Winter Park-Maitland observer

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title:
Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication:
Winter Park FL
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates:
28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID:
UF00091444:00291


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WPMOBSERVER.COM Winter Park residents and business owners Steven and Su zanne Graffham breathed a sigh of relief Sunday afternoon as the historic chapel that houses their wedding business was success fully relocated to its new home. The historic building began its journey through the streets of Winter Park around 7 a.m., trav eling down New York Avenue on three hydraulic construction dollies it had been placed on the day before. Dozens of residents stopped to watch the spectacle as mov ers took the structure from its former site on New England Avenue to a corner parcel at the intersection of New York and Lyman avenues across from the USPS 00-6186 Publisher statement on page 4. VISIT WPMOBSERVER.COM SUBSCRIBE NOW! WHERE TO BUY NOT-SO-USUAL HOLIDAY GIFTS LIFESTYLES, 6 To build a re In case Central Floridas 10-degrees-above normal HOME MAGNIFIER, 10 Where are you going? Everybodys into the holiday spirit, and Josh Garrick has your guide for where to party. CULTURE, 15 COMMUNITY BULLETIN ............ 4 CALENDAR .................... 4 LIFESTYLES .................... 6 HOME MAGNIFIER .............. 10 CULTURE ..................... 15 OPINIONS .................... 17 CLASSIFIEDS .................. 18 A historic home took to the high ing to its new home at the south end of Lake Osceola in Winter Park. His toric preservation ists in Winter Park cheered from the shoreline at the Albin Polasek Mu seum and Sculp ture Garden as the citys 128-year-old Capen House ar rived by barge. Movers pulled house toward the shore of its old address on Inter lachen Avenue via tractor-trailer ing it onto a large barge Tuesday afternoon. Dozens of paddle boarders, kayakers and spectators on boats structure as it crossed the lake, cheering as it reached the shore of the Albin Polasek Museum grounds. put into words, said Debbie Komanski, executive director of the Albin Polasek Museum and Sculpture Garden. This has been a very concerted effort by a lot of people to make this happen in this short period of time. To see it actually coming through is both very emotional as well as extremely rewarding and inspiring for the future in what well be able to do with it. The houses journey across Lake Osceola resembled a parade on water. Komanski, Executive Director Betsy Owens of Casa Fe liz, and Executive Director Susan torical Association waved to resi Albin Polasek Museum. I think we really made his tory today, said Owens, who fundraising efforts. It was pretty exciting to be a part of it weve worked very hard to make today a reality. Its been six months since the historic home built in 1885 for early Winter Park settler John S. Capen faced the wrecking ball. Residents cried out for the protec tion of the house after property owners John and Betsy Pokorny planned to demolish it to make way for a new lakefront home. But the Pokornys agreed to PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Preservation Capen organizers wave from their house boat as it oats across Lake Osceola Tuesday. Capen House sets sail for new home TIM FREED Observer staff Please see CAPEN on page 2 Maitland is greening up its public works department next year, with the City Council vot ing to add an electric hybrid The 2013 Volt will be the citys tive energy sources. Public Works Director Rick Lemke said the $35,895 electricoperated vehicle will save the city roughly $14,000 in gas and maintenance over its estimated 10-year life span. It gives us the opportunity to enter the green world, Lemke said, adding that this purchase opens the door to the city adding additional electric vehicles in the future, if the Volt is found to per form well. At the Councils urging, Lemke sought out bids from local Chevrolet dealers and received the lowest bid from Starling Chevrolet in Kissimmee, which offered the city a purchase price $4,000 below originally budgeted estimates. This is a win-win situation where we can do the right thing environmentally, and the right thing by the citys pocket book by saving us lot of money, said Councilman John Lowndes, a Maitland goes electric, adds Chevy Volt to eet SARAH WILSON Observer staff Wedding chapel gets hitched Seventy-year-old former church hits the road to avoid wrecking ball TIM FREED Observer staff Please see CHAPEL on page 2 407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC Winter Park Recovery CenterExecutive Drug & Alcohol Treatment Protocols 20 and 40-Week Outpatient Programs Suboxone/Subutex For Opioid Abuse Privacy and Confidentiality AssuredMedically Managed Dual Diagnosis Evidenced Based Programs2056 Aloma Ave, Suite 100, Winter Park, FL 32792 www.WinterParkRecoveryCenter.com 407-629-0413 PHOTO BY TIM FREED THE OBSERVER The Winter Park Wedding Chapel rolls to its new plot after being uprooted Sunday. Please see ELECTRIC on page 2 128-year-old Polasek Museum

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Page 2 | Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer CHAPEL | Relocation spares venue from destruction CAPEN | Barge operation took more than 6 hours farmers market. The relocation meant a new beginning for the Graffhams and their wedding busi ness, which was forced to move along with the chapel to make way for future devel opment along New England Avenue. Were really relieved to see it in one piece at its new home, Suzanne said. Were very excited for the future. But the chapel hasnt tied the knot with its new location quite yet. The new base ment for the building still needs to be constructed, along with the surround ing walls and minor repairs from the moving process. Movers took a topdown approach with con structing the new foun dation, carefully steering the chapel on wheels down a slope into an 8.5-foot-deep hole and raising it 11 feet high to make room for the basement to be built underneath. The Graffhams couldnt help but feel uneasy as their 103-ton business venture slowly rolled down a sandy slope. Watching it happen, even though were not responsible for actually moving it, is very nerve-racking, Steven said as the house began its short descent toward its new foundation. I havent felt like this since my wife had a baby. The move wouldnt have been possible without the support of Traditional Neigh ted to enriching Hannibal Square thats now spearheading a fundraising effort for the construction. Itll cost just over $160,000 to complete the project, including the relocation, set ting the foundation and restoration. Traditional Neighborhoods Inc. has raised about $18,000 thus far and will continue to accept donations on its website as construction moves forward, said Dan nization and the general contractor for the chapel relocation. Moving day had been a long time com ing for the Graffhams. The building should have been destroyed to make way for new development years ago, but property own ers allowed the couple to use the space for a photography studio and, eventually, a wedding chapel. The couple were assured that the building would be eventually demolished. But the cha pel went on to marry hundreds of couples since the wedding business began in 2009, turning the building into a community staple. The property owners took notice and chose to donate the chapel to the couple instead to have it relocated. Bellows plans to make the wedding chapel even more charming than before with the addition of a new courtyard, a fountain, a slated roof and bronze trim mings on the exterior. The fact that its going ahead means we can move forward; we can have many more weddings there, Steven said. It gives us stability in our business and our future. A $50 fundraising event with hors doeuvres, cocktails and live entertainment for the Winter Park Wedding Chapel will take place tonight, Dec. 12, from 7 to 9 p.m. between Hannibals and Armandos off New England Avenue. Bellows said he hopes to have construc tion complete by mid-February. house a new home. The Albin Polasek Mu seum and Sculpture Garden stepped for ward, proposing a plan to move the house to the museum grounds so it could be used for program space. The Pokornys gave the community until the end of 2013 to raise at least $400,000 and move the house a goal thats now halfway to becoming a reality. I couldnt be more pleased with how its gone today, said Frank Roark, the gen eral contractor for the project. Theres been a lot of uncertainty and challenges with this thing. To get it to this milestone was a big deal for us. But the Capen House isnt home free just yet. Movers are now in the process of half of the home 180 degrees so that the back faces Lake Osceola, while another group of movers prepares the second half for place ment on the barge. The second half of Dec. 21, meeting the Dec. 31 deadline, Ko manski said. The museum still needs to raise between $120,000 and $130,000 to pay for the reas sembling and furnishing of the historic home. Komanski said its now up to Winter Park residents and historic preservationists to give new life to the Capen House. Many, many people came together in order to get this to this point, she said. I feel the majority of the citizens in our town feel strongly about preserving our history here in Winter Park and helping it cohabi tate with things we need for the future. C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE Come ska te at the holiday ice rink in Central Park West Meadow!November 15, 2013 thruJanuary 5,2014Monday thru Thursday > 3 p.m. 9 p.m. Friday > 3 p.m. 10 p.m. Saturday > 10 a.m. 10 p.m. Sunday > Noon 8 p.m.see website for extended school holiday hoursAll day general admission $10(includes skates)407-599-3203 >cityofwinterpark.org/WITP WINTER PARK in the special thanks to our sponsors rfrfntb at Winter Park Towers Your room is waiting for you if you need Pain and Symptom Management Hospital Follow-up Complex Treatments, or Crisis Care Referrals 866-742-6655#5019096 www.cornerstonehospice.org www.SeriousIllness.org/cornerstoneMedicare, Medicaid, most commercial insurances accepted The fact that its going ahead means we can move forward; we can have many more weddings there. PHOTO BY TIM FREED THE OBSERVER The Capen House, decked out in a Christmas wreath, heads to its new home. ELECTRIC | Car expected to save Maitland money proudly proclaimed longtime driver of a Toyota Prius hybrid. Councilman Ivan Valdez said he was still hesitant to declare electric cars a real win looking toward the future, but applauded city staff for their continued forwardthinking. After a vote to purchase the car was tabled at Valdes suggestion for more discussion in October, the Council plugged in a unanimous vote to approve the cars purchase Nov. 25. Since that meeting, the Public Works de partment said the vehicle has been ordered, and can be expected to hit city streets in four to six weeks. This is not a risk; its a deal thats going to save us a lot of money, Lowndes said. Every time you drive past a gas station, just smile and wave. C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013 | Page 3 We are large enough to give you what you want and small enough to provide it the way you want it. To learn more, please visit any of our banking centers from Orlando to Miami or call us at 1-800-435-8839.13-0089/rev090113 citynational.com Member FDIC Personal Relationships | Local Decisions | StabilityREDEFINING BANKING. 1115-8 CNwinterPrk.indd 1 11/20/13 9:40 AM Maitland City Talk BY HOWARD SCHIEFERDECKER MAYOR The Maitland City Council met on Monday, Dec. 9, at 6:30 p.m. in the City Hall Council Chambers. Below is a synopsis of that meet ing. Old Business: source Ordinance: The City Man ager stated that there was noth ing new to report at this time and that we should receive an update sometime in January. Public Hearings: There were no scheduled Public Hearings. Consent Items: Minutes of Nov. 25, 2013 were ap proved. Commission Meeting Minutes of Oct. 17, 2013 were accepted. Easement Agreement with Up town Maitland Partners, LTD. was approved. Tahoe Vehicle in the amount of was approved. Dec. 23, 2013 was canceled. Decision Items: tract with Keith and Schnars, P.A. as the Select Mobility Fee Consul tant in the amount of $45,335. workshop be scheduled to dis cuss the options for the Thurston House Lease Renewal. the Summit Centre Way Row was approved. Interpretation of Separation Re quirements. After discussion, an amendment to the Chicken Keep ing Ordinance will be presented Council Meeting. Discussion Item: of Conduct Committee discussed the ordinance that was drafted by Committee and answered ques tions posed by Council. Various members of the Committee ad dressed the draft ordinance. To listen to a recording of the meeting, please check our website at itsmymaitland.com Keeping up conduct Orlando s Only Doggie Daycare with a Gym! Orlando s Only Doggie Daycare with a Gym! Customized work outs Training Indoor warm water swimming 2826 Shader Rd. Orlando, 32808 407-295-3888 BarkingDogFitness.co m Ask abou t ou r FREE trial policy! Give Your Dog the Gift of Health. Sign up BEFORE year end and receive 10% o for LIFE and a FREE swim or massage! Fact A lean dog lives an average 2 years longer than an overweight dog AN D is healthier and happ ier!

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Page 4 | Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013 PHONE: 407-563-7000 FAX: 407-563-7099 WPMOBSERVER.COM PUBLISHER Tracy Craft 407.515.2605 TCraft@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MANAGING EDITOR Isaac Babcock 407.563.7023 IBabcock@TurnstileMediaGroup.com ASSOCIATE EDITOR Sarah Wilson 407.563.7026 SWilson@TurnstileMediaGroup.com DESIGNER Tom Miller 407.563.7032 TMiller@TurnstileMediaGroup.com STAFF WRITERS Brittni Larson Megan Stokes Tim Freed Allison Olcsvay Kristy Vickery COLUMNISTS Chris Jepson Jepson@MediAmerica.us Louis Roney LRoney@cfl.rr.com Josh Garrick JoshGarrick9@gmail.com ADVERTISING SALES Linda Stern 407.376.2434 LStern@TurnstileMediaGroup.com LEGAL NOTICE ADVERTISING Ashley McBride 407.286.0807 Legal@FLALegals.com SUBSCRIPTIONS/CIRCULATION Luana Baez 407.563.7013 LBaez@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MEMBER OF: -Florida Press Association -Winter Park/Maitland/Goldenrod Chambers of Commerce Winter Park/Maitland Observer is published by Turnstile Media Group. Founded in 1990 and headquartered in Orlando, Fla., Turnstile Media Group is also the parent of Golfweek, Golfweek Custom Media, TurfNet, Professional Artist, Seminole Voice, Baldwin Park Living and Turnstile Connect. TURNSTILE MEDIA GROUP CHAIRMAN Rance Crain PRESIDENT/CEO Francis X. Farrell VICE PRESIDENTS Patti Green & Jeff Babineau USPS #00-6186 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Winter Park / Maitland Observer 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835 Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster DEC. 12-13 Orlando Circle of Friends is rehearsing and polishing for our audiences a fun and entertaining collection of many holiday favorites at An Ugly Sweater Christmas at Orlando Museum of Art. Well take a Sleigh Ride as we Let It Snow then well have Chestnuts Roasting on an Open Fire. Join us for some rollicking fun, or have a Blue Christmas with out us! Tickets are available for $20 for shows at 8 p.m. Friday, Dec. 13, and 3:30 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 14. Student/se nior/child rate is $15. As always, a portion of the proceeds of our concerts benets a charity. Visit our website at ocofchorus. com for more information and to pur chase tickets. DEC. 12-14 Join the Winter Park High School drama department at their production of Al most, Maine. A charming romantic comedy about love, loss, and the north ern lights, Almost, Maine is full of warm fuzzies in the midst of winter. Almost, Maine plays at 7 p.m. on Dec. 12-14 at the Winter Park 9th Grade Auditorium. There is a special matinee performance at 2 p.m. on Dec. 14. Tickets are $10 at the door. Written in 2004, this play is set in the small territory of Almost, Maine. It follows 19 residents as they attempt to make sense of love and loss. These sundry peo ple overcome their fear of the unknown, accept each other for who they are, and rediscover lost hope, all in the midst of a cold Maine winter. Call 407-622-3200 for tickets. DEC. 15 Come enjoy Winter Dreams, the holi day sounds of the Maitland Symphony Orchestra at 7:30 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 15, at the Maitland Presbyterian Church, 341 N. Orlando Ave. The concert is free. For information, call 321-303-1404. A Christmas musical presentation at Winter Park Presbyterian Church will lift your holiday spirits at 10:30 a.m. Dec. 15. Enjoy a special harpist-accompanied musical presentation, The Ceremony of the Carols at Winter Park Presbyterian Church, 400 S. Lakemont Ave. Call 407647-1467 or visit winppc.org for more information. DEC. 19-22 The Winter Park Presbyterian Churchs holiday schedule will again feature the Longest Night, which is a worship ser vice of remembrance, and its 45th annual Living Nativity. The Longest Night service, scheduled for Sunday, Dec. 22, at 7 p.m., provides a time of quiet reection, spe cial music, healing prayer, and candle light for those experiencing loneliness and loss because of the death of a loved one, relationship problems, job insecuri ties, health concerns, or weariness from holiday preparations. All are welcome. Show times for the Living Nativity are 7, 7:30, 8, and 8:30 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 19, and Friday, Dec. 20. The Living Nativity, a tradition of the telling of the Christmas story, features a storyteller, carols and live animals. DEC. 22 Please join Winter Park Presbyterian Church at 10:30 a.m. on Sunday, Dec. 22, for a lessons and carols service with congregational participation in singing of classic Christmas carols at 400 S. Lakemont Ave. Call 407-647-1467 or visit winppc.org for more information. ONGOING The Emil Buehler Perpetual Trust Plan etarium at Seminole State College offers Central Florida the chance to celebrate the holidays with multiple performances of its most popular show. The Planetar ium will present The Star of Bethle hem two showings each on Dec. 13, Dec. 20 and Dec. 21. Show times for each date are 7 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. The Star of Bethlehem looks at how the calendar system has changed over the millennia and examines clues from the Bible to pin down the birth year of Jesus under our current calendar. The origins of the Magi are then looked at to determine what ce lestial phenomena they would have most likely interpreted to be the Star. Now through Sunday, Jan. 5, the city of Winter Park is bundling up once again for Winter in the Park, the citys annual holiday ice skating rink in Central Park West Meadow. The West Meadow is locat ed at 150 N. New York Ave., on the corner of New York Avenue and Morse Boulevard, in downtown Winter Park. Snowakes of all ages and skill levels are invited to chill out as they glide, spin and turn at Winter in the Park: Monday through Thursday, 3 to 9 p.m.; Friday, 3 to 10 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday, noon to 8 p.m. See website for extended school holiday hours. Snow angels are invited to skate all day for only $10 per skater (skate rental in cluded). For a blizzard of 20 or more peo ple, some cool group discounts are avail able for all this frigid fun. The rink is also available for rental opportunities. Advance reservations are required for pri vate party and group reservations to avoid an icy avalanche of skaters at the rink. Holiday music, games, carolers and so much more will urry around you as you enjoy Winter in the Park. For more infor mation, please call 407-599-3203 or visit cityofwinterpark.org/WITP. If you are interested in showcasing your business during the busy holiday season to the 30,000-plus expected rink attend ees, please visit the website and click on the SPONSOR tab for information on how to become an ice rink dasher board sponsor. Take a stroll down memory lane as the Winter Park Playhouse pays tribute to two of Americas most well-loved composers of all time, George and Ira Gershwin! This high-energy song and dance celebra tion will put a smile on your face and a song in your heart! Featuring a collection of Gershwin favorites, including Em braceable You, Ive Got a Crush on You, I Got Rhythm, Someone to Watch Over Me, and SWonderful! Who could ask for anything more? Its through Dec. 14. Its all conceived by Roy Alan with the nar rative by Todd Allen Long and musical ar rangements by Christopher Leavy. FAMILY CALENDAR Member of: Christmas Celebra tions Winter Park Presbyter ian Church 400 S. Lakemon t Avenue 407-647-1467 www.winppc.org Living NativityThursday & Friday, December 19 & 20, 7:00-9:00pm on the half hour Join us for the Living Nativity, Christmas music, a beautiful candlelit sanctuary, a miniature village, cookies, and photos taken at the manger Christmas Musical Presentations Sunday, December 15 at 10:30am Enjoy a special harpist-accompanied musical presentation, The Ceremony of the Carols Sunday, December 22 at 10:30am Lessons and Carols service with congregational participation in singing of classic Christmas carols Christmas Eve Services Tuesday, December 24 at 5:00pm Family Christmas Service Tuesday, December 24 at 7:00pm Candlelight Serv ice Tuesday, December 24 at 11:00pm Candlelight Com munion Service Letters to Santa contest Hey kids, write your letters to Santa and you could win a prize package including tickets for ice-skating! The theme for the Winter Park-Maitland Observers Let ters to Santa contest this year is The gift I most want to give is and write what youd do if you could be Santa Claus to the world. Letters to Santa contest entries are to be no longer than one page, and weve extended our deadline to Dec. 16. Send emails to ibabcock@turnstileme diagroup.com or physical mail to Santa Claus, 1500 Park Center Drive, Orlando FL 32835. Include the authors name, phone number, address and email. Good luck! The contest sponsored by the Observer, city of Winter Park, Winter Park Chamber of Commerce, Maitland Public Library and Winter Park Public Library. Community Bulletin

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013 | Page 5 Winter Park City Talk BY RANDY KNIGHT CITY MANAGER Dec. 9 City Commission highlights There was a City Commission meeting held Dec. 9 in City Hall Commission Chambers. Below are a few highlights of decisions made at the meeting: Mayors Report Commerce gave a summary pre sentation regarding the tremen dous success of Feed the Need, wide fundraiser for Second Har vest Food Bank of Central Florida. More than $96,000 was raised in this fundraising campaign to help end hunger in Central Florida. Congratulations and thanks to ev eryone who helped support this worthy cause. nized as the featured artist in the citys current Art in Chambers exhibit. Non-Action Items garding downtown parking. Rec ommendations will be brought to the Commission in January 2014. Consent Agenda were approved (for a complete listing, please visit cityofwinter appropriate $25,000 for street pav ing materials was approved. to the Native Load Firm Fixed Capacity and Partial Require between city of Winter Park and dated Aug. 12, 2013, was ap proved. Action Items Requiring Discussion advertisements of two parcels of land located at 300 N. Penn sylvania Ave. and 321 Hannibal Square West located within the CRA district for possible devel opment options were approved with an amendment to the 300 N. Pennsylvania Ave. property for Board to look at this property for potential a potential park. Public Hearings ton LLC: to divide the property at 1280 Ar lots was approved. ordinance to amend Chapter 58, Land Development Code, Ar ticle I Comprehensive Plan Fu ture Land Use Map so as to estab lish Commercial Future Land Use on the annexed property at 656 Overspin Drive and to indicate the annexation of this property on the other maps within the Com prehensive Plan was approved. ordinance to amend Chapter 58, Land Development Code, Ar annexed property at 656 Overspin Drive was approved. ordinance to vacate and abandon a portion of Gaines Way, lying be tween 610 and 1760 Gaines Way, but retaining and reserving to the city a utility easement over the entire area thereof, was approved. A full copy of the Dec. 9 City Commission minutes will be available at cityofwinterpark.org the week of Jan. 13, pending ap proval by the City Commission. More public parking available The city of Winter Park has opened up new public parking spaces just west of City Hall on Lyman Avenue. This lot was pre viously designated for City Hall employee parking only. Howev er, due to the busy holiday season parking during this time, the city has repurposed those spaces to three-hour public parking. New AED locator network Winter Park Fire-Rescue an nounces the addition of a new information system intended to assist 9-1-1 dispatchers by helping them locate life-saving automated available near victims of sudden cardiac arrest. Sudden cardiac arrest is re sponsible for more than 300,000 deaths in the United States each year. Compact and portable, an AED is designed to be used by laypeople, with little or no train ing, to deliver a shock designed to save the victims life before para medics arrive. The problem is that, until now, publicly available AEDs are rarely used in an emergency be cause people are unaware of their location, and 9-1-1 dispatchers are unable to provide the location of the nearest AED to the respond er, said, Winter Park Fire Chief Jim White. The new AED locator system lets us instantly see the lo cation of all the registered AEDs that are near a victim of a sud den cardiac arrest so we can alert someone to get the device in time to help save their life. To encourage the registration of all AED devices, the city of Win ter Park will reach out to owners restaurants, gyms, recreational venues, churches and other loca tions where AEDs may be avail able. AED owners are encouraged to visit NationalAEDRegistry. com to register their AEDs at no cost. The new system from Atrus, called AED Link, shows the lo cation of all registered AEDs on electronic maps. Dispatchers can then direct callers to a nearby de vice before paramedics arrive. Having the Atrus system in place throughout the area in creases the effectiveness of every registered AED. Winter Park joins Orange County in encouraging all AED owners to register their devices as soon as possible, mak ing them accessible in an emer gency. The system is offered to the community through the Orange County Department of Emergen cy Management and will go live in Winter Park on Dec. 16. The only cool place in town! It cant be December its way freezing temperatures in Win ter Parks holiday ice rink. Now through Sunday, Jan. 5, you can skate at the citys coolest event of the year Winter in the Park, the citys annual holiday ice skating rink in Central Park West Mead ow. The West Meadow is located at 150 N. New York Ave., found at the corner of New York Avenue and Morse Boulevard in down all ages and skill levels are invited to chill out as they glide, spin and turn at Winter in the Park: 3 to 9 p.m. See website for extended school holiday hours. For more information, please call 407-599-3203 or visit cityof at cityofwinterpark.org, like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and watch us on Vimeo. Saving more lives Second Harvest Food Bank is working to feed hope. Each week, an average of 55,000 people kids, seniors, working families, homeless and others rely on us for help getting food. And though we provided more than 39 million pounds of food this year alone, it simply wasnt enough. Because until no one is hungry, we still have work to do. Our neighbors throughout Central Florida continue to need your caring and your help. Remember: A dollar invested in hope can provide up to $9 in groceries.Make a difference. Donate today. www.FeedHopeNow.org 407.295.1066Member of Feeding America FEED HOPE NOW SHF145_WPObserver_5x8.indd 1 10/28/13 11:18 AM

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Page 6 | Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Lifestyles Christmas trees sparkle, glim mer and glow, draped in different themes pulling the eye in to a hol iday kaleidoscope of gifts handpicked for customers from around the world. But the items found here are not just holi day themed, they come and go with the seasons, as quick as one season ends and another be gins, so does the dcor at the newly opened Winter Park Lafayette and Rushford home store. We approach home dcor and gift giving in a creative and unexpect ed way; we have an out side of the box approach to things that we all owner Kristen Painter said. We try to offer something unique and more interesting than you would people to come in and see some thing new that theyve never seen thats fresh and inspires them. Want to wash your hands with grapefruit and sugar? Theres a soap for that. Dont have a Christ mas garden gnome yet? Theyve got that. Hand-beaten metal bowl with a crab guarding the rim? They have that too. Painter said she travels to mar kets across the U.S. and handpicks every product for her home store. For the size of the store that we are, we have far more manu factures that we work with than most stores, Painter said. Most stores will have a dozen, may be two dozen manufactures that they order from, we have well into the hundreds; so were always adding something new. Lafayette and Rushford cus tomer and Winter Park resident Carolyn Bethel said the new home PHOTOS BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVER Christmas cheer is everywhere at Hannibal Squares newset shop. Manager Chris Scott and sales associate Kim Whittaker help shoppers nd the best gifts for all occasions at Lafayette & Rushford. Lafayette & Rushford rushes W.P. KRISTY VICKERY Observer Staff Please see GIFTS on next page rfnftbf D ecember 19th-22ndBob Carr Performing Arts Centre ORLANDO PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA BOOK YOUR SEA TS T ODAY !407-426-1739O RLA N D OBA LLET.ORG rffttb f* Price does not include tickets to The Nutcracker performance. photocarlos amoedo | focustudios.com Pizza & more ... rfntb rf ntbfCannot be combined with any other coupon or offer. Expires 1/1/14.ntnfrnfrr Located at the 20-20 Super Center Plaza near the corner of SR 436 and Howell Branch Rd. btbCannot be combined with any other coupon or offer. Expires 1/1/14. Savannah Court and Cove Excellence in Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation 1301 W. Maitland Blvd. Maitland, FL 32751407-645-3990www.SavannahCourtMaitland.comAssisted Living Facility License No. 8447 Skilled Nursing Facility License No. 1635096 Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above. You are always welcome!A Senior Living Community where Hospitality is a Way of Life.

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013 | Page 7 ter Park. theres nothing like it, Bethel said. I do a lot of shopping and I think all of their things are uniquethe store stands apart. The family-owned business has had a store in Dunedin for more than 10 years, and decided it was time for a second store. With much research to the Central Florida area they decided Hannibal Square was the on Nov. 16. The people of Winter Park really just came out and showed tremendous support and far exceeded any expec tations, Painter said. People really like to support the independently owned businesses. Weve been just weve gotten thus far, and taken back by how kind everyone has been. She said that their grand opening was elbow-to-elbow with people, not only shopping, but just coming out to show support. Its really a community here; ev eryone is so wonderfully supportive here, Christopher Scott said. It feels like here in Hannibal Square we are all a fam ily. Lafayette and Rushford Sales Associate Kim Whittaker said the Hannibal Square community has welcomed the new home store with open arms. There are so many neighbors that are upscale and people just dont reach out but not here, Whittaker said. We want to see everyone succeed, and anything we can do for each other is just going to make it a better community. Lafayette and Rushford know Winter Park was the right choice for them and couldnt be happier with their decision to open here. waiting for us here, Painter said. It feels like weve already been here forever, theres an intangible quaintness to this area. A Free Concert Sponsored by:Maitland Presbyterian Church 341 N. Orlando Avenue Maitland, FLDecember 15, 2013 7:30 p.m.Call 321-303-1404 $2 OFF Any Sub, Chip and Large Drink purchase. Visit our tasty new Winter Park restaurant location at: 528 S. Park Avenue 407.960.7827 By Rollins College Park Avenue near Fairbanks. 2010 Firehouse Subs. This offer valid with coupon at participating restaurants. Prices and participation may vary, see restaurant for details. Limit one per customer, per visit. Not valid with any other offers. Exp. 3/31/14. Theres a new Firehouse Subs right here on Park Avenue in Winter Park. Get ready for steamin hot subs piled high with top notch meats and cheeses. ( WERE OPEN )Stop, Drop, And Roll On In. Visit FirehouseSubs.com to order online and find your nearest location. GIFTS | From handmade Santas to eclectic ornaments, Winter Parks newest shop is prepped for the season C ONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE

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Page 8 | Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer rffrntbrbtrbrtr rr btr r r r nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr Family Fun Event sponsored by Family Fun Event sponsored by One Senior Place ... See our full Calendar of Events at OneSeniorPlace.com407.949.6733715 Douglas Avenue Altamonte Springs, FL 32714M-F 8:30am 5pmSENIOR CLUB SPONSORED BY FAMILY PHYSICIANS GROUP EVERY MONDAY, 10AM 12PM December 16th Movie Day December 23rd Casino Day December 30th Bingo MONDAY, DECEMBER 16 The Real Estate Specialists are IN! Also: 23rd & 30th (10am-1pm) Presented by EXIT Real Estate Results By Appointment Only 407.949.6714 TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17 Health Care Reform 3pm-4:30pm By Florida Blue-McBride Insurance Agency RSVP 407.230.7825 WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 18 Are your Hearing Aids in the Drawer? 3pm-4:30pm Presented by Harmony Hearing Centers of America RSVP 407.949.6737 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 19 The Real Estate Specialists are IN! 9am-12pm By EXIT Real Estate Results We will be closed on Wednesday, December 25th. Happy Holiday!Calendar of Events December 2013 After struggling in the wake of defensive player injuries that took a toll but never knocked them off their eight-game win streak, the Knights will have more than 20 days to rest before the biggest game in team history. And after Sunday nights announcement they know theyre heading to Glendale, Ariz., to face Baylor in the Tostitos Fiesta Bowl. But until this weekend the Knights thought theyd be head ing to the Sugar Bowl in New Or ule was set into motion Friday night, when unranked Bowling Green upset the Northern Illinois Huskies, who were No. 14 in the BCS Standings at the time, with a 47-27 rout. That loss put UCF in position to play in NIUs place, a presumptive slot in the Fiesta Bowl. After UCFs win over SMU in Dallas on Saturday night, their fate was all but sealed. Ten years after head coach George OLeary took the helm of the UCF Knights football team, in their best season ever en route to their biggest bowl game. The NCAAs top offense awaits Knights ISAAC BABCOCK Observer staff Please see KNIGHTS on next page PHOTOS BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVER Christmas arrived early in Winter Park thanks to the Morse Museums annual event on Dec. 5. Christmas in the Park

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013 | Page 9 e Mayf lower. Smart. Secure. And Spectacular. Imagine a time in your life when you have the freedom to do exactly as you please. Relax ...revitalize ...reinvent ...renew. And, then imagine a place where you can do all that on your terms and still have the complete peace of mind that comes only with the guarantee of comprehensive continuing care. That place ...is The Mayower the gold standard for retirement communities in Central Florida. Here, you have the freedom and exibility to customize your home and your retirement lifestyle to make them uniquely yours. And while youre doing that, youll also have the guarantee of pre-funded long-term care in our 5-Star rated Health Center. Thats what prompted residents like Father Bob and Sallie Phillips to plan ahead and proactively make the move ...because they wanted to, not because they needed to. How about you?Whats your plan for the future? Call today, and lets talk about it: 407 .672 1620. 8 8 1 4 1 P R AD WPO 12/2013 Winter Pa rk's Distinctive R etir ement Community www.themayf lower .com 1620 Mayower Court Winter Park, FL 32792 A WORRY FREE LI F ESTY L E PL US GU A R A NTEED LON G TERM CA RE [ now peace of mind ] MAY 994 Phillips Ad_WPO.indd 1 10/30/13 2:11 PM rffrfnColleen D. Kennon, Owner tbbf b KEEP UP WITH MAITLAND NEWS AND EVENTS!www.IndependenceLane.com Facebook.com/ItsMyMaitland KNIGHTS | After another heart-attack victory to close out the season, UCFs biggest challenge awaits interesting, but controlled their destiny all the way to the closing against SMU Saturday. They hung in there and made some good adjustments at halftime, Head Coach George OLeary told UCFKnights.com after the game. We came out in the no-huddle and Blake did an outstanding job of controlling the ball. UCF had struggled against the bitter cold all game, which had been in the 20s on account of a morning kickoff in Central Time. The Knights dropped passes, in the frigid weather in Dallas, where snow ringed the edges of Blake Bortles found the end zone himself in the deciding score, rac ing to the left sideline and cruising past the pylon to put the Knights up for good. Bortles would throw for 242 yards to lead the Knights to victory. After barely cracking doublethe Knights would go on to rack up 338 yards in the game after accelerating their offense in the second half. They would outgun the Mustangs offense, which had 313 yards, most of them on the ground. Where UCF led substan versus SMUs 15. For the better half of the fourth quarter the Knights were in con trol, shutting down the Mustangs defense and driving down the trouble on receptions and runs. UCF receiver Rannell Hall had crucial catches all game to ad vance the offense, and the UCF defense found ways to stop the SMU offense in the second half after giving a concussion to SMU quarterback Neal Burcham in the fourth quarter. Hall would catch 44 yards of receptions. Wide re ceiver Jeff Godfrey led the team in reception yardage with 62 yards. The Knights had trouble early on after letting the Mustangs score it to 3-0. The Knights wouldnt catch up to the Mustangs until after the half, overtaking them in the fourth quarter and holding on for the win. Thanks to the win, which set a sweep of conference play in team ular season ranked No. 15 in the BCS Standings an all-time high. At 8:30 p.m. on New Years fense in NCAA Division 1 football this season. The Baylor Bears have gained an average of 624.5 total yards per game and 53.3 points per game, about 20 points more per game than the Knights. But the Bears have also been known to give up big plays, mak ing for high-scoring games for both teams. With the Knights for blowout performances against Akron, FIU, UConn and Rutgers, it could be an offensive slugfest. The game will be aired on ESPN. C ONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE ARCHIVE PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Knights fans have reason to cheer after learning the football team is Fiesta Bowl bound.

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Page 10 | Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer rfnrrt bnrr frrr trr nf nrrt nrr rtfrf nnrrn tnrr rrtbnrrr nnffnft nfn ft rnfnt fnrrffr ft nnf rt nt rt fnnrrtn rr nnt rfnn nnnrnn tnrnn rfnrrrtrn nfrn ntn ft rfntbf rfbnnf tn By Richard P. BryanJumbo Mortgages Are Alive and Well Almost every week you read the predictions of real estate experts on the state of the current home market and just what buyers and sellers can expect now and in the near future. Most experts see home prices climb ing by single digits over the next four years, while a number of real estate forecasters see prices plateau ing early in 2014 before picking up speed in the second and third quar ters. While national statistics ing in a given market, we have seen local existing home prices continue to climb over the past 24 months which has helped narrow the medi an price differential from the boom market days of 2005-2007. Real es tate experts and savvy homebuyers alike look at median price as the true barometer of housing market con ditions over a period of time. Me dian prices are much more accurate numbers to work with than average home prices which can be skewed by one or more million-dollar-plus residences or several lower priced homes. Historically, local residential real estate has appreciated about 4-6 percent annually. In fact, when we straight-line the appreciation of existing homes in Orange and Semi nole counties over the past 20 years were right on a 4 percent pace. At this writing there is a 4-month sup ply of existing homes which will hold prices steady or perhaps result in slightly higher prices depending on location. There also is the possi bility that we may see an onslaught of properties coming on the market in January and February which will increase inventory and keep prices steady. If, however, inventory drops below a 3-month supply existing home prices will probably increase. That said, the median price of existing homes locally is nowhere near what it was in the boom years of July 1, 2005 through June 30, 2007 when it stood at $249,000. The gap, however, has been narrowed from 56.2 percent in 2010 when the me dian price had dipped to $109,000, to 38.5 percent in the past 12 months when the median had risen to $153,000. There are a variety of rea sons, but location often has a great borhoods performing better than others when it comes to closing the median price gap. Our analysis showed the median price off from a low of 21.2 percent in Baldwin Park ing quicker, to a high of 43.7 percent covers both Orange and Seminole counties, where the price gap is cur rently the widest. Just as the median price of existing homes in Orange and Seminole counties is improving, so is home buyer optimism and that bodes well as we prepare to enter a new year. Scott Hillman is president of Fannie Hillman + Associates, a 32-year-old Winter Park-based real estate company specializing in residential real estate sales. He can be reached at (407) 644-1234 or scott@fanniehillman.com. Median home prices a true barometer of market WINDSONG BEAUTY DESIGNED BY WP ARCHITECT ROBERT MILLER CUSTOM BUILT WINDSONG ESTATE ON SECLUDED LOT SLEEK & CONTEMPOARY W/ DETACHED GUEST HOUSE IN SEVILLA ONE-OF-A-KIND MASTERPIECE PERFECT FOR AUTO LOVERS W/ 19 CAR GARAGE Voted Best Real Estate Agency by Winter Park/Maitland Observer Readers www.fanniehillman.com

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013 | Page 11 Stop by and open your account TODAY 1. Annual Percentage Yield (APY) is accurate as of 11/07/2013. Rate is subject to change at any time without prior notice. Fees may reduce earnings. Offer applies to new accounts only; Public Funds are not eligible. Account must be opened on or before December 31, 2013 to qualify. Minimum opening deposit of $10,000 (up to a maximum of $500,000) will earn .75% APY. Rate applies to the rst six (6) months from opening date. Afterwards the rate will revert to the standard rates in effect, which as of 11/07/2013 are: For Personal High Yield Money Market, balances of $0.00 $99,999.99 earns 0.05% APY; balances of $100,000.00 and above earns 0.30% APY and for Business Money Market, balances of $0.00$49,999.99 earns 0.05% APY; balances of $50,000.00 $99,999.99 earns 0.15% APY; and balances of $100,000.00 and above earns 0.30% APY. Maintain an average daily balance of $2,500 to avoid the $12.00 monthly maintenance fee. These Accounts are governed by Federal Regulation which limits the number of certain types of transactions; no more than six (6) transfers and withdrawals, or a combination of such to your other accounts or to a third party per month or statement cycle. Excessive transaction fee of $5.00 will be assessed for each transaction in excess of six (6) during a month. 851 1113 FloridaCommunityBank.com Florida based. Florida focused.1APY Money Market Get PowerfulSavings Growth! Limited 407.622.5000 407.909.1744 407.333.2246 407.814.0491 407.774.3000 321.453.5800 321.868.3580 851 1113-MMKT-WinterParkObserver-NA-FINAL.indd 1 11/8/13 3:24 PM rfntbfrfntbtf tbb bbbbfbbn bn ftbfbbtb fnb ffffbb bnbbftbf bb407.645.4321www.KellyPriceAndCompany.comn Jennifer King Dee Morgan Kelly L. Price Pamela Ryan Jennifer Sloan Audra Wilks PHOTOS BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVER The holiday season kicked off in Maitland, with the lighting of the tree at Lake Lily Park on Dec. 7. Maitlands Season of Light PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK AND SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVER Local news anchor Bob Opsahl told the story of Winter Parks Christmas tree and then hit the lights for the citys tree lighting on Dec. 7. Winter Park Tree Lighting WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com Order your classified ad online! At WPMObserver.com you can create, customize and pay for your ad in one convenient place!

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Page 12 | Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer 407-896-5520 John Penne9 year resident of Baldwin Park Orlando Top 100 Real Estate Agents Orlando Magazine 2011, 2012 & 2013AFFORDABLE REAL ESTATE COMMISSIONS31/2% Commission Realtors Full MLS ServiceEMAIL: pennybrokers@earthlink.net WEB: pennybrokersorlando.com COMPARE THE SAVINGSSALES PRICE 6% TRADITIONAL BROKER 3.5% PENNY BROKER SELLER SAVES 1% PENNY BROKERS SELLER SAVES$200,000. $12,000. $7,000. $5,000. $2,000. $10,000. $300,000. $18,000. $10,500. $7,500. $3,000. $15,000. $400,000. $24,000. $14,000. $10,000. $4,000. $20,000. $500,000. $30,000. $17,500. $12,500. $5,000. $25,000. $600,000. $36,000. $21,000. $15,000. $6,000. $30,000. $700,000. $42,000. $24,500. $17,500. $7,000. $35,000. $800,000. $48,000. $28,000. $20,000. $8,000. $40,000. $900,000. $54,000. $31,500. $22,500. $9,000. $45,000. $1,000,000. $60,000. $35,000. $25,000. $10,000. $50,000. WHEN SELLING YOUR HOME, THERE IS A DIFFERENCE Sold over 40 homes in Baldwin Park Thank you, Thank you, Thank you to all our friends, clients and customers who made 2013 a great year! 4094 MARKHAM PL Baldwin Park 3 Br+ Ofce $415,000 4097 WARDELL Baldwin Park 4/3 $530,000 5326 ARDSDALE LANE 3BR + 2025 COULSON ALLY $359,900 SOLD SOLD SOLD SOLDSEASONS BEST! Merry Christmas! Happy Hanakkah! Peace! Joy! Good tidings to all!Call 407-896-5520$439,900 BALDWIN PARK PRICE REDUCED Transitional design. 4BR/4BA + garage is in prestine condition & personies Baldwin Park Living at its nest! All new SS appliances, abundant 42 cherry cabinets, plantation shutters, tray ceilings, master bedroom w/California closet. Exterior screened porch w/ Walk to downtown, 2 blocks to Enders Park & Pool. TREASURE IN THE PARK LISA FLEMING Realtor Fannie Hillman + Associates (407) 644-1234 ext. 223 (321) 228-8341 cell www.fanniehillman.com lcfrealty@yahoo.comVoted Orlandos Best Residential Real Estate Oce Ranked a Top Producer since 2002Born and raised in the Winter Park/Maitland area DEDICATION. COMMUNICATION. NEGOTIATION.My skills will get you the results youre looking for. e real estate market is moving fast, thanks to low inventory and high buyer count, so contact me today to buy or sell your home quickly! Winter Parks Waterbridge Winter Parks Sevilla Orlandos Landcaster Park THE JERRY OLLER & SHIRLEY JONES TEAM Offering personalized service & attention to detail to every client. PENDING NEW LISTING SOLD Housing trends in 2014; Tight invento ry, rising inter est rates and home value gains Out with the old and in with the new! 2013 was a great year for many homeowners neigh borhoods and buyers alike as home values rose, interest rates remained affordable, and many communities in the greater-Orlan do area saw fewer vacant homes and foreclosures. Its been said that slow and steady wins the race, and 2014 is projected to con tinue the housing recovery this year began. Lets look at some of the expected trends for the New Year. Home values will continue West and South. Great news for Central Flo ridians here: According to the dence Index Survey, 3,000 Real tors were asked about expecta tions for home values in 2014. The Western and Southern regions were ranked highest with profes sionals predicting gains of 4 to 8 percent. This is great news for lo cal homeowners and it also echoes a poll taken earlier in the year by Realty Trac, which indicated that more than 8 million homeowners nationwide are estimated to be in positive equity situations on their primary home loans this year. Interest rates will rise, but thats not likely for a few months. Attention homebuyers on the proverbial fence! Buying before March may save you money on your monthly mortgage pay ments. As of print deadline, the Fed had not yet met for the last policy-making committee of the year. In this meeting the Fed will probably do one of two things, Rising home values to greet us in 2014 Christina Rordam Keepin it Real Estate Please see CHRISTINA on page 14 ARCHIVE PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER More sold signs and less inventory are expected for 2014, plus higher interest.

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013 | Page 13 INTEGRITY LOYALTY UNWAVERING ENTHUSIASM Jennifer SloanRealtor Sales Associate Lake Mary $1,175,000 5 BR | 4 BA | 4,784 SF Bonus Room Winter Park $1,295,000 4 BR | 4 BA | 3,654 SF Winter Park $699,000 3 BR | 3 BA | 2,746 SF Bonus Room SOLD SOLD SOLD c.407.810.8333 o.407.645.4321 H O U S E S W A N T E D ! G e t a F R E E N o O b l i g a o n C A S H O e r O n Y o u r H o u s e W i t h i n 2 4 H o u r s (8 5 5 ) 7 5 5 1 8 1 8 w w w C i r c l e 1 8 H o m e s c o m C A S H $ $ $ Q U I C K C L O S E A N Y P R I C E R A N G E A N Y C O N D I T I O N A N Y S I T U A T I O N Q: one before. Wed like to have a crackling throughout the winter, but so far I cant get one to light. I just get a lot of smoke in the Madison, Wis. A: it before, and there are some safety tips you need to follow as well. use. If it was inspected and cleaned when you moved in, youre good to go; but if it hasnt, or you dont know when it was last inspected, contact a chimney cleaning ser vice. is safe: move furniture, rugs, boxes, paper nearby, get one and place it in an accessible spot. of wood in various sizes, along with old and home improvement stores are expen a walk and collect an armful of fallen, dry twigs and small branches. With your fuel ready, its time to get and outward. Its probably the reason your Twist a half-sheet of newspaper into a one end. Hold the burning end a few inches underneath damper for about 30 seconds or until you see smoke from the burning pa the stack, but its important to make sure stacking four smallto medium-sized logs in a square or triangular pattern. Tuck an assortment of twigs, shredded newspaper and small branches between and under Carefully light the kindling, starting near the back of the log stack and working and branches. Properly seasoned logs should catch within a few minutes, but dont be disappointed if you have to repeat the process. protective screen is in place. Remember to until they are completely cold, and dispose from the house or garage. By Samantha Mazzotta Dodging the DraftQ: The apartment Im living in has older windows, and now that winter is almost here, the cold air is seeping in easily. My landlord said he winterized the windows by painting them shut. I dont think thats a solution. Any tips for me to quickly shut out the draft and get those windows open? Chilly Nose in Brattleboro, Vt.A: There are better solutions out there, for sure, than painting over drafty spots in the windows. And having windows that are stuck shut is a clear safety issue. Since your land lord isnt in a hurry to fix or replace those leaky windows, you have some options to get through this winter comfortably and without having to spend too much money on heating. First, unstick those windows. Use a box cutter to slice through the new paint down to the corners where the window sash meets the frame. Then gently wiggle the window open so the new paint isnt damaged or torn away. Once the window is open, make sure it slides open and shut smoothly. If not, look for paint or other gunk on the slide tracks in which the sash is set. Sand this stuff away and then smooth the tracks by running a bar of soap along them a few times. Next, see if the screen outside the window (if there is one) is part of a storm window-screen combination. If so, you can slide the screen up to sit behind the top pane of the storm window, and slide the bottom storm window down. This provides added protection against wind and weather. Now, youll need to weather-strip the window. Measure the width and height of each window to figure out how much weather stripping youll need. For a rental unit, you shouldnt invest in the most expensive weather stripping, either. Compressible strips, usually made of foam or another flexible material, with adhesive backing usually work well and are easy to install. Measure and cut the stripping to fit along the bottom of the window sash. Make sure it fits and that the window closes completely and can be locked before attaching it by its adhesive backing. You may need to weather-strip other parts of the window, depending on their type, age and the condition theyre in. Make sure the strips dont interfere with easy operation of the window. If you have a door that leads outside, try adding a piece of weather stripping along the base of the door to keep out drafts. Send your questions or home tips to ask@thisisahammer.com. My new ebook, Best Home Tips, is avail able to download on Amazon Kindle! Pick it up it today for just 99 cents. 2013 King Features Synd., Inc.To find drafty spots in a window, run a hair dryer along the sash and frame while a helper stands on the other side, feeling for warm air coming through.Backlogged Claims Actually Go DownDespite the projections that the number of backlogged claims with the Department of Veterans Affairs would climb during the recent government shutdown (so said Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric K. Shinseki), it wasnt as bad as expected. In a pre-shutdown reprieve, the VA was granted an exemption, and claims processing stayed up and running. However, during the shutdown, processors werent able to continue working their 20 hours per month mandatory overtime to whittle away at the backlog (claims that have been sitting for more than 125 days). That mandatory overtime has been a key component to getting the backlog reduced, and will stop completely in November. One would think that a lot of claims work was left undone. But the Monday Workload Report shows that despite the shutdown, the canceled overtime and all the doomand-gloom projections, the number of claims actually went down. Grant ed, they didnt go down by much, but they did go down. (If you want to view the archived file of Monday Morning Reports, go online to www. vba.va.gov/reports/mmwr/) Remember that before the shut down, the VA hadnt met its own projections of how fast the number of claims would fall on their way to eliminating the backlog. It didnt meet its own goal to the tune of approximately 100,000 claims for fiscal year 2013. (Some in Congress were a bit annoyed about that, since the VA had been granted $1.59 billion specifically to bring down the backlog.) Bottom line: If the mandatory over time is canceled permanently, then yes, the number of delayed claims can continue to go down, but it will be at a very slow rate. While the VA is still aiming for 2015 to clean up that backlog, its looking increasingly unlikely for that to happen. Freddy Groves regrets that he can not personally answer reader ques tions, but will incorporate them into his column whenever possible. Send email to columnreply2@gmail.com. 2013 King Features Synd., Inc.King Features Weekly ServiceNovember 4, 2013 Building a re? Dont get smoked Send your questions or home tips to ask@ thisisahammer.com. My new e-book, Best Home Tips, is available to download on Amazon Kindle! Pick it up it today for just 99 cents.

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Page 14 | Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer WHERE QUALITY MEETS EFFICIENCY216 S. Park Ave, Ste. 1 | Winter Park, FL 32789email: titledesk@midtowntitlellc.com www.midtowntitlellc.comP: 407.644.1157 F: 407.644.1357Serving Central Florida Homeowners & Lenders since 2006 Residential. Commercial. Loan-Purchase. Renance Closings. Satellite closing services available throughout state of Florida Bonded. Licensed. Insured. $685,000 $399,000 SOLD SOLD is made up of enthusiastic home buyers that have more optimism home purchases than any other age group. According to a recent National Association of Realtors study that evaluated the generational dif ferences of recent homebuyers and sellers, 85 percent of buyers younger than age 32 believe their cial investment. The oldest individuals of the Millennial generation are start understand that homeownership is one way to accumulate wealth, especially for younger families in todays world. The Millennial generation is the largest in history after the baby boomers, and they are ex pected to give the housing market a boost. However, there are chal lenges that might hinder their ability to purchase homes, in par ticular tight lending standards, student loan debt, and an uncer tain job market. The impact of student loan debt is a concern for future gen erations and the ability to be come homeowners, explains Orlando Regional Realtor Asso ciation Chairman Steve Merchant, owner-broker of Global Realty International. Those burdened with growing monthly debt pay ments will have restricted access it harder to save for a down pay ment. Yet those challenges arent changing younger buyers at titudes about homeownership. In Orlando, Millennial buyers are fortunate to be in a housing market with record affordabil ity and a rising inventory level, which means more great homes to choose from. Todays market presents great opportunities for young buyers to own a home, says Merchant. Orlando Realtors are commit ted to making sure those who are willing and able to own a home have the opportunity to do so, and can expertly guide young buyers through the complicated process. Young home buyers exuding optimism, condence CHRISTINA | Expect bond spending to drop in March, avoiding a mortgage rate spike either begin to cut back on their bond purchasing campaign straight away, or schedule a more gradual pull back. The most likely time frame for these changes to take effect is March, according to experts like Vincent Reinhart. Re inhart is the chief United States economist for Morgan Stanley, and he believes the Fed will set in motion a plan for reducing bond spending around that time. If this plays out as he expects, then we will likely avoid another mort gage rate spike in the immediate future like the one we saw back nounced he would be scaling back bond buying. Inventory will remain tight, es pecially in hot neighborhoods. In yet another continuation of 2013s market, Realtors are antici pating inventory to remain tight in high demand areas such as the Southern region we call home. This means we will continue to see what is considered a sellers market, and the hottest homes fetching top dollar and multiple bids. Sellers can maximize this op fore putting it on the market and hiring an agent that has a wide digital reach so their home is seen by both local, out-of-state and out-of-country buyers. As for the buyers, rates are still currently in the 4-percent range and there are still plenty of homes for sale. Your dream home is within reach, just Happy New Year! C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 12

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013 | Page 15 Now through Dec. 29 Its a Wonderful Life: A live radio play The Orlando Shakespeare Theater invites us to share the holiday cheer of Its a Wonderful Life, performed as a 1940s radio broadcast, running through Dec. 29. Inspired by the legendary bring to life a dozen characters in a radio broadcast complete with commercial jingles. Orlando Shakes invites us to fall in love all over again with George Bailey and the angel who saves his life on Christmas Eve. Call 407-4471700 or visit orlandoshakes.org To Editor: photo features ac tors Brad DePlanche, Suzanne ODonnell, and Piper Rae Patter son. Photo by Landon St. Gordon. Dec. 12 to 22 Breakthrough Theatre presents The Best Christmas Pageant Ever In this hilarious Christmas classic, a well-intentioned couple struggles to put on their church Christmas pageant with a cast that includes the Herdman kids, the most inventively awful kids in history. Its fun and mayhem as the Herdman kids collide headon with the Christmas story! Running from Dec. 12 to 22, place your ticket reservation by calling 407-920-4034. The Theatre is at 419A W. Fairbanks Ave. in Winter Park. Dec. 13 through Jan. 5 Bookish sculptures at A&H Museums Maitland With an opening reception Art Center will present new sculptures by Dawn Rosendahl, exhibit Ex Libris Rosendahl transforms books into sculp tures, resurrecting the books like blocks of wood, rendering them into fascinatingly surrealist works of art. Call 407-539-2181 or visit ArtandHistory.org Dec. 13 Free Fridays at the Morse Museum While all Fridays are free at the evening of Dec. 13 will be extra special with Victoria Schultz performing on the harp, docentguided family tours beginning at 5:15 p.m., an art demonstration by author and illustrator Mark Wayne Adams at 6 p.m., and a curator tour of Louis Comfort Tiffanys Laurelton Hall at 7 p.m. Its all free at the Morse Museum in Winter Park. Call 407645-5311 or visit morsemu seum.org Dec. 13 and 14 McRae Artists Holiday Open House The 21 artists at McRae Art Studios in Winter Park will welcome art lovers and collectors to a Holiday Open House on Dec. 13 from 6 to 9 p.m., and Dec. 14 from 4 to 9 p.m. The annual event is an opportunity for the public to walk through the artists studios, visit with artists and purchase origi nal works of art from the more than 1,000 available artworks. The Studios are at 904 Railroad Ave. in Winter Park, and the event is free and open to the public. Visit mcraeart studios.com or call 407-682-2740. Dec. 14 Clare and the Chocolate Nutcracker Its an up-tempo Nut cracker when Clare lives her enchanted dream, traveling with the Chocolate Nutcracker to the Kingdom of Toys. Visiting Candy Land and New Orleans (Clares Mardi Gras. This Nutcracker is performed in ballet, jazz, mod ern, swing, gospel and hip hop as Tchaikovsky and Duke Ellington are fused to bring us a very con temporary version of the holiday classic. Call 407-403-5519 or visit clareandthechocolatenutcracker. net Dec. 14 A boat parade for the history books The Rotary Club of Winter Park will present the ninth an Ski Show on Dec. 14 on Lakes Virginia and Osceola in Winter Park. The on-the-water Parade features holiday-lighted boats along the lakes shorelines. Events begin at 3:30 p.m. with a water ski show, followed by a Josh Garrick Culture worthy of your calendar Please see CULTURE on page 16 r fn tbn r rfr nntrntbnr ffftbbfb nn tnbn nnf t nrn rnn n brn tbn r bn ROSENDAHL SCULPTURES BEST PAGEANT EVER

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Page 16 | Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer move to the Polasek Museum, tion. A sculptural Christmas tree by sculptor Amy Wieck will also be unveiled. The Parade will pass the Polasek Museum at 6:30 p.m. Call 407-647-6294 or visit wp boatparade.com Dec. 14 and 15 Bach Festival Society presents A Classic Christmas The Bach Festivals most popular performances in the beautiful Knowles Chapel at Rollins College are the Clas sic Christmas performances that performing holiday classics and choral masterworks. With only two performances Dec. 14 at 7:30 p.m. and Dec. 15 at 2 p.m., these much-loved choral concerts exemplify the holiday season. call 407-646-2182. Dec. 14 and 15 Eat, Drink & Be Merry with the Orlando Gay Chorus Merry with than the Orlando Gay Chorus as they present their Holi day Concert at the Plaza at 425 N. Bumby Ave. in Orlando. At this celebration of Faith, Fun and Festivity, the OGC will sing and dance to the music that captures the festive heart of the Holidaze. Performances are set for Dec. 14 at 7:30 p.m. and Dec. 15 at 4:30 p.m. Please bring a new, unwrapped toy to support Toys For Tots! Visit orlandogay chorus.org Dec. 15 Maitland Symphony free holiday concert The Maitland Symphony Orchestra invites everyone to their annual free holiday concert on Dec. 15 beginning at 7:30 p.m. Including music from The Nut cracker and familiar melodies of the Christmas season, a special feature will be the Florida pre miere of a work by Michael Ma hadeen called Winter Lights. Performing Arts of Maitland invites the whole family to dream together with music from the past, from the heavens and into the New Year. At the Maitland Presbyterian Church, call 321303-1404 or visit pamaitland.org Dec. 15 and 22 Breakthrough Theatres Cabaret Sunday goes Holidaze Winter Parks Breakthrough Theatre will present a special two-night-only cabaret called the Breakthrough Family Christmas on Sundays, Dec. 15 and 22, at 7 p.m. With a huge cast of Breakthrough alumni singing favorite Christmas songs and sharing stories of Christmas-past, this eventfrom-the-heart is the perfect way to put you and your family in the Christmas spirit. For reservations, call 407-920-4034. Dec. 17 and 18 Andrea McArdles Sounds of the Season Broadways Original Annie Andrea McArdle will celebrate the holiday season at The Abbey with Sounds of the Season, with performances on Dec. 17 and 18 at 8 p.m. The show business legend will offer traditional holiday favorites along with beloved Broadway hits from Oliver and An nie. McArdle was the youngest performer ever nominated for a for the title role in Annie and has since appeared in countless musicals and caba rets. For tickets, visit ticketweb.com Dec. 17 and 18 The Winter Park Playhouses Cabaret Series That powerhouse duo Heather Alexander and Laura Hodos will perform their new est cabaret, Happy Hour, at the Winter Park Playhouse on Dec. 17 and 18. Happy Hour celebrates the lighter side of life with come dic and uplifting songs, ranging from musical theatre to standard hits, all of which is extra special as rendered by the charming, comedic, and always spontane ous Heather and Laura. Call 407-645-0145 or visit winterpark playhouse.org for reservations. Dec. 18 to 23 Dickens by Candlelight with tea and cookies Of all the ways to experience Charles Dickens A Christmas Carol my favorite is the produc tion called Dickens by Candle light. While candlelight is in the title, the production brings us into the action by seating us at tables where we are served tea and homemade cookies as the extraordinary three actors (who And this year is extra special to have Robin Olson, who created Dickens by Candlelight in 1997, return to the cast along with audience favorites John DiDonna and Monica Tamborello. Running Dec. 18 to 23, call 407-222-7669 or visit Dickensbycandlelight.com Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906. CULTURE | The Christmas cheer keeps coming with concerts, parties, plus tea and cookies with Dickens C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 15 WEED Robert William, 58, artist. Rob ert Bob Weed passed away suddenly on Thanksgiving Day November 28, 2013 in Santa Fe, New Mexico following brief re spiratory complications from chemotherapy treatment. Bob was born on July 18, 1955 in Norwalk, Connecticut. Bob graduated artist communities including Westport Con Thomas, Virgin Islands. Bobs tremendous thirst for life and his wit and charisma cast a huge shadow and all who loved him are devastated by his sudden depar ture. Bob enjoyed painting well into the night with his beloved entertain all who would listen with wisdom and wine. Bob was a everything and the world is less beautiful without him. Bob is survived by his wife Raven L. Weed, his father George W. Weed, his brothers Damian G. Weed and Thaddeus G. Weed and his nephew who honors Bobs name with his middle name Erik Robert Berardinelli Family Funeral Service 1399 Luisa Street Santa Fe, NM 87505 (505) 984-8600 www.berardinellifuneralhome.com ANDREA MCARDLE HAPPY HOUR CABARET This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORG @EnzianTheater Letters to Santa Event: THE MUPPET CHRISTMAS CAROLA special Holiday event and screening With treats and fun activities for children! Sun 11:30 AMSaturday Matinee Classics: ITS A WONDERFUL LIFEExperience this classic on the big screen! Sat 12 PM OPENING FRIDAY! Directed by Alexander Payne Cast | Will Forte, Bruce Dern, Bob Odenkirk NEBRASKA Fri Sun 3:30, 6:30, 9:30 Mon Thurs 6:30, 9:30 WEDNESDAY NIGHT PITCHER SHOW SPICE WORLD 7:30 FREE

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013 | Page 17 Opinions EDITORIAL CARTOON Chris Jepson Perspectives Why is more better? When asked what we should toast to, one of my responses maraderie. More fun. More introspection. More grace. More champagne. You get the idea. I think it challenging as human be ings to not want more. I subscribe to design, fashion and ar chitectural publications and I look at what others possess and some of it I want. I would love to have a house, a refuge just outside of Florence, on the way to Sienna. Id take a beach house on the west coast of Costa Rica and if I had a big pile of chips, Id have an apartment (with in New York City. Four residences would be just about right for my personal design ambitions. Creating, experiencing and living in beautiful environments ranks high on my list of priorities. Interesting to me is my lack of interest in cars. I could give two twits what I ride in as long as it is reli to pick-up WUCF-FM 89.9 I have even less interest in wristwatches. invests in an expensive watch. Thats me. I have not worn a watch since 1985. I purchased that watch for $3 at an Omaha pizza restaurant that was doing a promo tion; it was colorfully amusing. Our stuff, our desire for stuff, however, is killing us. More. The more stuff and experiences we accumulate the more damaging we are to the planet and its environment. We understand how absolutely devastating human beings are to our fellow species as well as to the land, water and air of the planet. There is no ambiguity that the more human beings on the planet, the worse our prospects as a species. More. Do more human beings imply a better life for all? An argument for more is that the bigger the pool of human ity, the more prospects that there will be scientists to solve our environmental prob lems, more creative geniuses to artistically enthrall, inspire and amuse us. Alas, that may be true, but more humanity also increases the probability of more psycho paths and deadbeats. If Americas popula tion is to grow 100 million this century, will the number of serial killers increase proportionally? How many more low-wage, fast food workers does America require? More. Small populations can create phenomenal environments produc ing incredible creative advancements. Con sider 5th century B.C. Athens or the Ancient Library of Alexandria, or 15th century Flor ence or 16th century Elizabethan England. Extraordinary advances in what it means to be a human being were achieved by getting enough people together under the right circumstances, and require hundreds of millions of people or Renaissance Florence. More humanity is not axiomatically progress. Actually, it will prove an impediment to human advance ment. More. That is the dichotomy we all face as 21st century Americans. What we need more of is birth control and responsible adults. Our future as a species, our planet depends on it. Id toast to that. And we dont need no expensive watch to know time is running out. Cheers. More time? Not in the cards Jepson is a 27-year resident of Central Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.US Louis Roney Play On! Some guys measure success in terms of dollars. I concentrate on what I have man aged to accomplish. cross the Atlantic, Admiral Byrd spent a year alone at the South Pole, Bill Tilden was beating everybody at tennis, Bobby Jones was world golf champion, and Babe Ruth was the sultan of swat. These guys were among the accomplishers of their day. I was a little kid noticing that the way to get recognized favorably in this world is was taught that my own accomplishments were all that would ever bring me credit. As a result, I look back over some 92 years at things I managed to get done come hell or high water, and my charitable memory allows me to forget a multitude of my One glaring truth rises to the surface: I never did anything worthwhile without the help of someone else, and worthwhile youre honest and looking to build selfesteem, dont kid yourself by thinking you can do it with things that are snaps, and that just anybody can do all by himself. break the 100-yard dash record, but early on I was shooting for successes that lay quite far beyond the end of my nose. I found out rather soon that the best oranges were at the top of the tree, not down low where pickers had already been busy, and where no climbing was required. In athletics, the sports that made one think better of himself had to involve competition with other guys of at least the same age and size. In the classroom, one had to vie successfully with that homely gal who always made straight As. To be good in both directions, one had to Ren der unto Caesar those things which are Caesars, and unto God those things that are Gods. The ultimate terrible human competi tion is war, whose results are life and death. Such realizations make one try rather hard and put out everything he has out, that is. War is a game invented by old men who put young men in the position of kill or be killed, a very simple formula that works only because young men have who is trying to kill you does not neces sitate that your ideology be the opposite of his. However opposite convictions are often the cases between deadly competi tors. Competition is historically the spark of the most worthy human accomplishments. The need creates the invention, doesnt it? Would Edison have come up with the electric light bulb if he had been living automobile makers put the engine in the front? Thats where the horse was in the horse and wagon, wasnt it? Traditional change calls for need plus imagination, and opportunity, and the human animal has always had a goodly supply of these. Necessity is the mother of invention. In the human mind, want ing and needing often meld into one identical inventive compulsion. Years ago I made a movie in France of the opera Faust whose title role I sang many times in France and America. The ancient Faust legend concerns a brilliant scientist, who in his old age trades his soul to the Devil for a return to the youth and romance of his early years. Fausts mad his life and brought him to the verge of suicide, but the appearance of the Devil in a puff of smoke holds the promise of Fausts regaining his youth temporarily. Faust trades his eternal soul to the Devil. Are many people today driven by the craving for the acquisition of power? A re cent world-visitor, Adolf Hitler, is enough proof that power can be attained evilly. And Jack Kennedy was quick to remind us, Life is not fair. But, then again, Alls fair in love and war, isnt it? Getting things done About Roney: HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney) King Features Weekly ServiceDecember 9, 2013 Do more human beings imply a better life? More humanity also increases the probability of more psychopaths. Letters to the editor Send your thoughts (400 words or less) to Managing Editor Isaac Babcock at ibabcock@turnstilemediagroup.com In November, the Winter Park Chamber its-kind, community-wide effort to raise funds for Second Harvest Food Bank of Central Florida. With partners Rollins Col lege, Sodexo, the city of Winter Park, and Think Creative, as well as sponsors Winter tirement Community and Florida Distrib uting, and many community champions hunger in our community! I want to thank everyone who par ticipated and supported this great cause. Im incredibly proud of the Winter Park community. This was truly a monumental endeavor that encompassed our entire community, including local government, merchants, houses of worship and indi vidual residents. Special thanks also to the amazing group of folks who worked so hard behind the scenes to make this such a success. Ive never worked with a better group of people, and I have never been as thankful as I was this Thanksgiving. Patrick W. Chapin Winter Park Chamber of Commerce

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Page 18 | Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer OBSERVER Just Sold Homes THE MARKE T PLA C E MindGym December 9, 2013 MindGym December 9, 2013 Jerry Oller 1121 Woodland St, Orlan do $490,000. 12/05/2013 Janis Fuller 311 E Morse blvd #4-1, Winter Park $396,000. 12/05/2013 Jackie OLeary 11824 Iselle Dr, Or lando $264,500. 12/06/2013 Kelly Maloney 210 Tavestock Loop, Winter Springs $255,000. 12/09/2013 739 Bear Creek Circle, Winter Springs, FL 32708 sold by Jennifer King 100 S. Eola Avenue Unit 902, Orlan do, FL 32801 sold by Pamela Ryan SATURDAY 1-4 GREAT LOCATION ON LARGE LOT 1820 Pineview, Winter Park. 2BD/1.5BA, 1,411SF. Located on a large lot in Winter Park, this home boasts a large master bedroom suite with a walk-in closet. Wood cabinets in the kitchen. Large Florida room and bonus room not includ ed in square footage. $174,900 OBSERVER Open Houses Saturday, December 14th 263 Minorca Beach Way Unit 802, New Smyrna Beach FL 32169 3 BR | 2 BA | 1,655 SF | $599,000 Gorgeous 8th floor unit in the Evissa building. Immaculate and professionally decorated with breathtaking views of the Intercoastal Waterway and the expansive Atlantic Ocean from every room. Kitchen is open to the dining room and breakfast nook. Living room with bar and slid ing glass doors to the private balcony. World-class amenities including 24-hour manned gatehouse, heated pools, Har Tru Tennis Center, clubhouse with catered kitchen, billards, library and lounge, fit ness center, gated beach and 64 boat slip marina. Hosted by: Kelly L. Price from 2-5 PM Sunday, December 15th 1181 Covewood Trail, Maitland, FL 32751 3 BR | 2.5 BA | 2,447 SF | $425,000 Meticulously maintained, spacious 3 bedroom 2.5 baths pool home nestled in Maitland Woods neighborhood. Many up grades including wood floors in the family room and master bedroom. Hosted by: Rhonda Chesmore from 2-5 PM 680 Arjay Way, Winter Park FL 32789 4 BR | 3 BA | 2,912 SF | $599,999 Fabulous pool home in the highly desir able neighborhood of Timberlane Shores! This home has been completed updated, featuring hardwood floors throughout post of the home, split floor plan and wide open living spaces. The spacious master suite features wonderful walk-in closets and a spa-like master bath. The kitchen overlooks the family room and French doors lead out to the sparkling pool and pavered patio. Hosted by: Debbie Tassell from 1-4 PM 134 Detmar Drive, Winter Park, FL 3278 4 BR | 3 BA | 3,333SF | $785,000 Nestled in the heart of Winter Park this beautiful four bedroom, three and a half bath home offers two master suites, renovated gourmet kitchen with Wolf gas range, spacious bedrooms and large re laxing outside deck. Located in one of Winter Parks most desirable neighbor hoods with Park Avenue just a pleasant stroll away. Hosted by: Gwyn Clark from 2-4 PM 960 Georgia Avenue, Winter Park FL 32789 4 BR | 4 BA | 3,654 SF | $1,295,000 ANNOUNCEMENTS BE YOUR OWN BOSS! OWN A YOGURT, DOLLAR, MAILBOX, PARTY, TEEN, CLOTHING, OR FITNESS STORE. WORLDWIDE, 100% FINANCING, OAC. FROM $55,900 COMPLETE TURNKEY (800)385-2160 WWW.DRSS3.COM Winter Park Benefit Shop 140 Lyman Ave, Winter Park needs items to sell: clothing, bedding, jewelry, kitchenware and bric-a brac. Also need ing volunteers. Contact Elizabeth Comer 407-647-8276. Open Tues & Fri at 9:30am; Sat 10am-1pm. All proceeds support childrens programs & the Or lando Blind Association. EDUCATION You can become an expert in HVAC installation and repair. Pinnacle Career Institute On line HVAC education in as little as 12 months. Call us today: 1-877-651-3961 or go online: www.HVAC-Online-Educa tion.com HELP WANTED Driver Trainees Needed NOW! Become a driver for Werner Enterprises. Earn $800 per week! Local CDL Training. 1-877-214-3624. Top 1% Pay & CSA Friendly Equip, Full Benefits + Quality Hometime, No slip seating -Take truck home, CDL-A Req 877-258-8782 www. ad-drivers.com HELP WANTED Position Available: Club and House Administrator: The Womans Club of Winter Park, Inc., an almost century old non-profit civic and charitable organization, is seeking to fill a half time (20 hours per week) position by January 1, 2014. The successful candi date will have proven skills and experi ence in marketing, public relations, ad ministration, communications, social media, budgeting, and event planning. Ability to work well with a variety of people is essential. This person will work with the club Board of Directors, mem bers, and rental clients, as well as one other part-time employee, whose job entails house maintenance and technol ogy. Salary range, $16-$18/hour de pending upon experience and perfor mance. Please submit a full resume and letters of reference to Sandra Blossey, 1262 Melissa Ct. Winter Park, FL 32789 Now Hiring: OTR CDLA Drivers New Pay Package and $2500 Sign-On Bonus! Mostly 5-10 days out, full benefits, achievable bo nuses. Call for details 1-888-378-9691/ apply at www.heyl.net MISCELLANEOUS AIRLINE CAREERS begin here Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Finan cial aid for qualified students. Job place ment assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769 REAL ESTATE: COMMERCIAL OFFICE FOR RENTWINTER PARK Executive office available in prestigious bank building. Approximately 10 x 12 with windows on two sides. Additional space available for assistant, now or lat er, at additional charge. Aloma and Lake mont Avenues. 24-hour access. Mini mum one year term. Broker. $500 per month. Lou Nimkoff 407-405-3368 of fice@briofl.com REAL ESTATE: FOR RENT 1BR/1Bath Condo for RENT $725/ mo Single story condo no one above or be low. Range,stove,dishwasher,tile throughout, washer/dryer hookups, three closets. Cats ok. Dogs no way. Pool, tenn nis courts. Near intersection of RedBug Road & 436/Semoran Blvd. Very nice community. Available now. Minimum 1 year lease. Dan 863-797-4128 sunshi nerentals123@gmail.com REAL ESTATE: FOR SALE 10 ACRE MOUNTAIN TOP ESTATE! Gorgeous Blue Ridge mountain acreage featuring spectacular 3 state views & towering hardwoods! Abuts U.S. National Forest. Great building spot! U/G utilities, paved rd frontage, RV friendly. Priced to sell only $69,900. Excellent financing. Call now 866-952-5303, x 92 Tennessee Log Cabin on 6 acres with FREE Boat Slip! Only $74,900 New 3BR, 2BA log cabin shell, lake access, nicely wooded, level setting. Quiet paved road frontage. Excel lent financing. Call now 877-888-0267, x 453 www.orange-blossom.com/7100 1-800-624-8835 1-800-624-8835 1-800-624-8835 1-800-624-8835 1-800-624-8835 Gifts of Floridas Finest FruitIndian River CitrusORANGE BLOSSOM 811 Item #7100 Order Navels & Grapefruit, get Tangelos FREE! Send a healthy holiday gift of famous Florida Navel Oranges and Ruby Red Grapefruit, and get a box of sweet, easy to peel Tangelos FREE. Tree-ripened and picked at the peak of perfection, satisfaction guaranteed. All three boxes will be shipped to one address.5 lbs. of Citrus in each box! EXTRA BONUS FREE 3 oz. Jar Genuine Honeybell Marmalade MindGym December 9, 2013 MindGym December 9, 2013 Picturesque location on a brick street at the corner of Georgia & Palmer ~ Walk to Park Avenue! Fantastic wall of windows in the family room overlooking the pool and spa. Spacious kitchen, plantation shutters throughout, gorgeous wood floors, high ceilings and three fireplaces. Private fenced backyard with mature landscaping. Hosted by: Lauren Fritch from 1-4 PM

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013 | Page 19 ARIES (March 21 to April 19) The arts are a strong part of the Arian aspect, with music becoming more dominant. An important decision looms as a longtime relationship takes an unexpected turn. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Surrounding yourself with beautiful things helps restore the Taurean soul. Enjoy an art exhibit, for example. Or redecorate your personal space with something truly splendid. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Some colleagues might try to talk you out of what they insist is a risk, but which you consider an opportunity. As usual, fol low your own good sense when making your decision. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) A workplace change you might have worried about soon proves to be high ly favorable for the clever Crab who is ready to take advantage of new oppor tunities opening up. LEO (July 23 to August 22) Con gratulations. Your Leonine pride is polished to a dazzling new brilliance thanks to your success in winning sup port for your new project from even the most doubtful of detractors. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) An unsettling rumor about a col leagues apparently regrettable behavior is soon proved groundless, allow ing you to enjoy the upcoming end-ofyear festivities in a happy mood. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Your success in helping to create a harmonious environment out of a chaotic situation earns you the admiration of someone who could become an important new presence in your life. SCORPIO (October 23 to Novem ber 21) Your Scorpions sense of loy alty could find you leading a passion ate defense of a loved one you feel is being unfairly treated. The weeks end brings long-awaited family news. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Your keen instincts are once more on high alert as you find yourself being pressured to make a quick decision about a certain matter. More facts come to light by weeks end. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) An unexpected workplace development could disrupt some family plans. A full explanation, however, averts domestic discord. A financial matter continues to need attention. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Spend time away from distractions to reassess some recent moves that might not have worked out as you had hoped. What you learn could be invaluable for future deci sion-making. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) A recent act of kindness is a reminder of how important your friends are to you. You might want to show your appreciation by hosting a special preNew Years party just for them. BORN THIS WEEK: You always try to do your best, which sometimes causes you to be critical of those who dont live up to your standards. 2008 King Features Synd., Inc. Dec. 26, 1908, Jack Johnson becomes the first black American to win the world heavyweight title when he knocks out Canadian Tommy Burns in the 14th round in a championship bout near Sydney, Australia. Johnson held the heavyweight title until 1915. Dec. 25, 1914, just after mid night on Christmas morning, German troops fighting in World War I cease firing their guns and artillery, and commence to sing Christmas carols. At points along the eastern and western fronts, Russian, French and British soldiers even heard brass bands joining the Germans in their joyous singing. Dec. 28, 1938, silent-film star Florence Lawrence commits suicide in Beverly Hills, Calif. Lawrence also was an inventor: She designed the first auto signaling arm, a mechanical turn signal, along with the first mechanical brake signal. She did not patent these inventions, however, and as a result she received no credit for or profit from either one. Dec. 23, 1946, President Harry Truman appoints an amnesty board to review cases of conscientious objectors who were imprisoned after refus ing to serve during World War II. Of the 15,000 violators of the World War II Selective Service Act, only 1,500 were considered entitled to full amnesty. Dec. 29, 1956, the New York Times leaks the news that the United States is preparing a major policy statement on the Middle East. The U.S. would oppose any Soviet military intervention in the region, and Middle Eastern powers could count on economic help and military help in opposing any Soviet aggression. Dec. 27, 1968, Apollo 8, the first manned mission to orbit the moon, returns safely to Earth after an historic six-day journey. Astronauts Frank Bor man, James Lovell, Jr., and William Anders were the first human beings to see the dark side of the moon. Dec. 24, 1972, comedian Bob Hope gives what he says is his final Christmas show to U.S. forces in Sai gon. The show marked Hopes ninth consecutive Christmas appearance in Vietnam. 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. King Features Weekly ServiceDecember 9, 2013 ARIES (March 21 to April 19) The arts are a strong part of the Arian aspect, with music becoming more dominant. An important decision looms as a longtime relationship takes an unexpected turn. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Surrounding yourself with beautiful things helps restore the Taurean soul. Enjoy an art exhibit, for example. Or redecorate your personal space with something truly splendid. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Some colleagues might try to talk you out of what they insist is a risk, but which you consider an opportunity. As usual, fol low your own good sense when making your decision. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) A workplace change you might have worried about soon proves to be high ly favorable for the clever Crab who is ready to take advantage of new oppor tunities opening up. LEO (July 23 to August 22) Con gratulations. Your Leonine pride is polished to a dazzling new brilliance thanks to your success in winning sup port for your new project from even the most doubtful of detractors. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) An unsettling rumor about a col leagues apparently regrettable behavior is soon proved groundless, allow ing you to enjoy the upcoming end-ofyear festivities in a happy mood. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Your success in helping to create a harmonious environment out of a chaotic situation earns you the admiration of someone who could become an important new presence in your life. SCORPIO (October 23 to Novem ber 21) Your Scorpions sense of loy alty could find you leading a passion ate defense of a loved one you feel is being unfairly treated. The weeks end brings long-awaited family news. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Your keen instincts are once more on high alert as you find yourself being pressured to make a quick decision about a certain matter. More facts come to light by weeks end. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) An unexpected workplace development could disrupt some family plans. A full explanation, however, averts domestic discord. A financial matter continues to need attention. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Spend time away from distractions to reassess some recent moves that might not have worked out as you had hoped. What you learn could be invaluable for future deci sion-making. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) A recent act of kindness is a reminder of how important your friends are to you. You might want to show your appreciation by hosting a special preNew Years party just for them. BORN THIS WEEK: You always try to do your best, which sometimes causes you to be critical of those who dont live up to your standards. 2008 King Features Synd., Inc. Dec. 26, 1908, Jack Johnson becomes the first black American to win the world heavyweight title when he knocks out Canadian Tommy Burns in the 14th round in a championship bout near Sydney, Australia. Johnson held the heavyweight title until 1915. Dec. 25, 1914, just after mid night on Christmas morning, German troops fighting in World War I cease firing their guns and artillery, and commence to sing Christmas carols. At points along the eastern and western fronts, Russian, French and British soldiers even heard brass bands joining the Germans in their joyous singing. Dec. 28, 1938, silent-film star Florence Lawrence commits suicide in Beverly Hills, Calif. Lawrence also was an inventor: She designed the first auto signaling arm, a mechanical turn signal, along with the first mechanical brake signal. She did not patent these inventions, however, and as a result she received no credit for or profit from either one. Dec. 23, 1946, President Harry Truman appoints an amnesty board to review cases of conscientious objectors who were imprisoned after refus ing to serve during World War II. Of the 15,000 violators of the World War II Selective Service Act, only 1,500 were considered entitled to full amnesty. Dec. 29, 1956, the New York Times leaks the news that the United States is preparing a major policy statement on the Middle East. The U.S. would oppose any Soviet military intervention in the region, and Middle Eastern powers could count on economic help and military help in opposing any Soviet aggression. Dec. 27, 1968, Apollo 8, the first manned mission to orbit the moon, returns safely to Earth after an historic six-day journey. Astronauts Frank Bor man, James Lovell, Jr., and William Anders were the first human beings to see the dark side of the moon. Dec. 24, 1972, comedian Bob Hope gives what he says is his final Christmas show to U.S. forces in Sai gon. The show marked Hopes ninth consecutive Christmas appearance in Vietnam. 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. King Features Weekly ServiceDecember 9, 2013 JOB RESOURCES at EmployFlorida.com helped Jasmine choose a career path and land a job she loves.You too can discover REAL RESULTS with Employ Florida.JASMINE GREENMonitor Support Technician, Shands HospitalEmploy Florida is an equal opportunity program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. The Employ Florida telephone number may be reached by persons using TTY/TTD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711. Disponible en Espanol.1-866-FLA-2345EmployFlorida.com Donate A Boat sponsored by boat angel outreach centers STOP CRIMES AGAINST CHILDREN www.boatangel.com2-Night Free Vacation!or Car Today! 800 1 CAR L ANGE FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now surviveDIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922



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WPMOBSERVER.COM Winter Park residents and business owners Steven and Su zanne Graffham breathed a sigh of relief Sunday afternoon as the historic chapel that houses their wedding business was success fully relocated to its new home. The historic building began its journey through the streets of Winter Park around 7 a.m., trav eling down New York Avenue on three hydraulic construction dollies it had been placed on the day before. Dozens of residents stopped to watch the spectacle as movers took the structure from its former site on New England Avenue to a corner parcel at the intersection of New York and Lyman avenues across from the USPS 00-6186 Publisher statement on page 4. VISIT WPMOBSERVER.COMSUBSCRIBE NOW! WHERE TO BUY NOT-SO-USUAL HOLIDAY GIFTSLIFESTYLES, 6To build a reIn case Central Floridas 10-degrees-above normal HOME MAGNIFIER, 10Where are you going? Everybodys into the holiday spirit, and Josh Garrick has your guide for where to party. CULTURE, 15COMMUNITY BULLETIN ........... 4 CALENDAR ................... 4 LIFESTYLES ................... 6 HOME MAGNIFIER ............. 10 CULTURE .................... 15 OPINIONS ................... 17 CLASSIFIEDS ................. 18 A historic home took to the high ing to its new home at the south end of Lake Osceola in Winter Park. Historic preservation ists in Winter Park cheered from the shoreline at the Albin Polasek Museum and Sculpture Garden as the citys 128-year-old Capen House ar rived by barge. Movers pulled house toward the shore of its old address on Inter lachen Avenue via tractor-trailer ing it onto a large barge Tuesday afternoon. Dozens of paddle boarders, kayakers and spectators on boats structure as it crossed the lake, cheering as it reached the shore of the Albin Polasek Museum grounds. put into words, said Debbie Komanski, executive director of the Albin Polasek Museum and Sculpture Garden. This has been a very concerted effort by a lot of people to make this happen in this short period of time. To see it actually coming through is both very emotional as well as extremely rewarding and inspiring for the future in what well be able to do with it. The houses journey across Lake Osceola resembled a parade on water. Komanski, Executive Director Betsy Owens of Casa Fe liz, and Executive Director Susan torical Association waved to resiAlbin Polasek Museum. I think we really made his tory today, said Owens, who fundraising efforts. It was pretty exciting to be a part of it weve worked very hard to make today a reality. Its been six months since the historic home built in 1885 for early Winter Park settler John S. Capen faced the wrecking ball. Residents cried out for the protec tion of the house after property owners John and Betsy Pokorny planned to demolish it to make way for a new lakefront home. But the Pokornys agreed to PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERPreservation Capen organizers wave from their house boat as it oats across Lake Osceola Tuesday. Capen House sets sail for new homeTIM FREED Observer staff Please see CAPEN on page 2Maitland is greening up its public works department next year, with the City Council vot ing to add an electric hybrid The 2013 Volt will be the citys tive energy sources. Public Works Director Rick Lemke said the $35,895 electricoperated vehicle will save the city roughly $14,000 in gas and maintenance over its estimated 10-year life span. It gives us the opportunity to enter the green world, Lemke said, adding that this purchase opens the door to the city adding additional electric vehicles in the future, if the Volt is found to per form well. At the Councils urging, Lemke sought out bids from local Chevrolet dealers and received the lowest bid from Starling Chevrolet in Kissimmee, which offered the city a purchase price $4,000 below originally budgeted estimates. This is a win-win situation where we can do the right thing environmentally, and the right thing by the citys pocket book by saving us lot of money, said Councilman John Lowndes, a Maitland goes electric, adds Chevy Volt to eetSARAH WILSON Observer staffWedding chapel gets hitchedSeventy-year-old former church hits the road to avoid wrecking ballTIM FREED Observer staff Please see CHAPEL on page 2 407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC Winter Park Recovery CenterExecutive Drug & Alcohol Treatment Protocols 20 and 40-Week Outpatient Programs Suboxone/Subutex For Opioid Abuse Privacy and Confidentiality AssuredMedically Managed Dual Diagnosis Evidenced Based Programs2056 Aloma Ave, Suite 100, Winter Park, FL 32792 www.WinterParkRecoveryCenter.com 407-629-0413 PHOTO BY TIM FREED THE OBSERVERThe Winter Park Wedding Chapel rolls to its new plot after being uprooted Sunday. Please see ELECTRIC on page 2128-year-old Polasek Museum

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Page 2 | Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer CHAPEL | Relocation spares venue from destructionCAPEN | Barge operation took more than 6 hoursfarmers market. The relocation meant a new beginning for the Graffhams and their wedding business, which was forced to move along with the chapel to make way for future devel opment along New England Avenue. Were really relieved to see it in one piece at its new home, Suzanne said. Were very excited for the future. But the chapel hasnt tied the knot with its new location quite yet. The new basement for the building still needs to be constructed, along with the surround ing walls and minor repairs from the moving process. Movers took a topdown approach with constructing the new foun dation, carefully steering the chapel on wheels down a slope into an 8.5-foot-deep hole and raising it 11 feet high to make room for the basement to be built underneath. The Graffhams couldnt help but feel uneasy as their 103-ton business venture slowly rolled down a sandy slope. Watching it happen, even though were not responsible for actually moving it, is very nerve-racking, Steven said as the house began its short descent toward its new foundation. I havent felt like this since my wife had a baby. The move wouldnt have been possible without the support of Traditional Neigh ted to enriching Hannibal Square thats now spearheading a fundraising effort for the construction. Itll cost just over $160,000 to complete the project, including the relocation, set ting the foundation and restoration. Traditional Neighborhoods Inc. has raised about $18,000 thus far and will continue to accept donations on its website as construction moves forward, said Dan nization and the general contractor for the chapel relocation. Moving day had been a long time coming for the Graffhams. The building should have been destroyed to make way for new development years ago, but property own ers allowed the couple to use the space for a photography studio and, eventually, a wedding chapel. The couple were assured that the building would be eventually demolished. But the chapel went on to marry hundreds of couples since the wedding business began in 2009, turning the building into a community staple. The property owners took notice and chose to donate the chapel to the couple instead to have it relocated. Bellows plans to make the wedding chapel even more charming than before with the addition of a new courtyard, a fountain, a slated roof and bronze trim mings on the exterior. The fact that its going ahead means we can move forward; we can have many more weddings there, Steven said. It gives us stability in our business and our future. A $50 fundraising event with hors doeuvres, cocktails and live entertainment for the Winter Park Wedding Chapel will take place tonight, Dec. 12, from 7 to 9 p.m. between Hannibals and Armandos off New England Avenue. Bellows said he hopes to have construc tion complete by mid-February. house a new home. The Albin Polasek Mu seum and Sculpture Garden stepped for ward, proposing a plan to move the house to the museum grounds so it could be used for program space. The Pokornys gave the community until the end of 2013 to raise at least $400,000 and move the house a goal thats now halfway to becoming a reality. I couldnt be more pleased with how its gone today, said Frank Roark, the gen eral contractor for the project. Theres been a lot of uncertainty and challenges with this thing. To get it to this milestone was a big deal for us. But the Capen House isnt home free just yet. Movers are now in the process of half of the home 180 degrees so that the back faces Lake Osceola, while another group of movers prepares the second half for place ment on the barge. The second half of Dec. 21, meeting the Dec. 31 deadline, Ko manski said. The museum still needs to raise between $120,000 and $130,000 to pay for the reas sembling and furnishing of the historic home. Komanski said its now up to Winter Park residents and historic preservationists to give new life to the Capen House. Many, many people came together in order to get this to this point, she said. I feel the majority of the citizens in our town feel strongly about preserving our history here in Winter Park and helping it cohabi tate with things we need for the future. CONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE CONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE Come ska te at the holiday ice rink in Central Park West Meadow!November 15, 2013 thruJanuary 5,2014Monday thru Thursday > 3 p.m. 9 p.m. Friday > 3 p.m. 10 p.m. Saturday > 10 a.m. 10 p.m. Sunday > Noon 8 p.m.see website for extended school holiday hoursAll day general admission $10(includes skates)407-599-3203 >cityofwinterpark.org/WITP WINTER PARK in the special thanks to our sponsors rfrfntb at Winter Park Towers Your room is waiting for you if you need Pain and Symptom Management Hospital Follow-up Complex Treatments, or Crisis Care Referrals 866-742-6655#5019096 www.cornerstonehospice.org www.SeriousIllness.org/cornerstoneMedicare, Medicaid, most commercial insurances accepted The fact that its going ahead means we can move forward; we can have many more weddings there. PHOTO BY TIM FREED THE OBSERVERThe Capen House, decked out in a Christmas wreath, heads to its new home. ELECTRIC | Car expected to save Maitland moneyproudly proclaimed longtime driver of a Toyota Prius hybrid. Councilman Ivan Valdez said he was still hesitant to declare electric cars a real win looking toward the future, but applauded city staff for their continued forwardthinking. After a vote to purchase the car was tabled at Valdes suggestion for more discussion in October, the Council plugged in a unanimous vote to approve the cars purchase Nov. 25. Since that meeting, the Public Works department said the vehicle has been ordered, and can be expected to hit city streets in four to six weeks. This is not a risk; its a deal thats going to save us a lot of money, Lowndes said. Every time you drive past a gas station, just smile and wave. CONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013 | Page 3 We are large enough to give you what you want and small enough to provide it the way you want it. To learn more, please visit any of our banking centers from Orlando to Miami or call us at 1-800-435-8839.13-0089/rev090113 citynational.com Member FDIC Personal Relationships | Local Decisions | StabilityREDEFINING BANKING. 1115-8 CNwinterPrk.indd 1 11/20/13 9:40 AM Maitland City TalkBY HOWARD SCHIEFERDECKER MAYOR The Maitland City Council met on Monday, Dec. 9, at 6:30 p.m. in the City Hall Council Chambers. Below is a synopsis of that meet ing. Old Business: source Ordinance: The City Manager stated that there was nothing new to report at this time and that we should receive an update sometime in January. Public Hearings: There were no scheduled Public Hearings. Consent Items: Minutes of Nov. 25, 2013 were approved. Commission Meeting Minutes of Oct. 17, 2013 were accepted. Easement Agreement with Up town Maitland Partners, LTD. was approved. Tahoe Vehicle in the amount of was approved. Dec. 23, 2013 was canceled. Decision Items:tract with Keith and Schnars, P.A. as the Select Mobility Fee Consultant in the amount of $45,335. workshop be scheduled to dis cuss the options for the Thurston House Lease Renewal. the Summit Centre Way Row was approved. Interpretation of Separation Re quirements. After discussion, an amendment to the Chicken Keep ing Ordinance will be presented Council Meeting. Discussion Item: of Conduct Committee discussed the ordinance that was drafted by Committee and answered ques tions posed by Council. Various members of the Committee addressed the draft ordinance. To listen to a recording of the meeting, please check our website at itsmymaitland.comKeeping up conduct Orlandos Only Doggie Daycare with a Gym! Orlandos Only Doggie Daycare with a Gym! Customized workouts Training Indoor warm water swimming 2826 Shader Rd. Orlando, 32808 407-295-3888 BarkingDogFitness.com Ask about our FREE trial policy! Give Your Dog the Gift of Health. Sign up BEFORE year end and receive 10% o for LIFE and a FREE swim or massage! Fact A lean dog lives an average 2 years longer than an overweight dog AND is healthier and happier!

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Page 4 | Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013 PHONE: 407-563-7000 FAX: 407-563-7099 WPMOBSERVER.COMPUBLISHERTracy Craft407.515.2605TCraft@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MANAGING EDITORIsaac Babcock 407.563.7023IBabcock@TurnstileMediaGroup.comASSOCIATE EDITORSarah Wilson 407.563.7026SWilson@TurnstileMediaGroup.comDESIGNERTom Miller 407.563.7032TMiller@TurnstileMediaGroup.comSTAFF WRITERSBrittni Larson Megan Stokes Tim Freed Allison Olcsvay Kristy VickeryCOLUMNISTSChris JepsonJepson@MediAmerica.usLouis RoneyLRoney@cfl.rr.comJosh GarrickJoshGarrick9@gmail.comADVERTISING SALESLinda Stern407.376.2434LStern@TurnstileMediaGroup.comLEGAL NOTICE ADVERTISINGAshley McBride 407.286.0807Legal@FLALegals.comSUBSCRIPTIONS/CIRCULATIONLuana Baez 407.563.7013LBaez@TurnstileMediaGroup.comMEMBER OF: -Florida Press Association -Winter Park/Maitland/Goldenrod Chambers of CommerceWinter Park/Maitland Observer is published by Turnstile Media Group. Founded in 1990 and headquartered in Orlando, Fla., Turnstile Media Group is also the parent of Golfweek, Golfweek Custom Media, TurfNet, Professional Artist, Seminole Voice, Baldwin Park Living and Turnstile Connect.TURNSTILE MEDIA GROUPCHAIRMANRance CrainPRESIDENT/CEOFrancis X. FarrellVICE PRESIDENTSPatti Green & Jeff BabineauUSPS #00-6186 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:Winter Park / Maitland Observer 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835 Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster DEC. 12-13Orlando Circle of Friends is rehearsing and polishing for our audiences a fun and entertaining collection of many holiday favorites at An Ugly Sweater Christmas at Orlando Museum of Art. Well take a Sleigh Ride as we Let It Snow then well have Chestnuts Roasting on an Open Fire. Join us for some rollicking fun, or have a Blue Christmas with out us! Tickets are available for $20 for shows at 8 p.m. Friday, Dec. 13, and 3:30 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 14. Student/se nior/child rate is $15. As always, a portion of the proceeds of our concerts benets a charity. Visit our website at ocofchorus. com for more information and to pur chase tickets.DEC. 12-14Join the Winter Park High School drama department at their production of Almost, Maine. A charming romantic comedy about love, loss, and the north ern lights, Almost, Maine is full of warm fuzzies in the midst of winter. Almost, Maine plays at 7 p.m. on Dec. 12-14 at the Winter Park 9th Grade Auditorium. There is a special matinee performance at 2 p.m. on Dec. 14. Tickets are $10 at the door. Written in 2004, this play is set in the small territory of Almost, Maine. It follows 19 residents as they attempt to make sense of love and loss. These sundry peo ple overcome their fear of the unknown, accept each other for who they are, and rediscover lost hope, all in the midst of a cold Maine winter. Call 407-622-3200 for tickets. DEC. 15Come enjoy Winter Dreams, the holi day sounds of the Maitland Symphony Orchestra at 7:30 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 15, at the Maitland Presbyterian Church, 341 N. Orlando Ave. The concert is free. For information, call 321-303-1404. A Christmas musical presentation at Winter Park Presbyterian Church will lift your holiday spirits at 10:30 a.m. Dec. 15. Enjoy a special harpist-accompanied musical presentation, The Ceremony of the Carols at Winter Park Presbyterian Church, 400 S. Lakemont Ave. Call 407647-1467 or visit winppc.org for more information. DEC. 19-22The Winter Park Presbyterian Churchs holiday schedule will again feature the Longest Night, which is a worship ser vice of remembrance, and its 45th annual Living Nativity. The Longest Night service, scheduled for Sunday, Dec. 22, at 7 p.m., provides a time of quiet reection, spe cial music, healing prayer, and candle light for those experiencing loneliness and loss because of the death of a loved one, relationship problems, job insecuri ties, health concerns, or weariness from holiday preparations. All are welcome. Show times for the Living Nativity are 7, 7:30, 8, and 8:30 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 19, and Friday, Dec. 20. The Living Nativity, a tradition of the telling of the Christmas story, features a storyteller, carols and live animals.DEC. 22Please join Winter Park Presbyterian Church at 10:30 a.m. on Sunday, Dec. 22, for a lessons and carols service with congregational participation in singing of classic Christmas carols at 400 S. Lakemont Ave. Call 407-647-1467 or visit winppc.org for more information. ONGOINGThe Emil Buehler Perpetual Trust Plan etarium at Seminole State College offers Central Florida the chance to celebrate the holidays with multiple performances of its most popular show. The Planetar ium will present The Star of Bethlehem two showings each on Dec. 13, Dec. 20 and Dec. 21. Show times for each date are 7 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. The Star of Bethlehem looks at how the calendar system has changed over the millennia and examines clues from the Bible to pin down the birth year of Jesus under our current calendar. The origins of the Magi are then looked at to determine what ce lestial phenomena they would have most likely interpreted to be the Star. Now through Sunday, Jan. 5, the city of Winter Park is bundling up once again for Winter in the Park, the citys annual holiday ice skating rink in Central Park West Meadow. The West Meadow is locat ed at 150 N. New York Ave., on the corner of New York Avenue and Morse Boulevard, in downtown Winter Park. Snowakes of all ages and skill levels are invited to chill out as they glide, spin and turn at Winter in the Park: Monday through Thursday, 3 to 9 p.m.; Friday, 3 to 10 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday, noon to 8 p.m. See website for extended school holiday hours. Snow angels are invited to skate all day for only $10 per skater (skate rental in cluded). For a blizzard of 20 or more peo ple, some cool group discounts are avail able for all this frigid fun. The rink is also available for rental opportunities. Advance reservations are required for pri vate party and group reservations to avoid an icy avalanche of skaters at the rink. Holiday music, games, carolers and so much more will urry around you as you enjoy Winter in the Park. For more infor mation, please call 407-599-3203 or visit cityofwinterpark.org/WITP. If you are interested in showcasing your business during the busy holiday season to the 30,000-plus expected rink attend ees, please visit the website and click on the SPONSOR tab for information on how to become an ice rink dasher board sponsor. Take a stroll down memory lane as the Winter Park Playhouse pays tribute to two of Americas most well-loved composers of all time, George and Ira Gershwin! This high-energy song and dance celebra tion will put a smile on your face and a song in your heart! Featuring a collection of Gershwin favorites, including Embraceable You, Ive Got a Crush on You, I Got Rhythm, Someone to Watch Over Me, and SWonderful! Who could ask for anything more? Its through Dec. 14. Its all conceived by Roy Alan with the nar rative by Todd Allen Long and musical ar rangements by Christopher Leavy. FAMILY CALENDAR Member of: Christmas Celebra tions Winter Park Presbyter ian Church 400 S. Lakemon t Avenue 407-647-1467 www.winppc.org Living NativityThursday & Friday, December 19 & 20, 7:00-9:00pm on the half hour Join us for the Living Nativity, Christmas music, a beautiful candlelit sanctuary, a miniature village, cookies, and photos taken at the manger Christmas Musical Presentations Sunday, December 15 at 10:30am Enjoy a special harpist-accompanied musical presentation, The Ceremony of the Carols Sunday, December 22 at 10:30am Lessons and Carols service with congregational participation in singing of classic Christmas carols Christmas Eve Services Tuesday, December 24 at 5:00pm Family Christmas Service Tuesday, December 24 at 7:00pm Candlelight Serv ice Tuesday, December 24 at 11:00pm Candlelight Com munion Service Letters to Santa contestHey kids, write your letters to Santa and you could win a prize package including tickets for ice-skating! The theme for the Winter Park-Maitland Observers Let ters to Santa contest this year is The gift I most want to give is and write what youd do if you could be Santa Claus to the world. Letters to Santa contest entries are to be no longer than one page, and weve extended our deadline to Dec. 16. Send emails to ibabcock@turnstilemediagroup.com or physical mail to Santa Claus, 1500 Park Center Drive, Orlando FL 32835. Include the authors name, phone number, address and email. Good luck! The contest sponsored by the Observer, city of Winter Park, Winter Park Chamber of Commerce, Maitland Public Library and Winter Park Public Library. Community Bulletin

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013 | Page 5 Winter Park City TalkBY RANDY KNIGHT CITY MANAGER Dec. 9 City Commission highlights There was a City Commission meeting held Dec. 9 in City Hall Commission Chambers. Below are a few highlights of decisions made at the meeting:Mayors Report Commerce gave a summary pre sentation regarding the tremen dous success of Feed the Need, wide fundraiser for Second Har vest Food Bank of Central Florida. More than $96,000 was raised in this fundraising campaign to help end hunger in Central Florida. Congratulations and thanks to ev eryone who helped support this worthy cause. nized as the featured artist in the citys current Art in Chambers exhibit.Non-Action Items garding downtown parking. Rec ommendations will be brought to the Commission in January 2014.Consent Agenda were approved (for a complete listing, please visit cityofwinter appropriate $25,000 for street paving materials was approved. to the Native Load Firm Fixed Capacity and Partial Require between city of Winter Park and dated Aug. 12, 2013, was approved.Action Items Requiring Discussion advertisements of two parcels of land located at 300 N. Penn sylvania Ave. and 321 Hannibal Square West located within the CRA district for possible devel opment options were approved with an amendment to the 300 N. Pennsylvania Ave. property for Board to look at this property for potential a potential park.Public Hearings ton LLC: to divide the property at 1280 Ar lots was approved. ordinance to amend Chapter 58, Land Development Code, Ar ticle I Comprehensive Plan Fu ture Land Use Map so as to establish Commercial Future Land Use on the annexed property at 656 Overspin Drive and to indicate the annexation of this property on the other maps within the Com prehensive Plan was approved. ordinance to amend Chapter 58, Land Development Code, Ar annexed property at 656 Overspin Drive was approved. ordinance to vacate and abandon a portion of Gaines Way, lying be tween 610 and 1760 Gaines Way, but retaining and reserving to the city a utility easement over the entire area thereof, was approved. A full copy of the Dec. 9 City Commission minutes will be available at cityofwinterpark.org the week of Jan. 13, pending ap proval by the City Commission.More public parking availableThe city of Winter Park has opened up new public parking spaces just west of City Hall on Lyman Avenue. This lot was pre viously designated for City Hall employee parking only. Howev er, due to the busy holiday season parking during this time, the city has repurposed those spaces to three-hour public parking. New AED locator networkWinter Park Fire-Rescue an nounces the addition of a new information system intended to assist 9-1-1 dispatchers by helping them locate life-saving automated available near victims of sudden cardiac arrest. Sudden cardiac arrest is re sponsible for more than 300,000 deaths in the United States each year. Compact and portable, an AED is designed to be used by laypeople, with little or no train ing, to deliver a shock designed to save the victims life before para medics arrive. The problem is that, until now, publicly available AEDs are rarely used in an emergency be cause people are unaware of their location, and 9-1-1 dispatchers are unable to provide the location of the nearest AED to the respond er, said, Winter Park Fire Chief Jim White. The new AED locator system lets us instantly see the lo cation of all the registered AEDs that are near a victim of a sud den cardiac arrest so we can alert someone to get the device in time to help save their life. To encourage the registration of all AED devices, the city of Winter Park will reach out to owners restaurants, gyms, recreational venues, churches and other loca tions where AEDs may be avail able. AED owners are encouraged to visit NationalAEDRegistry. com to register their AEDs at no cost. The new system from Atrus, called AED Link, shows the location of all registered AEDs on electronic maps. Dispatchers can then direct callers to a nearby de vice before paramedics arrive. Having the Atrus system in place throughout the area in creases the effectiveness of every registered AED. Winter Park joins Orange County in encouraging all AED owners to register their devices as soon as possible, mak ing them accessible in an emer gency. The system is offered to the community through the Orange County Department of Emergency Management and will go live in Winter Park on Dec. 16. The only cool place in town!It cant be December its way freezing temperatures in Win ter Parks holiday ice rink. Now through Sunday, Jan. 5, you can skate at the citys coolest event of the year Winter in the Park, the citys annual holiday ice skating rink in Central Park West Mead ow. The West Meadow is located at 150 N. New York Ave., found at the corner of New York Avenue and Morse Boulevard in down all ages and skill levels are invited to chill out as they glide, spin and turn at Winter in the Park: 3 to 9 p.m. See website for extended school holiday hours. For more information, please call 407-599-3203 or visit cityofat cityofwinterpark.org, like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and watch us on Vimeo.Saving more lives Second Harvest Food Bank is working to feed hope. Each week, an average of 55,000 people kids, seniors, working families, homeless and others rely on us for help getting food. And though we provided more than 39 million pounds of food this year alone, it simply wasnt enough. Because until no one is hungry, we still have work to do. Our neighbors throughout Central Florida continue to need your caring and your help. Remember: A dollar invested in hope can provide up to $9 in groceries.Make a difference. Donate today. www.FeedHopeNow.org 407.295.1066Member of Feeding America FEED HOPE NOW SHF145_WPObserver_5x8.indd 1 10/28/13 11:18 AM

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Page 6 | Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Lifestyles Christmas trees sparkle, glim mer and glow, draped in different themes pulling the eye in to a hol iday kaleidoscope of gifts handpicked for customers from around the world. But the items found here are not just holiday themed, they come and go with the seasons, as quick as one season ends and another be gins, so does the dcor at the newly opened Winter Park Lafayette and Rushford home store. We approach home dcor and gift giving in a creative and unexpect ed way; we have an out side of the box approach to things that we all owner Kristen Painter said. We try to offer something unique and more interesting than you would people to come in and see something new that theyve never seen thats fresh and inspires them. Want to wash your hands with grapefruit and sugar? Theres a soap for that. Dont have a Christ mas garden gnome yet? Theyve got that. Hand-beaten metal bowl with a crab guarding the rim? They have that too. Painter said she travels to mar kets across the U.S. and handpicks every product for her home store. For the size of the store that we are, we have far more manu factures that we work with than most stores, Painter said. Most stores will have a dozen, may be two dozen manufactures that they order from, we have well into the hundreds; so were always adding something new. Lafayette and Rushford cus tomer and Winter Park resident Carolyn Bethel said the new home -PHOTOS BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVERChristmas cheer is everywhere at Hannibal Squares newset shop. Manager Chris Scott and sales associate Kim Whittaker help shoppers nd the best gifts for all occasions at Lafayette & Rushford.Lafayette & Rushford rushes W.P.KRISTY VICKERY Observer Staff Please see GIFTS on next page rfnftbf D ecember 19th-22ndBob Carr Performing Arts Centre ORLANDO PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA BOOK YOUR SEATS TODAY !407-426-1739O RLAND OBA LLET.ORG rffttbf* Price does not include tickets to The Nutcracker performance. photocarlos amoedo | focustudios.com Pizza & more ... rfntb rf ntbfCannot be combined with any other coupon or offer. Expires 1/1/14.ntnfrnfrr Located at the 20-20 Super Center Plaza near the corner of SR 436 and Howell Branch Rd. btbCannot be combined with any other coupon or offer. Expires 1/1/14. Savannah Court and Cove Excellence in Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation 1301 W. Maitland Blvd. Maitland, FL 32751407-645-3990www.SavannahCourtMaitland.comAssisted Living Facility License No. 8447 Skilled Nursing Facility License No. 1635096 Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above. You are always welcome!A Senior Living Community where Hospitality is a Way of Life.

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013 | Page 7ter Park. theres nothing like it, Bethel said. I do a lot of shopping and I think all of their things are uniquethe store stands apart. The family-owned business has had a store in Dunedin for more than 10 years, and decided it was time for a second store. With much research to the Central Florida area they decided Hannibal Square was the on Nov. 16. The people of Winter Park really just came out and showed tremendous support and far exceeded any expec tations, Painter said. People really like to support the independently owned businesses. Weve been just weve gotten thus far, and taken back by how kind everyone has been. She said that their grand opening was elbow-to-elbow with people, not only shopping, but just coming out to show support. Its really a community here; ev eryone is so wonderfully supportive here, Christopher Scott said. It feels like here in Hannibal Square we are all a fam ily. Lafayette and Rushford Sales Associate Kim Whittaker said the Hannibal Square community has welcomed the new home store with open arms. There are so many neighbors that are upscale and people just dont reach out but not here, Whittaker said. We want to see everyone succeed, and anything we can do for each other is just going to make it a better community. Lafayette and Rushford know Winter Park was the right choice for them and couldnt be happier with their decision to open here. waiting for us here, Painter said. It feels like weve already been here forever, theres an intangible quaintness to this area. A Free Concert Sponsored by:Maitland Presbyterian Church 341 N. Orlando Avenue Maitland, FLDecember 15, 2013 7:30 p.m.Call 321-303-1404 $2 OFF Any Sub, Chip and Large Drink purchase. Visit our tasty new Winter Park restaurant location at: 528 S. Park Avenue 407.960.7827 By Rollins College Park Avenue near Fairbanks. 2010 Firehouse Subs. This offer valid with coupon at participating restaurants. Prices and participation may vary, see restaurant for details. Limit one per customer, per visit. Not valid with any other offers. Exp. 3/31/14. Theres a new Firehouse Subs right here on Park Avenue in Winter Park. Get ready for steamin hot subs piled high with top notch meats and cheeses. ( WERE OPEN )Stop, Drop, And Roll On In. Visit FirehouseSubs.com to order online and find your nearest location. GIFTS | From handmade Santas to eclectic ornaments, Winter Parks newest shop is prepped for the season CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE

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Page 8 | Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer rffrntbrbtrbrtr rr btr r r r nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr Family Fun Event sponsored by Family Fun Event sponsored by One Senior Place ... See our full Calendar of Events at OneSeniorPlace.com407.949.6733715 Douglas Avenue Altamonte Springs, FL 32714M-F 8:30am 5pmSENIOR CLUB SPONSORED BY FAMILY PHYSICIANS GROUP EVERY MONDAY, 10AM 12PM December 16th Movie Day December 23rd Casino Day December 30th Bingo MONDAY, DECEMBER 16 The Real Estate Specialists are IN! Also: 23rd & 30th (10am-1pm) Presented by EXIT Real Estate Results By Appointment Only 407.949.6714 TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17 Health Care Reform 3pm-4:30pm By Florida Blue-McBride Insurance Agency RSVP 407.230.7825 WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 18 Are your Hearing Aids in the Drawer? 3pm-4:30pm Presented by Harmony Hearing Centers of America RSVP 407.949.6737 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 19 The Real Estate Specialists are IN! 9am-12pm By EXIT Real Estate Results We will be closed on Wednesday, December 25th. Happy Holiday!Calendar of Events December 2013 After struggling in the wake of defensive player injuries that took a toll but never knocked them off their eight-game win streak, the Knights will have more than 20 days to rest before the biggest game in team history. And after Sunday nights announcement they know theyre heading to Glendale, Ariz., to face Baylor in the Tostitos Fiesta Bowl. But until this weekend the Knights thought theyd be head ing to the Sugar Bowl in New Or ule was set into motion Friday night, when unranked Bowling Green upset the Northern Illinois Huskies, who were No. 14 in the BCS Standings at the time, with a 47-27 rout. That loss put UCF in position to play in NIUs place, a presumptive slot in the Fiesta Bowl. After UCFs win over SMU in Dallas on Saturday night, their fate was all but sealed. Ten years after head coach George OLeary took the helm of the UCF Knights football team, in their best season ever en route to their biggest bowl game. The NCAAs top offense awaits KnightsISAAC BABCOCK Observer staff Please see KNIGHTS on next page PHOTOS BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVERChristmas arrived early in Winter Park thanks to the Morse Museums annual event on Dec. 5.Christmas in the Park

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013 | Page 9 e Mayflower. Smart. Secure. And Spectacular.Imagine a time in your life when you have the freedom to do exactly as you please. Relax ...revitalize ...reinvent ...renew. And, then imagine a place where you can do all that on your terms and still have the complete peace of mind that comes only with the guarantee of comprehensive continuing care. That place ...is The Mayower the gold standard for retirement communities in Central Florida. Here, you have the freedom and exibility to customize your home and your retirement lifestyle to make them uniquely yours. And while youre doing that, youll also have the guarantee of pre-funded long-term care in our 5-Star rated Health Center. Thats what prompted residents like Father Bob and Sallie Phillips to plan ahead and proactively make the move ...because they wanted to, not because they needed to. How about you?Whats your plan for the future? Call today, and lets talk about it: 407 .672. 1620. 88141 PR AD WPO 12/2013 Winter Pa rk's Distinctive Retirement Community www.themayf lower.com 1620 Mayower Court Winter Park, FL 32792 A WORRY FREE LIFESTYLE PLUS GUARANTEED LONG TERM CARE [ now peace of mind ] MAY 994 Phillips Ad_WPO.indd 1 10/30/13 2:11 PM rffrfnColleen D. Kennon, Owner tbbf b KEEP UP WITH MAITLAND NEWS AND EVENTS!www.IndependenceLane.com Facebook.com/ItsMyMaitland KNIGHTS | After another heart-attack victory to close out the season, UCFs biggest challenge awaitsinteresting, but controlled their destiny all the way to the closing against SMU Saturday. They hung in there and made some good adjustments at halftime, Head Coach George OLeary told UCFKnights.com after the game. We came out in the no-huddle and Blake did an outstanding job of controlling the ball. UCF had struggled against the bitter cold all game, which had been in the 20s on account of a morning kickoff in Central Time. The Knights dropped passes, in the frigid weather in Dallas, where snow ringed the edges of Blake Bortles found the end zone himself in the deciding score, rac ing to the left sideline and cruising past the pylon to put the Knights up for good. Bortles would throw for 242 yards to lead the Knights to victory. After barely cracking doublethe Knights would go on to rack up 338 yards in the game after accelerating their offense in the second half. They would outgun the Mustangs offense, which had 313 yards, most of them on the ground. Where UCF led substan versus SMUs 15. For the better half of the fourth quarter the Knights were in con trol, shutting down the Mustangs defense and driving down the trouble on receptions and runs. UCF receiver Rannell Hall had crucial catches all game to ad vance the offense, and the UCF defense found ways to stop the SMU offense in the second half after giving a concussion to SMU quarterback Neal Burcham in the fourth quarter. Hall would catch 44 yards of receptions. Wide re ceiver Jeff Godfrey led the team in reception yardage with 62 yards. The Knights had trouble early on after letting the Mustangs score it to 3-0. The Knights wouldnt catch up to the Mustangs until after the half, overtaking them in the fourth quarter and holding on for the win. Thanks to the win, which set a sweep of conference play in team ular season ranked No. 15 in the BCS Standings an all-time high. At 8:30 p.m. on New Years fense in NCAA Division 1 football this season. The Baylor Bears have gained an average of 624.5 total yards per game and 53.3 points per game, about 20 points more per game than the Knights. But the Bears have also been known to give up big plays, making for high-scoring games for both teams. With the Knights for blowout performances against Akron, FIU, UConn and Rutgers, it could be an offensive slugfest. The game will be aired on ESPN. CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE ARCHIVE PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERKnights fans have reason to cheer after learning the football team is Fiesta Bowl bound.

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Page 10 | Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer rfnrrt bnrr frrr trr nf nrrt nrr rtfrf nnrrn tnrr rrtbnrrr nnffnft nfn ft rnfnt fnrrffr ft nnf rt nt rt fnnrrtn rr nnt rfnn nnnrnn tnrnn rfnrrrtrn nfrn ntn ft rfntbf rfbnnf tn By Richard P. BryanJumbo Mortgages Are Alive and Well Almost every week you read the predictions of real estate experts on the state of the current home market and just what buyers and sellers can expect now and in the near future. Most experts see home prices climbing by single digits over the next four years, while a number of real estate forecasters see prices plateauing early in 2014 before picking up speed in the second and third quar ters. While national statistics ing in a given market, we have seen local existing home prices continue to climb over the past 24 months which has helped narrow the medi an price differential from the boom market days of 2005-2007. Real es tate experts and savvy homebuyers alike look at median price as the true barometer of housing market conditions over a period of time. Me dian prices are much more accurate numbers to work with than average home prices which can be skewed by one or more million-dollar-plus residences or several lower priced homes. Historically local residential real estate has appreciated about 4-6 percent annually. In fact, when we straight-line the appreciation of existing homes in Orange and Seminole counties over the past 20 years were right on a 4 percent pace. At this writing there is a 4-month sup ply of existing homes which will hold prices steady or perhaps result in slightly higher prices depending on location. There also is the possi bility that we may see an onslaught of properties coming on the market in January and February which will increase inventory and keep prices steady. If, however, inventory drops below a 3-month supply existing home prices will probably increase. That said, the median price of existing homes locally is nowhere near what it was in the boom years of July 1, 2005 through June 30, 2007 when it stood at $249,000. The gap, however, has been narrowed from 56.2 percent in 2010 when the median price had dipped to $109,000, to 38.5 percent in the past 12 months when the median had risen to $153,000. There are a variety of rea sons, but location often has a great borhoods performing better than others when it comes to closing the median price gap. Our analysis showed the median price off from a low of 21.2 percent in Baldwin Park ing quicker, to a high of 43.7 percent covers both Orange and Seminole counties, where the price gap is cur rently the widest. Just as the median price of existing homes in Orange and Seminole counties is improving, so is home buyer optimism and that bodes well as we prepare to enter a new year. Scott Hillman is president of Fannie Hillman + Associates, a 32-year-old Winter Park-based real estate company specializing in residential real estate sales. He can be reached at (407) 644-1234 or scott@fanniehillman.com.Median home prices a true barometer of market WINDSONG BEAUTY DESIGNED BY WP ARCHITECT ROBERT MILLER CUSTOM BUILT WINDSONG ESTATE ON SECLUDED LOT SLEEK & CONTEMPOARY W/ DETACHED GUEST HOUSE IN SEVILLA ONE-OF-A-KIND MASTERPIECE PERFECT FOR AUTO LOVERS W/ 19 CAR GARAGE Voted Best Real Estate Agency by Winter Park/Maitland Observer Readers www.fanniehillman.com

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013 | Page 11 Stop by and open your account TODAY 1. Annual Percentage Yield (APY) is accurate as of 11/07/2013. Rate is subject to change at any time without prior notice. Fees may reduce earnings. Offer applies to new accounts only; Public Funds are not eligible. Account must be opened on or before December 31, 2013 to qualify. Minimum opening deposit of $10,000 (up to a maximum of $500,000) will earn .75% APY. Rate applies to the rst six (6) months from opening date. Afterwards the rate will revert to the standard rates in effect, which as of 11/07/2013 are: For Personal High Yield Money Market, balances of $0.00 $99,999.99 earns 0.05% APY; balances of $100,000.00 and above earns 0.30% APY and for Business Money Market, balances of $0.00$49,999.99 earns 0.05% APY; balances of $50,000.00 $99,999.99 earns 0.15% APY; and balances of $100,000.00 and above earns 0.30% APY. Maintain an average daily balance of $2,500 to avoid the $12.00 monthly maintenance fee. These Accounts are governed by Federal Regulation which limits the number of certain types of transactions; no more than six (6) transfers and withdrawals, or a combination of such to your other accounts or to a third party per month or statement cycle. Excessive transaction fee of $5.00 will be assessed for each transaction in excess of six (6) during a month. 851 1113 FloridaCommunityBank.com Florida based. Florida focused.1APY Money Market Get PowerfulSavings Growth! Limited 407.622.5000 407.909.1744 407.333.2246 407.814.0491 407.774.3000 321.453.5800 321.868.3580 851 1113-MMKT-WinterParkObserver-NA-FINAL.indd 1 11/8/13 3:24 PM rfntbfrfntbtf tbb bbbbfbbn bn ftbfbbtb fnb ffffbb bnbbftbf bb407.645.4321www.KellyPriceAndCompany.comn Jennifer KingDee MorganKelly L. PricePamela RyanJennifer SloanAudra Wilks PHOTOS BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVERThe holiday season kicked off in Maitland, with the lighting of the tree at Lake Lily Park on Dec. 7. Maitlands Season of Light PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK AND SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVERLocal news anchor Bob Opsahl told the story of Winter Parks Christmas tree and then hit the lights for the citys tree lighting on Dec. 7. Winter Park Tree Lighting WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com Order your classified ad online!At WPMObserver.com you can create, customize and pay for your ad in one convenient place!

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Page 12 | Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer 407-896-5520 John Penne9 year resident of Baldwin Park Orlando Top 100 Real Estate Agents Orlando Magazine 2011, 2012 & 2013AFFORDABLE REAL ESTATE COMMISSIONS31/2% Commission Realtors Full MLS ServiceEMAIL: pennybrokers@earthlink.net WEB: pennybrokersorlando.com COMPARE THE SAVINGSSALES PRICE 6% TRADITIONAL BROKER 3.5% PENNY BROKER SELLER SAVES 1% PENNY BROKERS SELLER SAVES$200,000.$12,000.$7,000.$5,000.$2,000.$10,000. $300,000.$18,000.$10,500.$7,500.$3,000.$15,000. $400,000.$24,000.$14,000.$10,000.$4,000.$20,000. $500,000.$30,000.$17,500.$12,500.$5,000.$25,000. $600,000.$36,000.$21,000.$15,000.$6,000.$30,000. $700,000.$42,000.$24,500.$17,500.$7,000.$35,000. $800,000.$48,000.$28,000.$20,000.$8,000.$40,000. $900,000.$54,000.$31,500.$22,500.$9,000.$45,000. $1,000,000.$60,000.$35,000.$25,000.$10,000.$50,000. WHEN SELLING YOUR HOME, THERE IS A DIFFERENCE Sold over 40 homes in Baldwin Park Thank you, Thank you, Thank you to all our friends, clients and customers who made 2013 a great year! 4094 MARKHAM PL Baldwin Park 3 Br+ Ofce $415,000 4097 WARDELL Baldwin Park 4/3 $530,000 5326 ARDSDALE LANE 3BR + 2025 COULSON ALLY $359,900 SOLD SOLD SOLD SOLDSEASONS BEST! Merry Christmas! Happy Hanakkah! Peace! Joy! Good tidings to all!Call 407-896-5520$439,900 BALDWIN PARK PRICE REDUCED Transitional design. 4BR/4BA + garage is in prestine condition & personies Baldwin Park Living at its nest! All new SS appliances, abundant 42 cherry cabinets, plantation shutters, tray ceilings, master bedroom w/California closet. Exterior screened porch w/ Walk to downtown, 2 blocks to Enders Park & Pool. TREASURE IN THE PARK LISA FLEMING Realtor Fannie Hillman + Associates (407) 644-1234 ext. 223 (321) 228-8341 cell www.fanniehillman.com lcfrealty@yahoo.comVoted Orlandos Best Residential Real Estate Oce Ranked a Top Producer since 2002Born and raised in the Winter Park/Maitland area DEDICATION. COMMUNICATION. NEGOTIATION.My skills will get you the results youre looking for. e real estate market is moving fast, thanks to low inventory and high buyer count, so contact me today to buy or sell your home quickly! Winter Parks Waterbridge Winter Parks Sevilla Orlandos Landcaster Park THE JERRY OLLER & SHIRLEY JONES TEAM Offering personalized service & attention to detail to every client. PENDING NEW LISTING SOLD Housing trends in 2014; Tight invento ry, rising inter est rates and home value gains Out with the old and in with the new! 2013 was a great year for many homeowners neigh borhoods and buyers alike as home values rose, interest rates remained affordable, and many communities in the greater-Orlan do area saw fewer vacant homes and foreclosures. Its been said that slow and steady wins the race, and 2014 is projected to continue the housing recovery this year began. Lets look at some of the expected trends for the New Year. Home values will continue West and South. Great news for Central Flo ridians here: According to the dence Index Survey, 3,000 Real tors were asked about expectations for home values in 2014. The Western and Southern regions were ranked highest with profes sionals predicting gains of 4 to 8 percent. This is great news for local homeowners and it also echoes a poll taken earlier in the year by Realty Trac, which indicated that more than 8 million homeowners nationwide are estimated to be in positive equity situations on their primary home loans this year. Interest rates will rise, but thats not likely for a few months. Attention homebuyers on the proverbial fence! Buying before March may save you money on your monthly mortgage pay ments. As of print deadline, the Fed had not yet met for the last policy-making committee of the year. In this meeting the Fed will probably do one of two things, Rising home values to greet us in 2014 Christina Rordam Keepin it Real Estate Please see CHRISTINA on page 14 ARCHIVE PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERMore sold signs and less inventory are expected for 2014, plus higher interest.

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013 | Page 13 INTEGRITY LOYALTY UNWAVERING ENTHUSIASM Jennifer SloanRealtor Sales Associate Lake Mary $1,175,000 5 BR | 4 BA | 4,784 SF Bonus Room Winter Park $1,295,000 4 BR | 4 BA | 3,654 SF Winter Park $699,000 3 BR | 3 BA | 2,746 SF Bonus Room SOLD SOLD SOLD c.407.810.8333 o.407.645.4321 HOUSES WANTED!!! Get a FREE No Obliga on CASH O er On Your House Within 24 Hours! (855) 755-1818 www.Circle18Homes.com CASH $$$ QUICK CLOSE ANY PRICE RANGE ANY CONDITION ANY SITUATION Q: one before. Wed like to have a crackling throughout the winter, but so far I cant get one to light. I just get a lot of smoke in the Madison, Wis. A: it before, and there are some safety tips you need to follow as well. use. If it was inspected and cleaned when you moved in, youre good to go; but if it hasnt, or you dont know when it was last inspected, contact a chimney cleaning ser vice. is safe: move furniture, rugs, boxes, paper nearby, get one and place it in an accessible spot. of wood in various sizes, along with old and home improvement stores are expen a walk and collect an armful of fallen, dry twigs and small branches. With your fuel ready, its time to get and outward. Its probably the reason your Twist a half-sheet of newspaper into a one end. Hold the burning end a few inches underneath damper for about 30 seconds or until you see smoke from the burning pa the stack, but its important to make sure stacking four smallto medium-sized logs in a square or triangular pattern. Tuck an assortment of twigs, shredded newspaper and small branches between and under Carefully light the kindling, starting near the back of the log stack and working and branches. Properly seasoned logs should catch within a few minutes, but dont be disappointed if you have to repeat the process. protective screen is in place. Remember to until they are completely cold, and dispose from the house or garage. By Samantha Mazzotta Dodging the DraftQ: The apartment Im living in has older windows, and now that winter is almost here, the cold air is seeping in easily. My landlord said he winterized the windows by painting them shut. I dont think thats a solution. Any tips for me to quickly shut out the draft and get those windows open? Chilly Nose in Brattleboro, Vt.A: There are better solutions out there, for sure, than painting over drafty spots in the windows. And having windows that are stuck shut is a clear safety issue. Since your land lord isnt in a hurry to fix or replace those leaky windows, you have some options to get through this winter comfortably and without having to spend too much money on heating. First, unstick those windows. Use a box cutter to slice through the new paint down to the corners where the window sash meets the frame. Then gently wiggle the window open so the new paint isnt damaged or torn away. Once the window is open, make sure it slides open and shut smoothly. If not, look for paint or other gunk on the slide tracks in which the sash is set. Sand this stuff away and then smooth the tracks by running a bar of soap along them a few times. Next, see if the screen outside the window (if there is one) is part of a storm window-screen combination. If so, you can slide the screen up to sit behind the top pane of the storm window, and slide the bottom storm window down. This provides added protection against wind and weather. Now, youll need to weather-strip the window. Measure the width and height of each window to figure out how much weather stripping youll need. For a rental unit, you shouldnt invest in the most expensive weather stripping, either. Compressible strips, usually made of foam or another flexible material, with adhesive backing usually work well and are easy to install. Measure and cut the stripping to fit along the bottom of the window sash. Make sure it fits and that the window closes completely and can be locked before attaching it by its adhesive backing. You may need to weather-strip other parts of the window, depending on their type, age and the condition theyre in. Make sure the strips dont interfere with easy operation of the window. If you have a door that leads outside, try adding a piece of weather stripping along the base of the door to keep out drafts. Send your questions or home tips to ask@thisisahammer.com. My new ebook, Best Home Tips, is avail able to download on Amazon Kindle! Pick it up it today for just 99 cents. 2013 King Features Synd., Inc.To find drafty spots in a window, run a hair dryer along the sash and frame while a helper stands on the other side, feeling for warm air coming through.Backlogged Claims Actually Go DownDespite the projections that the number of backlogged claims with the Department of Veterans Affairs would climb during the recent government shutdown (so said Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric K. Shinseki), it wasnt as bad as expected. In a pre-shutdown reprieve, the VA was granted an exemption, and claims processing stayed up and running. However, during the shutdown, processors werent able to continue working their 20 hours per month mandatory overtime to whittle away at the backlog (claims that have been sitting for more than 125 days). That mandatory overtime has been a key component to getting the backlog reduced, and will stop completely in November. One would think that a lot of claims work was left undone. But the Monday Workload Report shows that despite the shutdown, the canceled overtime and all the doomand-gloom projections, the number of claims actually went down. Grant ed, they didnt go down by much, but they did go down. (If you want to view the archived file of Monday Morning Reports, go online to www. vba.va.gov/reports/mmwr/) Remember that before the shut down, the VA hadnt met its own projections of how fast the number of claims would fall on their way to eliminating the backlog. It didnt meet its own goal to the tune of approximately 100,000 claims for fiscal year 2013. (Some in Congress were a bit annoyed about that, since the VA had been granted $1.59 billion specifically to bring down the backlog.) Bottom line: If the mandatory over time is canceled permanently, then yes, the number of delayed claims can continue to go down, but it will be at a very slow rate. While the VA is still aiming for 2015 to clean up that backlog, its looking increasingly unlikely for that to happen. Freddy Groves regrets that he can not personally answer reader ques tions, but will incorporate them into his column whenever possible. Send email to columnreply2@gmail.com. 2013 King Features Synd., Inc.King Features Weekly ServiceNovember 4, 2013 Building a re? Dont get smoked Send your questions or home tips to ask@ thisisahammer.com. My new e-book, Best Home Tips, is available to download on Amazon Kindle! Pick it up it today for just 99 cents.

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Page 14 | Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer WHERE QUALITY MEETS EFFICIENCY216 S. Park Ave, Ste. 1 | Winter Park, FL 32789email: titledesk@midtowntitlellc.com www.midtowntitlellc.comP: 407.644.1157 F: 407.644.1357Serving Central Florida Homeowners & Lenders since 2006 Residential. Commercial. Loan-Purchase. Renance Closings. Satellite closing services available throughout state of Florida Bonded. Licensed. Insured. $685,000 $399,000 SOLD SOLD is made up of enthusiastic home buyers that have more optimism home purchases than any other age group. According to a recent National Association of Realtors study that evaluated the generational dif ferences of recent homebuyers and sellers, 85 percent of buyers younger than age 32 believe their cial investment. The oldest individuals of the Millennial generation are start understand that homeownership is one way to accumulate wealth, especially for younger families in todays world. The Millennial generation is the largest in history after the baby boomers, and they are ex pected to give the housing market a boost. However, there are challenges that might hinder their ability to purchase homes, in par ticular tight lending standards, student loan debt, and an uncer tain job market. The impact of student loan debt is a concern for future gen erations and the ability to be come homeowners, explains Orlando Regional Realtor Asso ciation Chairman Steve Merchant, owner-broker of Global Realty International. Those burdened with growing monthly debt payments will have restricted access it harder to save for a down pay ment. Yet those challenges arent changing younger buyers at titudes about homeownership. In Orlando, Millennial buyers are fortunate to be in a housing market with record affordabil ity and a rising inventory level, which means more great homes to choose from. Todays market presents great opportunities for young buyers to own a home, says Merchant. Orlando Realtors are commit ted to making sure those who are willing and able to own a home have the opportunity to do so, and can expertly guide young buyers through the complicated process. Young home buyers exuding optimism, condence CHRISTINA | Expect bond spending to drop in March, avoiding a mortgage rate spike either begin to cut back on their bond purchasing campaign straight away, or schedule a more gradual pull back. The most likely time frame for these changes to take effect is March, according to experts like Vincent Reinhart. Re inhart is the chief United States economist for Morgan Stanley, and he believes the Fed will set in motion a plan for reducing bond spending around that time. If this plays out as he expects, then we will likely avoid another mort gage rate spike in the immediate future like the one we saw back nounced he would be scaling back bond buying. Inventory will remain tight, es pecially in hot neighborhoods. In yet another continuation of 2013s market, Realtors are antici pating inventory to remain tight in high demand areas such as the Southern region we call home. This means we will continue to see what is considered a sellers market, and the hottest homes fetching top dollar and multiple bids. Sellers can maximize this opfore putting it on the market and hiring an agent that has a wide digital reach so their home is seen by both local, out-of-state and out-of-country buyers. As for the buyers, rates are still currently in the 4-percent range and there are still plenty of homes for sale. Your dream home is within reach, just Happy New Year! CONTINUED FROM PAGE 12

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013 | Page 15Now through Dec. 29 Its a Wonderful Life: A live radio play The Orlando Shakespeare Theater invites us to share the holiday cheer of Its a Wonderful Life, performed as a 1940s radio broadcast, running through Dec. 29. Inspired by the legendary bring to life a dozen characters in a radio broadcast complete with commercial jingles. Orlando Shakes invites us to fall in love all over again with George Bailey and the angel who saves his life on Christmas Eve. Call 407-4471700 or visit orlandoshakes.org To Editor: photo features actors Brad DePlanche, Suzanne ODonnell, and Piper Rae Patter son. Photo by Landon St. Gordon.Dec. 12 to 22 Breakthrough Theatre presents The Best Christmas Pageant EverIn this hilarious Christmas classic, a well-intentioned couple struggles to put on their church Christmas pageant with a cast that includes the Herdman kids, the most inventively awful kids in history. Its fun and mayhem as the Herdman kids collide headon with the Christmas story! Running from Dec. 12 to 22, place your ticket reservation by calling 407-920-4034. The Theatre is at 419A W. Fairbanks Ave. in Winter Park.Dec. 13 through Jan. 5 Bookish sculptures at A&H Museums MaitlandWith an opening reception Art Center will present new sculptures by Dawn Rosendahl, exhibit Ex Libris Rosendahl transforms books into sculp tures, resurrecting the books like blocks of wood, rendering them into fascinatingly surrealist works of art. Call 407-539-2181 or visit ArtandHistory.orgDec. 13 Free Fridays at the Morse Museum While all Fridays are free at the evening of Dec. 13 will be extra special with Victoria Schultz performing on the harp, docentguided family tours beginning at 5:15 p.m., an art demonstration by author and illustrator Mark Wayne Adams at 6 p.m., and a curator tour of Louis Comfort Tiffanys Laurelton Hall at 7 p.m. Its all free at the Morse Museum in Winter Park. Call 407645-5311 or visit morsemuseum.orgDec. 13 and 14 McRae Artists Holiday Open HouseThe 21 artists at McRae Art Studios in Winter Park will welcome art lovers and collectors to a Holiday Open House on Dec. 13 from 6 to 9 p.m., and Dec. 14 from 4 to 9 p.m. The annual event is an opportunity for the public to walk through the artists studios, visit with artists and purchase original works of art from the more than 1,000 available artworks. The Studios are at 904 Railroad Ave. in Winter Park, and the event is free and open to the public. Visit mcraeart studios.com or call 407-682-2740.Dec. 14 Clare and the Chocolate NutcrackerIts an up-tempo Nutcracker when Clare lives her enchanted dream, traveling with the Chocolate Nutcracker to the Kingdom of Toys. Visiting Candy Land and New Orleans (Clares Mardi Gras. This Nutcracker is performed in ballet, jazz, modern, swing, gospel and hip hop as Tchaikovsky and Duke Ellington are fused to bring us a very contemporary version of the holiday classic. Call 407-403-5519 or visit clareandthechocolatenutcracker. net Dec. 14 A boat parade for the history books The Rotary Club of Winter Park will present the ninth an Ski Show on Dec. 14 on Lakes Virginia and Osceola in Winter Park. The on-the-water Parade features holiday-lighted boats along the lakes shorelines. Events begin at 3:30 p.m. with a water ski show, followed by a Josh Garrick Culture worthy of your calendar Please see CULTURE on page 16 r fn tbn r rfr nntrntbnr ffftbbfb nn tnbn nnf t nrn rnn n brn tbn r bn ROSENDAHL SCULPTURES BEST PAGEANT EVER

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Page 16 | Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer move to the Polasek Museum, tion. A sculptural Christmas tree by sculptor Amy Wieck will also be unveiled. The Parade will pass the Polasek Museum at 6:30 p.m. Call 407-647-6294 or visit wpboatparade.comDec. 14 and 15 Bach Festival Society presents A Classic ChristmasThe Bach Festivals most popular performances in the beautiful Knowles Chapel at Rollins College are the Classic Christmas performances that performing holiday classics and choral masterworks. With only two performances Dec. 14 at 7:30 p.m. and Dec. 15 at 2 p.m., these much-loved choral concerts exemplify the holiday season. call 407-646-2182. Dec. 14 and 15 Eat, Drink & Be Merry with the Orlando Gay Chorus Merry with than the Orlando Gay Chorus as they present their Holi day Concert at the Plaza at 425 N. Bumby Ave. in Orlando. At this celebration of Faith, Fun and Festivity, the OGC will sing and dance to the music that captures the festive heart of the Holidaze. Performances are set for Dec. 14 at 7:30 p.m. and Dec. 15 at 4:30 p.m. Please bring a new, unwrapped toy to support Toys For Tots! Visit orlandogaychorus.org Dec. 15 Maitland Symphony free holiday concert The Maitland Symphony Orchestra invites everyone to their annual free holiday concert on Dec. 15 beginning at 7:30 p.m. Including music from The Nutcracker and familiar melodies of the Christmas season, a special feature will be the Florida pre miere of a work by Michael Mahadeen called Winter Lights. Performing Arts of Maitland invites the whole family to dream together with music from the past, from the heavens and into the New Year. At the Maitland Presbyterian Church, call 321303-1404 or visit pamaitland.org Dec. 15 and 22 Breakthrough Theatres Cabaret Sunday goes Holidaze Winter Parks Breakthrough Theatre will present a special two-night-only cabaret called the Breakthrough Family Christmas on Sundays, Dec. 15 and 22, at 7 p.m. With a huge cast of Breakthrough alumni singing favorite Christmas songs and sharing stories of Christmas-past, this eventfrom-the-heart is the perfect way to put you and your family in the Christmas spirit. For reservations, call 407-920-4034. Dec. 17 and 18 Andrea McArdles Sounds of the Season Broadways Original Annie Andrea McArdle will celebrate the holiday season at The Abbey with Sounds of the Season, with performances on Dec. 17 and 18 at 8 p.m. The show business legend will offer traditional holiday favorites along with beloved Broadway hits from Oliver and Annie. McArdle was the youngest performer ever nominated for a for the title role in Annie and has since appeared in countless musicals and caba rets. For tickets, visit ticketweb.comDec. 17 and 18 The Winter Park Playhouses Cabaret Series That powerhouse duo Heather Alexander and Laura Hodos will perform their newest cabaret, Happy Hour, at the Winter Park Playhouse on Dec. 17 and 18. Happy Hour celebrates the lighter side of life with comedic and uplifting songs, ranging from musical theatre to standard hits, all of which is extra special as rendered by the charming, comedic, and always spontane ous Heather and Laura. Call 407-645-0145 or visit winterparkplayhouse.org for reservations. Dec. 18 to 23 Dickens by Candlelight with tea and cookiesOf all the ways to experience Charles Dickens A Christmas Carol my favorite is the production called Dickens by Candlelight. While candlelight is in the title, the production brings us into the action by seating us at tables where we are served tea and homemade cookies as the extraordinary three actors (who And this year is extra special to have Robin Olson, who created Dickens by Candlelight in 1997, return to the cast along with audience favorites John DiDonna and Monica Tamborello. Running Dec. 18 to 23, call 407-222-7669 or visit Dickensbycandlelight.com Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906.CULTURE | The Christmas cheer keeps coming with concerts, parties, plus tea and cookies with Dickens CONTINUED FROM PAGE 15 WEED Robert William, 58, artist. Rob ert Bob Weed passed away suddenly on Thanksgiving Day November 28, 2013 in Santa Fe, New Mexico following brief re spiratory complications from chemotherapy treatment. Bob was born on July 18, 1955 in Norwalk, Connecticut. Bob graduated artist communities including Westport ConThomas, Virgin Islands. Bobs tremendous thirst for life and his wit and charisma cast a huge shadow and all who loved him are devastated by his sudden depar ture. Bob enjoyed painting well into the night with his beloved entertain all who would listen with wisdom and wine. Bob was a everything and the world is less beautiful without him. Bob is survived by his wife Raven L. Weed, his father George W. Weed, his brothers Damian G. Weed and Thaddeus G. Weed and his nephew who honors Bobs name with his middle name Erik Robert Berardinelli Family Funeral Service 1399 Luisa Street Santa Fe, NM 87505 (505) 984-8600 www.berardinellifuneralhome.com ANDREA MCARDLE HAPPY HOUR CABARET This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORG @EnzianTheater Letters to Santa Event: THE MUPPET CHRISTMAS CAROLA special Holiday event and screening With treats and fun activities for children! Sun 11:30 AMSaturday Matinee Classics: ITS A WONDERFUL LIFEExperience this classic on the big screen! Sat 12 PM OPENING FRIDAY! Directed by Alexander Payne Cast | Will Forte, Bruce Dern, Bob Odenkirk NEBRASKA Fri Sun 3:30, 6:30, 9:30 Mon Thurs 6:30, 9:30 WEDNESDAY NIGHT PITCHER SHOW SPICE WORLD 7:30 FREE

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013 | Page 17Opinions EDITORIAL CARTOON Chris Jepson PerspectivesWhy is more better? When asked what we should toast to, one of my responses maraderie. More fun. More introspection. More grace. More champagne. You get the idea. I think it challenging as human be ings to not want more. I subscribe to design, fashion and ar chitectural publications and I look at what others possess and some of it I want. I would love to have a house, a refuge just outside of Florence, on the way to Sienna. Id take a beach house on the west coast of Costa Rica and if I had a big pile of chips, Id have an apartment (with in New York City. Four residences would be just about right for my personal design ambitions. Creating, experiencing and living in beautiful environments ranks high on my list of priorities. Interesting to me is my lack of interest in cars. I could give two twits what I ride in as long as it is relito pick-up WUCF-FM 89.9 I have even less interest in wristwatches. invests in an expensive watch. Thats me. I have not worn a watch since 1985. I purchased that watch for $3 at an Omaha pizza restaurant that was doing a promo tion; it was colorfully amusing. Our stuff, our desire for stuff, however, is killing us. More. The more stuff and experiences we accumulate the more damaging we are to the planet and its environment. We understand how absolutely devastating human beings are to our fellow species as well as to the land, water and air of the planet. There is no ambiguity that the more human beings on the planet, the worse our prospects as a species. More. Do more human beings imply a better life for all? An argument for more is that the bigger the pool of human ity, the more prospects that there will be scientists to solve our environmental problems, more creative geniuses to artistically enthrall, inspire and amuse us. Alas, that may be true, but more humanity also increases the probability of more psycho paths and deadbeats. If Americas population is to grow 100 million this century, will the number of serial killers increase proportionally? How many more low-wage, fast food workers does America require? More. Small populations can create phenomenal environments producing incredible creative advancements. Con sider 5th century B.C. Athens or the Ancient Library of Alexandria, or 15th century Flor ence or 16th century Elizabethan England. Extraordinary advances in what it means to be a human being were achieved by getting enough people together under the right circumstances, and require hundreds of millions of people or Renaissance Florence. More humanity is not axiomatically progress. Actually, it will prove an impediment to human advancement. More. That is the dichotomy we all face as 21st century Americans. What we need more of is birth control and responsible adults. Our future as a species, our planet depends on it. Id toast to that. And we dont need no expensive watch to know time is running out. Cheers. More time? Not in the cards Jepson is a 27-year resident of Central Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.US Louis Roney Play On!Some guys measure success in terms of dollars. I concentrate on what I have man aged to accomplish. cross the Atlantic, Admiral Byrd spent a year alone at the South Pole, Bill Tilden was beating everybody at tennis, Bobby Jones was world golf champion, and Babe Ruth was the sultan of swat. These guys were among the accomplishers of their day. I was a little kid noticing that the way to get recognized favorably in this world is was taught that my own accomplishments were all that would ever bring me credit. As a result, I look back over some 92 years at things I managed to get done come hell or high water, and my charitable memory allows me to forget a multitude of my One glaring truth rises to the surface: I never did anything worthwhile without the help of someone else, and worthwhile youre honest and looking to build selfesteem, dont kid yourself by thinking you can do it with things that are snaps, and that just anybody can do all by himself. break the 100-yard dash record, but early on I was shooting for successes that lay quite far beyond the end of my nose. I found out rather soon that the best oranges were at the top of the tree, not down low where pickers had already been busy, and where no climbing was required. In athletics, the sports that made one think better of himself had to involve competition with other guys of at least the same age and size. In the classroom, one had to vie successfully with that homely gal who always made straight As. To be good in both directions, one had to Render unto Caesar those things which are Caesars, and unto God those things that are Gods. The ultimate terrible human competition is war, whose results are life and death. Such realizations make one try rather hard and put out everything he has out, that is. War is a game invented by old men who put young men in the position of kill or be killed, a very simple formula that works only because young men have who is trying to kill you does not necessitate that your ideology be the opposite of his. However opposite convictions are often the cases between deadly competitors. Competition is historically the spark of the most worthy human accomplishments. The need creates the invention, doesnt it? Would Edison have come up with the electric light bulb if he had been living automobile makers put the engine in the front? Thats where the horse was in the horse and wagon, wasnt it? Traditional change calls for need plus imagination, and opportunity, and the human animal has always had a goodly supply of these. Necessity is the mother of invention. In the human mind, wanting and needing often meld into one identical inventive compulsion. Years ago I made a movie in France of the opera Faust whose title role I sang many times in France and America. The ancient Faust legend concerns a brilliant scientist, who in his old age trades his soul to the Devil for a return to the youth and romance of his early years. Fausts mad his life and brought him to the verge of suicide, but the appearance of the Devil in a puff of smoke holds the promise of Fausts regaining his youth temporarily. Faust trades his eternal soul to the Devil. Are many people today driven by the craving for the acquisition of power? A re cent world-visitor, Adolf Hitler, is enough proof that power can be attained evilly. And Jack Kennedy was quick to remind us, Life is not fair. But, then again, Alls fair in love and war, isnt it? Getting things done About Roney: HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney) King Features Weekly ServiceDecember 9, 2013 Do more human beings imply a better life? More humanity also increases the probability of more psychopaths.Letters to the editorSend your thoughts (400 words or less) to Managing Editor Isaac Babcock at ibabcock@turnstilemediagroup.com In November, the Winter Park Chamber its-kind, community-wide effort to raise funds for Second Harvest Food Bank of Central Florida. With partners Rollins College, Sodexo, the city of Winter Park, and Think Creative, as well as sponsors Winter tirement Community and Florida Distributing, and many community champions hunger in our community! I want to thank everyone who par ticipated and supported this great cause. Im incredibly proud of the Winter Park community. This was truly a monumental endeavor that encompassed our entire community, including local government, merchants, houses of worship and indi vidual residents. Special thanks also to the amazing group of folks who worked so hard behind the scenes to make this such a success. Ive never worked with a better group of people, and I have never been as thankful as I was this Thanksgiving. Patrick W. Chapin Winter Park Chamber of Commerce

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Page 18 | Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer OBSERVERJust Sold Homes THE MMARKEt T PLAc C E MindGym December 9, 2013 MindGym December 9, 2013 Jerry Oller 1121 Woodland St, Orlan do $490,000. 12/05/2013 Janis Fuller 311 E Morse blvd #4-1, Winter Park $396,000. 12/05/2013 Jackie OLeary 11824 Iselle Dr, Or lando $264,500. 12/06/2013 Kelly Maloney 210 Tavestock Loop, Winter Springs $255,000. 12/09/2013 739 Bear Creek Circle, Winter Springs, FL 32708 sold by Jennifer King 100 S. Eola Avenue Unit 902, Orlan do, FL 32801 sold by Pamela Ryan SATURDAY 1-4 GREAT LOCATION ON LARGE LOT 1820 Pineview, Winter Park. 2BD/1.5BA, 1,411SF. Located on a large lot in Winter Park, this home boasts a large master bedroom suite with a walk-in closet. Wood cabinets in the kitchen. Large Florida room and bonus room not includ ed in square footage. $174,900 OBSERVER Open Houses Saturday, December 14th263 Minorca Beach Way Unit 802, New Smyrna Beach FL 32169 3 BR | 2 BA | 1,655 SF | $599,000 Gorgeous 8th floor unit in the Evissa building. Immaculate and professionally decorated with breathtaking views of the Intercoastal Waterway and the expansive Atlantic Ocean from every room. Kitchen is open to the dining room and breakfast nook. Living room with bar and slid ing glass doors to the private balcony. World-class amenities including 24-hour manned gatehouse, heated pools, Har Tru Tennis Center, clubhouse with catered kitchen, billards, library and lounge, fit ness center, gated beach and 64 boat slip marina. Hosted by: Kelly L. Price from 2-5 PM Sunday, December 15th1181 Covewood Trail, Maitland, FL 32751 3 BR | 2.5 BA | 2,447 SF | $425,000 Meticulously maintained, spacious 3 bedroom 2.5 baths pool home nestled in Maitland Woods neighborhood. Many up grades including wood floors in the family room and master bedroom. Hosted by: Rhonda Chesmore from 2-5 PM 680 Arjay Way, Winter Park FL 32789 4 BR | 3 BA | 2,912 SF | $599,999 Fabulous pool home in the highly desir able neighborhood of Timberlane Shores! This home has been completed updated, featuring hardwood floors throughout post of the home, split floor plan and wide open living spaces. The spacious master suite features wonderful walk-in closets and a spa-like master bath. The kitchen overlooks the family room and French doors lead out to the sparkling pool and pavered patio. Hosted by: Debbie Tassell from 1-4 PM 134 Detmar Drive, Winter Park, FL 3278 4 BR | 3 BA | 3,333SF | $785,000 Nestled in the heart of Winter Park this beautiful four bedroom, three and a half bath home offers two master suites, renovated gourmet kitchen with Wolf gas range, spacious bedrooms and large relaxing outside deck. Located in one of Winter Parks most desirable neighbor hoods with Park Avenue just a pleasant stroll away. Hosted by: Gwyn Clark from 2-4 PM 960 Georgia Avenue, Winter Park FL 32789 4 BR | 4 BA | 3,654 SF | $1,295,000 ANNOUNCEMENTSBE YOUR OWN BOSS! OWN A YOGURT, DOLLAR, MAILBOX, PARTY,TEEN, CLOTHING, OR FITNESS STORE. WORLDWIDE, 100% FINANCING, OAC. FROM $55,900 COMPLETE TURNKEY (800)385-2160 WWW.DRSS3.COMWinter Park Benefit Shop140 Lyman Ave, Winter Park needs items to sell: clothing, bedding, jewelry, kitchenware and bric-a brac. Also need ing volunteers. Contact Elizabeth Comer 407-647-8276. Open Tues & Fri at 9:30am; Sat 10am-1pm. All proceeds support childrens programs & the Or lando Blind Association.EDUCATIONYou can become an expert in HVAC installationand repair. Pinnacle Career Institute On line HVAC education in as little as 12 months. Call us today: 1-877-651-3961 or go online: www.HVAC-Online-Education.comHELP WANTEDDriver Trainees Needed NOW!Become a driver for Werner Enterprises. Earn $800 per week! Local CDL Training. 1-877-214-3624.Top 1% Pay & CSA Friendly Equip, Full Benefits + QualityHometime, No slip seating -Take truck home, CDL-A Req 877-258-8782 www. ad-drivers.com HELP WANTEDPosition Available: Club and House Administrator:The Womans Club of Winter Park, Inc., an almost century old non-profit civic and charitable organization, is seeking to fill a half time (20 hours per week) position by January 1, 2014. The successful candidate will have proven skills and experi ence in marketing, public relations, ad ministration, communications, social media, budgeting, and event planning. Ability to work well with a variety of people is essential. This person will work with the club Board of Directors, mem bers, and rental clients, as well as one other part-time employee, whose job entails house maintenance and technology. Salary range, $16-$18/hour depending upon experience and perfor mance. Please submit a full resume and letters of reference to Sandra Blossey, 1262 Melissa Ct. Winter Park, FL 32789Now Hiring: OTR CDLA Drivers New Pay Packageand $2500 Sign-On Bonus! Mostly 5-10 days out, full benefits, achievable bo nuses. Call for details 1-888-378-9691/ apply at www.heyl.netMISCELLANEOUSAIRLINE CAREERS begin here Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Finan cial aid for qualified students. Job place ment assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769 REAL ESTATE: COMMERCIALOFFICE FOR RENTWINTER PARKExecutive office available in prestigious bank building. Approximately 10 x 12 with windows on two sides. Additional space available for assistant, now or lat er, at additional charge. Aloma and Lake mont Avenues. 24-hour access. Minimum one year term. Broker. $500 per month. Lou Nimkoff 407-405-3368 office@briofl.comREAL ESTATE: FOR RENT1BR/1Bath Condo for RENT $725/ moSingle story condo no one above or be low. Range,stove,dishwasher,tile throughout, washer/dryer hookups, three closets. Cats ok. Dogs no way. Pool, tenn nis courts. Near intersection of RedBug Road & 436/Semoran Blvd. Very nice community. Available now. Minimum 1 year lease. Dan 863-797-4128 sunshi nerentals123@gmail.comREAL ESTATE: FOR SALE10 ACRE MOUNTAIN TOP ESTATE!Gorgeous Blue Ridge mountain acreage featuring spectacular 3 state views & towering hardwoods! Abuts U.S. National Forest. Great building spot! U/G utilities, paved rd frontage, RV friendly. Priced to sell only $69,900. Excellent financing. Call now 866-952-5303, x 92 Tennessee Log Cabin on 6 acres with FREE Boat Slip!Only $74,900 New 3BR, 2BA log cabin shell, lake access, nicely wooded, level setting. Quiet paved road frontage. Excel lent financing. Call now 877-888-0267, x 453 www.orange-blossom.com/7100 1-800-624-8835 1-800-624-8835 1-800-624-8835 1-800-624-8835 1-800-624-8835 Gifts of Floridas Finest FruitIndian River CitrusORANGE BLOSSOM 811 Item #7100 Order Navels & Grapefruit, get Tangelos FREE! Send a healthy holiday gift of famous Florida Navel Oranges and Ruby Red Grapefruit, and get a box of sweet, easy to peel Tangelos FREE. Tree-ripened and picked at the peak of perfection, satisfaction guaranteed. All three boxes will be shipped to one address.5 lbs. of Citrus in each box! EXTRA BONUS FREE 3 oz. Jar Genuine Honeybell Marmalade MindGym December 9, 2013 MindGym December 9, 2013 Picturesque location on a brick street at the corner of Georgia & Palmer ~ Walk to Park Avenue! Fantastic wall of windows in the family room overlooking the pool and spa. Spacious kitchen, plantation shutters throughout, gorgeous wood floors, high ceilings and three fireplaces. Private fenced backyard with mature landscaping. Hosted by: Lauren Fritch from 1-4 PM

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013 | Page 19 ARIES (March 21 to April 19) The arts are a strong part of the Arian aspect, with music becoming more dominant. An important decision looms as a longtime relationship takes an unexpected turn. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Surrounding yourself with beautiful things helps restore the Taurean soul. Enjoy an art exhibit, for example. Or redecorate your personal space with something truly splendid. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Some colleagues might try to talk you out of what they insist is a risk, but which you consider an opportunity. As usual, fol low your own good sense when making your decision. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) A workplace change you might have worried about soon proves to be high ly favorable for the clever Crab who is ready to take advantage of new oppor tunities opening up. LEO (July 23 to August 22) Con gratulations. Your Leonine pride is polished to a dazzling new brilliance thanks to your success in winning sup port for your new project from even the most doubtful of detractors. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) An unsettling rumor about a col leagues apparently regrettable behavior is soon proved groundless, allow ing you to enjoy the upcoming end-ofyear festivities in a happy mood. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Your success in helping to create a harmonious environment out of a chaotic situation earns you the admiration of someone who could become an important new presence in your life. SCORPIO (October 23 to Novem ber 21) Your Scorpions sense of loy alty could find you leading a passion ate defense of a loved one you feel is being unfairly treated. The weeks end brings long-awaited family news. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Your keen instincts are once more on high alert as you find yourself being pressured to make a quick decision about a certain matter. More facts come to light by weeks end. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) An unexpected workplace development could disrupt some family plans. A full explanation, however, averts domestic discord. A financial matter continues to need attention. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Spend time away from distractions to reassess some recent moves that might not have worked out as you had hoped. What you learn could be invaluable for future deci sion-making. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) A recent act of kindness is a reminder of how important your friends are to you. You might want to show your appreciation by hosting a special preNew Years party just for them. BORN THIS WEEK: You always try to do your best, which sometimes causes you to be critical of those who dont live up to your standards. 2008 King Features Synd., Inc. Dec. 26, 1908, Jack Johnson becomes the first black American to win the world heavyweight title when he knocks out Canadian Tommy Burns in the 14th round in a championship bout near Sydney, Australia. Johnson held the heavyweight title until 1915. Dec. 25, 1914, just after mid night on Christmas morning, German troops fighting in World War I cease firing their guns and artillery, and commence to sing Christmas carols. At points along the eastern and western fronts, Russian, French and British soldiers even heard brass bands joining the Germans in their joyous singing. Dec. 28, 1938, silent-film star Florence Lawrence commits suicide in Beverly Hills, Calif. Lawrence also was an inventor: She designed the first auto signaling arm, a mechanical turn signal, along with the first mechanical brake signal. She did not patent these inventions, however, and as a result she received no credit for or profit from either one. Dec. 23, 1946, President Harry Truman appoints an amnesty board to review cases of conscientious objectors who were imprisoned after refus ing to serve during World War II. Of the 15,000 violators of the World War II Selective Service Act, only 1,500 were considered entitled to full amnesty. Dec. 29, 1956, the New York Times leaks the news that the United States is preparing a major policy statement on the Middle East. The U.S. would oppose any Soviet military intervention in the region, and Middle Eastern powers could count on economic help and military help in opposing any Soviet aggression. Dec. 27, 1968, Apollo 8, the first manned mission to orbit the moon, returns safely to Earth after an historic six-day journey. Astronauts Frank Bor man, James Lovell, Jr., and William Anders were the first human beings to see the dark side of the moon. Dec. 24, 1972, comedian Bob Hope gives what he says is his final Christmas show to U.S. forces in Sai gon. The show marked Hopes ninth consecutive Christmas appearance in Vietnam. 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. King Features Weekly ServiceDecember 9, 2013 ARIES (March 21 to April 19) The arts are a strong part of the Arian aspect, with music becoming more dominant. An important decision looms as a longtime relationship takes an unexpected turn. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Surrounding yourself with beautiful things helps restore the Taurean soul. Enjoy an art exhibit, for example. Or redecorate your personal space with something truly splendid. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Some colleagues might try to talk you out of what they insist is a risk, but which you consider an opportunity. As usual, fol low your own good sense when making your decision. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) A workplace change you might have worried about soon proves to be high ly favorable for the clever Crab who is ready to take advantage of new oppor tunities opening up. LEO (July 23 to August 22) Con gratulations. Your Leonine pride is polished to a dazzling new brilliance thanks to your success in winning sup port for your new project from even the most doubtful of detractors. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) An unsettling rumor about a col leagues apparently regrettable behavior is soon proved groundless, allow ing you to enjoy the upcoming end-ofyear festivities in a happy mood. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Your success in helping to create a harmonious environment out of a chaotic situation earns you the admiration of someone who could become an important new presence in your life. SCORPIO (October 23 to Novem ber 21) Your Scorpions sense of loy alty could find you leading a passion ate defense of a loved one you feel is being unfairly treated. The weeks end brings long-awaited family news. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Your keen instincts are once more on high alert as you find yourself being pressured to make a quick decision about a certain matter. More facts come to light by weeks end. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) An unexpected workplace development could disrupt some family plans. A full explanation, however, averts domestic discord. A financial matter continues to need attention. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Spend time away from distractions to reassess some recent moves that might not have worked out as you had hoped. What you learn could be invaluable for future deci sion-making. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) A recent act of kindness is a reminder of how important your friends are to you. You might want to show your appreciation by hosting a special preNew Years party just for them. BORN THIS WEEK: You always try to do your best, which sometimes causes you to be critical of those who dont live up to your standards. 2008 King Features Synd., Inc. Dec. 26, 1908, Jack Johnson becomes the first black American to win the world heavyweight title when he knocks out Canadian Tommy Burns in the 14th round in a championship bout near Sydney, Australia. Johnson held the heavyweight title until 1915. Dec. 25, 1914, just after mid night on Christmas morning, German troops fighting in World War I cease firing their guns and artillery, and commence to sing Christmas carols. At points along the eastern and western fronts, Russian, French and British soldiers even heard brass bands joining the Germans in their joyous singing. Dec. 28, 1938, silent-film star Florence Lawrence commits suicide in Beverly Hills, Calif. Lawrence also was an inventor: She designed the first auto signaling arm, a mechanical turn signal, along with the first mechanical brake signal. She did not patent these inventions, however, and as a result she received no credit for or profit from either one. Dec. 23, 1946, President Harry Truman appoints an amnesty board to review cases of conscientious objectors who were imprisoned after refus ing to serve during World War II. Of the 15,000 violators of the World War II Selective Service Act, only 1,500 were considered entitled to full amnesty. Dec. 29, 1956, the New York Times leaks the news that the United States is preparing a major policy statement on the Middle East. The U.S. would oppose any Soviet military intervention in the region, and Middle Eastern powers could count on economic help and military help in opposing any Soviet aggression. Dec. 27, 1968, Apollo 8, the first manned mission to orbit the moon, returns safely to Earth after an historic six-day journey. Astronauts Frank Bor man, James Lovell, Jr., and William Anders were the first human beings to see the dark side of the moon. Dec. 24, 1972, comedian Bob Hope gives what he says is his final Christmas show to U.S. forces in Sai gon. The show marked Hopes ninth consecutive Christmas appearance in Vietnam. 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. King Features Weekly ServiceDecember 9, 2013 JOB RESOURCES at EmployFlorida.com helped Jasmine choose a career path and land a job she loves.You too can discover REAL RESULTS with Employ Florida.JASMINE GREENMonitor Support Technician, Shands HospitalEmploy Florida is an equal opportunity program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. The Employ Florida telephone number may be reached by persons using TTY/TTD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711. Disponible en Espanol.1-866-FLA-2345EmployFlorida.com Donate A Boat sponsored by boat angel outreach centers STOP CRIMES AGAINST CHILDREN www.boatangel.com2-Night Free Vacation!or Car Today! 800 1 CAR L ANGE FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now surviveDIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922