Winter Park-Maitland observer

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title:
Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication:
Winter Park FL
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates:
28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID:
UF00091444:00295


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WPMOBSERVER.COM USPS 00-6186 Publisher statement on page 4. VISIT WPMOBSERVER.COM SUBSCRIBE NOW! IS THE MLB INTERESTED IN WINTER PARK? SPORTS, 11 Band of brothers Know that new sound you were looking for? Well listen to this. LIFESTYLES, 8 Heart-healthy imbibing A winery that started as a farm. HEALTHY LIVING, 13 CALENDAR .................... 4 LIFESTYLES .................... 8 HEALTHY LIVING ................ 13 OPINIONS .................... 19 CLASSIFIEDS .................. 20 CULTURE .................... B1 Winter Parks Lt. Chuck Nadd a hero last week. Nadd and his girlfriend Shannon Cantwell sat atop the Budweiser wagon pulled by the brewerys famous Clydesdales as confetti puffed through the air and a marching band trumpeted their arrival. Spectators decked in red, white and blue cheered, holding signs of welcome and pride over their hometown hero. Children veterans donned their military uniforms or wore patches on their biker vests showing how they served. One veteran impro vised by writing Navy on a piece of tape put on his baseball cap. And every person there made new friends over their excitement and anticipation to see the honored soldier. Everybody serving today is serving on a volunteer basis, and they volunteer to give every thing, said Navy veteran Jim Rushing, who traveled to see Winter Park, Orlando and Eatonville residents wont have to look far this upcoming week to celebrate Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and his legacy for human equality. Winter Park will be celebrat ing its 12th annual Unity Heri tage Festival in a two-day cel ebration on Sunday and Monday, Jan. 19 and 20 at Shady Park. Sunday afternoon will feature a live gospel program, childrens activities and vendors from 1 to 5 p.m. on the park grounds. The following day marks the Martin Luther King Jr. Celebra tion, which includes guest speak ers, the recognition of a Winter Park family which has impacted the community, and live Motown and blues music starting at 3 p.m. It all starts at 10 a.m. and wraps up at 5 p.m. Its about getting people to never forget about what he re ally stood for outside of being a minister, festival Chair Robert Knight said. He was a person who believed that all people of all shades and opportunities should be given a fair chance. Every man deserves a fair chance. Rollins College will throw a celebration of its own from Jan. off with the annual Martin Luther King Jr. Vigil at 6 p.m. at Knowles Memorial Chapel. An Equal Rights Symposium at the Faculty Club runs from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. the next day. Wednesday features a viewing movie about Jackie Robinson and his integration into major league Trust Auditorium. The traveling exhibit The Florida Modern Day Slavery Mu seum will be on display at Tars Celebrate MLK Day this weekend Orange County remembers Martin Luther King Jr. TIM FREED Observer staff Please see HERO on page 2 There are faces new and old poised to enter the ring for two contestable Maitland City Coun cil seats this week, as qualifying to get on the ballot for the citys March 11 election begins on Mon day. After serving two terms over the course of six years in seat 2, Councilwoman Linda Frosch will term-out in April, leaving her seat up for grabs. A year after terming-out in seat 3, former City Councilwoman Bev Reponen has set her sights on reclaiming a to run for the empty seat. Longtime resident and com munity activist Martha BryantHall is also throwing her name in the race, announcing herself as a candidate for seat 2. Councilman John Lowndes is set to seek reelection for seat 4, after earning a partial term in the position last year. for both seats will open Monday, Jan. 20, at noon, and closes Friday, Jan. 24, at noon. A month and a half of campaigning will follow before the election on March 11. For more information about the election and next weeks qualifying process, visit itsmy maitland.com Maitland election qualifying kicks off SARAH WILSON Observer staff A heros welcome Winter Park native Lt. Chuck Nadd received a surprise parade after he returned home from Afghanistan last week. BRITTNI LARSON Observer staff 407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC Winter Park Recovery CenterNow Is the Time to Make Your New Years Resolution Executive Drug, Alcohol & Weight-Loss Programs Privacy and Confidentiality Assured Medically Managed Dual Diagnosis Evidenced Based Solutions2056 Aloma Ave, Suite 100, Winter Park, FL 32792 www.WinterParkRecoveryCenter.com 407-629-0413 PHOTO BY BRITTNI LARSON THE OBSERVER Please see MLK DAY on page 2

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Page 2 | Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer HERO | Spectators lined the streets to welcome back pilot MLK DAY | Events running for five days the parade from DeBary. They deserve our respect. Nadd, 24, who is a Black into town that day after an eight-month deployment in Afghanistan. The parade, called A Heros Welcome and set on New England Avenue, was a complete surprise, and was by Budweiser. Rumors said that it could possibly be used in the companys Super Bowl ad, but representatives would not It was organized with the help of Cantwell, who put him up for selection to be featured along with the help of his unit, the 10th Combat Avia tion Brigade, Nadd said. He was under the impression that hed be speaking to a Veterans of Foreign Wars group, but became suspi cious that something a little more special was going to happen when Cantwell met him at the airport when she wasnt even supposed to be in town. But he couldnt expect what would hap pen next. I was shocked and honored, Nadd said. That was clear to see as Nadd waited on stage to speak to the crowd. When he wasnt smiling, an expression of sheer amaze ment struck his face as he looked over his community, and as he spoke, the emotion of the mo ment could be heard in his voice. First of all, so many have giv en so much more than me so remember all the folks out there who are still out there, who come back injured or who might not come back, he said to attendees. Theyre the real heroes. Nadd, who graduated from Trinity Prep in 2007, enrolled at West Point and put on a uniform birthday. He knew from a young age that one day he would join the military to protect his country and the rights his parents sought out when they emigrated from Europe. Theyd always instilled in him a sense of pride and ap preciation for the freedoms they enjoyed by calling the United States home. When we were attacked by terrorists on September 11, 2001, I was determined to one day serve the country I love so much in uniform, Nadd said. I am pas sionate about serving my country because, as Ronald Reagan once said, we have an obligation to preserve for our children this, the last best hope of man on earth. While gone, he had talked with family on the phone and through Skype. One of his favor ite memories was sharing a pack age he got from his friend Ravi Sankar with his fellow soldiers chocolate and marshmallows that made for a memorable night of istan, they were all family, he said, but hes certainly happy to be home, where he can feel safe and be with the people he loves. Not having the threat of night is certainly the best com fort. Next, Nadd will head to his home station of Fort Drum, N.Y., for about the next year and a half, serving as a platoon leader always come back to Winter Park, grade Civics back at Trinity Prep, which he does every year. Plaza all day on Thursday and Friday. The celebration ends with a that tells the story of an AfricanAmerican butler in the White House who witnesses history on Friday at the SunTrust Audito rium. When I think of M. L. King obviously I think of a great leader and a great man, but I also think of somebody who led our country to be more calm, to be more inclu sive and to recognize the value of all people as people, Winter Park Mayor Ken Bradley said. That should be our goal ev ery single day, but to pause once a year and honor his memory and what his holiday stands for is very worthy. I look forward to the events happening in the city. Eatonville will celebrate with its 37th annual Martin Luther along Kennedy Boulevard. The Remember! Celebrate! Act! Kings Dream for Our World. Orlandos Martin Luther King Jr. parade marches down Orange Avenue in the citys downtown Praise Team Showcase wraps up the event with a gospel music performance starting at 1 p.m. at Lake Eola Amphitheater. C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE 2826 Shader Rd. Orlando, FL 32808 Get/Keep You r Dog in Shape in 2014! 407-295-3888 B arkingDogFitness.com FACT! A Lean dog lives an average of 2 years longer than an overweight dog. Conveniently located at... AC T NOW!New Y ears Promo!Get 25% o for LIFE!expires 1/31/14 Customized workouts Training Indoor Warm Water Swimming ORLANDOS ONLY DOGGIE DAY CARE WITH A GYM! H O U S E S W A N T E D ! G e t a F R E E N o O b l i g a o n C A S H O e r O n Y o u r H o u s e W i t h i n 2 4 H o u r s (8 5 5 ) 7 5 5 1 8 1 8 w w w C i r c l e 1 8 H o m e s c o m C A S H $ $ $ Q U I C K C L O S E A N Y P R I C E R A N G E A N Y C O N D I T I O N A N Y S I T U A T I O N PHOTOS BY BRITTNI LARSON THE OBSERVER New England Avenue lled with spectators to welcome an Army helicopter pilot home from war in Afghanistan. ARCHIVE PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Winter Park, Maitland and Eatonville will honor Martin Luther King Jrs legacy this weekend. C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 | Page 3 Maitland City Talk BY HOWARD SCHIEFERDECKER MAYOR Happy New Year! The city al ways has an array of events and activities in Maitland, and this year is no exception. In Janu ary, February and March there is something available for almost everyone in the family, so please grab your calendar, make some notes and have a great new year in Maitland. JANUARY Pookies Winter Rescue Fest In its sixth year, Pookies Rescue Fest, held on Saturday, Jan. 25, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Lake Lily Park, has become a favorite event here in Maitland. Presented by the Urban Pet Project, this event has something for the whole family, including Fido! With more than 100 rescue groups and vendors featuring everything from specialty dog collars to gourmet treats, Pookies is featuring education, a kids zone and food trucks! FEBRUARY Movie in the Park The continuing series of family Movies in the Park presented by the city of Maitland Leisure Services Department will feature Despicable Me 2 on Feb. 1 at 6:30 p.m. in Quinn Strong Park located at 345 S. Maitland Ave. Join us while Gru, the ex-supervillain, is adjusting to family life and attempting to make an honest living in the jam business, just as a secret Arctic laboratory is stolen. The Anti-Villain League decides it needs an insiders help and recruits Gru in the investigation. Together with the eccentric AVL agent, Lucy Wilde, Gru concludes that his prime suspect is the presumed-dead supervillain, El Macho, whose teenage son is also making the moves on his eldest daughter, Margo. Seemingly blinded by his overprotectiveness of his children and his growing mutual attraction to Lucy, Gru seems on the wrong track even as his minions are being quietly kidnapped en masse for some malevolent purpose. Bring your chairs and blankets and we will bring you the stars (and free popcorn)! MARCH Movie in the Park Presented by the city of Maitland Leisure Services Department, Marchs event will feature Monsters University on March 1 at 7 p.m. in Quinn Strong Park located at 345 S. Maitland Ave. Mike Wazowski and James P. Sullivan are an inseparable pair, but that wasnt always the case. From the moment these two mismatched monsters met they couldnt stand each other. Monsters University unlocks the door to how Mike and Sulley overcame their differences and became the best of friends! Bring your chairs and blankets and we will be you the stars (and free popcorn)! The city of Maitland Farmers Market This weekly shopping and strolling opportunity to meet friends and neighbors is hosted each week on Sundays from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the shores of beautiful Lake Lily Park. The Farmers Market will be closed on April 13 for the Maitland Chamber Arts Festival and April 20 for the Easter holiday. We encourage you to visit our events and markets in Maitland and to visit the websites of the Maitland Public Library (mait landpubliclibrary.org) the Per forming Arts of Maitland (pamai tland.org), and the Art & History Museums Maitland at (artan dhistory.com) to discover an excit ing world of activities and events that everyone can enjoy. For more information about these and other upcoming events, contact the city of Maitland Lei sure Services Department Com this story may change from time to time, so please check back at itsmymaitland.com for updates. Come see Rescue Fest! Rooted & grounded in Jesus Christ. The Learning Tree is a Ministry of First Baptist Church of Winter ParkWe offer Full-Day Infant Care and Childcare Year-Round, Preschool Classes, Summer Camp, and much more! 1021 New York Avenue N., Winter Park, Florida 32789 Established in 1972 we are celebrating 41 years of service this year. 407-659-5701 www.TrustcoBank.com*Information based on current closings. Circumstances beyond Trustco Banks control may delay closing. Please n ote: W e r eser ve the right to alte r or w ithdraw these products or certain featu res thereof without prior notification.Member FDICEQUAL HOUSINGLENDER RYour Home Town Bank TRUSTCO BANKFast, Local Decisions Close your First Mortgage in 30 days!*Schedule Closing Date at Application Our loans close on time!Low Closing Costs No Points and No T ax Escrow required Trustco Mortgages We Close Loans! r fntbrnb n n r r r r We improve the lives of the people we serve.ftfnft r

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Page 4 | Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 PHONE: 407-563-7000 FAX: 407-563-7099 WPMOBSERVER.COM PUBLISHER Tracy Craft 407.515.2605 TCraft@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MANAGING EDITOR Isaac Babcock 407.563.7023 IBabcock@TurnstileMediaGroup.com ASSOCIATE EDITOR Sarah Wilson 407.563.7026 SWilson@TurnstileMediaGroup.com DESIGNER Tom Miller 407.563.7032 TMiller@TurnstileMediaGroup.com STAFF WRITERS Brittni Larson Megan Stokes Tim Freed Allison Olcsvay Kristy Vickery COLUMNISTS Chris Jepson Jepson@MediAmerica.us Louis Roney LRoney@cfl.rr.com Josh Garrick JoshGarrick9@gmail.com ADVERTISING SALES Linda Stern 407.376.2434 LStern@TurnstileMediaGroup.com LEGAL NOTICE ADVERTISING Ashley McBride 407.286.0807 Legal@FLALegals.com SUBSCRIPTIONS/CIRCULATION Luana Baez 407.563.7013 LBaez@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MEMBER OF: -Florida Press Association -Winter Park/Maitland/Goldenrod Chambers of Commerce Winter Park/Maitland Observer is published by Turnstile Media Group. Founded in 1990 and headquartered in Orlando, Fla., Turnstile Media Group is also the parent of Golfweek, Golfweek Custom Media, TurfNet, Professional Artist, Seminole Voice, Baldwin Park Living and Turnstile Connect. TURNSTILE MEDIA GROUP CHAIRMAN Rance Crain PRESIDENT/CEO Francis X. Farrell VICE PRESIDENTS Patti Green & Jeff Babineau USPS #00-6186 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Winter Park / Maitland Observer 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835 Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster JAN. 18-19 The 37th annual Central Florida Scottish Highland Games brings the unique exhi bition of ancient Scottish sport, music and food to the elds of Winter Springs Cen tral Winds Park on Jan. 18 and 19. Come out for the spectacle of men throwing phone pole-sized logs through the air, try ing to ip them over. Learn Celtic dancing. Drink Dunedin beer. Sample some of the best whiskeys in the world. Listen to the best pipe bands in the world competing against each other. Join in the competi tion yourself. Even the kids have their own mini games. Visit ascot.com for more in formation. JAN. 19-20 Residents and local businesses will come together to celebrate the city of Winter Parks 12th annual Unity Heritage Fes tival on Sunday and Monday. The annual festival will promote family history and raise funds for the Educational Fulll ment Fund for local economically dis advantaged youth. Activities will include childrens games, food and retail vendors, entertainment by various gospel artists, and the presentation of the annual Heri tage Award. Its from 1 to 5 p.m. Jan. 19 and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Jan. 20 at Shady Park in Hannibal Square. On Monday it will run in conjunction with the citys an nual Martin Luther King Jr. Day. Its free! Call 407-599-3275 for more information. JAN. 25 Dont miss Food Truck Crazy coming to Fleet Peeples Park in Winter Park this weekend! Its from noon to 4 p.m. on Jan. 25 at 2000 S. Lakemont Ave. Its a regular event that happens every fourth Friday of the month. Come out for a variety of food trucks featuring local cuisine. Visit food truckcrazy.com for more information. ONGOING Friday Nights at the Morse continues from 4 to 8 p.m. every Friday for free. In addition to complimentary admission to the galleries every Friday from 4 to 8 p.m., the Museum features a schedule of live music, art demonstrations, and special tours on selected evenings. The Museum invites the public to take advantage of these free opportunities to see permanent exhibitions as well as gallery updates. Live music is scheduled from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. on the second Friday night of the month. Its at 445 N. Park Ave. in Winter Park. Visit morsemuseum.org or call 407645-5311 for more information. FAMILY CALENDAR Calendar JAN. 16 Come out for networking at its nest at Business After Hours, which will feature the second annual Ovations Awards. Presented by the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce and the Winter Park-Maitland Observer, the Ovations are awards voted on by Observer readers for the best busi nesses in the area in 50 categories. Come out for food, drinks and networking from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Thursday Jan. 16 at the Winter Park Welcome Center, 151 W. Ly man Ave. in Winter Park. Visit winterpark. org for more information. JAN. 17 The Small Business Education Series topic this month is Business Finance: Using QuickBooks Faster, Better, Smart er. Come out and enrich your business knowledge from 8 to 9 a.m. Jan. 17 at the Winter Park Welcome Center, 151 W. Ly man Ave. in Winter Park. Visit winterpark. org for more information. Rollins College President Lewis Duncan will speak about Rollins College: The Next Chapter at 12:15 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 17, in the Matthias Family Life Cen ter at the First United Methodist Church of Winter Park. The event is free, however lunch will be provided for $6. No need to register unless you want to reserve a lunch. Visit fumcwp.org for information. The Winter Park Chamber of Commerce and the city of Winter Park invite you to at tend the annual Mayor/City Commission Luncheon presented by WastePro. The event will feature Mayor Ken Bradleys annual State of the City Address, brief remarks from Winter Parks City Commis sioners, and the presentation of the citys Employees of the Year. Reserve your seat today! Its at 11:30 a.m. Jan. 17 at the Al fond Inn, 300 E. New England Ave. Visit winterpark.org or call 407-644-8281 for more information. JAN. 18 January in Central Florida is camellia season! See for yourself the beauty of thousands of camellia ower blooms at the Camellia Society of Central Floridas (CSCF) 68th annual Camellia Show and Festival presented by Espoma Organic Fertilizer from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sat urday, Jan. 18, at the Winter Park Gar den Club Clubhouse at Mead Botanical Garden, 1500 S. Denning Drive in Winter Park. Sanctioned by the American Camel lia Society, the CSCF show and festival is Floridas largest camellia show. From 1 to 4 p.m. the public can view the awardwinning blooms from Central Florida and throughout the Southeastern United States. The free show and festival in cludes: free parking; assorted colorful va rieties of camellia plants for sale; various vendors (camellias and food); a Camellia 101 class from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. (RSVP for classes email lkmccoy@c.rr.com or call 407-963-8970); and self-guided tours of the camellia garden and the other gardens at Mead. Forty young, classically trained opera singers will compete for the opportunity to sing on the stage of the Metropolitan Opera in New York. Its at the Trinity Pre paratory School Auditorium from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Jan. 18. Its free to the public. For more information, call 407-922-4688 or visit metauditionslforida.org JAN. 19 Beginning Sunday, Jan. 19, one of our na tions most respected prayer conference leaders, Peter Lord, and associate Vince Mann will preach and present a series of seminars on praying in the spirit. The seven day conference will be supported by First Baptist Church of Winter Parks Prayer Team, The Sunday School Faculty, the Celebration Choir, Deacons and mem bers of all ages who have been praying for families, friends and neighbors at a church that has been here for 100 years. The conference begins at 10:30 a.m. on Sunday, Jan. 19. And the public is invited. Please call 407-644-3061 if you have any questions. First Baptist Church is located at 1021 N. New York Ave. in Winter Park. JAN. 22 Join FemCity Orlando as COPE (Center for Obesity Prevention and Education) Certied Health Coach Beth Dillaha addresses attaining good health at a healthy body weight from 6 to 8 p.m. Jan. 22 at Flower No. 5, 1807 E. Winter Park Road in Orlando. The evening, sponsored by Trusted Source and Kim Truelove Pho tography, is complimentary for FemFes sional members and $20 for non-mem bers. To register or for more information, email orlando@femfessionals.com, call 407-758-5324, or visit femfessionals. com/femcities/Orlando.htm. Pre-registra tion is necessary to attend. Community Bulletin Mastering business Nicole Rodricks of Winter Park was among nearly 600 undergraduate, graduate and nursing students at Baker University who received their degrees during commence ment ceremonies Dec. 14 and 15 at the Collins Center. Baker, the rst university in Kansas, has been listed among the top schools in the Midwest in the annual col lege rankings by U.S. News & World Re port, and selected as a top school in the Midwest by The Princeton Review. Ro dricks graduated with a masters de gree in business administration. She pre viously graduated from Bentley University. Share your wisdom Heart of Florida United Way is seeking volunteers to help residents of Orange, Osceola and Seminole counties become nancially t this Martin Luther King Jr. holiday. In partnership with the IRSs Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program, United Way and other community partners are offering free tax preparation services to low-income individuals and families. On Monday, Jan. 20, United Way volunteers will be distributing thousands of informa tional yers in numerous lowand mid dle-income communities in the tri-county area. All volunteers will be provided with free Live United T-shirts and water bot tles. A brief training will occur at the be ginning of each shift to prepare volunteers for any questions that they may be asked by residents. Volunteers can visit Financially Fit Income Tax Outreach 2014 to register online. Questions about this event may be directed to Matthew Blood, manager of community participation at Heart of Florida United Way, at Matthew.Blood@ hfuw.org or 407-849-2372. Its TAX time. Appointments Available 7 Days a Week!Tax Form Processing LLC4070 Aloma Ave., Suite 1010 Winter Park, FL 32792Tel: (407) 657-6336www.TaxFormProcessing.com Proudly Serving the Orlando Area for 19 years! Scan QR Code 40$ 00OffTax PreparationMust present this coupon at time service is provided. Offer valid for one-time use. Cannot be combined with any other offer. Expires April 15, 2014Offer Code: WPMO14

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 | Page 5 LOCAL NEWS. BIG IMPACT.Subscribe now to keep up with the latest news unfolding in your community. WINNER OF10FLORIDAPRESS ASSOCIATIONAWARDS Visit WPMObserver.com/Subscribe or call 407.563.7013 to order today! to Keep Women Well for Life. Diane S. Mancini, ARNP-C, NCMP returns to Winter Park on January 6, 2014. As a certied family nurse practitioner and certied menopause practitioner by the North American Menopause Society, she knows that the best way to keep women well throughout all the unique stages of life is to provide comprehensive well-woman care and an array of non-surgical treatments. Diane will start seeing patients, full time, from the new, beautiful Womens Health Pavilion located behind Winter Park Memorial Hospital on Edinburgh Drive. Diane S.Mancini ARNP-C, NCMPA Lifetime of Care to Keep Women WellAbnormal Uterine Bleeding Endometriosis and Chronic Pelvic Pain General Gynecologic Care Hormone Replacement Therapy and Bioidenticals Menopausal Treatment and Counseling Pelvic Pain Pelvic Organ Prolapse Patient Physicals Providing Patient Education Sexual Dysfunction Urinary Incontinence and Interstitial Cystitis Uterine Fibroids Well-Woman Care Across the Life Span Winter Park Womens Health Pavilion 100 N. Edinburgh Drive, Suite 102, Winter Park, FL 32792 407.303.4190 | www.McCarusGyn.com

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Page 6 | Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Winter Park City Talk BY RANDY KNIGHT CITY MANAGER Watch City Commission meetings live! Major policy-making deci sions that govern city business are made at the City Commission lev el. Often, residents and members of the community are unable to physically attend meetings due to work or personal schedules. Now, interested parties can watch city of Winter Park Commission meet As long as you have Internet access, you can watch Commis sion meetings, gavel-to-gavel, live, as they happen from your desktop, laptop or any mobile device. During City Commission meetings, simply log on to the terpark.org and click on Govern ment > Live Video Broadcasts to business. Jan. 13 City Commission meeting If you were unable to watch or attend the City Commission meet ing held Jan. 13 in City Hall Com mission Chambers, below are a few highlights of decisions made at the meeting: Mayors Report tion was presented in preparation of the Tuesday, March 11, 2014, General Election. missioner Tom McMacken to the Orange County Community Ac tion Board was approved. Consent Agenda (for a complete listing, please visit were approved. Action Items Requiring Dis cussion cussed and approved with dates to be brought forward for the next strategic planning session. ment Plan was approved with amendments. into a 45-day process to evaluate opportunities for minor league baseball in Winter Park. Public Hearings annexing 612 E. Lake Sue Ave. was approved. vacating and abandoning the electric utility easement at 470 W. New England Ave. was approved. notice of Intent to use the uniform method for collecting special as sessments within the platted area the municipal boundaries of the city of Winter Park, to fund the citys undergrounding of the House Networks facilities, was approved. A full copy of the Jan. 13 City Commission minutes will be available at cityofwinterpark.org the week of Jan. 27, pending ap proval by the City Commission. Unity Heritage Festival The city of Winter Park is proud to present the 12th annual Unity Heritage Festival on Sun day, Jan. 19, and Monday, Jan. 20. The annual community festival will promote family history and raise funds for the Educational nomically disadvantaged youth. The festival begins Sunday, Jan. 19, from 1 to 5 p.m., in Shady Park at Hannibal Square located at the intersection of Pennsylvania and New England avenues. Patrons are also encouraged to visit the Hannibal Square Heritage Center just across the street from Shady Park. The center pays tribute to the past, present and future con tributions of Winter Parks histor ic African-American community. The heritage festival continues in Shady Park on Martin Luther King Jr. Day from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 10 a.m. for a special Martin Lu ther King Jr. symbolic program, including the Feature Family Pre sentation. Exciting events and ac tivities will continue throughout the day including food and music. For more information regard ing the Unity Heritage Festival, please call 407-599-3275. More public parking available The city of Winter Park has opened up new public parking spaces just west of City Hall on Lyman Avenue. This lot was pre viously designated for City Hall employee parking only. Howev more parking, the city has repur posed those spaces to three-hour public parking. on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, watch us on Vimeo. More places to park

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rfntb ttrttn trbrrbrbrrbrbrrbrbrrrrrrrf ftrrf btrbnnrbbrrnr rr rrr brrrrr rrr rrrrrr ttrbr brfbrnr brfbrr bbr btbrbbrf rr bbbrbrr bnrr brfrrr nrfrrr brtrnrrtrrtrnrrnrbrnbbrTD Bank is TD Bank, N.A., a wholly-owned U.S. subsidiary of The Toronto-Dominion Bank. Member FDIC. Accounts issued by TD Bank, N.A. are not insured by Canada Deposit Insurance Corporation. 1 Money transferred by wire transfer only. Incoming wire fees may apply and will be rebated the next business day. Foreign exchange conversion rates may apply. 2 Assets are only considered for mortgage applications. 3 Subject to credit approval and other conditions. Mortgages limited to property located in U.S. state where TD Bank, N.A. has locations. Equal Housing Lender 4 Credit cards issued by TD Canada Trust or TD Bank, N.A. Subject to credit approval. Applicants for a TD Bank, N.A. issued card must have a U.S. address within the TD Bank, NA footprint (PA, NY, NJ, CT, NH, ME, MA, FL, VT, DE, MD, DC, NC, SC, VA or RI). Other restrictions apply. 5 TD Bank, N.A. is located in the United States and its support line, Stores, products and services are primarily serviced in English. The TD logo and other trade-marks are the property of The Toronto-Dominion Bank. Canadians in Florida can nd a TD Bank as easy as they can nd a beach.To open an account, visit a TD Bank Store near you or call 1 -877-700-29 1 3 anytime .5Great service and convenience for Canadians at nearly 1,300 TD Bank locations in the U.S. No-fee wire transfers of up to $100,000 daily between your Canadian and U.S. based TD accounts over the phone.1 View your Canadian and U.S. based TD accounts on the same webpage or mobile device. Pay your U.S. bills online or on your mobile device. Use your Canadian and U.S. assets,2 income and credit history to apply for a U.S. mortgage3 or a U.S. credit card.4 0003506_N4106_5A.indd 1 12/12/13 4:10 PM

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Page 8 | Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Lifestyles Its been said that music can bring people closer. For two broth ers in Winter Park, it couldnt have happened any other way. In a small duplex off of Aloma Avenue in Winter Park, 29-yearold Sean Holcombs throaty, rich voice bounces off the hardwood to strum his guitar and sing at once. Sitting at a picnic table in their dining room, he does it ef fortlessly. His brother Aaron, 24, slides a bow of horsehair across the strings of his Keller cello. Then two dis cordant notes suddenly blend together and theyre off. the living room on a Sunday af ternoon as the two brothers run through a cover of Damien Rices Volcano, followed by two of their own original songs. The acoustic guitar and cello combination makes for a warm and cozy sound that puts listeners somewhere else. Beside a camp road out west. Its been four years since Sean and Aaron began their musical endeavors together. Four years ly crossed once again. Coming of age The Holcomb brothers grew up in a big family, with three more brothers and three sisters. Sean and Aaron called the Orlando area home for most of their lives, a stones throw away from behe moth theme parks and a bustling downtown. When he was in middle school, Sean picked up a guitar and tryed to play along with songs he heard. He plucked away and his hands wouldnt let go. It wasnt long before he dove into the local mu sic scene at age 16, playing local shows in downtown Orlando in southern rock bands. As Sean learned guitar by feel and playing along with CDs, by the cello, taking formal lessons and eventually joining the Florida Young Artists Orchestra in high school. Music became an escape. Its very thera peutic once you settle into it, Aar on said. You can be having a really rough week and a really hard day and it can be stress re lieving. Sometimes it can be better than therapy, just sitting there and playing. The broth ers continued to peruse mu sic on their own, but rarely played together. A musical pilgrimage The year forever be known as a year of dramatic change for Sean. An unexpected crisis would lead him to make one of the hardest decisions of his life. Sean was married, became a fa ther and later separated from his wife all before age 23. He frantically searched for a job to help pay for child support and stumbled upon an opportu nity on Craigslist. Itd be a long commute: a cattle ranching job 2,000 miles away in Beulah, Colo. As much as I didnt want to, it was something I had to do, Sean said. The reason behind it was good ultimately, it was clear to me Seans the individual that when things get hard he really looks at What do I have to do, Aaron said. Sometimes he comes up with some really hard choic es. Sean said goodbye to his fami ly and friends and took a one way ranch with nothing but clothes PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Sean, left, and Aaron Holcomb found their musical groove in an unusual guitar and cello duo thats entertaining local audiences. Band of brothers Unique music act brings family together TIM FREED Observer staff Please see HOLCOMB on next page KEEP UP WITH MAITLAND NEWS AND EVENTS!www.IndependenceLane.com Facebook.com/ItsMyMaitland FEATURING ... 250 North Orlando Ave. Winter Park, FL 32789407.677.9777 Duette Architella Honeycomb Shades A Premier Flooring Source Area Rugs Window Treatments... AND MUCH MORE! To see exclusive interviews with the Holcomb Brothers and video of their music, visit this Observer story online at http://bit.ly/1dOajuX

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 | Page 9 and a guitar. He lived the life of a cowboy: branding, herding and feeding section. But the year he spent in Colo rado also gave him a creative sanctuary. Sean strummed his guitar on the front porch of his ranch house, gazing at the Wet Mountain range, a hot cup of coffee set on a handrail. They call them the Wet Mountains for a reason. The nearest big city, Pueb lo, gets about a foot of snow a year. Only a half hours drive away, the mountains get 10 times that much. Se ans one snowy winter left him a lot of time to think. His mind always came back to his son, Benjamin. He began to pour his heart into song. Finding his future Back in Central Florida, Aaron hadnt played the cello in months. Hed aged out of the Florida Young Artists Orchestra after playing there for four years, learning pieces like Stravinskys Firebird Suite and Dvoraks Slavonic Dance. But now his favorite instrument was just a conversation piece against a wall. He kept his focus on school and work, pushing himself to the brink by taking a schedule of four classes while holding down a job and helping out in his parents commercial janitorial company. But as hard as Aaron worked, he still felt lost. At that point, I was exploring my options in school and the po tential career paths to stem from, Aaron said. No one in my fam ily had graduated college with a degreeI didnt really have a lot of direction or a blue print of what to do. I really let the wind kick me around too much, considering only what I was responsible for that week and not concerning my self with what might lie ahead. The cello continued to collect dust as work and school con sumed Aarons life. He walked past it every day, a constant reminder of the years he dedicated to music. He always told himself hed pick it up once again. A lot of the time it was un packed and just sitting there, star ing at me, he said. A ticket home stepped foot on the ranch, Sean found a way to come back home. A close friend tipped him off to an internship back in Orlando that could lead to a welding job mak ing $250,000 a year. Sean knew it was time to leave the ranch behind. There was no future and no security, Sean said. You can only spin your wheels for so long. It was my olive branch. It was a way out. He stared at the scrap heap of a truck he expected to get him home. It hadnt moved in 20 years. The hubs were frozen. The engine didnt turn. The carburetor was a hunk of varnished gasoline slowly turning back into crude. As Sean spun wrenches on that red and white Ford, Aaron took a the brothers made the long drive to Orlando, switching drivers while the other slept through the day and night. The grueling drive dragged on for days, and at one point landing the brothers in a cactus patch. That road trip was the kind of thing that really tested our bond, Sean said. Sean couldnt stop thinking about the music he wrote while in Colorado. A years worth of lyrics and melodies raced through his mind, begging to be written into songs. When I moved back, I was on 13-0079/rev090113Member FDIC citynational.com At City National Bank, we make your dream home a reality. CNB has a full suite of mortgage solutions to meet your needs. Speak to one of our Mortgage Banking Officers today by calling 305-577-7333 or 1-800-435-8839.Let Us You Home South Florida Business Journals Community Bank of the Year 1227-2 CNwinterParkAd.indd 1 12/27/13 3:09 PM HOLCOMB | A cross-country journey that tested a brotherly bond helped jumpstart a musical reinvention C ONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE Please see HOLCOMB on page 11

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Page 10 | Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer r fn tbn r rfr nntrntbnr ffftbbfb nn tnbn nnf t nrn rnn n brn tbn r bn PHOTOS BY TIM FREED, ISAAC BABCOCK AND SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVER Fire was the theme of the night at Crealde School of Art on Jan. 11, with artists pouring molten bronze, re-hardening pottery and demon strating programs the school has available to the public in a festive openhouse atmosphere across the sprawling campus in Winter Park. Crealdes Night of Fire rf rntbtn rf r fnt b tt rfntbt t rtn r tr rtntrt ntrrt t rf rttrt nbt t t rtrntnrrr trt rt t r rt nrtt t trtr tn rfnr t r t r r rn rfntrt t trt tt t t n r r rfntttbbttftttt

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 | Page 11 The Winter Park City Com mission had baseball on the brain during Mondays City Commis sion meeting as they voted to move forward in pursuit of estab lishing a minor league baseball team in the city, eyeing several new locations for a potential stadium. Commissioners unanimously voted to begin a 45-day discus sion period looking at the feasi bility of a team in Winter Park. Input gathered from city staff and the city advisory boards will help the City Commission decide how a stadium would be paid for, where the stadium would be, and Park residents. Excitement was contagious among City Commissioners at the thought of a minor league baseball team in the city. This is a generational op portunity for our community, Mayor Ken Bradley said. To discuss it is thrilling. I think were the envy of many communities to even be having the opportunity to discuss something. Discussions held over the past year had originally put Rollins Colleges Harper Shepard Field at Please see BASEBALL on page 12 Does Winter Park have room for baseball? home to entice a minor league baseball team TIM FREED Observer staff ARCHIVE PHOTO BY REBECCA MALES THE OBSERVER Winter Park ofcials are in talks to bring a Major League Baseball clubs Single A team to the city. HOLCOMB | Brothers in song The internship opportunity fell through for Sean due to his friend leaving the business, but he later found a job working as a sales manager at Lowes, a steady job that now allows him to support his son. But Seans mind continued to wonder to his music. He longed to continue writing, hoping some day to perform front of an audi ence again. Sean urged Aaron to pick up the cello once more and form a duo. A band of brothers. Within weeks of coming home, Sean and Aaron were practicing and writing. The brothers went on to perform live concerts, playing Dexters in Hannibal Square once a month and booking other shows at local events and weddings. Their younger sister Hannah even stood in on viola, playing gigs with her brothers as a trio. Hannah feels stronger than ever that music brought their fam ily together. I think its really helped them as brothers a lot to come closer, es pecially when Sean moved away, Hannah said. For him to be able to connect with Aaron through music was really helpful for both of them. Aaron now works as a phar school at Valencia College, all while keeping up with the band. What we do I wouldnt trade it for anything else, Aaron something its very rewarding to be able to do something like this with your brother. The Holcomb brothers play on in Seans living room, weaving melodies and tones together into and Aaron seem to communicate without a single word. A simple head nod or gesture signals the other to move on to the next verse. Many arrangements are impro vised, allowing them to run free within the skeleton of a song. Its sentences, only with notes instead of words. Someone came up to me, whispering in my ear, Sean sings, telling me everythings going to be alright. C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 9

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Page 12 | Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer rfr rnrtb ftn frbffft bnrf rbrrbftrb f rftrfttft rfnrbtr rft ttnffbfnf tfnbffff rffn fbff ff nft frff bftfrfnfffbtb bf tnrrf tfftrfr rfrn nfbf rf bfbttnb ffbttbf nnttfnrff rfrr btbfrMelissa A. Abrahamsonrfnttbtb Kristin M. Riberdy rfnttbbbrtfbbfr bfftThe Right Way to Invest in Real EstateBy Melissa A. Abrahamson and Kristin M. Riberdy BASEBALL | P rospective minor league baseball teams on the citys short list have been kept a secret the forefront of potential loca tions for a new baseball stadium. The college expressed interest over the past few months in the concept, but the Rollins College executive board voted last month to discontinue their efforts in exploring a minor league baseball stadium because of fundraising concerns, City Manager Randy Knight said. But the city hasnt stopped looking for a stadium site just yet. Knight presented four frontrun ners for a potential location to the City Commission on Monday: Martin Luther King Jr. Park, the incoming Rauvadage develop ment along U.S. Highway 17-92, the UP development also along 17-92 and a former tree farm. What I really dont want to see is something shoehorned into somewhere, Commissioner Tom McMacken said. If we were to consider this and talk to some class facility. The city is considering a stadium in the range of 2,500 to 3,500 seats, qualifying for a Single A level baseball team. Winter C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 11 ARCHIVE PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Currently the highest level baseball in town is the Florida Collegiate Summer League. The Winter Park Diamond Dawgs play at Rollins Colleges Harper Shepherd Field. Park has been communicating with teams, but nothing has been made concrete, Bradley said. There would be an estimated economic impact of $6 million a year with the establishment of a minor league baseball team, Knight said. Commissioner Carolyn Cooper warned that the minor league baseball decision needs to be made not on an impulse, but with a desire for whats best for the city. I dont want this to be an emotional decision, Cooper said. I dont want anyone making recommendations to me based on the fact that they enjoy watching baseball. Winter Park and baseball couldnt be a more perfect pair, Bradley said. I can think of nothing more Americana than Winter Park, Bradley said, and I can think of nothing more Americana than baseball.

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 | Page 13 Down a little dirt road shaded by a canopy of live oaks, 20 Lake Mary area, lies the heart of Central Floridas burgeoning wine business. Oak Haven Farms and Winery sits on a sunny hillside, just far enough from the city to make visitors feel like theyve entered a different world. Owners Harry and Karen Stauderman purchased the little farm in 1995, and a few years later decided to plant a crop of strawberries that turned out to be quite successful. We started with just 3 acres, a card table and a cash box and now were up to 7 acres of strawberries for u-pick, plus the vines, Harry said. In time, they added a kitchen to the property to make home made strawberry shortcake, milkshakes, sundaes and other To encourage families to visit and stay awhile, they added a playground, complete with their signature tire swing in an oak tree. They even added hayrides, hot dogs and warming up when the weather turns chilly. Visitors to the farm can take home more than just fresh straw berries though. Oak Haven Farms also offers fresh made jams, jellies and local honey. What really sets them apart though are the wines the Staudermans make and bottle on site. As a way to use excess strawberries that ripen late in the season, the self-taught winemak making strawberry wine and later blueberry wines. when the Staudermans planted a few acres of Muscadine grapes. According to the University of Florida Agricultural Extension Florida and known for their high yield, natural resistance to insects and disease, and their ability Oak Haven Farms now pro duces as many as seven varieties of wine every year, including sweet or dry white wines made from the Carlos varietal, red wines from the Noble varietal in addition to their always popular strawberry and blueberry wines and a special mead wine, made from local honey. From vine to table, the wines take over a year to produce. Wines closer than you think at Oak Haven Farms Healthy Living Please see WINE on page 14 $10.00 OFF Initial Purchase $100 or more CANADIAN MEDS SAVE UP TO 80% on Prescription Drug PricesORDER by phone No Store Visit required Advair Benicar Celebrex Cialis Crestor Cymbalta Flomax Levitra Lexapro Lipitor Nexium Spiriva Viagra Zetia CALL for a FREE Quote! We Ship Anywhere in the U.S.A. Locally owned & operated. 744 South US Hwy 441 Lady Lake, FL 32159(352) 633-3301 ALLISON OLCSVAY Observer Staff PHOTO BY ALLISON OLCSVAY THE OBSERVER Harry Stauderman and his wife Karen wanted a berry farm, but it grew into a winery that ferments grapes and berries grown on farmland just north of the Orange County border.

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Page 14 | Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer C O M E & S E E THEACTIONCHURCH. COM Come & See.. your kids have fun at church in a clean and safe environment.Come & See.. that your relationships can be healthy and fulfilling.Come & See.. what it feels like to be free from your past and to fulfill your destiny.Come Come & See.. someone, maybe even you, win 4 seasonal Disney passes OR free Chick-Fil-A for an entire year! --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Every Sunday at 10:30am Men in kilts launch boulders, hammers and logs through the air and sailing over a green meadow. Scottish dancers weave their feet into a blur, their tartan skirts kicking up with each controlled bounce as if they were shod with springs. And, no matter where you wander, the sound of bagpipes follows. The sights, sounds and smells are all Scotland, but if youre a Central Florida resident, you dont have to leave home to experience it. This weekend marks the 37th year that the Central Florida Scottish Highland Games will be held at Central Winds Park in Winter Springs. Our goal is for everyone to hear a bag pipe playing in the park whether you like it or not, said a laughing Chuck McGrew, vice president of the Scottish-American Society of Central Florida, the group that puts on the event. The Games are the biggest event in Seminole County and the largest High land Games in the Southeast, with 22,000 attendees last year. Organizers expect to have similar attendance numbers this year. The Games have athletics events to watch bands, Highland Dancers showing off some traditional moves, beer and Scotch whisky tastings, and an award-winning Merida look-alike all the way from Scot land who will be there to impress fans of The bravest of visitors can try Scottish dish thats a savory pudding of sheeps heart, liver and lungs encased in its stomach. We do our best to present Scottish culture to the com munity in every way possible, McGrew said. Its a little bit of Scotland for two days. A new addi tion to this years Games is the Quidditch demo tournament. The game made famous by J.K. Rowlings Harry Potter series of books to the ground by universities all over the world. Teams from Rollins College and the University of Central Florida will compete against each other, and Sunrise Elementary School players will show the kids attend ing how its done. Tina Gordon Leslie brought the idea to the Games organizers, and got quite a few puzzled looks. Theyll go either, Whats that? or Re ally, when did that become a real game? Leslie said. Its a little bit of fantasy be cause its a game that started out in a storybook. She hopes that it will bring Harry Potter lov ers to the Highland Games, and introduce the sport, which she calls a mix of basket ball, dodge ball, soccer and rugby, to a new crowd of action lovers. The game is incredibly exciting, Les lie said. Its a tough, rough-and-tumble game. While organizers are all about having fun, they also want their visitors to dig a little deeper while at the Games, especially if they have Scottish heritage theyd like to learn about. More than 40 clans will be represented and those interested in learning about their namesake can stop by their tent. Chip Crawford, president of the Scottish-American Society of Central Florida, learned about his family history through attending the Games, and found an amazing sense of self in the process. He said hes proud to be a part of sharing that experience with as many people he can. Looking at your roots has got to give you some insight into who you are, Crawford said. The games give you the opportunity to scratch the surface. But you dont have to be a Scot to be welcomed at the Games, you just have to want to have a little fun, and of course bear the blare of bagpipes, Crawford said. big clan of humanity. 1000 E. State Road 434 in Winter Springs. Sports of Scotland come to Central Florida The Central Florida Scottish Highland Games celebrates 37 years of bringing a two-day taste of ancient celtic traditions to Central Florida. BRITTNI LARSON Observer staff ARCHIVE PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Its a caber-tossing, bag-piping, whiskey-tasting good time at the Scottish Highland Games, which brings in more than 20,000 spectators every year. WINE | Winery started as a familys berry farm The grapes are left basking in the Florida sun to maturity until they are harvested, crushed and pressed to extract the juice, which is fermented and aged in large metal vats in a climate controlled envi ronment. Following aging, the wines are strained to eliminate any sediments that may have accumulated and bottled for sale. Our wines show a lot of promise, Harry said. While they may not impress wine snobs, everyday wine drinkers are Oak Haven Farms opens to the public every year as the strawberries begin to ripen. This year, Harry said that should be mid-December. Visitors to the farm will enjoy the uthe farms new wine tasting counter as well as the opportunity to purchase some of their favorites to take home. For now, the wine is only available on site, but fans of the eat local move ment will be happy to know that the Staudermans, now in their fourth year as winemakers, are beginning to look for ad ditional markets to share the fruits of their labors. They hope to be able to offer their wines in the coming years to vendors and restaurants throughout Central Florida, area. Of the 25 wineries listed on the Florida Grape Growers Association website, Oak Haven Farms is the closest to Orange County, just across the northern border. By developing their own niche, the Staudermans have made a place for themselves as a family-friendly way to experience rural Florida and all that local agriculture has to offer. We enjoy what we do and think our wines will hold up to peoples expecta tions if they just give them a try, Harry said. C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 13

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 | Page 15 shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM here should be more to life than maintenance-free living. To learn more about our community in Kissimmee, call (407) 933-1999. One Senior Place ... See our full Calendar of Events at OneSeniorPlace.com407.949.6733715 Douglas Avenue Altamonte Springs, FL 32714M-F 8:30am 5pmMONDAY, JANUARY 20 Senior Club Sponsored by Family Physicians Group Every Monday, 10am 12pm January 20th Movie Day January 27th Casino Day The Real Estate Specialists are IN! 10am-1pm (also 27th) Presented by EXIT Real Estate Results By Appointment Only 407.949.6714 TUESDAY, JANUARY 21 Crafts & Conversation 2pm-4pm By VITAS Innovative Hospice Care RSVP 407.599.2522 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22 Healthy Aging Conference by Compass Research 9:30-10:30, Ira J. Goodman, MD Is it Memory Loss or Something More? 11 12, Craig T. Curtis, MD Working Toward a Healthier Tomorrow 12:30-1:30, Chelsea A. Mabry, PhD Healthy Aging and Memory Loss Prevention Memory Consultations will be available on site. RSVP for Each Session: 407.218.5974 Hearing Aids Users Improve Relation ships & Self Image! 3pm-4:30pm By Harmony Hearing Centers RSVP 407.949.6737 THURSDAY, JANUARY 23 Daughters Missing Mothers 6pm-7:30pm (also Jan 30th; Feb 6th, 13th, 20th, 27th) By VITAS Innovative Hospice Care RSVP 407.691.4548 The Real Estate Specialists are IN! 9am-12pm (also 30th) By EXIT Real Estate Results 2014 MARKET OUTLOOK 12pm-1pm By Price Financial Services RSVP 407.339.4500 By VITAS Innovative Hospice Care RSVP 407.599.2522 FRIDAY, JANUARY 24 By VITAS Innovative Hospice Care RSVP 407.599.2522Calendar of Events January 2014 Savannah Court and Cove Excellence in Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation 1301 W. Maitland Blvd. Maitland, FL 32751407-645-3990www.SavannahCourtMaitland.comAssisted Living Facility License No. 8447 Skilled Nursing Facility License No. 1635096 Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above. You are always welcome!A Senior Living Community where Hospitality is a Way of Life. Lets face it, I am one boring person and, as youll soon discover, a bit preachy some times. I dont drink, and Ive only tried weed twice in my entire life. The only reaction I had was to get thirsty. And I certainly dont need pot to get the munchies. Right now, you are probably asking yourself, Why bother even telling you this? Heres why: A lot of commen tators who are musing about the spectacle of Colorados decriminalization of recre by fondly reminiscing about their own mellow times get ting stoned. Apparently they think it bestows credibility on them, as they ponder the long lines in Denver to buy newly legalized pot. Its now allowed in the state, but its still against federal law, and thats why a debate has lit up anew. Shouldnt it be treated like alcohol? The answer is, of course it should be. The restrictions against a drug that is clearly less harmful are clearly absurd, particularly when studies show that brutal penalties against violators are enforced much more harshly in Americas poor and minor ity communities. Alcohol is an addictive drug that is demonstrably more destruc tive to individual health and to society as a whole, its regulated and limited, but its sold to anyone who meets the age requirement. We should be able to lead our private lives as we want, as long as theres no danger to society. Of course there is plenty of danger, but we should be evenhanded. But here comes the preachy part: Why do we use the stuff? Why have we always indulged in substances that make us crazy, loud, destructive, you name it? Are we as a species so frightened of reality that we need to escape it by ingesting something mind-altering rather than just dealing with it? Obvi ously the answer is that we do need chemical reinforcement, since we have drunk, inhaled, chewed or injected it since the dawn of time. Its not just recreational use of drugs. If were feeling just the slightest bit sad, no mat ter what the good reason, theres always some physician willing to prescribe Zoloft or Prozac, or some other SSRI, which messes with the brains chemicals in ways no one fully understands. Is your kid a bit scattered? Well, its not hard Adderall, which is speed, by the way. Its important to mention that these pharmaceuticals provide who have a genuine medical or psychological problem, but the stuff is dangerous to those who dont. Instead of dealing with their issues, they want to cop out by becoming numbed. Thats the appeal of alco hol, marijuana and the other playtime substances they numb us. But why do we want that? Yes, Im sure this is be ing dismissed by many of you as a priggish attack on fun, but Id love to think I enjoy a good time as much as the next person. I just dont want to regret it afterward. Id like to remember it the next day when I wake up. But we really do need to wake up. Sure, legal ize this stuff, but realize what it does to us. Legalized mind numbing

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Page 16 | Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Eighty-eight percent of all New Years resolutions fail. The area of the brain that operates willpower (to execute on resolutions) is also responsible for other functions like focus, short-term memory, solving abstract tasks etc. As a result, we arent able to give the time, energy and effort to carry out our resolu tions. Its a great idea to review a block of time (a year, month or week) and get clear about the road ahead. Its also important though to get to the heart of the matter and ask why we want what we want. Here are my tips to enjoying a New Years evolution: How do you want to feel? New Years resolutions tend be very heavy on doing, accomplish that idea on its head and instead ask yourself How do I want to feel in the new year? Our emotions come charged with energy and it is easier with to-dos created by the mind. This inner clarity will guide your outer decisions and youll likely have way more fun than you ex pected getting to your goals. Journal I highly recommend keeping a journal by your side as you be gin your 2014 adventures. Journals are great tools to help us tap into our own hidden reservoirs of cre ativity and inner-growth. By writing in them, we engage our mind, body and heart. It is a holistic method of self-discovery. So as you try out different ideas and activities, make notes whenever possible. You might serve you in the months to come. Keep an open mind (and heart) what I think is possible by and for through, we need to release all old beliefs and thought-patterns and stay open. I invite you to approach the rest of the year with an open mind and heart. While Im big on making plans, I keep them as guidelines. Life can be spontaneous and surpris ing; it might have grander plans for you that you never imagined for yourself. Bring your inner child Shoshin is a concept in Zen Buddhism meaning beginners mind. It refers to having an attitude of openness, eagerness, and lack of preconceptions. Remember a time when you believed in magic, unicorns and limitless possibilities? As children we used to be deeply connected to our true, authentic, please connect with your inner child and ask for her input on things. You and excitement very refreshing on this journey. Re-start often You dont have to wait for the year to end to re-evaluate your lifes priorities and get charged up about making positive changes. Every full moon, every week and every morning we have the opportunity to release the old and invite the new. In fact it is impossible to make annual plans without breaking them down into smaller chunks like months and weeks. Set smaller blocks of time to review, release and re-evaluate things. What are you most looking for ward to in 2014? What are some of your dreams and goals? Resolution vs. Evolution: How will you approach 2014? Alert to Caregivers of Dependents with Special Needs: You May Need to Change the Beneciaries of Your Life Insurance, Annuities, IRAs or Other Retirement AccountsThe process of special needs planning involves developing a total plan to provide for the dependents lifetime care. Ownership of assets must be coordinated with legal documents (such as trusts, wills and beneciary designations) to avoid the loss or reduction of any government or other benets for which the dependent may be eligible. Assets can pass from one individual to another individual in a variety of ways. Assets may be transferred by sale or by gift. At death, assets may pass through a will or under intestacy laws and be distributed by the estate. Assets may be distributed by trusts. Certain assets will be distributed through operation of law. These include assets held jointly (such as real property held in joint tenancy, or as tenants in the entirety) that avoid the probate process and go directly to another named person. Other assets can pass through operation of contract. These usually include life insurance policies, annuities, IRAs, and certain other types of retirement accounts that permit the owner to name a beneciary. These types of assets typically avoid the probate process (unless the estate is named beneciary), passing directly to the named beneciary. Even the very best plans can go astray if all the pieces of the puzzle are not pieced together correctly. Distributions specied in wills can result in money going directly to a person with special needs (for example, a provision that requires that the residuary estate be divided equally among the decedents children, with the share of any predeceased child being divided equally among that childs children or descendents of predeceased children). Payments made directly to a person with a disability can result in the reduction or even loss of government benets. How many caregivers of dependents with disabilities today have named their dependent as the beneciary on a group or individual life insurance policies, IRAs, 401(k) plans, prot sharing plans, or dened benet pension plans? How many people have forgotten whom they have named as beneciary? How many people never named a beneciary? When the caregiver dies, the terms of those policies and retirement plans will govern the distribution of the money usually requiring distribution to the named beneciary or, if none is named or living, to the estate. If the dependent with special needs receives the money, this could produce disastrous results. When planning for the nancial future of someone with special needs, all beneciaries of insurance policies, pension plans, IRAs, and annuities, need to be reviewed. If the caregivers have established a special needs trust for their dependent with special needs, the trust should be named as beneciary, so not to compromise their loved ones benet eligibility. One mistake, a forgotten policy, or a beneciary designation not updated, can unravel the best of plans! Due to the complexity of federal and state laws, you may require specially trained professionals to help you plan for the future of your dependent with special needs.. A Special Needs Planner can work with your attorney and provide the nancial and insurance products that may be needed to complete your planning. Call Special Needs Planner Charles Fisher at 407-393-6693 for a condential consultation. The MetLife Center for Special Needs PlanningSM, formerly MetDESK For more information about this and other related topics, visit our organizations website at www.metlife.com/specialneeds or call 1-877-638-3375. Pursuant to IRS Circular 230, MetLife is providing you with the following notication: The information contained in this document is not intended to (and cannot) be used by anyone to avoid IRS penalties. This document supports the promotion and marketing of insurance products. You should seek advice based on your particular circumstances from an independent tax advisor. MetLife, its agents, and representatives may not give legal or tax advice. Any discussion of taxes herein or related to this document is for general information purposes only and does not purport to be complete or cover every situation. Tax law is subject to interpretation and legislative change. Tax results and the appropriateness of any product for any specic taxpayer may vary depending on the facts and circumstances. You should consult with and rely on your own independent legal and tax advisers regarding your particular set of facts and circumstances. L1111221507[exp0114][All States][DC,PR] SNP-ARTICLE-CHANGEBENE Charles FisherFinancial Services Representative Special Needs Planner MetLife of Central Florida 301 E. Pine Street, Suite 800, Orlando, FL 32801 DEAR DR. DONOHUE: My husband is 6-feet 4-inches tall and weighs 170 pounds. He is a com petitive distance runner. He loves Kool-Aid and calculates that in a year he drinks 150 pounds of sugar in Kool-Aid alone. A friend told him if he continues this habit, he might develop diabetes. Can a skinny, athletic person de velop diabetes from consuming sugar? S.B. ANSWER: Although sugar is half the name of sugar diabetes, sugar doesnt cause diabetes. Its a popular belief that it does, but it doesnt. People with diabetes are careful to watch their sugar intake, and they watch their total carbohydrate intake, but diabet ics dont have to eliminate sugar completely from their lives. Type 1 diabetes, the kind that requires insulin to control, often has its onset in younger years. Its due to a destruction of the insu lin-making cells of the pancreas. Sugar has nothing to do with it. Type 2 diabetes comes about from a decline in insulin produc tion along with a decline in its effectiveness. Ninety percent of Type 2 diabetics are overweight, and weight loss helps them control their blood sugar. Physi cal inactivity also contributes to Type 2 diabetes. So do genes. Again, its not the sugar intake that produces this common type of diabetes. But monitoring the intake of sugar is important for control of this variety of diabetes. The booklet on diabetes pres ents this illness and its treatments in detail. Readers can obtain a copy by writing: Dr. Donohue No. 402W, Box 536475, Orlando, money order (no cash) for $4.75 ents printed name and address. DEAR DR. DONOHUE: I think I may have the illness where a person pulls out clumps of hair. Im not sure of the name. I I have been off caffeine for 25 years, and I do not pull my hair out. I thought this might be help ful to others. K.H. ANSWER: The name of the condition is trichotillomania (TRICK-ohTILL-uh-MAY-kneeuh). Between 4 million and 11 million Americans have it. Its called an impulse disorder. I hadnt heard about a caffeine connection. If this holds true for others, they will deeply appreci ate your advice. Dr. Donohue regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but he will incorporate them in his column whenever possible. Readers may write him or request an order form of available health newsletters at P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475. The role of sugar in sugar diabetes Puja Madan is a womens health coach, writer and speaker. She has received her training from the world-renowned Institute for Integrative Nutrition, New York. Puja offers powerful health and wellness programs for young women, in person or online, empowering them through healthier food and lifestyle choices. Puja practises Yoga and meditation daily and believes that all inner growth starts with a love affair with oneself! For more information visit www.innerscientist.com or www.facebook. com/innerscientist

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 | Page 17 BIGGEST LOSER CONTEST 2014Will be a jump off point to start my goal of helping over 400 residents lose weight and gain a new and more vibrant life. THE CONTEST WILL HAVE FIVE WINNERS: FIRST PRIZE: 3 night stay in Marco Island and a lovely gift from Victoria Jewelers. SECOND PRIZE: Gift certicate to In Style Hair Nails and Day Spa and dinner for two at La Bella Luna or Japanese Seito Sushi Bar. THIRD PRIZE: Gift certicate to Baldwin Nails and Wine Styles. FOURTH PRIZE: Gift certicate dinner for two at Jacks Steakhouse and a few rounds of virtual golf at Virtual Golf Caddy Shanks. FIFTH PRIZE: Gift certicate to Farris and Foster and Planet Smoothie. ENTRY FOR CONTEST REQUIREMENTS: Start date 1/01/2014 end date 6/01/14 Have at least 30 lbs. to lose Train 3 times a week Ready for change (do I have a surprise for you to overcome every obstacle and fear!) Nutrition Shopping tour through our very own Publix. Biweekly weigh-ins and measurementsAs for 2014, expect 180 Degree Fitness to have some awesome changes!I have been extremely blessed and am truly grateful for the honor that clients have bestowed upon me in helping them achieve their weight loss goals. To show my appreciation to Baldwin Park residents. The business will be changed and called Baldwin Park 180 Degree Fitness. The rst ever Christian tness studio here in Baldwin Park. This is home for me. I love the people and am dedicated to help as many residents conquer their challenges with weight loss.BALDWIN PARKPRIVATE PERSONAL TRAINING 407.680.4263www.180DegreeFitness.com1595 Meeting Place, Orlando, FL 32814As you know its all a mind game. Most people know what eating healthy is, but for your own reasons are not consistent. Do they want it bad enough? Sure. Then if its not will power what is it then? Simple fear We all have a fear that holds us back from success ask yourself and youll see the root is always some kind of fear. Mine used to be that I didnt want to be the center of attention. So I found myself sabotaging my results. Sound familiar? I applied some mental exercises, and praise Jesus overcame my fear and instead embraced it. What a wonderful experience when you can do that! Its been over 17 years that I lost 80 lbs., and it also helped me overcome my anxiety and depression. John Manjarres CFT, MES, SNS The Body Transformation Expert Hearty soup keeps winter chill at bay For many people, the cold weather is a reason not to exer cise outside, or not to exercise at all. However, it is possible to get a great workout outdoors this winter, as long as you also exer cise caution and dress properly. Exercising in cold weather can put extra stress on the body. It is important to consult your physi cian if you have a medical condi tion that puts you at risk before starting a new outdoor regimen. The two conditions you have to worry about are frostbite and hypothermia. Frostbite is the freezing of body tissue. It oc curs most often on and face. Symptoms of frostbite include pain, numbness, tingling and burning of the affected site. Hypothermia occurs when the core body temperature drops to below 95 degrees Fahrenheit. Symp toms include chills, fatigue, drowsiness, slurred speech, intense shivering and loss of coordination. line of defense. Dress in layers. synthetic fabric such as polypro pylene, which helps draw sweat away from the body. The next help insulate the body. The top layer should be waterproof to help keep heat from escaping and keep moisture and wind out. Its also important to protect areas of the body prone to frost bite. A thin pair of gloves under a heavier pair will protect hands. Thermal socks will help protect the feet. It may be necessary to purchase shoes a half size larger to allow for the thickness of the socks. Dont forget a hat or head band to protect your ears. ids. Dehydration is not just a risk in the summer. When sweating and increased breathing occur, in any type of weather, dehydration is a possibility. It is particularly important to warm up properly for cold weather workouts. The body tends to stiffen more easily in cold weather. Do a short warmup activity to help prevent injury. Remember that shoveling snow can be a good workout, but also can take a toll on people who are not used to heavy lifting. Take the same precautions you would for any other hard outdoor workout, because that is exactly what it is! After your winter workout, you can warm up with a hearty bowl of Kale and Potato Chow der. With potatoes replacing the cream traditionally used in chowder recipes, this is a fast, economical and healthy soup that will keep the chill away until spring. 1. In a large pot, heat the oil. Add onions, salt, pepper and until onions are tender, about 3 to 5 minutes. Add garlic and the tomatoes, and cook for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the potatoes, water and broth to the soup pot. Bring the ingredients to a boil and reduce to a simmer. Cook until potatoes are almost done, about 10 minutes. 2. Remove 2 cups of the potatoes along with some of the liquid. Place potatoes and liquid into a blender. Carefully loosen top of the blender to allow air to circulate, and cover the top with a dishtowel to prevent the hot liquid from exploding out. Start blending on lowest setting, and gradually increase to medium and then high. Blend until the potatoes are smooth. 3. Add the potato mixture, kale, carrots and kidney beans to ue cooking for 10 to 15 minutes until kale and carrots are tender. Taste and add more seasoning as needed. Serve in soup bowl along with side salad of fruit or leafy greens, and whole-grain crackers servings. (Additional information provided by Tammy Roberts, Nutrition and Health Education Specialist, Bates County, Univer sity of Missouri Extension.) Angela Shelf Medearis is an awardwinning childrens author, culinary historian and author of seven cookbooks. Her new cookbook is The Kitchen Divas Diabetic Cookbook. Her website is divapro.com. To see how-to videos, recipes and much, much more, Like Angela Shelf Medearis, The Kitchen Diva! on Facebook and go to Hulu.com. Recipes may not be reprinted without permission from Angela Shelf Medearis. KALE AND POTATO CHOWDER 4 cups chopped fresh kale, stems removed 1 medium onion, diced 1 tablespoon poultry seasoning or Italian seasoning 4 cloves garlic, diced 1 (14-ounce) can diced tomatoes no salt added, with liquid 4 large baking potatoes, diced with skin 3 cups water 2 cups low-sodium chicken broth 1 large carrot, sliced into thin rounds 1 (15-ounce) can kidney beans, drained and rinsed OWC Launches Garden Schedule; Healthy Living Expo Set for February 15 O ur Whole Community (OWC), which provides educational programs throughout the year, will kick off its gardening workshops in 2014 with Composting, Saturday, January 25 at the OWC Garden in Winter Park. This years calendar also includes the return of OWCs Healthy Living Expo, held in partner ship with the City of Winter Park. The event will be held February 15, 2014, from 9 a.m. 1 p.m., at the Winter Park Community Center. Free health assessments, speakers on Mind, Body and Spirit, healthy vendors and chef and garden demonstrations will be available. Our Whole Community continues to grow its slate of healthy living programs each year, says OWC Board Chair Lavon Williams. He says the gardening programs are free for OWC gardeners; $10 per family of non-OWC gardeners. There is no charge to attend the Healthy Living Expo. Here are the scheduled spring garden programs. Park. Garden entrance is on Welbourne Ave. New England Ave., Winter Park. rian Church, 400 S. Lakemont Ave., Winter Park. Garden entrance is on Dundee Drive. Whole Community Garden, 550 W. Morse Blvd., Winter Park. Garden entrance is on Welbourne Ave. Garden is by the Annex. For more information, email Leah Nash at owc_ed@me.com or call 407.758.5324. zation that brings communities together to establish relationships and share resources resulting in innovative programs that inspire, motivate and educate individuals in their pursuit of optimal health. For more information on Our Whole Community, please visit ourwholecommunity.org. Our Whole Community is pleased to contribute monthly to the Winter Park Observer. Email owc_ed@me.com for inquiries about OWC. OWC Launches Garden Schedule; Healthy Living Expo Set for February 15

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Page 18 | Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com r fntbt f rtt ftbt bt bnr nr rt b bb f b tb off trtnCoupon redeemable for cash, check or credit card purchases only. Not redeemable for insurance transactions. Excludes custom/special orders & nutritional supplements. May not be combined with any other dis counts. Coupon has no cash value. at Winter Park Towers Your room is waiting for you if you need Pain and Symptom Management Hospital Follow-up Complex Treatments, or Crisis Care Referrals 866-742-6655#5019096 www.cornerstonehospice.org www.SeriousIllness.org/cornerstoneMedicare, Medicaid, most commercial insurances accepted JANUARY 13 (Mon) Beginning Walk-Run Program Begins .................... Blue Jacket Park Presented by Track Shack Fitness Club 21 (Tue) MarathonFest Marathon Training Begins .................... Glenridge MS Presented by Track Shack Fitness Club 25 (Sat) Seasons 52 Park Avenue 5.2k* .................................. Park Avenue Presented by Florida HospitalFEBRUARY 1 (Sat) Florida Hospital Lady Track Shack 5k ......................... Mead Garden 15 (Sat) Run Around the Pines 5k* ...................................... Showalter Field Presented by Florida HospitalMARCH 15 (Sat) Zimmerman Kiser Sutcliffe Winter Park Road Race 10k & 2 Mile*Presented by Florida Hospital ................................ Park Avenue 24 (Mon) Beginning Walk-Run Program Begins .................... Blue Jacket Park Presented by Track Shack Fitness ClubAPRIL 26 (Sat) Run for the Trees 5k .............................................. Showalter FieldJULY 4 (Fri) Hunter Vision Watermelon 5k ..................................... Park Avenue Run, Walk, Train. Winter ParkFloridas premier fitness destination! Did you know that approximately half of all employed Americans suffer from neck and/or back pain? According to the American Chiro practic Association, these are two of the most common reasons employees miss work. Incorrect posture and sit ting for the majority of the day often result in pain and tightness of the neck and back. Whether it is leaning over your computer or leaning over your workbench, employees need to stretch often. Dr. John Jenkins, neurosurgeon at Winter Park Memo rial Hospital, says, A great way to keep our spine and neck healthy is to exercise, maintain a healthy weight and take several stretch breaks throughout the day. Here are a few simple stretches that can help relieve tension right in and mental stress. Scalene stretch 1. Sit or stand face forward with good posture 2. Place your left hand on your right shoulder, applying slight pres sure downward 3. Tilt your left ear toward your left shoulder 4. Slowly lift your chin toward the ceiling and stop within your comfort level 5. Hold for 5-10 seconds side Hip rotator stretch 1. Sit upright with a tall back 2. Cross left ankle to right knee 3. Slowly lean forward and stop within your comfort level 4. Hold for 5-10 seconds 5. Release and repeat on opposite side Trunk exion 1. This stretch can be done sitting or standing with feet parallel to each other 2. Bend forward at the waist, reaching towards the ground 3. Relax your head and neck and hold position for 5-10 seconds Hip exor stretch 1. Sit or stand upright with good posture 2. If sitting, sit on edge of your seat, turn to the left and drop your seconds then repeat on the opposite side 3. If standing, step back with left leg while bending left knee, tucking your hip under you. Hold for 5-10 seconds then repeat on the opposite side Repeat these exercises as needed throughout the workday, getting up to stretch or move at least once every hour. Practice breathing in and exhaling through pierced lips for 10 seconds at a time to fully con tract and expand your rib cage and diaphragm to further enhance your mental clarity. If you have any questions relating to back or neck pain, contact Dr. Jenkins at 407-646-7170 or go to his website johnajenkinsmd.com

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 | Page 19 Opinions EDITORIAL CARTOONS Chris Jepson Perspectives We, for all intents and purposes, have been the same model of human being for that that time frame will be tweaked as archeologists and anthropologists inter pret new data. For 150,000 of those years, we awoke each morning to the challenges and beauty of East Africa. Regardless, 50,000 years ago we started walking out of Eden. Imagine, if you will, what those early Homo sapiens thought about life. Early ending search for nourishment and safety from the elements. Yet, those people with pedicure, perhaps, and with appropriate dress, could be drop-shipped into the 21st century and they would seem, essentially, as you or I. They would have, however, none of the context or understanding we moderns have. My question is: how did early man and woman think about happiness? Did a warm day and a full stomach pro vide a modicum of contentment? What made them happy, and is our idea of happiness markedly different from their perspective? Did they see the beauty in rive joy (happiness) from the experience? More or less 2,500 years ago, the Greeks and the Chinese (independently) started of happiness. Most philosophers and historians agree that the concept of hap piness in antiquity centered around good luck and fortune, whereas contemporary Americans view happiness as something over which they have control and some thing that they can actively pursue. Happiness is what happens to us, and over that we have no control, offer happiness researchers Shigehiro Oishi and Jesse Graham. The Greeks (Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, etc.) began the Western discussion on what constitutes happiness and how to achieve it. According to these intellectual luminar ies, all of us naturally desire happiness. So far so good. Ah, but there is a rub. While happiness is the ultimate goal for the in dividual, happiness is not pleasure nor is it virtue. Happiness is the implementation of virtue. Happiness is the culmination of the human experience and is dependent on the rational use of reason. Happiness requires intellectual contemplation. Other Greek and Roman intellectuals were less highbrow about what consti tuted happiness, but they all equated hap piness and virtue. Christianity, unfortunately, didnt push the envelope of what constitutes happiness. Arguably, religion has been an impediment to earthly happiness. St. Augustine offered that, the earthly quest for happiness is doomed. Thomas Aquinas said partial happiness can be achieved only through the theological vir tues of charity, hope and faith. Aquinas was a step forward in that everybody could, at least, be partially happy. Martin Luther went even further asserting that, Christians should be merry . To live life as ence the world as a pleasure garden for the soul. Only a deeply religious life, ment to move the question from how can I be saved? to how can I be happy? We, moderns, pursue happiness with dogged determination. Science today suggests that all of us have a genetic default setting for happiness. A death, a divorcetime passesand were back to our individual set point of happiness. Following 200,000 years of humanity with others. Your kind of happiness Jepson is a 27-year resident of Central Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.US Louis Roney Play On! Decisions, decisions Opinions King Features Weekly ServiceJanuary 13, 2014 Most of the people to whom most people pay the most money are the people who make most of their big decisions for them. What if your doctor was to ask you this: Jim, do you think we should operate on you at 6 on Friday, or depend on a guard ed systemic approach? Ill be resting in nurse Lamours room while you decide. Imagine that your broker emerges from hiding following a few down-days on the Dow, and phones you: What do think we should do next, Jim? he asks! Then you turn to your secretary and say Dottie, that guy youre going with: Marry him if hes rich and hes good to his mother, and you love him. But be sure he proposes twice so you know that hes really made the deci sion! losopher, William James, wrote, There is no more miserable human being than one in whom nothing is habitual but indeci sion. A person who cannot make decisions has condemned himself to be a dissatis soar because one wing is eternally bound to his side. A Turkish proverb warns in poetic caveat that indecision can cost you your ing between two mosques. The renowned English poet, William Wordsworth, believed that his lifes purpose was preordained. He wrote, I made no vows, but vows were made for me. Lots of other people who know the feeling of having a calling on Earth, may feel that their lives primary decisions were somehow predestined. Robert Frost, the crotchety New Eng land poet who died shortly after he recited one of his poems at John F. Kennedys inauguration, was never able to think in such comforting terms. Frost was tortured by bitter curiosity as to the decisions he had made in his art and in his personal life. He wrote in The Road Not Taken, Two roads diverged in a wood, and I I took the one less travelled by, And that has made all the difference. To the end of his days, Frost, whom I knew slightly when he was living in our house at Harvard, wondered what his life would have been had he taken the other turn at that uniden In the years when I lived in Munich and sang in German opera companies, I could never drive through the beautiful Knig Platz where the Amerika Haus stands without conjuring up visions of what took place in that handsome building the last The very word Munich became synonymous with appeasement. And the name of British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain came to symbolize the fatal weakness of indecision. Hitler was bullying and determined on his evil course. However, most historians now agree stop the German dictator in the Amerika Haus would have worked then and there. If Winston Churchill, a man of decision, had been Prime Minister then, as he was after Chamberlain stepped down, many believe that Hitler, a notorious bluffer, would have met more than his match. World War II might well have been averted by one mans decisiveness. In being decisive we all make mistakes. We hope our mistakes are small ones, and But being indecisive guarantees failure failure compounded by a brand of men tal cowardice that comes from not facing the issue squarely. How often do you wish to eat out with your Aunt Tilly, the one who reads the menu for a half-hour, calls the waiter to the table three times for questioning, and then orders a plain omelet and a salad? I have always respected Billy Graham, whose approach is based upon a deci sion each must make for himself. Ill buy that! About Roney: HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney) Christianity, unfortunately, didnt push the envelope of what constitutes happiness.

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Page 20 | Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer ANNOUNCEMENTS A childless, young, successful woman seeks to adopt. Will be HANDS-ON Mom! Financial security. Expenses paid. Visit:www.jodi 2adopt.webs.com/ call Jodi 1-800718-5516 or text 609-770-1255. Adam Sklar #0150789 MOECKER AUCTIONS: Public Auction Schmann Casters & Equipment Company Inc. LIVE & ONLINE Tuesday, January 28th at 10am 1299 W Beaver Street, Jacksonville, Fl 32204 Tremendous amount of New Material Handling Equip ment, Forklift, Boat Trailers, Racking, Scrap Metal, Steel Casters,Dollies, Con veyor & much more. ABC Case No.:162013-CA-010616. Details at www. moeckerauctions.com (800) 840-BIDS. 15%-18%BP, $100 ref. cash dep. Subj to confirm. AB-1098 AU-3219, Eric Rubin UNPLANNED PREGNANCY? Adoption-A brave & selfless choice. Med ical, living & counseling expenses paid. Choose the loving & financially secure family. Compassionate Atty. Lauren Fein gold 24/7 866-633-0397 www.fklheart toheart.net #0958107 Winter Park Benefit Shop 140 Lyman Ave, Winter Park needs items to sell: clothing, bedding, jewelry, kitchenware and bric-a brac. Also need ing volunteers. Contact Elizabeth Comer 407-647-8276. Open Tues & Fri at 9:30am; Sat 10am-1pm. All proceeds support childrens programs & the Or lando Blind Association. Winter Park Benefit Shop: at 140 Lyman Avenue, Winter Park needs items to sell: clothing, bedding, jewelry, kitchenware/bric-a brac. Need volun teers contact Elizabeth Comer 407647-8276. Open 9:30am-2pm every Tues & Fri (and Sat 10am-2PM). Pro ceeds support childrens programs and the Orlando Blind Assoc. EDUCATION AIRLINE CAREERS begin here Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Finan cial aid for qualified students. Job place ment assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769 Saturday, January 18th: 1871 Britlyn Alley, Orlando FL 32814 3 BR | 3 BA | 3,440 SF | $383,900 Stunning four story townhome in desir able Baldwin Park! Immaculate model home with three bedrooms and three full and two half baths, and attached two car garage. Eat-in kitchen with granite coun tertops and stainless steel appliances. Fourth story is a large bonus room with half bath. Enjoy the expansive balcony and fantastic view! Hosted by: Tiffany Prewitt from 1-4 PM Sunday, January 19th: 2350 Temple Drive, Winter Park FL 32789 4 BR | 4 BA | 2,006 SF | $450,000 Gorgeous Winter Park home featuring a formal living room, office with pocket doors, and kitchen with breakfast bar open to the dining room area. The spa cious family room features a fireplace, built-ins and two sets of French doors that lead to the covered patio and fenced backyard. Gorgeous finishes throughout including crown molding, wood floors and plantation shutters! Bonuses include a guest suite above the detached two car garage. Hosted by: Debbie Tassell from 1-4 PM 219 S. Lawsona Boulevard, Orlando FL 32801 5 BR | 4 BA | 3,049 SF | $419,900 Charming 1930s two story home on an oversized double lot with original hard wood floors, two wood burning fireplaces, two large sun porches, separate In-Law apartment, formal dining room and lots of natural light! The fully fenced backyard features plenty of privacy, pavers and two wood decks for maximum enjoyment. Hosted by: Cindy Watson from 1-4 PM 505 W. Harvard Street, Orlando FL 32804 3 BR | 2 BA | $415,000 Fabulous College Park pool home located just one block off Edgewater Drive. Up dated with hardwood floors throughout, new kitchen with granite counters and new master bath. Hosted by: Jennifer King from 1-4 PM 815 Chichester Street, Orlando FL 32803 4 BR | 3 BA | 2,262 SF | $365,000 Adorable three bedroom, two bath bun galow in charming Orwin Manor. Main house features wood floors, wood burn ing fireplace and cedar closets. Finished 1/1 guest apartment above garage offers private access and its own kitchen. Hosted by: Kelly L. Price from 1-4 PM 3751 Percival Road, Orlando FL 32826 4 BR | 3.5 BA | 3,536 SF | $925,000 Immaculate model home on a beautiful lakefront lot with impressive views of Lake Price. Downstairs master retreat with his and hers closets, large walkin shower and Jacuzzi tub. Spacious kitchen offers built-in appliances, custom 150 E. Robinson Street Unit 2210, Orlando FL 32801 sold by Rhonda Chesmore 62 W. Colonial Drive Unit 207, Or lando FL 32801 sold by Padgett Mc Cormick 2006 Loch Berry Rd, Winter Park The Nancy Bagby Team $242,500 1/6/14 2660 Queen Mary Pl, Maitland Ann Lee $230,000 1/10/14 340 N Phelps Ave, Winter Park Cath erine DAmico $255,000 1/10/14 OBSERVER Just Sold Homes SATURDAY 1-4 NEW LISTING! MOVE-IN READY HOME IN OLDE WINTER PARK 522 S Phelps Avenue, Winter Park. 3BD/2BA, 1,727 SF. Mature landscaping, ample parking, and large storage shed in fenced backyard. Interior offers open floor plan with exposed beams through out entire house. Updated kitchen, large dining room, family room and office area with wood burning fireplace and Florida Room. Large deck overlooking back yard. $374,900 SUNDAY 12-3 LOCATION! LOCATION! LOCATION! 1510 Mizell Avenue, Winter Park. 3BD/3BA, 1,936SF. Perfectly situated be tween newer million$ Windsong Homes, this charmer features original hardwood floors, a beautifully updated kitchen, semi-vaulted ceilings & a fantastic fam ily room featuring brick fireplace PLUS a wall of built-in cabinets. Extras include inside utility/storage room, 2 car ga rage & a large, tranquil backyard patio!! 90x150 lot! $484,000 SUNDAY 1-4 FRENCH COUNTRY HOME 1848 Linden Road, Winter Park. 4BD/3BA, 2,092SF. Adorable French country home in Winter Park. Upstairs bedroom with private bath would make perfect guest or in-law suite or college student. Large oversized lot. $259,000 NEW LISTING! BEAUTIFUL HOME ON TREE-LINED STREET 310 W Lake Sue Avenue, Winter Park. 4BD/3.5BA, 2,880SF. This home offers hardwood floors, brick fireplace, and new sun room overlooking flagstone patio and pool. Gourmet kitchen with custom cabi nets, granite counters and backsplash, and stainless appliances. First floor master suite boasts huge walk-in closet and upgraded bath with spa. Double pane windows and plantation shutters throughout. $719,000 SECLUDED MAITLAND POOL HOME 431 W Sybelia Avenue, Maitland. 5BD/4.5BA, 3,903SF. Large master suite opens to the pool area. Split floor plan. OBSERVER Open Houses THE MARKE T PLA C E MindGym January 13, 2014 MindGymJanuary 13, 2014 cabinets, large island and bar top seating for six. Additional features include a fire place in the family room and huge bonus room with balcony. Enjoy entertaining by the resort style pool with views of the pri vate beach and dock! Hosted by: Kelly L. Price from 1-4 PM 1750 Edwin Boulevard, Winter Park FL 32789 2 BR | 2 BA | 1,922 SF | $325,000 Adorable bungalow in the heart of Win ter Park on a brick street! Gorgeous hardwood floors throughout, open floor plan, and renovated kitchen overlooking the backyard with fish pond. Office/sit ting room area off each bedroom. Front screened-in porch with large deck in the backyard. Hosted by: Rhonda Chesmore from 1-4 PM Hardwood and Mexican tile flooring. Gor geous kitchen with granite countertops. Two bedrooms are upstairs with shared bath. Privacy wall behind home. $579,000 END UNIT TOWNHOME WITH GREAT LAY OUT 2201 Hawick Lane, Winter Park. 3BD/2.5BA, 1,814SF. Quality details throughout, starting in the gourmet kitchen with granite counters, stainless appliances and breakfast bar. Downstairs 10 ceilings, lighted archways and porce lain tile floors. French doors open to brick pavered courtyard. Master suite offers walk-in closet, granite vanity, whirlpool tub and separate shower. Located close to shopping, parks and hospital. $309,900 SUNDAY 2-5 NEW LISTING! BEAUTIFULLY MAINTAINED BALDWIN PARK HOME 5255 Baskin Street, Orlando. 3BD/2.5BA, 1,757SF. Khovnanian home with substan tial upgrades over $60,000. Beautiful hardwood floors, iron spindle staircase and covered porch. Kitchen has 42 cabi nets, granite counters, stone backsplash and stainless appliances. Upgraded insulation and double pane windows for energy efficiency. Two car garage. $412,000 OPEN AND UPDATED LAKEFRONT HOME 520 Lake Shore Drive, Maitland. 3BD/3BA, 2,463SF. Magnificent views of Lake Faith! Custom kitchen opens to living and dining areas with vaulted pine ceilings for ideal open floor plan. Enor mous Florida room with brick and granite bar. Large windows and bamboo flooring throughout. Private white sandy beach. Move-in ready! $499,000 NEW PRICE! SINGLE STORY CONDO IN COUNTRY CLUB AREA 904 Sussex Close, Orlando. 3BD/2BA, 2,060SF. Air conditioned two car garage, ten foot ceilings, parquet floors, com pletely repainted, new plantation shut ters, new carpet, new electrical panel, repiped and roof resealed. Crown molding, wainscoting, wood burning fireplace and brick patio. Community pool, night secu rity guard and great location. $259,000 NEW PRICE! COUNTRY CLUB OF ORLANDO TOWN HOME 2036 S Countryside Circle, Orlando. 3BD/2.5BA, 2,054SF. End unit with spa cious rooms, plantation shutters and crown molding. Open porch off fam ily room with brick accent wall leads to oversized two car garage. Commu nity offers night security guard, common grounds and optional pool membership. $209,900 SHOWPLACE PROPERTY OF THE WEEK NEW LISTING! PRIVATE BEACH ON LAKE SYBELIA 1110 N Lake Sybelia Drive, Maitland. 5BD/4.5BA, 4,517SF. Largest lakefront lot on Lake Sybelia. Custom boat dock with lift, open pool with refinished deck, and expansive lake views of ski lake through out. Eat-in kitchen has granite counters and stainless appliances. Master bath of fers Italian tile, custom cherry cabinets, and oversized Jacuzzi tub overlooking lake. Media room, library with gas fire place and oversized two car garage. $1,250,000 FEATURED PROPERTY WONDERFUL HOME IN GREAT LOCATION 680 Balmoral Road, Winter Park. 4BD/2.5BA, 2,264SF. Kenilworth Shores rf rf rnnf tf rff b tf n r f f b t t f r b t f nrf rf t f t tf f tf rf rfb nf t fr r b f r fff b tf n b f r t t fn rf f f r f n r f nfr br f f r nt b t bf rf fb bf t r n f bf rf b f t f b ff b r f f r f b f r f f rfn t rf tf f n n f t tt r ff tf rnnf f rff b f rf f f f f tb f r tf n fr ftr nfr f tf rf fr f t f b t f f f f f b n rfnf f b tf f f nf rb f b n n tf br f f rr rff r n t b FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now survive DIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922 home on a corner lot. Home offers fire place, hardwood floors, formal living and dining rooms and two car garage. A rated schools include Brookshire El ementary, Glenridge Middle and Winter Park High School. 1/3 acre lot. $525,000 FEATURED PROPERTY SOUGHT AFTER WINGFIELD 2159 Deer Hollow Circle, Longwood. 4BD/3BA. 3,100SF. Enjoy the Seminole County Lifestyle in this beautifully cared for home. Warm colors, extensive crown molding, newly re-done hard wood floors and incredible media room are just a few of the features in this Family Home. Relax in your tropical amazing screened pool area and lanai. Enjoy coming home to this beauty. $569,000 FEATURED PROPERTY BALDWIN PARK BEAUTY 2015 Meeting Place, Orlando. 3BD/3.5BA, 2,320SF. Spectacular townhome with tre mendous upgrades throughout! Antiquestyle hickory wood floors throughout the living areas. Gorgeous kitchen with maple cabinets, granite counters and stainless steel appliances. Master suite plus the balcony as well as the down stairs guest suite and porch all overlook Corrine Commons Park. Two-car garage. $525,000 HELP WANTED Driver Trainees Needed Now! Become a driver for Werner Enterprises. Earn $800 per week! Local CDL Training. 1-877-214-3624 Now Hiring OTR CDLA Drivers. New Pay Package and $2500 Sign-On Bonus! Mostly 5-10 days out, full bene fits, achievable bonuses. Call for details 1-888-978-3791/apply www.heyl.net Phone Collection Job Near Maitland Blvd & I4. Collector. Fulltime/Part-time. Phone/computer skills needed. Phone etiquette. Experience pre ferred. Day-time position with some flex ibility. Fax resume to 407-786-4322 or email to jobapp2@aol.com. MERCHANDISE STEEL BUILDING CLEARANCE: 5 Only 25x32, 30x40, 40x60, 60x100, 100x240. Straightwalls! Choose Color! FREE Freight!Local Office: Punta Gorda! Call Now For Quote!1-800-237-9620, ext. 941 PROFESSIONAL SERVICE No Time.... Call! WE CLEAN FOR YOU!! Commercial and Residential servicing. WE DO IT!! Call Catherine Adam 321-356-8160. cad am1959@yahoo.com REAL ESTATE: COMMERCIAL OFFICE FOR RENTWINTER PARK Executive office available in prestigious bank building. Approximately 10 x 12 with windows on two sides. Additional space available for assistant, now or lat er, at additional charge. Aloma and Lake mont Avenues. 24-hour access. Mini mum one year term. Broker. $500 per month. Lou Nimkoff 407-405-3368 of fice@briofl.com REAL ESTATE: FOR SALE Mountain Stream Bargain! Beautifully wooded acreage 390 crys tal clear stream, natural yr-round spring, prime Blue Ridge Mountain location. Paved roads, utilities municipal water, more. Only $27,900. Excellent financing, little down. Call now 866-952-5303 Al abama Ext: 110 Florida Ext: 111 Georgia Ext: 112 OPEN HOUSE, January 18 & 19, NOON-3pm Oceanfront Complex, SOUTHEASTER, NSB, 2bd/2.5ba, FSBO, $310,000. NO SIGNS. Find Balloons! Directions: 860573-1597 Colleen 860-573-1597 Cre base@cox.net 2006 Oakhurst Ave, Winter Park Ann Lee/Ann Lee $488,000 1/10/14 1872 Jessica Court, Winter Park Jerry Oller/Shirley Jones $465,000 1/10/14 810 N Lakemont Ave, Winter Park Melissa Woodman $185,500 1/10/14

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 | Page 21 TONIGHT Jan. 16 2014 Ovations Awards The Winter Park Chamber of Commerce and Park Avenue Merchants Association invite us to kick off the New Year with networking, food and drinks at the 2014 Ovations Awards Cer emony. The Chamber has joined with the Winter Park/Maitland Observer for this second annual best of guide to Winter Park as voted by Chamber members, readers and the local community. Awards will be presented in 50 different categories beginning at 5:30 p.m. at the Winter Park Welcome Center at 151 W. Lyman Ave. in Winter Park. Visit winter park.org TONIGHT Jan. 16 I Believe at the CityArts Factory What do you believe? is a fundamental question that shapes the world in which we live. Art for All Spaces will present an art exhibit about believing; through words and images, artists will share the beliefs that inform and inspire them. In addition, poets will present verses based upon the I Believe titles. Hosted by the CityArts Factory (29 S. Orange Ave. in Orlando), Down town Arts District, and Art for All Spaces, call 407-450-2255 or email artforallspaces@gmail.com Jan. 17 to 27 Breakthrough Theatre Presents Their Annual Best of Broadway In what has become an an nual musical revue featuring the songs from Broadway musicals that opened (within a given time-frame), Breakthrough Theatre of Winter Park hits it out of the park by choosing Broadway shows from 1975 to 1984. Proving that you can please all the people some-ofthe-time, this years revue features songs from The Wiz, A Chorus Line, and Chicago to Evita, nd St, and Cats. With performances from Jan. 17 to 27, call 407-920-4034 to reserve your seat. Jan. 17, 18, 19 CFCArts Spotlight Presents Melissa Braillard Resolutions, featuring the effervescent Melissa Braillard, is an evening of music about risks we take, decisions we make, and resolutions we break. A singing actor in Central Florida for over 10 years, Melissa has performed with Orlando Shakespeare, the Orlando Philharmonic, Walt Disney World and more. Resolu tions will be performed on Jan. 17 at 7:30 p.m., Jan. 18 at 5 p.m., and Jan. 19 at 7:30 p.m. at Central Christian Church at 250 SW Ivanhoe Blvd. in Orlando. Visit cfcarts.com Jan. 18 30th Annual Dr. Martin Luther King Parade and Sound Showcase The Birthday celebration for Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. will begin with a Parade which steps off at 10 a.m. on Jan. 18 and follows Orange Avenue in Downtown Orlando. The celebra tion continues at 1 p.m. with The Sound Praise Team Showcase at the Lake Eola Amphitheater. This musical showcase features Cen tral Florida church singers and residents as they perform before a panel of judges to celebrate the Please see CULTURE on page 22 JACKIE ROBINSON MELISSA BRAILLARD Josh Garrick Culture for your calendar

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Page 22 | Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer legacy of Dr. King. The event is free. Call 407-246-2122 or visit cityoforlando.net. Jan. 18 Festival Singers Singing the Scriptures With a repertoire ranging from Brahms to Bernstein, the Festival Singers of Florida will present a choral concert, Singing the Scrip tures at the Winter Park Presby terian Church at 400 Lakemont Ave. on Jan. 18. Incorporating Biblical texts as well as hymns, selections will include Lead, Kindly Light, Fairest Lord Jesus, The Lords Prayer, and more. The performance is free. Visit fsof.org Jan. 21 at 7 p.m. The Orlando Ballet Uncorked The second in-formance of Orlando Ballets popular behindthe-scenes look at the creative process is an up close and per sonal visit with Artistic Director Robert Hill and his company of dancers. This is our chance to learn how the Choreographer converts creative concepts into choreography. At The Abbey in Downtown Orlando, $30 gets you in the door and puts a glass of wine in your hand... Call 407-704-6261 Jan. 22 to March 9 The Life & Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby Parts I and II In the Florida theater-event-ofthe-season, a cast of 27 actors will play over 150 characters in this unique, two-part, dramatic and comic masterpiece that captures the genius of Charles Dickens. Combining outrageous characters with theatrical spectacle, The Life & Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby Parts I and II won both the Tony Award and The Olivier Award for Play of the Year. Nick lebys adventures lead the way to a must-see theatrical event for Florida audiences. Visit Orlandoshakes.org or call 407-447-1700 Jan. 23 The Winter Park Institute at Rollins College In a series of talks of fered free to the Public, the Winter Park Institute at Rol lins College will begin its 2014 season with Sharon Robinson, daughter of major league baseball player Jackie Robinson. On Jan. 23 at 7 p.m., Ms. Robinson will discuss her fathers legacy, highlighting his nowlegendary values in sports and in life. Over the years, the Institute has brought renowned speakers, poets and Pulitzer Prize winning authors to Florida. This seasons featured speakers include former Florida Governor Jeb Bush and Filmmaker Ken Burns. Events are free and open to the public. Call 407-691-1995 or visit winterparkinstitute.org Jan. 23 to Feb. 23 The Magical Adventures of Merlin at Orlando Repertory The Magi cal Adventures of Merlin, to be presented from Jan. 23 to Feb. 23 at the Orlando Rep is an imagined tale about how young Merlin meets young, soon-to-be King Arthur in mythical, ancient England. Young Merlin faces seri ous life-choices before becoming the greatest wizard in the land as surprises abound in this musical adventure for the whole family. Call 407-896-7365 or visit orland orep.com Jan. 24 and 25 The 90th Birthday of the Orlando Museum of Art The Orlando Museum of Art is celebrating 90 Years in Orlando, and the Opening of the Mu seums 90th birthday celebration will be very special as it features Gainsborough and the Golden Age of Painting in Europe from the Speed Art Museum. Between 1600 and 1800 (the years in which these paintings were produced), popular subjects included portraits, religious paintings, landscapes, still-lifes, and classi cal antiquity that illustrated the people and objects that made the two centuries a rich cultural age. An opening reception will be held on Jan. 24 at 6 p.m. The exhibit opens to the public on Jan. 25 at 10 a.m. Call 407-896-4231 or visit omart.org Jan. 24 to 26 The Wizarding World of Harry Potter at Universal Studios Enter a world where magic is real on the weekend of Jan. 24 as the world descends on Orlando. Universal Studios will celebrate the adventures of Harry Potter at The Wizarding World of Harry Potter in three days of fun set against the backdrop of two amazing theme parks. It will feature Q&A sessions with cast members, a wand master-class, a Hogwarts castle. Stock up on wizard supplies at the shops of Hogsmeade, and experience pulse-pounding rides in a world of magical excitement. Visit uni versalorlando.com Jan. 24 to Feb. 15 Breakin Up Is Hard To Do at the Winter Park Playhouse Set in a 1960s Catskills resort, Breakin Up Is Hard To Do is a musical comedy about two friends in search of romance over one wild and crazy Labor Day weekend. The score features 18 Neil Sedaka classics including Where the Boys Are, Sweet Sixteen, Calendar Girl, and of course the chart-topping title song. Directed and cho reographed by Roy Alan with musical direction by Christopher Leavy, the production features a cast of Playhouse favorites. Call 407-645-0145 or visit winterpark playhouse.org. And looking ahead Nov. 6 The Dr. Phillips Center Sets ofcial opening date In my year-end wrap-up of 2013, I included the thrill of watching our new Performing Arts Center rise before our eyes. This week Center President Kathy Ramsberger announced the ribbon-cutting on the theater complex will be Nov. 6 with an Opening Night Gala the follow ing evening. The opening will include an open house and free performances in a celebration that will last for days, she said. The $514 million Center will begin performances in the 2,700seat Disney Hall with the musical Newsies. The 300-seat Alexis & Jim Pugh Theater will also open this fall with the third theater in the complex expected to be com pleted in 2018. CULTURE | The Orlando Museum of Art turns 90 years old this month, come out for its birthday celebration C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 21 Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906. Tim Hendricks Joins Citizens Bank of Florida For additional information THE LIFE & ADVENTURES OF NICHOLAS NICKLEBY BREAKIN UP IS HARD TO DO This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORG @EnzianTheater Wednesday Night Pitcher Show: NEW JACK CITY Wed 7:30 SPECIAL PROGRAMS: FILMAGE: THE STORY OF THE DESCENDANTS/ALL CO-PRESENTED BY PARK AVE CDS Tues 9:30INSIDE LLEWYN DAVISDirected by Ethan Coen & Joel Coen Cast | Oscar Issac, Carey Mulligan, Justin Timberlake, John Goodman, Garrett Hedlund Fri & Sun 3:30, 6:30, 9:30 Sat 3:45, 6:30, 9:30 Mon, Wed, Thurs 6:30, 9:30Tues 6:30 Science on Screen: A.I. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE Preceded with a presentation by Dr. Kenneth Stanley of UCF on the present state of articial intelligence Sat 12PM

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WPMOBSERVER.COM USPS 00-6186 Publisher statement on page 4. VISIT WPMOBSERVER.COMSUBSCRIBE NOW! IS THE MLB INTERESTED IN WINTER PARK? SPORTS, 11Band of brothersKnow that new sound you were looking for? Well listen to this.LIFESTYLES, 8Heart-healthy imbibingA winery that started as a farm. HEALTHY LIVING, 13CALENDAR ................... 4 LIFESTYLES ................... 8 HEALTHY LIVING ............... 13 OPINIONS ................... 19 CLASSIFIEDS ................. 20 CULTURE .................... B1 Winter Parks Lt. Chuck Nadd a hero last week. Nadd and his girlfriend Shannon Cantwell sat atop the Budweiser wagon pulled by the brewerys famous Clydesdales as confetti puffed through the air and a marching band trumpeted their arrival. Spectators decked in red, white and blue cheered, holding signs of welcome and pride over their hometown hero. Children veterans donned their military uniforms or wore patches on their biker vests showing how they served. One veteran impro vised by writing Navy on a piece of tape put on his baseball cap. And every person there made new friends over their excitement and anticipation to see the honored soldier. Everybody serving today is serving on a volunteer basis, and they volunteer to give every thing, said Navy veteran Jim Rushing, who traveled to see Winter Park, Orlando and Eatonville residents wont have to look far this upcoming week to celebrate Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and his legacy for human equality. Winter Park will be celebrat ing its 12th annual Unity Heri tage Festival in a two-day celebration on Sunday and Monday, Jan. 19 and 20 at Shady Park. Sunday afternoon will feature a live gospel program, childrens activities and vendors from 1 to 5 p.m. on the park grounds. The following day marks the Martin Luther King Jr. Celebra tion, which includes guest speak ers, the recognition of a Winter Park family which has impacted the community, and live Motown and blues music starting at 3 p.m. It all starts at 10 a.m. and wraps up at 5 p.m. Its about getting people to never forget about what he really stood for outside of being a minister, festival Chair Robert Knight said. He was a person who believed that all people of all shades and opportunities should be given a fair chance. Every man deserves a fair chance. Rollins College will throw a celebration of its own from Jan. off with the annual Martin Luther King Jr. Vigil at 6 p.m. at Knowles Memorial Chapel. An Equal Rights Symposium at the Faculty Club runs from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. the next day. Wednesday features a viewing movie about Jackie Robinson and his integration into major league Trust Auditorium. The traveling exhibit The Florida Modern Day Slavery Mu seum will be on display at Tars Celebrate MLK Day this weekend Orange County remembers Martin Luther King Jr.TIM FREED Observer staff Please see HERO on page 2There are faces new and old poised to enter the ring for two contestable Maitland City Council seats this week, as qualifying to get on the ballot for the citys March 11 election begins on Monday. After serving two terms over the course of six years in seat 2, Councilwoman Linda Frosch will term-out in April, leaving her seat up for grabs. A year after terming-out in seat 3, former City Councilwoman Bev Reponen has set her sights on reclaiming a to run for the empty seat. Longtime resident and community activist Martha BryantHall is also throwing her name in the race, announcing herself as a candidate for seat 2. Councilman John Lowndes is set to seek reelection for seat 4, after earning a partial term in the position last year. for both seats will open Monday, Jan. 20, at noon, and closes Friday, Jan. 24, at noon. A month and a half of campaigning will follow before the election on March 11. For more information about the election and next weeks qualifying process, visit itsmymaitland.comMaitland election qualifying kicks offSARAH WILSON Observer staffA heros welcomeWinter Park native Lt. Chuck Nadd received a surprise parade after he returned home from Afghanistan last week.BRITTNI LARSON Observer staff 407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC Winter Park Recovery CenterNow Is the Time to Make Your New Years Resolution Executive Drug, Alcohol & Weight-Loss Programs Privacy and Confidentiality Assured Medically Managed Dual Diagnosis Evidenced Based Solutions2056 Aloma Ave, Suite 100, Winter Park, FL 32792 www.WinterParkRecoveryCenter.com 407-629-0413 PHOTO BY BRITTNI LARSON THE OBSERVER Please see MLK DAY on page 2

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Page 2 | Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer HERO | Spectators lined the streets to welcome back pilotMLK DAY | Events running for five daysthe parade from DeBary. They deserve our respect. Nadd, 24, who is a Black into town that day after an eight-month deployment in Afghanistan. The parade, called A Heros Welcome and set on New England Avenue, was a complete surprise, and was by Budweiser. Rumors said that it could possibly be used in the companys Super Bowl ad, but representatives would not It was organized with the help of Cantwell, who put him up for selection to be featured along with the help of his unit, the 10th Combat Avia tion Brigade, Nadd said. He was under the impression that hed be speaking to a Veterans of Foreign Wars group, but became suspi cious that something a little more special was going to happen when Cantwell met him at the airport when she wasnt even supposed to be in town. But he couldnt expect what would happen next. I was shocked and honored, Nadd said. That was clear to see as Nadd waited on stage to speak to the crowd. When he wasnt smiling, an expression of sheer amazement struck his face as he looked over his community, and as he spoke, the emotion of the moment could be heard in his voice. First of all, so many have given so much more than me so remember all the folks out there who are still out there, who come back injured or who might not come back, he said to attendees. Theyre the real heroes. Nadd, who graduated from Trinity Prep in 2007, enrolled at West Point and put on a uniform birthday. He knew from a young age that one day he would join the military to protect his country and the rights his parents sought out when they emigrated from Europe. Theyd always instilled in him a sense of pride and ap preciation for the freedoms they enjoyed by calling the United States home. When we were attacked by terrorists on September 11, 2001, I was determined to one day serve the country I love so much in uniform, Nadd said. I am pas sionate about serving my country because, as Ronald Reagan once said, we have an obligation to preserve for our children this, the last best hope of man on earth. While gone, he had talked with family on the phone and through Skype. One of his favor ite memories was sharing a pack age he got from his friend Ravi Sankar with his fellow soldiers chocolate and marshmallows that made for a memorable night of istan, they were all family, he said, but hes certainly happy to be home, where he can feel safe and be with the people he loves. Not having the threat of night is certainly the best comfort. Next, Nadd will head to his home station of Fort Drum, N.Y., for about the next year and a half, serving as a platoon leader always come back to Winter Park, grade Civics back at Trinity Prep, which he does every year. Plaza all day on Thursday and Friday. The celebration ends with a that tells the story of an AfricanAmerican butler in the White House who witnesses history on Friday at the SunTrust Audito rium. When I think of M. L. King obviously I think of a great leader and a great man, but I also think of somebody who led our country to be more calm, to be more inclu sive and to recognize the value of all people as people, Winter Park Mayor Ken Bradley said. That should be our goal every single day, but to pause once a year and honor his memory and what his holiday stands for is very worthy. I look forward to the events happening in the city. Eatonville will celebrate with its 37th annual Martin Luther along Kennedy Boulevard. The Remember! Celebrate! Act! Kings Dream for Our World. Orlandos Martin Luther King Jr. parade marches down Orange Avenue in the citys downtown Praise Team Showcase wraps up the event with a gospel music performance starting at 1 p.m. at Lake Eola Amphitheater. CONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE 2826 Shader Rd. Orlando, FL 32808 Get/Keep Your Dog in Shape in 2014! 407-295-3888 BarkingDogFitness.com FACT! A Lean dog lives an average of 2 years longer than an overweight dog. Conveniently located at... ACT NOW!New Years Promo!Get 25% o for LIFE!expires 1/31/14 Customized workouts Training Indoor Warm Water Swimming ORLANDOS ONLY DOGGIE DAYCARE WITH A GYM! HOUSES WANTED!!! Get a FREE No Obliga on CASH O er On Your House Within 24 Hours! (855) 755-1818 www.Circle18Homes.com CASH $$$ QUICK CLOSE ANY PRICE RANGE ANY CONDITION ANY SITUATION PHOTOS BY BRITTNI LARSON THE OBSERVERNew England Avenue lled with spectators to welcome an Army helicopter pilot home from war in Afghanistan.ARCHIVE PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERWinter Park, Maitland and Eatonville will honor Martin Luther King Jrs legacy this weekend. CONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 | Page 3 Maitland City TalkBY HOWARD SCHIEFERDECKER MAYOR Happy New Year! The city al ways has an array of events and activities in Maitland, and this year is no exception. In Janu ary, February and March there is something available for almost everyone in the family, so please grab your calendar, make some notes and have a great new year in Maitland. JANUARY Pookies Winter Rescue Fest In its sixth year, Pookies Rescue Fest, held on Saturday, Jan. 25, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Lake Lily Park, has become a favorite event here in Maitland. Presented by the Urban Pet Project, this event has something for the whole family, including Fido! With more than 100 rescue groups and vendors featuring everything from specialty dog collars to gourmet treats, Pookies is featuring education, a kids zone and food trucks!FEBRUARY Movie in the Park The continuing series of family Movies in the Park presented by the city of Maitland Leisure Services Department will feature Despicable Me 2 on Feb. 1 at 6:30 p.m. in Quinn Strong Park located at 345 S. Maitland Ave. Join us while Gru, the ex-supervillain, is adjusting to family life and attempting to make an honest living in the jam business, just as a secret Arctic laboratory is stolen. The Anti-Villain League decides it needs an insiders help and recruits Gru in the investigation. Together with the eccentric AVL agent, Lucy Wilde, Gru concludes that his prime suspect is the presumed-dead supervillain, El Macho, whose teenage son is also making the moves on his eldest daughter, Margo. Seemingly blinded by his overprotectiveness of his children and his growing mutual attraction to Lucy, Gru seems on the wrong track even as his minions are being quietly kidnapped en masse for some malevolent purpose. Bring your chairs and blankets and we will bring you the stars (and free popcorn)!MARCH Movie in the Park Presented by the city of Maitland Leisure Services Department, Marchs event will feature Monsters University on March 1 at 7 p.m. in Quinn Strong Park located at 345 S. Maitland Ave. Mike Wazowski and James P. Sullivan are an inseparable pair, but that wasnt always the case. From the moment these two mismatched monsters met they couldnt stand each other. Monsters University unlocks the door to how Mike and Sulley overcame their differences and became the best of friends! Bring your chairs and blankets and we will be you the stars (and free popcorn)!The city of Maitland Farmers Market This weekly shopping and strolling opportunity to meet friends and neighbors is hosted each week on Sundays from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the shores of beautiful Lake Lily Park. The Farmers Market will be closed on April 13 for the Maitland Chamber Arts Festival and April 20 for the Easter holiday. We encourage you to visit our events and markets in Maitland and to visit the websites of the Maitland Public Library (mait landpubliclibrary.org) the Per forming Arts of Maitland (pamaitland.org), and the Art & History Museums Maitland at (artan dhistory.com) to discover an excit ing world of activities and events that everyone can enjoy. For more information about these and other upcoming events, contact the city of Maitland Lei sure Services Department Com this story may change from time to time, so please check back at itsmymaitland.com for updates. Come see Rescue Fest! Rooted & grounded in Jesus Christ. The Learning Tree is a Ministry of First Baptist Church of Winter ParkWe offer Full-Day Infant Care and Childcare Year-Round, Preschool Classes, Summer Camp, and much more! 1021 New York Avenue N., Winter Park, Florida 32789 Established in 1972 we are celebrating 41 years of service this year. 407-659-5701 www.TrustcoBank.com*Information based on current closings. Circumstances beyond Trustco Banks control may delay closing. Please note: We reserve the right to alter or withdraw these products or certain features thereof without prior notification.Member FDICEQUAL HOUSINGLENDER RYour Home Town Bank TRUSTCO BANKFast, Local Decisions Close your First Mortgage in 30 days!*Schedule Closing Date at Application Our loans close on time!Low Closing Costs No Points and No Tax Escrow required Trustco Mortgages We Close Loans! r fntbrnb nn r r r r We improve the lives of the people we serve.ftfnft r

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Page 4 | Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 PHONE: 407-563-7000 FAX: 407-563-7099 WPMOBSERVER.COMPUBLISHERTracy Craft407.515.2605TCraft@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MANAGING EDITORIsaac Babcock 407.563.7023IBabcock@TurnstileMediaGroup.comASSOCIATE EDITORSarah Wilson 407.563.7026SWilson@TurnstileMediaGroup.comDESIGNERTom Miller 407.563.7032TMiller@TurnstileMediaGroup.comSTAFF WRITERSBrittni Larson Megan Stokes Tim Freed Allison Olcsvay Kristy VickeryCOLUMNISTSChris JepsonJepson@MediAmerica.usLouis RoneyLRoney@cfl.rr.comJosh GarrickJoshGarrick9@gmail.comADVERTISING SALESLinda Stern407.376.2434LStern@TurnstileMediaGroup.comLEGAL NOTICE ADVERTISINGAshley McBride 407.286.0807Legal@FLALegals.comSUBSCRIPTIONS/CIRCULATIONLuana Baez 407.563.7013LBaez@TurnstileMediaGroup.comMEMBER OF: -Florida Press Association -Winter Park/Maitland/Goldenrod Chambers of CommerceWinter Park/Maitland Observer is published by Turnstile Media Group. Founded in 1990 and headquartered in Orlando, Fla., Turnstile Media Group is also the parent of Golfweek, Golfweek Custom Media, TurfNet, Professional Artist, Seminole Voice, Baldwin Park Living and Turnstile Connect.TURNSTILE MEDIA GROUPCHAIRMANRance CrainPRESIDENT/CEOFrancis X. FarrellVICE PRESIDENTSPatti Green & Jeff BabineauUSPS #00-6186 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:Winter Park / Maitland Observer 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835 Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster JAN. 18-19The 37th annual Central Florida Scottish Highland Games brings the unique exhi bition of ancient Scottish sport, music and food to the elds of Winter Springs Cen tral Winds Park on Jan. 18 and 19. Come out for the spectacle of men throwing phone pole-sized logs through the air, try ing to ip them over. Learn Celtic dancing. Drink Dunedin beer. Sample some of the best whiskeys in the world. Listen to the best pipe bands in the world competing against each other. Join in the competi tion yourself. Even the kids have their own mini games. Visit ascot.com for more in formation. JAN. 19-20Residents and local businesses will come together to celebrate the city of Winter Parks 12th annual Unity Heritage Festival on Sunday and Monday. The annual festival will promote family history and raise funds for the Educational Fulll ment Fund for local economically dis advantaged youth. Activities will include childrens games, food and retail vendors, entertainment by various gospel artists, and the presentation of the annual Heri tage Award. Its from 1 to 5 p.m. Jan. 19 and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Jan. 20 at Shady Park in Hannibal Square. On Monday it will run in conjunction with the citys an nual Martin Luther King Jr. Day. Its free! Call 407-599-3275 for more information. JAN. 25 Dont miss Food Truck Crazy coming to Fleet Peeples Park in Winter Park this weekend! Its from noon to 4 p.m. on Jan. 25 at 2000 S. Lakemont Ave. Its a regular event that happens every fourth Friday of the month. Come out for a variety of food trucks featuring local cuisine. Visit food truckcrazy.com for more information. ONGOINGFriday Nights at the Morse continues from 4 to 8 p.m. every Friday for free. In addition to complimentary admission to the galleries every Friday from 4 to 8 p.m., the Museum features a schedule of live music, art demonstrations, and special tours on selected evenings. The Museum invites the public to take advantage of these free opportunities to see permanent exhibitions as well as gallery updates. Live music is scheduled from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. on the second Friday night of the month. Its at 445 N. Park Ave. in Winter Park. Visit morsemuseum.org or call 407645-5311 for more information. FAMILY CALENDAR Calendar JAN. 16 Come out for networking at its nest at Business After Hours, which will feature the second annual Ovations Awards. Presented by the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce and the Winter Park-Maitland Observer, the Ovations are awards voted on by Observer readers for the best businesses in the area in 50 categories. Come out for food, drinks and networking from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Thursday Jan. 16 at the Winter Park Welcome Center, 151 W. Lyman Ave. in Winter Park. Visit winterpark. org for more information. JAN. 17The Small Business Education Series topic this month is Business Finance: Using QuickBooks Faster, Better, Smarter. Come out and enrich your business knowledge from 8 to 9 a.m. Jan. 17 at the Winter Park Welcome Center, 151 W. Lyman Ave. in Winter Park. Visit winterpark. org for more information. Rollins College President Lewis Duncan will speak about Rollins College: The Next Chapter at 12:15 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 17, in the Matthias Family Life Cen ter at the First United Methodist Church of Winter Park. The event is free, however lunch will be provided for $6. No need to register unless you want to reserve a lunch. Visit fumcwp.org for information. The Winter Park Chamber of Commerce and the city of Winter Park invite you to at tend the annual Mayor/City Commission Luncheon presented by WastePro. The event will feature Mayor Ken Bradleys annual State of the City Address, brief remarks from Winter Parks City Commis sioners, and the presentation of the citys Employees of the Year. Reserve your seat today! Its at 11:30 a.m. Jan. 17 at the Al fond Inn, 300 E. New England Ave. Visit winterpark.org or call 407-644-8281 for more information. JAN. 18January in Central Florida is camellia season! See for yourself the beauty of thousands of camellia ower blooms at the Camellia Society of Central Floridas (CSCF) 68th annual Camellia Show and Festival presented by Espoma Organic Fertilizer from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 18, at the Winter Park Gar den Club Clubhouse at Mead Botanical Garden, 1500 S. Denning Drive in Winter Park. Sanctioned by the American Camel lia Society, the CSCF show and festival is Floridas largest camellia show. From 1 to 4 p.m. the public can view the awardwinning blooms from Central Florida and throughout the Southeastern United States. The free show and festival in cludes: free parking; assorted colorful va rieties of camellia plants for sale; various vendors (camellias and food); a Camellia 101 class from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. (RSVP for classes email lkmccoy@c.rr.com or call 407-963-8970); and self-guided tours of the camellia garden and the other gardens at Mead. Forty young, classically trained opera singers will compete for the opportunity to sing on the stage of the Metropolitan Opera in New York. Its at the Trinity Pre paratory School Auditorium from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Jan. 18. Its free to the public. For more information, call 407-922-4688 or visit metauditionslforida.orgJAN. 19Beginning Sunday, Jan. 19, one of our na tions most respected prayer conference leaders, Peter Lord, and associate Vince Mann will preach and present a series of seminars on praying in the spirit. The seven day conference will be supported by First Baptist Church of Winter Parks Prayer Team, The Sunday School Faculty, the Celebration Choir, Deacons and mem bers of all ages who have been praying for families, friends and neighbors at a church that has been here for 100 years. The conference begins at 10:30 a.m. on Sunday, Jan. 19. And the public is invited. Please call 407-644-3061 if you have any questions. First Baptist Church is located at 1021 N. New York Ave. in Winter Park.JAN. 22 Join FemCity Orlando as COPE (Center for Obesity Prevention and Education) Certied Health Coach Beth Dillaha addresses attaining good health at a healthy body weight from 6 to 8 p.m. Jan. 22 at Flower No. 5, 1807 E. Winter Park Road in Orlando. The evening, sponsored by Trusted Source and Kim Truelove Pho tography, is complimentary for FemFes sional members and $20 for non-mem bers. To register or for more information, email orlando@femfessionals.com, call 407-758-5324, or visit femfessionals. com/femcities/Orlando.htm. Pre-registra tion is necessary to attend.Community Bulletin Mastering business Nicole Rodricks of Winter Park was among nearly 600 undergraduate, graduate and nursing students at Baker University who received their degrees during commencement ceremonies Dec. 14 and 15 at the Collins Center. Baker, the rst university in Kansas, has been listed among the top schools in the Midwest in the annual col lege rankings by U.S. News & World Re port, and selected as a top school in the Midwest by The Princeton Review. Rodricks graduated with a masters de gree in business administration. She pre viously graduated from Bentley University.Share your wisdomHeart of Florida United Way is seeking volunteers to help residents of Orange, Osceola and Seminole counties become nancially t this Martin Luther King Jr. holiday. In partnership with the IRSs Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program, United Way and other community partners are offering free tax preparation services to low-income individuals and families. On Monday, Jan. 20, United Way volunteers will be distributing thousands of informa tional yers in numerous lowand mid dle-income communities in the tri-county area. All volunteers will be provided with free Live United T-shirts and water bottles. A brief training will occur at the be ginning of each shift to prepare volunteers for any questions that they may be asked by residents. Volunteers can visit Financially Fit Income Tax Outreach 2014 to register online. Questions about this event may be directed to Matthew Blood, manager of community participation at Heart of Florida United Way, at Matthew.Blood@ hfuw.org or 407-849-2372. Its TAX time. Appointments Available 7 Days a Week!Tax Form Processing LLC4070 Aloma Ave., Suite 1010 Winter Park, FL 32792Tel: (407) 657-6336www.TaxFormProcessing.com Proudly Serving the Orlando Area for 19 years! Scan QR Code 40$00OffTax PreparationMust present this coupon at time service is provided. Offer valid for one-time use. Cannot be combined with any other offer. Expires April 15, 2014Offer Code: WPMO14

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 | Page 5 LOCAL NEWS. BIG IMPACT.Subscribe now to keep up with the latest news unfolding in your community. WINNER OF10FLORIDAPRESS ASSOCIATIONAWARDS Visit WPMObserver.com/Subscribe or call 407.563.7013 to order today! to Keep Women Well for Life. Diane S. Mancini, ARNP-C, NCMP returns to Winter Park on January 6, 2014. As a certied family nurse practitioner and certied menopause practitioner by the North American Menopause Society, she knows that the best way to keep women well throughout all the unique stages of life is to provide comprehensive well-woman care and an array of non-surgical treatments. Diane will start seeing patients, full time, from the new, beautiful Womens Health Pavilion located behind Winter Park Memorial Hospital on Edinburgh Drive. Diane S.Mancini ARNP-C, NCMPA Lifetime of Care to Keep Women WellAbnormal Uterine Bleeding Endometriosis and Chronic Pelvic Pain General Gynecologic Care Hormone Replacement Therapy and Bioidenticals Menopausal Treatment and Counseling Pelvic Pain Pelvic Organ Prolapse Patient Physicals Providing Patient Education Sexual Dysfunction Urinary Incontinence and Interstitial Cystitis Uterine Fibroids Well-Woman Care Across the Life Span Winter Park Womens Health Pavilion 100 N. Edinburgh Drive, Suite 102, Winter Park, FL 32792 407.303.4190 | www.McCarusGyn.com

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Page 6 | Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Winter Park City TalkBY RANDY KNIGHT CITY MANAGER Watch City Commission meetings live!Major policy-making decisions that govern city business are made at the City Commission level. Often, residents and members of the community are unable to physically attend meetings due to work or personal schedules. Now, interested parties can watch city of Winter Park Commission meet As long as you have Internet access, you can watch Commis sion meetings, gavel-to-gavel, live, as they happen from your desktop, laptop or any mobile device. During City Commission meetings, simply log on to the terpark.org and click on Govern ment > Live Video Broadcasts to business.Jan. 13 City Commission meeting If you were unable to watch or attend the City Commission meeting held Jan. 13 in City Hall Com mission Chambers, below are a few highlights of decisions made at the meeting:Mayors Reporttion was presented in preparation of the Tuesday, March 11, 2014, General Election. missioner Tom McMacken to the Orange County Community Ac tion Board was approved. Consent Agenda (for a complete listing, please visit were approved. Action Items Requiring Dis cussion cussed and approved with dates to be brought forward for the next strategic planning session. ment Plan was approved with amendments. into a 45-day process to evaluate opportunities for minor league baseball in Winter Park.Public Hearings annexing 612 E. Lake Sue Ave. was approved. vacating and abandoning the electric utility easement at 470 W. New England Ave. was approved. notice of Intent to use the uniform method for collecting special as sessments within the platted area the municipal boundaries of the city of Winter Park, to fund the citys undergrounding of the House Networks facilities, was approved. A full copy of the Jan. 13 City Commission minutes will be available at cityofwinterpark.org the week of Jan. 27, pending ap proval by the City Commission.Unity Heritage Festival The city of Winter Park is proud to present the 12th annual Unity Heritage Festival on Sun day, Jan. 19, and Monday, Jan. 20. The annual community festival will promote family history and raise funds for the Educational nomically disadvantaged youth. The festival begins Sunday, Jan. 19, from 1 to 5 p.m., in Shady Park at Hannibal Square located at the intersection of Pennsylvania and New England avenues. Patrons are also encouraged to visit the Hannibal Square Heritage Center just across the street from Shady Park. The center pays tribute to the past, present and future contributions of Winter Parks histor ic African-American community. The heritage festival continues in Shady Park on Martin Luther King Jr. Day from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 10 a.m. for a special Martin Lu ther King Jr. symbolic program, including the Feature Family Presentation. Exciting events and activities will continue throughout the day including food and music. For more information regard ing the Unity Heritage Festival, please call 407-599-3275. More public parking availableThe city of Winter Park has opened up new public parking spaces just west of City Hall on Lyman Avenue. This lot was previously designated for City Hall employee parking only. Howev more parking, the city has repur posed those spaces to three-hour public parking. on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, watch us on Vimeo.More places to park

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Page 8 | Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Lifestyles Its been said that music can bring people closer. For two broth ers in Winter Park, it couldnt have happened any other way. In a small duplex off of Aloma Avenue in Winter Park, 29-yearold Sean Holcombs throaty, rich voice bounces off the hardwood to strum his guitar and sing at once. Sitting at a picnic table in their dining room, he does it ef fortlessly. His brother Aaron, 24, slides a bow of horsehair across the strings of his Keller cello. Then two dis cordant notes suddenly blend together and theyre off. the living room on a Sunday af ternoon as the two brothers run through a cover of Damien Rices Volcano, followed by two of their own original songs. The acoustic guitar and cello combination makes for a warm and cozy sound that puts listeners somewhere else. Beside a camproad out west. Its been four years since Sean and Aaron began their musical endeavors together. Four years ly crossed once again.Coming of ageThe Holcomb brothers grew up in a big family, with three more brothers and three sisters. Sean and Aaron called the Orlando area home for most of their lives, a stones throw away from behe moth theme parks and a bustling downtown. When he was in middle school, Sean picked up a guitar and tryed to play along with songs he heard. He plucked away and his hands wouldnt let go. It wasnt long before he dove into the local mu sic scene at age 16, playing local shows in downtown Orlando in southern rock bands. As Sean learned guitar by feel and playing along with CDs, by the cello, taking formal lessons and eventually joining the Florida Young Artists Orchestra in high school. Music became an escape. Its very therapeutic once you settle into it, Aar on said. You can be having a really rough week and a really hard day and it can be stress re lieving. Sometimes it can be better than therapy, just sitting there and playing. The brothers continued to peruse mu sic on their own, but rarely played together.A musical pilgrimageThe year forever be known as a year of dramatic change for Sean. An unexpected crisis would lead him to make one of the hardest decisions of his life. Sean was married, became a father and later separated from his wife all before age 23. He frantically searched for a job to help pay for child support and stumbled upon an opportu nity on Craigslist. Itd be a long commute: a cattle ranching job 2,000 miles away in Beulah, Colo. As much as I didnt want to, it was something I had to do, Sean said. The reason behind it was good ultimately, it was clear to me Seans the individual that when things get hard he really looks at What do I have to do, Aaron said. Sometimes he comes up with some really hard choices. Sean said goodbye to his fami ly and friends and took a one way ranch with nothing but clothes PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERSean, left, and Aaron Holcomb found their musical groove in an unusual guitar and cello duo thats entertaining local audiences.Band of brothersUnique music act brings family togetherTIM FREED Observer staff Please see HOLCOMB on next page KEEP UP WITH MAITLAND NEWS AND EVENTS!www.IndependenceLane.com Facebook.com/ItsMyMaitland FEATURING ... 250 North Orlando Ave. Winter Park, FL 32789407.677.9777 Duette Architella Honeycomb Shades A Premier Flooring Source Area Rugs Window Treatments... AND MUCH MORE! To see exclusive interviews with the Holcomb Brothers and video of their music, visit this Observer story online at http://bit.ly/1dOajuX

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 | Page 9and a guitar. He lived the life of a cowboy: branding, herding and feeding section. But the year he spent in Colo rado also gave him a creative sanctuary. Sean strummed his guitar on the front porch of his ranch house, gazing at the Wet Mountain range, a hot cup of coffee set on a handrail. They call them the Wet Mountains for a reason. The nearest big city, Pueb lo, gets about a foot of snow a year. Only a half hours drive away, the mountains get 10 times that much. Se ans one snowy winter left him a lot of time to think. His mind always came back to his son, Benjamin. He began to pour his heart into song.Finding his futureBack in Central Florida, Aaron hadnt played the cello in months. Hed aged out of the Florida Young Artists Orchestra after playing there for four years, learning pieces like Stravinskys Firebird Suite and Dvoraks Slavonic Dance. But now his favorite instrument was just a conversation piece against a wall. He kept his focus on school and work, pushing himself to the brink by taking a schedule of four classes while holding down a job and helping out in his parents commercial janitorial company. But as hard as Aaron worked, he still felt lost. At that point, I was exploring my options in school and the po tential career paths to stem from, Aaron said. No one in my fam ily had graduated college with a degreeI didnt really have a lot of direction or a blue print of what to do. I really let the wind kick me around too much, considering only what I was responsible for that week and not concerning my self with what might lie ahead. The cello continued to collect dust as work and school con sumed Aarons life. He walked past it every day, a constant reminder of the years he dedicated to music. He always told himself hed pick it up once again. A lot of the time it was unpacked and just sitting there, star ing at me, he said.A ticket home stepped foot on the ranch, Sean found a way to come back home. A close friend tipped him off to an internship back in Orlando that could lead to a welding job mak ing $250,000 a year. Sean knew it was time to leave the ranch behind. There was no future and no security, Sean said. You can only spin your wheels for so long. It was my olive branch. It was a way out. He stared at the scrap heap of a truck he expected to get him home. It hadnt moved in 20 years. The hubs were frozen. The engine didnt turn. The carburetor was a hunk of varnished gasoline slowly turning back into crude. As Sean spun wrenches on that red and white Ford, Aaron took a the brothers made the long drive to Orlando, switching drivers while the other slept through the day and night. The grueling drive dragged on for days, and at one point landing the brothers in a cactus patch. That road trip was the kind of thing that really tested our bond, Sean said. Sean couldnt stop thinking about the music he wrote while in Colorado. A years worth of lyrics and melodies raced through his mind, begging to be written into songs. When I moved back, I was on 13-0079/rev090113Member FDIC citynational.com At City National Bank, we make your dream home a reality. CNB has a full suite of mortgage solutions to meet your needs. Speak to one of our Mortgage Banking Officers today by calling 305-577-7333 or 1-800-435-8839.Let Us You Home South Florida Business Journals Community Bank of the Year 1227-2 CNwinterParkAd.indd 1 12/27/13 3:09 PM HOLCOMB | A cross-country journey that tested a brotherly bond helped jumpstart a musical reinvention CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE Please see HOLCOMB on page 11

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Page 10 | Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer r fn tbn r rfr nntrntbnr ffftbbfb nn tnbn nnf t nrn rnn n brn tbn r bn PHOTOS BY TIM FREED, ISAAC BABCOCK AND SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVERFire was the theme of the night at Crealde School of Art on Jan. 11, with artists pouring molten bronze, re-hardening pottery and demon strating programs the school has available to the public in a festive openhouse atmosphere across the sprawling campus in Winter Park. Crealdes Night of Fire rf rntbtn rf rfnt btt rfntbttrtnr trrtntrtntrrt trfrttrtnbttt rtrntnrrrtrtrt trrtnrttttrtrtn rfnrtrtrrrn rfntrtttrttttt nrr rfntttbbttftttt

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 | Page 11The Winter Park City Com mission had baseball on the brain during Mondays City Commis sion meeting as they voted to move forward in pursuit of establishing a minor league baseball team in the city, eyeing several new locations for a potential stadium. Commissioners unanimously voted to begin a 45-day discussion period looking at the feasibility of a team in Winter Park. Input gathered from city staff and the city advisory boards will help the City Commission decide how a stadium would be paid for, where the stadium would be, and Park residents. Excitement was contagious among City Commissioners at the thought of a minor league baseball team in the city. This is a generational opportunity for our community, Mayor Ken Bradley said. To discuss it is thrilling. I think were the envy of many communities to even be having the opportunity to discuss something. Discussions held over the past year had originally put Rollins Colleges Harper Shepard Field at Please see BASEBALL on page 12 Does Winter Park have room for baseball? home to entice a minor league baseball teamTIM FREED Observer staff ARCHIVE PHOTO BY REBECCA MALES THE OBSERVERWinter Park ofcials are in talks to bring a Major League Baseball clubs Single A team to the city. HOLCOMB | Brothers in songThe internship opportunity fell through for Sean due to his friend leaving the business, but he later found a job working as a sales manager at Lowes, a steady job that now allows him to support his son. But Seans mind continued to wonder to his music. He longed to continue writing, hoping someday to perform front of an audi ence again. Sean urged Aaron to pick up the cello once more and form a duo. A band of brothers. Within weeks of coming home, Sean and Aaron were practicing and writing. The brothers went on to perform live concerts, playing Dexters in Hannibal Square once a month and booking other shows at local events and weddings. Their younger sister Hannah even stood in on viola, playing gigs with her brothers as a trio. Hannah feels stronger than ever that music brought their fam ily together. I think its really helped them as brothers a lot to come closer, es pecially when Sean moved away, Hannah said. For him to be able to connect with Aaron through music was really helpful for both of them. Aaron now works as a phar school at Valencia College, all while keeping up with the band. What we do I wouldnt trade it for anything else, Aaron something its very rewarding to be able to do something like this with your brother. The Holcomb brothers play on in Seans living room, weaving melodies and tones together into and Aaron seem to communicate without a single word. A simple head nod or gesture signals the other to move on to the next verse. Many arrangements are impro vised, allowing them to run free within the skeleton of a song. Its sentences, only with notes instead of words. Someone came up to me, whispering in my ear, Sean sings, telling me everythings going to be alright. CONTINUED FROM PAGE 9

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Page 12 | Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer rfr rnrtb ftn frbffft bnrf rbrrbftrb f rftrfttft rfnrbtr rft ttnffbfnf tfnbffff rffn fbff ff nft frff bftfrfnfffbtb bf tnrrf tfftrfr rfrn nfbf rf bfbttnb ffbttbf nnttfnrff rfrr btbfrMelissa A. Abrahamsonrfnttbtb Kristin M. Riberdy rfnttbbbrtfbbfr bfftThe Right Way to Invest in Real EstateBy Melissa A. Abrahamson and Kristin M. Riberdy BASEBALL | Prospective minor league baseball teams on the citys short list have been kept a secret the forefront of potential loca tions for a new baseball stadium. The college expressed interest over the past few months in the concept, but the Rollins College executive board voted last month to discontinue their efforts in exploring a minor league baseball stadium because of fundraising concerns, City Manager Randy Knight said. But the city hasnt stopped looking for a stadium site just yet. Knight presented four frontrun ners for a potential location to the City Commission on Monday: Martin Luther King Jr. Park, the incoming Rauvadage develop ment along U.S. Highway 17-92, the UP development also along 17-92 and a former tree farm. What I really dont want to see is something shoehorned into somewhere, Commissioner Tom McMacken said. If we were to consider this and talk to some class facility. The city is considering a stadium in the range of 2,500 to 3,500 seats, qualifying for a Single A level baseball team. Winter CONTINUED FROM PAGE 11 ARCHIVE PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERCurrently the highest level baseball in town is the Florida Collegiate Summer League. The Winter Park Diamond Dawgs play at Rollins Colleges Harper Shepherd Field. Park has been communicating with teams, but nothing has been made concrete, Bradley said. There would be an estimated economic impact of $6 million a year with the establishment of a minor league baseball team, Knight said. Commissioner Carolyn Cooper warned that the minor league baseball decision needs to be made not on an impulse, but with a desire for whats best for the city. I dont want this to be an emotional decision, Cooper said. I dont want anyone making recommendations to me based on the fact that they enjoy watching baseball. Winter Park and baseball couldnt be a more perfect pair, Bradley said. I can think of nothing more Americana than Winter Park, Bradley said, and I can think of nothing more Americana than baseball.

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 | Page 13 Down a little dirt road shaded by a canopy of live oaks, 20 Lake Mary area, lies the heart of Central Floridas burgeoning wine business. Oak Haven Farms and Winery sits on a sunny hillside, just far enough from the city to make visitors feel like theyve entered a different world. Owners Harry and Karen Stauderman purchased the little farm in 1995, and a few years later decided to plant a crop of strawberries that turned out to be quite successful. We started with just 3 acres, a card table and a cash box and now were up to 7 acres of strawberries for u-pick, plus the vines, Harry said. In time, they added a kitchen to the property to make home made strawberry shortcake, milkshakes, sundaes and other To encourage families to visit and stay awhile, they added a playground, complete with their signature tire swing in an oak tree. They even added hayrides, hot dogs and warming up when the weather turns chilly. Visitors to the farm can take home more than just fresh strawberries though. Oak Haven Farms also offers fresh made jams, jellies and local honey. What really sets them apart though are the wines the Staudermans make and bottle on site. As a way to use excess strawberries that ripen late in the season, the self-taught winemakmaking strawberry wine and later blueberry wines. when the Staudermans planted a few acres of Muscadine grapes. According to the University of Florida Agricultural Extension Florida and known for their high yield, natural resistance to insects and disease, and their ability Oak Haven Farms now produces as many as seven varieties of wine every year, including sweet or dry white wines made from the Carlos varietal, red wines from the Noble varietal in addition to their always popular strawberry and blueberry wines and a special mead wine, made from local honey. From vine to table, the wines take over a year to produce. Wines closer than you think at Oak Haven FarmsHealthy Living Please see WINE on page 14 $10.00 OFF Initial Purchase $100 or more CANADIAN MEDS SAVE UP TO 80% on Prescription Drug PricesORDER by phone No Store Visit required Advair Benicar Celebrex Cialis Crestor Cymbalta Flomax Levitra Lexapro Lipitor Nexium Spiriva Viagra Zetia CALL for a FREE Quote! We Ship Anywhere in the U.S.A. Locally owned & operated. 744 South US Hwy 441 Lady Lake, FL 32159(352) 633-3301 ALLISON OLCSVAY Observer Staff PHOTO BY ALLISON OLCSVAY THE OBSERVERHarry Stauderman and his wife Karen wanted a berry farm, but it grew into a winery that ferments grapes and berries grown on farmland just north of the Orange County border.

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Page 14 | Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer COME & SEE! ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------THEACTIONCHURCH.COM Come & See... your kids have fun at church in a clean and safe environment.Come & See... that your relationships can be healthy and fulfilling.Come & See... what it feels like to be free from your past and to fulfill your destiny.Come Come & See... someone, maybe even you, win 4 seasonal Disney passes OR free Chick-Fil-A for an entire year! --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Every Sunday at 10:30am Men in kilts launch boulders, hammers and logs through the air and sailing over a green meadow. Scottish dancers weave their feet into a blur, their tartan skirts kicking up with each controlled bounce as if they were shod with springs. And, no matter where you wander, the sound of bagpipes follows. The sights, sounds and smells are all Scotland, but if youre a Central Florida resident, you dont have to leave home to experience it. This weekend marks the 37th year that the Central Florida Scottish Highland Games will be held at Central Winds Park in Winter Springs. Our goal is for everyone to hear a bagpipe playing in the park whether you like it or not, said a laughing Chuck McGrew, vice president of the Scottish-American Society of Central Florida, the group that puts on the event. The Games are the biggest event in Seminole County and the largest High land Games in the Southeast, with 22,000 attendees last year. Organizers expect to have similar attendance numbers this year. The Games have athletics events to watch bands, Highland Dancers showing off some traditional moves, beer and Scotch whisky tastings, and an award-winning Merida look-alike all the way from Scotland who will be there to impress fans of The bravest of visitors can try Scottish dish thats a savory pudding of sheeps heart, liver and lungs encased in its stomach. We do our best to present Scottish culture to the community in every way possible, McGrew said. Its a little bit of Scotland for two days. A new addition to this years Games is the Quidditch demo tournament. The game made famous by J.K. Rowlings Harry Potter series of books to the ground by universities all over the world. Teams from Rollins College and the University of Central Florida will compete against each other, and Sunrise Elementary School players will show the kids attending how its done. Tina Gordon Leslie brought the idea to the Games organizers, and got quite a few puzzled looks. Theyll go either, Whats that? or Really, when did that become a real game? Leslie said. Its a little bit of fantasy because its a game that started out in a storybook. She hopes that it will bring Harry Potter lovers to the Highland Games, and introduce the sport, which she calls a mix of basketball, dodge ball, soccer and rugby, to a new crowd of action lovers. The game is incredibly exciting, Leslie said. Its a tough, rough-and-tumble game. While organizers are all about having fun, they also want their visitors to dig a little deeper while at the Games, especially if they have Scottish heritage theyd like to learn about. More than 40 clans will be represented and those interested in learning about their namesake can stop by their tent. Chip Crawford, president of the Scottish-American Society of Central Florida, learned about his family history through attending the Games, and found an amazing sense of self in the process. He said hes proud to be a part of sharing that experience with as many people he can. Looking at your roots has got to give you some insight into who you are, Crawford said. The games give you the opportunity to scratch the surface. But you dont have to be a Scot to be welcomed at the Games, you just have to want to have a little fun, and of course bear the blare of bagpipes, Crawford said. big clan of humanity. 1000 E. State Road 434 in Winter Springs. Sports of Scotland come to Central FloridaThe Central Florida Scottish Highland Games celebrates 37 years of bringing a two-day taste of ancient celtic traditions to Central Florida. BRITTNI LARSON Observer staff ARCHIVE PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERIts a caber-tossing, bag-piping, whiskey-tasting good time at the Scottish Highland Games, which brings in more than 20,000 spectators every year. WINE | Winery started as a familys berry farm The grapes are left basking in the Florida sun to maturity until they are harvested, crushed and pressed to extract the juice, which is fermented and aged in large metal vats in a climate controlled environment. Following aging, the wines are strained to eliminate any sediments that may have accumulated and bottled for sale. Our wines show a lot of promise, Harry said. While they may not impress wine snobs, everyday wine drinkers are Oak Haven Farms opens to the public every year as the strawberries begin to ripen. This year, Harry said that should be mid-December. Visitors to the farm will enjoy the uthe farms new wine tasting counter as well as the opportunity to purchase some of their favorites to take home. For now, the wine is only available on site, but fans of the eat local movement will be happy to know that the Staudermans, now in their fourth year as winemakers, are beginning to look for ad ditional markets to share the fruits of their labors. They hope to be able to offer their wines in the coming years to vendors and restaurants throughout Central Florida, area. Of the 25 wineries listed on the Florida Grape Growers Association website, Oak Haven Farms is the closest to Orange County, just across the northern border. By developing their own niche, the Staudermans have made a place for themselves as a family-friendly way to experience rural Florida and all that local agriculture has to offer. We enjoy what we do and think our wines will hold up to peoples expectations if they just give them a try, Harry said. CONTINUED FROM PAGE 13

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 | Page 15 shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM here should be more to life than maintenance-free living. To learn more about our community in Kissimmee, call (407) 933-1999. One Senior Place ... See our full Calendar of Events at OneSeniorPlace.com407.949.6733715 Douglas Avenue Altamonte Springs, FL 32714M-F 8:30am 5pmMONDAY, JANUARY 20 Senior Club Sponsored by Family Physicians Group Every Monday, 10am 12pm January 20th Movie Day January 27th Casino Day The Real Estate Specialists are IN! 10am-1pm (also 27th) Presented by EXIT Real Estate Results By Appointment Only 407.949.6714 TUESDAY, JANUARY 21 Crafts & Conversation 2pm-4pm By VITAS Innovative Hospice Care RSVP 407.599.2522 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22 Healthy Aging Conference by Compass Research 9:30-10:30, Ira J. Goodman, MD Is it Memory Loss or Something More? 11 12, Craig T. Curtis, MD Working Toward a Healthier Tomorrow 12:30-1:30, Chelsea A. Mabry, PhD Healthy Aging and Memory Loss Prevention Memory Consultations will be available on site. RSVP for Each Session: 407.218.5974 Hearing Aids Users Improve Relationships & Self Image! 3pm-4:30pm By Harmony Hearing Centers RSVP 407.949.6737 THURSDAY, JANUARY 23 Daughters Missing Mothers 6pm-7:30pm (also Jan 30th; Feb 6th, 13th, 20th, 27th) By VITAS Innovative Hospice Care RSVP 407.691.4548 The Real Estate Specialists are IN! 9am-12pm (also 30th) By EXIT Real Estate Results 2014 MARKET OUTLOOK 12pm-1pm By Price Financial Services RSVP 407.339.4500 By VITAS Innovative Hospice Care RSVP 407.599.2522 FRIDAY, JANUARY 24 By VITAS Innovative Hospice Care RSVP 407.599.2522Calendar of Events January 2014 Savannah Court and Cove Excellence in Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation 1301 W. Maitland Blvd. Maitland, FL 32751407-645-3990www.SavannahCourtMaitland.comAssisted Living Facility License No. 8447 Skilled Nursing Facility License No. 1635096 Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above. You are always welcome!A Senior Living Community where Hospitality is a Way of Life. Lets face it, I am one boring person and, as youll soon discover, a bit preachy some times. I dont drink, and Ive only tried weed twice in my entire life. The only reaction I had was to get thirsty. And I certainly dont need pot to get the munchies. Right now, you are probably asking yourself, Why bother even telling you this? Heres why: A lot of commentators who are musing about the spectacle of Colorados decriminalization of recre by fondly reminiscing about their own mellow times get ting stoned. Apparently they think it bestows credibility on them, as they ponder the long lines in Denver to buy newly legalized pot. Its now allowed in the state, but its still against federal law, and thats why a debate has lit up anew. Shouldnt it be treated like alcohol? The answer is, of course it should be. The restrictions against a drug that is clearly less harmful are clearly absurd, particularly when studies show that brutal penalties against violators are enforced much more harshly in Americas poor and minor ity communities. Alcohol is an addictive drug that is demonstrably more destruc tive to individual health and to society as a whole, its regulated and limited, but its sold to anyone who meets the age requirement. We should be able to lead our private lives as we want, as long as theres no danger to society. Of course there is plenty of danger, but we should be evenhanded. But here comes the preachy part: Why do we use the stuff? Why have we always indulged in substances that make us crazy, loud, destructive, you name it? Are we as a species so frightened of reality that we need to escape it by ingesting something mind-altering rather than just dealing with it? Obvi ously the answer is that we do need chemical reinforcement, since we have drunk, inhaled, chewed or injected it since the dawn of time. Its not just recreational use of drugs. If were feeling just the slightest bit sad, no mat ter what the good reason, theres always some physician willing to prescribe Zoloft or Prozac, or some other SSRI, which messes with the brains chemicals in ways no one fully understands. Is your kid a bit scattered? Well, its not hard Adderall, which is speed, by the way. Its important to mention that these pharmaceuticals provide who have a genuine medical or psychological problem, but the stuff is dangerous to those who dont. Instead of dealing with their issues, they want to cop out by becoming numbed. Thats the appeal of alco hol, marijuana and the other playtime substances they numb us. But why do we want that? Yes, Im sure this is be ing dismissed by many of you as a priggish attack on fun, but Id love to think I enjoy a good time as much as the next person. I just dont want to regret it afterward. Id like to remember it the next day when I wake up. But we really do need to wake up. Sure, legal ize this stuff, but realize what it does to us. Legalized mind numbing

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Page 16 | Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Eighty-eight percent of all New Years resolutions fail. The area of the brain that operates willpower (to execute on resolutions) is also responsible for other functions like focus, short-term memory, solving abstract tasks etc. As a result, we arent able to give the time, energy and effort to carry out our resolu tions. Its a great idea to review a block of time (a year, month or week) and get clear about the road ahead. Its also important though to get to the heart of the matter and ask why we want what we want. Here are my tips to enjoying a New Years evolution: How do you want to feel? New Years resolutions tend be very heavy on doing, accomplish that idea on its head and instead ask yourself How do I want to feel in the new year? Our emotions come charged with energy and it is easier with to-dos created by the mind. This inner clarity will guide your outer decisions and youll likely have way more fun than you ex pected getting to your goals. Journal I highly recommend keeping a journal by your side as you begin your 2014 adventures. Journals are great tools to help us tap into our own hidden reservoirs of cre ativity and inner-growth. By writing in them, we engage our mind, body and heart. It is a holistic method of self-discovery. So as you try out different ideas and activities, make notes whenever possible. You might serve you in the months to come. Keep an open mind (and heart) what I think is possible by and for through, we need to release all old beliefs and thought-patterns and stay open. I invite you to approach the rest of the year with an open mind and heart. While Im big on making plans, I keep them as guidelines. Life can be spontaneous and surpris ing; it might have grander plans for you that you never imagined for yourself. Bring your inner child Shoshin is a concept in Zen Buddhism meaning beginners mind. It refers to having an attitude of openness, eagerness, and lack of preconceptions. Remember a time when you believed in magic, unicorns and limitless possibilities? As children we used to be deeply connected to our true, authentic, please connect with your inner child and ask for her input on things. You and excitement very refreshing on this journey. Re-start often You dont have to wait for the year to end to re-evaluate your lifes priorities and get charged up about making positive changes. Every full moon, every week and every morning we have the opportunity to release the old and invite the new. In fact it is impossible to make annual plans without breaking them down into smaller chunks like months and weeks. Set smaller blocks of time to review, release and re-evaluate things. What are you most looking for ward to in 2014? What are some of your dreams and goals?Resolution vs. Evolution: How will you approach 2014? Alert to Caregivers of Dependents with Special Needs: You May Need to Change the Beneciaries of Your Life Insurance, Annuities, IRAs or Other Retirement AccountsThe process of special needs planning involves developing a total plan to provide for the dependents lifetime care. Ownership of assets must be coordinated with legal documents (such as trusts, wills and beneciary designations) to avoid the loss or reduction of any government or other benets for which the dependent may be eligible. Assets can pass from one individual to another individual in a variety of ways. Assets may be transferred by sale or by gift. At death, assets may pass through a will or under intestacy laws and be distributed by the estate. Assets may be distributed by trusts. Certain assets will be distributed through operation of law. These include assets held jointly (such as real property held in joint tenancy, or as tenants in the entirety) that avoid the probate process and go directly to another named person. Other assets can pass through operation of contract. These usually include life insurance policies, annuities, IRAs, and certain other types of retirement accounts that permit the owner to name a beneciary. These types of assets typically avoid the probate process (unless the estate is named beneciary), passing directly to the named beneciary. Even the very best plans can go astray if all the pieces of the puzzle are not pieced together correctly. Distributions specied in wills can result in money going directly to a person with special needs (for example, a provision that requires that the residuary estate be divided equally among the decedents children, with the share of any predeceased child being divided equally among that childs children or descendents of predeceased children). Payments made directly to a person with a disability can result in the reduction or even loss of government benets. How many caregivers of dependents with disabilities today have named their dependent as the beneciary on a group or individual life insurance policies, IRAs, 401(k) plans, prot sharing plans, or dened benet pension plans? How many people have forgotten whom they have named as beneciary? How many people never named a beneciary? When the caregiver dies, the terms of those policies and retirement plans will govern the distribution of the money usually requiring distribution to the named beneciary or, if none is named or living, to the estate. If the dependent with special needs receives the money, this could produce disastrous results. When planning for the nancial future of someone with special needs, all beneciaries of insurance policies, pension plans, IRAs, and annuities, need to be reviewed. If the caregivers have established a special needs trust for their dependent with special needs, the trust should be named as beneciary, so not to compromise their loved ones benet eligibility. One mistake, a forgotten policy, or a beneciary designation not updated, can unravel the best of plans! Due to the complexity of federal and state laws, you may require specially trained professionals to help you plan for the future of your dependent with special needs.. A Special Needs Planner can work with your attorney and provide the nancial and insurance products that may be needed to complete your planning. Call Special Needs Planner Charles Fisher at 407-393-6693 for a condential consultation. The MetLife Center for Special Needs PlanningSM, formerly MetDESK For more information about this and other related topics, visit our organizations website at www.metlife.com/specialneeds or call 1-877-638-3375. Pursuant to IRS Circular 230, MetLife is providing you with the following notication: The information contained in this document is not intended to (and cannot) be used by anyone to avoid IRS penalties. This document supports the promotion and marketing of insurance products. You should seek advice based on your particular circumstances from an independent tax advisor. MetLife, its agents, and representatives may not give legal or tax advice. Any discussion of taxes herein or related to this document is for general information purposes only and does not purport to be complete or cover every situation. Tax law is subject to interpretation and legislative change. Tax results and the appropriateness of any product for any specic taxpayer may vary depending on the facts and circumstances. You should consult with and rely on your own independent legal and tax advisers regarding your particular set of facts and circumstances. L1111221507[exp0114][All States][DC,PR] SNP-ARTICLE-CHANGEBENE Charles FisherFinancial Services Representative Special Needs Planner MetLife of Central Florida 301 E. Pine Street, Suite 800, Orlando, FL 32801 DEAR DR. DONOHUE: My husband is 6-feet 4-inches tall and weighs 170 pounds. He is a com petitive distance runner. He loves Kool-Aid and calculates that in a year he drinks 150 pounds of sugar in Kool-Aid alone. A friend told him if he continues this habit, he might develop diabetes. Can a skinny, athletic person develop diabetes from consuming sugar? S.B. ANSWER: Although sugar is half the name of sugar diabetes, sugar doesnt cause diabetes. Its a popular belief that it does, but it doesnt. People with diabetes are careful to watch their sugar intake, and they watch their total carbohydrate intake, but diabet ics dont have to eliminate sugar completely from their lives. Type 1 diabetes, the kind that requires insulin to control, often has its onset in younger years. Its due to a destruction of the insulin-making cells of the pancreas. Sugar has nothing to do with it. Type 2 diabetes comes about from a decline in insulin production along with a decline in its effectiveness. Ninety percent of Type 2 diabetics are overweight, and weight loss helps them control their blood sugar. Physi cal inactivity also contributes to Type 2 diabetes. So do genes. Again, its not the sugar intake that produces this common type of diabetes. But monitoring the intake of sugar is important for control of this variety of diabetes. The booklet on diabetes presents this illness and its treatments in detail. Readers can obtain a copy by writing: Dr. Donohue No. 402W, Box 536475, Orlando, money order (no cash) for $4.75 ents printed name and address. DEAR DR. DONOHUE: I think I may have the illness where a person pulls out clumps of hair. Im not sure of the name. I I have been off caffeine for 25 years, and I do not pull my hair out. I thought this might be help ful to others. K.H. ANSWER: The name of the condition is trichotillomania (TRICK-ohTILL-uh-MAY-kneeuh). Between 4 million and 11 million Americans have it. Its called an impulse disorder. I hadnt heard about a caffeine connection. If this holds true for others, they will deeply appreci ate your advice. Dr. Donohue regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but he will incorporate them in his column whenever possible. Readers may write him or request an order form of available health newsletters at P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475.The role of sugar in sugar diabetes Puja Madan is a womens health coach, writer and speaker. She has received her training from the world-renowned Institute for Integrative Nutrition, New York. Puja offers powerful health and wellness programs for young women, in person or online, empowering them through healthier food and lifestyle choices. Puja practises Yoga and meditation daily and believes that all inner growth starts with a love affair with oneself! For more information visit www.innerscientist.com or www.facebook. com/innerscientist

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 | Page 17 BIGGEST LOSER CONTEST 2014Will be a jump off point to start my goal of helping over 400 residents lose weight and gain a new and more vibrant life. THE CONTEST WILL HAVE FIVE WINNERS: FIRST PRIZE: 3 night stay in Marco Island and a lovely gift from Victoria Jewelers. SECOND PRIZE: Gift certicate to In Style Hair Nails and Day Spa and dinner for two at La Bella Luna or Japanese Seito Sushi Bar. THIRD PRIZE: Gift certicate to Baldwin Nails and Wine Styles. FOURTH PRIZE: Gift certicate dinner for two at Jacks Steakhouse and a few rounds of virtual golf at Virtual Golf Caddy Shanks. FIFTH PRIZE: Gift certicate to Farris and Foster and Planet Smoothie. ENTRY FOR CONTEST REQUIREMENTS: Start date 1/01/2014 end date 6/01/14 Have at least 30 lbs. to lose Train 3 times a week Ready for change (do I have a surprise for you to overcome every obstacle and fear!) Nutrition Shopping tour through our very own Publix. Biweekly weigh-ins and measurementsAs for 2014, expect 180 Degree Fitness to have some awesome changes!I have been extremely blessed and am truly grateful for the honor that clients have bestowed upon me in helping them achieve their weight loss goals. To show my appreciation to Baldwin Park residents. The business will be changed and called Baldwin Park 180 Degree Fitness. The rst ever Christian tness studio here in Baldwin Park. This is home for me. I love the people and am dedicated to help as many residents conquer their challenges with weight loss.BALDWIN PARKPRIVATE PERSONAL TRAINING 407.680.4263www.180DegreeFitness.com1595 Meeting Place, Orlando, FL 32814As you know its all a mind game. Most people know what eating healthy is, but for your own reasons are not consistent. Do they want it bad enough? Sure. Then if its not will power what is it then? Simple fear We all have a fear that holds us back from success ask yourself and youll see the root is always some kind of fear. Mine used to be that I didnt want to be the center of attention. So I found myself sabotaging my results. Sound familiar? I applied some mental exercises, and praise Jesus overcame my fear and instead embraced it. What a wonderful experience when you can do that! Its been over 17 years that I lost 80 lbs., and it also helped me overcome my anxiety and depression. John Manjarres CFT, MES, SNS The Body Transformation Expert Hearty soup keeps winter chill at bayFor many people, the cold weather is a reason not to exer cise outside, or not to exercise at all. However, it is possible to get a great workout outdoors this winter, as long as you also exer cise caution and dress properly. Exercising in cold weather can put extra stress on the body. It is important to consult your physician if you have a medical condi tion that puts you at risk before starting a new outdoor regimen. The two conditions you have to worry about are frostbite and hypothermia. Frostbite is the freezing of body tissue. It occurs most often on and face. Symptoms of frostbite include pain, numbness, tingling and burning of the affected site. Hypothermia occurs when the core body temperature drops to below 95 degrees Fahrenheit. Symp toms include chills, fatigue, drowsiness, slurred speech, intense shivering and loss of coordination. line of defense. Dress in layers. synthetic fabric such as polypropylene, which helps draw sweat away from the body. The next help insulate the body. The top layer should be waterproof to help keep heat from escaping and keep moisture and wind out. Its also important to protect areas of the body prone to frost bite. A thin pair of gloves under a heavier pair will protect hands. Thermal socks will help protect the feet. It may be necessary to purchase shoes a half size larger to allow for the thickness of the socks. Dont forget a hat or headband to protect your ears. ids. Dehydration is not just a risk in the summer. When sweating and increased breathing occur, in any type of weather, dehydration is a possibility. It is particularly important to warm up properly for cold weather workouts. The body tends to stiffen more easily in cold weather. Do a short warmup activity to help prevent injury. Remember that shoveling snow can be a good workout, but also can take a toll on people who are not used to heavy lifting. Take the same precautions you would for any other hard outdoor workout, because that is exactly what it is! After your winter workout, you can warm up with a hearty bowl of Kale and Potato Chowder. With potatoes replacing the cream traditionally used in chowder recipes, this is a fast, economical and healthy soup that will keep the chill away until spring. 1. In a large pot, heat the oil. Add onions, salt, pepper and until onions are tender, about 3 to 5 minutes. Add garlic and the tomatoes, and cook for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the potatoes, water and broth to the soup pot. Bring the ingredients to a boil and reduce to a simmer. Cook until potatoes are almost done, about 10 minutes. 2. Remove 2 cups of the potatoes along with some of the liquid. Place potatoes and liquid into a blender. Carefully loosen top of the blender to allow air to circulate, and cover the top with a dishtowel to prevent the hot liquid from exploding out. Start blending on lowest setting, and gradually increase to medium and then high. Blend until the potatoes are smooth. 3. Add the potato mixture, kale, carrots and kidney beans to ue cooking for 10 to 15 minutes until kale and carrots are tender. Taste and add more seasoning as needed. Serve in soup bowl along with side salad of fruit or leafy greens, and whole-grain crackers servings. (Additional information provided by Tammy Roberts, Nutrition and Health Education Specialist, Bates County, Univer sity of Missouri Extension.) Angela Shelf Medearis is an awardwinning childrens author, culinary historian and author of seven cookbooks. Her new cookbook is The Kitchen Divas Diabetic Cookbook. Her website is divapro.com. To see how-to videos, recipes and much, much more, Like Angela Shelf Medearis, The Kitchen Diva! on Facebook and go to Hulu.com. Recipes may not be reprinted without permission from Angela Shelf Medearis. KALE AND POTATO CHOWDER 4 cups chopped fresh kale, stems removed 1 medium onion, diced 1 tablespoon poultry seasoning or Italian seasoning 4 cloves garlic, diced 1 (14-ounce) can diced tomatoes no salt added, with liquid 4 large baking potatoes, diced with skin 3 cups water 2 cups low-sodium chicken broth 1 large carrot, sliced into thin rounds 1 (15-ounce) can kidney beans, drained and rinsed OWC Launches Garden Schedule; Healthy Living Expo Set for February 15Our Whole Community (OWC), which provides educational programs throughout the year, will kick off its gardening workshops in 2014 with Composting, Saturday, January 25 at the OWC Garden in Winter Park. This years calendar also includes the return of OWCs Healthy Living Expo, held in partner ship with the City of Winter Park. The event will be held February 15, 2014, from 9 a.m. 1 p.m., at the Winter Park Community Center. Free health assessments, speakers on Mind, Body and Spirit, healthy vendors and chef and garden demonstrations will be available. Our Whole Community continues to grow its slate of healthy living programs each year, says OWC Board Chair Lavon Williams. He says the gardening programs are free for OWC gardeners; $10 per family of non-OWC gardeners. There is no charge to attend the Healthy Living Expo. Here are the scheduled spring garden programs. Park. Garden entrance is on Welbourne Ave. New England Ave., Winter Park. rian Church, 400 S. Lakemont Ave., Winter Park. Garden entrance is on Dundee Drive. Whole Community Garden, 550 W. Morse Blvd., Winter Park. Garden entrance is on Welbourne Ave. Garden is by the Annex.For more information, email Leah Nash at owc_ed@me.com or call 407.758.5324. zation that brings communities together to establish relationships and share resources resulting in innovative programs that inspire, motivate and educate individuals in their pursuit of optimal health. For more information on Our Whole Community, please visit ourwholecommunity.org. Our Whole Community is pleased to contribute monthly to the Winter Park Observer. Email owc_ed@me.com for inquiries about OWC. OWC Launches Garden Schedule; Healthy Living Expo Set for February 15

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Page 18 | Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com r fntbt f rtt ftbt bt bnr nr rt b bb f b tb off trtnCoupon redeemable for cash, check or credit card purchases only. Not redeemable for insurance transactions. Excludes custom/special orders & nutritional supplements. May not be combined with any other discounts. Coupon has no cash value. at Winter Park Towers Your room is waiting for you if you need Pain and Symptom Management Hospital Follow-up Complex Treatments, or Crisis Care Referrals 866-742-6655#5019096 www.cornerstonehospice.org www.SeriousIllness.org/cornerstoneMedicare, Medicaid, most commercial insurances accepted JANUARY 13 (Mon) Beginning Walk-Run Program Begins ....................Blue Jacket Park Presented by Track Shack Fitness Club 21 (Tue) MarathonFest Marathon Training Begins ....................Glenridge MS Presented by Track Shack Fitness Club 25 (Sat) Seasons 52 Park Avenue 5.2k* ..................................Park Avenue Presented by Florida HospitalFEBRUARY 1 (Sat) Florida Hospital Lady Track Shack 5k .........................Mead Garden 15 (Sat) Run Around the Pines 5k* ......................................Showalter Field Presented by Florida HospitalMARCH 15 (Sat) Zimmerman Kiser Sutcliffe Winter Park Road Race 10k & 2 Mile*Presented by Florida Hospital ................................Park Avenue 24 (Mon) Beginning Walk-Run Program Begins ....................Blue Jacket Park Presented by Track Shack Fitness ClubAPRIL 26 (Sat) Run for the Trees 5k ..............................................Showalter FieldJULY 4 (Fri) Hunter Vision Watermelon 5k .....................................Park Avenue Run, Walk, Train. Winter ParkFloridas premier fitness destination! Did you know that approximately half of all employed Americans suffer from neck and/or back pain? According to the American Chiro practic Association, these are two of the most common reasons employees miss work. Incorrect posture and sit ting for the majority of the day often result in pain and tightness of the neck and back. Whether it is leaning over your computer or leaning over your workbench, employees need to stretch often. Dr. John Jenkins, neurosurgeon at Winter Park Memorial Hospital, says, A great way to keep our spine and neck healthy is to exercise, maintain a healthy weight and take several stretch breaks throughout the day. Here are a few simple stretches that can help relieve tension right in and mental stress.Scalene stretch1. Sit or stand face forward with good posture 2. Place your left hand on your right shoulder, applying slight pres sure downward 3. Tilt your left ear toward your left shoulder 4. Slowly lift your chin toward the ceiling and stop within your comfort level 5. Hold for 5-10 seconds sideHip rotator stretch 1. Sit upright with a tall back 2. Cross left ankle to right knee 3. Slowly lean forward and stop within your comfort level 4. Hold for 5-10 seconds 5. Release and repeat on opposite sideTrunk exion1. This stretch can be done sitting or standing with feet parallel to each other 2. Bend forward at the waist, reaching towards the ground 3. Relax your head and neck and hold position for 5-10 secondsHip exor stretch1. Sit or stand upright with good posture 2. If sitting, sit on edge of your seat, turn to the left and drop your seconds then repeat on the opposite side 3. If standing, step back with left leg while bending left knee, tucking your hip under you. Hold for 5-10 seconds then repeat on the opposite side Repeat these exercises as needed throughout the workday, getting up to stretch or move at least once every hour. Practice breathing in and exhaling through pierced lips for 10 seconds at a time to fully con tract and expand your rib cage and diaphragm to further enhance your mental clarity.If you have any questions relating to back or neck pain, contact Dr. Jenkins at 407-646-7170 or go to his website johnajenkinsmd.com

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 | Page 19Opinions EDITORIAL CARTOONSChris Jepson PerspectivesWe, for all intents and purposes, have been the same model of human being for that that time frame will be tweaked as archeologists and anthropologists inter pret new data. For 150,000 of those years, we awoke each morning to the challenges and beauty of East Africa. Regardless, 50,000 years ago we started walking out of Eden. Imagine, if you will, what those early Homo sapiens thought about life. Early ending search for nourishment and safety from the elements. Yet, those people with pedicure, perhaps, and with appropriate dress, could be drop-shipped into the 21st century and they would seem, essentially, as you or I. They would have, however, none of the context or understanding we moderns have. My question is: how did early man and woman think about happiness? Did a warm day and a full stomach provide a modicum of contentment? What made them happy, and is our idea of happiness markedly different from their perspective? Did they see the beauty in rive joy (happiness) from the experience? More or less 2,500 years ago, the Greeks and the Chinese (independently) started of happiness. Most philosophers and historians agree that the concept of hap piness in antiquity centered around good luck and fortune, whereas contemporary Americans view happiness as something over which they have control and something that they can actively pursue. Happiness is what happens to us, and over that we have no control, offer happiness researchers Shigehiro Oishi and Jesse Graham. The Greeks (Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, etc.) began the Western discussion on what constitutes happiness and how to achieve it. According to these intellectual luminar ies, all of us naturally desire happiness. So far so good. Ah, but there is a rub. While happiness is the ultimate goal for the individual, happiness is not pleasure nor is it virtue. Happiness is the implementation of virtue. Happiness is the culmination of the human experience and is dependent on the rational use of reason. Happiness requires intellectual contemplation. Other Greek and Roman intellectuals were less highbrow about what consti tuted happiness, but they all equated hap piness and virtue. Christianity, unfortunately, didnt push the envelope of what constitutes happiness. Arguably, religion has been an impediment to earthly happiness. St. Augustine offered that, the earthly quest for happiness is doomed. Thomas Aquinas said partial happiness can be achieved only through the theological vir tues of charity, hope and faith. Aquinas was a step forward in that everybody could, at least, be partially happy. Martin Luther went even further asserting that, Christians should be merry . To live life as ence the world as a pleasure garden for the soul. Only a deeply religious life, ment to move the question from how can I be saved? to how can I be happy? We, moderns, pursue happiness with dogged determination. Science today suggests that all of us have a genetic default setting for happiness. A death, a divorcetime passesand were back to our individual set point of happiness. Following 200,000 years of humanity with others.Your kind of happiness Jepson is a 27-year resident of Central Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.US Louis Roney Play On!Decisions, decisions Opinions King Features Weekly ServiceJanuary 13, 2014 Most of the people to whom most people pay the most money are the people who make most of their big decisions for them. What if your doctor was to ask you this: Jim, do you think we should operate on you at 6 on Friday, or depend on a guard ed systemic approach? Ill be resting in nurse Lamours room while you decide. Imagine that your broker emerges from hiding following a few down-days on the Dow, and phones you: What do think we should do next, Jim? he asks! Then you turn to your secretary and say Dottie, that guy youre going with: Marry him if hes rich and hes good to his mother, and you love him. But be sure he proposes twice so you know that hes really made the decision! losopher, William James, wrote, There is no more miserable human being than one in whom nothing is habitual but indeci sion. A person who cannot make decisions has condemned himself to be a dissatis soar because one wing is eternally bound to his side. A Turkish proverb warns in poetic caveat that indecision can cost you your ing between two mosques. The renowned English poet, William Wordsworth, believed that his lifes purpose was preordained. He wrote, I made no vows, but vows were made for me. Lots of other people who know the feeling of having a calling on Earth, may feel that their lives primary decisions were somehow predestined. Robert Frost, the crotchety New Eng land poet who died shortly after he recited one of his poems at John F. Kennedys inauguration, was never able to think in such comforting terms. Frost was tortured by bitter curiosity as to the decisions he had made in his art and in his personal life. He wrote in The Road Not Taken, Two roads diverged in a wood, and I I took the one less travelled by, And that has made all the difference. To the end of his days, Frost, whom I knew slightly when he was living in our house at Harvard, wondered what his life would have been had he taken the other turn at that uniden In the years when I lived in Munich and sang in German opera companies, I could never drive through the beautiful Knig Platz where the Amerika Haus stands without conjuring up visions of what took place in that handsome building the last The very word Munich became synonymous with appeasement. And the name of British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain came to symbolize the fatal weakness of indecision. Hitler was bullying and determined on his evil course. However, most historians now agree stop the German dictator in the Amerika Haus would have worked then and there. If Winston Churchill, a man of decision, had been Prime Minister then, as he was after Chamberlain stepped down, many believe that Hitler, a notorious bluffer, would have met more than his match. World War II might well have been averted by one mans decisiveness. In being decisive we all make mistakes. We hope our mistakes are small ones, and But being indecisive guarantees failure failure compounded by a brand of mental cowardice that comes from not facing the issue squarely. How often do you wish to eat out with your Aunt Tilly, the one who reads the menu for a half-hour, calls the waiter to the table three times for questioning, and then orders a plain omelet and a salad? I have always respected Billy Graham, whose approach is based upon a decision each must make for himself. Ill buy that! About Roney: HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney)Christianity, unfortunately, didnt push the envelope of what constitutes happiness.

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Page 20 | Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer ANNOUNCEMENTSA childless,young, successful woman seeks to adopt. Will be HANDS-ON Mom! Financial security. Expenses paid. Visit:www.jodi 2adopt.webs.com/ call Jodi 1-800718-5516 or text 609-770-1255. Adam Sklar #0150789 MOECKER AUCTIONS: Public AuctionSchmann Casters & Equipment Company Inc. LIVE & ONLINE Tuesday, January 28th at 10am 1299 W Beaver Street, Jacksonville, Fl 32204 Tremendous amount of New Material Handling Equip ment, Forklift, Boat Trailers, Racking, Scrap Metal, Steel Casters,Dollies, Con veyor & much more. ABC Case No.:162013-CA-010616. Details at www. moeckerauctions.com (800) 840-BIDS. 15%-18%BP, $100 ref. cash dep. Subj to confirm. AB-1098 AU-3219, Eric Rubin UNPLANNED PREGNANCY?Adoption-A brave & selfless choice. Med ical, living & counseling expenses paid. Choose the loving & financially secure family. Compassionate Atty. Lauren Fein gold 24/7 866-633-0397 www.fklhearttoheart.net #0958107Winter Park Benefit Shop140 Lyman Ave, Winter Park needs items to sell: clothing, bedding, jewelry, kitchenware and bric-a brac. Also need ing volunteers. Contact Elizabeth Comer 407-647-8276. Open Tues & Fri at 9:30am; Sat 10am-1pm. All proceeds support childrens programs & the Or lando Blind Association.Winter Park Benefit Shop:at 140 Lyman Avenue, Winter Park needs items to sell: clothing, bedding, jewelry, kitchenware/bric-a brac. Need volunteers contact Elizabeth Comer 407647-8276. Open 9:30am-2pm every Tues & Fri (and Sat 10am-2PM). Pro ceeds support childrens programs and the Orlando Blind Assoc.EDUCATIONAIRLINE CAREERS begin here Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Finan cial aid for qualified students. Job place ment assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769 Saturday, January 18th: 1871 Britlyn Alley, Orlando FL 32814 3 BR | 3 BA | 3,440 SF | $383,900 Stunning four story townhome in desir able Baldwin Park! Immaculate model home with three bedrooms and three full and two half baths, and attached two car garage. Eat-in kitchen with granite coun tertops and stainless steel appliances. Fourth story is a large bonus room with half bath. Enjoy the expansive balcony and fantastic view! Hosted by: Tiffany Prewitt from 1-4 PM Sunday, January 19th: 2350 Temple Drive, Winter Park FL 32789 4 BR | 4 BA | 2,006 SF | $450,000 Gorgeous Winter Park home featuring a formal living room, office with pocket doors, and kitchen with breakfast bar open to the dining room area. The spacious family room features a fireplace, built-ins and two sets of French doors that lead to the covered patio and fenced backyard. Gorgeous finishes throughout including crown molding, wood floors and plantation shutters! Bonuses include a guest suite above the detached two car garage. Hosted by: Debbie Tassell from 1-4 PM 219 S. Lawsona Boulevard, Orlando FL 32801 5 BR | 4 BA | 3,049 SF | $419,900 Charming 1930s two story home on an oversized double lot with original hardwood floors, two wood burning fireplaces, two large sun porches, separate In-Law apartment, formal dining room and lots of natural light! The fully fenced backyard features plenty of privacy, pavers and two wood decks for maximum enjoyment. Hosted by: Cindy Watson from 1-4 PM 505 W. Harvard Street, Orlando FL 32804 3 BR | 2 BA | $415,000 Fabulous College Park pool home located just one block off Edgewater Drive. Up dated with hardwood floors throughout, new kitchen with granite counters and new master bath. Hosted by: Jennifer King from 1-4 PM 815 Chichester Street, Orlando FL 32803 4 BR | 3 BA | 2,262 SF | $365,000 Adorable three bedroom, two bath bun galow in charming Orwin Manor. Main house features wood floors, wood burn ing fireplace and cedar closets. Finished 1/1 guest apartment above garage offers private access and its own kitchen. Hosted by: Kelly L. Price from 1-4 PM 3751 Percival Road, Orlando FL 32826 4 BR | 3.5 BA | 3,536 SF | $925,000 Immaculate model home on a beautiful lakefront lot with impressive views of Lake Price. Downstairs master retreat with his and hers closets, large walkin shower and Jacuzzi tub. Spacious kitchen offers built-in appliances, custom 150 E. Robinson Street Unit 2210, Orlando FL 32801 sold by Rhonda Chesmore 62 W. Colonial Drive Unit 207, Or lando FL 32801 sold by Padgett McCormick 2006 Loch Berry Rd, Winter ParkThe Nancy Bagby Team $242,500 1/6/14 2660 Queen Mary Pl, Maitland Ann Lee $230,000 1/10/14 340 N Phelps Ave, Winter Park Cath erine DAmico $255,000 1/10/14 OBSERVER Just Sold Homes SATURDAY 1-4 NEW LISTING! MOVE-IN READY HOME IN OLDE WINTER PARK 522 S Phelps Avenue, Winter Park. 3BD/2BA, 1,727 SF. Mature landscaping, ample parking, and large storage shed in fenced backyard. Interior offers open floor plan with exposed beams through out entire house. Updated kitchen, large dining room, family room and office area with wood burning fireplace and Florida Room. Large deck overlooking backyard. $374,900 SUNDAY 12-3 LOCATION! LOCATION! LOCATION! 1510 Mizell Avenue, Winter Park. 3BD/3BA, 1,936SF. Perfectly situated between newer million$ Windsong Homes, this charmer features original hardwood floors, a beautifully updated kitchen, semi-vaulted ceilings & a fantastic family room featuring brick fireplace PLUS a wall of built-in cabinets. Extras include inside utility/storage room, 2 car garage & a large, tranquil backyard patio!! 90x150 lot! $484,000 SUNDAY 1-4 FRENCH COUNTRY HOME 1848 Linden Road, Winter Park. 4BD/3BA, 2,092SF. Adorable French country home in Winter Park. Upstairs bedroom with private bath would make perfect guest or in-law suite or college student. Large oversized lot. $259,000 NEW LISTING! BEAUTIFUL HOME ON TREE-LINED STREET 310 W Lake Sue Avenue, Winter Park. 4BD/3.5BA, 2,880SF. This home offers hardwood floors, brick fireplace, and new sun room overlooking flagstone patio and pool. Gourmet kitchen with custom cabi nets, granite counters and backsplash, and stainless appliances. First floor master suite boasts huge walk-in closet and upgraded bath with spa. Double pane windows and plantation shutters throughout. $719,000 SECLUDED MAITLAND POOL HOME 431 W Sybelia Avenue, Maitland. 5BD/4.5BA, 3,903SF. Large master suite opens to the pool area. Split floor plan. OBSERVEROpen Houses THE MMARKEt T PLAc C E MindGym January 13, 2014 MindGymJanuary 13, 2014 cabinets, large island and bar top seating for six. Additional features include a fire place in the family room and huge bonus room with balcony. Enjoy entertaining by the resort style pool with views of the pri vate beach and dock! Hosted by: Kelly L. Price from 1-4 PM 1750 Edwin Boulevard, Winter Park FL 32789 2 BR | 2 BA | 1,922 SF | $325,000 Adorable bungalow in the heart of Winter Park on a brick street! Gorgeous hardwood floors throughout, open floor plan, and renovated kitchen overlooking the backyard with fish pond. Office/sit ting room area off each bedroom. Front screened-in porch with large deck in the backyard. Hosted by: Rhonda Chesmore from 1-4 PM Hardwood and Mexican tile flooring. Gor geous kitchen with granite countertops. Two bedrooms are upstairs with shared bath. Privacy wall behind home. $579,000 END UNIT TOWNHOME WITH GREAT LAY OUT 2201 Hawick Lane, Winter Park. 3BD/2.5BA, 1,814SF. Quality details throughout, starting in the gourmet kitchen with granite counters, stainless appliances and breakfast bar. Downstairs 10 ceilings, lighted archways and porcelain tile floors. French doors open to brick pavered courtyard. Master suite offers walk-in closet, granite vanity, whirlpool tub and separate shower. Located close to shopping, parks and hospital. $309,900 SUNDAY 2-5 NEW LISTING! BEAUTIFULLY MAINTAINED BALDWIN PARK HOME 5255 Baskin Street, Orlando. 3BD/2.5BA, 1,757SF. Khovnanian home with substan tial upgrades over $60,000. Beautiful hardwood floors, iron spindle staircase and covered porch. Kitchen has 42 cabi nets, granite counters, stone backsplash and stainless appliances. Upgraded insulation and double pane windows for energy efficiency. Two car garage. $412,000 OPEN AND UPDATED LAKEFRONT HOME 520 Lake Shore Drive, Maitland. 3BD/3BA, 2,463SF. Magnificent views of Lake Faith! Custom kitchen opens to living and dining areas with vaulted pine ceilings for ideal open floor plan. Enor mous Florida room with brick and granite bar. Large windows and bamboo flooring throughout. Private white sandy beach. Move-in ready! $499,000 NEW PRICE! SINGLE STORY CONDO IN COUNTRY CLUB AREA 904 Sussex Close, Orlando. 3BD/2BA, 2,060SF. Air conditioned two car garage, ten foot ceilings, parquet floors, com pletely repainted, new plantation shut ters, new carpet, new electrical panel, repiped and roof resealed. Crown molding, wainscoting, wood burning fireplace and brick patio. Community pool, night security guard and great location. $259,000 NEW PRICE! COUNTRY CLUB OF ORLANDO TOWN HOME 2036 S Countryside Circle, Orlando. 3BD/2.5BA, 2,054SF. End unit with spa cious rooms, plantation shutters and crown molding. Open porch off fam ily room with brick accent wall leads to oversized two car garage. Commu nity offers night security guard, common grounds and optional pool membership. $209,900 SHOWPLACE PROPERTY OF THE WEEK NEW LISTING! PRIVATE BEACH ON LAKE SYBELIA 1110 N Lake Sybelia Drive, Maitland. 5BD/4.5BA, 4,517SF. Largest lakefront lot on Lake Sybelia. Custom boat dock with lift, open pool with refinished deck, and expansive lake views of ski lake through out. Eat-in kitchen has granite counters and stainless appliances. Master bath offers Italian tile, custom cherry cabinets, and oversized Jacuzzi tub overlooking lake. Media room, library with gas fire place and oversized two car garage. $1,250,000 FEATURED PROPERTY WONDERFUL HOME IN GREAT LOCATION 680 Balmoral Road, Winter Park. 4BD/2.5BA, 2,264SF. Kenilworth Shores rfrfrnnftfrffbtf nrffbttfrbtf nrfrftfttfftf rfrfbnftfrrbfr fffbtfnbf rt tfnrf ff rf n rfnfrbrf fr ntb t bfrffbbf t rnfbfrfbf tfbffb rf f rfbfrf f rfn trftffnn ftttrff tfrnnffrffbfrff ff f tbfr tfn frftrnfrftf rffrf tfbtffff fbnrfnffbtff fnfrbfbnn tf brff rrrff rntb FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now survive DIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922 home on a corner lot. Home offers fire place, hardwood floors, formal living and dining rooms and two car garage. A rated schools include Brookshire El ementary, Glenridge Middle and Winter Park High School. 1/3 acre lot. $525,000 FEATURED PROPERTY SOUGHT AFTER WINGFIELD 2159 Deer Hollow Circle, Longwood. 4BD/3BA. 3,100SF. Enjoy the Seminole County Lifestyle in this beautifully cared for home. Warm colors, extensive crown molding, newly re-done hard wood floors and incredible media room are just a few of the features in this Family Home. Relax in your tropical amazing screened pool area and lanai. Enjoy coming home to this beauty. $569,000 FEATURED PROPERTY BALDWIN PARK BEAUTY 2015 Meeting Place, Orlando. 3BD/3.5BA, 2,320SF. Spectacular townhome with tre mendous upgrades throughout! Antiquestyle hickory wood floors throughout the living areas. Gorgeous kitchen with maple cabinets, granite counters and stainless steel appliances. Master suite plus the balcony as well as the down stairs guest suite and porch all overlook Corrine Commons Park. Two-car garage. $525,000 HELP WANTEDDriver Trainees Needed Now!Become a driver for Werner Enterprises. Earn $800 per week! Local CDL Training. 1-877-214-3624Now Hiring OTR CDLA Drivers.New Pay Package and $2500 Sign-On Bonus! Mostly 5-10 days out, full bene fits, achievable bonuses. Call for details 1-888-978-3791/apply www.heyl.netPhone Collection JobNear Maitland Blvd & I4. Collector. Fulltime/Part-time. Phone/computer skills needed. Phone etiquette. Experience pre ferred. Day-time position with some flex ibility. Fax resume to 407-786-4322 or email to jobapp2@aol.com.MERCHANDISESTEEL BUILDING CLEARANCE:5 Only 25x32, 30x40, 40x60, 60x100, 100x240. Straightwalls! Choose Color! FREE Freight!Local Office: Punta Gorda! Call Now For Quote!1-800-237-9620, ext. 941PROFESSIONAL SERVICENo Time.... Call!WE CLEAN FOR YOU!! Commercial and Residential servicing. WE DO IT!! Call Catherine Adam 321-356-8160. cadam1959@yahoo.comREAL ESTATE: COMMERCIALOFFICE FOR RENTWINTER PARKExecutive office available in prestigious bank building. Approximately 10 x 12 with windows on two sides. Additional space available for assistant, now or lat er, at additional charge. Aloma and Lake mont Avenues. 24-hour access. Minimum one year term. Broker. $500 per month. Lou Nimkoff 407-405-3368 of fice@briofl.comREAL ESTATE: FOR SALEMountain Stream Bargain!Beautifully wooded acreage 390 crys tal clear stream, natural yr-round spring, prime Blue Ridge Mountain location. Paved roads, utilities municipal water, more. Only $27,900. Excellent financing, little down. Call now 866-952-5303 Al abama Ext: 110 Florida Ext: 111 Georgia Ext: 112 OPEN HOUSE, January 18 & 19, NOON-3pmOceanfront Complex, SOUTHEASTER, NSB, 2bd/2.5ba, FSBO, $310,000. NO SIGNS. Find Balloons! Directions: 860573-1597 Colleen 860-573-1597 Cre base@cox.net 2006 Oakhurst Ave, Winter Park Ann Lee/Ann Lee $488,000 1/10/14 1872 Jessica Court, Winter Park Jerry Oller/Shirley Jones $465,000 1/10/14 810 N Lakemont Ave, Winter Park Melissa Woodman $185,500 1/10/14

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 | Page 21TONIGHT Jan. 16 2014 Ovations Awards The Winter Park Chamber of Commerce and Park Avenue Merchants Association invite us to kick off the New Year with networking, food and drinks at the 2014 Ovations Awards Cer emony. The Chamber has joined with the Winter Park/Maitland Observer for this second annual best of guide to Winter Park as voted by Chamber members, readers and the local community. Awards will be presented in 50 different categories beginning at 5:30 p.m. at the Winter Park Welcome Center at 151 W. Lyman Ave. in Winter Park. Visit winter park.org TONIGHT Jan. 16 I Believe at the CityArts Factory What do you believe? is a fundamental question that shapes the world in which we live. Art for All Spaces will present an art exhibit about believing; through words and images, artists will share the beliefs that inform and inspire them. In addition, poets will present verses based upon the I Believe titles. Hosted by the CityArts Factory (29 S. Orange Ave. in Orlando), Downtown Arts District, and Art for All Spaces, call 407-450-2255 or email artforallspaces@gmail.comJan. 17 to 27 Breakthrough Theatre Presents Their Annual Best of Broadway In what has become an annual musical revue featuring the songs from Broadway musicals that opened (within a given time-frame), Breakthrough Theatre of Winter Park hits it out of the park by choosing Broadway shows from 1975 to 1984. Proving that you can please all the people some-ofthe-time, this years revue features songs from The Wiz, A Chorus Line, and Chicago to Evita, nd St, and Cats. With performances from Jan. 17 to 27, call 407-920-4034 to reserve your seat. Jan. 17, 18, 19 CFCArts Spotlight Presents Melissa BraillardResolutions, featuring the effervescent Melissa Braillard, is an evening of music about risks we take, decisions we make, and resolutions we break. A singing actor in Central Florida for over 10 years, Melissa has performed with Orlando Shakespeare, the Orlando Philharmonic, Walt Disney World and more. Resolutions will be performed on Jan. 17 at 7:30 p.m., Jan. 18 at 5 p.m., and Jan. 19 at 7:30 p.m. at Central Christian Church at 250 SW Ivanhoe Blvd. in Orlando. Visit cfcarts.comJan. 18 30th Annual Dr. Martin Luther King Parade and Sound ShowcaseThe Birthday celebration for Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. will begin with a Parade which steps off at 10 a.m. on Jan. 18 and follows Orange Avenue in Downtown Orlando. The celebration continues at 1 p.m. with The Sound Praise Team Showcase at the Lake Eola Amphitheater. This musical showcase features Cen tral Florida church singers and residents as they perform before a panel of judges to celebrate the Please see CULTURE on page 22 JACKIE ROBINSON MELISSA BRAILLARDJosh Garrick Culture for your calendar

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Page 22 | Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer legacy of Dr. King. The event is free. Call 407-246-2122 or visit cityoforlando.net. Jan. 18 Festival Singers Singing the ScripturesWith a repertoire ranging from Brahms to Bernstein, the Festival Singers of Florida will present a choral concert, Singing the Scriptures at the Winter Park Presby terian Church at 400 Lakemont Ave. on Jan. 18. Incorporating Biblical texts as well as hymns, selections will include Lead, Kindly Light, Fairest Lord Jesus, The Lords Prayer, and more. The performance is free. Visit fsof.orgJan. 21 at 7 p.m. The Orlando Ballet Uncorked The second in-formance of Orlando Ballets popular behindthe-scenes look at the creative process is an up close and per sonal visit with Artistic Director Robert Hill and his company of dancers. This is our chance to learn how the Choreographer converts creative concepts into choreography. At The Abbey in Downtown Orlando, $30 gets you in the door and puts a glass of wine in your hand... Call 407-704-6261Jan. 22 to March 9 The Life & Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby Parts I and II In the Florida theater-event-ofthe-season, a cast of 27 actors will play over 150 characters in this unique, two-part, dramatic and comic masterpiece that captures the genius of Charles Dickens. Combining outrageous characters with theatrical spectacle, The Life & Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby Parts I and II won both the Tony Award and The Olivier Award for Play of the Year. Nick lebys adventures lead the way to a must-see theatrical event for Florida audiences. Visit Orlandoshakes.org or call 407-447-1700 Jan. 23 The Winter Park Institute at Rollins College In a series of talks offered free to the Public, the Winter Park Institute at Rollins College will begin its 2014 season with Sharon Robinson, daughter of major league baseball player Jackie Robinson. On Jan. 23 at 7 p.m., Ms. Robinson will discuss her fathers legacy, highlighting his nowlegendary values in sports and in life. Over the years, the Institute has brought renowned speakers, poets and Pulitzer Prize winning authors to Florida. This seasons featured speakers include former Florida Governor Jeb Bush and Filmmaker Ken Burns. Events are free and open to the public. Call 407-691-1995 or visit winterparkinstitute.orgJan. 23 to Feb. 23 The Magical Adventures of Merlin at Orlando RepertoryThe Magical Adventures of Merlin, to be presented from Jan. 23 to Feb. 23 at the Orlando Rep is an imagined tale about how young Merlin meets young, soon-to-be King Arthur in mythical, ancient England. Young Merlin faces serious life-choices before becoming the greatest wizard in the land as surprises abound in this musical adventure for the whole family. Call 407-896-7365 or visit orlandorep.com Jan. 24 and 25 The 90th Birthday of the Orlando Museum of Art The Orlando Museum of Art is celebrating 90 Years in Orlando, and the Opening of the Museums 90th birthday celebration will be very special as it features Gainsborough and the Golden Age of Painting in Europe from the Speed Art Museum. Between 1600 and 1800 (the years in which these paintings were produced), popular subjects included portraits, religious paintings, landscapes, still-lifes, and classi cal antiquity that illustrated the people and objects that made the two centuries a rich cultural age. An opening reception will be held on Jan. 24 at 6 p.m. The exhibit opens to the public on Jan. 25 at 10 a.m. Call 407-896-4231 or visit omart.orgJan. 24 to 26 The Wizarding World of Harry Potter at Universal Studios Enter a world where magic is real on the weekend of Jan. 24 as the world descends on Orlando. Universal Studios will celebrate the adventures of Harry Potter at The Wizarding World of Harry Potter in three days of fun set against the backdrop of two amazing theme parks. It will feature Q&A sessions with cast members, a wand master-class, a Hogwarts castle. Stock up on wizard supplies at the shops of Hogsmeade, and experience pulse-pounding rides in a world of magical excitement. Visit universalorlando.comJan. 24 to Feb. 15 Breakin Up Is Hard To Do at the Winter Park Playhouse Set in a 1960s Catskills resort, Breakin Up Is Hard To Do is a musical comedy about two friends in search of romance over one wild and crazy Labor Day weekend. The score features 18 Neil Sedaka classics including Where the Boys Are, Sweet Sixteen, Calendar Girl, and of course the chart-topping title song. Directed and choreographed by Roy Alan with musical direction by Christopher Leavy, the production features a cast of Playhouse favorites. Call 407-645-0145 or visit winterparkplayhouse.org. And looking ahead Nov. 6 The Dr. Phillips Center Sets ofcial opening dateIn my year-end wrap-up of 2013, I included the thrill of watching our new Performing Arts Center rise before our eyes. This week Center President Kathy Ramsberger announced the ribbon-cutting on the theater complex will be Nov. 6 with an Opening Night Gala the follow ing evening. The opening will include an open house and free performances in a celebration that will last for days, she said. The $514 million Center will begin performances in the 2,700seat Disney Hall with the musical Newsies. The 300-seat Alexis & Jim Pugh Theater will also open this fall with the third theater in the complex expected to be completed in 2018.CULTURE | The Orlando Museum of Art turns 90 years old this month, come out for its birthday celebration CONTINUED FROM PAGE 21 Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906. Tim Hendricks Joins Citizens Bank of Florida For additional information THE LIFE & ADVENTURES OF NICHOLAS NICKLEBY BREAKIN UP IS HARD TO DO This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORG @EnzianTheater Wednesday Night Pitcher Show: NEW JACK CITY Wed 7:30 SPECIAL PROGRAMS: FILMAGE: THE STORY OF THE DESCENDANTS/ALL CO-PRESENTED BY PARK AVE CDS Tues 9:30INSIDE LLEWYN DAVISDirected by Ethan Coen & Joel Coen Cast | Oscar Issac, Carey Mulligan, Justin Timberlake, John Goodman, Garrett Hedlund Fri & Sun 3:30, 6:30, 9:30 Sat 3:45, 6:30, 9:30 Mon, Wed, Thurs 6:30, 9:30Tues 6:30 Science on Screen: A.I. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE Preceded with a presentation by Dr. Kenneth Stanley of UCF on the present state of articial intelligence Sat 12PM

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