Winter Park-Maitland observer

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title:
Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication:
Winter Park FL
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates:
28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID:
UF00091444:00290


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WPMOBSERVER.COM Winter Parks Historic Preservation Advisory Board received a rude awakening Nov. 14 as archaeologist Myles Bland reviewed the citys historic preservation ordinance, declar ing that the city will surely lose its historic resources if changes arent made. The city commissioned Bland to take a closer look at their historic preservation efforts in response to the outcry from resi dents after the recent controver sy over the 128-year-old Capen House. Winter Parks historic resources were sparse to be gin with, making up only 8 percent of the citys total residential and commercial struc tures combined, Bland said. The city cur rently loses 1.2 percent of net known historic structures each year to demolition, according to his report. Use it or lose it folkshistor ic resources are non-renewable, and once theyre gone they cant be replaced, said Bland, who has more than 18 years of archae ological experience. This is a grim trend that is in need of reversal. Bland came forward with 12 different critiques in regards to how the city designates historic landmarks, ways they can obtain funding for historic preservation and new ordinances that should be put in place. Some of biggest problems Bland pointed out involved Tears brimmed in Cheryl and Richard Gonzales eyes as three solemnly spoken words helped to three on Nov. 22. Hes yours now, said Or ange County Judge Robert M. Evans. Just as if he had been born to you. The words marked an end to the couples wait and a begin ning to their new life as parents as their new smiling son, 10-yearto his seat behind them. In the span of a few sentences, went from one of ongoing worry to one with a secure home and two stable parents. Because of all the moving around he did before he came to us, he never had a place to keep his things, never had enough clothing, every time they moved he would have to start all over. Until now, Jayden never had a secure place, Cheryl Gonzales said. Today because of all the hard work of the people at Childrens Home Society and DCF, Jayden has us forever and we just want to say thank you so much to all of them for helping make this pos sible. Courtrooms usually reserved as serious, somber places instead became places of celebration on Nov. 22 for families like the Gonzales. In honor of Novem bers National Adoption Month, Orange, Seminole and Osceola counties hosted special adoption ceremonies, just in time to make before the holidays. In Orange County, the jury room was transformed into a makeshift courtroom to accom modate all the adoptive families, friends and relatives who were there to celebrate with them. Big grins mixed with tearyeyed looks of wonder as new families glanced at each other as dy bears and cake took the place of legal briefs, gavels and stenog raphers. Weve been a family since April, Cheryl said, but some thing changed today. Were no longer aunt and uncle; now were mommy and daddy. Many of the new families PHOTO BY ALLISON OLCSVAY THE OBSERVER Riley Crites, 7, with adopted mom grandmother Judy Crites at the National Adoption Day event held in Orlando Nov. 22. Dozens of families were ofcially created at the event. New family for the holidays Kids across Central their forever families Makes getting into Publix not a pleasure ALLISON OLCSVAY Observer staff Please see ADOPTION on page 2 Holiday supermarket shop pers in Maitland were unhappy last week as road construction of U.S. Highway 17-92 and Hora tio Avenue making getting in and out of Publix anything but a plea sure. Publix manager Mike Sasso brought his customers com plaints to the City Council last Monday, citing ongoing confu sion and construction chaos hap pening around his store everyday at rush hour. From shoppers not knowing where they can enter and exit to others reporting re peat accounts of nails in tires on Sybelia Avenue, Its a night mare, Sasso said. End game for the construction but city staff said theres bound to be a few bumps in the road getting there. Its like doing a major reno vation in your house and living in it at the same time, said City Manager Jim Williams. drafted after a Maitland Area Transportation Study in 2004 and Construction snarls Maitland trafc SARAH WILSON Observer staff Please see CONSTRUCTION on page 2 Winter Park history faces wrecking ball Citys preservation rules criticized for letting buildings disappear TIM FREED Observer staff Please see HISTORY on page 4 VISIT WPMOBSERVER.COM SUBSCRIBE NOW! WILDCATS SPIKE COMPETITION SPORTS, 11 The future of food A converted church aims to be a hub for locally-sourced groceries. LIFESTYLES, 9 Get t for the holidays Activities for adults and seniors to lose the pounds by 2014. CENTRAL FLORIDA SENIOR, B2 COMMUNITY BULLETIN ............ 8 CALENDAR .................... 8 LIFESTYLES .................... 9 SPORTS ..................... 11 CULTURE ..................... 15 OPINIONS .................... 18 CLASSIFIEDS .................. 31 CENTRAL FLORIDA SENIOR ....... B1 407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC Winter Park Recovery CenterExecutive Drug & Alcohol Treatment Protocols 20 and 40-Week Outpatient Programs Suboxone/Subutex For Opioid Abuse Privacy and Confidentiality AssuredMedically Managed Dual Diagnosis Evidenced Based Programs2056 Aloma Ave, Suite 100, Winter Park, FL 32792 www.WinterParkRecoveryCenter.com 407-629-0413 PHOTO BY TIM FREED THE OBSERVER Historic buildings have disappeared at 1.2 percent per year.

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Page 2 | Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer raising their grandchildren. When the need arises, you just gotta step up, said Crites, who adopted her granddaughter to give her the security she had been craving. She was always afraid she would have to leave me. This way she never has to again. Peggi Smith of Altamonte Springs also adopted her granddaughter, 4-year-old Aa liyah during the ceremonies Nov. 22. Like Crites, Smith wanted to be able to reassure her granddaughter with the knowledge that she would always have a safe place to call home. Aaliyah has been with me since day one and now its a blessing to know that shes staying with us, as part of our family and our world, Smith said. Thirty children in the tri-county area be came part of their forever families during this years special celebration, said Karla Radka, vice president of Community Im pact for Community Based Care. As one of those 30 kids, 14-year-old Eliz abeth Rowland took three sentences to sum up the universal hopefulness felt going for ward for all those in her shoes. It makes me feel happier to be part of this family because I love them, she said. If I need something, theyll give it to me. It makes me feel happy and warm inside to be adopted today. Over the last 10 years, 700 kids in Cen tral Florida have found forever families through adoption. But for every child who is adopted, Radka said, there are many family. Many of the new par ents, like Jen nifer Downs, began as fos ter parents and adopted children who had been placed in their care initially as foster chil dren. The pro cess to become foster parents takes about six to eight months, Radka said. It is a time and learning that is very valuable to the process of understand ing how the system works and how best to help these chil dren. Once foster parents are approved, they are matched with children in need of stable environments. Every case is different, de pending on the age of the child, whether or not they are part of a sibling group and how long they are expected to need foster care. In some cases, the children become eli gible for adoption, which can take another Seventeen-month-old Jaxon Downs wont remember this day, but his mom will never forget it. Downs is a single mom whos been a foster parent for two years. In that time, she has fostered seven kids. Jaxon was my lucky number seven, she said. Dressed smartly for the occasion in a brightly striped bow-tie and crisp white shirt, little Jaxon brought a lot of supporters with him, including his grandparents and his aunt and uncle all of them excited to be part of his life as he grows up. He doesnt know what this all means yet, but he knows we are here for him and thats all that matters, Downs said. ADOPTION | Foster kids finally get forever homes at Orlando event that united 30 kids with new parents faced a long journey to reach this mile stone. They worked their way through end less court hearings, evaluations and paper work, all the while learning or relearning how to parent. Quite a few of the adoptions were by family members, such as grandparents formally adopting grandchildren or, in the case of the Gonzales family, aunt and uncle adopting nephew. Judy Crites arrived at the Orange Coun ty Courthouse as Grandma and left as Mom. Her granddaughter, 7-year-old Riley, was grinning over the top of her new ted dy bear, as the realization that shed never have to leave the security of her grand mothers home again began to set in. Its great to be adotted, Riley said, lisp ing over her Ps through her missing two front teeth. Im gonna tell all my friends about being adotted. Riley and her two younger siblings live with their grandmothers, Judy Crites and Linda Byrd, who teamed up a year ago to share a home and the responsibilities of C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE rf nnrtb rrrfnNO PURCHASE NECESSARY. PHOTO BY ALLISON OLCSVAY THE OBSERVER Jayden Gonzales, 10, with new parents Richard and Cheryl at the Nov. 22 adoption event in Orlando that united 30 kids with new parents to celebrated National Adoption Day. CONSTRUCTION | Detours wreak havoc on road revisited in 2013, add an additional left turn lane from southbound 17-92 onto west bound Horatio, and takes Horatio down to one lane each way between 17-92 and Maitland Avenue. It also closes the median where George Avenue crosses 17-92, and extends existing left turn lanes from west bound Horatio onto southbound 17-92. Maitland Public Works Director Rick Lemke said the goal of the project, which is slated for completion in mid-January 2014, Avenue and back onto 17-92. terns for construction and simultaneous undergrounding work, coupled with con tinued building development work hap pening at the corner of George Avenue and 17-92, some local residents say theres got to be a better way. Construction activity is a wonderful thing and we love to see that but you cant just take over a public street, and thats actually whats happened, resident Dale McDonald said. Winter Park resident Alice Weber said that with all the confusion happening at the intersection, its only a matter of time be fore someone gets hurt. and they will not be at that intersection for the purpose of beauty, Weber said. Lemke said the city is working to im prove construction congestion and clear up backups as best they can by adapting traf intersection lights. He said Publix is also being allowed additional signage to help the store. We know theres a problem there, and Lemke said. Mayor Howard Schieferdecker urged residents to be patient while the city works out the best solution. said, youll see theres a method in the madness. C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 | Page 3 The city of Maitlands Season of Light celebrates the holiday season The city of Maitlands Season of Light celebration, ushering in the holiday season, will take place on Saturday, Dec. 7 beginning at 3 p.m. in Lake Lily Park. This longstanding tradition is a pre lude to the holiday season and is highlighted by the lighting of the city of Maitland Holiday Tree that Lake Lily until January 2014. We invite you to join us in this special holiday celebration that provides an excellent opportunity to make new holiday memories and share the spirit of the season with family, friends and loved ones. You may even run into Santa Claus! You are invited to stroll around Lake Lily Park and enjoy the holi day Yum Yum Cupcake, Midnight Sun Ice cream Sandwich Compa ny, All Things Sweet, Tucks Table, and The Big Cheese food trucks. Holiday gift vendors will be open that special gift you have been looking for. Entertainment for this years event will begin at 3 p.m. and will feature live stage performances by the Outer Toons. The Starving Artist Studio Dancers will appear and from time to time you may discover strolling holiday per formers in the park. Later in the afternoon, we will be joined by the Maitland Middle School Wind Ensemble, Stage Band, Chorus, Chamber Orchestra, the Maitland Colby Studio Dancers and The Waterhouse Dickens Carolers. We invite you to take time out of your holiday schedule to visit with us at Lake Lily Park as we celebrate the holidays with a spe way to get the entire family into the holiday spirit then to come out to the Season of Light celebra tion in Maitlands Lake Lily Park. We hope to see you there Happy Holidays! rffrntbrbtrbrtr rr btr r r r nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr Family Fun Event sponsored by Family Fun Event sponsored by Maitland City Talk BY HOWARD SCHIEFERDECKER MAYOR A season of light 407-659-5701 www.TrustcoBank.com Member FDICEQU AL HOUSINGLENDER *Minimum balance of $500 to earn interest. Please Note: We reserve the right to alter or withdraw these products or certain features thereof without prior notification. RYour Home Town Bank TRUSTCOBANKPlus Free Access to Over 55,000 ATMs Worldwide!No Monthly Service Charges Free ATM/Debit Card Just look for this ATM logo! Free Interest Checking! Pizza & more ... rfntb rf ntbfCannot be combined with any other coupon or offer. Expires 1/1/14.ntnfrnfrr Located at the 20-20 Super Center Plaza near the corner of SR 436 and Howell Branch Rd. btbCannot be combined with any other coupon or offer. Expires 1/1/14. Orlando s Only Doggie Daycare with a Gym! Orlando s Only Doggie Daycare with a Gym! Customized work outs Training Indoor warm water swimming 2826 Shader Rd. Orlando, 32808 407-295-3888 BarkingDogFitness.co m Ask abou t ou r FREE trial policy! Give Your Dog the Gift of Health. Sign up BEFORE year end and receive 10% o for LIFE and a FREE swim or massage! Fact A lean dog lives an average 2 years longer than an overweight dog AN D is healthier and hap p ier!

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Page 4 | Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer rfnftbf D ecember 19th-22ndBob Carr Performing Arts Centre ORLANDO PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA BOOK YOUR SEA TS T ODAY !407-426-1739O RLA N D OBA LLET.ORG rffttb f* Price does not include tickets to The Nutcracker performance. photocarlos amoedo | focustudios.com HISTORY | Preservation consultant: Citys process pits neighbor against neighbor incorrect and out-of-date information. The citys survey areas need more of a compre hensive look, Bland said. Many parts of the city have yet to be surveyed, leaving entire neighborhoods unchecked for historical resources. A failure to update the surveyed areas has also data. Several buildings have different addresses since they were surveyed over the past few decades, resulting in hundreds of incorrect forms. From a technical standpoint, this has to be dont know the voids inside your area, you cant really move forward, Bland said. Bland took to task the citys method of designating historic districts. A historic des ignation in Winter Park requires 20 percent of the population of a proposed historic district to sign a petition, as well as a threshold of at least two-thirds of the property owners in the proposed district to submit a ballot in favor of its formation. Bland saw the voting aspect as one of the citys biggest problems, explaining that it turns the process into a social affair that pits districts by modern social structure. Landmarks require the same voting process, he said, resulting in many landmarks being unprotected. Voting is not the norm, Bland said. It is quite odd and certainly counterproductive to historic preservation. The public voting ally. Bland insisted that theres still much more the city can do to Park could lead to additional funding for his toric structure surveys and the development of guidelines for ordinances a simple step that has yet to be taken. The city would be better served with an archaeological ordinance as well, Bland said, which would lay down guidelines for how to identify, protect and recover artifacts during also make construction teams aware of po tential archaeological risk. Local residents spoke out following Blands presentation, agreeing that the city needs to take action as quickly as possible. and all of his facts and information tonight, said Julie Lamar, chair of the board of Friends of Casa Feliz. One of the things that rang true to me is the sense of urgency about revising our ordinance. We are losing hope of having districts with every demolition that happens. Other residents urged the city to bring Blands presentation before the City Commis sion. information presented tonight, said Betsy Owens, executive director of Casa Feliz. This is obviously a critical issue for our city. I think it would be a real shame if our City Commission were to not hear his report. The City Commission will receive a pre sentation from Bland at a future meeting date to be determined. C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 PHONE: 407-563-7000 FAX: 407-563-7099 WPMOBSERVER.COM PUBLISHER Tracy Craft 407.515.2605 TCraft@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MANAGING EDITOR Isaac Babcock 407.563.7023 IBabcock@TurnstileMediaGroup.com ASSOCIATE EDITOR Sarah Wilson 407.563.7026 SWilson@TurnstileMediaGroup.com DESIGNER Tom Miller 407.563.7032 TMiller@TurnstileMediaGroup.com STAFF WRITERS Brittni Larson Megan Stokes Tim Freed Allison Olcsvay Kristy Vickery COLUMNISTS Chris Jepson Jepson@MediAmerica.us Louis Roney LRoney@cfl.rr.com Josh Garrick JoshGarrick9@gmail.com ADVERTISING SALES Linda Stern 407.376.2434 LStern@TurnstileMediaGroup.com LEGAL NOTICE ADVERTISING Ashley McBride 407.286.0807 Legal@FLALegals.com SUBSCRIPTIONS/CIRCULATION Luana Baez 407.563.7013 LBaez@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MEMBER OF: -Florida Press Association -Winter Park/Maitland/Goldenrod Chambers of Commerce Winter Park/Maitland Observer is published by Turnstile Media Group. Founded in 1990 and headquartered in Orlando, Fla., Turnstile Media Group is also the parent of Golfweek, Golfweek Custom Media, TurfNet, Professional Artist, Seminole Voice, Baldwin Park Living and Turnstile Connect. TURNSTILE MEDIA GROUP CHAIRMAN Rance Crain PRESIDENT/CEO Francis X. Farrell VICE PRESIDENTS Patti Green & Jeff Babineau USPS #00-6186 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Winter Park / Maitland Observer 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835 Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 | Page 7 CoffeeTalk featuring City Manager Randy Knight If you have a latt beans to grind or you simply want to espresso your thoughts, CoffeeTalk may be the cup for you. Please join an informal conversation with City Manager Randy Knight, Thursday, Decem ber 5, from 8 a.m. to 9 a.m., at the Winter Park Welcome Center located at 151 W. Ly man Ave. This is the last CoffeeTalk of the sea son where you can sit down and talk with Randy over a cup of coffee and chat about any city issues that are of interest to you. Special thanks to Palmanos Cafe, Coffee & Wine Bar for donating the coffee for this special series. For more information, please call 407-599-3428. Dec. 9 City Commission meeting There will be a City Commission meet ing Monday, Dec. 9, at 3:30 p.m., in City Hall Commission Chambers located at 401 S. Park Ave. For the most up-to-date agenda, please visit cityofwinterpark.org > Government > City Commission > Agenda. Below are a few topics of interest: Action Items Requiring Discussion vertisements of two parcels of land located at 300 N. Pennsylvania Ave. and 321 Hanni bal Square West located within the CRA for possible development options. Public Hearings oSubdivision or Lot Split approval to di vide the property at 1280 Arlington Place, Zoned R-2, into two lots. amend Chapter 58, Land Development Code, Article I Comprehensive Plan Future Land Use Map so as to establish Commercial Future Land Use on the an nexed property at 656 Overspin Dr. and to indicate the annexation of this property on the other maps within the Comprehensive Plan. amend Chapter 58, Land Development Zoning Map so as to establish Commercial (C-3) Zoning on the annexed property at 656 Overspin Dr. cate and abandon a portion of Gaines Way lying between 610 Gaines Way and 1760 Gaines Way, but retaining and reserving to the city a utility easement over the entire area thereof. agenda on the home page of cityofwinter park.org under Whats New > City Com mission Agenda. Art in Chambers exhibition featuring Blair Sligar The citys Public Art Advisory Board an in Chambers exhibition horse magic fea turing sculptures, paintings and prints by Blair Sligar, who will be introduced at the City Commission meeting on Monday, Dec. 9, at 3:30 p.m. Horse magic will be open for public viewing from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Mon day through Friday, except for holidays, through Tuesday, Jan. 7. The exhibition features sculptures with a rococo-like intri cacy and extravagance that showcase the materials and structure, playful and dark prints with anthropomorphic animals, and paintings that demonstrate his interest in mythologies and canons. For more information regarding Art in Chambers, please call 407-599-3498. For information regarding additional events, please visit cityofwinterpark.org. Skate away any holiday stress Now through Sunday, Jan. 5, 2014, you can skate at the citys coolest event of the year Winter in the Park, the citys annual holiday ice skating rink in Central Park West Meadow. The West Meadow is located at 150 N. New York Ave winterpark.org, like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and watch us on Vimeo. We are large enough to give you what you want and small enough to provide it the way you want it. To learn more, please visit any of our banking centers from Orlando to Miami or call us at 1-800-435-8839.13-0089/rev090113 citynational.com Member FDIC Personal Relationships | Local Decisions | StabilityREDEFINING BANKING. 1115-8 CNwinterPrk.indd 1 11/20/13 9:40 AM Winter Park City Talk BY RANDY KNIGHT CITY MANAGER Lets go get some coffee $2 OFF Any Sub, Chip and Large Drink purchase. Visit our tasty new Winter Park restaurant location at: 528 S. Park Avenue 407.960.7827 By Rollins College Park Avenue near Fairbanks. 2010 Firehouse Subs. This offer valid with coupon at participating restaurants. Prices and participation may vary, see restaurant for details. Limit one per customer, per visit. Not valid with any other offers. Exp. 3/31/14. Theres a new Firehouse Subs right here on Park Avenue in Winter Park. Get ready for steamin hot subs piled high with top notch meats and cheeses. ( WERE OPEN )Stop, Drop, And Roll On In. Visit FirehouseSubs.com to order online and find your nearest location.

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Page 8 | Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer FAMILY CALENDAR Batter up Bear Creek Recreational Complex is hosting a six-week base ball camp starting Jan. 11. Some of the areas best coaches will direct the program in conjunction with U.S. Baseball Academy. Classes are available for players in grades 1-12 and are limited to six players per coach. Sessions are offered in advanced hit ting, pitching, catching, elding and base running. Space is lim ited. Registration is now under way. For more information, visit USBaseballAcademy.com, or call toll-free at 866-622-4487. Best lawyers Winderweedle, Haines, Ward and Woodman, P.A. was recently named a 2014 Best Law Firm by U.S. News & World Report and Best Lawyers. Firms included in the 2014 Best Law Firms list are recognized for professional excellence with persistently impres sive ratings from clients and peers. The 2014 rankings are based on the highest number of participating rms and highest number of client ballots on record. More than 12,000 attorneys provided more than 330,000 law rm assessments to be chosen from. DEC. 5-7 For 37 years, the Rotary Club of Orange County East-Winter Park has sponsored and run the prestigious Tip-Off Classic Invitational high school basketball tournament where potential future NBA stars play and college and pro scouts congregate. The tournament will be held at the Winter Park High School Gymna sium, 2100 Summereld Road. It started with the rst round of games at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Dec. 4 and runs through Saturday, Dec. 7 with the nal game being played at 8:30 p.m. High schools that have earned an invitation to participate this year are: Boone, Oak Ridge, Wekiva, Lake Highland, Lake Howell, Orlando Christian Prep, Evans and Winter Park. This tourna ment has raised over $925,000 and. after expenses, distributed $625,000 to the local community via charities, the par ticipating schools, and $12,000 college scholarships to deserving B students who could not otherwise afford to attend college. Admission into the tournament is $5 or two cans of food. In the past ve years over 12,000 cans of food have been collected and given to local charities. DEC. 5 On Thursday, Dec. 5, the Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art presents its free annual Christmas in the Park event for the 35th year in downtown Win ter Park. The almost two-hour program begins at 6:15 p.m. when the signal will be given to turn on the window lights. The museum will turn Central Park in down town Winter Park into a gallery without walls and a roof of tree canopy and stars with an outdoor exhibition that has since 2006 included nine illuminated Tif fany windows This year the esteemed 160-voice Bach Festival Society Choir, accompanied by piano, drums and a 12-member brass ensemble, will give its 28th concert for the event. Come celebrate the Holidays with Casa Feliz! Our fth annual holiday open house, Christmas at the Casa , will take place Thursday, Dec. 5 from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Sponsored through a generous grant from Commerce National Bank and Trust in Winter Park, the event will dovetail with the Morse Museums Christmas in the Park. Guests can have photos taken with Santa, enjoy hot cocoa and cookies, and enjoy the yuletide tunes of the Belles & Bows Quartet. There is no charge to at tend Christmas at the Casa, but a do nation of $2 per person, or $5 per family is suggested. Professional Santa portraits are available for $10. For additional infor mation on any of these or other Casa Feliz events, contact Betsy Owens at 407-6288196, or bowens@casafeliz.us. The 24th Annual Holiday Tree Lighting Ceremony presented by Winter Park Tow ers will be held on Friday, Dec. 6, begin ning at 5 p.m. in Central Park. The event features performances by local childrens choirs, including St. Margaret Mary Cath olic School Choir, New Warner Chapel, Park Maitland Singing Eagles Glee Club, r JAN 22-24, Bob Carr Centre, Orlando rfnt b fntntbbbnbbttb tbnttnbbnbbtbnbrfntftbtfFive Thousand Years of Myths & Legends Come to Life on Stage tnntnnnt nttnntntntntr ftttnnn tnnntnnf nntntnn tntnftttnnnttn ftnntt ntntntntn nn tnftntntnnn ntnttntntftn ntttntntnnnttn nntnrtnnnntt tntrf rfrrf Community Bulletin Winter Park High Schools Belle Chanson Choir and Orlando Harmony. Winners of the Holiday Card Competition will also be recognized and WFTV Channel 9 news anchor Bob Opsahl will join the crowd for the lighting of the tree live on the evening newscast. Afterwards families can enjoy refreshments and activities provided by local businesses, plus visits with Santa and Mrs. Claus. DEC. 7 Maitlands Season of Light on Satur day, Dec. 7 at 3 p.m. is a longstanding tradition in our community and we invite you to join us in our holiday celebration. Its an excellent opportunity to make new holiday memories and share the spirit of the season with family, friends and loved ones. You may even run into Santa Claus! You are invited to stroll around Lake Lily Park and enjoy the holiday food trucks Yum Yum Cupcake, Midnight Sun Icecream Sandwich Company, Philly, All Things Sweet, Tucks Table, and The Big Cheese, as well as gift vendors open for early shopping. The show begins at 3 p.m. with live stage entertainment by the Out er Toons and the School of Performing Arts Dancers and strolling entertainment. There will be a tree lighting, Santa Claus, and a reworks nale. It all starts at 3 p.m. on Dec. 7 at Lake Lily Park. Winter Parks 61st annual Ye Olde Home town Christmas Parade hits Park Av enue at 9 a.m. on Dec. 7, heading south from Cole Avenue alongside Central Park and ending at Lyman Avenue. Thousands come out for the parade every year, with plenty of space to watch on the avenue. Wake up bright and early the next morn ing and help turn pancake batter into a stack of dough at the 15th Annual Lead ership Winter Park Pancake Breakfast Join presenting sponsors Fannie Hillman + Associates and Vanson Constructors, plus Leadership Winter Park graduates for a traditional pancake breakfast complete with sausage, coffee, juice and an array of toppings at the Central Park stage. Tickets are $6 for adults and $4 for children and can be purchased in advance at www. winterpark.org, the Winter Park Welcome Center or at the event. Proceeds from the breakfast will benet six Winter Park area elementary schools to help purchase much-needed supplies for the classroom. Pancakes are served from 7 to 10:30 a.m. Come early, enjoy a hearty breakfast and grab a great seat for the parade! The Big Bang Bazaar Holiday Spectacu lar is coming to the Maitland Civic Center at 641 S. Maitland Ave. from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday Dec. 7-8. Free swag bags for the rst 100 guests each day. Find indie arts, crafts and vin tage gear at this eclectic holiday event. Visit bigbangbazaar.net for more informa tion. The Museum of Military History on Dec 7-8 will host Military Appreciation Weekend by the Museum at Browns Farm, 4901 Oren Brown Road in Kissim mee. The event will be highlighted by both WWII re-enactments on Saturday and both Civil War and WWII re-enactments on Sunday. Weapon demonstrations will take place prior to the re-enactments. The Civil Air Patrols 463rd Cadet Squadron and Kissimmee Sea Cadet units will be at the event to present the colors and par ticipate in competitive events on Sunday. Also on Sunday, a special concert of WWII era music will be presented by the Bahia Dance Band. Food vendors, booths, and childrens activities will be available both days. For more information visit http:// museumofmilitaryhistory.com Business Briefs

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 | Page 9 Lifestyles Theres something big grow ing just a few blocks from Winter Park and its got the garden to show for it. Along the curb of Cor rows deep, encouraging visitors toward the entrance of the newly opened East End Market. The smell of freshly baked bread wafts out through the twostory buildings propped open door, and you only make it a few inches inside before Rosie, a familiar face to local farmers market-goers, welcomes you in. Shes the woman in charge of sell ing Olde Hearth Beard Co. baked goods, and shes beaming in her newfound permanent home. Its the best feeling to be here, theres a great energy and look out there you cant beat that view! she says, motioning to the garden just steps outside her door. After more than a year of reno vations turning an abandoned 14,000-sqaure-foot church into a one-of-a-kind neighborhood mar ket and locally sourced food hub, the bustling community hangout founder John Rife always imag ined itd be. Independent vendors now call door market home, from bakers and coffee brewers, to juicers and decorators. Alongside the Mar ket Hall hosts the Txokos Basque Kitchen, a new culinary concept from the owners of Spanish River Grill, which sources food right from the garden out front. Its a beautiful collision of col laboration, said Jarrett Johnson with Lineage Coffee, which slings exotic pour-over brews from around the globe in the far back of PHOTOS BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVER From gourmet coffees and fresh baked goods to craft beers and desserts, the market offers treats for any time of day. Making a market and garden grow East End Market opens in Audubon Park SARAH WILSON Observer staff Please see MARKET on page 10 Presented by: Supported by: Featuring Pamela Nabors President & CEO Meet and greet with community leaders and business owners. Learn how Workforce Central Florida is strengthening our communitys workforce through employer training opportunities Hear from WCFs new CEO on how the organization is transitioning to a new brand. Friday, December 13, 2013 7:45 a.m. Networking/ 8:15 a.m. Program WINTER PARK WELCOME CENTER 151 W. Lyman Avenue, Winter Park, FL 32789 A complimentary continental breakfast will be served. The event is free and open to the public. For more information, call (407) 644-8281 or visit www.winterpark.org. East End Market is located just blocks from Winter Park at 1301 Corrine Drive in Audubon Park. Visit eastendmkt.com for more information and a list of vendors.

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Page 10 | Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer the Market Hall. Operating simultaneously in the space are an event area, demonstration kitchen, incubator Its very community-orient ed, Rosie said. You buy some thing here and you walk around and sit wherever you want. Go out to the garden, go to the bar, its a community deal. when they walk in the door, she said shes made a game of watch ing peoples faces as they enter. Theyre like kids when they come in, she said. Their eyes widen and they cant help but smile. The Market is open Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. The hours of individual vendors vary though, so you can come by earlier for a coffee and later for a craft beer and dessert afterward. It encompasses something for everyone, Rosie said. Im very proud to be a part of this whole thing. MARKET | Vendors operate community-style, customers from each shop can stop and eat, drink together C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 10 r fn tbn r rfr nntrntbnr ffftbbfb nn tnbn nnf t nrn rnn n brn tbn r bn 13ABK064_CATERING_FLYER_WINTER_PARK_PRESS.pdf 2 11/4/13 11:40 AM PHOTOS BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVERX As the East End Market grows its relationships in the community, so does its garden, which provides farm-to-table veggie options for the on-site restaurant kitchen at Txokos Basque Kitchen.

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 | Page 11 The Knights are at their high est ranking of the season after yet another heart attack-inducing USF Bulls 23-20 on the gridiron Nov. 29. With a well-timed interception after a torrent of turnovers that went the wrong way, the Knights snagged a win out of thin air in a chilly thriller in the Bright House. Just as the Bulls seemed destined to tie or win the game, driving deep into UCF territory with less than two minutes to go, line backer Jordan Ozerities hands snagged a Mike White pass and sent the tense crowd into a jubi lant frenzy. That was accompa nied by a collective sigh of relief in a game in which the Knights lost three fumbles and committed two interceptions, which contrib uted to half of USFs scores. When you dont play very you dont usually win games like that, Head Coach George OLeary said in a press con ference after the game. It had been 11 years since the Knights had won a game in which they gave up four or more turn overs. Sunday night they found out what their sixth win by a touchdown or less would do for their ranking. The result, a No. 16 spot in the BCS standings, is the highest the team has ever been ranked. They debuted at No. 23 the same week the BCS standings debuted on Oct. 20, and have slowly moved their way into better numbers ever since. Their slow and steady rise has come despite edging out victories by a touchdown or less in four games this season in which they were the favorite or the heavy attempts against rival USF was just the most recent in a string of led to the 2013 Knights being dubbed the heart attack kids. It had been a much closer game than expected Nov. 29 as the UCF Knights (10-1, 7-0) and the USF Bulls (2-8, 2-5) traded punts for much of the game. After mul tiple fumbles handed USF its only scores of the Knights distanced themselves by halftime, but it wouldnt be enough of a margin of safety. A seemingly off-balance Blake ceivers, and rushers had trouble against an unexpectedly tough USF defense. Meanwhile the Bulls caught up to and overtook the Knights. The bright spot that slowly began to shine as the game wore on would be running back Will Stanback, who became the yard age workhorse for the Knights after two scary fumbles early on by regular go-to runner Storm Johnson. Stanback would rush for 40 yards on 10 carries and catch 69 yards worth of receptions. his hands and race to 69 yards on the ground and snag 62 yards in the air. The game never had a wider scoring gap than a single touch down separating the two teams for its duration, making for a hair-raising experience for the Knights, who came into the game heavy favorites. But the grudge match turned into just that as the teams battled in search of tougher competition. The teams met at the height of one of the Knights all-time best Feld Entertainment248339 #R inglingBro s Ringling.comSAVE $4 on Tickets!Good on Select PerformancesRestrictions and exclusions may apply. No double discounts. Subject to availability. Excludes premium seats. Offer excludes day of show. JAN. GOOD ONLY Fri. JAN. 10 7:30 PM Sat. JAN. 11 11:30 AM & 7:30 PM Presented locally by UCF looks to clinch BCS bowl berth ISAAC BABCOCK Observer staff FEATURING ... 250 North Orlando Ave. Winter Park, FL 32789407.677.9777 Duette Architella Honeycomb Shades Duette Architella Honeycomb Shades every climate...every season A Premier Flooring Source Area Rugs Window Treatments... AND MUCH MORE! PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER The Knights have been strong at home, but unstoppable on the road this season, heading to Dallas to face SMU for a game that could clinch their shot at a BCS bowl appearance. Please see KNIGHTS on page 12

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Page 12 | Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer seasons, while USF was strug gling in one of its worst. An offensive juggernaut in many games this season, the Knights only converted one third down conversion out of nine attempts in addition to their The Knights would come away with a win thanks to a 52yard Breshad Perriman touch down reception and Ozerities interception with less than two minutes to go to seal the deal as the Bulls were threatening. The win clinched a share of the American Athletic Conference title for the Knights, who will either own it outright or share it depending on the outcomes of games Dec. 5 and 7. Starting at 7:30 p.m. Dec. 5 the Louisville Cardinals (10-1, 6-1) will play at Cincinnati (10-1, 6-1). Both teams will be looking to bolster their bowl game chances with a win. The Cardinals wont be able to share the AACs BCS bid no mat ter what happens, as the Knights defeated them this season. The game is especially crucial for the Cincinnati Bearcats, who could share in the AAC title and have a shot at the AACs automatic bowl bid if they upset the Cardinals. By the end of Thursday night, the Knights may already have the crown all to themselves. But if Cincinnati wins, which may game to clinch the BCS bowl berth. If the Bearcats win and the Knights lose, the Knights will have to hope they stay above Cincinnati in the BCS standings. Cincinnati is currently ranked No. 23 in the USA Today Col lege Coaches poll, where UCF is No. 17. The USA Today poll has consistently ranked the Knights worse than all three other major polls. Its also the only poll that puts Cincinnati in its top 25. The BCS Stand arbiter of postseason bowl game place ment, hasnt ranked Cincinnati all season, and put UCF at No. 16 this week. The Knights travel to face SMU at noon on Dec. 7. The Knights may have some advan tages heading into Dallas. Theyre undefeated on the road this season, though theyve needed to score in of every AAC road game in order to win. And SMU star quarterback Garrett Gilbert is still question able to start against UCF because of a knee sprain. Without Gilbert against Houston last week, the Mustangs lost 34-0 and threw three interceptions. PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER UCF quarterback Blake Bortles was shaky against USF, throwing two interceptions, but led the Knights to victory. H O U S E S W A N T E D ! G e t a F R E E N o O b l i g a o n C A S H O e r O n Y o u r H o u s e W i t h i n 2 4 H o u r s (8 5 5 ) 7 5 5 1 8 1 8 w w w C i r c l e 1 8 H o m e s c o m C A S H $ $ $ Q U I C K C L O S E A N Y P R I C E R A N G E A N Y C O N D I T I O N A N Y S I T U A T I O N KNIGHTS | Another edge-of-your-seat finish gives UCF a chance at its biggest bowl game in team history C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 11 The Alfond Inn The Ancient Olive/ The Spice & Tea Exchange BankFIRST Ken & Ruth Bradley Brio Properties Carpe Diem Centennial Bank City of Winter Park Community City of Winter Park Employees Cocina 214 Costco Wholesale Edyth Bush Charitable Foundation Fannie Hillman + Associates Ferrell Wealth Management Florida Blue Florida Distributing Co. Gods Homeless Works International Harrison Berry P.A. Kuykendall Gardner Lowndes, Drosdick, Doster, Kantor & Reed, P.A. Massey Communications The Mayower Retirement Community Mens Divorce Law Firm My Guys Moving Orange Bank of Florida Panera Bread The Park Press The Paris Bistro Peterbrooke Chocolatier of WinterPark Rollins College St. Dorothy Catholic Community Sodexo Ten Thousand Villages Think Creative Waste Pro Wawa Whole Foods Market Winter Park Winter Park Chamber of Commerce Winter Park Family Dentistry Winter Park Health Foundation Winter Park Magazine Winter Park/ Maitland Observer Winter Park Memorial Hospital Winter Park Womens Center Winter Park YMCA Family Center WKMG Local 6 Tom Yochum$95,000 RAISED. THOUSANDS OF LIVES CHANGED.With the support of our Community Champions, we raised $95,000 to support people in need in our community. Thats nearly double our original goal. And many more lives touched this holiday season. Thank you for helping us Feed the Need. FEED NEED WINTER PARK A COMMUNITY-WIDE EFFORT TO RAISE FUNDS FOR SECOND HARVEST FOOD BANK OF CENTRAL FLORIDA In Partnership with: Presented by:

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 | Page 13 AVAILABLE NOVEMBER 26 ON DIGITAL HD ON BLU-RAYTM COMBO PACK & DVD DECEMBER 10 ENTER FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN A BLU-RAY COMBO PACKSend us your name and mailing address to tcraft@turnstilemediagroup.comNO PURCHASE NECESSARY. UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT! 50%off yogurt Free Wi-Fi rfntt btn HOURS SUNDAY-THURSDAY noon 10 p.m. FRIDAY AND SATURDAY noon 11 p.m. 513 Park Ave., Winter Park 321-972-8925NO SIZE LIMIT EXPIRES 1-1-14 The Winter Park High School girls volleyball team won it all on the Florida stage in November after defeating Lake Mary High Silver Spurs Arena in Kissimmee redeeming themselves from a the previous season. The Wildcats blazed through their season with a 29-3 record, trouncing their record last year of 26-6. The title marked the schools fourth girls volleyball state championship, all in the past 10 years. That was the best feeling in the world, said Kacey Saunier, senior and team captain. We waited a year of practicing to come back from states last year. I think thats all we thought about for a year straight. The teams work started al most 356 days earlier, said Coach Stephanie Gibson. A heartbreaking loss in a state sets last season had taken its toll on the girls, but also motivated them to make another run. The same core group of play ers was ready for another go. A defeat after being only three points away from winning the state championship in 2012 is going to leave a little bit of emotions that hopefully can help guide you to overcome that, Gibson said. Im sure all the kids had that in the back of their mindwe had to learn how to eliminate all of the extra thoughts and emotions. Winter Park continued to working tirelessly on shot selec tion, often staying late after practices. We didnt want to let go of a state championship, so I think ev ery time we came in the gym we worked as hard as we could, Saunier said. That was our main goal of the year, to get better ev ery single time that we had a chance, and I think we did. The teams emotional strength was tested just a week before playoffs following a loss to Boca Raton High School, the reigning state champions who defeated Winter Park the previ ous year. I credit them for an emotional metamorphosis so to speak, Gibson said. Our team learned so much about ourselves in that match and we were able to ap ply what weve learned in every Winter Parks comeback kids TIM FREED Observer staff PHOTO COURTESY OF WPHS VOLLEYBALL Winter Park got revenge at the state championships, winning after nishing in second place at last years tournament. Rooted & grounded in Jesus Christ. The Learning Tree is a Ministry of First Baptist Church of Winter ParkWe offer Full-Day Infant Care and Childcare Year-Round, Preschool Classes, Summer Camp, and much more! 1021 New York Avenue N., Winter Park, Florida 32789 Established in 1972 we are celebrating 41 years of service this year. Winter Park girls volleyball team returns Please see VOLLEYBALL on page 14

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Page 14 | Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer VOLLEYBALL | Girls avenged five-game championship loss match for the remainder of the year. The Wildcats took heart and went on to win their division of 16 teams, moving on to the regional tournament before ad vancing to the state tournament. But the Wildcats faced further opposition in the form of in juries. Senior Beth Nordhorn twisted her ankle during the state High School, dropping down on an opponents foot after jumping to block a ball in front of the net. Senior Christina Ambrose also ricocheted of her hitting hand during the same match. But that wasnt about to stop the Wildcats. I big thing for me was not letting that show and playing through, Nordhorn said. Obvi ously, my team and how we were doing was much more important than a simple ankle injury. Nordhorn, Ambrose and the rest of the Wildcats persevered and won the match three sets to one, punching their ticket to the They returned to Silver Spurs match of the season, and for six players, their high school career. by a slim margin of 25-22, but lost the second set 17-25. The team took it as a wakeup call, dominat ing Lake Mary 25-12 in the third set. their victory in the fourth set by a score of 25-20. They had come all the way back to win it all all of their hard work had paid off. theyd fought to conceal the en tire season began to unravel. It was incredible for us, Ive never really felt anything like that, Nordhorn said. Watching did it. To reach the pinnacle of your sport through a season of hard work and trials and errors is just so rewarding and so exhilarat ing, Gibson said. Moving forward, six seniors will graduate after this season, leaving a group of younger Wild cats with a chance to step up and take the reins. C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 13 PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER The Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra rang in the season at the Holiday Pops concert Dec. 1 in Winter Park with Natalie Cordone and Shawn Kilgore. Holiday Pops

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 | Page 15 Today Dec. 5 Christmas in the Park in Winter Park Of all the magical nights of our holiday season, today stands out as the 35th time the Morse Museum will present its free Christmas in the Park event. Beginning at precisely 6:15 p.m., the Museums Tiffany windows are turned on as thousands of people gather in Central Park for a unique celebration of art and music. The Museum will exhibit nine illuminated Tiffany windows as the 160-voice Bach Festival Choir presents a joyous holiday concert. Highly recom mended! Call 407-645-5311 or visit morsemuseum.org Today Dec. 5 Celebrate the C-son with Casa Feliz Make an evening of down town Winter Park as Casa Feliz invites everyone to Christmas at the Casa from 6 to 8:30 p.m. before or after visiting the Morse Museums splendid Christmas in the Park event. Casa Feliz will Cs including Christmas Dcor with the Casa decked out for the holidays; Carols with the Belles & Bows Quartet; Claus Santa, that is including the opportunity to have your portrait taken with the Jolly One; and Cookies & Cocoa! The festivities are made possible by Commerce National Bank. Today Dec. 5 1st Thursdays: Art under $200 Tis the Season at the Orlando Museum of Art where the 1st Thursday Art Party, under the leadership of arts patron Ed Herbst, introduces new art to art-partiers who know they prices. That is especially true tonight when all of the art shown is priced under $200. Think holi day gifts, think original art, think support for the artists of Central Florida, and think how much sense that makes for everyone Listed in Intellectual Property Today as: 22ND in the nation for trademarks issued Top 100 in the nation for patents issued Protect your new brainstorm with the brain trust of an Intellectual Property law rm. Contact ADDM&G today for further information. www.addmg.com Take Me to Your Leader in Intellectual Property LawGRAY MATTER MATTERS Orlando 4078412330 | Jacksonville 9043987000 | Melbourne 3216228651 Miami 3053748303 | Tampa 8136394222* | Winter Springs 4077965064 Second Harvest Food Bank is working to feed hope. Each week, an average of 55,000 people kids, seniors, working families, homeless and others rely on us for help getting food. And though we provided more than 39 million pounds of food this year alone, it simply wasnt enough. Because until no one is hungry, we still have work to do. Our neighbors throughout Central Florida continue to need your caring and your help. Remember: A dollar invested in hope can provide up to $9 in groceries.Make a difference. Donate today. www.FeedHopeNow.org 407.295.1066Member of Feeding America FEED HOPE NOW SHF145_WPObserver_5x8.indd 1 10/28/13 11:18 AM Josh Garrick Culture worthy of your calendar Please see CULTURE on page 16 Holiday Ice Skating Rink in Central Park West Meadow at the corner of New York Avenue & Morse Boulevard in Winter ParkNovember 15, 2013thruJanuary 5, 2014open 7 days a week > extended school holiday hours group rates & private parties > reservations requiredspecial thanks to our sponsors 407-599-3203or cityofwinterpark.org/WITP rrffntb CHRISTMAS AT THE CASA CHRISTMAS IN THE PARK ART GIFTS UNDER $200

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Page 16 | Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Please see CULTURE on next page CULTURE | Looking for a romantic evening out? Check out The Light in the Piazza at the Mad Cow Theater C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 15 A Free Concert Sponsored by:Maitland Presbyterian Church 341 N. Orlando Avenue Maitland, FLDecember 15, 2013 7:30 p.m.Call 321-303-1404 this holiday season. Call 407-8964231 or visit Omart.org Now through Dec. 14 Crazy for Gershwin at the Winter Park Playhouse The creatives at the Winter Park Playhouse have created sev eral new musicals based on the work of a great composer or per former, and their newest effort is Crazy for Gershwin A Tribute to George & Ira Gershwin. Run ning through Dec. 14, this tribute to the Gershwin brothers reminds us of the unbelievable number of songs created by this All-Amer ican duo. Call 407-645-0145 or visit winterparkplayhouse.org Dec. 6 to Jan. 5 The Light in the Piazza at Mad Cow Theater Set in Rome in 1953, The Light in the Piazza is the story of a young American tourist, travel ing with her mother, who meets and falls in love with a young Italian. The mother opposes the affair for reasons that become apparent as the musical unfolds. With music and lyrics by Adam Guettel, grandson of Richard Rodgers, Light in the Piazza won six Tony Awards in 2005. Presented by Mad Cow Theater from Dec. 6 to Jan. 5, visit madcowtheatre. com or call 407-2978788. Dec. 6 Winter Park Tree Lighting Ceremony There is more holiday cheer on Dec. 6 at the annual Holi day Tree Lighting Ceremony in Central Park in downtown Winter Park beginning at 5 p.m. The entire family is invited to this free event as Park Avenue becomes a winter wonderland with performances by St. Marga ret Mary Catholic School Choir, Park Maitland Glee Club, New Warner Chapel, Winter Park Highs Belle Chanson Choir, and Orlando Harmony. Afterwards we are invited for refreshments PANCAKE BREAKFAST LIGHT IN THE PIAZZA

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 | Page 17 provided by local businesses along with visits with Santa and Mrs. Claus all in Central Park in Winter Park. Dec. 7 Leadership Winter Park Pancake Breakfast The Leadership Winter Park Pancake Breakfast has become a holiday tradition that turns pan cake batter into a stack of dough! Proceeds from the breakfast schools, assisting teachers with the purchase of necessary school supplies. Those who come early enjoy a delicious breakfast and get a great seat for the Ye Olde Hometown Christmas Parade (parade beginning at 9 a.m.). Breakfast begins Dec. 7 at 7 a.m. on the Central Park stage. Tickets are $6 for adults and $4 for children, and include pancakes, sausage and refreshments. Dec. 7 Winter Park Ye Olde Hometown Christmas Parade December for 61 years, (making this the longest-running holiday parade in Central Florida), the Winter Park Chamber of Com merce will host the Winter Park Ye Olde Hometown Christmas Parade on Saturday, Dec. 7 at 9 a.m. This year the parade will honor Grand Marshal and Orange County Public Schools Board Member Joie Cadle. The parade will travel down Park Avenue, from Cole Avenue south to Comstock Avenue. Floats, departments, scout groups, local dignitaries and Santa will be part of the fun. Dec. 9 Venetian Vespers with the Orlando Philharmonic Maestro Christopher Wilkins will conduct a sizable cham ber orchestra drawn from the Orlando Philharmonic, joined by the UCF Chamber Singers on Dec. 9 in a program called Venetian Vespers beginning at 7 p.m. St. Marks Basilica in Venice gave rise to a tradition of works for multiple choirs, including works by Monteverdi, Gabrieli, and Vivaldi, composers whose works will be highlighted in this highly recommended concert at the Shakespeare Center. For tickets call 407-770-0071 or visit Orlandophil.org Current All hail chef Chris Windus of the Alfond Inn Two months ago I put on my Restaurant Reviewers hat and wrote to you about the culinary wonders being created by Execu tive Chef Chris Windus at Ham iltons Kitchen at The Alfond Inn. So it is no surprise that Orlando Life Magazine recently named Chef Chris as Best New Chef in their Silver Spoon Awards. Tech nically, Chef Chris is not a new chef (he spent 10 years as Exec Chef of blue-zoo at the Disney Swan Hotel), but he is new to The Alfond. Call 407-998-8089 or visit thealfondinn.com, and tell them Josh sent you. Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906. CULTURE | Get in the holiday spirit with the pancake breakfast and Christmas parade this weekend C ONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE KEEP UP WITH MAITLAND NEWS AND EVENTS!www.IndependenceLane.com Facebook.com/ItsMyMaitland CHEF CHRIS WINDUS This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORG @EnzianTheater FilmSlam Experience the best local indie lm showcase and VOTE for each months winner Sun 1PM STORY OF A SMALL TOWN WITH A BIG SOUND. Featuring music of Aretha Franklin, The Rolling Stones, Jimmy Cliff, and more MUSCLE SHOALS Fri Sun, 3:15, 9:15 Mon, Wed, Thurs 9:15 FINAL WEEK! Cast | Chiwetel Ejiofor, Benedict Cumberbatch, Paul Giamatti, Brad Pitt 12 YEARS A SLAVE Fri Thurs 6:15 Cult Classics: GO Bringing your favorites back on 35mm Tues 9:30

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Page 18 | Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Opinions Chris Jepson Perspectives What if? What if after WWII, the de scendants of Nazis created social clubs to publicly glorify and remember the noble lost cause of the National Socialist Ger man Workers Party? What if the German government, decades after WWII, issued glorious reunion of former Nazi soldiers? What if the Daughters of Nazism orga nized to honor the memory of their ances tors who so nobly fought to protect the homeland from imperialists and commu nists? What if Joseph Goebbels, Minister of Propaganda, had German high schools named after him? an abomination, almost without historical precedent, is undeniable. Yet, we Ameri cans continue to glorify and honor a horror (the Confederacy/slavery) that was un questionably as egregious as anything the Nazis perpetrated. The Nazis were in power but 12 years and were repudiated by the German people. American slavery (and Jim Crow) was in effect for more than 300 years, and a noble cause. How is it that the horrors of Nazism abominations they were, yet the Confed eracy (slavery) gets a pass that somehow, losing in the defense of slavery was noble? Oh, apologists will argue, the Confederacy, the Civil War was never about slavery it was about states rights (freedom, ironi cally). Yes, of course, just as Nazism was about the future of the German people. Weve all watched Gone With The Wind too many times. How plantation ing hosannas and willingly participating in their own subjugation as Uncle Toms and owners. Theyre so very thankful and ap preciative for three meals and a roof over their head. What a crock. Oh, and those noble Southern boys of the Confederacy. Gloriously dying for the cause? Uh, tell me again the cause? Freedom! Freedom! Yes, freedom for white boys to enslave. Such a noble cause. Just ask the Sons & Daughters of the Confed eracy. Every American should see the recently released movie Years A Slave. It is based on the true story of a free black man living in New York who was kidnapped into slavery and transported to the South in the 1840s. Any, and I mean any, roman tic ideas you have about the antebellum South will be disabused. No more Gone With The Wind nobility of cause. wasshamefullypivotal in the establish ment of the United States. It is a scourge on our history, and to listen to Southern apologists defend the Confederacy as something noble and worth commemorat ing is a distortion of history and fact and is insulting to black Americans, nay, to all Americans. It is no stretch to equate Nazism with the Confederacy. Both dealt with the marginalization and destruction of human beings in a state-sanctioned, authorized manner. To denounce one and glorify the other is historically ignorant, hypocritical and appalling. Do drive olDixie down Jepson is a 27-year resident of Central Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.US Louis Roney Play On! character and characters. These are two distinctly different things. With football in the air every fall, my players who comprised the Winter Park High School Wildcats in the late 1930s. We Wildcats took what we were doing was, in his minute realm, a high potentate. Football was to us still a game, but a game to be played with utmost desire to win and to win within the bounds of rules and good sportsmanship. We same guys were pals who swam blocked and tackled each other with full of us had played football together in some form or other since we were in grammar school, and had picked up knowledge of the game from movie news shorts and the by the Rollins College Tars at Tinker Field in Orlando. In its own league, Rollins was a consis tent winner, and had a good coach, a prob lematic vociferous guy who had been a team. I loved the game and played center on our team, but never kidded myself that I would play beyond high school. At 165 lbs., my football days were limited, and I enjoyed them to the full while I could. One player on our team, halfback Ralph Jackson, was good enough to play for the Citadel in Charlestown after graduating from WPHS. I unexpectedly won an academic schol arship to Harvard, and when I arrived in Cambridge, I realized that I was at least 30 pounds lighter than anyone on the fresh man team, and was nowhere near as adept as those fellows who had come to Harvard via Exeter, Andover, etc. Harvard was by then no longer the power it had been in footballs historic early days, when the Ivy League was creating the game we know today. Football is a microcosmic non-lethal representation of war, I used to think. The two sides do everything within the rules to conquer each other for sixty fateful min utes. If you played a position in those early days, you played both offense and defense, period! If you came out of the game, you had to stay out for the rest of that half.... In WWII Naval training, I spent a month on the campus of Notre Dame University where football had long been adored in almost superhuman ways. One bright sunny day I walked alone out into the Notre Dame stadium to the middle of the 50 yard line and stood there in the silence. I looked around and imagined that I heard the crowds who had come to cheer Notre Dame and Army, or Ohio State, or USC, in that teeming stadium ghosts of glorious past gridiron days. I once had a coach who told me quite clearly to put my opponent out of the game if I could. I dared to tell him that I would try to put my opponent out of the play, but certainly not out of the game. I was in a game where opponents were pledged and armed to eliminate each other from the face of the earth. That condition was a big step beyond anything that foot ball ever suggested to us kids who played the game. War was quite another matter. The new self-imposed limits of what one will do to be victorious over other people reversed the character of what we young boys had learned and adopted in playing football, and in living as civilized human beings. Competition and character About Roney: HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney) Have you ever wondered about which hospitals in your community provide the best care? If you or a loved one needed elective surgery, like a knee replacement, how would you pick the right hospital? A new tool called Hospital Compare gives you easy access to important information about the quality of all the hospitals in your area that accept Medicare and its all available online at medicare.gov/hos pitalcompare. This information can help you and your health care provider make an informed decision about the best hospital for your needs. There are a lot of factors to consider when choosing a hospital. For starters, pick a hospital that accepts your health insur ance (whether thats Medicare or another type of insurance). Consider hospitals that have the best track record in providing procedure. Hospital Compare has all of this information and much more. (This website is not intended for use in emergencies if youre already in an ambulance, for example. If you experience an emergency, always go to the nearest hospital.) Q: Why is the quality of my hospital important? A: Not all hospitals are the same some provide better care than others. Hospitals that provide high-quality care ensure that patients get the right care at the right time and that patients needs are met. Choosing a hospital that provides highquality care can help keep you safe and avoid potential problems. Q: How can Hospital Compare help me choose a hospital? A: Hospital Compare collects up-todate quality, safety, and patient satisfaction information for nearly every hospital in the country. You can use the website to see how the hospitals in your area compare to each other on many measures of quality, and you can see how those hospitals com pare to state and national averages. pital Compare? A: Hospital Compare provides informa tion on a wide variety of quality issues. For ence mended care for patients with certain conditions, such as people with pneumonia or people whove had a heart attack who were treated for common conditions or received common procedures All of this information gives you a glimpse into the kind of care you might receive. Q: How do I use Hospital Compare? A: Using your computer, smart phone, or tablet, go to medicare.gov/hospitalc ompare/search.html. If you dont have access to a computer, ask your health care provider for help. in your area by entering your address or zip code, and select up to three hospitals youd like to compare. If you already know which hospital youre looking for, you can search by hospital name. While you cant always predict when youll need care, Hospital Compare can be an important tool to help you and your health care provider learn about your op tions and make the best decision for your health care needs. Talk to your health care provider about how Hospital Compare can help you. Families USA is the national organiza tion for health care consumers. Shopping for health care: Comparing hospitals can help ~ Why I Am a Daughter of the Confederacy ~ I am a Daughter of the Confederacy because I was born a Daughter of the Confederacy . a heritage so rich in honor and glory. . I do not consider the cause . to be lost or forgotten. Rather, I am extremely proud of the fact that he [ancestor] was a part of it. As proclaimed on the United Daughters of the Confederacy website Football is a microcosmic non-lethal representation of war, I used to think.

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 | Page 31 WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com OBSERVER Just Sold Homes THE MARKE T PLA C E MindGym December 2, 2013 MindGymDecember 2, 2013 Sharon Helsby 1536 Holts Grove, Win ter Park $1,495,000. 11/22/2013 Patty Munsey 1321 Ridgewood Ave, Winter Park $176,000. 11/26/2013 Joe Miller 1217 E. Lk Colony Dr, Mai tland $597,500. 11/27/2013 Sharon Helsby 1668 Wild Indigo, Oviedo $416,500. 11/27/2013 MaryStuart Day /Megan Cross 1754 Lake Berry Drive, Winter Park $530,000. 12/02/2013 2760 Goldenrod Drive, Winter Park, FL 32792 sold by Pamela Ryan 1724 Reppard Road, Orlando, FL 32803 sold by Jennifer King 1575 Orange Avenue, Winter Park, FL 32789 sold by Rhonda Chesmore 780 Virginia Drive, Winter Park, FL 32789 sold by Kelly L. Price 1806 Florinda Drive, Orlando, FL 32804 sold by Padgett McCormick SATURDAY 1-4 QUAINT HOME ON BRICK STREET 1570 Grove Terrace, Winter Park. 3BD/2BA, 1,663SF. Excellent Winter Park location. One car detached garage with workshop space. Yard is low mainte nance. High ceilings in living areas and master suite. Two walk in closets and French doors in master suite that open out to back patio. Kitchen has granite counters, newer wood cabinets and a breakfast nook. Wood and ceramic tile throughout. $409,000 SUNDAY 12-3 NEW PRICE! AMAZING 1930s CHARACTER HOME 1520 Glencoe Road, Winter Park. 3BD PLUS Office/2.5BA, 2,351SF. Deeded lake access to Lake Virginia! Craftsman style home located on a lushly land scaped 91x150 lot. Circular driveway, front porch and courtyard. Original hard wood floors, wood burning fireplace and bonus room. Downstairs master suite with walk-in closet, updated bath and soaking tub. Newer kitchen with break fast nook. Backyard oasis and detached garage. $550,000 SUNDAY 1-4 ADORABLE COLLEGE PARK BUNGALOW 755 Clifford Drive, Orlando. 3BD/2.5BA, 1,594SF. Located on lovely brick street surrounded by beautiful homes. Kitchen remodeled with new cabinets and stain less appliances. Hardwood floors. New paint inside, new roof, new heating and AC and upgraded electrical. Very large fenced backyard with room for a pool. Wonderful location. $235,000 HOME ON WATERBRIDGE CUL-DE-SAC 1300 Serena Drive, Winter Park. 3 BD/2BA, 2,342 SF. Full of natural light, this recently renovated single family home with open family room & kitchen has new tile floors, granite, stainless and pendant lights. New baths. Large living room with vaulted ceilings and woodburning fireplace. French doors open to 3 courtyards. 2-car garage. $515,000 BALDWIN PARK BEAUTY 2015 Meeting Place, Orlando. 3BD/3.5BA, 2,320SF. Overlooking Corrine Commons Park with upgrades throughout including hickory wood floors, crown molding, tray ceilings, hand blown glass chandelier. Kitchen has 40 maple cabinets, granite counters, stainless appliances, warming drawer and two wine refrigerators. Two car garage. $525,000 OBSERVER Open Houses Saturday, December 7th 3751 Percival Road, Orlando FL 32826 4 BR | 3.5 BA | 3,536 SF | $925,000 Immaculate model home on a beautiful lakefront lot with impressive views of Lake Price. Downstairs master retreat with his and hers closets, large walkin shower and Jacuzzi tub. Spacious kitchen offers built-in appliances, custom cabinets, large island and bar top seating for six. Additional features include a fire place in the family room and huge bonus room with balcony. Enjoy entertaining by the resort style pool with views of the pri vate beach and dock! Hosted by: Kelly L. Price from 2-5 PM Sunday, December 8th 712 Monmouth Way, Winter Park FL 32792 5 BR | 3 BA | 2,200+ SF | $369,800 Fabulous 5 bedroom/3 bath Winter Park Pines home with over 2,200 sq. ft. plus oversized two car garage located on a quiet street. Spacious screened porch (33x16) overlooking sparkling pool. Floor plan features a living room, dining room, plus family room with fireplace, split bedroom plan, and pool bath. Many recent updates. Hosted by: Mary Ann Steltenkamp from 1-4 PM 219 Flame Avenue, Maitland FL 32751 4 BR | 2.5 BA | 3,430 SF | $425,000 Stunning ranch style home nestled in a lovely Maitland neighborhood situated on stunning park-like lot. Features include a large eat-in kitchen, family room with fireplace, wet bar, and bright Florida room that leads out to a beautifully pavered patio. Enjoy relaxing in the lush backyard near the waterfall and pond! Hosted by: Kelly L. Price from 1-4 PM 960 Georgia Avenue, Winter Park FL 32789 4 BR | 4 BA | 3,654 SF | $1,295,000 Picturesque location on a brick street at the corner of Georgia & Palmer ~ Walk to Park Avenue! Fantastic wall of windows in the family room overlooking the pool and spa. Spacious kitchen, plantation shutters throughout, gorgeous wood floors, high ceilings and three fireplaces. Private fenced backyard with mature landscaping. Hosted by: Jennifer Sloan from 1-3 PM www.orange-blossom.com/7100 1-800-624-8835 1-800-624-8835 1-800-624-8835 1-800-624-8835 1-800-624-8835 Order Navels & Grapefruit, get Tangelos FREE!EXTRA BONUS FREE 3 oz. Jar Genuine Honeybell MarmaladePlus standard shipping.* Gifts of Floridas Finest FruitIndian River CitrusORANGE BLOSSOM Item #7100 8115 lbs. of Citrus in each box! Send a healthy holiday gift of famous Florida Navel Oranges and Ruby Red Grapefruit, and get a box of sweet, easy to peel Tangelos FREE. Tree-ripened and picked at the peak of perfection, satisfaction guaranteed. All three boxes will be shipped to one address. ANNOUNCEMENTS MOECKER AUCTIONS: Public Auction, Road Runner Highway Signs, Inc. (Road striping division only)December 10th @ 10am 4421 12th St. Court East, Bradenton, Fl 34203. Specialized high way marking/striping equipment and ve hicles that meets DOT safety. Special preview: 12/09 10am-4pm. www.moec kerauctions.com (800) 840-BIDS 15%18%BP, $100 ref. cash dep. Subj to con firm. Receivership case #2013 CA 002342 Circuit Court of Manatee County, Fl AB-1098 AU-3219, Eric Rubin ANNOUNCEMENTS Winter Park Benefit Shop 140 Lyman Ave, Winter Park needs items to sell: clothing, bedding, jewelry, kitchenware and bric-a brac. Also need ing volunteers. Contact Elizabeth Comer 407-647-8276. Open Tues & Fri at 9:30am; Sat 10am-1pm. All proceeds support childrens programs & the Or lando Blind Association HELP WANTED Position Available: Club and House Administrator: The Womans Club of Winter Park, Inc., an almost century old non-profit civic and charitable organization, is seeking to fill a half time (20 hours per week) position by January 1, 2014. The successful candi date will have proven skills and experi ence in marketing, public relations, ad ministration, communications, social media, budgeting, and event planning. Ability to work well with a variety of people is essential. This person will work with the club Board of Directors, mem bers, and rental clients, as well as one other part-time employee, whose job entails house maintenance and technol ogy. Salary range, $16-$18/hour de pending upon experience and perfor mance. Please submit a full resume and letters of reference to Sandra Blossey, 1262 Melissa Ct. Winter Park, FL 32789 HELP WANTED Now Hiring: OTR CDLA Drivers New Pay Package and $2500 Sign-On Bonus! Mostly 5-10 days out, full benefits, achievable bo nuses. Call for details 1-888-378-9691/ apply at www.heyl.net Driver Trainees Needed NOW! Become a driver for Werner Enterprises. Earn $800 per week! Local CDL Training. 1-877-214-3624. MISCELLANEOUS AIRLINE CAREERS begin here Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Finan cial aid for qualified students. Job place ment assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769 PROFESSIONAL SERVICE House Cleaning Services Need your home cleaned? I am the one who can do it. Honest & Experienced. References upon request. Weekly, Biweekly, monthly. Reasonable rates. Free Estimates. Please call Brenda 321-2394403. REAL ESTATE: COMMERICIAL OFFICE FOR RENTWINTER PARK Executive office available in prestigious bank building. Approximately 10 x 12 with windows on two sides. Additional space available for assistant, now or lat er, at additional charge. Aloma and Lake mont Avenues. 24-hour access. Mini mum one year term. Broker. $500 per month. Lou Nimkoff 407-405-3368 office@briofl.com REAL ESTATE: FOR RENT 1BR/1Bath Condo for RENT $725/ mo Single story condo no one above or be low. Range,stove,dishwasher,tile throughout, washer/dryer hookups, three closets. Cats ok. Dogs no way. Pool, tenn nis courts. Near intersection of RedBug Road & 436/Semoran Blvd. Very nice community. Available now. Minimum 1 year lease. Dan 863-797-4128 sunshinerentals123@gmail.com REAL ESTATE: FOR SALE 10 ACRE MOUNTAIN TOP ESTATE! Gorgeous Blue Ridge mountain acreage featuring spectacular 3 state views & towering hardwoods! Abuts U.S. National Forest. Great building spot! U/G utilities, paved rd frontage, RV friendly. Priced to sell only $69,900. Excellent financing. Call now 866-952-5303, x 92 DOWNTOWN WINTER PARK CONDO/TOWNHOME OWNERS We have buyers waiting. Find out what your property is worth. Free computer ized list of area condos/townhomes. Ac tive and Sold listings www.winterparkfl. biz Winter Park Land Co. Linda S. Camp 321-377-3052 Linda Camp 321-377-3052 linda@linda camp.com FLORIDA WATERFRONT CONDO LIQUIDATION SALE! Brand new 2BR/2BA 1,690sf luxury con do only $149,900 Originally under con tract for $365,000. Near downtown Or lando & all theme parks/attractions. Must see. Call now 877-333-0272, x 173 New Log Home* on 8+ acres in Florida just $87,900. Sale! Saturday, Dec 14th. 3BR, 2BA, 1700sf cabin on spectacular lake access setting in beautiful upscale community with all infrastructure/amenities com pleted. Excellent financing. Call now 877-525-3033, x983. *constructed weather tight log home shell. Tennessee Log Cabin on 6 acres with FREE Boat Slip! Only $74,900 New 3BR, 2BA log cabin shell, lake access, nicely wooded, level setting. Quiet paved road frontage. Excel lent financing. Call now 877-888-0267, x 453 EmployFlorida.com 1-866-352-2345 Employ Florida is an equal opportunity program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. The Employ Florida telephone number may be reached by persons using TTY/TTD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711. Disponible en Espanol. JOB RESOURCES at EmployFlorida.com helped me nd a new job I enjoy earning higher pay than I did before I was laid off. You too can discover REAL RESULTS with Employ Florida. RANDAL HARDBOWER Industrial Electrician Green Circle Bio Energy Inc. NEW LISTING! BEAUTIFUL POOL HOME IN PARK GROVE 812 Granville Drive, Winter Park. 5BD/3.5BA, 2,950SF. Traditional ranch home with formal living room with brick fireplace and dining room with built-in corner cabinets. Bamboo floors and stainless appliances. Two covered back patios with brick pavers. Lush landscap ing and pool with fountains in private fenced yard. Large lot and attached 2-car garage. Zoned for Dommerich Elemen tary & Maitland Middle. Prime location near Park Avenue. $699,000 RANCH HOME WITH GUEST APARTMENT 100 W Rockwood Way, Winter Park. 5BD/3BA, 2,628SF. Sprawling home on oversized lot in the heart of Winter Park. Brick streets and giant oak canopies wel come you to the Forrest Hills neighbor hood. Large and spacious rooms in main house and the 1/1 guest house offers kitchen, playroom and separate en trance. $449,000 SUNDAY 2-5 TRADITIONAL POOL HOME IN IDEAL LO CATION 451 Sylvan Drive, Winter Park. 4BD/3BA, 3,150SF. Light and bright home wrapped in French doors that open to large cov ered brick patio. Wet bar with wine fridge in butlers area. Split bedroom plan. Mas ter bath has double sinks, jetted tub and separate shower. Large fenced yard with brick paver pool deck and heated spa. $699,000 Order your classified ad online! At WPMObserver.com you can create, customize and pay for your ad in one convenient place!

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Page 32 | Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Care ful, Lamb. Dont let your generous nature lead to some serious overspending as you contemplate your holiday gift-giving. Your social life kicks off into high gear by weeks end. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) A positive attitude helps you weather annoying but unavoidable changes in holiday plans. Aspects favor new friendships and reinforcement of exist ing relationships. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Demands on your energy level could be much higher than usual as you pre pare for the upcoming holidays. Be sure to pace yourself. Friends and family will be happy to help. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Dont allow a suddenly icy reaction from a friend or family member to continue without learning what caused it and what can be done to restore that once warm and caring relationship. LEO (July 23 to August 22) A rela tionship seems to be unraveling, mostly from a lack of attention. It might be a good idea to ease up on whatever else youre doing so you can spend more time working to mend it. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) New facts emerge that not only help explain the recent rift with a trusted colleague, but also might provide a chance to wipe the slate clean and make a fresh start in your friendship. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) A family members personal situ ation is, fortunately, resolved in time for you to get back into your hectic round of holiday preparations. An old friend might bring a new friend into your life. SCORPIO (October 23 to Novem ber 21) Pace yourself in meeting holi day pressures and workplace demands to avoid winding up with a frayed temper and a Scorpian stinger that lashes out at puzzled kith, kin and col leagues. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) A financial matter requires close attention. Also, news from a trusted source provides the means to help sort out a long-standing state of confusion and put it into per spective. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) This is a good time to reinforce family ties. Make it a priority to assess and resolve all outstanding problems. Start the upcoming holiday season with a full measure of love. AQUARIUS (January 20 to Febru ary 18) Dont be pressured into a socalled solid-gold investment. Wait until the holiday distractions are over. Then take a harder look at it. You might find that the gold is starting to flake off. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) A former friend might be trying to heal the breach between you by using a mutual friend as an intermediary. Best advice: Keep an open mind despite any lingering bad feelings. BORN THIS WEEK: You have a way of saying the right thing at the right time. Your friendships are deep and lasting. 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. Dec. 19, 1732, Benjamin Frank lin of Philadelphia first published Poor Richards Almanack. The book, filled with proverbs preaching industry and prudence, was published continuously for 25 years and became one of the most popular publications in colonial America. Dec. 17, 1843, Charles Dickens classic story A Christmas Car ol is published. Dickens never lost momentum as a writer, churning out major novels every year or two, often in serial form. Among his most impor tant works are David Copperfield (1850), Great Expectations (1861) and A Tale of Two Cities (1859). Dec. 18, 1912, after three years of digging in the Piltdown gravel pit in Sussex, England, amateur archaeologist Charles Dawson announces the discovery of two skulls that appear to belong to a primitive hominid and ancestor of man. Dec. 21, 1945, Gen. George S. Patton, commander of the U.S. 3rd Army, dies from injuries suffered not in battle, but in a freak car accident. He was 60 years old. Descended from a long line of military men, Patton grad uated from the West Point Military Academy in 1909. Dec. 22, 1956, a baby gorilla named Colo enters the world at the Columbus Zoo in Ohio, becoming the first-ever gorilla born in captivity. She went on to become a mother, grand mother, and in 1996, a great-grand mother to Timu, the first surviving infant gorilla conceived by artificial insemination. Colo is still alive today. Dec. 16, 1960, two airliners collide over New York City, killing 134 people aboard the planes and on the ground. A miscalculation by the pilot of the United flight put his plane directly into the path of a TWA Super Constellation. Christmas presents car ried by the planes passengers were strewn all over the streets. Dec. 20, 1989, the United States invades Panama in an attempt to over throw military dictator Manuel Noriega, who had been indicted in the Unit ed States on drug-trafficking charges. Noriegas Panamanian Defense Forces were promptly crushed. 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. King Features Weekly ServiceDecember 2, 2013 ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Care ful, Lamb. Dont let your generous nature lead to some serious overspending as you contemplate your holiday gift-giving. Your social life kicks off into high gear by weeks end. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) A positive attitude helps you weather annoying but unavoidable changes in holiday plans. Aspects favor new friendships and reinforcement of exist ing relationships. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Demands on your energy level could be much higher than usual as you pre pare for the upcoming holidays. Be sure to pace yourself. Friends and family will be happy to help. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Dont allow a suddenly icy reaction from a friend or family member to continue without learning what caused it and what can be done to restore that once warm and caring relationship. LEO (July 23 to August 22) A rela tionship seems to be unraveling, mostly from a lack of attention. It might be a good idea to ease up on whatever else youre doing so you can spend more time working to mend it. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) New facts emerge that not only help explain the recent rift with a trusted colleague, but also might provide a chance to wipe the slate clean and make a fresh start in your friendship. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) A family members personal situ ation is, fortunately, resolved in time for you to get back into your hectic round of holiday preparations. An old friend might bring a new friend into your life. SCORPIO (October 23 to Novem ber 21) Pace yourself in meeting holi day pressures and workplace demands to avoid winding up with a frayed temper and a Scorpian stinger that lashes out at puzzled kith, kin and col leagues. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) A financial matter requires close attention. Also, news from a trusted source provides the means to help sort out a long-standing state of confusion and put it into per spective. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) This is a good time to reinforce family ties. Make it a priority to assess and resolve all outstanding problems. Start the upcoming holiday season with a full measure of love. AQUARIUS (January 20 to Febru ary 18) Dont be pressured into a socalled solid-gold investment. Wait until the holiday distractions are over. Then take a harder look at it. You might find that the gold is starting to flake off. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) A former friend might be trying to heal the breach between you by using a mutual friend as an intermediary. Best advice: Keep an open mind despite any lingering bad feelings. BORN THIS WEEK: You have a way of saying the right thing at the right time. Your friendships are deep and lasting. 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. Dec. 19, 1732, Benjamin Frank lin of Philadelphia first published Poor Richards Almanack. The book, filled with proverbs preaching industry and prudence, was published continuously for 25 years and became one of the most popular publications in colonial America. Dec. 17, 1843, Charles Dickens classic story A Christmas Car ol is published. Dickens never lost momentum as a writer, churning out major novels every year or two, often in serial form. Among his most impor tant works are David Copperfield (1850), Great Expectations (1861) and A Tale of Two Cities (1859). Dec. 18, 1912, after three years of digging in the Piltdown gravel pit in Sussex, England, amateur archaeologist Charles Dawson announces the discovery of two skulls that appear to belong to a primitive hominid and ancestor of man. Dec. 21, 1945, Gen. George S. Patton, commander of the U.S. 3rd Army, dies from injuries suffered not in battle, but in a freak car accident. He was 60 years old. Descended from a long line of military men, Patton grad uated from the West Point Military Academy in 1909. Dec. 22, 1956, a baby gorilla named Colo enters the world at the Columbus Zoo in Ohio, becoming the first-ever gorilla born in captivity. She went on to become a mother, grand mother, and in 1996, a great-grand mother to Timu, the first surviving infant gorilla conceived by artificial insemination. Colo is still alive today. Dec. 16, 1960, two airliners collide over New York City, killing 134 people aboard the planes and on the ground. A miscalculation by the pilot of the United flight put his plane directly into the path of a TWA Super Constellation. Christmas presents car ried by the planes passengers were strewn all over the streets. Dec. 20, 1989, the United States invades Panama in an attempt to over throw military dictator Manuel Noriega, who had been indicted in the Unit ed States on drug-trafficking charges. Noriegas Panamanian Defense Forces were promptly crushed. 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. King Features Weekly ServiceDecember 2, 2013 rf nt b tt A MarkNet Alliance Member AU-C002594 10% Buyers PremiumRowell Auctions, Inc.800-323-8388 For Details Visit RowellAuctions.com RowellAuctions.com 127 Acres Offered Divided Cropland, Recreational & Development Tract 127 Acres Offered DividedCropland, Recreational & Development TractPine Forest & Banks Road, Grady County, GeorgiaBidding Ends Wed., December 18th @ 2:00 p.m.~ Subject to Auto Extend Bidding Feature ~Offered Online Exclusively at RowellAuctions.comFantastic Agricultural Tracts Great Development Tracts Excellent Hunting Beautiful Homesites Peaceful Country Living FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now surviveDIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922 rfntb rf ntand soreness nb naches THG-12902

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e Mayf lower. Smart. Secure. And Spectacular. Imagine a time in your life when you have the freedom to do exactly as you please. Relax ...revitalize ...reinvent ...renew. And, then imagine a place where you can do all that on your terms and still have the complete peace of mind that comes only with the guarantee of comprehensive continuing care. That place ...is The Mayower the gold standard for retirement communities in Central Florida. Here, you have the freedom and exibility to customize your home and your retirement lifestyle to make them uniquely yours. And while youre doing that, youll also have the guarantee of pre-funded long-term care in our 5-Star rated Health Center. Thats what prompted residents like Father Bob and Sallie Phillips to plan ahead and proactively make the move ...because they wanted to, not because they needed to. How about you?Whats your plan for the future? Call today, and lets talk about it: 407 .672 1620. 8 8 1 4 1 P R AD WPO 12/2013 Winter Pa rk's Distinctive R etir ement Community www.themayf lower .com 1620 Mayower Court Winter Park, FL 32792 A WORRY FREE LI F ESTY L E PL US GU A R A NTEED LON G TERM CA RE [ now peace of mind ] MAY 994 Phillips Ad_WPO.indd 1 10/30/13 2:11 PM Sandy Gonzalez was one of those boys who built model airplanes at night and by day searched the skies for the real things, watching for them as one might for shooting stars. He caught the aviation bug at an early age and spent nearly every waking moment dream ing of the day when he could get his wings. childhood, some of which was spent in a Catholic group home, Gonzalez found his place at the Manhattan High School of Aviation. In the early 1940s it was a special ized school for boys in New York City who were eager to join the ranks of young men aviation. There were classes for boys interested in becoming pi mechanics. Gonzalez had no doubts about where he wanted to land: the pilots seat. He graduated early, at age 17, and took a job with the Army Air Corps Cadet pro gram in Middleton, Penn. While he was waiting to turn 18 so he could enlist, the U.S. was waging war on Japan and Germany following the assault on Pearl Harbor Dec. 7, 1941. Shortly after his 18th birthday in May 1943, the long awaited call came in and it was off to basic training fol Then it was on to bomber training in Sebring, where he learned to pilot the B-17, a popular WWII bomber that carried a crew of 10. Following bomber training, Gonzalez joined the Eighth Air and successfully completed 30 bombing missions. An incred ible feat, as anyone who has ever seen Memphis Belle can attest. I was always in the right place at the right time, Gon zalez said. It was just good timing for the most part that kept me safe. Throughout the remainder Air Rescue unit, whose job it was to pick up downed pilots or troops who had strayed off course. After the war, he was stationed in West Palm Beach, and remained with the Air Rescue service helping de velop protocols and train pilots for missions. Grumman Albatross Seaplane, which was capable of landing in the open ocean under all sorts of harrowing conditions including rescuing a downed pilot off of a rocky beach on the shore of Canada. The pilot managed to land on the beach, but it was too short to take off, so we came in and rescued him. The only way we could take off though, was to use JATO, or Jet Assisted Take Off can isters. We had four on board, two for each side that generated 4,000 pounds of thrust, more than enough to see us safely off the small beach, he said. On another mission, Gon zalez recalled rescuing a fellow soldier from a river at night un The motto of the Air Rescue unit reads So that others may live, a selflike Gonzalez never took lightly. He and his fellow pilots and crewmen risked their own lives on every mission, but he said they always considered it their personal duty to bring back every missing member they could. I was always proud that I never lost a crewmember, Gonzalez said. Through various assign ments both at home and abroad, Gonzalez continued to serve honorably throughout his 29-year career with the Air Force. He performed air res cue missions in WWII, Korea, Vietnam as well as hundreds of peacetime missions. He re tired with the rank of Colonel and moved to Gainesville to be near his children, who were attending the University of Florida at the time. A few years later, Gonzalez and his wife moved to Fern Park, where they lived togeth er for 30 years, until his wifes passing in 2000. Today Gonzalez makes his home in the Village on the Green in Longwood. At 88, he still lives independently. In fact, he would outdo many people half his age on the computer, managing the Air Rescue Associations web site and serves as the groups executive director. Over the years, Gonzalez has seen many a friend take day. And that, he said, is why he feels so strongly about maintaining the camaraderie of his fellow aviators. He has dedicated much of his retirement as president, then as executive director, of the Air Rescue Association, heading annual reunions, up dating newsletters and help ing former, current and future members of Air Rescue units stay in touch and reconnect whenever possible. Its not always easy run ning all this, but its important to me and to the members to keep it all going, he said. Its how we connect and share the bonds that we all have. 60 years ago, a boy who longed to y went to war A SUPPLEMENT OF THE WINTER PARK-MAITLAND OBSERVER AND SEMINOLE VOICE DECEMBER 2013 PHOTO BY ALLISON OLCSVAY CENTRAL FLORIDA SENIOR Sandy Gonzalez stands with tokens of his past, mementos and awards from his time at war. ALLISON OLCSVAY Central Florida Senior

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Page 2 Senior Calendar MAITLAND SENIOR CENTER The Maitland Senior Center is located at 345 S. Maitland Ave., and is open Monday through Fri day from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The schedule is subject to change without notice. The Maitland Se nior Center will be closed Dec. 23 through Jan. 3 for the holidays! Central Florida Senior DECEMBER 2013 PUBLISHER Tracy Craft 407.515.2605 TCraft@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MANAGING EDITOR Isaac Babcock 407.563.7023 IBabcock@TurnstileMediaGroup.com ADVERTISING Linda Stern 407.376.2434 LStern@TurnstileMediaGroup.com Deborah Sheehy 407.563.7009 DSheehy@TurnstileMediaGroup.com ASSOCIATE EDITOR Sarah Wilson 407.563.7026 SWilson@TurnstileMediaGroup.com DESIGNER Tom Miller 407.563.7032 TMiller@TurnstileMediaGroup.com Published by Turnstile Media Group 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835-5705 P: 407.563.7000 F: 407.563.7099 We will reopen at 9 a.m. on Jan. 6. For more information about these and any other events at the Mai tland Senior Center, please call 407-539-6251 or visit itsmymai tland.com Join Audrey every Tuesday in De cember at 10:30 a.m. for Line Dance Lessons Class is 1.5 hours and perfect for all levels of dancers. Beginners always wel come! Cost is $4 to the teacher. Join us every Monday and Friday in December at 1 p.m. to see your favorite movies! Check our cal endar online to see what movies are showing in December. Join John every Monday, Thurs day, and Friday in December at 9 a.m. for Yoga. Please wear com fortable clothes and bring your own mat. Cost is $2 to the teacher. Join us every Monday in Decem ber at 1 p.m. for our Conver sational French group Spend some time chatting with others and making new friends. Join Esther every Tuesday in December at 9 a.m. for Tai Chi classes Cost of the class is $10 per month to the teacher. Please wear a white shirt, black pants, and comfortable shoes. Join us every Tuesday in Decem ber at 1 p.m. for our Conversa tional Spanish group Spend some time chatting with others and making new friends. Must be uent in Spanish to participate. Join Sherre every Wednesday in December at 9:30 a.m. for a com bo of mat and chair yoga that is great for all levels. Cost of the class is $5 to the teacher. Please bring a yoga mat. Join Ty every Wednesday in De cember at 11 a.m. for Yoga Nidra, a sublime conscious sleep (medi tation) class. Cost of the class is $5 to the teacher. Please bring a yoga mat, something to cover yourself with (if you tend to get cold), and a small pillow. Join Donna every Thursday in De cember at 11:30 a.m. for Chair Yoga. Cost of the class is a $2 do nation to the teacher. Join Ann every Friday in Decem ber for Recorder classes at 12:30 p.m. Lessons are free! Please call the Senior Center at 407-5396251 for specics on this class. On the second Friday of the month counselors from Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders will provide free unbiased counsel ing about Medicare, Medigap, HMOs, Medicaid, Prescriptions Drug Plans, and Long Term Care. All counseling is rst-come-rstserved. Bring your list of medica tions or Rx bottles, insurance card and red, white and blue Medicare card. For more information, email information@elderaffairs.org, visit FLORIDASHINE.org, or contact the Maitland Senior Center. CASSELBERRY ADULT FITNESS CLASSES Chair Yoga is at 10 a.m. every Monday and will get you moving again! The cost is $2 per class. Gentle/Restorative Yoga is from 8:45 to 10 a.m. on Sundays. Cost is $10 per class. Senior citizens discount is $5 per class. For more information, contact Alice Gomes at 609-290-8195 or email alice@ imagineyoga.net. Many more classes are available. For more information on classes and registration, contact Mario Al garin at 407-262-7700, ext. 1576, or malgarin@casselberry.org or visit casselberry.org/register WINTER SPRINGS SENIOR CENTER The Senior Center will be closed Dec. 25 for Christmas. A special holiday lunch will be at 1 p.m. at the Senior Center on Dec. 22. RSVP at 407-327-6554. Please see SENIOR CALENDAR next page

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Page 3 Learn ceramics from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Mondays at the Winter Springs Senior Center at 400 N. Edgemon Ave. in Winter Springs. Call 407-327-6556 for more in formation. Have fun and get moving at yoga classes at 10 a.m. every Friday morning. Chair yoga is also avail able, offering all the benets of traditional yoga. Bingo is Wednesday, Friday and the last Sunday of the month. Lunch is served at 11:45 a.m. fol lowed by Bingo at 1 p.m. Theres no bingo prior to the last Sunday of the month. A bridge class meets at 10:30 a.m. every Tuesday to help your game. Call 407-327-6556 for more classes and information. Lets give a big thumbs-up to Dr. H, a physician at a re gional Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center and a whistleblower. a House Veterans Affairs oversight and investigations subcommittee about her whistleblower complaints to which have resulted in numer of serious wrongdoing at the regional center. For example: werent supervised. They were labeled Licensed Inde pendent Practitioners, which they werent, and they were practicing outside the scope of their licensure. There was never any oversight or review of the care they gave. Thus empowered, nurse practitioners prescribed nar Federal and individual state laws and VA Handbook regu institutional DEA tracking numbers on the drugs, with no physician oversight whatso ever and no means of tracing who prescribed what. sign prescriptions for patients they hadnt even seen. When the doctors objected, the chief of staff brought in residents from a local medical school to write prescriptions after hours. where there were actually no doctors, only nursing staff. Many veterans were unaware that they were being seen only by a nurse, not a doctor. sign collaborative agreements concerning the nursing prac titioners status (essentially monitoring agreements), and when they objected (they could be sued for the work of the nurse), they were told that 55 percent of their perfor mance pay would be withheld. complete histories for patients, just pasting in previous information. Ive read a lot of terrible medical center reports, but this beats them all. I havent named the medical center because I fear these problems arent unique in the VA healthcare system. Send email to columnreply2@ gmail.com 2013 King Features Synd. Inc. 2013 HearUSA, All Rights Reserved. www.hearusa.com7512 Dr. Phillips Blvd., Suite 90 Orlando, FL 32819(On Dr. Phillips Boulevard, near Steinmart and between Stefanos Grill and Kekes restaurant in the Dr. Phillips Marketplace.) Call Toll Free: 855.802.5532 Hear Your Best for the Holidays this Year!Schedule a FREE Hearing Screening! Hear Your Best for the Holidays this Year!Schedule a FREE Hearing Screening! Family. Friends. Festivities. The joyous sounds of the holidays are fast approaching which means its the perfect time for a FREE Hearing Check-up. Dont let another year with hearing loss dampen your cheer. Total Experience World Class Hearing Care Most complete and accurate hearing check-up. Total Selection HearUSA oers a broad selection of advanced hearing aids from trusted brands.Total Technology Video Otoscope examination a look inside your ear to determine if you have ear wax.60-Day TrialRestrictions apply, call for details. Call today for yourFREE Hearing Check-up! A LIFETIME OF BETTER HEARING! FIRST CLASS CARE WORLD CLASS TECHNOLOGY a pair of Siemens 3mi hearing aids**With purchase of a pair of 3mi model only. Everyday Price $2695 each. Sale Price $2295 each. Not valid with any other oer or discount.$800 OFF 130901 HearUSA Holiday Ad_Central Florida Senior_10.25x8 to run 12-5_01.indd 1 10/29/13 10:09 AM America needs more whistleblowers SENIOR CALENDAR | Bingo and more C ONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE Savannah Court and Cove Excellence in Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation 1301 W. Maitland Blvd. Maitland, FL 32751407-645-3990www.SavannahCourtMaitland.comAssisted Living Facility License No. 8447 Skilled Nursing Facility License No. 1635096 Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above. You are always welcome!A Senior Living Community where Hospitality is a Way of Life. Savannah Court Maitland 1301 West Maitland Boulevard Tuesday, December 10, 2013 10:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m. Come see local crafters and thier wares, at an old fashion Bazaar Please call to RSVP!Old Fashion-Bazaar Bash

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Page 6 at Winter Park Towers Your room is waiting for you if you need Pain and Symptom Management Hospital Follow-up Complex Treatments, or Crisis Care Referrals 866-742-6655#5019096 www.cornerstonehospice.org www.SeriousIllness.org/cornerstoneMedicare, Medicaid, most commercial insurances accepted rffrfnColleen D. Kennon, Owner tbbf b Member of: The length of time you might spend in the emergency room has gotten longer and longer as many Medicare patients are held under whats called observation status. AARP recently completed a study called Rapid Growth in Medicare Hospital Observa tion Services: Whats Going On? that shows the length of time patients are held that way has grown, sometimes to more than 48 hours. If youre a Medicare patient, you can be toting up out-of-pocket costs with every passing hour youre held in this medical limbo. Theres no cost-sharing cap with these observation status stays, not to mention that you might not receive the level of care that you should. As an observation outpatient, youre liable for the costs of tests and procedures. Additionally, if you end up in skilled nursing, the obser vation status time you spend in the hospital doesnt count for the Medicare requirement that you have three days as an inpatient. Your portion of the costs can skyrocket, and you might even be denied skilled nursing care because you werent in the hospital long from the AARP study: have increased 94 percent. versus inpatient) is sometimes changed by the hospital after the patient is sent home. skilled nursing that Medicare didnt cover (due to being originally held in observation limbo) was $10,503. A number of senators in Congress have proposed legis lation that would require time spent in observation status to count as part of the three-day inpatient requirement. To read the full 25-page re port, go to aarp.org and put the studys title in the search box. Matilda Charles regrets that she cannot personally answer reader questions, but will incorporate them into her column whenever possible. Send email to columnreply2@gmail.com 2013 King Features Synd. Inc. Emergency room stays can cost a bundle INTRODUCING 877-618-5526 Fully Equipped Kitchens Carefree Granite Countertops Elevator Access Four Paws Friendly 1, 2 & 3 Bedrooms from $685**Promotions, terms and conditions subject to change. Pricing displayed includes optional digital cable, reserved parking space, and washer/dryer connections. GardenParkSeniorLiving.com UptownMaitland.com Visit Us at: 365 Garden Edge Point Fern Park, FL 32730 Office Hours: Monday Friday 10 am 6 pm Saturday: 10 am 5 pm Sunday: 12 pm 5 pm BRAND NEW 55+ SENIOR LIVING APARTMENTS

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Page 7 Lets face it too much of the coverage we provide from Washington is inside base ball, easily ignored by those who live in the real world. Sometimes, though, this stuff matters. A case in point is the decision by Harry Reid and his Democratic gaggle to invoke the nuclear option. Its called that because Reid and his partisan majority blew up ing a parliamentary maneuver, they were able to circumvent the usual two-thirds vote nec essary to change the rules and used a simple majority to do away with the biggest delaying the deliberative United States Senate. Republicans are having a cow. Youll regret this, sput tered Minority Leader Mitch McConnell. The solution to this problem is at the ballot box. He was trying to make the obvious point that if the Rs take over, its the Ds who will have lost their power to stop a conservative agenda. Unwittingly, however, Mc Connell was offering a justi a stalling tactic that he and his partisans were using to thwart the winner of the last election. The voters choose who will head the nation. Last time around, that was Barack Obama, meaning he gets to on the federal bench, and also who will head the departments and agencies of his adminis tration. Forgive the civics refresher, but while the Constitutions advise-and-consent power provides the Senate an abil ity to block nominees, it is supposed to be used sparingly. The key word is consent, but at an unprecedented level, the judicial and executive appoint ments put forth by President Obama. It came to a head when they blocked three of his openings. The Republicans were daring Reid to make the nuclear move in truth, they triple-dared him so he did. Actually, it wasnt a com is an exception for the Su preme Court nominees, and it still can be deployed to shut down legislation. That brought some criticism from those who believe that the GOP agenda is all about obstruc tion. If Barack Obama asked Congress to approve a Happy Thanksgiving resolution, it upper chamber. Republicans vow revenge. They have plenty of tools for continuing the gridlock. The Senate rules are packed with delaying tactics. So they can retaliate against the nuclear option with the death of a thousand cuts. The budget deals that need to be done, for instance, can be sunk if they simply refuse to negotiate. Depending on how vindictive they choose to be, we could be facing another govern ment shutdown or debt-ceiling crisis. If youre wondering just what all this has to do with running the country, the answer is nothing. Those on the right point out that when theyve held the power, the liberals have also embraced procedural block ades. But the Republicans have reached new highs. Or would it be lows? In the ugly world of politics, things rarely improve they get worse. Inside baseball? Yes, it is, but the game affects all of us. If the legislative branch can substitute political pettiness for law making, we will con tinue to deteriorate. Thats not what a democracy is supposed to be. 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com r fntbt f rtt ftbt bt bnr nr rt b bb f b tb off trtnCoupon redeemable for cash, check or credit card purchases only. Not redeemable for insurance transactions. Excludes custom/special orders & nutritional supplements. May not be combined with any other dis counts. Coupon has no cash value. New Holiday Merchandise! Nuclear matters: War on the Capitol oor ASSISTED LIVING RESIDENCE 395 Alafaya Woods Blvd., Oviedo, FL 32765 407-977-8786ALF License No. 9235, 9308, 9307 www.slm.net/SCOviedo1 Signature property of Located on a beautiful campus setting, our two Savannah Court communities provide full assisted living services while Savannah Cottage offers a secured residence for those with memory loss. Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above! You are always welcome at Savannah Court and Cottage of Oviedo. MEMORY CARE RESIDENCEWhere hospitality is truly a way of life! Savannah Court and Cottage ASSISTED LIVING RESIDENCE 395 Alafaya Woods Blvd., Oviedo, FL 32765 407-977-8786ALF License No. 9235, 9308, 9307 www.slm.net/SCOviedo1 Signature property of Located on a beautiful campus setting, our two Savannah Court communities provide full assisted living services while Savannah Cottage offers a secured residence for those with memory loss. Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above! You are always welcome at Savannah Court and Cottage of Oviedo. MEMORY CARE RESIDENCEWhere hospitality is truly a way of life! Savannah Court and Cottage Located on a beautiful campus setting, our two Savannah Court communities provide full assisted living services while Savannah Cottage offers a secured residence for those with memory loss. You are always welcome at Savannah Court and Cottage of Oviedo www.savannahcourtoviedo.com395 Alafaya Woods Blvd., Oviedo, FL 32765407-977-8786 Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above!

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Page 8 DEAR PAWS CORNER: I have two dogs and a cat, and I love them all dearly. I also try to make things a little better for pets that dont have homes by helping out two days a month at the local shelter. Please let your read ers know that they can make a huge difference in dogs and cats lives even with a small contribution. If they cant give their time, they can donate money, food or other pet-care items. Caring in Kalamazoo DEAR KALAMAZOO: You told them, and thanks! The holiday season offers the most opportunities to donate, no matter what amount, to a pets. So while youre busy making gift lists and holiday preparations, dont forget to include pets in need some where in those thoughts. Most local shelters have Web pages online where you fundraising events, see what food or supplies are needed, email address to learn more. Those that dont have a website often have listings or dedicated space in the town or community newspaper. Major pet-care organiza tions and pet-supply stores have fundraising drives throughout the year, while local organizations sometimes hold supply drives and other events with the help of local businesses or municipalities. You also can donate your free time to help out at local animal shelters. Contact your nearest shelter to see if op portunities are available, how much time is required and if additional training is needed for certain volunteer posi tions. Send your questions or comments to ask@pawscorner.com. Did you know mosquitos can transmit heartworm lar vae to dogs, but eas dont? Find out more in my new book, Fighting Fleas, available now. 2013 King Features Synd. Inc. Remember pets in need this holiday season will be celebrating mass starting at1300 N. Mills Ave.(Mills and Montana, just north of Colonial Dr.)Mass begins at 11 a.m. Casual attireParking is along Mills and in Watkins Dental parking lot. Please visit website for information HEAR YE ... HEAR YE! shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM here should be more to life than maintenance-free living. To learn more about our community in Kissimmee, call (407) 933-1999.



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WPMOBSERVER.COM Winter Parks Historic Preservation Advisory Board received a rude awakening Nov. 14 as archaeologist Myles Bland reviewed the citys historic preservation ordinance, declar ing that the city will surely lose its historic resources if changes arent made. The city commissioned Bland to take a closer look at their historic preservation efforts in response to the outcry from resi dents after the recent controver sy over the 128-year-old Capen House. Winter Parks historic resources were sparse to begin with, making up only 8 percent of the citys total residential and commercial structures combined, Bland said. The city cur rently loses 1.2 percent of net known historic structures each year to demolition, according to his report. Use it or lose it folkshistor ic resources are non-renewable, and once theyre gone they cant be replaced, said Bland, who has more than 18 years of archaeological experience. This is a grim trend that is in need of reversal. Bland came forward with 12 different critiques in regards to how the city designates historic landmarks, ways they can obtain funding for historic preservation and new ordinances that should be put in place. Some of biggest problems Bland pointed out involved Tears brimmed in Cheryl and Richard Gonzales eyes as three solemnly spoken words helped to three on Nov. 22. Hes yours now, said Or ange County Judge Robert M. Evans. Just as if he had been born to you. The words marked an end to the couples wait and a begin ning to their new life as parents as their new smiling son, 10-yearto his seat behind them. In the span of a few sentences, went from one of ongoing worry to one with a secure home and two stable parents. Because of all the moving around he did before he came to us, he never had a place to keep his things, never had enough clothing, every time they moved he would have to start all over. Until now, Jayden never had a secure place, Cheryl Gonzales said. Today because of all the hard work of the people at Childrens Home Society and DCF, Jayden has us forever and we just want to say thank you so much to all of them for helping make this pos sible. Courtrooms usually reserved as serious, somber places instead became places of celebration on Nov. 22 for families like the Gonzales. In honor of Novembers National Adoption Month, Orange, Seminole and Osceola counties hosted special adoption ceremonies, just in time to make before the holidays. In Orange County, the jury room was transformed into a makeshift courtroom to accom modate all the adoptive families, friends and relatives who were there to celebrate with them. Big grins mixed with tearyeyed looks of wonder as new families glanced at each other as dy bears and cake took the place of legal briefs, gavels and stenog raphers. Weve been a family since April, Cheryl said, but something changed today. Were no longer aunt and uncle; now were mommy and daddy. Many of the new families PHOTO BY ALLISON OLCSVAY THE OBSERVERRiley Crites, 7, with adopted mom grandmother Judy Crites at the National Adoption Day event held in Orlando Nov. 22. Dozens of families were ofcially created at the event. New family for the holidaysKids across Central their forever families Makes getting into Publix not a pleasureALLISON OLCSVAY Observer staff Please see ADOPTION on page 2Holiday supermarket shop pers in Maitland were unhappy last week as road construction of U.S. Highway 17-92 and Hora tio Avenue making getting in and out of Publix anything but a pleasure. Publix manager Mike Sasso brought his customers complaints to the City Council last Monday, citing ongoing confu sion and construction chaos happening around his store everyday at rush hour. From shoppers not knowing where they can enter and exit to others reporting re peat accounts of nails in tires on Sybelia Avenue, Its a nightmare, Sasso said. End game for the construction but city staff said theres bound to be a few bumps in the road getting there. Its like doing a major renovation in your house and living in it at the same time, said City Manager Jim Williams. drafted after a Maitland Area Transportation Study in 2004 and Construction snarls Maitland trafcSARAH WILSON Observer staff Please see CONSTRUCTION on page 2Winter Park history faces wrecking ball Citys preservation rules criticized for letting buildings disappearTIM FREED Observer staff Please see HISTORY on page 4 VISIT WPMOBSERVER.COMSUBSCRIBE NOW! WILDCATS SPIKE COMPETITIONSPORTS, 11The future of foodA converted church aims to be a hub for locally-sourced groceries. LIFESTYLES, 9Get t for the holidaysActivities for adults and seniors to lose the pounds by 2014. CENTRAL FLORIDA SENIOR, B2COMMUNITY BULLETIN ........... 8 CALENDAR ................... 8 LIFESTYLES ................... 9 SPORTS .................... 11 CULTURE .................... 15 OPINIONS ................... 18 CLASSIFIEDS ................. 31 CENTRAL FLORIDA SENIOR ....... B1 407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC Winter Park Recovery CenterExecutive Drug & Alcohol Treatment Protocols 20 and 40-Week Outpatient Programs Suboxone/Subutex For Opioid Abuse Privacy and Confidentiality AssuredMedically Managed Dual Diagnosis Evidenced Based Programs2056 Aloma Ave, Suite 100, Winter Park, FL 32792 www.WinterParkRecoveryCenter.com 407-629-0413 PHOTO BY TIM FREED THE OBSERVERHistoric buildings have disappeared at 1.2 percent per year.

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Page 2 | Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer raising their grandchildren. When the need arises, you just gotta step up, said Crites, who adopted her granddaughter to give her the security she had been craving. She was always afraid she would have to leave me. This way she never has to again. Peggi Smith of Altamonte Springs also adopted her granddaughter, 4-year-old Aa liyah during the ceremonies Nov. 22. Like Crites, Smith wanted to be able to reassure her granddaughter with the knowledge that she would always have a safe place to call home. Aaliyah has been with me since day one and now its a blessing to know that shes staying with us, as part of our family and our world, Smith said. Thirty children in the tri-county area be came part of their forever families during this years special celebration, said Karla Radka, vice president of Community Im pact for Community Based Care. As one of those 30 kids, 14-year-old Eliz abeth Rowland took three sentences to sum up the universal hopefulness felt going for ward for all those in her shoes. It makes me feel happier to be part of this family because I love them, she said. If I need something, theyll give it to me. It makes me feel happy and warm inside to be adopted today. Over the last 10 years, 700 kids in Cen tral Florida have found forever families through adoption. But for every child who is adopted, Radka said, there are many family. Many of the new par ents, like Jennifer Downs, began as foster parents and adopted children who had been placed in their care initially as foster chil dren. The pro cess to become foster parents takes about six to eight months, Radka said. It is a time and learning that is very valuable to the process of understand ing how the system works and how best to help these children. Once foster parents are approved, they are matched with children in need of stable environments. Every case is different, de pending on the age of the child, whether or not they are part of a sibling group and how long they are expected to need foster care. In some cases, the children become eligible for adoption, which can take another Seventeen-month-old Jaxon Downs wont remember this day, but his mom will never forget it. Downs is a single mom whos been a foster parent for two years. In that time, she has fostered seven kids. Jaxon was my lucky number seven, she said. Dressed smartly for the occasion in a brightly striped bow-tie and crisp white shirt, little Jaxon brought a lot of supporters with him, including his grandparents and his aunt and uncle all of them excited to be part of his life as he grows up. He doesnt know what this all means yet, but he knows we are here for him and thats all that matters, Downs said.ADOPTION | Foster kids finally get forever homes at Orlando event that united 30 kids with new parentsfaced a long journey to reach this mile stone. They worked their way through endless court hearings, evaluations and paper work, all the while learning or relearning how to parent. Quite a few of the adoptions were by family members, such as grandparents formally adopting grandchildren or, in the case of the Gonzales family, aunt and uncle adopting nephew. Judy Crites arrived at the Orange Coun ty Courthouse as Grandma and left as Mom. Her granddaughter, 7-year-old Riley, was grinning over the top of her new ted dy bear, as the realization that shed never have to leave the security of her grand mothers home again began to set in. Its great to be adotted, Riley said, lisp ing over her Ps through her missing two front teeth. Im gonna tell all my friends about being adotted. Riley and her two younger siblings live with their grandmothers, Judy Crites and Linda Byrd, who teamed up a year ago to share a home and the responsibilities of CONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE rf nnrtb rrrfnNO PURCHASE NECESSARY. PHOTO BY ALLISON OLCSVAY THE OBSERVERJayden Gonzales, 10, with new parents Richard and Cheryl at the Nov. 22 adoption event in Orlando that united 30 kids with new parents to celebrated National Adoption Day. CONSTRUCTION | Detours wreak havoc on road revisited in 2013, add an additional left turn lane from southbound 17-92 onto westbound Horatio, and takes Horatio down to one lane each way between 17-92 and Maitland Avenue. It also closes the median where George Avenue crosses 17-92, and extends existing left turn lanes from west bound Horatio onto southbound 17-92. Maitland Public Works Director Rick Lemke said the goal of the project, which is slated for completion in mid-January 2014, Avenue and back onto 17-92. terns for construction and simultaneous undergrounding work, coupled with con tinued building development work hap pening at the corner of George Avenue and 17-92, some local residents say theres got to be a better way. Construction activity is a wonderful thing and we love to see that but you cant just take over a public street, and thats actually whats happened, resident Dale McDonald said. Winter Park resident Alice Weber said that with all the confusion happening at the intersection, its only a matter of time be fore someone gets hurt. and they will not be at that intersection for the purpose of beauty, Weber said. Lemke said the city is working to improve construction congestion and clear up backups as best they can by adapting traf intersection lights. He said Publix is also being allowed additional signage to help the store. We know theres a problem there, and Lemke said. Mayor Howard Schieferdecker urged residents to be patient while the city works out the best solution. said, youll see theres a method in the madness. CONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 | Page 3The city of Maitlands Season of Light celebrates the holiday season The city of Maitlands Season of Light celebration, ushering in the holiday season, will take place on Saturday, Dec. 7 beginning at 3 p.m. in Lake Lily Park. This longstanding tradition is a prelude to the holiday season and is highlighted by the lighting of the city of Maitland Holiday Tree that Lake Lily until January 2014. We invite you to join us in this special holiday celebration that provides an excellent opportunity to make new holiday memories and share the spirit of the season with family, friends and loved ones. You may even run into Santa Claus! You are invited to stroll around Lake Lily Park and enjoy the holiday Yum Yum Cupcake, Midnight Sun Ice cream Sandwich Compa ny, All Things Sweet, Tucks Table, and The Big Cheese food trucks. Holiday gift vendors will be open that special gift you have been looking for. Entertainment for this years event will begin at 3 p.m. and will feature live stage performances by the Outer Toons. The Starving Artist Studio Dancers will appear and from time to time you may discover strolling holiday per formers in the park. Later in the afternoon, we will be joined by the Maitland Middle School Wind Ensemble, Stage Band, Chorus, Chamber Orchestra, the Maitland Colby Studio Dancers and The Waterhouse Dickens Carolers. We invite you to take time out of your holiday schedule to visit with us at Lake Lily Park as we celebrate the holidays with a spe way to get the entire family into the holiday spirit then to come out to the Season of Light celebration in Maitlands Lake Lily Park. We hope to see you there Happy Holidays! rffrntbrbtrbrtr rr btr r r r nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr nbbrr Family Fun Event sponsored by Family Fun Event sponsored by Maitland City TalkBY HOWARD SCHIEFERDECKER MAYOR A season of light 407-659-5701 www.TrustcoBank.com Member FDICEQUAL HOUSINGLENDER *Minimum balance of $500 to earn interest. Please Note: We reserve the right to alter or withdraw these products or certain features thereof without prior notification. RYour Home Town Bank TRUSTCOBANKPlus Free Access to Over 55,000 ATMs Worldwide!No Monthly Service Charges Free ATM/Debit Card Just look for this ATM logo! Free Interest Checking! Pizza & more ... rfntb rf ntbfCannot be combined with any other coupon or offer. Expires 1/1/14.ntnfrnfrr Located at the 20-20 Super Center Plaza near the corner of SR 436 and Howell Branch Rd. btbCannot be combined with any other coupon or offer. Expires 1/1/14. Orlandos Only Doggie Daycare with a Gym! Orlandos Only Doggie Daycare with a Gym! Customized workouts Training Indoor warm water swimming 2826 Shader Rd. Orlando, 32808 407-295-3888 BarkingDogFitness.com Ask about our FREE trial policy! Give Your Dog the Gift of Health. Sign up BEFORE year end and receive 10% o for LIFE and a FREE swim or massage! Fact A lean dog lives an average 2 years longer than an overweight dog AND is healthier and happier!

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Page 4 | Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer rfnftbf D ecember 19th-22ndBob Carr Performing Arts Centre ORLANDO PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA BOOK YOUR SEATS TODAY !407-426-1739O RLAND OBA LLET.ORG rffttbf* Price does not include tickets to The Nutcracker performance. photocarlos amoedo | focustudios.com HISTORY | Preservation consultant: Citys process pits neighbor against neighborincorrect and out-of-date information. The citys survey areas need more of a comprehensive look, Bland said. Many parts of the city have yet to be surveyed, leaving entire neighborhoods unchecked for historical resources. A failure to update the surveyed areas has also data. Several buildings have different addresses since they were surveyed over the past few decades, resulting in hundreds of incorrect forms. From a technical standpoint, this has to be dont know the voids inside your area, you cant really move forward, Bland said. Bland took to task the citys method of designating historic districts. A historic designation in Winter Park requires 20 percent of the population of a proposed historic district to sign a petition, as well as a threshold of at least two-thirds of the property owners in the proposed district to submit a ballot in favor of its formation. Bland saw the voting aspect as one of the citys biggest problems, explaining that it turns the process into a social affair that pits districts by modern social structure. Landmarks require the same voting process, he said, resulting in many landmarks being unprotected. Voting is not the norm, Bland said. It is quite odd and certainly counterproductive to historic preservation. The public voting ally. Bland insisted that theres still much more the city can do to Park could lead to additional funding for his toric structure surveys and the development of guidelines for ordinances a simple step that has yet to be taken. The city would be better served with an archaeological ordinance as well, Bland said, which would lay down guidelines for how to identify, protect and recover artifacts during also make construction teams aware of potential archaeological risk. Local residents spoke out following Blands presentation, agreeing that the city needs to take action as quickly as possible. and all of his facts and information tonight, said Julie Lamar, chair of the board of Friends of Casa Feliz. One of the things that rang true to me is the sense of urgency about revising our ordinance. We are losing hope of having districts with every demolition that happens. Other residents urged the city to bring Blands presentation before the City Commission. information presented tonight, said Betsy Owens, executive director of Casa Feliz. This is obviously a critical issue for our city. I think it would be a real shame if our City Commission were to not hear his report. The City Commission will receive a presentation from Bland at a future meeting date to be determined. CONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 PHONE: 407-563-7000 FAX: 407-563-7099 WPMOBSERVER.COMPUBLISHERTracy Craft407.515.2605TCraft@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MANAGING EDITORIsaac Babcock 407.563.7023IBabcock@TurnstileMediaGroup.comASSOCIATE EDITORSarah Wilson 407.563.7026SWilson@TurnstileMediaGroup.comDESIGNERTom Miller 407.563.7032TMiller@TurnstileMediaGroup.comSTAFF WRITERSBrittni Larson Megan Stokes Tim Freed Allison Olcsvay Kristy VickeryCOLUMNISTSChris JepsonJepson@MediAmerica.usLouis RoneyLRoney@cfl.rr.comJosh GarrickJoshGarrick9@gmail.comADVERTISING SALESLinda Stern407.376.2434LStern@TurnstileMediaGroup.comLEGAL NOTICE ADVERTISINGAshley McBride 407.286.0807Legal@FLALegals.comSUBSCRIPTIONS/CIRCULATIONLuana Baez 407.563.7013LBaez@TurnstileMediaGroup.comMEMBER OF: -Florida Press Association -Winter Park/Maitland/Goldenrod Chambers of CommerceWinter Park/Maitland Observer is published by Turnstile Media Group. Founded in 1990 and headquartered in Orlando, Fla., Turnstile Media Group is also the parent of Golfweek, Golfweek Custom Media, TurfNet, Professional Artist, Seminole Voice, Baldwin Park Living and Turnstile Connect.TURNSTILE MEDIA GROUPCHAIRMANRance CrainPRESIDENT/CEOFrancis X. FarrellVICE PRESIDENTSPatti Green & Jeff BabineauUSPS #00-6186 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:Winter Park / Maitland Observer 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835 Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 | Page 7CoffeeTalk featuring City Manager Randy KnightIf you have a latt beans to grind or you simply want to espresso your thoughts, CoffeeTalk may be the cup for you. Please join an informal conversation with City Manager Randy Knight, Thursday, Decem ber 5, from 8 a.m. to 9 a.m., at the Winter Park Welcome Center located at 151 W. Ly man Ave. This is the last CoffeeTalk of the sea son where you can sit down and talk with Randy over a cup of coffee and chat about any city issues that are of interest to you. Special thanks to Palmanos Cafe, Coffee & Wine Bar for donating the coffee for this special series. For more information, please call 407-599-3428. Dec. 9 City Commission meeting There will be a City Commission meet ing Monday, Dec. 9, at 3:30 p.m., in City Hall Commission Chambers located at 401 S. Park Ave. For the most up-to-date agenda, please visit cityofwinterpark.org > Government > City Commission > Agenda. Below are a few topics of interest:Action Items Requiring Discussion vertisements of two parcels of land located at 300 N. Pennsylvania Ave. and 321 Hannibal Square West located within the CRA for possible development options. Public Hearings oSubdivision or Lot Split approval to di vide the property at 1280 Arlington Place, Zoned R-2, into two lots. amend Chapter 58, Land Development Code, Article I Comprehensive Plan Future Land Use Map so as to establish Commercial Future Land Use on the an nexed property at 656 Overspin Dr. and to indicate the annexation of this property on the other maps within the Comprehensive Plan. amend Chapter 58, Land Development Zoning Map so as to establish Commercial (C-3) Zoning on the annexed property at 656 Overspin Dr. cate and abandon a portion of Gaines Way lying between 610 Gaines Way and 1760 Gaines Way, but retaining and reserving to the city a utility easement over the entire area thereof. agenda on the home page of cityofwinter park.org under Whats New > City Com mission Agenda.Art in Chambers exhibition featuring Blair SligarThe citys Public Art Advisory Board anin Chambers exhibition horse magic fea turing sculptures, paintings and prints by Blair Sligar, who will be introduced at the City Commission meeting on Monday, Dec. 9, at 3:30 p.m. Horse magic will be open for public viewing from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Mon day through Friday, except for holidays, through Tuesday, Jan. 7. The exhibition features sculptures with a rococo-like intri cacy and extravagance that showcase the materials and structure, playful and dark prints with anthropomorphic animals, and paintings that demonstrate his interest in mythologies and canons. For more information regarding Art in Chambers, please call 407-599-3498. For information regarding additional events, please visit cityofwinterpark.org.Skate away any holiday stressNow through Sunday, Jan. 5, 2014, you can skate at the citys coolest event of the year Winter in the Park, the citys annual holiday ice skating rink in Central Park West Meadow. The West Meadow is located at 150 N. New York Ave winterpark.org, like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and watch us on Vimeo. We are large enough to give you what you want and small enough to provide it the way you want it. To learn more, please visit any of our banking centers from Orlando to Miami or call us at 1-800-435-8839.13-0089/rev090113 citynational.com Member FDIC Personal Relationships | Local Decisions | StabilityREDEFINING BANKING. 1115-8 CNwinterPrk.indd 1 11/20/13 9:40 AM Winter Park City TalkBY RANDY KNIGHT CITY MANAGER Lets go get some coffee $2 OFF Any Sub, Chip and Large Drink purchase. Visit our tasty new Winter Park restaurant location at: 528 S. Park Avenue 407.960.7827 By Rollins College Park Avenue near Fairbanks. 2010 Firehouse Subs. This offer valid with coupon at participating restaurants. Prices and participation may vary, see restaurant for details. Limit one per customer, per visit. Not valid with any other offers. Exp. 3/31/14. Theres a new Firehouse Subs right here on Park Avenue in Winter Park. Get ready for steamin hot subs piled high with top notch meats and cheeses. ( WERE OPEN )Stop, Drop, And Roll On In.Visit FirehouseSubs.com to order online and find your nearest location.

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Page 8 | Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer FAMILY CALENDAR Batter up Bear Creek Recreational Complex is hosting a six-week baseball camp starting Jan. 11. Some of the areas best coaches will direct the program in conjunction with U.S. Baseball Academy. Classes are available for players in grades 1-12 and are limited to six players per coach. Sessions are offered in advanced hit ting, pitching, catching, elding and base running. Space is lim ited. Registration is now under way. For more information, visit USBaseballAcademy.com, or call toll-free at 866-622-4487.Best lawyersWinderweedle, Haines, Ward and Woodman, P.A. was recently named a 2014 Best Law Firm by U.S. News & World Report and Best Lawyers. Firms included in the 2014 Best Law Firms list are recognized for professional excellence with persistently impres sive ratings from clients and peers. The 2014 rankings are based on the highest number of participating rms and highest number of client ballots on record. More than 12,000 attorneys provided more than 330,000 law rm assessments to be chosen from.DEC. 5-7For 37 years, the Rotary Club of Orange County East-Winter Park has sponsored and run the prestigious Tip-Off Classic Invitational high school basketball tournament where potential future NBA stars play and college and pro scouts congregate. The tournament will be held at the Winter Park High School Gymna sium, 2100 Summereld Road. It started with the rst round of games at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Dec. 4 and runs through Saturday, Dec. 7 with the nal game being played at 8:30 p.m. High schools that have earned an invitation to participate this year are: Boone, Oak Ridge, Wekiva, Lake Highland, Lake Howell, Orlando Christian Prep, Evans and Winter Park. This tourna ment has raised over $925,000 and. after expenses, distributed $625,000 to the local community via charities, the par ticipating schools, and $12,000 college scholarships to deserving B students who could not otherwise afford to attend college. Admission into the tournament is $5 or two cans of food. In the past ve years over 12,000 cans of food have been collected and given to local charities.DEC. 5On Thursday, Dec. 5, the Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art presents its free annual Christmas in the Park event for the 35th year in downtown Win ter Park. The almost two-hour program begins at 6:15 p.m. when the signal will be given to turn on the window lights. The museum will turn Central Park in down town Winter Park into a gallery without walls and a roof of tree canopy and stars with an outdoor exhibition that has since 2006 included nine illuminated Tif fany windows. This year the esteemed 160-voice Bach Festival Society Choir, accompanied by piano, drums and a 12-member brass ensemble, will give its 28th concert for the event. Come celebrate the Holidays with Casa Feliz! Our fth annual holiday open house, Christmas at the Casa, will take place Thursday, Dec. 5 from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Sponsored through a generous grant from Commerce National Bank and Trust in Winter Park, the event will dovetail with the Morse Museums Christmas in the Park. Guests can have photos taken with Santa, enjoy hot cocoa and cookies, and enjoy the yuletide tunes of the Belles & Bows Quartet. There is no charge to at tend Christmas at the Casa, but a do nation of $2 per person, or $5 per family is suggested. Professional Santa portraits are available for $10. For additional infor mation on any of these or other Casa Feliz events, contact Betsy Owens at 407-6288196, or bowens@casafeliz.us. The 24th Annual Holiday Tree Lighting Ceremony presented by Winter Park Towers will be held on Friday, Dec. 6, begin ning at 5 p.m. in Central Park. The event features performances by local childrens choirs, including St. Margaret Mary Catholic School Choir, New Warner Chapel, Park Maitland Singing Eagles Glee Club, r JAN 22-24, Bob Carr Centre, Orlando rfnt b fntntbbbnbbttb tbnttnbbnbbtbnbrfntftbtfFive Thousand Years of Myths & Legends Come to Life on Stage tnntnnnt nttnntntntntr ftttnnn tnnntnnf nntntnn tntnftttnnnttn ftnntt ntntntntn nn tnftntntnnn ntnttntntftn ntttntntnnnttn nntnrtnnnntt tntrf rfrrf Community Bulletin Winter Park High Schools Belle Chanson Choir and Orlando Harmony. Winners of the Holiday Card Competition will also be recognized and WFTV Channel 9 news anchor Bob Opsahl will join the crowd for the lighting of the tree live on the evening newscast. Afterwards families can enjoy refreshments and activities provided by local businesses, plus visits with Santa and Mrs. Claus.DEC. 7Maitlands Season of Light on Satur day, Dec. 7 at 3 p.m. is a longstanding tradition in our community and we invite you to join us in our holiday celebration. Its an excellent opportunity to make new holiday memories and share the spirit of the season with family, friends and loved ones. You may even run into Santa Claus! You are invited to stroll around Lake Lily Park and enjoy the holiday food trucks Yum Yum Cupcake, Midnight Sun Icecream Sandwich Company, Philly, All Things Sweet, Tucks Table, and The Big Cheese, as well as gift vendors open for early shopping. The show begins at 3 p.m. with live stage entertainment by the Out er Toons and the School of Performing Arts Dancers and strolling entertainment. There will be a tree lighting, Santa Claus, and a reworks nale. It all starts at 3 p.m. on Dec. 7 at Lake Lily Park. Winter Parks 61st annual Ye Olde Home town Christmas Parade hits Park Av enue at 9 a.m. on Dec. 7, heading south from Cole Avenue alongside Central Park and ending at Lyman Avenue. Thousands come out for the parade every year, with plenty of space to watch on the avenue. Wake up bright and early the next morn ing and help turn pancake batter into a stack of dough at the 15th Annual Lead ership Winter Park Pancake Breakfast. Join presenting sponsors Fannie Hillman + Associates and Vanson Constructors, plus Leadership Winter Park graduates for a traditional pancake breakfast complete with sausage, coffee, juice and an array of toppings at the Central Park stage. Tickets are $6 for adults and $4 for children and can be purchased in advance at www. winterpark.org, the Winter Park Welcome Center or at the event. Proceeds from the breakfast will benet six Winter Park area elementary schools to help purchase much-needed supplies for the classroom. Pancakes are served from 7 to 10:30 a.m. Come early, enjoy a hearty breakfast and grab a great seat for the parade! The Big Bang Bazaar Holiday Spectacular is coming to the Maitland Civic Center at 641 S. Maitland Ave. from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday Dec. 7-8. Free swag bags for the rst 100 guests each day. Find indie arts, crafts and vin tage gear at this eclectic holiday event. Visit bigbangbazaar.net for more informa tion. The Museum of Military History on Dec 7-8 will host Military Appreciation Weekend by the Museum at Browns Farm, 4901 Oren Brown Road in Kissim mee. The event will be highlighted by both WWII re-enactments on Saturday and both Civil War and WWII re-enactments on Sunday. Weapon demonstrations will take place prior to the re-enactments. The Civil Air Patrols 463rd Cadet Squadron and Kissimmee Sea Cadet units will be at the event to present the colors and par ticipate in competitive events on Sunday. Also on Sunday, a special concert of WWII era music will be presented by the Bahia Dance Band. Food vendors, booths, and childrens activities will be available both days. For more information visit http:// museumofmilitaryhistory.comBusiness Briefs

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 | Page 9Lifestyles Theres something big grow ing just a few blocks from Winter Park and its got the garden to show for it. Along the curb of Cor rows deep, encouraging visitors toward the entrance of the newly opened East End Market. The smell of freshly baked bread wafts out through the twostory buildings propped open door, and you only make it a few inches inside before Rosie, a familiar face to local farmers market-goers, welcomes you in. Shes the woman in charge of sell ing Olde Hearth Beard Co. baked goods, and shes beaming in her newfound permanent home. Its the best feeling to be here, theres a great energy and look out there you cant beat that view! she says, motioning to the garden just steps outside her door. After more than a year of reno vations turning an abandoned 14,000-sqaure-foot church into a one-of-a-kind neighborhood mar ket and locally sourced food hub, the bustling community hangout founder John Rife always imag ined itd be. Independent vendors now call door market home, from bakers and coffee brewers, to juicers and decorators. Alongside the Mar ket Hall hosts the Txokos Basque Kitchen, a new culinary concept from the owners of Spanish River Grill, which sources food right from the garden out front. Its a beautiful collision of collaboration, said Jarrett Johnson with Lineage Coffee, which slings exotic pour-over brews from around the globe in the far back of PHOTOS BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVERFrom gourmet coffees and fresh baked goods to craft beers and desserts, the market offers treats for any time of day.Making a market and garden growEast End Market opens in Audubon ParkSARAH WILSON Observer staff Please see MARKET on page 10 Presented by: Supported by: Featuring Pamela Nabors President & CEO Meet and greet with community leaders and business owners. Learn how Workforce Central Florida is strengthening our communitys workforce through employer training opportunities Hear from WCFs new CEO on how the organization is transitioning to a new brand. Friday, December 13, 2013 7:45 a.m. Networking/ 8:15 a.m. Program WINTER PARK WELCOME CENTER 151 W. Lyman Avenue, Winter Park, FL 32789 A complimentary continental breakfast will be served. The event is free and open to the public. For more information, call (407) 644-8281 or visit www.winterpark.org. East End Market is located just blocks from Winter Park at 1301 Corrine Drive in Audubon Park. Visit eastendmkt.com for more information and a list of vendors.

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Page 10 | Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer the Market Hall. Operating simultaneously in the space are an event area, demonstration kitchen, incubator Its very community-orient ed, Rosie said. You buy some thing here and you walk around and sit wherever you want. Go out to the garden, go to the bar, its a community deal. when they walk in the door, she said shes made a game of watch ing peoples faces as they enter. Theyre like kids when they come in, she said. Their eyes widen and they cant help but smile. The Market is open Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. The hours of individual vendors vary though, so you can come by earlier for a coffee and later for a craft beer and dessert afterward. It encompasses something for everyone, Rosie said. Im very proud to be a part of this whole thing. MARKET | Vendors operate community-style, customers from each shop can stop and eat, drink together CONTINUED FROM PAGE 10 r fn tbn r rfr nntrntbnr ffftbbfb nn tnbn nnf t nrn rnn n brn tbn r bn 13ABK064_CATERING_FLYER_WINTER_PARK_PRESS.pdf 2 11/4/13 11:40 AM PHOTOS BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVERXAs the East End Market grows its relationships in the community, so does its garden, which provides farm-to-table veggie options for the on-site restaurant kitchen at Txokos Basque Kitchen.

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 | Page 11The Knights are at their high est ranking of the season after yet another heart attack-inducing USF Bulls 23-20 on the gridiron Nov. 29. With a well-timed interception after a torrent of turnovers that went the wrong way, the Knights snagged a win out of thin air in a chilly thriller in the Bright House. Just as the Bulls seemed destined to tie or win the game, driving deep into UCF territory with less than two minutes to go, linebacker Jordan Ozerities hands snagged a Mike White pass and sent the tense crowd into a jubilant frenzy. That was accompanied by a collective sigh of relief in a game in which the Knights lost three fumbles and committed two interceptions, which contrib uted to half of USFs scores. When you dont play very you dont usually win games like that, Head Coach George OLeary said in a press conference after the game. It had been 11 years since the Knights had won a game in which they gave up four or more turnovers. Sunday night they found out what their sixth win by a touchdown or less would do for their ranking. The result, a No. 16 spot in the BCS standings, is the highest the team has ever been ranked. They debuted at No. 23 the same week the BCS standings debuted on Oct. 20, and have slowly moved their way into better numbers ever since. Their slow and steady rise has come despite edging out victories by a touchdown or less in four games this season in which they were the favorite or the heavy attempts against rival USF was just the most recent in a string of led to the 2013 Knights being dubbed the heart attack kids. It had been a much closer game than expected Nov. 29 as the UCF Knights (10-1, 7-0) and the USF Bulls (2-8, 2-5) traded punts for much of the game. After multiple fumbles handed USF its only scores of the Knights distanced themselves by halftime, but it wouldnt be enough of a margin of safety. A seemingly off-balance Blake ceivers, and rushers had trouble against an unexpectedly tough USF defense. Meanwhile the Bulls caught up to and overtook the Knights. The bright spot that slowly began to shine as the game wore on would be running back Will Stanback, who became the yard age workhorse for the Knights after two scary fumbles early on by regular go-to runner Storm Johnson. Stanback would rush for 40 yards on 10 carries and catch 69 yards worth of receptions. his hands and race to 69 yards on the ground and snag 62 yards in the air. The game never had a wider scoring gap than a single touchdown separating the two teams for its duration, making for a hair-raising experience for the Knights, who came into the game heavy favorites. But the grudge match turned into just that as the teams battled in search of tougher competition. The teams met at the height of one of the Knights all-time best Feld Entertainment248339 #R inglingBro s Ringling.comSAVE $4 on Tickets!Good on Select PerformancesRestrictions and exclusions may apply. No double discounts. Subject to availability. Excludes premium seats. Offer excludes day of show. JAN. GOOD ONLY Fri. JAN. 10 7:30 PM Sat. JAN. 11 11:30 AM & 7:30 PM Presented locally by UCF looks to clinch BCS bowl berthISAAC BABCOCK Observer staff FEATURING ... 250 North Orlando Ave. Winter Park, FL 32789407.677.9777 Duette Architella Honeycomb Shades Duette Architella Honeycomb Shades every climate...every season A Premier Flooring Source Area Rugs Window Treatments... AND MUCH MORE! PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERThe Knights have been strong at home, but unstoppable on the road this season, heading to Dallas to face SMU for a game that could clinch their shot at a BCS bowl appearance. Please see KNIGHTS on page 12

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Page 12 | Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer seasons, while USF was strug gling in one of its worst. An offensive juggernaut in many games this season, the Knights only converted one third down conversion out of nine attempts in addition to their The Knights would come away with a win thanks to a 52yard Breshad Perriman touchdown reception and Ozerities interception with less than two minutes to go to seal the deal as the Bulls were threatening. The win clinched a share of the American Athletic Conference title for the Knights, who will either own it outright or share it depending on the outcomes of games Dec. 5 and 7. Starting at 7:30 p.m. Dec. 5 the Louisville Cardinals (10-1, 6-1) will play at Cincinnati (10-1, 6-1). Both teams will be looking to bolster their bowl game chances with a win. The Cardinals wont be able to share the AACs BCS bid no matter what happens, as the Knights defeated them this season. The game is especially crucial for the Cincinnati Bearcats, who could share in the AAC title and have a shot at the AACs automatic bowl bid if they upset the Cardinals. By the end of Thursday night, the Knights may already have the crown all to themselves. But if Cincinnati wins, which may game to clinch the BCS bowl berth. If the Bearcats win and the Knights lose, the Knights will have to hope they stay above Cincinnati in the BCS standings. Cincinnati is currently ranked No. 23 in the USA Today College Coaches poll, where UCF is No. 17. The USA Today poll has consistently ranked the Knights worse than all three other major polls. Its also the only poll that puts Cincinnati in its top 25. The BCS Stand arbiter of postseason bowl game placement, hasnt ranked Cincinnati all season, and put UCF at No. 16 this week. The Knights travel to face SMU at noon on Dec. 7. The Knights may have some advan tages heading into Dallas. Theyre undefeated on the road this season, though theyve needed to score in of every AAC road game in order to win. And SMU star quarterback Garrett Gilbert is still question able to start against UCF because of a knee sprain. Without Gilbert against Houston last week, the Mustangs lost 34-0 and threw three interceptions. PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERUCF quarterback Blake Bortles was shaky against USF, throwing two interceptions, but led the Knights to victory. HOUSES WANTED!!! Get a FREE No Obliga on CASH O er On Your House Within 24 Hours! (855) 755-1818 www.Circle18Homes.com CASH $$$ QUICK CLOSE ANY PRICE RANGE ANY CONDITION ANY SITUATION KNIGHTS | Another edge-of-your-seat finish gives UCF a chance at its biggest bowl game in team history CONTINUED FROM PAGE 11 The Alfond Inn The Ancient Olive/ The Spice & Tea Exchange BankFIRST Ken & Ruth Bradley Brio Properties Carpe Diem Centennial Bank City of Winter Park Community City of Winter Park Employees Cocina 214 Costco Wholesale Edyth Bush Charitable Foundation Fannie Hillman + Associates Ferrell Wealth Management Florida Blue Florida Distributing Co. Gods Homeless Works International Harrison Berry P.A. Kuykendall Gardner Lowndes, Drosdick, Doster, Kantor & Reed, P.A. Massey Communications The Mayower Retirement Community Mens Divorce Law Firm My Guys Moving Orange Bank of Florida Panera Bread The Park Press The Paris Bistro Peterbrooke Chocolatier of WinterPark Rollins College St. Dorothy Catholic Community Sodexo Ten Thousand Villages Think Creative Waste Pro Wawa Whole Foods Market Winter Park Winter Park Chamber of Commerce Winter Park Family Dentistry Winter Park Health Foundation Winter Park Magazine Winter Park/ Maitland Observer Winter Park Memorial Hospital Winter Park Womens Center Winter Park YMCA Family Center WKMG Local 6 Tom Yochum$95,000 RAISED. THOUSANDS OF LIVES CHANGED.With the support of our Community Champions, we raised $95,000 to support people in need in our community. Thats nearly double our original goal. And many more lives touched this holiday season. Thank you for helping us Feed the Need. FEED NEED WINTER PARK A COMMUNITY-WIDE EFFORT TO RAISE FUNDS FOR SECOND HARVEST FOOD BANK OF CENTRAL FLORIDA. In Partnership with: Presented by:

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 | Page 13 AVAILABLE NOVEMBER 26 ON DIGITAL HD ON BLU-RAYTM COMBO PACK & DVD DECEMBER 10 ENTER FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN A BLU-RAY COMBO PACKSend us your name and mailing address to tcraft@turnstilemediagroup.comNO PURCHASE NECESSARY. UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT! 50%off yogurt Free Wi-Fi rfntt btn HOURS SUNDAY-THURSDAY noon 10 p.m. FRIDAY AND SATURDAY noon 11 p.m. 513 Park Ave., Winter Park 321-972-8925NO SIZE LIMIT EXPIRES 1-1-14 The Winter Park High School girls volleyball team won it all on the Florida stage in November after defeating Lake Mary High Silver Spurs Arena in Kissimmee redeeming themselves from a the previous season. The Wildcats blazed through their season with a 29-3 record, trouncing their record last year of 26-6. The title marked the schools fourth girls volleyball state championship, all in the past 10 years. That was the best feeling in the world, said Kacey Saunier, senior and team captain. We waited a year of practicing to come back from states last year. I think thats all we thought about for a year straight. The teams work started almost 356 days earlier, said Coach Stephanie Gibson. A heartbreaking loss in a state sets last season had taken its toll on the girls, but also motivated them to make another run. The same core group of players was ready for another go. A defeat after being only three points away from winning the state championship in 2012 is going to leave a little bit of emotions that hopefully can help guide you to overcome that, Gibson said. Im sure all the kids had that in the back of their mindwe had to learn how to eliminate all of the extra thoughts and emotions. Winter Park continued to working tirelessly on shot selection, often staying late after practices. We didnt want to let go of a state championship, so I think every time we came in the gym we worked as hard as we could, Saunier said. That was our main goal of the year, to get better every single time that we had a chance, and I think we did. The teams emotional strength was tested just a week before playoffs following a loss to Boca Raton High School, the reigning state champions who defeated Winter Park the previ ous year. I credit them for an emotional metamorphosis so to speak, Gibson said. Our team learned so much about ourselves in that match and we were able to apply what weve learned in every Winter Parks comeback kidsTIM FREED Observer staff PHOTO COURTESY OF WPHS VOLLEYBALL Winter Park got revenge at the state championships, winning after nishing in second place at last years tournament. Rooted & grounded in Jesus Christ. The Learning Tree is a Ministry of First Baptist Church of Winter ParkWe offer Full-Day Infant Care and Childcare Year-Round, Preschool Classes, Summer Camp, and much more! 1021 New York Avenue N., Winter Park, Florida 32789 Established in 1972 we are celebrating 41 years of service this year. Winter Park girls volleyball team returns Please see VOLLEYBALL on page 14

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Page 14 | Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer VOLLEYBALL | Girls avenged five-game championship lossmatch for the remainder of the year. The Wildcats took heart and went on to win their division of 16 teams, moving on to the regional tournament before ad vancing to the state tournament. But the Wildcats faced further opposition in the form of injuries. Senior Beth Nordhorn twisted her ankle during the state High School, dropping down on an opponents foot after jumping to block a ball in front of the net. Senior Christina Ambrose also ricocheted of her hitting hand during the same match. But that wasnt about to stop the Wildcats. I big thing for me was not letting that show and playing through, Nordhorn said. Obvi ously, my team and how we were doing was much more important than a simple ankle injury. Nordhorn, Ambrose and the rest of the Wildcats persevered and won the match three sets to one, punching their ticket to the They returned to Silver Spurs match of the season, and for six players, their high school career. by a slim margin of 25-22, but lost the second set 17-25. The team took it as a wakeup call, dominating Lake Mary 25-12 in the third set. their victory in the fourth set by a score of 25-20. They had come all the way back to win it all all of their hard work had paid off. theyd fought to conceal the entire season began to unravel. It was incredible for us, Ive never really felt anything like that, Nordhorn said. Watching did it. To reach the pinnacle of your sport through a season of hard work and trials and errors is just so rewarding and so exhilarat ing, Gibson said. Moving forward, six seniors will graduate after this season, leaving a group of younger Wild cats with a chance to step up and take the reins. CONTINUED FROM PAGE 13 PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERThe Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra rang in the season at the Holiday Pops concert Dec. 1 in Winter Park with Natalie Cordone and Shawn Kilgore. Holiday Pops

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 | Page 15Today Dec. 5 Christmas in the Park in Winter ParkOf all the magical nights of our holiday season, today stands out as the 35th time the Morse Museum will present its free Christmas in the Park event. Beginning at precisely 6:15 p.m., the Museums Tiffany windows are turned on as thousands of people gather in Central Park for a unique celebration of art and music. The Museum will exhibit nine illuminated Tiffany windows as the 160-voice Bach Festival Choir presents a joyous holiday concert. Highly recommended! Call 407-645-5311 or visit morsemuseum.orgToday Dec. 5 Celebrate the C-son with Casa Feliz Make an evening of downtown Winter Park as Casa Feliz invites everyone to Christmas at the Casa from 6 to 8:30 p.m. before or after visiting the Morse Museums splendid Christmas in the Park event. Casa Feliz will Cs including Christmas Dcor with the Casa decked out for the holidays; Carols with the Belles & Bows Quartet; Claus Santa, that is including the opportunity to have your portrait taken with the Jolly One; and Cookies & Cocoa! The festivities are made possible by Commerce National Bank. Today Dec. 5 1st Thursdays: Art under $200Tis the Season at the Orlando Museum of Art where the 1st Thursday Art Party, under the leadership of arts patron Ed Herbst, introduces new art to art-partiers who know they prices. That is especially true tonight when all of the art shown is priced under $200. Think holi day gifts, think original art, think support for the artists of Central Florida, and think how much sense that makes for everyone Listed in Intellectual Property Today as: 22ND in the nation for trademarks issued Top 100 in the nation for patents issued Protect your new brainstorm with the brain trust of an Intellectual Property law rm. Contact ADDM&G today for further information. www.addmg.com Take Me to Your Leader in Intellectual Property LawGRAY MATTER MATTERS Orlando 4078412330 | Jacksonville 9043987000 | Melbourne 3216228651 Miami 3053748303 | Tampa 8136394222* | Winter Springs 4077965064 Second Harvest Food Bank is working to feed hope. Each week, an average of 55,000 people kids, seniors, working families, homeless and others rely on us for help getting food. And though we provided more than 39 million pounds of food this year alone, it simply wasnt enough. Because until no one is hungry, we still have work to do. Our neighbors throughout Central Florida continue to need your caring and your help. Remember: A dollar invested in hope can provide up to $9 in groceries.Make a difference. Donate today. www.FeedHopeNow.org 407.295.1066Member of Feeding America FEED HOPE NOW SHF145_WPObserver_5x8.indd 1 10/28/13 11:18 AM Josh Garrick Culture worthy of your calendar Please see CULTURE on page 16 Holiday Ice Skating Rink in Central Park West Meadow at the corner of New York Avenue & Morse Boulevard in Winter ParkNovember 15, 2013thruJanuary 5, 2014open 7 days a week > extended school holiday hours group rates & private parties > reservations requiredspecial thanks to our sponsors 407-599-3203or cityofwinterpark.org/WITP rrffntb CHRISTMAS AT THE CASA CHRISTMAS IN THE PARK ART GIFTS UNDER $200

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Page 16 | Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Please see CULTURE on next pageCULTURE | Looking for a romantic evening out? Check out The Light in the Piazza at the Mad Cow Theater CONTINUED FROM PAGE 15 A Free Concert Sponsored by:Maitland Presbyterian Church 341 N. Orlando Avenue Maitland, FLDecember 15, 2013 7:30 p.m.Call 321-303-1404 this holiday season. Call 407-8964231 or visit Omart.orgNow through Dec. 14 Crazy for Gershwin at the Winter Park Playhouse The creatives at the Winter Park Playhouse have created several new musicals based on the work of a great composer or per former, and their newest effort is Crazy for Gershwin A Tribute to George & Ira Gershwin. Run ning through Dec. 14, this tribute to the Gershwin brothers reminds us of the unbelievable number of songs created by this All-Amer ican duo. Call 407-645-0145 or visit winterparkplayhouse.orgDec. 6 to Jan. 5 The Light in the Piazza at Mad Cow Theater Set in Rome in 1953, The Light in the Piazza is the story of a young American tourist, traveling with her mother, who meets and falls in love with a young Italian. The mother opposes the affair for reasons that become apparent as the musical unfolds. With music and lyrics by Adam Guettel, grandson of Richard Rodgers, Light in the Piazza won six Tony Awards in 2005. Presented by Mad Cow Theater from Dec. 6 to Jan. 5, visit madcowtheatre. com or call 407-2978788.Dec. 6 Winter Park Tree Lighting CeremonyThere is more holiday cheer on Dec. 6 at the annual Holiday Tree Lighting Ceremony in Central Park in downtown Winter Park beginning at 5 p.m. The entire family is invited to this free event as Park Avenue becomes a winter wonderland with performances by St. Marga ret Mary Catholic School Choir, Park Maitland Glee Club, New Warner Chapel, Winter Park Highs Belle Chanson Choir, and Orlando Harmony. Afterwards we are invited for refreshments PANCAKE BREAKFAST LIGHT IN THE PIAZZA

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 | Page 17provided by local businesses along with visits with Santa and Mrs. Claus all in Central Park in Winter Park. Dec. 7 Leadership Winter Park Pancake BreakfastThe Leadership Winter Park Pancake Breakfast has become a holiday tradition that turns pan cake batter into a stack of dough! Proceeds from the breakfast schools, assisting teachers with the purchase of necessary school supplies. Those who come early enjoy a delicious breakfast and get a great seat for the Ye Olde Hometown Christmas Parade (parade beginning at 9 a.m.). Breakfast begins Dec. 7 at 7 a.m. on the Central Park stage. Tickets are $6 for adults and $4 for children, and include pancakes, sausage and refreshments.Dec. 7 Winter Park Ye Olde Hometown Christmas Parade December for 61 years, (making this the longest-running holiday parade in Central Florida), the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce will host the Winter Park Ye Olde Hometown Christmas Parade on Saturday, Dec. 7 at 9 a.m. This year the parade will honor Grand Marshal and Orange County Public Schools Board Member Joie Cadle. The parade will travel down Park Avenue, from Cole Avenue south to Comstock Avenue. Floats, departments, scout groups, local dignitaries and Santa will be part of the fun. Dec. 9 Venetian Vespers with the Orlando Philharmonic Maestro Christopher Wilkins will conduct a sizable cham ber orchestra drawn from the Orlando Philharmonic, joined by the UCF Chamber Singers on Dec. 9 in a program called Venetian Vespers beginning at 7 p.m. St. Marks Basilica in Venice gave rise to a tradition of works for multiple choirs, including works by Monteverdi, Gabrieli, and Vivaldi, composers whose works will be highlighted in this highly recommended concert at the Shakespeare Center. For tickets call 407-770-0071 or visit Orlandophil.org Current All hail chef Chris Windus of the Alfond InnTwo months ago I put on my Restaurant Reviewers hat and wrote to you about the culinary wonders being created by Executive Chef Chris Windus at Hamiltons Kitchen at The Alfond Inn. So it is no surprise that Orlando Life Magazine recently named Chef Chris as Best New Chef in their Silver Spoon Awards. Technically, Chef Chris is not a new chef (he spent 10 years as Exec Chef of blue-zoo at the Disney Swan Hotel), but he is new to The Alfond. Call 407-998-8089 or visit thealfondinn.com, and tell them Josh sent you. Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906.CULTURE | Get in the holiday spirit with the pancake breakfast and Christmas parade this weekend CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE KEEP UP WITH MAITLAND NEWS AND EVENTS!www.IndependenceLane.com Facebook.com/ItsMyMaitland CHEF CHRIS WINDUS This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORG @EnzianTheater FilmSlam Experience the best local indie lm showcase and VOTE for each months winner Sun 1PM STORY OF A SMALL TOWN WITH A BIG SOUND. Featuring music of Aretha Franklin, The Rolling Stones, Jimmy Cliff, and more MUSCLE SHOALS Fri Sun, 3:15, 9:15 Mon, Wed, Thurs 9:15 FINAL WEEK! Cast | Chiwetel Ejiofor, Benedict Cumberbatch, Paul Giamatti, Brad Pitt 12 YEARS A SLAVE Fri Thurs 6:15 Cult Classics: GO Bringing your favorites back on 35mm Tues 9:30

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Page 18 | Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Opinions Chris Jepson PerspectivesWhat if? What if after WWII, the descendants of Nazis created social clubs to publicly glorify and remember the noble lost cause of the National Socialist Ger man Workers Party? What if the German government, decades after WWII, issued glorious reunion of former Nazi soldiers? What if the Daughters of Nazism orga nized to honor the memory of their ancestors who so nobly fought to protect the homeland from imperialists and commu nists? What if Joseph Goebbels, Minister of Propaganda, had German high schools named after him? an abomination, almost without historical precedent, is undeniable. Yet, we Ameri cans continue to glorify and honor a horror (the Confederacy/slavery) that was unquestionably as egregious as anything the Nazis perpetrated. The Nazis were in power but 12 years and were repudiated by the German people. American slavery (and Jim Crow) was in effect for more than 300 years, and a noble cause. How is it that the horrors of Nazism abominations they were, yet the Confed eracy (slavery) gets a pass that somehow, losing in the defense of slavery was noble? Oh, apologists will argue, the Confederacy, the Civil War was never about slavery it was about states rights (freedom, ironi cally). Yes, of course, just as Nazism was about the future of the German people. Weve all watched Gone With The Wind too many times. How plantation ing hosannas and willingly participating in their own subjugation as Uncle Toms and owners. Theyre so very thankful and appreciative for three meals and a roof over their head. What a crock. Oh, and those noble Southern boys of the Confederacy. Gloriously dying for the cause? Uh, tell me again the cause? Freedom! Freedom! Yes, freedom for white boys to enslave. Such a noble cause. Just ask the Sons & Daughters of the Confederacy. Every American should see the recently released movie Years A Slave. It is based on the true story of a free black man living in New York who was kidnapped into slavery and transported to the South in the 1840s. Any, and I mean any, roman tic ideas you have about the antebellum South will be disabused. No more Gone With The Wind nobility of cause. wasshamefullypivotal in the establishment of the United States. It is a scourge on our history, and to listen to Southern apologists defend the Confederacy as something noble and worth commemorat ing is a distortion of history and fact and is insulting to black Americans, nay, to all Americans. It is no stretch to equate Nazism with the Confederacy. Both dealt with the marginalization and destruction of human beings in a state-sanctioned, authorized manner. To denounce one and glorify the other is historically ignorant, hypocritical and appalling.Do drive olDixie down Jepson is a 27-year resident of Central Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.US Louis Roney Play On! character and characters. These are two distinctly different things. With football in the air every fall, my players who comprised the Winter Park High School Wildcats in the late 1930s. We Wildcats took what we were doing was, in his minute realm, a high potentate. Football was to us still a game, but a game to be played with utmost desire to win and to win within the bounds of rules and good sportsmanship. We same guys were pals who swam blocked and tackled each other with full of us had played football together in some form or other since we were in grammar school, and had picked up knowledge of the game from movie news shorts and the by the Rollins College Tars at Tinker Field in Orlando. In its own league, Rollins was a consis tent winner, and had a good coach, a problematic vociferous guy who had been a team. I loved the game and played center on our team, but never kidded myself that I would play beyond high school. At 165 lbs., my football days were limited, and I enjoyed them to the full while I could. One player on our team, halfback Ralph Jackson, was good enough to play for the Citadel in Charlestown after graduating from WPHS. I unexpectedly won an academic schol arship to Harvard, and when I arrived in Cambridge, I realized that I was at least 30 pounds lighter than anyone on the fresh man team, and was nowhere near as adept as those fellows who had come to Harvard via Exeter, Andover, etc. Harvard was by then no longer the power it had been in footballs historic early days, when the Ivy League was creating the game we know today. Football is a microcosmic non-lethal representation of war, I used to think. The two sides do everything within the rules to conquer each other for sixty fateful minutes. If you played a position in those early days, you played both offense and defense, period! If you came out of the game, you had to stay out for the rest of that half.... In WWII Naval training, I spent a month on the campus of Notre Dame University where football had long been adored in almost superhuman ways. One bright sunny day I walked alone out into the Notre Dame stadium to the middle of the 50 yard line and stood there in the silence. I looked around and imagined that I heard the crowds who had come to cheer Notre Dame and Army, or Ohio State, or USC, in that teeming stadium ghosts of glorious past gridiron days. I once had a coach who told me quite clearly to put my opponent out of the game if I could. I dared to tell him that I would try to put my opponent out of the play, but certainly not out of the game. I was in a game where opponents were pledged and armed to eliminate each other from the face of the earth. That condition was a big step beyond anything that foot ball ever suggested to us kids who played the game. War was quite another matter. The new self-imposed limits of what one will do to be victorious over other people reversed the character of what we young boys had learned and adopted in playing football, and in living as civilized human beings.Competition and character About Roney: HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney)Have you ever wondered about which hospitals in your community provide the best care? If you or a loved one needed elective surgery, like a knee replacement, how would you pick the right hospital? A new tool called Hospital Compare gives you easy access to important information about the quality of all the hospitals in your area that accept Medicare and its all available online at medicare.gov/hospitalcompare. This information can help you and your health care provider make an informed decision about the best hospital for your needs. There are a lot of factors to consider when choosing a hospital. For starters, pick a hospital that accepts your health insur ance (whether thats Medicare or another type of insurance). Consider hospitals that have the best track record in providing procedure. Hospital Compare has all of this information and much more. (This website is not intended for use in emergencies if youre already in an ambulance, for example. If you experience an emergency, always go to the nearest hospital.) Q: Why is the quality of my hospital important? A: Not all hospitals are the same some provide better care than others. Hospitals that provide high-quality care ensure that patients get the right care at the right time and that patients needs are met. Choosing a hospital that provides highquality care can help keep you safe and avoid potential problems. Q: How can Hospital Compare help me choose a hospital? A: Hospital Compare collects up-todate quality, safety, and patient satisfaction information for nearly every hospital in the country. You can use the website to see how the hospitals in your area compare to each other on many measures of quality, and you can see how those hospitals com pare to state and national averages. pital Compare? A: Hospital Compare provides information on a wide variety of quality issues. For ence mended care for patients with certain conditions, such as people with pneumonia or people whove had a heart attack who were treated for common conditions or received common procedures All of this information gives you a glimpse into the kind of care you might receive. Q: How do I use Hospital Compare? A: Using your computer, smart phone, or tablet, go to medicare.gov/hospitalcompare/search.html. If you dont have access to a computer, ask your health care provider for help. in your area by entering your address or zip code, and select up to three hospitals youd like to compare. If you already know which hospital youre looking for, you can search by hospital name. While you cant always predict when youll need care, Hospital Compare can be an important tool to help you and your health care provider learn about your op tions and make the best decision for your health care needs. Talk to your health care provider about how Hospital Compare can help you. Families USA is the national organiza tion for health care consumers. Shopping for health care: Comparing hospitals can help~ Why I Am a Daughter of the Confederacy ~ I am a Daughter of the Confederacy because I was born a Daughter of the Confederacy . a heritage so rich in honor and glory. . I do not consider the cause . to be lost or forgotten. Rather, I am extremely proud of the fact that he [ancestor] was a part of it. As proclaimed on the United Daughters of the Confederacy websiteFootball is a microcosmic non-lethal representation of war, I used to think.

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 | Page 31 WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com OBSERVER Just Sold Homes THE MMARKEt T PLAc C E MindGym December 2, 2013 MindGymDecember 2, 2013 Sharon Helsby 1536 Holts Grove, Winter Park $1,495,000. 11/22/2013 Patty Munsey 1321 Ridgewood Ave, Winter Park $176,000. 11/26/2013 Joe Miller 1217 E. Lk Colony Dr, Maitland $597,500. 11/27/2013 Sharon Helsby 1668 Wild Indigo, Oviedo $416,500. 11/27/2013 MaryStuart Day /Megan Cross 1754 Lake Berry Drive, Winter Park $530,000. 12/02/2013 2760 Goldenrod Drive, Winter Park, FL 32792 sold by Pamela Ryan 1724 Reppard Road, Orlando, FL 32803 sold by Jennifer King 1575 Orange Avenue, Winter Park, FL 32789 sold by Rhonda Chesmore 780 Virginia Drive, Winter Park, FL 32789 sold by Kelly L. Price 1806 Florinda Drive, Orlando, FL 32804 sold by Padgett McCormick SATURDAY 1-4 QUAINT HOME ON BRICK STREET 1570 Grove Terrace, Winter Park. 3BD/2BA, 1,663SF. Excellent Winter Park location. One car detached garage with workshop space. Yard is low mainte nance. High ceilings in living areas and master suite. Two walk in closets and French doors in master suite that open out to back patio. Kitchen has granite counters, newer wood cabinets and a breakfast nook. Wood and ceramic tile throughout. $409,000 SUNDAY 12-3 NEW PRICE! AMAZING 1930s CHARACTER HOME 1520 Glencoe Road, Winter Park. 3BD PLUS Office/2.5BA, 2,351SF. Deeded lake access to Lake Virginia! Craftsman style home located on a lushly landscaped 91x150 lot. Circular driveway, front porch and courtyard. Original hard wood floors, wood burning fireplace and bonus room. Downstairs master suite with walk-in closet, updated bath and soaking tub. Newer kitchen with break fast nook. Backyard oasis and detached garage. $550,000 SUNDAY 1-4 ADORABLE COLLEGE PARK BUNGALOW 755 Clifford Drive, Orlando. 3BD/2.5BA, 1,594SF. Located on lovely brick street surrounded by beautiful homes. Kitchen remodeled with new cabinets and stainless appliances. Hardwood floors. New paint inside, new roof, new heating and AC and upgraded electrical. Very large fenced backyard with room for a pool. Wonderful location. $235,000 HOME ON WATERBRIDGE CUL-DE-SAC 1300 Serena Drive, Winter Park. 3 BD/2BA, 2,342 SF. Full of natural light, this recently renovated single family home with open family room & kitchen has new tile floors, granite, stainless and pendant lights. New baths. Large living room with vaulted ceilings and woodburning fireplace. French doors open to 3 courtyards. 2-car garage. $515,000 BALDWIN PARK BEAUTY 2015 Meeting Place, Orlando. 3BD/3.5BA, 2,320SF. Overlooking Corrine Commons Park with upgrades throughout including hickory wood floors, crown molding, tray ceilings, hand blown glass chandelier. Kitchen has 40 maple cabinets, granite counters, stainless appliances, warming drawer and two wine refrigerators. Two car garage. $525,000 OBSERVEROpen Houses Saturday, December 7th 3751 Percival Road, Orlando FL 32826 4 BR | 3.5 BA | 3,536 SF | $925,000 Immaculate model home on a beautiful lakefront lot with impressive views of Lake Price. Downstairs master retreat with his and hers closets, large walkin shower and Jacuzzi tub. Spacious kitchen offers built-in appliances, custom cabinets, large island and bar top seating for six. Additional features include a fire place in the family room and huge bonus room with balcony. Enjoy entertaining by the resort style pool with views of the pri vate beach and dock! Hosted by: Kelly L. Price from 2-5 PM Sunday, December 8th 712 Monmouth Way, Winter Park FL 32792 5 BR | 3 BA | 2,200+ SF | $369,800 Fabulous 5 bedroom/3 bath Winter Park Pines home with over 2,200 sq. ft. plus oversized two car garage located on a quiet street. Spacious screened porch (33x16) overlooking sparkling pool. Floor plan features a living room, dining room, plus family room with fireplace, split bedroom plan, and pool bath. Many recent updates. Hosted by: Mary Ann Steltenkamp from 1-4 PM 219 Flame Avenue, Maitland FL 32751 4 BR | 2.5 BA | 3,430 SF | $425,000 Stunning ranch style home nestled in a lovely Maitland neighborhood situated on stunning park-like lot. Features include a large eat-in kitchen, family room with fireplace, wet bar, and bright Florida room that leads out to a beautifully pavered patio. Enjoy relaxing in the lush backyard near the waterfall and pond! Hosted by: Kelly L. Price from 1-4 PM 960 Georgia Avenue, Winter Park FL 32789 4 BR | 4 BA | 3,654 SF | $1,295,000 Picturesque location on a brick street at the corner of Georgia & Palmer ~ Walk to Park Avenue! Fantastic wall of windows in the family room overlooking the pool and spa. Spacious kitchen, plantation shutters throughout, gorgeous wood floors, high ceilings and three fireplaces. Private fenced backyard with mature landscaping. Hosted by: Jennifer Sloan from 1-3 PM www.orange-blossom.com/7100 1-800-624-8835 1-800-624-8835 1-800-624-8835 1-800-624-8835 1-800-624-8835 Order Navels & Grapefruit, get Tangelos FREE!EXTRA BONUS FREE 3 oz. Jar Genuine Honeybell MarmaladePlus standard shipping.* Gifts of Floridas Finest FruitIndian River CitrusORANGE BLOSSOM Item #7100 8115 lbs. of Citrus in each box! Send a healthy holiday gift of famous Florida Navel Oranges and Ruby Red Grapefruit, and get a box of sweet, easy to peel Tangelos FREE. Tree-ripened and picked at the peak of perfection, satisfaction guaranteed. All three boxes will be shipped to one address. ANNOUNCEMENTSMOECKER AUCTIONS: Public Auction, Road Runner Highway Signs, Inc.(Road striping division only)December 10th @ 10am 4421 12th St. Court East, Bradenton, Fl 34203. Specialized highway marking/striping equipment and ve hicles that meets DOT safety. Special preview: 12/09 10am-4pm. www.moec kerauctions.com (800) 840-BIDS 15%18%BP, $100 ref. cash dep. Subj to con firm. Receivership case #2013 CA 002342 Circuit Court of Manatee County, Fl AB-1098 AU-3219, Eric Rubin ANNOUNCEMENTSWinter Park Benefit Shop140 Lyman Ave, Winter Park needs items to sell: clothing, bedding, jewelry, kitchenware and bric-a brac. Also need ing volunteers. Contact Elizabeth Comer 407-647-8276. Open Tues & Fri at 9:30am; Sat 10am-1pm. All proceeds support childrens programs & the Or lando Blind AssociationHELP WANTEDPosition Available: Club and House Administrator:The Womans Club of Winter Park, Inc., an almost century old non-profit civic and charitable organization, is seeking to fill a half time (20 hours per week) position by January 1, 2014. The successful candidate will have proven skills and experi ence in marketing, public relations, ad ministration, communications, social media, budgeting, and event planning. Ability to work well with a variety of people is essential. This person will work with the club Board of Directors, mem bers, and rental clients, as well as one other part-time employee, whose job entails house maintenance and technology. Salary range, $16-$18/hour depending upon experience and perfor mance. Please submit a full resume and letters of reference to Sandra Blossey, 1262 Melissa Ct. Winter Park, FL 32789 HELP WANTEDNow Hiring: OTR CDLA Drivers New Pay Packageand $2500 Sign-On Bonus! Mostly 5-10 days out, full benefits, achievable bo nuses. Call for details 1-888-378-9691/ apply at www.heyl.netDriver Trainees Needed NOW!Become a driver for Werner Enterprises. Earn $800 per week! Local CDL Training. 1-877-214-3624.MISCELLANEOUSAIRLINE CAREERS begin here Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Finan cial aid for qualified students. Job place ment assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769PROFESSIONAL SERVICEHouse Cleaning ServicesNeed your home cleaned? I am the one who can do it. Honest & Experienced. References upon request. Weekly, Biweekly, monthly. Reasonable rates. Free Estimates. Please call Brenda 321-2394403.REAL ESTATE: COMMERICIALOFFICE FOR RENTWINTER PARKExecutive office available in prestigious bank building. Approximately 10 x 12 with windows on two sides. Additional space available for assistant, now or lat er, at additional charge. Aloma and Lake mont Avenues. 24-hour access. Minimum one year term. Broker. $500 per month. Lou Nimkoff 407-405-3368 office@briofl.com REAL ESTATE: FOR RENT1BR/1Bath Condo for RENT $725/ moSingle story condo no one above or be low. Range,stove,dishwasher,tile throughout, washer/dryer hookups, three closets. Cats ok. Dogs no way. Pool, tenn nis courts. Near intersection of RedBug Road & 436/Semoran Blvd. Very nice community. Available now. Minimum 1 year lease. Dan 863-797-4128 sunshinerentals123@gmail.comREAL ESTATE: FOR SALE10 ACRE MOUNTAIN TOP ESTATE!Gorgeous Blue Ridge mountain acreage featuring spectacular 3 state views & towering hardwoods! Abuts U.S. National Forest. Great building spot! U/G utilities, paved rd frontage, RV friendly. Priced to sell only $69,900. Excellent financing. Call now 866-952-5303, x 92 DOWNTOWN WINTER PARK CONDO/TOWNHOME OWNERSWe have buyers waiting. Find out what your property is worth. Free computer ized list of area condos/townhomes. Ac tive and Sold listings www.winterparkfl. biz Winter Park Land Co. Linda S. Camp 321-377-3052 Linda Camp 321-377-3052 linda@linda camp.comFLORIDA WATERFRONT CONDO LIQUIDATION SALE!Brand new 2BR/2BA 1,690sf luxury condo only $149,900 Originally under contract for $365,000. Near downtown Or lando & all theme parks/attractions. Must see. Call now 877-333-0272, x 173New Log Home* on 8+ acres in Florida just $87,900.Sale! Saturday, Dec 14th. 3BR, 2BA, 1700sf cabin on spectacular lake access setting in beautiful upscale community with all infrastructure/amenities com pleted. Excellent financing. Call now 877-525-3033, x983. *constructed weather tight log home shell. Tennessee Log Cabin on 6 acres with FREE Boat Slip!Only $74,900 New 3BR, 2BA log cabin shell, lake access, nicely wooded, level setting. Quiet paved road frontage. Excel lent financing. Call now 877-888-0267, x 453 EmployFlorida.com 1-866-352-2345 Employ Florida is an equal opportunity program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. The Employ Florida telephone number may be reached by persons using TTY/TTD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711. Disponible en Espanol. JOB RESOURCES at EmployFlorida.com helped me nd a new job I enjoy earning higher pay than I did before I was laid off. You too can discover REAL RESULTS with Employ Florida. RANDAL HARDBOWER Industrial Electrician Green Circle Bio Energy Inc. NEW LISTING! BEAUTIFUL POOL HOME IN PARK GROVE 812 Granville Drive, Winter Park. 5BD/3.5BA, 2,950SF. Traditional ranch home with formal living room with brick fireplace and dining room with built-in corner cabinets. Bamboo floors and stainless appliances. Two covered back patios with brick pavers. Lush landscap ing and pool with fountains in private fenced yard. Large lot and attached 2-car garage. Zoned for Dommerich Elemen tary & Maitland Middle. Prime location near Park Avenue. $699,000 RANCH HOME WITH GUEST APARTMENT 100 W Rockwood Way, Winter Park. 5BD/3BA, 2,628SF. Sprawling home on oversized lot in the heart of Winter Park. Brick streets and giant oak canopies wel come you to the Forrest Hills neighbor hood. Large and spacious rooms in main house and the 1/1 guest house offers kitchen, playroom and separate en trance. $449,000 SUNDAY 2-5 TRADITIONAL POOL HOME IN IDEAL LO CATION 451 Sylvan Drive, Winter Park. 4BD/3BA, 3,150SF. Light and bright home wrapped in French doors that open to large cov ered brick patio. Wet bar with wine fridge in butlers area. Split bedroom plan. Mas ter bath has double sinks, jetted tub and separate shower. Large fenced yard with brick paver pool deck and heated spa. $699,000 Order your classified ad online! At WPMObserver.com you can create, customize and pay for your ad in one convenient place!

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Page 32 | Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Care ful, Lamb. Dont let your generous nature lead to some serious overspending as you contemplate your holiday gift-giving. Your social life kicks off into high gear by weeks end. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) A positive attitude helps you weather annoying but unavoidable changes in holiday plans. Aspects favor new friendships and reinforcement of exist ing relationships. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Demands on your energy level could be much higher than usual as you pre pare for the upcoming holidays. Be sure to pace yourself. Friends and family will be happy to help. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Dont allow a suddenly icy reaction from a friend or family member to continue without learning what caused it and what can be done to restore that once warm and caring relationship. LEO (July 23 to August 22) A rela tionship seems to be unraveling, mostly from a lack of attention. It might be a good idea to ease up on whatever else youre doing so you can spend more time working to mend it. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) New facts emerge that not only help explain the recent rift with a trusted colleague, but also might provide a chance to wipe the slate clean and make a fresh start in your friendship. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) A family members personal situ ation is, fortunately, resolved in time for you to get back into your hectic round of holiday preparations. An old friend might bring a new friend into your life. SCORPIO (October 23 to Novem ber 21) Pace yourself in meeting holi day pressures and workplace demands to avoid winding up with a frayed temper and a Scorpian stinger that lashes out at puzzled kith, kin and col leagues. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) A financial matter requires close attention. Also, news from a trusted source provides the means to help sort out a long-standing state of confusion and put it into per spective. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) This is a good time to reinforce family ties. Make it a priority to assess and resolve all outstanding problems. Start the upcoming holiday season with a full measure of love. AQUARIUS (January 20 to Febru ary 18) Dont be pressured into a socalled solid-gold investment. Wait until the holiday distractions are over. Then take a harder look at it. You might find that the gold is starting to flake off. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) A former friend might be trying to heal the breach between you by using a mutual friend as an intermediary. Best advice: Keep an open mind despite any lingering bad feelings. BORN THIS WEEK: You have a way of saying the right thing at the right time. Your friendships are deep and lasting. 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. Dec. 19, 1732, Benjamin Frank lin of Philadelphia first published Poor Richards Almanack. The book, filled with proverbs preaching industry and prudence, was published continuously for 25 years and became one of the most popular publications in colonial America. Dec. 17, 1843, Charles Dickens classic story A Christmas Car ol is published. Dickens never lost momentum as a writer, churning out major novels every year or two, often in serial form. Among his most impor tant works are David Copperfield (1850), Great Expectations (1861) and A Tale of Two Cities (1859). Dec. 18, 1912, after three years of digging in the Piltdown gravel pit in Sussex, England, amateur archaeologist Charles Dawson announces the discovery of two skulls that appear to belong to a primitive hominid and ancestor of man. Dec. 21, 1945, Gen. George S. Patton, commander of the U.S. 3rd Army, dies from injuries suffered not in battle, but in a freak car accident. He was 60 years old. Descended from a long line of military men, Patton grad uated from the West Point Military Academy in 1909. Dec. 22, 1956, a baby gorilla named Colo enters the world at the Columbus Zoo in Ohio, becoming the first-ever gorilla born in captivity. She went on to become a mother, grand mother, and in 1996, a great-grand mother to Timu, the first surviving infant gorilla conceived by artificial insemination. Colo is still alive today. Dec. 16, 1960, two airliners collide over New York City, killing 134 people aboard the planes and on the ground. A miscalculation by the pilot of the United flight put his plane directly into the path of a TWA Super Constellation. Christmas presents car ried by the planes passengers were strewn all over the streets. Dec. 20, 1989, the United States invades Panama in an attempt to over throw military dictator Manuel Noriega, who had been indicted in the Unit ed States on drug-trafficking charges. Noriegas Panamanian Defense Forces were promptly crushed. 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. King Features Weekly ServiceDecember 2, 2013 ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Care ful, Lamb. Dont let your generous nature lead to some serious overspending as you contemplate your holiday gift-giving. Your social life kicks off into high gear by weeks end. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) A positive attitude helps you weather annoying but unavoidable changes in holiday plans. Aspects favor new friendships and reinforcement of exist ing relationships. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Demands on your energy level could be much higher than usual as you pre pare for the upcoming holidays. Be sure to pace yourself. Friends and family will be happy to help. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Dont allow a suddenly icy reaction from a friend or family member to continue without learning what caused it and what can be done to restore that once warm and caring relationship. LEO (July 23 to August 22) A rela tionship seems to be unraveling, mostly from a lack of attention. It might be a good idea to ease up on whatever else youre doing so you can spend more time working to mend it. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) New facts emerge that not only help explain the recent rift with a trusted colleague, but also might provide a chance to wipe the slate clean and make a fresh start in your friendship. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) A family members personal situ ation is, fortunately, resolved in time for you to get back into your hectic round of holiday preparations. An old friend might bring a new friend into your life. SCORPIO (October 23 to Novem ber 21) Pace yourself in meeting holi day pressures and workplace demands to avoid winding up with a frayed temper and a Scorpian stinger that lashes out at puzzled kith, kin and col leagues. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) A financial matter requires close attention. Also, news from a trusted source provides the means to help sort out a long-standing state of confusion and put it into per spective. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) This is a good time to reinforce family ties. Make it a priority to assess and resolve all outstanding problems. Start the upcoming holiday season with a full measure of love. AQUARIUS (January 20 to Febru ary 18) Dont be pressured into a socalled solid-gold investment. Wait until the holiday distractions are over. Then take a harder look at it. You might find that the gold is starting to flake off. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) A former friend might be trying to heal the breach between you by using a mutual friend as an intermediary. Best advice: Keep an open mind despite any lingering bad feelings. BORN THIS WEEK: You have a way of saying the right thing at the right time. Your friendships are deep and lasting. 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. Dec. 19, 1732, Benjamin Frank lin of Philadelphia first published Poor Richards Almanack. The book, filled with proverbs preaching industry and prudence, was published continuously for 25 years and became one of the most popular publications in colonial America. Dec. 17, 1843, Charles Dickens classic story A Christmas Car ol is published. Dickens never lost momentum as a writer, churning out major novels every year or two, often in serial form. Among his most impor tant works are David Copperfield (1850), Great Expectations (1861) and A Tale of Two Cities (1859). Dec. 18, 1912, after three years of digging in the Piltdown gravel pit in Sussex, England, amateur archaeologist Charles Dawson announces the discovery of two skulls that appear to belong to a primitive hominid and ancestor of man. Dec. 21, 1945, Gen. George S. Patton, commander of the U.S. 3rd Army, dies from injuries suffered not in battle, but in a freak car accident. He was 60 years old. Descended from a long line of military men, Patton grad uated from the West Point Military Academy in 1909. Dec. 22, 1956, a baby gorilla named Colo enters the world at the Columbus Zoo in Ohio, becoming the first-ever gorilla born in captivity. She went on to become a mother, grand mother, and in 1996, a great-grand mother to Timu, the first surviving infant gorilla conceived by artificial insemination. Colo is still alive today. Dec. 16, 1960, two airliners collide over New York City, killing 134 people aboard the planes and on the ground. A miscalculation by the pilot of the United flight put his plane directly into the path of a TWA Super Constellation. Christmas presents car ried by the planes passengers were strewn all over the streets. Dec. 20, 1989, the United States invades Panama in an attempt to over throw military dictator Manuel Noriega, who had been indicted in the Unit ed States on drug-trafficking charges. Noriegas Panamanian Defense Forces were promptly crushed. 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. King Features Weekly ServiceDecember 2, 2013 rfntbtt A MarkNet Alliance Member AU-C002594 10% Buyers PremiumRowell Auctions, Inc.800-323-8388 For Details Visit RowellAuctions.com RowellAuctions.com 127 Acres Offered Divided Cropland, Recreational & Development Tract 127 Acres Offered DividedCropland, Recreational & Development TractPine Forest & Banks Road, Grady County, GeorgiaBidding Ends Wed., December 18th @ 2:00 p.m.~ Subject to Auto Extend Bidding Feature ~Offered Online Exclusively at RowellAuctions.comFantastic Agricultural Tracts Great Development Tracts Excellent Hunting Beautiful Homesites Peaceful Country Living FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now surviveDIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922 rfntb rf ntand soreness nb naches THG-12902

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e Mayflower. Smart. Secure. And Spectacular.Imagine a time in your life when you have the freedom to do exactly as you please. Relax ...revitalize ...reinvent ...renew. And, then imagine a place where you can do all that on your terms and still have the complete peace of mind that comes only with the guarantee of comprehensive continuing care. That place ...is The Mayower the gold standard for retirement communities in Central Florida. Here, you have the freedom and exibility to customize your home and your retirement lifestyle to make them uniquely yours. And while youre doing that, youll also have the guarantee of pre-funded long-term care in our 5-Star rated Health Center. Thats what prompted residents like Father Bob and Sallie Phillips to plan ahead and proactively make the move ...because they wanted to, not because they needed to. How about you?Whats your plan for the future? Call today, and lets talk about it: 407 .672. 1620. 88141 PR AD WPO 12/2013 Winter Pa rk's Distinctive Retirement Community www.themayf lower.com 1620 Mayower Court Winter Park, FL 32792 A WORRY FREE LIFESTYLE PLUS GUARANTEED LONG TERM CARE [ now peace of mind ] MAY 994 Phillips Ad_WPO.indd 1 10/30/13 2:11 PM Sandy Gonzalez was one of those boys who built model airplanes at night and by day searched the skies for the real things, watching for them as one might for shooting stars. He caught the aviation bug at an early age and spent nearly every waking moment dream ing of the day when he could get his wings. childhood, some of which was spent in a Catholic group home, Gonzalez found his place at the Manhattan High School of Aviation. In the early 1940s it was a special ized school for boys in New York City who were eager to join the ranks of young men aviation. There were classes for boys interested in becoming pi mechanics. Gonzalez had no doubts about where he wanted to land: the pilots seat. He graduated early, at age 17, and took a job with the Army Air Corps Cadet program in Middleton, Penn. While he was waiting to turn 18 so he could enlist, the U.S. was waging war on Japan and Germany following the assault on Pearl Harbor Dec. 7, 1941. Shortly after his 18th birthday in May 1943, the long awaited call came in and it was off to basic training fol Then it was on to bomber training in Sebring, where he learned to pilot the B-17, a popular WWII bomber that carried a crew of 10. Following bomber training, Gonzalez joined the Eighth Air and successfully completed 30 bombing missions. An incred ible feat, as anyone who has ever seen Memphis Belle can attest. I was always in the right place at the right time, Gon zalez said. It was just good timing for the most part that kept me safe. Throughout the remainder Air Rescue unit, whose job it was to pick up downed pilots or troops who had strayed off course. After the war, he was stationed in West Palm Beach, and remained with the Air Rescue service helping de velop protocols and train pilots for missions. Grumman Albatross Seaplane, which was capable of landing in the open ocean under all sorts of harrowing conditions including rescuing a downed pilot off of a rocky beach on the shore of Canada. The pilot managed to land on the beach, but it was too short to take off, so we came in and rescued him. The only way we could take off though, was to use JATO, or Jet Assisted Take Off canisters. We had four on board, two for each side that generated 4,000 pounds of thrust, more than enough to see us safely off the small beach, he said. On another mission, Gonzalez recalled rescuing a fellow soldier from a river at night un The motto of the Air Rescue unit reads So that others may live, a selflike Gonzalez never took lightly. He and his fellow pilots and crewmen risked their own lives on every mission, but he said they always considered it their personal duty to bring back every missing member they could. I was always proud that I never lost a crewmember, Gonzalez said. Through various assignments both at home and abroad, Gonzalez continued to serve honorably throughout his 29-year career with the Air Force. He performed air res cue missions in WWII, Korea, Vietnam as well as hundreds of peacetime missions. He re tired with the rank of Colonel and moved to Gainesville to be near his children, who were attending the University of Florida at the time. A few years later, Gonzalez and his wife moved to Fern Park, where they lived togeth er for 30 years, until his wifes passing in 2000. Today Gonzalez makes his home in the Village on the Green in Longwood. At 88, he still lives independently. In fact, he would outdo many people half his age on the computer, managing the Air Rescue Associations website and serves as the groups executive director. Over the years, Gonzalez has seen many a friend take day. And that, he said, is why he feels so strongly about maintaining the camaraderie of his fellow aviators. He has dedicated much of his retirement as president, then as executive director, of the Air Rescue Association, heading annual reunions, up dating newsletters and help ing former, current and future members of Air Rescue units stay in touch and reconnect whenever possible. Its not always easy running all this, but its important to me and to the members to keep it all going, he said. Its how we connect and share the bonds that we all have.60 years ago, a boy who longed to y went to war A SUPPLEMENT OF THE WINTER PARK-MAITLAND OBSERVER AND SEMINOLE VOICE DECEMBER 2013 PHOTO BY ALLISON OLCSVAY CENTRAL FLORIDA SENIORSandy Gonzalez stands with tokens of his past, mementos and awards from his time at war. ALLISON OLCSVAY Central Florida Senior

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Page 2 Senior Calendar MAITLAND SENIOR CENTER The Maitland Senior Center is located at 345 S. Maitland Ave., and is open Monday through Fri day from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The schedule is subject to change without notice. The Maitland Se nior Center will be closed Dec. 23 through Jan. 3 for the holidays! Central Florida SeniorDECEMBER 2013PUBLISHER Tracy Craft 407.515.2605 TCraft@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MANAGING EDITOR Isaac Babcock 407.563.7023 IBabcock@TurnstileMediaGroup.com ADVERTISING Linda Stern 407.376.2434 LStern@TurnstileMediaGroup.com Deborah Sheehy 407.563.7009 DSheehy@TurnstileMediaGroup.com ASSOCIATE EDITOR Sarah Wilson 407.563.7026 SWilson@TurnstileMediaGroup.com DESIGNER Tom Miller 407.563.7032 TMiller@TurnstileMediaGroup.com Published by Turnstile Media Group 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835-5705 P: 407.563.7000 F: 407.563.7099 We will reopen at 9 a.m. on Jan. 6. For more information about these and any other events at the Maitland Senior Center, please call 407-539-6251 or visit itsmymai tland.com Join Audrey every Tuesday in December at 10:30 a.m. for Line Dance Lessons. Class is 1.5 hours and perfect for all levels of dancers. Beginners always wel come! Cost is $4 to the teacher. Join us every Monday and Friday in December at 1 p.m. to see your favorite movies! Check our cal endar online to see what movies are showing in December. Join John every Monday, Thurs day, and Friday in December at 9 a.m. for Yoga. Please wear com fortable clothes and bring your own mat. Cost is $2 to the teacher. Join us every Monday in December at 1 p.m. for our Conver sational French group Spend some time chatting with others and making new friends. Join Esther every Tuesday in December at 9 a.m. for Tai Chi classes. Cost of the class is $10 per month to the teacher. Please wear a white shirt, black pants, and comfortable shoes. Join us every Tuesday in December at 1 p.m. for our Conversational Spanish group Spend some time chatting with others and making new friends. Must be uent in Spanish to participate. Join Sherre every Wednesday in December at 9:30 a.m. for a combo of mat and chair yoga that is great for all levels. Cost of the class is $5 to the teacher. Please bring a yoga mat. Join Ty every Wednesday in De cember at 11 a.m. for Yoga Nidra, a sublime conscious sleep (meditation) class. Cost of the class is $5 to the teacher. Please bring a yoga mat, something to cover yourself with (if you tend to get cold), and a small pillow. Join Donna every Thursday in De cember at 11:30 a.m. for Chair Yoga. Cost of the class is a $2 do nation to the teacher. Join Ann every Friday in Decem ber for Recorder classes at 12:30 p.m. Lessons are free! Please call the Senior Center at 407-5396251 for specics on this class. On the second Friday of the month counselors from Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders will provide free unbiased counsel ing about Medicare, Medigap, HMOs, Medicaid, Prescriptions Drug Plans, and Long Term Care. All counseling is rst-come-rstserved. Bring your list of medica tions or Rx bottles, insurance card and red, white and blue Medicare card. For more information, email information@elderaffairs.org, visit FLORIDASHINE.org, or contact the Maitland Senior Center.CASSELBERRY ADULT FITNESS CLASSESChair Yoga is at 10 a.m. every Monday and will get you moving again! The cost is $2 per class. Gentle/Restorative Yoga is from 8:45 to 10 a.m. on Sundays. Cost is $10 per class. Senior citizens discount is $5 per class. For more information, contact Alice Gomes at 609-290-8195 or email alice@ imagineyoga.net. Many more classes are available. For more information on classes and registration, contact Mario Al garin at 407-262-7700, ext. 1576, or malgarin@casselberry.org or visit casselberry.org/registerWINTER SPRINGS SENIOR CENTERThe Senior Center will be closed Dec. 25 for Christmas. A special holiday lunch will be at 1 p.m. at the Senior Center on Dec. 22. RSVP at 407-327-6554. Please see SENIOR CALENDAR next page

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Page 3 Learn ceramics from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Mondays at the Winter Springs Senior Center at 400 N. Edgemon Ave. in Winter Springs. Call 407-327-6556 for more information. Have fun and get moving at yoga classes at 10 a.m. every Friday morning. Chair yoga is also avail able, offering all the benets of traditional yoga. Bingo is Wednesday, Friday and the last Sunday of the month. Lunch is served at 11:45 a.m. fol lowed by Bingo at 1 p.m. Theres no bingo prior to the last Sunday of the month. A bridge class meets at 10:30 a.m. every Tuesday to help your game. Call 407-327-6556 for more classes and information. Lets give a big thumbs-up to Dr. H, a physician at a re gional Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center and a whistleblower. a House Veterans Affairs oversight and investigations subcommittee about her whistleblower complaints to which have resulted in numer of serious wrongdoing at the regional center. For example: werent supervised. They were labeled Licensed Inde pendent Practitioners, which they werent, and they were practicing outside the scope of their licensure. There was never any oversight or review of the care they gave. Thus empowered, nurse practitioners prescribed nar Federal and individual state laws and VA Handbook regu institutional DEA tracking numbers on the drugs, with no physician oversight whatso ever and no means of tracing who prescribed what. sign prescriptions for patients they hadnt even seen. When the doctors objected, the chief of staff brought in residents from a local medical school to write prescriptions after hours. where there were actually no doctors, only nursing staff. Many veterans were unaware that they were being seen only by a nurse, not a doctor. sign collaborative agreements concerning the nursing prac titioners status (essentially monitoring agreements), and when they objected (they could be sued for the work of the nurse), they were told that 55 percent of their perfor mance pay would be withheld. complete histories for patients, just pasting in previous information. Ive read a lot of terrible medical center reports, but this beats them all. I havent named the medical center because I fear these problems arent unique in the VA healthcare system. Send email to columnreply2@ gmail.com 2013 King Features Synd. Inc. 2013 HearUSA, All Rights Reserved. www.hearusa.com7512 Dr. Phillips Blvd., Suite 90 Orlando, FL 32819(On Dr. Phillips Boulevard, near Steinmart and between Stefanos Grill and Kekes restaurant in the Dr. Phillips Marketplace.) Call Toll Free: 855.802.5532 Hear Your Best for the Holidays this Year!Schedule a FREE Hearing Screening! Hear Your Best for the Holidays this Year!Schedule a FREE Hearing Screening! Family. Friends. Festivities. The joyous sounds of the holidays are fast approaching which means its the perfect time for a FREE Hearing Check-up. Dont let another year with hearing loss dampen your cheer. Total Experience World Class Hearing Care Most complete and accurate hearing check-up. Total Selection HearUSA oers a broad selection of advanced hearing aids from trusted brands.Total Technology Video Otoscope examination a look inside your ear to determine if you have ear wax.60-Day TrialRestrictions apply, call for details. Call today for yourFREE Hearing Check-up! A LIFETIME OF BETTER HEARING! FIRST CLASS CARE WORLD CLASS TECHNOLOGY a pair of Siemens 3mi hearing aids**With purchase of a pair of 3mi model only. Everyday Price $2695 each. Sale Price $2295 each. Not valid with any other oer or discount.$800 OFF 130901 HearUSA Holiday Ad_Central Florida Senior_10.25x8 to run 12-5_01.indd 1 10/29/13 10:09 AM America needs more whistleblowers SENIOR CALENDAR | Bingo and more CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE Savannah Court and Cove Excellence in Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation 1301 W. Maitland Blvd. Maitland, FL 32751407-645-3990www.SavannahCourtMaitland.comAssisted Living Facility License No. 8447 Skilled Nursing Facility License No. 1635096 Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above. You are always welcome!A Senior Living Community where Hospitality is a Way of Life. Savannah Court Maitland 1301 West Maitland Boulevard Tuesday, December 10, 2013 10:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m. Come see local crafters and thier wares, at an old fashion Bazaar Please call to RSVP!Old Fashion-Bazaar Bash

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Page 6 at Winter Park Towers Your room is waiting for you if you need Pain and Symptom Management Hospital Follow-up Complex Treatments, or Crisis Care Referrals 866-742-6655#5019096 www.cornerstonehospice.org www.SeriousIllness.org/cornerstoneMedicare, Medicaid, most commercial insurances accepted rffrfnColleen D. Kennon, Owner tbbf b Member of: The length of time you might spend in the emergency room has gotten longer and longer as many Medicare patients are held under whats called observation status. AARP recently completed a study called Rapid Growth in Medicare Hospital Observa tion Services: Whats Going On? that shows the length of time patients are held that way has grown, sometimes to more than 48 hours. If youre a Medicare patient, you can be toting up out-of-pocket costs with every passing hour youre held in this medical limbo. Theres no cost-sharing cap with these observation status stays, not to mention that you might not receive the level of care that you should. As an observation outpatient, youre liable for the costs of tests and procedures. Additionally, if you end up in skilled nursing, the obser vation status time you spend in the hospital doesnt count for the Medicare requirement that you have three days as an inpatient. Your portion of the costs can skyrocket, and you might even be denied skilled nursing care because you werent in the hospital long from the AARP study: have increased 94 percent. versus inpatient) is sometimes changed by the hospital after the patient is sent home. skilled nursing that Medicare didnt cover (due to being originally held in observation limbo) was $10,503. A number of senators in Congress have proposed legis lation that would require time spent in observation status to count as part of the three-day inpatient requirement. To read the full 25-page re port, go to aarp.org and put the studys title in the search box. Matilda Charles regrets that she cannot personally answer reader questions, but will incorporate them into her column whenever possible. Send email to columnreply2@gmail.com 2013 King Features Synd. Inc.Emergency room stays can cost a bundle INTRODUCING 877-618-5526 Fully Equipped Kitchens Carefree Granite Countertops Elevator Access Four Paws Friendly 1, 2 & 3 Bedrooms from $685**Promotions, terms and conditions subject to change. Pricing displayed includes optional digital cable, reserved parking space, and washer/dryer connections. GardenParkSeniorLiving.com UptownMaitland.com Visit Us at: 365 Garden Edge Point Fern Park, FL 32730 Office Hours: Monday Friday 10 am 6 pm Saturday: 10 am 5 pm Sunday: 12 pm 5 pm BRAND NEW 55+ SENIOR LIVING APARTMENTS

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Page 7 Lets face it too much of the coverage we provide from Washington is inside base ball, easily ignored by those who live in the real world. Sometimes, though, this stuff matters. A case in point is the decision by Harry Reid and his Democratic gaggle to invoke the nuclear option. Its called that because Reid and his partisan majority blew up ing a parliamentary maneuver, they were able to circumvent the usual two-thirds vote nec essary to change the rules and used a simple majority to do away with the biggest delaying the deliberative United States Senate. Republicans are having a cow. Youll regret this, sput tered Minority Leader Mitch McConnell. The solution to this problem is at the ballot box. He was trying to make the obvious point that if the Rs take over, its the Ds who will have lost their power to stop a conservative agenda. Unwittingly, however, McConnell was offering a justi a stalling tactic that he and his partisans were using to thwart the winner of the last election. The voters choose who will head the nation. Last time around, that was Barack Obama, meaning he gets to on the federal bench, and also who will head the departments and agencies of his adminis tration. Forgive the civics refresher, but while the Constitutions advise-and-consent power provides the Senate an abil ity to block nominees, it is supposed to be used sparingly. The key word is consent, but at an unprecedented level, the judicial and executive appoint ments put forth by President Obama. It came to a head when they blocked three of his openings. The Republicans were daring Reid to make the nuclear move in truth, they triple-dared him so he did. Actually, it wasnt a com is an exception for the Su preme Court nominees, and it still can be deployed to shut down legislation. That brought some criticism from those who believe that the GOP agenda is all about obstruc tion. If Barack Obama asked Congress to approve a Happy Thanksgiving resolution, it upper chamber. Republicans vow revenge. They have plenty of tools for continuing the gridlock. The Senate rules are packed with delaying tactics. So they can retaliate against the nuclear option with the death of a thousand cuts. The budget deals that need to be done, for instance, can be sunk if they simply refuse to negotiate. Depending on how vindictive they choose to be, we could be facing another govern ment shutdown or debt-ceiling crisis. If youre wondering just what all this has to do with running the country, the answer is nothing. Those on the right point out that when theyve held the power, the liberals have also embraced procedural block ades. But the Republicans have reached new highs. Or would it be lows? In the ugly world of politics, things rarely improve they get worse. Inside baseball? Yes, it is, but the game affects all of us. If the legislative branch can substitute political pettiness for law making, we will con tinue to deteriorate. Thats not what a democracy is supposed to be. 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com r fntbt f rtt ftbt bt bnr nr rt b bb f b tb off trtnCoupon redeemable for cash, check or credit card purchases only. Not redeemable for insurance transactions. Excludes custom/special orders & nutritional supplements. May not be combined with any other discounts. Coupon has no cash value. New Holiday Merchandise! 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Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above! You are always welcome at Savannah Court and Cottage of Oviedo. MEMORY CARE RESIDENCEWhere hospitality is truly a way of life! Savannah Court and Cottage Located on a beautiful campus setting, our two Savannah Court communities provide full assisted living services while Savannah Cottage offers a secured residence for those with memory loss. You are always welcome at Savannah Court and Cottage of Oviedo www.savannahcourtoviedo.com395 Alafaya Woods Blvd., Oviedo, FL 32765407-977-8786 Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above!

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Page 8 DEAR PAWS CORNER: I have two dogs and a cat, and I love them all dearly. I also try to make things a little better for pets that dont have homes by helping out two days a month at the local shelter. Please let your read ers know that they can make a huge difference in dogs and cats lives even with a small contribution. If they cant give their time, they can donate money, food or other pet-care items. Caring in Kalamazoo DEAR KALAMAZOO: You told them, and thanks! The holiday season offers the most opportunities to donate, no matter what amount, to a pets. So while youre busy making gift lists and holiday preparations, dont forget to include pets in need some where in those thoughts. Most local shelters have Web pages online where you fundraising events, see what food or supplies are needed, email address to learn more. Those that dont have a website often have listings or dedicated space in the town or community newspaper. Major pet-care organiza tions and pet-supply stores have fundraising drives throughout the year, while local organizations sometimes hold supply drives and other events with the help of local businesses or municipalities. You also can donate your free time to help out at local animal shelters. Contact your nearest shelter to see if op portunities are available, how much time is required and if additional training is needed for certain volunteer posi tions. Send your questions or comments to ask@pawscorner.com. Did you know mosquitos can transmit heartworm lar vae to dogs, but eas dont? Find out more in my new book, Fighting Fleas, available now. 2013 King Features Synd. Inc.Remember pets in need this holiday season will be celebrating mass starting at1300 N. Mills Ave.(Mills and Montana, just north of Colonial Dr.)Mass begins at 11 a.m. Casual attireParking is along Mills and in Watkins Dental parking lot. Please visit website for information HEAR YE ... HEAR YE! shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM here should be more to life than maintenance-free living. To learn more about our community in Kissimmee, call (407) 933-1999.