks, live music, a silent and a live auction. Ronald McDonald House provides a home and care to families with children receiving treatment at local hospitals in Orlando. Visit ronaldmcdonaldhouseorlando. org/events. March 6 Books and Cooks to benet the Winter Park Public Library The Alfond Inn is the setting for an evening of celebrity chefs signing their books to support the Winter Park Public Library. Featuring John Rivers of 4 Rivers Smokehouse, Brandon Mc Glamery of Prato and Luma on Park, Norman Van Aken of Normans at the Ritz-Carlton, Rich ard Gonzmart of Columbia Restau rants, and Hollis Wilder of Sweet By Holly. The $25 ticket includes the authors panel at The Alfond Inn, a bourbon cocktail (recipe by John Rivers), and gourmet snacks by Luma on Park and Sweet By Miss Holly. Contact P. Corkum at pcorkum@wppl.org or call 407-623-3277. CULTURE | Come out and enjoy Wine and Wit, a comedy roast featuring former Florida Rep. Dick Batchelor C ONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906. KEEP UP WITH MAITLAND NEWS AND EVENTS!www.IndependenceLane.com Facebook.com/ItsMyMaitland BATCHELOR This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORG @EnzianTheater FLORIDA FILM FESTIVAL April 4-13, 2014 Passes and Packages on sale now! Floridalmfestival.com THE PAST Winner! Best Actress, Cannes Film Festival Berenice Bejo Winner! Best Foreign Language Film National Board of Review Fri, Sat, Sun 3:15, 6:30, 9:30 Mon, Wed, Thurs 6:30, 9:30 Tues 6:30Peanut Butter Matinee Family Film: MY DOG SKIPIt is family friendly, only $5, and a special Kids Menu will be offered! Sun 12PM Cult Classics: WATERMELON MAN Tues 9:30

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Page 22 | Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Opinions Chris Jepson Perspectives Oftentimes in life the question is not whether it is going to hurt, but rather how much. The vague sense of unease Ive experi enced the past 45 years over the decline of Happy Days idiom, jumped the shark. deck chairs on the Titanic was of small consolation as the ship sank. How pro vincial. That is so yesterday. What were Krug 1988, a little orchestral background music and laughter. And, why not? The party aint nearly over. How does one balance what one under stands about Earths ecology, that there are too many humans at the trough and that what we call progress for our species has been unequivocally devastating to the planet? On one hand, the Industrial Revolution has made toaster-ovens and SUVs oh-so essential, but at great expense to our air, land and water. Whether or not you be lieve in climate change is incidental to me denial is indeed an option no one, how ever, can legitimately argue that human activity is not eliminating entire species of I was watching The Daily Show with Jon Stewart last week as he interviewed Elizabeth Kolbert, author of The Sixth Extinction. Granted, The Daily Show is comedy, yet Stewarts topics are seldom funny. Stewart uses humor, sarcasm and derision to comment on todays political, social and economic realities. I recommend his show. Elizabeth Kolbert was making the point that human activity is leading to a sixth extinction. It is a sobering account of what we humans have wrought for the planet and that we continue do so at our peril. Environmentalist Paul Ehrlich described human activity thusly: In pushing other species to extinction, humanity is busy sawing off the limb on which it perches. Hahaha! Too funny, the human condi tion. Stewart made an observation about Kolberts premise (human activity/specie loss) and then, sarcastically under his breath, said something to the effect that we might as well, Laugh our way to extinc tion. And, I thought, Hey, uncork the champagne! conversation suggested that 1) A mass extinction caused by human activity is un derway; 2) Its inexorable, we really cant stop it even if we try; and 3) What the hell, we might as well laugh about it. No one up to this point in any conversation Ive ever listened to suggested chuckling might be an appropriate response to our killing the planet. I suppose it is gallows humor. Were all gonna swing, might as well hope it doesnt rain, huh? Part of me greatly admires that most human of qualities, the ability to laugh at the tragic. I do. We humans are a resilient lot. I could list what weve lost, what were losing and some will say, Ho-hum, I was never going to make it to the Great Barrier Reef, anyway, or, Hey, Im recycling, what more can I do? And that is the cruel rub, even if we scrubbed clean the envi ronment of our Industrial Revolution(s), 2 billion more human beings are coming on line (this century) wanting their toaster ovens, SUVs, air-conditioning and lipstick. No amount of laughter will make the world more palatable when the monarch whether, but rather. Laughing our way to extinction Jepson is a 27-year resident of Central Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.US Louis Roney Play On! his wife Linda at the home of a good friend. The next time we saw the Russells was at a birthday party where Randy dis played his formidable musical talents both as a singer and saxophonist. Highly versa tile, Mr. Russell recently made us a present of no less than a book he has published. The book is a compact history of the Unit ed States called American History in No Time, labeled A Quick and Easy Read for the Essentials by Randolph G. Rus sell (it is purchasable at AmericanHistory InNoTime.com). In my opinion, Russells book would be an asset to anyone who is interested in our national biography. And it might well suit to a T anyone who could be helpful in the hands of those who are seeking citizenship in our country. Mr. Russells brief 108 pages miss few if any tricks in covering all the important histori cal events in our history and encapsulate everything one would need who is looking for a fact reviewing pre-exam pony. places and well never know the reasons why! When Mark Twain quoted his friend Charles Dudley Warner saying, Every body talks about the weather but nobody does anything about it, he started many an idle conversation. I have yet to under stand the compelling reason that so many people live in North Dakota. If you live in Florida, you are often inclined to mention the bright warm winter days we enjoy as our usual fare, but you may be ashamed to crow much about the obvious. I think the folks in North Dakota already know the plusses of living in our Sunshine State! When I used to concertize for community concerts all over the U.S., I often won dered why, with so many roads running in all directions, people settled in so many places without any obvious selling points. Still, theres some person at least who lives where theres a house anywhere on the map. seem to know the answers to the questions they ask of most other people but the answers may not be the ones they seek. Writing Play On! through several de cades, I have dared to express my opinion on myriad subjects, knowing that all opin ments are famously called, restatements of long-held prejudices. The human mind is amazingly spacious and, concomitantly, amazingly self-serving. Politicians know well the value of setting up their ideas by publicly asking themselves the proper questions. These days, there are many questions about the president and his air we breathe. I dont claim to have the answers to many of lifes conundrums, but I have a plethora of questions: Do I like the president? Thats quite another question. Does it really matter? people which preserve a republic in vigor. A degeneracy in these is a canker which soon eats to the heart of its laws and con stitution. Thomas Jefferson recently, was seven years younger than I, and I remember seeing her in my early teens when she was a prodigious child movie actress. At that time I cared little for girls especially little girl movie stars. W.C. Fields often said, Never go on stage with a dog or a child. Shirley proved the wisdom of that saying many times. A friend of my b.w.s, musical composer Jay Gorney, set Shirley on the top of his piano in a Hollywood movie studio in 1934 and told the producer, Here is your new child Stand Up and Cheer. The rest is history. Everything Shirley did in her long useful life was the real McCoy, and she had no diminishing vulnerabilities. She delivered the goods powerfully as an actress and later as a diplomat for her country. Along the way she worked for presidents Nixon, Ford, Reagan and H. W. Bush, and in their service she was never called upon to sing or to tap dance. government than is necessary, too many parasites living on the labor of the indus trious. Thomas Jefferson In no time, et al. About Roney: HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney) Sometimes there is no greater pleasure than spending an afternoon reading a good book. I read as much as I can, partic broken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption by Laura Hillenbrand. The book details the struggle of American airman Louis Zamperini who during the Second World War. Another great book is Patrick D. Smiths book A novel chronicles three generation of a fam ily that settled in Florida in the 1850s and gradually left their rural lifestyle behind as their success and wealth grew. It is one of my favorite books and a must read for every Florida resident. You can read great books like these and many others at one of the Orange County Library Systems many branches countywide. Our library system has items for nearly every interest. Our librarys collection houses more than 1.7 million individual cals. You can download e-books, music, videos and 250 magazines titles from the librarys website, ocls.info You can even have items dropped off at your doorstep free of charge. Simply check out items via the library website or by phone at 407-8357323. To return an item, simply mail it back or drop it off at your nearest branch. the Albertson Library opened in 1920. Since then, the library system has ex panded to 15 branches. The current main library in downtown Orlando was opened in 1966 and has grown to the size of a city block. The number of library branches has doubled since 1980 to meet the needs of Orange Countys ever growing popula tion. Today, the library system has a staff of 350 and a budget of $35.3 million per year. The library offers many other services as well. Our library system has the largest Finding a good book Ted Edwards Commissioners Corner genealogy collection in the Southeastern United States. The library also runs the Orlando Memory archive to document stories, images, and personal recollec tions of Orlando residents of years past. The library hosts approximately 1,000 seminars and educational programs per month across all of its 15 locations ranging from arts and cultural events, activities for children and teens, technology classes, and musical programs. Earlier this month, the downtown library opened the Dorothy Lumley Melrose Center for Technology, In novation & Creativity. The center provides hands on experience with audio and video recording and mixing, fabrication using a 3D printer, and various computer pro grams from QuickBooks to Photoshop. The Orange County Library System has branches within easy reach of most District 5 residents. Residents of the northwestern part of the district, including Maitland, the west side of Winter Park, and College Park can access the Eatonville branch at 200 E. Kennedy Blvd. and the Edgewater branch at 5049 Edgewater Drive. Downtown, Baldwin Park, and southern Winter Park residents are within a short distance away from the downtown main library at 101 E. Central Blvd. and the Herndon Branch at 4324 E. Colonial Drive. Residents on the east side can visit the Alafaya branch at 12000 E. Colonial Drive. Additionally, both the City of Winter Park and the City of Maitland operate their own libraries, which offer similar services. They are located at 460 East New England Ave. in Winter Park, and 501 S. Maitland Ave. in Maitland, respectively. With so many locations and programs available, I hope you will take advantage of all our public libraries have to offer. Our library is a symbol of Orange Countys commitment to improving the quality of life for our residents. If you need assis obtaining a library card, or have any other questions or concerns about county government, please feel free to contact me or my staff, Edgar Robinson and Lynette Rummel. We can be reached at 407-836

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014 | Page 23 WPMObserver.com OBSERVER Just Sold Homes SUNDAY 12-3 NEW PRICE! BEAUTIFULLY UPDATED WP HOME 1689 Hibiscus Ave, Winter Park. 4BD/3BA, 2,851 SF. New kitchen with granite 2007, 3 new ACs in 2007, 2nd master suite downstairs, wood floors, spacious updated master bath with 2 sinks, gran ite, shower & separate tub plus bonus room off master! Large screened porch opens to backyard. Screened porch off front downstairs bedroom & off master suite upstairs. $499,000 SUNDAY 1-4 MEDITERRANEAN TOWNHOME ON TREE LINED STREET 541 Fairfax Avenue, Winter Park. 3BD/2.5BA, 2,095SF. Light and bright townhome with vaulted ceilings, wood floors, bonus loft and a private court yard. Large downstairs master bedroom with fireplace and French door access to courtyard. Large eat-in kitchen with breakfast nook. New interior paint, new carpet and refinished wood floors. Over sized two car garage. Great location just blocks from Park Avenue. $450,000 OPEN AND UPDATED LAKEFRONT HOME 520 Lake Shore Drive, Maitland. 3BD/3BA, 2,463SF. Magnificent views of Lake Faith! Custom kitchen opens to living and dining areas with vaulted pine ceilings for ideal open floor plan. Enor mous Florida room with brick and granite bar. Large windows and bamboo flooring throughout. Beautiful open back porch and paver patio. Move-in ready! $499,000 GREAT HOME IN AVALON PARKS SOUTH VILLAGE 4145 Cummings Street, Orlando. 3BD/2BA, 2,339SF. Open kitchen with stainless steel appliances. Wonderful tile flooring throughout all the living areas. Spacious master suite with walk in closet and garden tub. Tremendous bonus room upstairs. Fantastic outdoor space with pavered patio area, pergola, built-in fire pit and relandscaped backyard. $295,000 SECLUDED MAITLAND POOL HOME 431 W Sybelia Avenue, Maitland. 5BD/4.5BA, 3,903SF. Large master suite opens to the pool area. Split floor plan. Hardwood and Mexican tile flooring. Gor geous kitchen with granite countertops. Two bedrooms are upstairs with shared bath. Privacy wall behind home. $579,000 Sunday, February 23rd 405 Lakewood Drive, Winter Park FL 32789 4 BR | 3 BA | 4,208 SF | $3,220,000 Exquisite lakefront estate on the Winter Park Chain of Lakes. Designer gourmet kitchen, private master retreat, Travertine tile & Brazilian walnut floors. Incredible outdoor living space with fireplace over looking the lake. No expense was spared in the design and creation of this mag nificent home. Hosted by: Rhonda Chesmore with Kelly Price & Company from 1-4 PM 1700 E. Winter Park Road, Winter Park FL 32789 3 BR | 2 BA | 1,438 SF | $349,000 Two story home on a tree lined street in Winter Park! Corner lot with a driveway on Lake Sue Road. Hardwood floors and updated master bath. Cozy kitchen has stainless steel appliances and granite counter tops. Hosted by: Renee Dee Morgan with Kelly Price & Company from 2-4 PM 1003 Fleck Avenue, Orlando FL 32804 2 BR | 1 BA | 986 SF | $132,000 Enjoy a quiet, College park neighbor hood with access to Big Lake Fairview! Situated on a corner lot, this home fea tures hardwood flooring, fresh paint, new kitchen appliances, new plumbing and updated electrical. Lake access for an amazing price! Hosted by: Jennifer JJ Mackle with Kelly Price & Company from 1-4 PM 1531 Mizell Avenue, Winter Park FL 32789 2 BR | 2 BA | 1,265 SF | $849,999 One of a kind property on a perfectly manicured double lot in sought-after Syl van Lake Shores neighborhood! Nestled on the west side of the property is a two bedroom, two full bath bungalow and sparkling pool. The east side of the prop erty has been transformed into a tranquil park-like setting including hidden garden arbor, and rose bushes. Hosted by: Amanda Geller with Kelly Price & Company from 1-4 PM 323 Hermitage Drive, Altamonte Springs FL 32701 4 BR | 2 BA | 1,962 SF | $275,000 Spectacular pool home on a picturesque street! Open kitchen has been remod eled with an under-counter wine fridge, designer lighting, Silestone countertops and custom cherry wood cabinets. Fam ily room has sliding glass doors that lead Wendy Williams Crumit 788 Brightwa ter Cir, Maitland $575,000. 02/11/2014 Catherine DAmico 1510 Mizell Ave, Winter Park $450,000. 02/12/2014 Wendy Williams Crumit 2097 Poin ciana Road, Winter Park $252,000. 02/12/2014 John McDade 908 Sweetbriar Road, Orlando $272,000. 02/13/2014 MaryStuart Day/Megan Cross 1736 Bar celona Way, Winter Park $438,500. 02/13/2014 Maria Van Warner 1924 Meeting Place, Orlando $465,000. 02/14/2014 Maria Van WarnerMaria Van Warner 1236 Waterwitch Cove, Orlando $433,000. 02/14/2014 Melissa Woodman 5512 Chenault Ave, Orlando $190,000. 02/14/2014 Maria Van Warner 329 Bahia Cir, Long wood $198,500. 02/14/2014 263 Minorca Beach Way Unit 802, New Smyrna Beach FL 32169 sold by Kelly L. Price with Kelly Price & Company 1691 Palm Avenue, Winter Park FL 32789 sold by Padgett McCormick with Kelly Price & Company 3348 Lakeview Oaks Drive, Long wood FL 32779 sold by Kelly L. Price with Kelly Price & Company 520 Ruffel Street, Maitland FL 32751 sold by Cindy Watson with Kelly Price & Company OBSERVER Open Houses THE MARKE T PLA C E MindGym February 17, 2014 MindGymFebruary 17, 2014 ANNOUNCEMENTS Absolute Auction. Ponce de Leon FL. 11+/acres, 21,000+/sq. ft. of improvements near US Hwy 90, offered in 7 parcels Febru ary 27, 1:00pm, gtauctions.com, 205.326.0833, Granger,Thagard & Asso ciates, Inc. G.W.Thagard AU2846,AB2100,BK3009116. FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now survive DIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922 rfff ntb t nrrffrnftb rr b b rn b rrfn b nrr b rrfrntnbnnnnbbnnbn frnrfnnrnnttfrftfrfft nnnnfrtfrnb rfntb rf ntand soreness nb naches THG-13903 out to the sunny Florida room. Formal living and dining rooms complete this beautiful home! Hosted by: Debbie Tassell with Kelly Price & Company from 1-4 PM ANNOUNCEMENTS Winter Park Benefit Shop: at 140 Lyman Avenue, Winter Park needs items to sell: clothing, bedding, jewelry, kitchenware/bric-a brac. Need volun teers contact Elizabeth Comer 407647-8276. Open 9:30am-2pm every Tues & Fri (and Sat 10am-2PM). Pro ceeds support childrens programs and the Orlando Blind Assoc. EDUCATION You can become an expert in HVAC installation and repair. Pinnacle Career Institute Online HVAC education in as little as 12 months. Call us today: 1-877-651-3961 or go online: www.HVAC-Online-Education.com FINANCIAL SERVICES Angel Oak Funding has branched out to Winter Park, FL Specializing in Mortgage Financing. Out side the box products include: Conven tional, FHA, VA & a full suite of Jumbo products all in-house! Equity lines up to 90%. Exclusive product for borrowers one day out of short sale, foreclosure & bankruptcy. Angel Oak Funding, LLC 321-689-8402 lee.foster@angeloak funding.com HEALTH & MEDICAL Liberation by American Standard Walk-In Bath Dont Struggle Getting Out Of A Normal Bathtub. Stay in your home longer, safely, independently. Liberation Walk-In Baths Commended by the Arthritis Foundation. Best Lifetime Warranty in the industry. Hydrotherapy, Chromatherapy, Aroma therapy no extra cost. Installation Included!Get $1,000 Off Call Toll-Free Today 1-866-583-1432. HELP WANTED CDL-A Team Owner Operators: $2,500 Lease Incentive! Team Dedicated Routes. Great Revenue & Regular Weekly Home Time! 888-486-5946 NFI Indus tries nfipartners.com Now Hiring OTR CDLA Drivers. New Pay Package and $2500 Sign-On Bonus! Mostly 5-10 days out, full bene fits, achievable bonuses. Call for details 1-888-978-3791/apply www.heyl.net MISCELLANEOUS AIRLINE CAREERS begin here Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Finan cial aid for qualified students. Job place ment assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-741-9260 www. FixJets.com MISCELLANEOUS DISH TV Retailer. Starting $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) Broadband Internet starting $14.95/ month (where available.) Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL Now! 1-800-980-6193 REAL ESTATE: FOR RENT SANFORD Free standing retail/ office building, 2640 SF, great signage & visibility. Lease for $2800 per month (also for sale). Call John, owner/broker, 407-492-7111 Winter Park Real Estate Offices for rent (Winter Park/Goldenrod/University). Doc tors office w/5 exam rooms + extra fea tures. Other office units available from 800-3000 SF. New Orleans style bldg; great prices. Call Ann 407-293-1934. an npolasek@cfl.rr.com REAL ESTATE: FOR SALE Mobile Homes with acreage. Ready to move in. Seller Financing (sub ject to credit approval). Lots of room for the price, 3Br 2Ba. No renters. 850-3086473 VMFhomes.com New Log Home* on 10+ acres only $89,900 3 Bed, 2 bath log home w direct river access. Conve nient to downtown Jacksonville. Excel lent financing. Call now 877-525-3033, x.19 *Constructed weather-tight log home shell. EHO Spectacular Blue Ridge Mtn View. 1+ Acre only $14,900! Gorgeous corner parcel in prime No. Georgia location w/ spectacular Blue Ridge Mountain view. Next to U.S. National Forest. Paved roads, municipal water & underground power. Mild restrictions, RV friendly. Call & ask about our FREE overnight stay with tour. Excellent low rate financing. Call now 1-866-952-5303, Ext. 169

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Page 24 | Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer MindGym February 17, 2014 MindGymFebruary 17, 2014 MindGym February 17, 2014 MindGym February 17, 2014 MindGym February 17, 2014 ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Your efforts in behalf of a colleague do not go unnoticed, let alone unappreciated. Meanwhile, arrange to spend more time investigating that troubling fact you recently uncovered. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Devoting a lot of time to a current career move means having less time for those in your private life. But once you explain the circumstances, they should understand and be supportive. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Organizing your many duties in order of importance should help you get through them pretty quickly. Addi tional information puts that still-to-bemade decision in a new light. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Lin gering bad feelings over a recent misunderstanding should fade as recon ciliation efforts continue. Meanwhile, vacation plans might need to be revised because of new developments. LEO (July 23 to August 22) Love dominates the Lions heart this week, with Cupid shooting arrows at single Leos and Leonas looking for romance. Partnered pairs also enjoy strengthened relationships. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Getting to Know You should be the single Virgos theme song as you and that special person discover more about one another. That workplace situation needs looking into. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) You might be upset at having your objectivity questioned in the handling of a dispute. But it would be wise to re-examine your feelings to make sure youre being fair with both sides. SCORPIO (October 23 to Novem ber 21) A family dispute creates mixed feelings about how you hope it will be ultimately resolved. Best advice: Stay out of it and let the involved parties work it through by themselves. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Making an effort to smooth over even the smallest obstacles now will go a long way to assuring that things run smoothly once youre set to move on with your plans. CAPRICORN (December 22 to Jan uary 19) A challenge to your authority can be upsetting, but your longtime supporters want you to defend your position so you can win over even your most adamant detractors. AQUARIUS (January 20 to Febru ary 18) Being unable to get involved in a friends problem calls for an honest approach. Provide explanations, not excuses. Another friend might be able to offer support for your decision. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) You find yourself swimming in circles, looking for some way to get back on a straight course. But things get easier once youre able to refocus your ener gies. BORN THIS WEEK: Youre known for your charm and your wis dom, and theres no one who wouldnt want you to be part of his or her life. 2014 King Features Syndicate March 6, 1475, Michelangelo Buonarroti, the greatest of the Italian Renaissance artists, is born in the vil lage of Caprese. His most important early work was the Pieta (1498), which showed the body of Christ in the lap of the Virgin Mary. He extracted the two perfectly balanced figures of the Pieta from a single block of marble. March 8, 1862, the Confederate ironclad Virginia wreaks havoc on a Yankee squadron off Hampton Roads, Va., when it attacked the U.S.S. Cum berland. Other Union ships fired back, but the shots were, in the words of one observer, having no more effect than peas from a pop-gun. March 3, 1931, President Her bert Hoover signs a congressional act making The Star-Spangled Banner the official national anthem of the United States. In 1814, Francis Scott Key composed the lyrics after witnessing the massive overnight British bombardment of Fort McHenry in Maryland during the War of 1812. March 4, 1944, Louis Lepke Buchalter, the head of Murder, Inc., is executed at Sing Sing Prison in New York. Lepke was the leader of the countrys largest crime syndicate throughout the 1930s. His downfall came when several members of his notorious killing squad became witnesses for the government. March 9, 1959, the first Barbie doll goes on display at the American Toy Fair in New York City. Barbie was the first mass-produced toy doll in the United States with adult features. Barbies appearance was modeled on a doll named Lilli, based on a German comic-strip character, and originally was marketed as a racy gag gift to adult men. March 5, 1977, the Dial-aPresident radio program, featuring President Jimmy Carter and CBS news anchorman Walter Cronkite, airs for the first time. Approximately 9 million calls flooded the radio studio during the two-hour broadcast. March 7, 1987, Mike Tyson defeats James Bonecrusher Smith to unify the WBA and WBC heavy weight titles. At age 20, Tyson became the youngest undisputed heavyweight champion in boxing history. 2014 King Features Synd., Inc. King Features Weekly ServiceFebruary 17, 2014 Its FREE to place estate sales, garage sales and yard sales on this page! Visit WPMObserver .com and click Create Your Classified