Winter Park-Maitland observer

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title:
Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication:
Winter Park FL
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates:
28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID:
UF00091444:00296


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Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014 Serving Winter Park, Maitland, Baldwin Park, College Park and Goldenrod50+ tax WPMOBSERVER.COM Winter Parks Best Western Mt. Vernon Inn could be on its way out if a land transaction with Unicorp National Developments closes at the end of 2014. Unicorp has the 65-year-old hotel under contract to make way for a new development, which includes plans for a new hotel in place of the Inn. The deal wont be closed until November of this year, but is likely to close as long as the city revises its building codes to allow more density, Mt. Vernon Inn Proprietor Rick Frazee said. Its a happy/sad deal, Frazee said. Things change. Im 65. Its about time I decide what Im going to do with the rest of my life. The hotel is a very challenging, time-consuming operation. The Mt. Vernon Inn has come a long way since its start as a USPS 00-6186 Publisher statement on page 4. VISIT WPMOBSERVER.COMSUBSCRIBE NOW! WHERE CULTURE MEETS POPLIFESTYLES, 7Whats your recycling goal?County shoots for 50 percent. COMMISSIONERS CORNER, 9Culture season revs upMark your calendar this week. CULTURE FOR YOUR CALENDAR, 11COMMUNITY BULLETIN ........... 4 CALENDAR ................... 4 LIFESTYLES ................... 7 SPORTS ..................... 9 CULTURE .................... 11 OPINIONS ................... 13 CLASSIFIEDS ................. 32 Gerhard Munster leans back in a chair on his homes patio deck, gazing at a portly white trawler boat pointed toward the St. Johns River in Sanford. Long into retirement, he seems ever at ease on a chilly Friday after noon, pondering his future a few weeks away at sea aboard the Raz-Ma-Taz. Hes not quite sure where hes going yet. The ever-smiling Austrian expat picks up a yellowed old newspaper from the table in front of him. On the front page of the Winter Park Observer, his smile, 25-years-younger, stares right back at him. Next to the photo, written in his own words: This is the culmination of a boyhood sleeping under a desk with no heater in the middle of winter. But he had his own news paper his dream come true. His history with the printed page began three decades and 5,000 miles before. A paper boy and Vienna Boys Choir member in his home in Austrias capital, he would grow up and ship out for a post with the Sunday Times in South Africa, work aboard the doomed sailing ship HMS Bounty and sell ads at pa pers throughout Florida. But his dream came true behind a Winn-Dixie supermarket in a converted duplex with a shower rigged up in the carport and a rickety abandoned layout table in the living room. It took three weeks to introduce the Winter The design was painstakingly laid by hand on pasteboards. Munster sold the ads, assembled an army of writers and an editorial board, and pasted up the newspaper himself on a layout board hed designed and built from a door hed pulled off its hinges. The submissions came in written by hand. He had to retype them all. He couldnt afford to have photos printed at $9.50 each, so he de signed his own rendering process using mi croscopic dots to get around the price. When his celebrity columnist acclaimed novelist Sloan Wilson asked to be paid $250 a week, Munster offered him a silver dollar. He ac cepted. In big bold white letters, the National Bank of Commerces ad on the front page of the in augural issue, Thursday, Jan. 26, 1989, read Great Expectations. I had no idea what I was doing, Munster said with a laugh. And just like that, the Observer had its eye on the city. Back then the eagle atop the page hand-drawn by Munster soared only above the words Winter Park. It only took a couple years before the Observers nameplate said Maitland too. the Observer. Munsters green Army Jeep rolling down the street during parades or parked care of that. Trying to grab non-traditional readers, he started personally delivering new The growth came quickly, as Munsters knack for marketing combined with the tal ents of a mishmash of staff from all walks of life. Back then the paper had a movie re PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERWinter Park Observer founder Gerhard Munster reads a copy of the papers rst issue, which was published 25 years ago this week. He retired in 2007 after serving as editor and publisher of the award-winning paper for 18 years. Twenty-ve years of newsISAAC BABCOCK Observer staff Please see ANNIVERSARY on page 2Mt. Vernon Inns nal checkoutUpcoming development could replace 65-year-old Mt. Vernon Inn with new hotelObserver reaches milestoneTIM FREED Observer staff Please see INN on page 4 407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC Winter Park Recovery CenterNow Is the Time to Make Your New Years Resolution Executive Drug, Alcohol & Weight-Loss Programs Privacy and Confidentiality Assured Medically Managed Dual Diagnosis Evidenced Based Solutions2056 Aloma Ave, Suite 100, Winter Park, FL 32792 www.WinterParkRecoveryCenter.com 407-629-0413 PHOTO BY TIM FREED THE OBSERVERThe Mt. Vernon Inn has been owned by the Frazee family since 1962, though it has stood since 1948.

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Page 2 | Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer ANNIVERSARY | Observer founder traveled the globe working for newspapers before his dream came trueabout The Accidental Tourist. ole Arthurs was advertising di rector, a post she would hold for two decades. Along the way she would pick up writing and pho tography, becoming one of the pa pers key reporters. In the summer of 1989, colum nist Chris Jepson came on board. A few months later, world famous opera singer Louis Roneys Play On! column debuted. Counter balancing each others politics, theyve been with the Observer ever since. And through it all, beyond the story of the helicopter that crashed into a Winter Park back yard, the destruction of the Winter Park Mall and rise of the Village, the end of a violent era in Hanni bal Square and the transformation of a new walkable doppelganger for Park Avenue, the Observer served as a conduit for it all. In the spring of 2007, Kyle Tay lor came knocking at Munsters door just as Munster was con sidering retirement. Within a few months, a new era for the Observ er dawned, though it was in the same old duplex with the brown shag carpets and an old pool table in the storage room. I loved the connection [the Observer] had to the community, said Taylor, who became the pa pers publisher that summer. Alex Babcock would helm the paper as editor for much of those tired, spearheading ambitious stories on the changing face of Winter Park and Maitland and the personal struggles of friends and families in the community. Getting to help people, thats why I got into journalism, he wrote of his time as editor. I believe in the ideal of the citizen reporter, the person whos asking questions that need answers, an swers that will get things changed for the better. The Observer gave us the chance to do that. Ill never forget the pride in of the west side of Winter Park, of the history of that area and the efforts of the west sides commu nity leaders to maintain a proud heritage, while they pushed out bad elements and did their best to accommodate the changes they in some ways dont have any choice but to accommodate. The research that went into that series, it was a real eye-opener about a commu nity wrestling with change, and ing. But it was a tough time for the newspaper business. By the end of 2008 the world had fallen into what would become the worst recession since the Great Depression. It was a tough business envi ronment, especially for newspa pers, Taylor said. It was chal lenging for all of us. The paper would go digital, making the jump to the Internet in the most economically trying era in the history of newspapers. I got to modernize the most reliable source of news for the area, Babcock said. That was the job I was handed take something good and make it fresh and new, put it on the level of the Sentinel, and get readers talking about it. We had a very solid foundation, including an archive like a treasure trove of Winter Park and Maitland history. We knew what the Observer was; the question for us was, What will it be? As the newspaper found ways to adapt and survive, it also won accolades statewide. To date the Observer has won 10 Florida Press Association Awards in the FPAs annual Better Weekly Newspaper competition under the helm of Babcock, Jenny Andreasson, who served as editor from January of 2009 to November of 2012, and the former editors twin brother Isaac Babcock, who has been the Observers editor since Novem ber of 2012. For Andreasson, who earned the role of associate editor only a year after joining the paper out of college, it was a transformative experience. I had wonderful support from all the connections Id made in the community, she said. It showed me how a community can come together and support each other. The cities could never be covered by the [Orlando Sentinel] like they can with this newspaper. Every week when the paper would arrive at the Observers ing, she said. The community that Winter Park, Maitland, Baldwin Park, College Park and Goldenrod will become is happening every day, waiting for its stories to be told. Thats something publisher Tracy Craft, who took over in March of 2012, said will always be available in the palm of your hand with the Observer. Theres something special about being able to read about your friends and family in a com munity paper that you can hold and touch, she said. While we continue to grow in the digital age, I think our roots will always be in the print version. The paper will always be the backbone. Back at his home, with RazMa-Taz waiting at the dock, Munster heads outside and checks the mailbox. His Ob server isnt there yet. Twentyevery week. The beginning was rough, but I got a great kick out of it, he said. With another cold Janu ary sending his thoughts to warmer waters in a few weeks, hes feeling adventurous again. He just needs to decide where his future will take him. Hell take a look at the Ob past some southern horizon. He knows a new paper will be wait ing at home when he gets back. But this Thursday will be a little different. Hell pick up the Observer just like he does every week, and itll be that moment in himself saying hello again, from back when a dream was just com ing true. We want to be your voice in the community, Munster wrote in Volume 1, Number 1. We are your newspaper, and we will never forget that. CONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE at Winter Park Towers Your room is waiting for you if you need Pain and Symptom Management Hospital Follow-up Complex Treatments, or Crisis Care Referrals 866-742-6655#5019096 www.cornerstonehospice.org www.SeriousIllness.org/cornerstoneMedicare, Medicaid, most commercial insurances accepted rfrntbtn rrfrntbbr rbbrrnr rfnrrnrnnfnn rfrfrntbbrrrnnnnr rbrrfrfbb rn rrfrrn rrfrffrbnnnr nrrnnrnnrfbb rnnrn f rf rfntbbbbbbbbb PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERA group of cats read the Winter Park Observer as depicted by Miami artist Herbert Hofer. Munsters Sanford home is lled with art dedicated to his time as the papers publisher. Read founding publisher Gerhard Munsters column about starting the Observer on Page 5 of this issue.

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014 | Page 3 Maitland City TalkBY HOWARD SCHIEFERDECKER MAYOR The Maitland City Council meets the second and fourth Mon day of the month at 6:30 p.m. The next meeting is scheduled for Jan. 27 in the Council Chambers, 1776 Independence Lane. Below is the agenda for that meeting. Special Presentations ilton-Buss CRA/Council MeetingPublic Hearings Urban Chicken Keeping Lease RenewalOld Businesssource OrdinanceConsent Agenda Meeting Minutes of Jan. 13. ation Advisory Board Minutes of Oct. 2, 2013 and Nov. 6, 2013. U.S. Highway 17-92 at Horatio tractor Inc. Medical Services EMS Matching Part-Time School Crossing Guard Thistle Lane/Mohawk Trail.Decision Item: ment Plan (CDP) Committee Re portDiscussion For updates, please check our website at itsmymaitland.comAre you pet-responsible? We are large enough to give you what you want and small enough to provide it the way you want it. To learn more, please visit any of our banking centers from Orlando to Miami or call us at 1-800-435-8839.13-0089/rev090113 citynational.com Member FDIC Personal Relationships | Local Decisions | StabilityREDEFINING BANKING. 1115-8 CNwinterPrk.indd 1 11/20/13 9:40 AM

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Page 4 | Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014 PHONE: 407-563-7000 FAX: 407-563-7099 WPMOBSERVER.COMPUBLISHERTracy Craft407.515.2605TCraft@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MANAGING EDITORIsaac Babcock 407.563.7023IBabcock@TurnstileMediaGroup.comASSOCIATE EDITORSarah Wilson 407.563.7026SWilson@TurnstileMediaGroup.comDESIGNERTom Miller 407.563.7032TMiller@TurnstileMediaGroup.comSTAFF WRITERSBrittni Larson Megan Stokes Tim Freed Allison Olcsvay Kristy VickeryCOLUMNISTSChris JepsonJepson@MediAmerica.usLouis RoneyLRoney@cfl.rr.comJosh GarrickJoshGarrick9@gmail.comADVERTISING SALESLinda Stern407.376.2434LStern@TurnstileMediaGroup.comLEGAL NOTICE ADVERTISINGAshley McBride 407.286.0807Legal@FLALegals.comSUBSCRIPTIONS/CIRCULATIONLuana Baez 407.563.7013LBaez@TurnstileMediaGroup.comMEMBER OF: -Florida Press Association -Winter Park/Maitland/Goldenrod Chambers of CommerceWinter Park/Maitland Observer is published by Turnstile Media Group. Founded in 1990 and headquartered in Orlando, Fla., Turnstile Media Group is also the parent of Golfweek, Golfweek Custom Media, TurfNet, Professional Artist, Seminole Voice, Baldwin Park Living and Turnstile Connect.TURNSTILE MEDIA GROUPCHAIRMANRance CrainPRESIDENT/CEOFrancis X. FarrellVICE PRESIDENTSPatti Green & Jeff BabineauUSPS #00-6186 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:Winter Park / Maitland Observer 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835 Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster FAMILY CALENDAR Community Bulletin Local man in Super Bowl ad Super Bowl Sunday Feb. 2 keep your eyes open for possible footage on televi sion of the Welcome Home event that was produced in Winter Park! Army Lt. Charles Chuck Nadd of Winter Park came home to surprise that involved the Budweiser company and the famous Clydesdale horses. He was a 2007 graduate of Trinity Prep and a 2011 graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point. He has been a Blackhawk helicopter pilot in Afghanistan. After a write-in contest and efforts that involved the National VFW and DOD (Veterans of Foreign Wars and De partment of Defense), Lt. Nadd was cho sen to represent all levels and all branch es of the military services. Budweiser has a history of making some memorable and heart-warming commercials that involve our armed forces.Calling all veteran artistsOrlando VA Medical Centers Veterans Creative Arts Festival is accepting sub missions until Monday, Feb. 3. Thats the nal deadline for the show set for Feb. 14 at the Lake Baldwin Outpatient Clinic in Baldwin Park, located at 5201 Raymond St. The competition is open to all veterans enrolled at the Orlando VA Medical Center or any one of its points of care. Competi tion rules and categories can be found at the Veterans Creative Arts Festival website at va.gov/opa/speceven/caf/docs/ festival.asp Those interested in competing should contact Jenny Danieli, Orlando VAMC rec reation therapist, at 407-629-1599, ext. 4205. JAN. 23The U.S. Chamber of Commerce Founda tion, in conjunction with the Florida Hos pital Medical Group, will host Hiring Our Heroes Orlando, a hiring fair for veter ans and military spouses from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Jan. 23 at Florida Technical College Auditorium, 12900 Challenger Parkway in Orlando. Interested job seekers should register for free at hiringourheroes.org. Walk-in job seekers are allowed (veterans must provide proof of service). Its Popcorn Flicks in the Park at 7 p.m. Jan. 23 at Winter Parks Central Park. Bring a blanket, a picnic basket and the family and watch The Incredible Mr. Limpet under the stars, courtesy of Enzian theater. Visit enzian.org for more informa tion. JAN. 25 Its the sixth annual Pookies Rescue Fest from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Jan. 25 at Lake Lily in Maitland. More than 100 rescue organizations and vendors will be there to help visitors to adopt a rescue pet or buy pet products. Groovy rafe prizes will be awarded. Visit pookiesrescuefest.com for more information. Dont miss Food Truck Crazy coming to Fleet Peeples Park in Winter Park this weekend! Its from noon to 4 p.m. Jan. 25 at 2000 S. Lakemont Ave. Its a regular event that happens every fourth Friday of the month. Come out for a variety of food trucks featuring local cuisine. Bring your pet! Visit foodtruckcrazy.com for more information. FEB. 2On Sunday, Feb. 2, the Roth Jewish Com munity Center of Greater Orlando will kick off its Camp J summer camps from 1 to 4 p.m. at its location in Maitland. The Camp J Kickoff will feature an opportu nity to nd out more information about everything that Camp J has to offer, from their specialty camps, such as magic, theater, Mad Science, Lego Robotics and pottery, to their sports camps such as Edgerrin James Football, SCUBA, TGA Golf and sports journalism camps. For more information, please visit orlandojcc.org/ camp or contact Abby Paulson at AbbyP@ orlandojcc.org INN | Plans not ready, but could be razedsmall, 36-room hotel in 1949. The Frazee family purchasing it from the OLeary family in 1962. They would later add the south section of rooms in 1971 and tear down the original 36 rooms of the hotel in 1981, making way for the north building which contains the current lobby and dining areas. Quirky musical duo Mark Wayne and Lorna Lambey performed at the hotels Red Fox Lounge for more than 20 years, bringing their comedic, interactime in 1991. The pair became so popular that many believe they inspired a reoccurring Saturday Night Live skit featuring Will Ferrell and Ana Gasteyer. Mt. Vernon is a very important property, Mayor Ken Bradley said. Its been owned by a family thats incredibly meaningful with a long history in our city. I dont know the circumstances behind the sale or anything at this point. As mayor, Im very interested in knowing what may come. Commissioner Carolyn Coo per said if the Mt. Vernon Inn from another quality hotel comThe Mt. Vernon Inn has served that niche for a long time, she said. Theyre really part of our community. Its a gateway to our city, Bradley said. Unicorp has yet to submit its plans for the new development to Winter Park city staff. CONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014 | Page 5 Gymnastics Indoor Batting Cages Speed and Agility Boot Camps After School Pick UpCall today for a FREE TRIAL class. Now Open in College Park Moms and Dads can workout while KIDS are in classes!! www.Theorlandoathletics.com 1984 W. New Hampshire Street, Orlando, Florida 32804 4 0 7 7 4 5 56 6 1 As a kid in Vienna, Austria, I walked every day to the local bundle of the Kurier, a daily pa per, and sold them on a busy street corner. Id return the next day to pick up more papers and drop off the money. It was a good way for a kid to earn a little pocket change and learn the value of money. Many years later when I lived in Johannesburg, South Africa, I worked for the Sunday Times as overseas surveys manager. The paper had a paid circulation of 560,000 copies. After coming to America, I worked for a small shopper in Saint Petersburg and later moved to Orlando selling advertising at the Sentinel. At the next junction in my life, I wanted to learn about community news and became partner in the Outlook in Oviedo. partner and I saw a different fu ture for the paper. He bought me out and I started my own news paper. I remember sitting at my kitchen table, pondering if I could start a weekly community newspaper in Winter Park to better serve our community the way I felt was the right way. I drew an eagle by hand with a No. 2 pen cil as my logo above the future name of my newspaper, and went through countless typical news paper names. The idea of choos ing the eagle as a very observant bird overseeing his domain made me choose the name Observer. I ordered a copy machine capable of reducing and enlarging, and a Macintosh II computer with QuarkXPress and Adobe Photoshop. I had to quickly learn to type and design advertising as my My next challenge was to works in mysterious ways. I came across a For Rent sign on Ex ecutive Drive behind Kmart in Winter Park and met my new, very understanding landlord Ron Black. He was all excited to have a new community newspaper as a tenant and showed me the vacant paste up bench, left behind from another monthly senior publication that had moved on. ny selling used newspaper vending machines to distribute my papers. The fellow I found had 30 machines of various colors and conditions. With a lot of elbow grease, sandpaper, primer and spray paint, I managed to restore all of these machines and proudly applied the Observer logo. After acquiring all the neces sary licenses, the Observer was now ready for production. Now I had to wear many hats. I was the proud owner, publisher, edi tor and advertising person as well as the layout artist, the circulation manager and distributor. Time before I had to go to print. Thank goodness for my mom Fern. She volunteered to become asked several local residents to become contributing freelance writers, including the world fa mous author Sloan Wilson, best known for the novel The Man in the Grey Flannel Suit. I then started appointing an editorial advisory board more people to talk about the new paper and get more subscribers. The more, the merrier! The success of every good community newspaper is community participation! With barely $1,000 in advertis ing and slightly behind schedule, Thursday, Jan. 26, 1989. The Win ter Park Observer was born and 25 years later I am proud to see my baby grow!From paper boy to newspaper publisher Gerhard J.W. MunsterObserver founding publisher and editor

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Page 6 | Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Jan. 27 City Commission meeting There will be a City Commis sion meeting Monday, Jan. 27, at 3:30 p.m. in City Hall Commis sion Chambers located at 401 S. Park Ave. For the most up-to-date agenda, please visit cityofwinter park.org > Government > City Commission > Agenda. Below are a few topics of interest:Mayors Report Florida League of Cities, 2014 Legislative Priorities da League of Cities Municipal Achievement Award honoring the citys 125th Anniversary Celebra tion Park Holiday Window Contest winners coin recipients Growth Award Enforcement Board, Winter Park City Managers Report strategic plan discussion.Consent Agenda 1/13/14. (for a complete listing, please visit cityofwinterpark.org/ccpackets). half of the parks rental not to ex ceed $825 for the Michael Andrew and SwingerHead Concert Sun day, Feb. 9, in Central Park. ment to spend $10,700 to replace the fence at Pineywood Cemetery using funds from the Cemetery Trust Fund. Action Items Requiring Dis cussion Public Hearings by for the property at 612 E. Lake Sue Ave.: nance annexing 612 E. Lake Sue Ave. nance amending the Comprehensive Plan Future Land Use Map to establish a Single Family Future Land Use designation. to establish Single Family Resi dential District. nance vacating and abandoning the electric utility easement at 470 W. New England Ave. Park LLC, for property at 111 N. Orlando Ave.: use site plan approval to eliminate building in the southeast portion of the site for a 7,000-square-foot questing a variance of 18 parking spaces. Park: amending Chapter 58 Land Development Code creating a non-compete window of 30 days before or after the citys annual spring and fall art festivals. public hearing to discuss all aspects of the undergrounding of electric/CATV facilities consist ing of properties abutting Semi nole Drive, as to which improve ments are to be paid in part by special assessments levied against all properties within the abovedescribed area. cal agency program supplemental agreement with the Florida De partment of Transportation for the design of the Brookshire Elementary School neighborhood side walks (Brechin Drive, Dunblane Drive and Kimbrace Place). regulates use of red light camera enforcement. State Legislature to repeal Florida Statute 386.209, which preempts regulation of smoking to the state, and to allow local governments to regulate smoking in parks. sions full agenda on the home page of cityofwinterpark.org un der Whats New > City Commis sion Agenda.Watch the Jan. 27 City Commission meeting liveIf you cannot attend the meeting, you can watch it live, gavelto-gavel as it happens on Mon day, Jan. 27, and every other City Commission meeting. During the meeting, simply log on to the terpark.org and click on Govern ment > Live Video Broadcasts to business.Employees of the YearOn Jan. 17, at the Mayors State of the City Luncheon, we present ed awards to the citys most out Please join me in congratulating the following: Giannotti, Assistant Environmental Resource Manager In 2011, Giannotti joined the Lakes Division. Since then, she has exhibited an exceptional work ethic and demonstrated leader ship qualities that have motivated the entire division and raised its level of performance. All of Gian nottis accomplishments, exper tise, public outreach efforts and professionalism have helped to save thousands of taxpayers dol lars and improve the image of the division and the city, not just among our residents, but within the greater environmental man agement community in Florida. medic Since Nov. 11, 1996, Ryan has served the people of Winter Park ing others is one of Ryans most Winter Park City TalkBY RANDY KNIGHT CITY MANAGER Watch us on video T H A N K Y O U T H A N K Y O U T H A N K Y O U The businesses, organizations and individuals below have chosen to support your local Chamber of Commerce again in 2014 by renewing their membership. Please join us in thanking them for their investment in our community the next time you shop, dine, or call on their place of business. For more information about the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce, our members, or upcoming events, visit us at the Winter Park Welcome Center, call (407) 644-8281 or log on to www.winterpark.org. A N N U A L S U P P O R T E R S 1st United Bank AAA Copytronics Day Communications, Inc. Filthy Rich Celebrity Jewelry Replicas Friends of Casa Feliz, Inc. Hutton Kilwins Chocolates & Ice Cream Orlando Estate Buyer, Inc. Orlando Life P.F. Chang's China Bistro The Ancient Olive The Spice and Tea Exchange WUCF 89.9 FM You Need Art 5 + Y E A R S A. Anthony Giovanoli Bosphorous Turkish Cuisine Citizens Bank of Florida Eileen Fisher Eyes & Optics Frank A. Hamner, P.A. Hannibal Square Association, Inc. Hannibal Square Heritage Center Michael Rogers, Inc. Ruggiero, Martinez & Norton, P.A. The Westchester Assisted Living Residence UpTown Dog Whole Foods Market Winter Park Winter Park Laser & Anti-Aging Center Winter Park Photography 1 0 + Y E A R S Central Florida Lifestyle Winter Park Breakfast Rotary Club Winter Park Garden Club 1 5 + Y E A R S All Business Printing, Inc. Brion Price Photography Christian Science Reading Room David Lundberg Building & Roofing Contractor Full Sail University Thaddeus & Polly Seymour 2 0 + Y E A R S Winter Park Maitland Observer 2 5 + Y E A R S First United Methodist Church New Hope for Kids, Inc. St. Margaret Mary Catholic Church Winter Park Day Nursery, Inc. 3 0 + Y E A R S Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens Creald School of Art 3 5 + Y E A R S Park Plaza Hotel 4 0 + Y E A R S Florida Gas Transmission Co. 4 5 + Y E A R S Jewett Orthopaedic Clinic, P.A. 5 0 + Y E A R S Massey Services, Inc. Murrah, Doyle and Wigle, P.A. Scenic Boat Tour Wayne Densch, Inc. 5 5 + Y E A R S Cooper, Simms, Nelson & Mosley Insurance Winter Park Land Company Chamber Trustees Park Avenue Merchants Association members Please see CITY TALK on page 9 GIANOTTI GONZALEZ RYAN

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014 | Page 7Lifestyles Its a plausible reality, said artist Jake Fernandez describing his new multi-media exhibit Con structed Landscapes at the Mait The same could be said of the events held there the same eve ning featuring a mashup of art exhibit, fashion show, concert and food festival. The concept is simple. The execution, however, is a bit like a juggling act. event series featuring a variety of night events showcasing local art ists doing what they do best. The public is invited to mingle with the artists and experience the sights and sounds of art in action. Januarys Culture Pop! theme was the Dapper Date and featured vintage clothing stylist Dana Marie Roquemore of Other Peoples Property, local duo Chasing Jo nah, the opening night of Fernandezs exhibit, as well as food from Quick Dinners and beverages from Cigar City Brewing and Joel Gott Fine Wines. General admission of $5 includes a free drink. The event exudes the atmo sphere of an open house, with guests invited to wander from one setting to another enjoying anything in any order. Guests who wandered through the art gallery before 9 p.m. chat ted up featured artist Jake Fernan dez, whose mixed media works included an intricate photo col lage reminiscent of an impres sionist painting. Visiting from France, Helen Vinson couldnt help herself, tugging Fernandez arm to get his attention while he was chatting with another patron. Then she broke with taboos by asking to touch his art, though she knew it wasnt allowed. With a nonchalant gesture, Fernandez waved at his painting and invited her Vinson to touch it. Just dont let them see you, he said of the gallery staff. As she reached out to touch the piece delicately, Fernandez deepened his voice and called rity guard voice, bringing a ripple of laughter from Vinson and her friends. Just across the narrow street, the opening cords of Chasing Jonahs dreamy set were beginning as patrons gathered to hear them play while chatting over drinks in the garden courtyard. Mingling with the guests, models dressed in vintage fashions from the s, s and s, rang ing in style from glamorous eve ning wear to dresses that looked straight out of LIFE magazine. Under the moss-drenched oak trees, the garden courtyard was a PHOTO BY ALLISON OLCSVAY THE OBSERVERCulture Pop! brings style air to Maitland. Bringing a pop of culture to date nightALLISON OLCSVAY Observer staff Please see DATE NIGHT on page 8 New Hope for Kids provides specialized support to children and families grieving the loss of a loved one and grants wishes to New Hope for Kids provides specialized support to children and families grieving the loss of a loved one and grants wishes to children with life-threatening illnesses in Central Florida. In 2013, New Hope for Kids granted 46 wishes to girls and boys and assisted over 420 children through grief facilitation. Because we do not receive any funding from government agencies, the personal donations so generously given by individuals and local organizations are very important to the success of our mission... to bring hope, healing and renewal to our community. We are so thankful for our dedicated Board of Directors, Volunteers and the generosity of the Central Florida community in another succesful TOY DRIVE for our families. We would like to thank those individuals who held Toy Drive Parties in their homes, individual donors at our many box locations and the staff, employees and generous patrons of the following businesses:

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dimly lit oasis of conversation as guests wandered in and out sam pling food, drink and music. At the back of the courtyard in a grotto that looked like it be longed in a Mayan pyramid, Oth er Peoples Property, owned and operated by Roquemore, set up a pop-up vintage shop for guests to browse. Offerings included dresses similar to those worn by the models, priced at around $30, vintage purses and jewelry that could have come from your (ultra-cool) grandmothers closet and a good selection of stylish vintage coats, perfect for warding off the chill in the air. Rochelle Womack lives just and came over to browse the vin tage clothing for sale. She ended up taking home a she said, be the highlight of her wardrobe. I really like what they are do ing here, said Womack. Its a perfect combination. Mary Helmers brought her husband of 42 years along for date night and she also seemed extremely pleased at the fashionas-art theme. I love vintage clothing and the art center, so I couldnt resist, she said. He loves me, so he couldnt resist either. Jan. 10s event was indeed a plausible reality with guests from all walks of life gathered in one place for one purpose: to enjoy each other and a little culture. It didnt seem to matter wheth er they were there for the art, the fashion or the music, each patron brought their own perspective to the event and that seems to be what Culture Pop! is all about, exposing the community to some thing new without any preconceptions.Page 8 | Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer ARCHIVE PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERCulture Pop! evolved from A&Hs popular monthly Culture and Cocktails nights. One Senior Place ... See our full Calendar of Events at OneSeniorPlace.com407.949.6733715 Douglas Avenue Altamonte Springs, FL 32714M-F 8:30am 5pmMONDAY, JANUARY 27 Senior Club Sponsored by Family Physicians Group Every Monday, 10am 12pm January 27th Casino Day The Real Estate Specialists are IN! 10am-1pm Presented by EXIT Real Estate Results By Appointment Only 407.949.6714 TUESDAY, JANUARY 28 Truth about Medicaid Planning 9:30am-12pm By The Law Ofces of Hoyt & Bryan RSVP 407.977.8080 Truth about Estate Planning 2pm-4pm By The Law Ofces of Hoyt & Bryan RSVP 407.977.8080 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 29 Is It Wax or Is It My Hearing? 3pm-4:30pm Presented by Harmony Hearing Centers of America RSVP 407.949.6737 THURSDAY, JANUARY 30 Matter of Balance 2:30pm-4:30pm By VITAS Innovative Hospice Care RSVP 407.599.2522 Daughters Missing Mothers 6pm-7:30pm (also Feb 6th, 13th, 20th, 27th) By VITAS Innovative Hospice Care RSVP 407.691.4548 The Real Estate Specialists are IN! 9am-12pm By EXIT Real Estate Results FRIDAY, JANUARY 31 Super Bowl Bingo 1pm-3pm Hosted by VITAS Innovative Hospice Care RSVP 407.599.2522Calendar of Events January 2014 Savannah Court and Cove Excellence in Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation 1301 W. Maitland Blvd. Maitland, FL 32751407-645-3990www.SavannahCourtMaitland.comAssisted Living Facility License No. 8447 Skilled Nursing Facility License No. 1635096 Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above. You are always welcome!A Senior Living Community where Hospitality is a Way of Life. Its TAX time. Appointments Available 7 Days a Week!Tax Form Processing LLC4070 Aloma Ave., Suite 1010 Winter Park, FL 32792Tel: (407) 657-6336www.TaxFormProcessing.com Proudly Serving the Orlando Area for 19 years! Scan QR Code 40$00OffTax PreparationMust present this coupon at time service is provided. Offer valid for one-time use. Cannot be combined with any other offer. Expires April 15, 2014Offer Code: WPMO14 DATE NIGHT | Get cultured in Maitland CONTINUED FROM PAGE 7 PHOTOS BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVERWinter Parks Unity Heritage Festival celebrated cultural music and dance on Jan. 19. Unity Heritage Fest Culture Pop! returns to the Maitland Art Center at 7 p.m. Feb. 14.

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014 | Page 9With a season spiraling out of control, the Knights are about to head into their toughest string of conference games so far while on a three-game losing streak. In the span of seven days the mens basketball team has lost to UConn (14-4, 2-3) 84-61, Rutgers (8-10, 2-3) 85-75, and SMU (14-4, 3-2) 58-46. And in a conference stacked with some of the NCAAs toughest teams three of the American Athletic Conferences teams are in the Top 25 the Knights are looking at a tough road to make a comeback. In shooting percentage theyve suffered the most. In their threegame skid they averaged 32.6 percent overall, well off the wild 60.3 percent they shot in a blow out of Jacksonville on Dec. 17. In most of the Knights wins shooting percentage has been a big factor. Theyve yet to lose a game in which they shot better than 45 percent this season. But theyve never won a game in which they shot less than 40 percent. Head coach Donnie Jones blamed young mistakes offensively as the big factor that led the Knights to their loss against SMU at home. The loss of lead ing scorer Isaiah Sykes midway through the game didnt help ei ther. He left the game with a head injury and possible concussion af ter a collision near the basket just after the second period began. In Sykes wake, the Knights only had one shooter in double digits on the scoreboard. Sykes had been averaging 15.4 points per game this season. The Knights did not say how long Sykes would be off the court. Theyll be traveling to Cincinnati to face the No. 19 Bearcats (17-2, 6-0) at 9 p.m. Jan. 23. Then at 7 p.m. on Jan. 29 they return home to host the No. 17 Memphis Tigers (13-4, 3-2) the highest ranked team in the AAC according to the AP Top 25 poll. Knights face tough string of AAC foesISAAC BABCOCK Observer staff HOUSES WANTED!!! Get a FREE No Obliga on CASH O er On Your House Within 24 Hours! (855) 755-1818 www.Circle18Homes.com CASH $$$ QUICK CLOSE ANY PRICE RANGE ANY CONDITION ANY SITUATION 2826 Shader Rd. Orlando, FL 32808 Get/Keep Your Dog in Shape in 2014! 407-295-3888 BarkingDogFitness.com FACT! A Lean dog lives an average of 2 years longer than an overweight dog. Conveniently located at... ACT NOW!New Years Promo!Get 25% o for LIFE!expires 1/31/14 Customized workouts Training Indoor Warm Water Swimming ORLANDOS ONLY DOGGIE DAYCARE WITH A GYM! Recycling reduces the amount Public and private sector organizations across Orange County re cycled 9.6 million tons of materi the waste can be reused as is while the rest is reduced to its component raw materials for reuse in new products. Recycling also reduces the demand for environmentally unfriendly activities such as strip mining, fossil fuel exploration, and forestry in virgin woodlands. For instance, recycling one ton of paper produces an equivalent amount of raw material that would come from 17 trees. Recycling is also more for new sources of materials. Re cycling of aluminum cans saves 95 percent of the energy required to make the same amount of aluminum from virgin sources. Recycling is also cost effective and creates new economic opportunities while using a minimal amount of new mate rial. The textile recycling industry offers an interesting insight into the positive economic impacts of recycling. More than 90 percent of discarded textiles are recycla ble, and a competitive market has emerged for both the reuse and recycling of these items. Many discarded clothing items are resold as is to the developing world, allowing many economi cally disadvantaged people to purchase high quality name brand clothing for just around $1. Many items are also broken down for raw materials. For instance, old sweaters from the United States are sold to places such as the United Kingdom, India, Italy, and the Philippines where they are turned into blankets for both local use and export. Other items are broken down for use in indus trial applications ranging from wiping materials to insulation. These processes reuse existing materials, create jobs along every step of the supply chain, and add value to products that would have otherwise been discarded. making 2014 the greenest year on record. If you live in a singlefamily residence in unincorporated Orange County, be sure to order your recycling bins from our Solid Waste Division. If you live in one of our many munici palities, do the same from your citys solid waste department. For residents of apartment or condominium complexes, please drop off your recyclables at the nearest nearest transfer station at Orange Countys Solid Waste website, aspx I hope that you will do your part to help Orange County reach our goal of recycling 50 percent of our waste this year. If you need further information on Orange Countys recycling efforts of have any other questions or concerns, please feel free to contact me or my staff, Edgar Robinson and Lynette Rummel. We can be reached at 407-836-7350 or by email at Heres wishing you and your family a wonderful, safe and green 2014. Whats your familys recycling goal for 2014? Ted EdwardsCommissioners CornerCITY TALK | Womens safety class organizer wins accoladesimpressive skills. While Ryan has responded to thousands of emer gency calls during his career, his caring for the condition of his pa tients, combined with his excel lent bedside manner has been rec ognized by both his patients and the time and enjoys sharing his His abilities are trusted to lead the departments new recruits. Gonzalez is a member of the Community Services Division and a leader, team player, relationship builder, and most importantly, a strong role model and mentor for our citys youth. She also leads our womens SAFE program or ganizing the classes and providing invaluable safety information to women, one of our most vul nerable of populations. Within the department, Gonzalez is known for accuracy, timeliness, willingness to help wherever needed, tlin are what make our city one of the safest cities in the county. on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, watch us on Vimeo. CONTINUED FROM PAGE 6 Winter ParkDISTRESS SALE

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CONGRATULATIONS!Thank you for voting for your fan favorites! Sponsored by FOOD & BEVERAGE Best Bar/ Happy Hour Prato Best Brunch Briarpatch Best Frozen Treat Jeremiah's Italian Ice Best Burger BurgerFi Best Salad Prato Best Coffee Shop Barnie's CoffeeKitchen Best Sandwich/Sub Shop Firehouse Subs Best Dessert/Chocolate Shop Peterbrooke Chocolatier of Winter Park Best Specialty Food Store The Ancient Olive Best Wine Bar The Wine Room on Park Best Bakery Croissant Gourmet Best Caterer Arthur's Catering Best Restaurant Prato Best New Restaurant (opened in 2013) Carmel Caf & Wine Bar SERVICES Best Real Estate Agency Fannie Hillman + Associates Best Bank/ Credit Union Bank of America Best Law Firm *tied Pohl & Short, P.A. Windweedle, Haines, Ward & Woodman, P.A. Best Hair Salon/ Barber Kendall & Kendall Best Nail Salon Winter Park Nails Best Hotel The Alfond Inn Best Insurance Agency Cooper Simms Nelson & Mosley Best Financial Advisor Grafton Wealth Management at Merrill Lynch Best CPA/ Accountant Moore Stephens Lovelace, P.A. Best Marketing/ Public Relations Firm CCH Marketing & Events Best Travel Agent Luxury Trips Best Auto Dealership Holler Hyundai Best Florist Winter Park Florist SHOPPING Best Jewelry Store Be on Park Best Womens Clothing Store Tuni Best Mens Clothing Store John Craig Clothier Best Childrens Clothing Store tugboat & the bird Best Pet Supply Store The Doggie Door Best Gift Store Leisa Lovely Designs Best Store for Window Shopping Tuni HEALTH & WELLNESS Best Fitness Studio The Bar Method of Winter Park Best Gym YMCA Best Physical Therapist Pursuit Physical Therapy Best Family Practice/ Pediatrician Interlachen Pediatrics Best Chiropractor Furey Chiropractic Best Dentist Dennis S. Apfel, D.D.S. Best Eye Care/ Optical Eyes & Optics Best Senior Living The Mayflower Retirement Community Best Plastic Surgeon D. Scott Rotatori, M.D. Best Dermatologist Central Florida Dermatology ENTERTAINMENT Best Museum Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art Best Theatre Enzian Theater Best Event/ Festival Winter Park Sidewalk Art Festival POTPOURRI Best Non-Profit/ Charity Winter Park Public Library Best Local Publication Winter Park Maitland Observer Best Kept Secret Winter Park Chapter of International Association of Administrative Professionals

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014 | Page 11Now through March 9 The Life & Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby Parts I and II 27 actors plays more than 150 characters in this unique, twopart, dramatic and comic mas terpiece that captures the genius of Charles Dickens. Combining Dickens outrageous characters with theatrical spectacle, The Nickleby Parts I and II leads the way to a must-see theatrical event. Visit Orlandoshakes.org or call 407-447-1700. Tonight Jan. 23 The Winter Park Institute at Rollins College In a series of talks offered free to the public, the Winter Park Institute at Rollins College begins its 2014 season with Sharon Robinson, daughter of major league baseball player Jackie Robin son. This evening at 7 p.m., Ms. Robinson will discuss her fathers legacy, highlighting his nowlegendary values in sports and in life. Bringing renowned speakers, poets and Pulitzer Prize-winning authors to Central Florida, this seasons speakers include former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and Filmmaker Ken Burns. Events are free and open to the public. Call 407-691-1995 or visit winterpar kinstitute.orgNow through Feb. 23 The Magical Adventures of Merlin at Orlando RepThe Magical Adventures of Merlin, to be presented through Feb. 23 at the Orlando Rep, is an imagined tale about how a young Merlin meets a young, soon-to-be King Arthur in Merlin faces serious life choices before becoming the greatest wizard in the land as surprises abound in this musical adventure for the whole family. Call 407896-7365 or visit orlandorep.com Jan. 24 to 26 The Wizarding World of Harry Potter at Universal Studios Enter a world where magic is real this weekend as the world descends on Orlando. Univer sal Studios will celebrate the adventures of Harry Potter at The Wizarding World of Harry Potter in three days of fun. Join tribute, explore Hogwarts castle, stock up on wizard supplies, and experience pulse-pounding rides. Visit universalorlando.comJan. 24 and 25 The 90th birthday of the Orlando Museum of Art The Orlando Museum of Art is celebrating 90 years in Orlando, and the opening of the Museums 90th birthday celebration will Rubens, Gainsborough and the Golden Age of Painting in Europe. Between 1600 and 1800, the years in which these paintings were produced, popular subjects included portraits, still-lifes, and classical antiquity, illustrating the people and the objects that made the two centuries a rich cultural age. An opening reception will be held Jan. 24 at 6 p.m.; the exhibit opens to the public on Jan. 25 at 10 a.m. Call 407-896-4231 or visit omart.orgJan. 24 to Feb. 15 Breakin Up Is Hard To Do at the Winter Park Playhouse Set in a 1960s Catskills resort, Breakin Up Is Hard To Do is a musical comedy about two friends in search of romance over one Labor Day weekend. The score features 18 Neil Sedaka classics including Where the Boys Are, Calendar Girl, and the chart-topping title song. Directed and choreographed by Roy Alan, the production features a cast of Playhouse favorites. Call 407-645-0145 or visit winterparkplayhouse.orgJosh Garrick Culture for your calendar JANUARY 13 (Mon) Beginning Walk-Run Program Begins ....................Blue Jacket Park Presented by Track Shack Fitness Club 21 (Tue) MarathonFest Marathon Training Begins ....................Glenridge MS Presented by Track Shack Fitness Club 25 (Sat) Seasons 52 Park Avenue 5.2k* ..................................Park Avenue Presented by Florida HospitalFEBRUARY 1 (Sat) Florida Hospital Lady Track Shack 5k .........................Mead Garden 15 (Sat) Run Around the Pines 5k* ......................................Showalter Field Presented by Florida HospitalMARCH 15 (Sat) Zimmerman Kiser Sutcliffe Winter Park Road Race 10k & 2 Mile*Presented by Florida Hospital ................................Park Avenue 24 (Mon) Beginning Walk-Run Program Begins ....................Blue Jacket Park Presented by Track Shack Fitness ClubAPRIL 26 (Sat) Run for the Trees 5k ..............................................Showalter FieldJULY 4 (Fri) Hunter Vision Watermelon 5k .....................................Park Avenue Run, Walk, Train. Winter ParkFloridas premier fitness destination! February 6 | 5 8 p.m. | Park AvenueExperience the charm and romance of Park Avenue while visiting 20 local merchants. Discover the latest fashions, gift ideas and seasonal menus at participating locations. Plus, enjoy appetizer and beverage samples along the way. Winter Park Sip, Shop & Stroll$25 | www.ExperienceParkAvenue.com | 407-644-8281Sip, Shop & Stroll... With Your Sweetheart! KEEP UP WITH MAITLAND NEWS AND EVENTS!www.IndependenceLane.com Facebook.com/ItsMyMaitland Please see CULTURE on page 12 MICHAEL ANDREW CITRUS BOWL KICKOFF

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Page 12 | Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Jan. 25 Orlando Philharmonic hosts a Party at The Plaza In a rockin party Gala fea turing headliner Michael Andrew classical to jazz, bluegrass, rock n roll and more, food stations, silent auction, photo booth, and a beer and wine bar (included), the Orlando Philharmonic and the Plaza Live Theatre present their at the Plaza begins at 6:30 p.m. on Jan. 25 at 425 N. Bumby Ave. in Orlando. Tickets are $95 and $150. Visit OrlandoPhil.org/Party or call 407-896-6700, ext. 236.Jan. 28 to Feb. 2 Best musical Once in Orlando premiere Once, winner of eight Tony Awards, including Best Musical, will play the Bob Carr PAC from Jan. 28 through Feb. 2. The celebrated new musical, based on the Academy Award-winning musician and a Czech immigrant drawn together by their shared love of music. Their unexpected friendship evolves into a compli cated romance, heightened by the emotion of the songs they create together. Tickets are available at OrlandoBroadway.com or by calling 1-800-982-2787.Jan 29 Florida Citrus Bowl Stadium demolition kick-off Next up for a serious face-lift in the city beautiful is the Florida Citrus Bowl. Opened in 1936 as a public works project under President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the stadium is about to undergo major demolition and recon struction. At 10 a.m. on Jan. 29, Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer and Orange County Mayor Teresa Jacobs will celebrate the begin ning of the venues reconstruction. New features will include a new lower bowl, 360-degree main concourse, club level with enclosed and open-air seating and a 10,000-square-foot party deck. Join the crowd. Were all invited. Jan. 31 to April 6 Southwestern Allure opens Mennellos 15th season Southwestern Allure: The Art of the Santa Fe Art Colony will open the Mennello Museums 15th season in an exhibit of 40 ence of Santa Fe as an art colony. Featuring the period from 1915 to 1940, Allure explores the artists who went to Santa Fe, what compelled them, and the work they produced. The opening reception will be held on Jan. 31 beginning at 6 p.m. Call 407-246-4278 or visit mennellomuseum.comFeb. 1 Commemorating Bok Tower GardensFeb. 1 is the Dedication Day Bok Tower Gardens commemo rates its 85th anniversary with free admission. The occasion will feature guest speakers, special carillon concerts, a tree planting ceremony, and a rare opportunity to cross the moat surrounding the singing tower. No reserva tions necessary. Visit boktower gardens.org Current New Year New name Same commitment to philanthropyThe Community Foundation nounced its new name, Central Florida Foundation, and has launched its new website as a resource to the community. The Central Florida Foundation is home to more than 400 charitable funds established by individuals, families and corporations. It has grown to more than $55 million in assets since 1996 and awarded more than $30 million in grants, including $1 million in scholar ships. The funds cover the full range of philanthropy supporting education, the arts, environment, health and human services and religion. Visit cffound.org And looking ahead Feb. 6, 7, 8 Tables Extra ExtraordinaireDecorators, brides, interior designers, and anyone who enjoys elegant entertaining will want to visit the Holy Trinity Conference Center in Maitland for Tables Extraordinaire. This unique fundraiser showcases 30 lavishly decorated tables while offering luncheons or dinners reminiscent of a trip to Greece. The three-day event ends on Saturday evening (Feb. 8) with a Gala Banquet. During the day, visit the Center for Greek pastries and delicacies (they even offer take-out for lunch and dinners). Visit htgocorlando.org or Tables Extraordinaire on Facebook, or call 407-333-3895.CULTURE | Party at The Plaza will feature Michael Andrew & The Big Atomic Band in downtown Orlando CONTINUED FROM PAGE 11 rfntbtnnn bbnfntnt bbbrbnnntfn rnr rfn Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906. ONCE This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORG @EnzianTheater Sundance Film Festival USA Presents: LITTLE ACCIDENTS Filmmaker Sara Colangelo will be in attendance to present the lm and hold a Q&A Thurs 6:30 Cult Classics: HEAVY METAL Tues 9:30 INSIDE LLEWYN DAVIS Directed by Ethan Coen & Joel Coen, Cast | Oscar Issac, Carey Mulligan, Justin Timberlake, John Goodman, Garrett Hedlund Fri, Sat, Sun 3:15, 6:15, 9:15 Mon & Wed 6:15, 9:15 Tues 6:15 Thurs 9:15 Peanut Butter Matinee Family Film: LABYRINTH Sun 12PM

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014 | Page 13Opinions Chris Jepson PerspectivesOh, Lordy! Shes talking about me, as someone who receives pictures of ador able little chickies wearing knitted hats. Ive told my daughter STOP IT! to not post such pictures but, damn, who can Friends post chickie pictures and Im guilty . of looking. I was late in creating a Facebook page. I thought it a bit goofy, and still do actually. In case youve just fallen off the turnip that hosts you and your Friends online. There are a billion plus users of Facebook to sell you stuff and market your inter ests. Essentially, Facebook users are just a way for capitalists to make a buck-off. Facebook is used a myriad of different ways. Some folks, realtors, for example, use it to sell their services or advertise available property. Corporations have Facebook pages. So, too, individuals. A gripe I have about Facebook is its designation of the word Friend. Anyone you accept as a Friend has access to your Facebook page and you to theirs. I am somewhat of a literalist when using the word Friend. I have 65 Facebook Friends, 27 are relatives, nine are from my hometown (went to public school with) plus 29 more are, to varying degrees longtime and shorttime friends. I will not Friend anyone I do not personally know. I am not so much interested in being Friended by some one who has 678 Facebook Friends. But thats just me. If, on a regular basis, you sit for any length of time before a computer terminal (writing, research, work, etc.), it is easy to periodically take a break, pop a screen and see whats doing on Facebook. Most of my Friends are liberal, or with a pronounced libertarian streak. I have the full range of Friends. Some post food recipes (with pictures), some talk about their favorite sports teams, others their children and grandchildren. My son and daughter like novel. One Friend posts pictures of her dachshund; its obvious she loves her pupster. I peruse commentary on social issues, politics and governance. Facebook, like most social media, connects the like-mind ed. This is good and bad, but that is grist for another column. I like getting updates from LA Lee on his love, where he is skiing, and his big doings on the West Coast. I relish the raging Philadelphia outbursts from MissAyeshaB on the gross incompe tence of chefs she knows. I enjoy the updates about my hometown of Sioux City. I like pictures of friends and family toasting life. Facebook is (for me) a small part of just that, enjoying life. I invest, maybe, 20 minutes a day actually online, posting or digesting Facebook updates. Inane? Sure. A lot of it is. Im just as guilty as the next Facebook user (more so perhaps) of posting the frivolous. It makes me laugh. So I was amused when a long time old friend (Weve known each other since we were 6) posted, I dont want to see chickens with knitted hats or cute puppies. I dont want to buy 300-count sheets. I dont care if the highway is blocked or if you had dinner with someone or your kid played soccer today I hate Facebook. I hate the way it sucks time for dumb stuff. So I have left. All true friend yet. Expect a call.A Facebook divorce Jepson is a 27-year resident of Central Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.US Louis Roney Play On!I have often ignored the inherent lim ited elasticity of chance friendships. I must admit to indulging in the exercise of trying to stretch even longtime friendships far beyond the capacity they may be capable of seldom a successful venture. During WWII, when I was training as other midshipmen in an expanded doubledeck-bunked Chicago hotel room. Three of us Midshipmen became pals of highly entertaining dimensions. In our free time we three were inseparable, and went together to football games, debutant parties, nightclubs, and elaborate Sunday brunches at the Ambassador East. We were invited to many more social occasions than our spare time allowed us to accept, and I shall never forget the elabo rate invitations extended to us Navy guys during that wartime training period. The Drake Hotel Bar on Michigan Boulevard was a kind of meeting place for us Navy guys where we were sure to get immediate invitations to events all over the Chicago area. future was momentarily put aside in the high spirits of our youthful and close friendship. In fact, we three somehow assumed that we would be pals forever after we got our Navy Commissions, did our various wartime duties, and returned Jay again was some years after the war was over, when he and his now wife took me to lunch on La Cienega Boulevard at a Hollywood restaurant. Jay looked like every other successful young businessman with a briefcase full of contracts. His good-looking wife could have come out of an ad in any one of several-dozen fashion magazines. As for me, I was singing a Verdi opera that evening in a big hall in L.A. My pal Jay and his wife were clearly not candiItalian opera. When we said good-bye after lunch, the word meant exactly what it prophetically implied and I never saw Jay and his wife again. strangest coincidences of my life: In the middle of WWII, while walking alone up a jungle pathway on the island of Espiritu Santo in the New Hebrides, I ran smack into Don who was coming alone down the same pathway! A couple of years after the war, when I sang an opera outdoors one summer should come on stage afterwards but Don, with his tall, slender, chic wife in tow. Don was now in Madison Avenue ad vertising, and the only advertising I knew anything about was in trying to make my name well known in the music world. Don was not personally familiar with opera, and it was not my lifes work to convert average American business Joes into culture-hounds. From then on, Don and I sometimes met for lunch, and he, MariJo and I often ball games. Don and MariJo lived high above 86th and Lex. Jay and Don are both gone now, and I am the only one left of the three Navy oversized Chicago hotel room all those years ago. Ive talked every now-and-then on the phone with Dons widow MariJo, who remains unmarried, and now lives in Atlanta. She is friendly enough, but I see little point in our getting together. The war has been over a long time. And everything connected with the war is over, no matter what we have lost irrevocably along the way.Friendships for a time About Roney: HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney)Letters to the editorSend your thoughts (400 words or less) to Managing Editor Isaac Babcock at ibabcock@turnstilemediagroup.com Orlandos compassionate wunder kind lands a promotionMy lifelong friend (since our Rollins days), Bonnie Manjura, passed away leaving a Central Florida legacy few can match. She was instrumental in putting Orlando on the tourism map internationfully lobbied Congress for the Heathrow interchange Jeno needed, founded the Lake Mary-Heathrow Festival of the Arts, founded the Seminole Ornament Society, had a major role in growing dozens of What set Bonnie Doreen Manjura apart was that she got started right out of Rollins in the s, incorporated extreme compassion and empathy into all of her business pursuits and never-ending charity work, and never lost sight of where shed come from. And she treated everyone with such loving care and compassion that literally thousands of employees, friends, and family members strongly believe that her values are timeless and will love her dearly forever. with nothing but the clothes on their backs, settling in Duluth, the home of the legendary billionaire, Jeno Paulucci. Bonnie would later become Jenos righthand-woman in Heathrow, Fla., personally executing many of the critical moves that gave rise to the Heathrow we know today. While Disney was a no-brainer for American tourists, it was a different story for the rest of the world. Bonnie changed all that as the most personable, energetic, and ambitious multi-lingual ambassador to the world that Orlando will ever have. Bonnie Manjura took on the male-domi nated business community of the s with an unmatched mix of personality, humor, extreme professionalism, peerless reputa tion, and driving ambition to succeed. Ive seen Bonnie charm the pants off a group of Orlandos boldfaced names with lines that would rival Jay Leno on a good night and Reagan-esque anecdotes at any time. Theyd open their wallets for her business ventures and her charities while holding her in the highest esteem ... in between laughs. Before 24/7 entered our vernacular, Bonnie was outworking anyone youve met, EVER. Every time we got together, she exclaimed, Were bustin it!Bonnie was the sister I never had, and I will greatly miss her dearly. I hope that todays youth will use their judgment to their generation. Sadly, there will only be one! Will Graves Rollins Know your historic home rightsIs your home 50 years old or older? Is it quaint, charming or architecturally interesting? Did an important person design the home? If you answered yes to two of the three questions, you need to be informed about the property rights debate that will surface at the Winter Park City Commission in January. For the last 6 months, the Historic Preservation Board has followed a directive by City Commissioners to examine our current historic preservation ordinance and propose changes, or not. The biggest issues are sure to contro owners should have to agree to have their home placed on the local historic registry. Currently in Winter Park, all real property, especially homes, are personal and what a homeowner decides to do or not do to it, is their decision. Placement on the historic registry comes with controls. Would you want to ask an appointed board permission for window replacement or garage door approval? Should this appointed board be able to place a home on the historic registry without an owners permission? The second issue is whether or not the ordinance should lower the voting thresh old for a neighborhood to call themselves an historic district. Currently, the ordinance requires a two-thirds majority of neighborhood resi dents to approve an historic district. That threshold is high, but it protects against a slim majority imposing their views on a cratic approach is frowned upon by the consultant hired to provide information for the Historic Preservation Board. He recommends historic districts be created by a board of experts and public hearings, with no citizen voting. He states the twothirds voting requirement is the crux of the problem with our current ordinance and is quite odd. Get informed and get involved. Its easy to pass ordinances, but its a lot tougher to rescind one. Talk to an appraiser, a realtor, or an attorney before this is presented to the City Commission. Visit the citys website and read the Historic Preserva tion Board minutes and reports. Talk to the candidates in the upcoming election. They would love to hear from you! Pitt Warner Winter Park

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Page 32 | Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com Sunday, January 26th 219 S. Lawsona Boulevard, Orlando FL 32801 5 BR | 4 BA | 3,049 SF | $419,900 Charming 1930s two story home on an oversized double lot with original hardwood floors, two wood burning fireplaces, two large sun porches, separate In-Law apartment, formal dining room and lots of natural light! The fully fenced backyard features plenty of privacy, pavers and two wood decks for maximum enjoyment. Hosted by: Cindy Watson from 1-4 PM 815 Chichester Street, Orlando FL 32803 4 BR | 3 BA | 2,262 SF | $365,000 Adorable three bedroom, two bath bun galow in charming Orwin Manor. Main house features wood floors, wood burn ing fireplace and cedar closets. Family/ dining room combo is open and bright with tiled flooring and wall length win dows that overlook the patio and court yard area. Finished 1/1 guest apartment above garage offers private access and its own kitchen. Hosted by: Jennifer JJ Mackle from 1-4 PM 1529 Holts Grove Circle, Winter Park FL 32789 4 BR | 4 BA | 4,356 SF | $1,440,000 Meticulous two story pool home in desirable Windsong! Soaring ceilings, designer features, spectacular wood and stone flooring, plantation shutters, granite counters and crown molding. Spacious office, chefs kitchen, sunny breakfast room and huge loft. Down stairs master retreat with spa-like bath. Expansive family room offers three sets of French doors that lead out to the cus tom screened porch. Private backyard oasis complete with sparkling pool, palm trees and privacy hedge. Hosted by: Tiffany Prewitt from 1-4 PM 285 Rippling Lane, Winter Park FL 32789 3 BR | 3 BA | 2,019 SF | $699,500 Gorgeous lakefront home on Lake Killar ney! Beautiful wood floors, updated and upgraded baths, office, fireplace, and attractive kitchen overlooking the lake. Enjoy stunning lake views from the over sized screened patio. The only lake in Winter Park where you can land a plane! Hosted by: Patrick Higgins from 1-4 PM 505 W. Harvard Street, Orlando FL 32804 3 BR | 2 BA | 1,777 SF | $415,000 Updated and renovated College Park pool home on a double lot! Steps from Edgewater Drives boutiques, restaurants and shopping. Beautiful kitchen with brand new cabinets, granite counters and stainless steel appliances. Master suite is a very comfortable size and has double closets. Master bath has been renovated with a walk-in shower. Addi tional features include original hardwood floors, fresh paint inside and out, beauti ful fenced yard, open deck and oversized two car garage with half bath. Hosted by: Lauren Fritch from 1-4 PM Meg Dolan 1184 Valley Creek Run, Winter Park $250,000. 01/14/2014 Catherine DAmico 2020 Vivada St, Orlando $259,000. 01/14/2014 Cindy Kuykendall 525 Stetson St, Orlando $230,000. 01/13/2014 Sharon Helsby 988 Brightwater Cir, Maitland $469,000. 01/15/2014 Jeff & Barbara Friedman 245 Whittier Cir, Orlando $299,000. 01/17/2014 Wendy Williams Crumit 928 Moss Lane, Winter Park $850,000. 01/17/2014 Ann Lee 4003 Santa Maria Dr, Kissimmee $110,000. 01/20/2014 Ann Lee 2260 San Vital Dr, Kissimmee $110,000. 01/17/2014 OBSERVER Just Sold Homes SUNDAY 12-3 LOCATION! LOCATION! LOCATION! 1510 Mizell Avenue, Winter Park. 3BD/3BA, 1,936SF. Perfectly situated between newer million$ Windsong Homes, this charmer features original hardwood floors, a beautifully updated kitchen, semi-vaulted ceilings & a fantastic family room featuring brick fireplace PLUS a wall of built-in cabinets. Extras include inside utility/storage room, 2 car garage & a large, tranquil backyard patio!! 90x150 lot! $484,000 WONDERFUL HOME IN GREAT LOCATION 680 Balmoral Road, Winter Park. 4BD/2.5BA, 2,264SF. Kenilworth Shores home on a corner lot. Home offers fire place, hardwood floors, formal living and dining rooms and two car garage. A rated schools include Brookshire El ementary, Glenridge Middle and Winter Park High School. 1/3 acre lot. $525,000 BALDWIN PARK BEAUTY 2015 Meeting Place, Orlando. 3BD/3.5BA, 2,320SF. Spectacular townhome with tre mendous upgrades throughout! Antiquestyle hickory wood floors throughout the living areas. Gorgeous kitchen with maple cabinets, granite counters and stainless steel appliances. Master suite, living room, downstairs guest suite and both porches overlook Corrine Commons Park. Two-car garage. $499,999 SUNDAY 1-4 BEAUTIFUL POOL HOME IN PARK GROVE 812 Granville Drive, Winter Park. 5BD/3.5BA, 2,950SF. Traditional ranch home with formal living room with brick fireplace and dining room with builtin corner cabinets. Bamboo floors and stainless appliances. Two covered back patios with brick pavers. Lush landscaping and pool with fountains in private fenced yard. Large lot and attached 2-car garage. Zoned for Dommerich Elemen tary & Maitland Middle. Prime location near Park Avenue. $685,000 MEDITERRANEAN TOWNHOME ON TREE LINED STREET 541 Fairfax Avenue, Winter Park. 3BD/2.5BA, 2,095SF. Light and bright townhome with vaulted ceilings, wood floors, bonus loft and a private court yard. Large downstairs master bedroom with fireplace and French door access to courtyard. Large eat-in kitchen with breakfast nook. New interior paint, new carpet and refinished wood floors. Over sized two car garage. Great location just blocks from Park Avenue. $450,000 SUNDAY 2-5 QUAINT HOME ON BRICK STREET 1570 Grove Terrace, Winter Park. 3BD/2BA, 1,663SF. Excellent Winter Park location. One car detached garage with workshop space. Yard is low maintenance. High ceilings in living areas and master suite. Two walk in closets and French doors in master suite that open out to back patio. Kitchen has granite counters, newer wood cabinets and a breakfast nook. Wood and ceramic tile throughout. $409,000 150 E. Robinson Street Unit 2210, Orlando FL 32801 sold by Rhonda Chesmore 62 W. Colonial Drive Unit 207, Or lando FL 32801 sold by Padgett McCormick 5463 Endicott Place, Oviedo FL 32765 sold by Pamela Ryan 1420 Chapman Circle, Winter Park FL 32789 sold by Pamela Seibert 340 N. Phelps Avenue, Winter Park FL 32789 sold by Tiffany Prewitt 45 Fern Crest Drive, Debary FL 32713 sold by Renee Dee Morgan 1051 Henley Downs Place, Lake Mary FL 32746 sold by Patrick Higgins OBSERVER Open Houses THE MMARKEt T PLAc C E MindGym January 20, 2014 MindGymJanuary 20, 2014 ANNOUNCEMENTSA childless married couple seeks to adopt.Will be full-time mom & devoted dad. Fi nancial security. Expenses paid. Call/ Text. Patricia & Adam. 1-800-790-5260. Bar#0150789.Winter Park Benefit Shop140 Lyman Ave, Winter Park needs items to sell: clothing, bedding, jewelry, kitchenware and bric-a brac. Also need ing volunteers. Contact Elizabeth Comer 407-647-8276. Open Tues & Fri at 9:30am; Sat 10am-1pm. All proceeds support childrens programs & the Or lando Blind Association.Winter Park Benefit Shop:at 140 Lyman Avenue, Winter Park needs items to sell: clothing, bedding, jewelry, kitchenware/bric-a brac. Need volunteers contact Elizabeth Comer 407647-8276. Open 9:30am-2pm every Tues & Fri (and Sat 10am-2PM). Pro ceeds support childrens programs and the Orlando Blind Assoc.EDUCATIONAIRLINE CAREERS begin here Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Finan cial aid for qualified students. Job place ment assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769 FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now survive DIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922 rfntb rf ntand soreness nb naches THG-12902 39th Annual Mount Dora Arts Festival February 1 & 2 www.MountDoraCenterForTheArts.org The National Auction Group #685 Sarasota County, FL Florida Press 3.792 inches wide by 4 inches deep Thomas J. Bone, FL #AU3433 rfrfntb5,700ACRESWORLD-CLASS HUNTING & FISHINGSARASOTACOUNTY,FLORIDA nftb UNLIMITED DEVELOPMENT POTENTIALttntttbnn r SUNDAY 2-5 TRADITIONAL TOWNHOME IN BALDWIN PARK 5453 Baldwin Park Street, 32814. 3BD/2.5BA, 1,756SF. Built in 2008, this townhome features hardwood floors, crown molding and French doors leading to brick paved patio and garden area. Gourmet kitchen boasts granite counters, 42 oak cabinetry with upgraded hard ware, under cabinet lighting, beautiful tile backsplash and stainless appliances. Wonderful Baldwin Park amenities! $315,000 EDUCATIONYou can becomean expert in HVAC installation and repair. Pinnacle Career Institute Online HVAC education in as little as 12 months. Call us today: 1-877-651-3961 or go online: www.HVAC-Online-Education.comHELP WANTEDNow Hiring OTR CDLA Drivers.New Pay Package and $2500 Sign-On Bonus! Mostly 5-10 days out, full bene fits, achievable bonuses. Call for details 1-888-978-3791/apply www.heyl.netMISCELLANEOUSA Guaranteed Offer in 48 Hours!We Buy Homes! www.dbuyshomes.com 800-741-6876 MISCELLANEOUSFebruary sublet/room rental needed2 quiet, serious med students need rental/sublet for month of February in WP area. Email: hetlandmaryo@gmail.comPROFESSIONAL SERVICENo Time.... Call!WE CLEAN FOR YOU!! Commercial and Residential servicing. WE DO IT!! Call Catherine Adam 321-356-8160. cadam1959@yahoo.comREAL ESTATE: COMMERCIALOFFICE FOR RENTWINTER PARKExecutive office available in prestigious bank building. Approximately 10 x 12 with windows on two sides. Additional space available for assistant, now or lat er, at additional charge. Aloma and Lake mont Avenues. 24-hour access. Minimum one year term. Broker. $500 per month. Lou Nimkoff 407-405-3368 of fice@briofl.com REAL ESTATE: FOR SALE3 STATE VIEWS! Natl Forest Access.1.84 AC $24,900 Prime, wooded, mountaintop acreage with majestic three state views. EZ access US National For est. Incredible 4 season recreation. Paved roads, underground power, fiber optic cable & municipal water. Perfect for primary/vacation/ retirement home. Ex cellent financing. Only one available, wont last. Call owner now 866-9525303, x120BANKRUPTCY AUCTION -5,700 +/Acres North Port, Florida Feb ruary 13 World Class Hunting Develop ment Potential 800-504-3010 National Auction Group, Inc. Thomas J. Bone, FL #AU3422



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Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014 Serving Winter Park, Maitland, Baldwin Park, College Park and Goldenrod 50+ tax WPMOBSERVER.COM Winter Parks Best Western Mt. Vernon Inn could be on its way out if a land transaction with Unicorp National Develop ments closes at the end of 2014. Unicorp has the 65-year-old hotel under contract to make way for a new development, which includes plans for a new hotel in place of the Inn. The deal wont be closed until November of this year, but is likely to close as long as the city revises its building codes to allow more density, Mt. Vernon Inn Proprietor Rick Frazee said. Its a happy/sad deal, Frazee said. Things change. Im 65. Its about time I decide what Im go ing to do with the rest of my life. The hotel is a very challenging, time-consuming operation. The Mt. Vernon Inn has come a long way since its start as a USPS 00-6186 Publisher statement on page 4. VISIT WPMOBSERVER.COM SUBSCRIBE NOW! WHERE CULTURE MEETS POP LIFESTYLES, 7 Whats your recycling goal? County shoots for 50 percent. COMMISSIONERS CORNER, 9 Culture season revs up Mark your calendar this week. CULTURE FOR YOUR CALENDAR, 11 COMMUNITY BULLETIN ............ 4 CALENDAR .................... 4 LIFESTYLES .................... 7 SPORTS ...................... 9 CULTURE ..................... 11 OPINIONS .................... 13 CLASSIFIEDS .................. 32 Gerhard Munster leans back in a chair on his homes patio deck, gazing at a portly white trawler boat pointed toward the St. Johns River in Sanford. Long into retirement, he seems ever at ease on a chilly Friday after noon, pondering his future a few weeks away at sea aboard the Raz-Ma-Taz. Hes not quite sure where hes going yet. The ever-smiling Austrian expat picks up a yellowed old newspaper from the table in front of him. On the front page of the Winter Park Observer, his smile, 25-years-younger, stares right back at him. Next to the photo, written in his own words: This is the culmination of a boyhood sleeping under a desk with no heater in the middle of winter. But he had his own news paper his dream come true. His history with the printed page began three decades and 5,000 miles before. A paper boy and Vienna Boys Choir member in his home in Austrias capital, he would grow up and ship out for a post with the Sunday Times in South Africa, work aboard the doomed sailing ship HMS Bounty and sell ads at pa pers throughout Florida. But his dream came true behind a Winn-Dixie supermarket in a converted duplex with a shower rigged up in the carport and a rickety abandoned layout table in the living room. It took three weeks to introduce the Winter The design was painstakingly laid by hand on pasteboards. Munster sold the ads, assembled an army of writers and an editorial board, and pasted up the newspaper himself on a layout board hed designed and built from a door hed pulled off its hinges. The submissions came in written by hand. He had to retype them all. He couldnt afford to have photos printed at $9.50 each, so he de signed his own rendering process using mi croscopic dots to get around the price. When his celebrity columnist acclaimed novelist Sloan Wilson asked to be paid $250 a week, Munster offered him a silver dollar. He ac cepted. In big bold white letters, the National Bank of Commerces ad on the front page of the in augural issue, Thursday, Jan. 26, 1989, read Great Expectations. I had no idea what I was doing, Munster said with a laugh. And just like that, the Observer had its eye on the city. Back then the eagle atop the page hand-drawn by Munster soared only above the words Winter Park. It only took a couple years before the Observers nameplate said Maitland too. the Observer. Munsters green Army Jeep roll ing down the street during parades or parked care of that. Trying to grab non-traditional readers, he started personally delivering new The growth came quickly, as Munsters knack for marketing combined with the tal ents of a mishmash of staff from all walks of life. Back then the paper had a movie re PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Winter Park Observer founder Gerhard Munster reads a copy of the papers rst issue, which was published 25 years ago this week. He retired in 2007 after serving as editor and publisher of the award-winning paper for 18 years. Twenty-ve years of news ISAAC BABCOCK Observer staff Please see ANNIVERSARY on page 2 Mt. Vernon Inns nal checkout Upcoming development could replace 65-year-old Mt. Vernon Inn with new hotel Observer reaches milestone TIM FREED Observer staff Please see INN on page 4 407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC Winter Park Recovery CenterNow Is the Time to Make Your New Years Resolution Executive Drug, Alcohol & Weight-Loss Programs Privacy and Confidentiality Assured Medically Managed Dual Diagnosis Evidenced Based Solutions2056 Aloma Ave, Suite 100, Winter Park, FL 32792 www.WinterParkRecoveryCenter.com 407-629-0413 PHOTO BY TIM FREED THE OBSERVER The Mt. Vernon Inn has been owned by the Frazee family since 1962, though it has stood since 1948.

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Page 2 | Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer ANNIVERSARY | Observer founder traveled the globe working for newspapers before his dream came true about The Accidental Tourist. ole Arthurs was advertising di rector, a post she would hold for two decades. Along the way she would pick up writing and pho tography, becoming one of the pa pers key reporters. In the summer of 1989, colum nist Chris Jepson came on board. A few months later, world famous opera singer Louis Roneys Play On! column debuted. Counter balancing each others politics, theyve been with the Observer ever since. And through it all, beyond the story of the helicopter that crashed into a Winter Park back yard, the destruction of the Winter Park Mall and rise of the Village, the end of a violent era in Hanni bal Square and the transformation of a new walkable doppelganger for Park Avenue, the Observer served as a conduit for it all. In the spring of 2007, Kyle Tay lor came knocking at Munsters door just as Munster was con sidering retirement. Within a few months, a new era for the Observ er dawned, though it was in the same old duplex with the brown shag carpets and an old pool table in the storage room. I loved the connection [the Observer] had to the community, said Taylor, who became the pa pers publisher that summer. Alex Babcock would helm the paper as editor for much of those tired, spearheading ambitious stories on the changing face of Winter Park and Maitland and the personal struggles of friends and families in the community. Getting to help people, thats why I got into journalism, he wrote of his time as editor. I believe in the ideal of the citizen reporter, the person whos asking questions that need answers, an swers that will get things changed for the better. The Observer gave us the chance to do that. Ill never forget the pride in of the west side of Winter Park, of the history of that area and the efforts of the west sides commu nity leaders to maintain a proud heritage, while they pushed out bad elements and did their best to accommodate the changes they in some ways dont have any choice but to accommodate. The research that went into that series, it was a real eye-opener about a commu nity wrestling with change, and ing. But it was a tough time for the newspaper business. By the end of 2008 the world had fallen into what would become the worst recession since the Great Depres sion. It was a tough business envi ronment, especially for newspa pers, Taylor said. It was chal lenging for all of us. The paper would go digital, making the jump to the Internet in the most economically trying era in the history of newspapers. I got to modernize the most reliable source of news for the area, Babcock said. That was the job I was handed take something good and make it fresh and new, put it on the level of the Sentinel, and get readers talking about it. We had a very solid foun dation, including an archive like a treasure trove of Winter Park and Maitland history. We knew what the Observer was; the question for us was, What will it be? As the newspaper found ways to adapt and survive, it also won accolades statewide. To date the Observer has won 10 Florida Press Association Awards in the FPAs annual Better Weekly Newspaper competition under the helm of Babcock, Jenny Andreasson, who served as editor from January of 2009 to November of 2012, and the former editors twin brother Isaac Babcock, who has been the Observers editor since Novem ber of 2012. For Andreasson, who earned the role of associate editor only a year after joining the paper out of college, it was a transformative experience. I had wonderful support from all the connections Id made in the community, she said. It showed me how a community can come together and support each other. The cities could never be covered by the [Orlando Sentinel] like they can with this newspaper. Every week when the paper would arrive at the Observers ing, she said. The community that Winter Park, Maitland, Baldwin Park, College Park and Goldenrod will become is happening every day, waiting for its stories to be told. Thats something publisher Tracy Craft, who took over in March of 2012, said will always be available in the palm of your hand with the Observer. Theres something special about being able to read about your friends and family in a com munity paper that you can hold and touch, she said. While we continue to grow in the digital age, I think our roots will always be in the print version. The paper will always be the backbone. Back at his home, with RazMa-Taz waiting at the dock, Munster heads outside and checks the mailbox. His Ob server isnt there yet. Twentyevery week. The beginning was rough, but I got a great kick out of it, he said. With another cold Janu ary sending his thoughts to warmer waters in a few weeks, hes feeling adventurous again. He just needs to decide where his future will take him. Hell take a look at the Ob past some southern horizon. He knows a new paper will be wait ing at home when he gets back. But this Thursday will be a little different. Hell pick up the Observer just like he does every week, and itll be that moment in himself saying hello again, from back when a dream was just com ing true. We want to be your voice in the community, Munster wrote in Volume 1, Number 1. We are your newspaper, and we will never forget that. C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE at Winter Park Towers Your room is waiting for you if you need Pain and Symptom Management Hospital Follow-up Complex Treatments, or Crisis Care Referrals 866-742-6655#5019096 www.cornerstonehospice.org www.SeriousIllness.org/cornerstoneMedicare, Medicaid, most commercial insurances accepted rfrntbtn r rf rn tb b r rb b r r nr rfn rrnr n nf nn rf rf rn tb brrrnnn nr rb rrf rfb b rn r rfrr n rrfr f frb n nnr nrrn nrnnrfb b rn nr n f rf rfntbbbbbbbbb PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER A group of cats read the Winter Park Observer as depicted by Miami artist Herbert Hofer. Munsters Sanford home is lled with art dedicated to his time as the papers publisher. Read founding publisher Gerhard Munsters column about starting the Observer on Page 5 of this issue.

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014 | Page 3 Maitland City Talk BY HOWARD SCHIEFERDECKER MAYOR The Maitland City Council meets the second and fourth Mon day of the month at 6:30 p.m. The next meeting is scheduled for Jan. 27 in the Council Chambers, 1776 Independence Lane. Below is the agenda for that meeting. Special Presentations ilton-Buss CRA/Council Meeting Public Hearings Urban Chicken Keeping Lease Renewal Old Business source Ordinance Consent Agenda Meeting Minutes of Jan. 13. ation Advisory Board Minutes of Oct. 2, 2013 and Nov. 6, 2013. U.S. Highway 17-92 at Horatio tractor Inc. Medical Services EMS Matching Part-Time School Crossing Guard Thistle Lane/Mohawk Trail. Decision Item: ment Plan (CDP) Committee Re port Discussion For updates, please check our website at itsmymaitland.com Are you pet-responsible? We are large enough to give you what you want and small enough to provide it the way you want it. To learn more, please visit any of our banking centers from Orlando to Miami or call us at 1-800-435-8839.13-0089/rev090113 citynational.com Member FDIC Personal Relationships | Local Decisions | StabilityREDEFINING BANKING. 1115-8 CNwinterPrk.indd 1 11/20/13 9:40 AM

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Page 4 | Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014 PHONE: 407-563-7000 FAX: 407-563-7099 WPMOBSERVER.COM PUBLISHER Tracy Craft 407.515.2605 TCraft@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MANAGING EDITOR Isaac Babcock 407.563.7023 IBabcock@TurnstileMediaGroup.com ASSOCIATE EDITOR Sarah Wilson 407.563.7026 SWilson@TurnstileMediaGroup.com DESIGNER Tom Miller 407.563.7032 TMiller@TurnstileMediaGroup.com STAFF WRITERS Brittni Larson Megan Stokes Tim Freed Allison Olcsvay Kristy Vickery COLUMNISTS Chris Jepson Jepson@MediAmerica.us Louis Roney LRoney@cfl.rr.com Josh Garrick JoshGarrick9@gmail.com ADVERTISING SALES Linda Stern 407.376.2434 LStern@TurnstileMediaGroup.com LEGAL NOTICE ADVERTISING Ashley McBride 407.286.0807 Legal@FLALegals.com SUBSCRIPTIONS/CIRCULATION Luana Baez 407.563.7013 LBaez@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MEMBER OF: -Florida Press Association -Winter Park/Maitland/Goldenrod Chambers of Commerce Winter Park/Maitland Observer is published by Turnstile Media Group. Founded in 1990 and headquartered in Orlando, Fla., Turnstile Media Group is also the parent of Golfweek, Golfweek Custom Media, TurfNet, Professional Artist, Seminole Voice, Baldwin Park Living and Turnstile Connect. TURNSTILE MEDIA GROUP CHAIRMAN Rance Crain PRESIDENT/CEO Francis X. Farrell VICE PRESIDENTS Patti Green & Jeff Babineau USPS #00-6186 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Winter Park / Maitland Observer 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835 Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster FAMILY CALENDAR Community Bulletin Local man in Super Bowl ad Super Bowl Sunday Feb. 2 keep your eyes open for possible footage on televi sion of the Welcome Home event that was produced in Winter Park! Army Lt. Charles Chuck Nadd of Winter Park came home to surprise that involved the Budweiser company and the famous Clydesdale horses. He was a 2007 graduate of Trinity Prep and a 2011 graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point. He has been a Blackhawk helicopter pilot in Afghanistan. After a write-in contest and efforts that involved the National VFW and DOD (Veterans of Foreign Wars and De partment of Defense), Lt. Nadd was cho sen to represent all levels and all branch es of the military services. Budweiser has a history of making some memorable and heart-warming commercials that involve our armed forces. Calling all veteran artists Orlando VA Medical Centers Veterans Creative Arts Festival is accepting sub missions until Monday, Feb. 3. Thats the nal deadline for the show set for Feb. 14 at the Lake Baldwin Outpatient Clinic in Baldwin Park, located at 5201 Raymond St. The competition is open to all veterans enrolled at the Orlando VA Medical Center or any one of its points of care. Competi tion rules and categories can be found at the Veterans Creative Arts Festival web site at va.gov/opa/speceven/caf/docs/ festival.asp Those interested in competing should contact Jenny Danieli, Orlando VAMC rec reation therapist, at 407-629-1599, ext. 4205. JAN. 23 The U.S. Chamber of Commerce Founda tion, in conjunction with the Florida Hos pital Medical Group, will host Hiring Our Heroes Orlando, a hiring fair for veter ans and military spouses from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Jan. 23 at Florida Technical College Auditorium, 12900 Challenger Parkway in Orlando. Interested job seekers should register for free at hiringourheroes.org. Walk-in job seekers are allowed (veterans must provide proof of service). Its Popcorn Flicks in the Park at 7 p.m. Jan. 23 at Winter Parks Central Park. Bring a blanket, a picnic basket and the family and watch The Incredible Mr. Lim pet under the stars, courtesy of Enzian theater. Visit enzian.org for more informa tion. JAN. 25 Its the sixth annual Pookies Rescue Fest from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Jan. 25 at Lake Lily in Maitland. More than 100 rescue organizations and vendors will be there to help visitors to adopt a rescue pet or buy pet products. Groovy rafe prizes will be awarded. Visit pookiesrescuefest.com for more information. Dont miss Food Truck Crazy coming to Fleet Peeples Park in Winter Park this weekend! Its from noon to 4 p.m. Jan. 25 at 2000 S. Lakemont Ave. Its a regular event that happens every fourth Friday of the month. Come out for a variety of food trucks featuring local cuisine. Bring your pet! Visit foodtruckcrazy.com for more information. FEB. 2 On Sunday, Feb. 2, the Roth Jewish Com munity Center of Greater Orlando will kick off its Camp J summer camps from 1 to 4 p.m. at its location in Maitland. The Camp J Kickoff will feature an opportu nity to nd out more information about everything that Camp J has to offer, from their specialty camps, such as magic, theater, Mad Science, Lego Robotics and pottery, to their sports camps such as Edgerrin James Football, SCUBA, TGA Golf and sports journalism camps. For more information, please visit orlandojcc.org/ camp or contact Abby Paulson at AbbyP@ orlandojcc.org INN | Plans not ready, but could be razed small, 36-room hotel in 1949. The Frazee family purchas ing it from the OLeary family in 1962. They would later add the south section of rooms in 1971 and tear down the original 36 rooms of the hotel in 1981, mak ing way for the north building which contains the current lobby and dining areas. Quirky musical duo Mark Wayne and Lorna Lambey performed at the hotels Red Fox Lounge for more than 20 years, bringing their comedic, interac time in 1991. The pair became so popular that many believe they inspired a reoccurring Saturday Night Live skit featuring Will Ferrell and Ana Gasteyer. Mt. Vernon is a very im portant property, Mayor Ken Bradley said. Its been owned by a family thats incredibly mean ingful with a long history in our city. I dont know the circum stances behind the sale or any thing at this point. As mayor, Im very interested in knowing what may come. Commissioner Carolyn Coo per said if the Mt. Vernon Inn from another quality hotel com The Mt. Vernon Inn has served that niche for a long time, she said. Theyre really part of our community. Its a gateway to our city, Bradley said. Unicorp has yet to submit its plans for the new development to Winter Park city staff. C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014 | Page 5 Gymnastics Indoor Batting Cages Speed and Agility Boot Camps After School Pick UpCall today for a FREE TRIAL class. Now Open in College Park Moms and Dads can workout while KIDS are in classes!! www.Theorlandoathletics.com 1984 W. New Hampshire Street, Orlando, Florida 32804 4 0 7 7 4 5 56 6 1 As a kid in Vienna, Austria, I walked every day to the local bundle of the Kurier, a daily pa per, and sold them on a busy street corner. Id return the next day to pick up more papers and drop off the money. It was a good way for a kid to earn a little pocket change and learn the value of money. Many years later when I lived in Johannesburg, South Africa, I worked for the Sunday Times as overseas surveys manager. The paper had a paid circulation of 560,000 copies. After coming to America, I worked for a small shopper in Saint Petersburg and later moved to Orlando selling advertising at the Sentinel. At the next junction in my life, I wanted to learn about community news and became partner in the Outlook in Oviedo. partner and I saw a different fu ture for the paper. He bought me out and I started my own news paper. I remember sitting at my kitchen table, pondering if I could start a weekly community news paper in Winter Park to better serve our community the way I felt was the right way. I drew an eagle by hand with a No. 2 pen cil as my logo above the future name of my newspaper, and went through countless typical news paper names. The idea of choos ing the eagle as a very observant bird overseeing his domain made me choose the name Observer. I ordered a copy machine capable of reducing and enlarging, and a Macintosh II computer with QuarkXPress and Adobe Pho toshop. I had to quickly learn to type and design advertising as my My next challenge was to works in mysterious ways. I came across a For Rent sign on Ex ecutive Drive behind Kmart in Winter Park and met my new, very understanding landlord Ron Black. He was all excited to have a new community newspaper as a tenant and showed me the vacant paste up bench, left behind from another monthly senior publica tion that had moved on. ny selling used newspaper vend ing machines to distribute my papers. The fellow I found had 30 machines of various colors and conditions. With a lot of elbow grease, sandpaper, primer and spray paint, I managed to restore all of these machines and proudly applied the Observer logo. After acquiring all the neces sary licenses, the Observer was now ready for production. Now I had to wear many hats. I was the proud owner, publisher, edi tor and advertising person as well as the layout artist, the circulation manager and distributor. Time before I had to go to print. Thank goodness for my mom Fern. She volunteered to become asked several local residents to become contributing freelance writers, including the world fa mous author Sloan Wilson, best known for the novel The Man in the Grey Flannel Suit. I then started appointing an editorial advisory board more people to talk about the new paper and get more subscribers. The more, the merrier! The success of every good community newspaper is community participation! With barely $1,000 in advertis ing and slightly behind schedule, Thursday, Jan. 26, 1989. The Win ter Park Observer was born and 25 years later I am proud to see my baby grow! From paper boy to newspaper publisher Gerhard J.W. Munster Observer founding publisher and editor

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Page 6 | Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Jan. 27 City Commission meeting There will be a City Commis sion meeting Monday, Jan. 27, at 3:30 p.m. in City Hall Commis sion Chambers located at 401 S. Park Ave. For the most up-to-date agenda, please visit cityofwinter park.org > Government > City Commission > Agenda. Below are a few topics of interest: Mayors Report Florida League of Cities, 2014 Legislative Priorities da League of Cities Municipal Achievement Award honoring the citys 125th Anniversary Celebra tion Park Holiday Window Contest winners coin recipients Growth Award Enforcement Board, Winter Park City Managers Report strategic plan discussion. Consent Agenda 1/13/14. (for a complete listing, please visit cityofwinterpark.org/ccpackets). half of the parks rental not to ex ceed $825 for the Michael Andrew and SwingerHead Concert Sun day, Feb. 9, in Central Park. ment to spend $10,700 to replace the fence at Pineywood Cemetery using funds from the Cemetery Trust Fund. Action Items Requiring Dis cussion Public Hearings by for the property at 612 E. Lake Sue Ave.: nance annexing 612 E. Lake Sue Ave. nance amending the Comprehen sive Plan Future Land Use Map to establish a Single Family Future Land Use designation. to establish Single Family Resi dential District. nance vacating and abandoning the electric utility easement at 470 W. New England Ave. Park LLC, for property at 111 N. Orlando Ave.: use site plan approval to eliminate building in the southeast portion of the site for a 7,000-square-foot questing a variance of 18 parking spaces. Park: amending Chapter 58 Land De velopment Code creating a non-compete window of 30 days before or after the citys annual spring and fall art festivals. public hearing to discuss all as pects of the undergrounding of electric/CATV facilities consist ing of properties abutting Semi nole Drive, as to which improve ments are to be paid in part by special assessments levied against all properties within the abovedescribed area. cal agency program supplemental agreement with the Florida De partment of Transportation for the design of the Brookshire Elemen tary School neighborhood side walks (Brechin Drive, Dunblane Drive and Kimbrace Place). regulates use of red light camera enforcement. State Legislature to repeal Florida Statute 386.209, which preempts regulation of smoking to the state, and to allow local governments to regulate smoking in parks. sions full agenda on the home page of cityofwinterpark.org un der Whats New > City Commis sion Agenda. Watch the Jan. 27 City Commission meeting live If you cannot attend the meet ing, you can watch it live, gavelto-gavel as it happens on Mon day, Jan. 27, and every other City Commission meeting. During the meeting, simply log on to the terpark.org and click on Govern ment > Live Video Broadcasts to business. Employees of the Year On Jan. 17, at the Mayors State of the City Luncheon, we present ed awards to the citys most out Please join me in congratulating the following: Giannotti, Assistant Environmen tal Resource Manager In 2011, Giannotti joined the Lakes Division. Since then, she has exhibited an exceptional work ethic and demonstrated leader ship qualities that have motivated the entire division and raised its level of performance. All of Gian nottis accomplishments, exper tise, public outreach efforts and professionalism have helped to save thousands of taxpayers dol lars and improve the image of the division and the city, not just among our residents, but within the greater environmental man agement community in Florida. medic Since Nov. 11, 1996, Ryan has served the people of Winter Park ing others is one of Ryans most Winter Park City Talk BY RANDY KNIGHT CITY MANAGER Watch us on video T H A N K Y O U T H A N K Y O U T H A N K Y O U The businesses, organizations and individuals below have chosen to support your local Chamber of Commerce again in 2014 by renewing their membership. Please join us in thanking them for their investment in our community the next time you shop, dine, or call on their place of business. For more information about the Winter Park Chambe r of Commerce, our members, or upcoming events, visit us at the Winter Park Welcome Center, cal l (407) 644-8281 or log on to www.winterpark.org. A N N U A L S U P P O R T E R S 1st United Bank AAA Copytronics Day Communications, Inc. Filthy Rich Celebrity Jewelry Replicas Friends of Casa Feliz, Inc. Hutton Kilwins Chocolates & Ice Cream Orlando Estate Buyer, Inc. Orlando Life P.F. Chang's China Bistro The Ancient Olive The Spice and Tea Exchange WUCF 89.9 FM You Need Art 5 + Y E A R S A. Anthony Giovanoli Bosphorous Turkish Cuisine Citizens Bank of Florida Eileen Fisher Eyes & Optics Frank A. Hamner, P.A. Hannibal Square Association, Inc. Hannibal Square Heritage Center Michael Rogers, Inc. Ruggiero, Martinez & Norton, P.A. The Westchester Assisted Living Residence UpTown Dog Whole Foods Market Winter Park Winter Park Laser & Anti-Aging Center Winter Park Photography 1 0 + Y E A R S Central Florida Lifestyle Winter Park Breakfast Rotary Club Winter Park Garden Club 1 5 + Y E A R S All Business Printing, Inc. Brion Price Photography Christian Science Reading Room David Lundberg Building & Roofing Contractor Full Sail University Thaddeus & Polly Seymour 2 0 + Y E A R S Winter Park Maitland Observer 2 5 + Y E A R S First United Methodist Church New Hope for Kids, Inc. St. Margaret Mary Catholic Church Winter Park Day Nursery, Inc. 3 0 + Y E A R S Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens Creald School of Art 3 5 + Y E A R S Park Plaza Hotel 4 0 + Y E A R S Florida Gas Transmission Co. 4 5 + Y E A R S Jewett Orthopaedic Clinic, P.A. 5 0 + Y E A R S Massey Services, Inc. Murrah, Doyle and Wigle, P.A. Scenic Boat Tour Wayne Densch, Inc. 5 5 + Y E A R S Cooper, Simms, Nelson & Mosley Insurance Winter Park Land Company Chamber Trustees Park Avenue Merchants Association members Please see CITY TALK on page 9 GIANOTTI GONZALEZ RYAN

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014 | Page 7 Lifestyles Its a plausible reality, said artist Jake Fernandez describing his new multi-media exhibit Con structed Landscapes at the Mait The same could be said of the events held there the same eve ning featuring a mashup of art exhibit, fashion show, concert and food festival. The concept is simple. The ex ecution, however, is a bit like a juggling act. event series featuring a variety of night events showcasing local art ists doing what they do best. The public is invited to mingle with the artists and experience the sights and sounds of art in action. Januarys Culture Pop! theme was the Dapper Date and featured vintage clothing stylist Dana Ma rie Roquemore of Other Peoples Property, local duo Chasing Jo nah, the opening night of Fernan dezs exhibit, as well as food from Quick Dinners and beverages from Cigar City Brewing and Joel Gott Fine Wines. General admission of $5 includes a free drink. The event exudes the atmo sphere of an open house, with guests invited to wander from one setting to another enjoying anything in any order. Guests who wandered through the art gallery before 9 p.m. chat ted up featured artist Jake Fernan dez, whose mixed media works included an intricate photo col lage reminiscent of an impres sionist painting. Visiting from France, Helen Vinson couldnt help herself, tugging Fernandez arm to get his attention while he was chatting with another patron. Then she broke with taboos by asking to touch his art, though she knew it wasnt allowed. With a nonchalant gesture, Fernandez waved at his painting and invited her Vinson to touch it. Just dont let them see you, he said of the gallery staff. As she reached out to touch the piece delicately, Fernandez deepened his voice and called rity guard voice, bringing a ripple of laughter from Vinson and her friends. Just across the narrow street, the opening cords of Chasing Jo nahs dreamy set were beginning as patrons gathered to hear them play while chatting over drinks in the garden courtyard. Mingling with the guests, mod els dressed in vintage fashions from the s, s and s, rang ing in style from glamorous eve ning wear to dresses that looked straight out of LIFE magazine. Under the moss-drenched oak trees, the garden courtyard was a PHOTO BY ALLISON OLCSVAY THE OBSERVER Culture Pop! brings style air to Maitland. Bringing a pop of culture to date night ALLISON OLCSVAY Observer staff Please see DATE NIGHT on page 8 New Hope for Kids provides specialized support to children and families grieving the loss of a loved one and grants wishes to New Hope for Kids provides specialized support to children and families grieving the loss of a loved one and grants wishes to children with life-threatening illnesses in Central Florida. In 2013, New Hope for Kids granted 46 wishes to girls and boys and assisted over 420 children through grief facilitation. Because we do not receive any funding from government agencies, the personal donations so generously given by individuals and local organizations are very important to the success of our mission... to bring hope, healing and renewal to our community. We are so thankful for our dedicated Board of Directors, Volunteers and the generosity of the Central Florida community in another succesful TOY DRIVE for our families. We would like to thank those individuals who held Toy Drive Parties in their homes, individual donors at our many box locations and the staff, employees and generous patrons of the following businesses:

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dimly lit oasis of conversation as guests wandered in and out sam pling food, drink and music. At the back of the courtyard in a grotto that looked like it be longed in a Mayan pyramid, Oth er Peoples Property, owned and operated by Roquemore, set up a pop-up vintage shop for guests to browse. Offerings included dresses similar to those worn by the mod els, priced at around $30, vintage purses and jewelry that could have come from your (ultra-cool) grandmothers closet and a good selection of stylish vintage coats, perfect for warding off the chill in the air. Rochelle Womack lives just and came over to browse the vin tage clothing for sale. She ended up taking home a she said, be the highlight of her wardrobe. I really like what they are do ing here, said Womack. Its a perfect combination. Mary Helmers brought her husband of 42 years along for date night and she also seemed extremely pleased at the fashionas-art theme. I love vintage clothing and the art center, so I couldnt resist, she said. He loves me, so he couldnt resist either. Jan. 10s event was indeed a plausible reality with guests from all walks of life gathered in one place for one purpose: to enjoy each other and a little culture. It didnt seem to matter wheth er they were there for the art, the fashion or the music, each patron brought their own perspective to the event and that seems to be what Culture Pop! is all about, exposing the community to some thing new without any precon ceptions. Page 8 | Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer ARCHIVE PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Culture Pop! evolved from A&Hs popular monthly Culture and Cocktails nights. One Senior Place ... See our full Calendar of Events at OneSeniorPlace.com407.949.6733715 Douglas Avenue Altamonte Springs, FL 32714M-F 8:30am 5pmMONDAY, JANUARY 27 Senior Club Sponsored by Family Physicians Group Every Monday, 10am 12pm January 27th Casino Day The Real Estate Specialists are IN! 10am-1pm Presented by EXIT Real Estate Results By Appointment Only 407.949.6714 TUESDAY, JANUARY 28 Truth about Medicaid Planning 9:30am-12pm By The Law Ofces of Hoyt & Bryan RSVP 407.977.8080 Truth about Estate Planning 2pm-4pm By The Law Ofces of Hoyt & Bryan RSVP 407.977.8080 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 29 Is It Wax or Is It My Hearing? 3pm-4:30pm Presented by Harmony Hearing Centers of America RSVP 407.949.6737 THURSDAY, JANUARY 30 Matter of Balance 2:30pm-4:30pm By VITAS Innovative Hospice Care RSVP 407.599.2522 Daughters Missing Mothers 6pm-7:30pm (also Feb 6th, 13th, 20th, 27th) By VITAS Innovative Hospice Care RSVP 407.691.4548 The Real Estate Specialists are IN! 9am-12pm By EXIT Real Estate Results FRIDAY, JANUARY 31 Super Bowl Bingo 1pm-3pm Hosted by VITAS Innovative Hospice Care RSVP 407.599.2522Calendar of Events January 2014 Savannah Court and Cove Excellence in Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation 1301 W. Maitland Blvd. Maitland, FL 32751407-645-3990www.SavannahCourtMaitland.comAssisted Living Facility License No. 8447 Skilled Nursing Facility License No. 1635096 Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above. You are always welcome!A Senior Living Community where Hospitality is a Way of Life. Its TAX time. Appointments Available 7 Days a Week!Tax Form Processing LLC4070 Aloma Ave., Suite 1010 Winter Park, FL 32792Tel: (407) 657-6336www.TaxFormProcessing.com Proudly Serving the Orlando Area for 19 years! Scan QR Code 40$ 00OffTax PreparationMust present this coupon at time service is provided. Offer valid for one-time use. Cannot be combined with any other offer. Expires April 15, 2014Offer Code: WPMO14 DATE NIGHT | Get cultured in Maitland C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 7 PHOTOS BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVER Winter Parks Unity Heritage Festival celebrated cultural music and dance on Jan. 19. Unity Heritage Fest Culture Pop! returns to the Maitland Art Center at 7 p.m. Feb. 14.

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014 | Page 9 With a season spiraling out of control, the Knights are about to head into their toughest string of conference games so far while on a three-game losing streak. In the span of seven days the mens basketball team has lost to UConn (14-4, 2-3) 84-61, Rutgers (8-10, 2-3) 85-75, and SMU (14-4, 3-2) 58-46. And in a conference stacked with some of the NCAAs toughest teams three of the American Athletic Conferences teams are in the Top 25 the Knights are looking at a tough road to make a comeback. In shooting percentage theyve suffered the most. In their threegame skid they averaged 32.6 percent overall, well off the wild 60.3 percent they shot in a blow out of Jacksonville on Dec. 17. In most of the Knights wins shoot ing percentage has been a big factor. Theyve yet to lose a game in which they shot better than 45 percent this season. But theyve never won a game in which they shot less than 40 percent. Head coach Donnie Jones blamed young mistakes offen sively as the big factor that led the Knights to their loss against SMU at home. The loss of lead ing scorer Isaiah Sykes midway through the game didnt help ei ther. He left the game with a head injury and possible concussion af ter a collision near the basket just after the second period began. In Sykes wake, the Knights only had one shooter in double digits on the scoreboard. Sykes had been averaging 15.4 points per game this season. The Knights did not say how long Sykes would be off the court. Theyll be traveling to Cin cinnati to face the No. 19 Bearcats (17-2, 6-0) at 9 p.m. Jan. 23. Then at 7 p.m. on Jan. 29 they return home to host the No. 17 Memphis Tigers (13-4, 3-2) the highest ranked team in the AAC accord ing to the AP Top 25 poll. Knights face tough string of AAC foes ISAAC BABCOCK Observer staff H O U S E S W A N T E D ! G e t a F R E E N o O b l i g a o n C A S H O e r O n Y o u r H o u s e W i t h i n 2 4 H o u r s (8 5 5 ) 7 5 5 1 8 1 8 w w w C i r c l e 1 8 H o m e s c o m C A S H $ $ $ Q U I C K C L O S E A N Y P R I C E R A N G E A N Y C O N D I T I O N A N Y S I T U A T I O N 2826 Shader Rd. Orlando, FL 32808 Get/Keep You r Dog in Shape in 2014! 407-295-3888 B arkingDogFitness.com FACT! A Lean dog lives an average of 2 years longer than an overweight dog. Conveniently located at... AC T NOW!New Y ears Promo!Get 25% o for LIFE!expires 1/31/14 Customized workouts Training Indoor Warm Water Swimming ORLANDOS ONLY DOGGIE DAY CARE WITH A GYM! Recycling reduces the amount Public and private sector organi zations across Orange County re cycled 9.6 million tons of materi the waste can be reused as is while the rest is reduced to its component raw materials for reuse in new products. Recycling also reduces the demand for envi ronmentally unfriendly activities such as strip mining, fossil fuel exploration, and forestry in virgin woodlands. For instance, recy cling one ton of paper produces an equivalent amount of raw material that would come from 17 trees. Recycling is also more for new sources of materials. Re cycling of aluminum cans saves 95 percent of the energy required to make the same amount of alu minum from virgin sources. Recycling is also cost effec tive and creates new economic opportunities while using a minimal amount of new mate rial. The textile recycling industry offers an interesting insight into the positive economic impacts of recycling. More than 90 percent of discarded textiles are recycla ble, and a competitive market has emerged for both the reuse and recycling of these items. Many discarded clothing items are resold as is to the developing world, allowing many economi cally disadvantaged people to purchase high quality name brand clothing for just around $1. Many items are also broken down for raw materials. For instance, old sweaters from the United States are sold to places such as the United Kingdom, India, Italy, and the Philippines where they are turned into blankets for both local use and export. Other items are broken down for use in indus trial applications ranging from wiping materials to insulation. These processes reuse existing materials, create jobs along every step of the supply chain, and add value to products that would have otherwise been discarded. making 2014 the greenest year on record. If you live in a singlefamily residence in unincorpo rated Orange County, be sure to order your recycling bins from our Solid Waste Division. If you live in one of our many munici palities, do the same from your citys solid waste department. For residents of apartment or condo minium complexes, please drop off your recyclables at the nearest nearest transfer station at Orange Countys Solid Waste website, aspx I hope that you will do your part to help Orange County reach our goal of recycling 50 percent of our waste this year. If you need further information on Orange Countys recycling efforts of have any other questions or concerns, please feel free to contact me or my staff, Edgar Robinson and Ly nette Rummel. We can be reached at 407-836-7350 or by email at Heres wishing you and your family a wonderful, safe and green 2014. Whats your familys recycling goal for 2014? Ted Edwards Commissioners Corner CITY TALK | Womens safety class organizer wins accolades impressive skills. While Ryan has responded to thousands of emer gency calls during his career, his caring for the condition of his pa tients, combined with his excel lent bedside manner has been rec ognized by both his patients and the time and enjoys sharing his His abilities are trusted to lead the departments new recruits. Gonzalez is a member of the Community Services Division and a leader, team player, relationship builder, and most importantly, a strong role model and mentor for our citys youth. She also leads our womens SAFE program or ganizing the classes and provid ing invaluable safety information to women, one of our most vul nerable of populations. Within the department, Gonzalez is known for accuracy, timeliness, willing ness to help wherever needed, tlin are what make our city one of the safest cities in the county. on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, watch us on Vimeo. C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 6 Winter ParkDISTRESS SALE

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CONGRATULATIONS!Thank you for voting for your fan favorites! Sponsored by FOOD & BEVERAGE Best Bar/ Happy Hour Prato Best Brunch Briarpatch Best Frozen Treat Jeremiah's Italian Ice Best Burger BurgerFi Best Salad Prato Best Coffee Shop Barnie's CoffeeKitchen Best Sandwich/Sub Shop Firehouse Subs Best Dessert/Chocolate Shop Peterbrooke Chocolatier of Winter Park Best Specialty Food Store The Ancient Olive Best Wine Bar The Wine Room on Park Best Bakery Croissant Gourmet Best Caterer Arthur's Catering Best Restaurant Prato Best New Restaurant (opened in 2013) Carmel Caf & Wine Bar SERVICES Best Real Estate Agency Fannie Hillman + Associates Best Bank/ Credit Union Bank of America Best Law Firm *tied Pohl & Short, P.A. Windweedle, Haines, Ward & Woodman, P.A. Best Hair Salon/ Barber Kendall & Kendall Best Nail Salon Winter Park Nails Best Hotel The Alfond Inn Best Insurance Agency Cooper Simms Nelson & Mosley Best Financial Advisor Grafton Wealth Management at Merrill Lynch Best CPA/ Accountant Moore Stephens Lovelace, P.A. Best Marketing/ Public Relations Firm CCH Marketing & Events Best Travel Agent Luxury Trips Best Auto Dealership Holler Hyundai Best Florist Winter Park Florist SHOPPING Best Jewelry Store Be on Park Best Womens Clothing Store Tuni Best Mens Clothing Store John Craig Clothier Best Childrens Clothing Store tugboat & the bird Best Pet Supply Store The Doggie Door Best Gift Store Leisa Lovely Designs Best Store for Window Shopping Tuni HEALTH & WELLNESS Best Fitness Studio The Bar Method of Winter Park Best Gym YMCA Best Physical Therapist Pursuit Physical Therapy Best Family Practice/ Pediatrician Interlachen Pediatrics Best Chiropractor Furey Chiropractic Best Dentist Dennis S. Apfel, D.D.S. Best Eye Care/ Optical Eyes & Optics Best Senior Living The Mayflower Retirement Community Best Plastic Surgeon D. Scott Rotatori, M.D. Best Dermatologist Central Florida Dermatology ENTERTAINMENT Best Museum Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art Best Theatre Enzian Theater Best Event/ Festival Winter Park Sidewalk Art Festival POTPOURRI Best Non-Profit/ Charity Winter Park Public Library Best Local Publication Winter Park Maitland Observer Best Kept Secret Winter Park Chapter of International Association of Administrative Professionals

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014 | Page 11 Now through March 9 The Life & Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby Parts I and II 27 actors plays more than 150 characters in this unique, twopart, dramatic and comic mas terpiece that captures the genius of Charles Dickens. Combining Dickens outrageous characters with theatrical spectacle, The Nickleby Parts I and II leads the way to a must-see theatrical event. Visit Orlandoshakes.org or call 407-447-1700. Tonight Jan. 23 The Winter Park Institute at Rollins College In a series of talks offered free to the public, the Winter Park Institute at Rollins College begins its 2014 season with Sharon Rob inson, daughter of major league baseball player Jackie Robin son. This evening at 7 p.m., Ms. Robinson will discuss her fathers legacy, highlighting his nowlegendary values in sports and in life. Bringing renowned speakers, poets and Pulitzer Prize-winning authors to Central Florida, this seasons speakers include former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and Film maker Ken Burns. Events are free and open to the public. Call 407-691-1995 or visit winterpar kinstitute.org Now through Feb. 23 The Magical Adventures of Merlin at Orlando Rep The Magical Adventures of Merlin, to be presented through Feb. 23 at the Orlando Rep, is an imagined tale about how a young Merlin meets a young, soon-to-be King Arthur in Merlin faces serious life choices before becoming the greatest wizard in the land as surprises abound in this musical adventure for the whole family. Call 407896-7365 or visit orlandorep.com Jan. 24 to 26 The Wizarding World of Harry Potter at Universal Studios Enter a world where magic is real this weekend as the world descends on Orlando. Univer sal Studios will celebrate the adventures of Harry Potter at The Wizarding World of Harry Potter in three days of fun. Join tribute, explore Hogwarts castle, stock up on wizard supplies, and experience pulse-pounding rides. Visit universalorlando.com Jan. 24 and 25 The 90th birthday of the Orlando Museum of Art The Orlando Museum of Art is celebrating 90 years in Orlando, and the opening of the Museums 90th birthday celebration will Rubens, Gainsborough and the Golden Age of Painting in Europe. Between 1600 and 1800, the years in which these paintings were produced, popular subjects included portraits, still-lifes, and classical antiquity, illustrating the people and the objects that made the two centuries a rich cul tural age. An opening reception will be held Jan. 24 at 6 p.m.; the exhibit opens to the public on Jan. 25 at 10 a.m. Call 407-896-4231 or visit omart.org Jan. 24 to Feb. 15 Breakin Up Is Hard To Do at the Winter Park Playhouse Set in a 1960s Catskills resort, Breakin Up Is Hard To Do is a musical comedy about two friends in search of romance over one Labor Day weekend. The score features 18 Neil Sedaka classics including Where the Boys Are, Calendar Girl, and the chart-topping title song. Directed and choreographed by Roy Alan, the production features a cast of Playhouse favorites. Call 407-645-0145 or visit winterpark playhouse.org Josh Garrick Culture for your calendar JANUARY 13 (Mon) Beginning Walk-Run Program Begins .................... Blue Jacket Park Presented by Track Shack Fitness Club 21 (Tue) MarathonFest Marathon Training Begins .................... Glenridge MS Presented by Track Shack Fitness Club 25 (Sat) Seasons 52 Park Avenue 5.2k* .................................. Park Avenue Presented by Florida HospitalFEBRUARY 1 (Sat) Florida Hospital Lady Track Shack 5k ......................... Mead Garden 15 (Sat) Run Around the Pines 5k* ...................................... Showalter Field Presented by Florida HospitalMARCH 15 (Sat) Zimmerman Kiser Sutcliffe Winter Park Road Race 10k & 2 Mile*Presented by Florida Hospital ................................ Park Avenue 24 (Mon) Beginning Walk-Run Program Begins .................... Blue Jacket Park Presented by Track Shack Fitness ClubAPRIL 26 (Sat) Run for the Trees 5k .............................................. Showalter FieldJULY 4 (Fri) Hunter Vision Watermelon 5k ..................................... Park Avenue Run, Walk, Train. Winter ParkFloridas premier fitness destination! February 6 | 5 8 p.m. | Park AvenueExperience the charm and romance of Park Avenue while visiting 20 local merchants. Discover the latest fashions, gift ideas and seasonal menus at participating locations. Plus, enjoy appetizer and beverage samples along the way. Winter Park Sip, Shop & Stroll$25 | www.ExperienceParkAvenue.com | 407-644-8281Sip, Shop & Stroll... With Your Sweetheart! KEEP UP WITH MAITLAND NEWS AND EVENTS!www.IndependenceLane.com Facebook.com/ItsMyMaitland Please see CULTURE on page 12 MICHAEL ANDREW CITRUS BOWL KICKOFF

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Page 12 | Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Jan. 25 Orlando Philharmonic hosts a Party at The Plaza In a rockin party Gala fea turing headliner Michael Andrew classical to jazz, bluegrass, rock n roll and more, food stations, silent auction, photo booth, and a beer and wine bar (included), the Orlando Philharmonic and the Plaza Live Theatre present their at the Plaza begins at 6:30 p.m. on Jan. 25 at 425 N. Bumby Ave. in Orlando. Tickets are $95 and $150. Visit OrlandoPhil.org/Party or call 407-896-6700, ext. 236. Jan. 28 to Feb. 2 Best musical Once in Orlando premiere Once, winner of eight Tony Awards, including Best Musi cal, will play the Bob Carr PAC from Jan. 28 through Feb. 2. The celebrated new musical, based on the Academy Award-winning musician and a Czech immigrant drawn together by their shared love of music. Their unexpected friendship evolves into a compli cated romance, heightened by the emotion of the songs they create together. Tickets are available at OrlandoBroadway.com or by call ing 1-800-982-2787. Jan 29 Florida Citrus Bowl Stadium demolition kick-off Next up for a serious face-lift in the city beautiful is the Florida Citrus Bowl. Opened in 1936 as a public works project under President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the stadium is about to undergo major demolition and recon struction. At 10 a.m. on Jan. 29, Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer and Orange County Mayor Teresa Jacobs will celebrate the begin ning of the venues reconstruc tion. New features will include a new lower bowl, 360-degree main concourse, club level with en closed and open-air seating and a 10,000-square-foot party deck. Join the crowd. Were all invited. Jan. 31 to April 6 Southwestern Allure opens Mennellos 15th season Southwestern Allure: The Art of the Santa Fe Art Colony will open the Mennello Museums 15th season in an exhibit of 40 ence of Santa Fe as an art colony. Featuring the period from 1915 to 1940, Allure explores the artists who went to Santa Fe, what com pelled them, and the work they produced. The opening reception will be held on Jan. 31 beginning at 6 p.m. Call 407-246-4278 or visit mennellomuseum.com Feb. 1 Commemorating Bok Tower Gardens Feb. 1 is the Dedication Day Bok Tower Gardens commemo rates its 85th anniversary with free admission. The occasion will feature guest speakers, special carillon concerts, a tree planting ceremony, and a rare opportunity to cross the moat surrounding the singing tower. No reserva tions necessary. Visit boktower gardens.org Current New Year New name Same commitment to philanthropy The Community Foundation nounced its new name, Central Florida Foundation, and has launched its new website as a resource to the community. The Central Florida Foundation is home to more than 400 charitable funds established by individuals, families and corporations. It has grown to more than $55 million in assets since 1996 and awarded more than $30 million in grants, including $1 million in scholar ships. The funds cover the full range of philanthropy supporting education, the arts, environment, health and human services and religion. Visit cffound.org And looking ahead Feb. 6, 7, 8 Tables Extra Extraordinaire Decorators, brides, inte rior designers, and anyone who enjoys elegant entertaining will want to visit the Holy Trinity Conference Center in Maitland for Tables Extraordinaire. This unique fundraiser showcases 30 lavishly decorated tables while offering luncheons or dinners reminiscent of a trip to Greece. The three-day event ends on Saturday evening (Feb. 8) with a Gala Banquet. During the day, visit the Center for Greek pastries and delicacies (they even offer take-out for lunch and dinners). Visit htgocorlando.org or Tables Extraordinaire on Facebook, or call 407-333-3895. CULTURE | Party at The Plaza will feature Michael Andrew & The Big Atomic Band in downtown Orlando C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 11 rfntbtnnn bbnfntnt bbbrbnnntfn rnr rfn Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906. O NCE This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORG @EnzianTheater Sundance Film Festival USA Presents: LITTLE ACCIDENTS Filmmaker Sara Colangelo will be in attendance to present the lm and hold a Q&A Thurs 6:30 Cult Classics: HEAVY METAL Tues 9:30 INSIDE LLEWYN DAVIS Directed by Ethan Coen & Joel Coen, Cast | Oscar Issac, Carey Mulligan, Justin Timberlake, John Goodman, Garrett Hedlund Fri, Sat, Sun 3:15, 6:15, 9:15 Mon & Wed 6:15, 9:15 Tues 6:15 Thurs 9:15 Peanut Butter Matinee Family Film: LABYRINTH Sun 12PM

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014 | Page 13 Opinions Chris Jepson Perspectives Oh, Lordy! Shes talking about me, as someone who receives pictures of ador able little chickies wearing knitted hats. Ive told my daughter STOP IT! to not post such pictures but, damn, who can Friends post chickie pictures and Im guilty . of looking. I was late in creating a Facebook page. I thought it a bit goofy, and still do actually. In case youve just fallen off the turnip that hosts you and your Friends online. There are a billion plus users of Facebook to sell you stuff and market your inter ests. Essentially, Facebook users are just a way for capitalists to make a buck-off. Facebook is used a myriad of different ways. Some folks, realtors, for example, use it to sell their services or advertise available property. Corporations have Facebook pages. So, too, individuals. A gripe I have about Facebook is its designation of the word Friend. Anyone you accept as a Friend has access to your Facebook page and you to theirs. I am somewhat of a literalist when using the word Friend. I have 65 Facebook Friends, 27 are relatives, nine are from my hometown (went to public school with) plus 29 more are, to varying degrees longtime and shorttime friends. I will not Friend anyone I do not personally know. I am not so much interested in being Friended by some one who has 678 Facebook Friends. But thats just me. If, on a regular basis, you sit for any length of time before a computer terminal (writing, research, work, etc.), it is easy to periodically take a break, pop a screen and see whats doing on Facebook. Most of my Friends are liberal, or with a pronounced libertarian streak. I have the full range of Friends. Some post food recipes (with pictures), some talk about their favorite sports teams, others their children and grandchildren. My son and daughter like novel. One Friend posts pictures of her dachshund; its obvious she loves her pupster. I peruse commentary on social issues, politics and governance. Facebook, like most social media, connects the like-mind ed. This is good and bad, but that is grist for another column. I like getting updates from LA Lee on his love, where he is ski ing, and his big doings on the West Coast. I relish the raging Philadelphia outbursts from MissAyeshaB on the gross incompe tence of chefs she knows. I enjoy the up dates about my hometown of Sioux City. I like pictures of friends and family toasting life. Facebook is (for me) a small part of just that, enjoying life. I invest, maybe, 20 minutes a day actually online, posting or digesting Facebook updates. Inane? Sure. A lot of it is. Im just as guilty as the next Facebook user (more so perhaps) of posting the frivolous. It makes me laugh. So I was amused when a long time old friend (Weve known each other since we were 6) posted, I dont want to see chickens with knitted hats or cute pup pies. I dont want to buy 300-count sheets. I dont care if the highway is blocked or if you had dinner with someone or your kid played soccer today I hate Facebook. I hate the way it sucks time for dumb stuff. So I have left. All true friend yet. Expect a call. A Facebook divorce Jepson is a 27-year resident of Central Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.US Louis Roney Play On! I have often ignored the inherent lim ited elasticity of chance friendships. I must admit to indulging in the exercise of trying to stretch even longtime friendships far beyond the capacity they may be capable of seldom a successful venture. During WWII, when I was training as other midshipmen in an expanded doubledeck-bunked Chicago hotel room. Three of us Midshipmen became pals of highly entertaining dimensions. In our free time we three were inseparable, and went together to football games, debutant parties, nightclubs, and elaborate Sunday brunches at the Ambassador East. We were invited to many more social occa sions than our spare time allowed us to accept, and I shall never forget the elabo rate invitations extended to us Navy guys during that wartime training period. The Drake Hotel Bar on Michigan Boulevard was a kind of meeting place for us Navy guys where we were sure to get immediate invitations to events all over the Chicago area. future was momentarily put aside in the high spirits of our youthful and close friendship. In fact, we three somehow assumed that we would be pals forever after we got our Navy Commissions, did our various wartime duties, and returned Jay again was some years after the war was over, when he and his now wife took me to lunch on La Cienega Boulevard at a Hollywood restaurant. Jay looked like every other successful young businessman with a briefcase full of contracts. His good-looking wife could have come out of an ad in any one of several-dozen fashion magazines. As for me, I was singing a Verdi opera that evening in a big hall in L.A. My pal Jay and his wife were clearly not candi Italian opera. When we said good-bye after lunch, the word meant exactly what it prophetically implied and I never saw Jay and his wife again. strangest coincidences of my life: In the middle of WWII, while walking alone up a jungle pathway on the island of Espiritu Santo in the New Hebrides, I ran smack into Don who was coming alone down the same pathway! A couple of years after the war, when I sang an opera outdoors one summer should come on stage afterwards but Don, with his tall, slender, chic wife in tow. Don was now in Madison Avenue ad vertising, and the only advertising I knew anything about was in trying to make my name well known in the music world. Don was not personally familiar with opera, and it was not my lifes work to convert average American business Joes into culture-hounds. From then on, Don and I sometimes met for lunch, and he, MariJo and I often ball games. Don and MariJo lived high above 86th and Lex. Jay and Don are both gone now, and I am the only one left of the three Navy oversized Chicago hotel room all those years ago. Ive talked every now-and-then on the phone with Dons widow MariJo, who remains unmarried, and now lives in Atlanta. She is friendly enough, but I see little point in our getting together. The war has been over a long time. And everything connected with the war is over, no matter what we have lost irrevocably along the way. Friendships for a time About Roney: HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney) Letters to the editor Send your thoughts (400 words or less) to Managing Editor Isaac Babcock at ibabcock@turnstilemediagroup.com Orlandos compassionate wunder kind lands a promotion My lifelong friend (since our Rollins days), Bonnie Manjura, passed away leaving a Central Florida legacy few can match. She was instrumental in putting Orlando on the tourism map internation fully lobbied Congress for the Heathrow interchange Jeno needed, founded the Lake Mary-Heathrow Festival of the Arts, founded the Seminole Ornament Society, had a major role in growing dozens of What set Bonnie Doreen Manjura apart was that she got started right out of Rollins in the s, incorporated extreme compas sion and empathy into all of her business pursuits and never-ending charity work, and never lost sight of where shed come from. And she treated everyone with such loving care and compassion that literally thousands of employees, friends, and family members strongly believe that her values are timeless and will love her dearly forever. with nothing but the clothes on their backs, settling in Duluth, the home of the legendary billionaire, Jeno Paulucci. Bonnie would later become Jenos righthand-woman in Heathrow, Fla., person ally executing many of the critical moves that gave rise to the Heathrow we know today. While Disney was a no-brainer for American tourists, it was a different story for the rest of the world. Bonnie changed all that as the most personable, energetic, and ambitious multi-lingual ambassador to the world that Orlando will ever have. Bonnie Manjura took on the male-domi nated business community of the s with an unmatched mix of personality, humor, extreme professionalism, peerless reputa tion, and driving ambition to succeed. Ive seen Bonnie charm the pants off a group of Orlandos boldfaced names with lines that would rival Jay Leno on a good night and Reagan-esque anecdotes at any time. Theyd open their wallets for her business ventures and her charities while holding her in the highest esteem ... in between laughs. Before 24/7 entered our vernacu lar, Bonnie was outworking anyone youve met, EVER. Every time we got together, she exclaimed, Were bustin it! Bonnie was the sister I never had, and I will greatly miss her dearly. I hope that todays youth will use their judgment to their generation. Sadly, there will only be one! Will Graves Rollins Know your historic home rights Is your home 50 years old or older? Is it quaint, charming or architecturally interesting? Did an important person design the home? If you answered yes to two of the three questions, you need to be informed about the property rights debate that will surface at the Winter Park City Commission in January. For the last 6 months, the Historic Preservation Board has followed a directive by City Com missioners to examine our current his toric preservation ordinance and propose changes, or not. The biggest issues are sure to contro owners should have to agree to have their home placed on the local historic registry. Currently in Winter Park, all real property, especially homes, are personal and what a homeowner decides to do or not do to it, is their decision. Placement on the historic registry comes with controls. Would you want to ask an appointed board permission for window replacement or garage door approval? Should this ap pointed board be able to place a home on the historic registry without an owners permission? The second issue is whether or not the ordinance should lower the voting thresh old for a neighborhood to call themselves an historic district. Currently, the ordinance requires a two-thirds majority of neighborhood resi dents to approve an historic district. That threshold is high, but it protects against a slim majority imposing their views on a cratic approach is frowned upon by the consultant hired to provide information for the Historic Preservation Board. He recommends historic districts be created by a board of experts and public hearings, with no citizen voting. He states the twothirds voting requirement is the crux of the problem with our current ordinance and is quite odd. Get informed and get involved. Its easy to pass ordinances, but its a lot tougher to rescind one. Talk to an appraiser, a realtor, or an attorney before this is presented to the City Commission. Visit the citys website and read the Historic Preserva tion Board minutes and reports. Talk to the candidates in the upcoming election. They would love to hear from you! Pitt Warner Winter Park

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Page 32 | Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com Sunday, January 26th 219 S. Lawsona Boulevard, Orlando FL 32801 5 BR | 4 BA | 3,049 SF | $419,900 Charming 1930s two story home on an oversized double lot with original hardwood floors, two wood burning fire places, two large sun porches, separate In-Law apartment, formal dining room and lots of natural light! The fully fenced backyard features plenty of privacy, pav ers and two wood decks for maximum enjoyment. Hosted by: Cindy Watson from 1-4 PM 815 Chichester Street, Orlando FL 32803 4 BR | 3 BA | 2,262 SF | $365,000 Adorable three bedroom, two bath bun galow in charming Orwin Manor. Main house features wood floors, wood burn ing fireplace and cedar closets. Family/ dining room combo is open and bright with tiled flooring and wall length win dows that overlook the patio and court yard area. Finished 1/1 guest apartment above garage offers private access and its own kitchen. Hosted by: Jennifer JJ Mackle from 1-4 PM 1529 Holts Grove Circle, Winter Park FL 32789 4 BR | 4 BA | 4,356 SF | $1,440,000 Meticulous two story pool home in desirable Windsong! Soaring ceilings, designer features, spectacular wood and stone flooring, plantation shutters, granite counters and crown molding. Spacious office, chefs kitchen, sunny breakfast room and huge loft. Down stairs master retreat with spa-like bath. Expansive family room offers three sets of French doors that lead out to the cus tom screened porch. Private backyard oasis complete with sparkling pool, palm trees and privacy hedge. Hosted by: Tiffany Prewitt from 1-4 PM 285 Rippling Lane, Winter Park FL 32789 3 BR | 3 BA | 2,019 SF | $699,500 Gorgeous lakefront home on Lake Killar ney! Beautiful wood floors, updated and upgraded baths, office, fireplace, and attractive kitchen overlooking the lake. Enjoy stunning lake views from the over sized screened patio. The only lake in Winter Park where you can land a plane! Hosted by: Patrick Higgins from 1-4 PM 505 W. Harvard Street, Orlando FL 32804 3 BR | 2 BA | 1,777 SF | $415,000 Updated and renovated College Park pool home on a double lot! Steps from Edgewater Drives boutiques, restaurants and shopping. Beautiful kitchen with brand new cabinets, granite counters and stainless steel appliances. Master suite is a very comfortable size and has double closets. Master bath has been renovated with a walk-in shower. Addi tional features include original hardwood floors, fresh paint inside and out, beauti ful fenced yard, open deck and oversized two car garage with half bath. Hosted by: Lauren Fritch from 1-4 PM Meg Dolan 1184 Valley Creek Run, Winter Park $250,000. 01/14/2014 Catherine DAmico 2020 Vivada St, Orlando $259,000. 01/14/2014 Cindy Kuykendall 525 Stetson St, Orlando $230,000. 01/13/2014 Sharon Helsby 988 Brightwater Cir, Maitland $469,000. 01/15/2014 Jeff & Barbara Friedman 245 Whittier Cir, Orlando $299,000. 01/17/2014 Wendy Williams Crumit 928 Moss Lane, Winter Park $850,000. 01/17/2014 Ann Lee 4003 Santa Maria Dr, Kissim mee $110,000. 01/20/2014 Ann Lee 2260 San Vital Dr, Kissimmee $110,000. 01/17/2014 OBSERVER Just Sold Homes SUNDAY 12-3 LOCATION! LOCATION! LOCATION! 1510 Mizell Avenue, Winter Park. 3BD/3BA, 1,936SF. Perfectly situated be tween newer million$ Windsong Homes, this charmer features original hardwood floors, a beautifully updated kitchen, semi-vaulted ceilings & a fantastic fam ily room featuring brick fireplace PLUS a wall of built-in cabinets. Extras include inside utility/storage room, 2 car ga rage & a large, tranquil backyard patio!! 90x150 lot! $484,000 WONDERFUL HOME IN GREAT LOCATION 680 Balmoral Road, Winter Park. 4BD/2.5BA, 2,264SF. Kenilworth Shores home on a corner lot. Home offers fire place, hardwood floors, formal living and dining rooms and two car garage. A rated schools include Brookshire El ementary, Glenridge Middle and Winter Park High School. 1/3 acre lot. $525,000 BALDWIN PARK BEAUTY 2015 Meeting Place, Orlando. 3BD/3.5BA, 2,320SF. Spectacular townhome with tre mendous upgrades throughout! Antiquestyle hickory wood floors throughout the living areas. Gorgeous kitchen with maple cabinets, granite counters and stainless steel appliances. Master suite, living room, downstairs guest suite and both porches overlook Corrine Commons Park. Two-car garage. $499,999 SUNDAY 1-4 BEAUTIFUL POOL HOME IN PARK GROVE 812 Granville Drive, Winter Park. 5BD/3.5BA, 2,950SF. Traditional ranch home with formal living room with brick fireplace and dining room with builtin corner cabinets. Bamboo floors and stainless appliances. Two covered back patios with brick pavers. Lush landscap ing and pool with fountains in private fenced yard. Large lot and attached 2-car garage. Zoned for Dommerich Elemen tary & Maitland Middle. Prime location near Park Avenue. $685,000 MEDITERRANEAN TOWNHOME ON TREE LINED STREET 541 Fairfax Avenue, Winter Park. 3BD/2.5BA, 2,095SF. Light and bright townhome with vaulted ceilings, wood floors, bonus loft and a private court yard. Large downstairs master bedroom with fireplace and French door access to courtyard. Large eat-in kitchen with breakfast nook. New interior paint, new carpet and refinished wood floors. Over sized two car garage. Great location just blocks from Park Avenue. $450,000 SUNDAY 2-5 QUAINT HOME ON BRICK STREET 1570 Grove Terrace, Winter Park. 3BD/2BA, 1,663SF. Excellent Winter Park location. One car detached garage with workshop space. Yard is low mainte nance. High ceilings in living areas and master suite. Two walk in closets and French doors in master suite that open out to back patio. Kitchen has granite counters, newer wood cabinets and a breakfast nook. Wood and ceramic tile throughout. $409,000 150 E. Robinson Street Unit 2210, Orlando FL 32801 sold by Rhonda Chesmore 62 W. Colonial Drive Unit 207, Or lando FL 32801 sold by Padgett Mc Cormick 5463 Endicott Place, Oviedo FL 32765 sold by Pamela Ryan 1420 Chapman Circle, Winter Park FL 32789 sold by Pamela Seibert 340 N. Phelps Avenue, Winter Park FL 32789 sold by Tiffany Prewitt 45 Fern Crest Drive, Debary FL 32713 sold by Renee Dee Morgan 1051 Henley Downs Place, Lake Mary FL 32746 sold by Patrick Higgins OBSERVER Open Houses THE MARKE T PLA C E MindGym January 20, 2014 MindGymJanuary 20, 2014 ANNOUNCEMENTS A childless married couple seeks to adopt. Will be full-time mom & devoted dad. Fi nancial security. Expenses paid. Call/ Text. Patricia & Adam. 1-800-790-5260. Bar#0150789. Winter Park Benefit Shop 140 Lyman Ave, Winter Park needs items to sell: clothing, bedding, jewelry, kitchenware and bric-a brac. Also need ing volunteers. Contact Elizabeth Comer 407-647-8276. Open Tues & Fri at 9:30am; Sat 10am-1pm. All proceeds support childrens programs & the Or lando Blind Association. Winter Park Benefit Shop: at 140 Lyman Avenue, Winter Park needs items to sell: clothing, bedding, jewelry, kitchenware/bric-a brac. Need volun teers contact Elizabeth Comer 407647-8276. Open 9:30am-2pm every Tues & Fri (and Sat 10am-2PM). Pro ceeds support childrens programs and the Orlando Blind Assoc. EDUCATION AIRLINE CAREERS begin here Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Finan cial aid for qualified students. Job place ment assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769 FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now survive DIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922 rfntb rf ntand soreness nb naches THG-12902 39th Annual Mount Dora Arts Festival February 1 & 2 www.MountDoraCenterForTheArts.org The National Auction Group #685 Sarasota County, FL Florida Press 3.792 inches wide by 4 inches deep Thomas J. Bone, FL #AU3433 r frfntb5,700ACRESWORLD-CLASS HUNTING & FISHINGSARASOTACOUNTY,FLORIDA nftb UNLIMITED DEVELOPMENT POTENTIALttntttbnn r SUNDAY 2-5 TRADITIONAL TOWNHOME IN BALDWIN PARK 5453 Baldwin Park Street, 32814. 3BD/2.5BA, 1,756SF. Built in 2008, this townhome features hardwood floors, crown molding and French doors lead ing to brick paved patio and garden area. Gourmet kitchen boasts granite counters, 42 oak cabinetry with upgraded hard ware, under cabinet lighting, beautiful tile backsplash and stainless appliances. Wonderful Baldwin Park amenities! $315,000 EDUCATION You can become an expert in HVAC installation and repair. Pinnacle Career Institute Online HVAC education in as little as 12 months. Call us today: 1-877-651-3961 or go online: www.HVAC-Online-Education.com HELP WANTED Now Hiring OTR CDLA Drivers. New Pay Package and $2500 Sign-On Bonus! Mostly 5-10 days out, full bene fits, achievable bonuses. Call for details 1-888-978-3791/apply www.heyl.net MISCELLANEOUS A Guaranteed Offer in 48 Hours! We Buy Homes! www.dbuyshomes.com 800-741-6876 MISCELLANEOUS February sublet/room rental needed 2 quiet, serious med students need rent al/sublet for month of February in WP area. Email: hetlandmaryo@gmail.com PROFESSIONAL SERVICE No Time.... Call! WE CLEAN FOR YOU!! Commercial and Residential servicing. WE DO IT!! Call Catherine Adam 321-356-8160. cad am1959@yahoo.com REAL ESTATE: COMMERCIAL OFFICE FOR RENTWINTER PARK Executive office available in prestigious bank building. Approximately 10 x 12 with windows on two sides. Additional space available for assistant, now or lat er, at additional charge. Aloma and Lake mont Avenues. 24-hour access. Mini mum one year term. Broker. $500 per month. Lou Nimkoff 407-405-3368 of fice@briofl.com REAL ESTATE: FOR SALE 3 STATE VIEWS! Natl Forest Access. 1.84 AC $24,900 Prime, wooded, mountaintop acreage with majestic three state views. EZ access US National For est. Incredible 4 season recreation. Paved roads, underground power, fiber optic cable & municipal water. Perfect for primary/vacation/ retirement home. Ex cellent financing. Only one available, wont last. Call owner now 866-9525303, x120 BANKRUPTCY AUCTION 5,700 +/Acres North Port, Florida Feb ruary 13 World Class Hunting Develop ment Potential 800-504-3010 National Auction Group, Inc. Thomas J. Bone, FL #AU3422