Winter Park-Maitland observer

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title:
Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication:
Winter Park FL
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates:
28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID:
UF00091444:00288


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

WPMOBSERVER.COM USPS 00-6186 Publisher statement on page 2 VISIT WPMOBSERVER.COMSUBSCRIBE NOW! LOCAL C ARTOONIST TURNS AUTHORLIFESTYLES, 9Knights ready for RutgersAfter a heart-attack comeback, UCF readies for stronger foe. SPORTS, 10A mighty heartFriends say goodbye to woman who gave her life to the YMCA. HEALTHY LIVING, 13COMMUNITY BULLETIN ............ 8 CALENDAR .................... 8 LIFESTYLES .................... 9 ATHLETICS ................... 10 HEALTHY LIVING ................ 13 CULTURE ..................... 18 OPINIONS .................... 21 CLASSIFIEDS .................. 39 The Winter Park City Commission may have a new solution to the citys downtown parking woes: tapping into private parking held by businesses and landowners. City Commissioners made a dent in the citys downtown parking problem during their meeting last Monday by approving two parking projects, including the relocation of their public works building to free up 73 parking spaces in its place. The other project will restripe 75 feet of New York Avenue at new spaces. In just one month, the city has nearly reached its goal of creating 100 spots in a 12-month period, an objective set in place after a parking study earlier this year showed the city was 237 spaces short on weekdays and 280 spaces short on weekends. I hope city staff have heard from our conversation that weve got to get to the 275 number, Mayor Ken Bradley said. Its probably something more than that. I think we would be deceiving ourselves if we dont think theres a parking problem in downtown Winter Park. But another potential project may create more spaces at the cost of certain merchants along the Avenue. Winter Park resident Sally Flynn addressed the Commission for resident Vicki Krueger and suggested that businesses share their private parking spaces for the greater good of the downtown area, noting that some spaces arent being used as often as they could be. The option intrigued the City Commission, particularly Mayor Bradley. I think thats an amen to that, Bradley said. Anybody that has private parking in the downtown cor ridor, we need to look at how thats being utilized. Business owners stressed that the parking problem needs to be addressed to bring in more foot The Enzian Theater in Maitland is pulling back the cur tain this week and showing the public its proposed expansion plans that could nearly triple it in size and add two additional screens. Central Floridas time alternative theater is presenting preliminary plans to the city of Maitlands Development Review Committee on Thursday that would add an additional 19,500 square feet to the existing 7,150-squarefoot cinema and bar space. Enzians Executive Vice President Elizabeth Tiedtke said the expansion is something the Theaters been dreaming of for nearly 15 years the addition of new theaters allowing them to increase showings and community programming on site and could Its something ally gotten into the past year, year and a half, and now were really excited to start to turn it from a dream into a reality, she said. The current plans add two new theaters one with 80 seats, the other with 50 while keeping the existing 200-seat venue intact. The plans also add a second valet parking, and additional bathrooms. In total, Tiedtke said the additions are estimated to cost $6 million, which will be funded by community donors. Right now were bursting at the seams, Tiedtke said. Well be able to even [our programing] all out with the two additional screens. Maitland Community Development Director Dick Wells said the meeting on Thursday is for exploratory purposes to see how the plans line up with Maitlands development codes and ideals. He said no development applithe project. Public comment will be taken after the plans are presented during the meeting, which begins at 6:30 p.m. in City Hall. Tiedtke said she hopes to get the ball rolling toward construction after this weeks meeting PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVERThe Enzian has brought stars such as Emma Stone with high-prole lm festivals.Enzian theater could triple in size$6 million addition could bring in bigger movies, more stars Commissioner to run for re-electionTIM FREED Observer Staff Please see ENZIAN on page 2Commissioner Sarah Sprinkel was set to announce her run for re-election as a Winter Park City Commissioner Tuesday night at press time at Palmanos Trattoria and Wine Bar. When I ran three years ago, I ran because I wanted to bring the community together, Sprinkel said. Were all really looking after the community in a very positive way I think thats why I want to continue. Ive seen the products of what happens when we work together. Sprinkel originally joined the City Commission in 2011 after winning a close campaign battle with attorney Bonnie Jackson. The City Commissioner wont know whether shell be opposed for her seat until Jan. 7 when qualifying for the election ends. I have people all the time who say to me Boy, our town has never looked this good, Sprinkel said. I kind of feel that way too. Those are the things that make me want to stay for another three years. This year marks the end of Commissioner Steve Learys term as well, but hes yet to for mally announce a campaign for re-election. Winter Parks next municipal election will be Tuesday, March 11. If necessary, a primary will be held Feb. 11. Three more for Sprinkel?SARAH WILSON Observer StaffCity mulls taking away private parkingCity Commission plans to add new parking in downtownTIM FREED Observer Staff 407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC Winter Park Recovery CenterExecutive Drug & Alcohol Treatment Protocols 20 and 40-Week Outpatient Programs Suboxone/Subutex For Opioid Abuse Privacy and Confidentiality AssuredMedically Managed Dual Diagnosis Evidenced Based Programs2056 Aloma Ave, Suite 100, Winter Park, FL 32792 www.WinterParkRecoveryCenter.com 407-629-0413 PHOTO COURTESY OF ENZIAN

PAGE 2

Page 2 | Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013 | Winter P ark / Maitland ObserverENZIAN | P ARKING | City says some businesses not using their spacesand into early 2014. The goal, she said, is to break ground in April and have the expansion complete by the annual Florida Film Festival to be hosted there in spring 2015. In 2008, the theater expanded its dining options with installation of the popular dinner and drinks destination, Eden Bar. And more recently earlier this year, overhauled the interior of its current theater by refurbishing its dine-in seating area. Tiedtke said current operations would continue as normal during the proposed construction, as all additions wrap around the back of the building, leaving the existing areas untouched. during the crucial holiday season. Talk to people who are trying said Peterbrooke Chocolatier coowner Kevin Wray. We actually offer curbside service; were running things out to peoples cars. From November to December, thats our most critical time of the year to make our sales and pay for those slower summer months. To have parking around those times is just critical. Commissioner Carolyn Cooper saw more opportunity to free up spaces by using the municipal Blake Yard and the Swoope Water Treatment Plant parking lot, paved areas that would be ready for use in a matter of days at no cost to the city. City employees and merchants volunteering to use the lots would free up that much more space along Park Avenue for customers, Cooper said. If we have places that we can make available free of charge to the employees on the Avenue and the city employees those who might be willing to go and voluntarily park there I think we could have something that would work for everyone, Cooper said. Were all in this together, we all want the merchants to be successful. But one potential project that came one vote away from passing had residents up in arms: a proposal to pave over a portion of the West Meadow to add 12 new parking spaces. It took us a while to get that green space, Winter Park resident Marti Miller said. If you change it back to 14 spaces today, then it will be 24 spaces next year, then it will be 36 spaces. It will only grow and we will lose our West Meadow once again. Leave that green space alone. City Commissioners chose to abandon the project after discussing it further. I dont see why we would want all of this upheaval for 12 spots, Deputy Mayor Sarah Sprinkel said. The city plans to have the 73 parking spots from public works building project ready in time for the Winter Park Sidewalk Art Festival in March 2014. City Commissioners will fur ther discuss private parking, the Blake Yard and the Swoope Water Treatment Plant parking lot at a future meeting. CONTINUED FROM FRONT P AGE CONTINUED FROM FRONT P AGE Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013 PHONE: 407-563-7000 FAX: 407-563-7099 WPMOBSERVER.COMPUBLISHERTracy Craft407.515.2605TCraft@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MANAGING EDITORIsaac Babcock 407.563.7023IBabcock@TurnstileMediaGroup.comASSOCIATE EDITORSarah Wilson 407.563.7026SWilson@TurnstileMediaGroup.comDESIGNERTom Miller 407.563.7032TMiller@TurnstileMediaGroup.comSTAFF WRITERSBrittni Larson Megan Stokes Tim Freed Allison Olcsvay Kristy VickeryCOLUMNISTSChris JepsonJepson@MediAmerica.usLouis RoneyLRoney@cfl.rr.comJosh GarrickJoshGarrick9@gmail.comADVERTISING SALESLinda Stern407.376.2434LStern@TurnstileMediaGroup.comLEGAL NOTICE ADVERTISINGAshley McBride 407.286.0807Legal@FLALegals.comSUBSCRIPTIONS/CIRCULATIONLuana Baez 407.563.7013LBaez@TurnstileMediaGroup.comMEMBER OF: -Florida Press Association -Winter Park/Maitland/Goldenrod Chambers of CommerceWinter Park/Maitland Observer is published by Turnstile Media Group. Founded in 1990 and headquartered in Orlando, Fla., Turnstile Media Group is also the parent of Golfweek, Golfweek Custom Media, TurfNet, Professional Artist, Seminole Voice, Baldwin Park Living and Turnstile Connect.TURNSTILE MEDIA GROUPCHAIRMANRance CrainPRESIDENT/CEOFrancis X. FarrellVICE PRESIDENTSPatti Green & Jeff BabineauUSPS #00-6186 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:Winter Park / Maitland Observer 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835 Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W Munster FEATURING ... 250 North Orlando Ave. Winter Park, FL 32789407.677.9777 Duette Architella Honeycomb Shades Duette Architella Honeycomb Shades every climate...every season A Premier Flooring Source Area Rugs Window Treatments... AND MUCH MORE! KEEP UP WITH MAITLAND NEWS AND EVENTS!www.IndependenceLane.com Facebook.com/ItsMyMaitland PHOTO BY TIM FREED THE OBSERVERThe city is already ahead in its plan to add nearly 300 spaces. Orlando s Only Doggie Daycare with a Gym! Customized workouts Training Indoor warm water swimming 2826 Shader Rd. Orlando 32808 407-295-3888 BarkingDogFitness.co m Fact A lean dog lives an average 2 years longer than an overweight dog AN D is healthier and hap p ier!

PAGE 3

Winter P ark / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013 | Page 3The kitchen is the heart of a home, especially during the holiday seasons. Children love to be a part of meal preparations, par ticularly during these special family gathering times. So we must be observant and provide for the safety of our loved ones while preparing foods. Simply staying in the kitchen is essential, and if you must leave even for a short period of time turn off the stove. Use a timer to remind you that you are cooking. With everyone visiting its easy to get distracted. To protect little ones, set up a kid free zone around the stove and areas where hot food or drinks are prepared; around 3 feet away is good. We also want to watch out for dangling power cords for hand mixers, electric carving knives, coffee pots, and plate warmers. Remember to have oven mitts or hot pads available to help ing or voluminous sleeves when working around the stove. Remember to keep wood utensils, paper products, or towels away from the stovetop. One of latest trends in cooking a turkey involves deep-frying, whether using an electric fryer indoors or a propane gas fryer outdoors. It can be messy, and if accomplished improperly or without caution, it can be danger ous. Be sure to wear closed toe shoes, long pants or a long apron, a long sleeved shirt and have gloves handy. For starters, you will want to determine the correct amount of oil you are going to use in the cooking of the bird. Place the tur key in the pot and add water until the bird is completely covered plus 2 inches. There should be several inches of room between the turkey and top of the pot. If its too close you need a smaller bird or larger pot. Remove the tur key and measure the water, this is the amount of oil youll need for cooking. Drain the water and thoroughly dry the pot. Preparing the turkey is very important. Be sure the bird is thoroughly defrosted and all contents inside the body cavity are removed. A fresh turkey alleviates the defrost cycle. Be sure there are no pop up tender-timer devices or anything left inside the bird and the turkey is really, really dry. You dont want to witness what happens when you put water into boiling oil! Add the oil to the pot and bring it up to the recommended cooking temperature. Use a really good thermometer to get the temperature right. Once youve reached the desired temperature, be sure the turkey is completely dry and at room temperature. You should have a means of lowering the turkey into the pot that does not place you too close to the pot or burner. Turn off the burner and slowly lower the tur key or the oil will splatter. A good method is to dunk the turkey a little at a time. A couple of dunks and the turkey should be nicely settled. Turn the burner back on wander too far away; remember deep-frying a turkey goes much quicker than oven roasting. tinguisher may not be needed, but its good to have just in case. wish you and yours a happy and safety holiday season. Dennis Marshall, CET, FCO Fire Marshal Maitland Fire Rescue Dept. Maitland City TalkBY HOWARD SCHIEFERDECKER MAYOR Holiday cooking safety 407-659-5701 www.TrustcoBank.com*Information based on current closings. Circumstances beyond Trustco Banks control may delay closing. Please n ote: W e r eser ve the right to alte r or w ithdraw these products or certain featu res thereof without prior notification.Member FDICEQUAL HOUSINGLENDER RYour Home Town Bank TRUSTCO BANKFast, Local Decisions Close your First Mortgage in 30 days!*Schedule Closing Date at Application Our loans close on time!Low Closing Costs No Points and No T ax Escrow required Trustco Mortgages We Close Loans! We are large enough to give you what you want and small enough to provide it the way you want it. To learn more, please visit any of our banking centers from Orlando to Miami or call us at 1-800-435-8839.13-0089/rev090113 citynational.com Member FDIC Personal Relationships | Local Decisions | StabilityREDEFINING BANKING. 1112-1 CNwinterPrk.indd 1 11/15/13 12:11 PM Rooted & grounded in Jesus Christ. The Learning Tree is a Ministry of First Baptist Church of Winter ParkWe offer Full-Day Infant Care and Childcare Year-Round, Preschool Classes, Summer Camp, and much more! 1021 New York Avenue N., Winter Park, Florida 32789 Established in 1972 we are celebrating 41 years of service this year.

PAGE 4

JOSH GARRICK Observer Sta The brand new Italio Restaurant in a perfect location just north of the busy intersection of Fairbanks and 17-92 in Winter Park has raised the concept of fast food to a level this reviewer never thought possible, AND theyve done it with (my favorite) Italian food! And here is the essence of what I have to share with you today. This is the best food you can get for the price anywhere in Central Florida. quick-service food concept in 2012 in Boca Raton where their customers quickly accepted this stand-inline, on-thego alternative to traditional Italian dining. Italios concept offers patrons literally hundreds of options to create the ideal meal we only wish we could cook at home with each ingredient pre-cooked by the restaurant and chosen by us. One happy customer summed it up by commenting, Do you like Italian? Do you want your meal fast? Do you understand how to order at Chipotle? If so, youll like Italio. Since were residents of Central Florida, we know how to stand in line better than any other people in the world, and remem bering this is fast food, you can use your time (while standing in line) to make is to be served. It can be a Pasta Bowl, Salad Bowl or a Piadina, an Italian wrap, much like a French crepe that actually has its history in ancient Roman street food. Step two offers a choice of meats such as Chicken breast (marinated in lemon-herb vin aigrette at $6.98); Meatball of ground beef and pork $6.98; Grilled sirloin steak $6.98; Grilled shrimp $8.98; Italian sausage $6.98; or the Veggie medley at $6.78. You see what I mean about the value. Step three taps into our inner-chef and challenges us with varying combinations of sauces, dressings and pestos ranging from Alfredo to traditional Pomodoro to Roasted Red Pepper pesto. The over 20 toppings, including brus chetta, chickpeas, olive tapenade and a variety of cheeses. Please keep in mind these low prices come with the traditional fast food compromises of eating from cardboard bowls with plastic knives and forks. But there is NO compromising on the food. I was proud of myself for creating a dish consisting of whole-wheat pasta, steak, fresh basil pesto, and aged, shaved Parme san cheese and it was delicious. Thats really the whole point here. Italio allows us to eat all our favorite comfort foods, and we can do it anytime, because the prices are so low. This was witnessed as I visit there exactly one month after the restaurant opened and it was already full of happy, pasta-loving customers. All around me, people were truly enjoying their food, which speaks to the atmosphere in Italio. Its a truly happy place. ferent readers who spotted me and shared how happy they were that I would be writing about what has already become a favorite restaurant for them. The Kids Menu is even cheaper ($3.98), and I enjoyed watching an experienced family as the kids professionally pulled their noodles into their mouths. Families cannot hope for more than a beautifully designed, clean restaurant that offers fresh ingredients at affordable prices for the casual diner. And theres more. As Italio wishes to be known as a good neighbor as well as being a good restaurant, they recently initiated Mangia Mondays a month-long charitable initiative and Outreach Center (CFOC). On every Monday through May Mondays will be contributed to the Central Florida charity, which transforms lives though education and employment opportunities. In addition, Italio and CFOCs employment division are collabo rating to secure job placements for members at the Winter Park restaurant. Impressive. I love the food AND I love the ease of this new concept restaurant, and since Italian is my favorite, I invite you to come over and share your thoughts when you Its so cool its like pasta has its own happy hour all day long at Italio. The Winter Park location is at 276 South Orlando Avenue and is open 7 days a week from 10:45 a.m. to 10 pm. Visit ItalioKitchen. comRestaurant Review of the NEW Italio (Winter Park) From the Corner Table

PAGE 5

Welcome to a place all about health, healing and you. The new Florida Hospital for Women at Winter Park Memorial Hospital fulfills all your needs under one roof with our onestop boutique approach for your mindbody-spirit called Full Embrace Health Care. Our network of womens physicians provides you with comprehensive womens services and the latest in wellness and health advancements, including your very own Life Designer. Its an elegant retreat, a haven designed exclusively for you. for W omen Winter Park PMS: 294 100% K 70% K Florida Hospital Font: Friz Quadrata Tag Line Font: Adobe Garamond italic C = 100 M = 56 Y = 0 K = 18 The skill to heal. The spirit to care. A ONE-STOP, BOUTIQUE CENTRE FOR HEALTH, DESIGNED EXCLUSIVELY FOR YOU.To schedule an appointment with one of our physicians or the Life Designer, call (407) 646-7999. NUTRITION UROGYNECOLOGY DIGESTIVE HEALTH MAMMOGRAPHY BREAST HEALTH ADVANCED GYNECOLOGY COMPREHENSIVE HEALTH ASSESSMENT MENOPAUSE HEART HEALTH LIFE DESIGNER BONE HEALTHMost insurance accepted.WPMH-13-15651 WPMH-13-15651 Maitland Observer Nov.indd 1 10/15/13 1:03 PM

PAGE 6

Page 6 | Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013 | Winter P ark / Maitland ObserverCoffeeT alk featuring Commissioner McMackenIf you have a latt beans to grind or you simply want to espresso your thoughts, CoffeeTalk may be the cup for you. Please join an informal conversation with Commissioner Tom McMacken Thursday, Nov. 21, from 8 to 9 a.m. at the Winter Park Welcome Center located at 151 W. Lyman Ave. CoffeeTalk gives the community an opportunity to sit down and talk with Commissioner McMacken over a cup of coffee and chat about any city issues that are of interest to them. Special thanks to Palmanos Cafe, Coffee & Wine Bar for donating the coffee for this special series. For more information, please call 407-599-3428. Nov. 25 City Commission meeting There will be a City Commission meeting Monday, Nov. 25, at 3:30 p.m. in City Hall Commission Chambers located at 401 S. Park Ave. For the most up-to-date agenda, please visit cityofwinter park.org > Government > City Commission > Agenda. Below are a few topics of interest:Consent Agenda complete listing, please visit cityofwinterpark.org/ccpackets). ecute Amendment One to the amended and restated Power Sales Agreement between Seminole Electric Cooperative Inc. and the city of Winter Park dated Jan. 15, 2013.Action Items Requiring Discussion Franchise with Waste Pro. Inc. Public Hearingston, LLC: proval to divide the property at 1280 Arlington Place, Zoned R-2, into two lots. to amend Chapter 58, Land Development Code, Article I Comprehensive Plan Future Land Use Map so as to establish Commercial Future Land Use on the annexed property at 656 Overspin Drive and to indicate the annexation of this property on the other maps within the Comprehensive Plan. amend Chapter 58, Land Development Code, Article III, Zon3) Zoning on the annexed property at 656 Overspin Drive. to vacate and abandon a portion of Gaines Way lying between 610 Gaines Way and 1760 Gaines Way, but retaining and reserving to the city a utility easement over the entire area thereof. sions full agenda on the home page of cityofwinterpark.org under Whats New > City Commission Agenda.Last week to help support F eed the Need This is the last week for our opportunity to support Feed the munitywide fundraiser to end hunger in Central Florida. The city of Winter Park has partnered with Rollins College, Sodexo, Think Creative Inc. and the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce to create this powerful fundraising engine to raise money to help Second Harvest Food Bank provide food for those in need. The Feed the Need fundraising campaign will end this Friday, Nov. 22. Some important facts to know: $9 worth of grocery products is provided for those in need. goes straight to feeding people. central Florida population 732,000 people needed food assistance last year. This is a 152 percent increase from 2006. children struggle with hunger. When these kids have no food, we have no choice but to respond. If you are able, please assist us in this worthy cause by joining the City of Winter Park Team and donating online at http://bit.ly/ cityofwinterpark. Remember, we paign so please dont hesitate. Thank you for helping Winter Park Feed the Need.Ice rink is open!Now through Sunday, Jan. 5, 2014, the city of Winter Park will bundle up once again for Winter in the Park, the citys annual holiday ice skating rink in Central Park West Meadow. The West Meadow is located at 150 N. New York Ave., on the corner of New York Avenue and Morse Boulevard, in downtown Winter Park. levels are invited to chill out as they glide, spin and turn at Winter in the Park: p.m. to 9 p.m. See website for extended school holiday hours. Snow angels are invited to skate all day for only $10 per a blizzard of 20 or more people, some cool group discounts are available for all this frigid fun. If you are interested in bringing your whole igloo to celebrate birthdays, special events, private parties or corporate holiday gatherings, the rink is available for rental opportunities. Advance reservations are required for private party and group reservations to avoid an icy avalanche of skaters at the rink. Holiday music, games, carolaround you as you enjoy Winter in the Park. For more information, please call 407-599-3203 or visit cityofwinterpark.org/witp at cityofwinterpark.org, like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and watch us on Vimeo. Winter Park City TalkBY RANDY KNIGHT CITY MANAGER Help feed the need THOUSANDS OF PEOPLE IN OUR OWN COMMUNITY WILL GO HUNGRY THIS SEASON WITHOUT OUR HELP. WE'D LOVE TO FEED THEM ALL. AND WE'RE ONLY HALFWAY THERE. FEED NEEDthe A COMMUNITY-WIDE EFFORT TO RAISE FUNDS FOR SECOND HARVEST FOOD BANK OF CENTRAL FLORIDA. WINTER PARK PLEASE DONATE TODAY TO HELP US PROVIDE ENOUGH FOOD TO FILL UP EVERY HUNGRY MAN, WOMAN AND CHILD. DONATE TODAY AT FEEDTHENEEDWP.ORG $50,000 GOAL $39,108 RAISEDIn Partnership with: Presented by:

PAGE 7

M o r n i n g s 4 : 3 0 a m 7 : 0 0 a m T rust Am y S w ee z e y and ge t C entr al F lorida s mo st ac cur a t e w ea ther f or ec a st. | W ak e up t o WE SH 2 Ne w s S unrise f or Fir st Alert W eather T r affic and Br eaking Ne w s. WE SH 2 Fir st Alert W eather is r ec ogni z ed as delivering the most accur ate f or ecast by by W eatheR ate, an independent r esear ch c ompan y f or six c onsecutive y ear s.

PAGE 8

Page 8 | Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013 | Winter P ark / Maitland ObserverCalendar FAMILY CALENDAR NOV. 21 The Goldenrod Historical Society is taking a eld trip to the Lake Mary Historical Museum at 10 a.m. Nov. 21. In addition to the regular museum exhibits, the museum will feature its Christmas display of vintage Christmas trees, toys and decorations so make sure you mark your calendars now for this great event. Invite friends and family and let us know how many will be coming. As with our own museum, the admission is free but they do accept donations. W e will be enjoying lunch in a local restaurant so bring your lunch money and your appetite for a great meal. Its at 158 N. Country Club Road in Lake Mary. CoffeeT alk featuring Commissioner T om McMacken runs from 8 to 9 a.m. Thursday Nov. 21 at the Winter P ark W elcome Center at the Winter P ark Chamber of Commerce. Got a latte on your mind or some beans to grind? Nows your chance. Visit cityofwinterpark.org for more infor mation. NOV. 23The 22nd annual Brouhaha Film and Video Showcase kicks off at the Enzian Theater at 11 a.m. Nov. 23. Its a series of four programs of multiple short lms from acclaimed lmmakers. Its only $5 per program or $10 for all four. It goes on through Sunday, Nov. 24. ONGOINGT ake a stroll down memory lane at the Winter Park Playhouse as we pay tribute to two of Americas most well-loved composers of all time, George and Ira Gershwin! This high-energy song and dance celebration will put a smile on your face and a song in your heart! Featuring a collection of Gershwin favorites, including Embraceable Y ou, Ive Got a Crush on Y ou, I Got Rhythm, Someone to W atch Over Me, and SW onderful! Who could ask for anything more? Its Nov. 21-24 and Dec. 5-14. Its all conceived by Roy Alan with the narrative by T odd Allen Long and musical arrangements by Christopher Leavy.Business Briefs Swinging for the fencesThe annual Florida League Celebrity Golf T ournament, presented by UBS Private W ealth, took place Nov. 11 and proved to be a continued success. The tournament, now in its sixth year, elded 28 ve-somes, as well as top Major League Baseball celebrities with a combined 191 years of MLB service, 851 home runs, 4,940 strike outs, 15 All-Star appearances, six rst round picks, three Silver Sluggers, ve W orld Series titles, and one Cy Y oung Award. The tournament was once again played at the prestigious Interlachen Country Club in Winter P ark. All proceeds throughout the weekend beneted the Florida Collegiate Summer League, which is a 501(c)(3) non-prot organization.Readers thank RollinsEarlier this year, Rollins College, on behalf of the Olin library staff and faculty, presented F ern Creek Elementary School with a check for $3,000 to pur chase non-ction books for its school library. The elementary school recently purchased the books. The money for the donation came when the Rollins Olin Library was presented with the 2013 Excellence in Academic Libraries Award in the college category from Association of College and Research Libraries. Friday, December 6; 5 p.m. in Central Park Presented by: Supported by: City of Winter ParkSaturday, December 7; 7 10:30 a.m. at the Central Park StagePresented by: Saturday, December 7; 9 a.m. along Park Avenue Presented by: Supported by: Centennial Bank For more information or tickets for the Pancake Breakfast, visit winterpark.org or call (407) 644-8281. NOV. 21The UCF Knights football team takes on Americas oldest college football team, Rutgers, at 7:30 p.m. Thursday at Bright House Networks Stadium at UCF. Itll also be televised on ESPN. Visit UCFKnights. com for more information. NOV. 22 Rollins College mens soccer is in the third round of the NCAA regional soccer tournament, and they get to play for their home crowd at Barker Family Stadium at Rollins. This Friday, Nov. 22, theyre the top seed against No. 2 W est Florida at 7 p.m. Then Saturday the winner of that game will face No. 3 Lander or No. 4 Car son-Newman at 1 p.m. for the quarternal match. Come out and support the team! NOV. 23A Local Folkus, LLC continues its commitment to the local food movement by celebrating their fourth annual Winter Park Harvest F estival this fall on Saturday, Nov. 23, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Throughout the day, a local producer-only market in Central P arks W est Meadow will offer festivalgoers the chance to gobble up all of the ingredients to create a completely local Thanksgiving meal. With more than 50 local farmers, food artisans and gar deners, its a great opportunity to get some holiday gift shopping done too! Kids activities by Florida Hospitals Mission Fit program, cooking demonstrations, and do-it-yourself gardening sessions will offer everyone a chance to learn more about building a healthy and vibrant local food system. A mobile community garden, organized by Our Whole Community, will display over fty grow boxes, grown by local elementary schools. Music will rock the stage courtesy of Barnstorm, Just T wistin Hay, Evan T aylor Jones, Carolyn Nicely, Heather Lee and Jordan Wynn, and Kattya Graham. For more information visit wpharvest.com A bike valet will be provided at the Winter P ark Harvest Festival from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. to help store your bike and encour age riders to leave their car behind for the day. Visit wpharvest.com for more infor mation. NOV. 28Each year on Thanksgiving morning, thousands of participants come out for the T urkey T rot, a 5K (3.1 miles) run/ power walk and T ot T rot to benet Seniors First. Last year, the race drew more than 5,600 participants to downtown Orlandos Lake Eola. Runners of all ages and levels are encouraged to attend. Seniors First is a nonprot social service organization dedicated to serving the needs of Central Floridas elderly population with a broad spectrum of nutrition, home improvement and support services. The funds raised as a result of the T urkey T rot directly benet the seniors of Orange and Seminole counties. Costume judging begins at 7 a.m. so get there early on Thanksgiving! Visit tur keytrotorlando.com for more information. ONGOINGNow through Sunday, Jan. 5 the city of Winter P ark is bundling up once again for Winter in the Park, the citys annual holiday ice skating rink in Central P ark W est Meadow. The W est Meadow is located at 150 N. New Y ork Ave., on the corner of New Y ork Avenue and Morse Boulevard, in downtown Winter P ark. Snowakes of all ages and skill levels are invited to chill out as they glide, spin and turn at Winter in the P ark Snow angels are invited to skate all day for only $10 per skater (skate rental included). Advance reservations are required for private party and group reservations to avoid an icy avalanche of skaters at the rink. Holiday music, games, carolers and so much more will urry around you as you enjoy Winter in the P ark. For more infor mation, please call 407-599-3203 or visit cityofwinterpark.org/WITP If you are interested in showcasing your business during the busy holiday season to the 30,000-plus expected attendees, please visit our website and click on the SPONSOR tab for information on how to become an ice rink dasher board sponsor.

PAGE 9

Winter P ark / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013 | Page 9Lifestyles Theres just something about their eyes. Sure, most times theyre just two big white circles, a simple concept. But then theres the fact that one is bigger than the other, or the crazy placement of those important little black-dot pupils. Its remarkable how Ethan Longs characters can change with the addition of the dash of an eyebrow or the deliberate scribble of a sleepy eyelid. Many have called him the master of the googly eye. Longs zany characters have danced across the pages of dozens of childrens books, many of which hes authored himself. The College Park resident has won the Theodor Seuss Geisel Award, the highest honor given to a book for beginning readers for his book Up, Tall and High! and has a show on Disney Channel based on his characters and concept called Tasty Time with ZeFronk. Most of his fans say that his quick wit is what sets him apart, and keeps kids coming back to his books. He draws silly cats, sweet and colorful chameleons, and approachable monsters. He tends to keep things simple, and let all the humor do the work and Im always amazed at how he can move an eyebrow and it totally changes a face, and an expression makes things funnier, said his wife Heather Long. Just the simple things, and I think he can do that like few people can. Long grabs a scrap of paper and draws some of his famous eyes, sketching one pair under neath another in sharp black ink. Quickly they go happy, sad, angry and crazy. His illustrations always seem to compel a smile. He can tell a story without a single word if he wants to, said Mary Cash, vice president and editor-in-chief of Holiday House, a publisher of Longs books. You almost know what a character is thinking by looking at his or her googly eyes, the expression on their faces. And Long is a bit of what youd expect from a childrens book author. He likes to goof around, and is immediately comfortable choosing his own poses when he has his photo taken holding his book over his face with his surprised eyes peeking out, or sticking out his tongue when he makes it to the page where his frog character does the same. He makes funny voices when a story hes telling dictates it. Once at dinner with his wife and children, they spotted their pose, its haunches looking like giant ears, tail like the nose of an elephant. Long immediately hopped up, drew some eyes on a post-it note and stuck them right on the cats butt, completing the picture. Thats life in the Long house, his wife said with a laugh. But Long is certainly not just all funny. Hes serious about art. Hes full of expression as he talks about his work, pulling out some more ing in its smell, knocking on the wood. He shows how spontaneity PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVERCollege Parks Ethan Long is famous for his googly eyed drawings, but thats just the beginning of his talents. Childrens book illustrator Ethan Long goes HollywoodBRITTNI LARSON Observer Staff Please see CARTOONS on page 11 Pizza & more ... rfntb rf ntbfCannot be combined with any other coupon or offer. Expires 1/1/14.ntnfrnfrr Located at the 20-20 Super Center Plaza near the corner of SR 436 and Howell Branch Rd. btbCannot be combined with any other coupon or offer. Expires 1/1/14. $2 OFF Any Sub, Chip and Large Drink purchase. Visit our tasty new Winter Park restaurant location at: 528 S. Park Avenue 407.960.7827 By Rollins College Park Avenue near Fairbanks. 2010 Firehouse Subs. This offer valid with coupon at participating restaurants. Prices and participation may vary, see restaurant for details. Limit one per customer, per visit. Not valid with any other offers. Exp. 3/31/14. Theres a new Firehouse Subs right here on Park Avenue in Winter Park. Get ready for steamin hot subs piled high with top notch meats and cheeses. ( WERE OPEN )Stop, Drop, And Roll On In. Visit FirehouseSubs.com to order online and find your nearest location. More than just a pair of googly eyes

PAGE 10

Page 10 | Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013 | Winter P ark / Maitland Observer Four quarters after enter ing their game against Temple as 17-point favorites, the UCF Knights left a game with an unexpected storyline: Stunning comeback. I told the players when they go to church tomorrow, make sure theyre in the front pew, head coach George OLeary told UCFKnights.com after the game. Somebodys looking out for them. A game after the Knights defense held off what appeared to be a certain game-winning touchdown by Houston with a fourminute of the game, the Knights allowed the Owls P.J. Walker to throw a career-high 382 yards. In the process the Owls posted their second-highest scoring game of the season. But the defense made game, forcing a Temple punt that would lead to the game-winning UCF score. The Knights will have to shake off their near-nightmare against Temple as they face a tougher team in Rutgers this week. The off a 52-17 battering by Cincinnati tied for their most lopsided loss of the year. But the more telling game for Rutgers may be the one before it on Nov. 2, when they played Temple and won by three points, just like UCF. That game had a similar signature to the Knights narrow escape. The teams traded scores the whole game. Temple had the lead gers, the favorite, had to pull off a last-second comeback to win. game against Temple Nov. 16, the Knights were narrowly holding off a demon that seems to come up once every season an unusually tough basement-dwelling team. The Knights in 2013 had largely evaded the specter of seasons past in which they lost or nearly lost to teams with only a win or two on the season. They had narrowly escaped Memconference play) Oct. 5 in a bizarre two-touchdownsin-nine-seconds comeback that ended 24-17. They had seemingly banished that ghost with a 62-17 bamboozling of UConn on Oct. 26. But a minute into the second quarter of their game against Temple, a program that hadnt won a conference game all season, the Knights were already in trouble. The Owls entered the end zone Walker to Jamie Gilmore, and the Knights suddenly were trailing a team that had lost eight games of their last nine. The Knights struck back when Will Stanback, the on-off hero of several games this season, broke free down the right sideline and blazed to a 49-yard short-passturned-long-run touchdown, and the Knights seemingly had things back in hand. But Temple had other plans, exchanging the lead with the Knights 10 times in the game, more than triple what theyd averaged this season. Only thanks to goal did the Knights go into halftime leading the game. Little did they know that two quarters later hed be doing it again, sealing an unlikely Knights comeback with a And the Knights only were at that point in the game after two highlight reel plays by wide receiver J.J. Worton that kept them within reach. His second improbable catch, diving horizontally at gers barely reaching enough to snag an overthrown bomb into the end zone, tied the game for the Knights with only a minute ARCHIVE PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERKnights QB Blake Bortles threw for 404 yards against T emple.Knights football reloads for RutgersISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff Please see KNIGHTS on page 12

PAGE 11

Winter P ark / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013 | Page 11ing touch on a piece just the act of blowing on wet ink to create a per fect splatter across the paper. He said he loves the action of making art, the moments when all his senses are engaged. And Longs childrens books start in an unexpected way. They all begin with a blank, white page, with that little bar blinking in front of him on the computer, waiting for the words. He starts by journaling, writing whatever is on his mind, just typing away. He gets everything out, and then he can begin a story. Writing out his everyday frustrations and mundane moments clear the path for creativity. I never save it, Long said. I just write it just kind of cleans me up. And then the hours of productivity start, and he is in his world. It just feels like nothing its kind of a numbing quality, because nothing bothers me, nothing matters, which is good, he said. It takes the weight off my shoulders and I dont have to think; it just takes me to another place. Its an interesting source for his sunny material, but friend and fellow childrens book author Ann Paul said his depth is what makes his work so special. He can tell a story that seems silly but theres something beneath the surface, and thats probably what makes his work so powerful, she said. They all come from a place deep inside him. PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVERLong sketches out ideas at his College P ark home. New Holiday Merchandise! Annual Percentage Yields (APYs) are accurate as of 11/14/2013. Rates subject to change at any time without prior notice. Fees may reduce earnings. Offer applies to new accounts only; Public Funds are not eligible. Account must be opened on or before December 31, 2013 to qualify. 1. Minimum opening deposit of $10,000 (up to a maximum of $500,000) will earn the disclosed rate of .60% APY for the initial 6-month portion of the term of the CD and 1.00% APY for the second 6-month portion of the term of the CD, resulting in a blended APY of .80%. Offer applicable to initial 12-month term only. CD will automatically renew to a standard 12-month CD in affect at that time at the current rate and APY. You may exercise your option to withdraw funds one time on this account during the second 6-month portion of the term of the CD, without being charged an early withdrawal penalty. You may exercise this withdrawal option within ve (5) calendar days from the last day of the rst 6-month portion of the term of the CD. If any withdrawal causes the balance to drop below the minimum opening deposit amount, an early withdrawal fee will be assessed. Additionally, withdrawals made within the rst six (6) business days after we receive your opening deposit will be subject to an early withdrawal fee. 2. Minimum opening deposit of $10,000 (up to a maximum of $500,000) will earn .75% APY. Rate applies to the rst six (6) months from opening date. Afterwards the rate will revert to the standard rates in effect, which as of 11/14/2013 are: For Personal High Yield Money Market, balances of $0.00 $99,999.99 earns 0.05% APY; balances of $100,000.00 and above earns 0.30% APY and for Business Money Market, balances of $0.00$49,999.99 earns 0.05% APY; balances of $50,000.00 $99,999.99 earns 0.15% APY; and balances $100,000.00 and above earns 0.30% APY. Maintain an average daily balance of $2,500 to avoid the $12.00 monthly maintenance fee. These Accounts are governed by Federal Regulation which limits the number of certain types of transactions; no more than six (6) transfers and withdrawals, or a combination of such to your other accounts or to a third party per month or statement cycle. Excessive transaction fee of $5.00 will be assessed for each transaction in excess of six (6) during a month. 896 1113 FloridaCommunityBank.com Florida based. Florida focused. Get Your Money Working HARDER. Limited Stop by your local FCB banking center and open your account TODAY Money Market 12-Month CD PENALTY-FREE withdrawal1 FCB JUM U P 1Blended Rate11 1.00%APY.60%APY.80%APY2 Money Market .75%APY CARTOONS | Creativity from frustration CONTINUED FROM P AGE 9 PHOTOS BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVEREatonville took the top prize with the most team walkers on Nov. 16. Mayors Sole Challenge PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERThe Bistro on P ark Ave. hosted a Flock P arty to raise money for LIbbys Legacy Breast Cancer Foundation, displaying art from 1350 W est Gallery on Nov. 13. Flamingos

PAGE 12

Page 12 | Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013 | Winter P ark / Maitland Observer KNIGHTS | W orton had miracle catchleft to go. Worton would grab 179 yards of catches in the game, a career high. would be the only offensive score of the game for which the Owls didnt have an answer. A minute goal soared through the uprights, averting what could have been a disastrous loss for the Knights. The Knights went 657 yards on offense in the game the third highest in team history. They allowed 518 yards, a more ignominious milestone allowed largely by the Knights secondary defense, which gave up 382 passing yards. But they came up with the crucial fourth quarter stop when it counted. Coming up for the Knights, two more games with wide point spreads will give them back-toback chances at polishing their gameplay against teams looking to make a statement. Against Rutgers theyll face an unfamiliar squad. The only other time the two teams have met was at the St. Petersburg Bowl in 2009, when the Scarlet Knights defeated UCF 45-24. Not a single current Knights player was on that squad, though offensive linemen Jordan and Justin McCrays older brother Cliff was a UCF left guard in the game. They kick off at 7:30 p.m. Thursday at the Bright House, televised on ESPN. CONTINUED FROM P AGE 10 of the game, but the Winter Park Wildcats edged out a berth into with a 38-35 nail-biter over West Orange on Friday night. Less than 15 seconds were left on the clock with the Wildcats driving toward the end zone bewouldnt be enough to even the score. They needed a touchdown. On a fourth down play with time nearly expired, quarterback J.P. Colton heaved a pass into double ing receiver Gabe McClary on the other end. The win gave the Wildcats an avenue into the semis against an Apopka team thats the reigning state champion in Class 8A. By the numbers the game appears to be by far the toughest challenge the Wildcats will face. Last season Apopka defeated playoffs 45-35. This season they did it by a 77-21 blowout one of the biggest blowouts in a decade in class 8A. lost to a team from this state this season, winning their 11 games by an average margin of 39 points, including four shutouts where they scored six TDs or more. The Wildcats havent played Apopka since 2008, when they lost 27-14. The Wildcats would go year en route to a regional championship runner up spot. The Wildcats will have to travel to Apopka for this one, with kickoff set for 7:30 p.m. Nov. 22. If the Wildcats can manage an upset, theyll be in to the regional championship round. VolleyballThe Winter Park girls volleyball team won a four-game thriller against Lake Mary to punctuate their rise in the big-school division over the past few years. In 2010 they didnt make the playoffs. In 2011 they bowed out in the regional championship in East Lake. In 2012 they made it all the way to the state championship match before falling in yet another to Boca Raton. Not this year. In a stacked bracket the Wildcats had three go to four games or more. The squeaked out a win, going 25-22, 17-25, 25-12, 25-20. Winter Park dominates gridiron, volleyball courtISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff Member of: LOCAL NEWS. BIG IMPACT.Subscribe now to keep up with the latest news unfolding in your community.BOGO Offer Two years for the price of one! Get one year (52 issues) of the Winter Park Maitland Observer for only $30, and youll receive a second year for FREE! Plus, as a thank you for subscribing, youll get a complimentary copy of the 2014 Winter Park/Maitland Observer 25th Anniversary Calendar in your December 26 issue! SPECIAL BOGO OFFER: BUY ONE YEAR, GET ONE FREE! Visit WPMObserver.com/Subscribe or call 407.563.7013 to order today!BOGO offer expires 12/31/13.

PAGE 13

Winter P ark / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013 | Page 13On a Monday afternoon, families from all over Winter Park enter the glass double doors of the Winter Park YMCA. Theyre families of all ethnicities and backgrounds, joining together to play sports, exercise and socialize. But some residents stop for a moment before they begin their beside the front desk plays a continuous slideshow of photos of a tiny woman with white hair and a broad smile. Moments of joy captured at birthday parties, weddings and family photos run in sequence dozens of smiles frozen in time across the face of a Winter Park resident who dedicated her life to family and her local YMCA. Winter Park resident and YMCA volunteer Mary Rumberger passed away from lung disease last month, leaving behind a legacy of generosity and dedication to supporting families in her city. Rumberger championed her local Y, serving on multiple boards and supporting fundraising efforts, lending her time and talent for more than 30 years. Mary is going to be missed, Winter Park YMCA Executive Director Bud Oliver said. Mary was one of a kindShe had the passion and was always willing to help. Winter Park YMCA as a proud parent, bringing her children to its sports programs after moving to the city in 1974. The Winter Park YMCA became a home away from home for Rumberger and her family, a place for swimming, gymFriday night spaghetti dinners. Her love for the Winter Park YMCA and its programs led her to serve as scholarship chair and board chair on the Winter Park YMCA Board. In 2001, she joined the YMCA of Central Florida Metropolitan Board of Directors, later becoming the board chair in 2006. She continued all the while to dive into annual fundraising campaigns, whether hunting down funding or coordinating events. She was a leader in a quiet way, but she could get more people to do things before you realized that you were involved, said Joan Ballard, who served on the YMCA of Central Florida Metropolitan Board of Directors with Rumberger. She was an inspiration, she was a friend, and she cer tainly leaves a huge legacy to the Y and to the community. Rumberger knew that a college education meant more opportunity for Winter Parks youth, continuously supporting the Teen Achievers program, which brings high school students to colleges to inspire them to succeed. She served as a chaperone on two college tours in 2011, hopping aboard a charter bus University of Miami, Stetson University and Bethune-Cookman University. She even provided monetary support to bring in guest speakers from different professions to motivate the students further. I see the outreach as part of her legacy, Oliver said. She was passionate about that giving back and making sure those kids had a chance. In 2005, the YMCA recognized Rumberger with the John Sterchi Award for generous lifetime ser vice, putting an exclamation mark on almost 30 years of time, love and funds given to the Y. Please see MARY on page 14Healthy Living PHOTOS COURTESY OF WINTER PARK YMCAMary Rumberger was best known for her smiling face volunteering to help residents live healthier lives.A fond farewell to the Ys quiet leaderWinter Park resident dedicated life to building familiesTIM FREED Observer Staff

PAGE 14

Page 14 | Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013 | Winter P ark / Maitland ObserverAutumn has arrived and with changes in the weather and the impending holiday season comes an important and timely tradition that should not be overlooked tagious respiratory illness that spreads mainly via droplets in the air. It spreads between people and can cause mild to severe illnesses that last one to two weeks. It can even with regular hand-washing. The best way to keep you and your family safe from the virus is Flu vaccines are designed to protect against three viruses that experts predict will be the most common in the upcoming season. The three commonly circulated viruses among people today shots are inactivated vaccines containing the dead virus and are given with a needle. The nasal spray is a vaccine made with live weakable to healthy people between the ages of 2-49 who are not pregnant. It is recommended that everyvaccine every year. It is especially important for certain people that include the following: of developing pneumonia if they medical conditions including asthma, diabetes and chronic lung disease as well as those who live with them years old Flu vaccines are constantly changing so its important to get the formulated vaccine every year. Healthy people are usually able quick but senior citizens, young children and people on the list above may have a harder time reyou from coming down with the illness, then it will also prevent the loved ones and those around you. A double win! www.centracare.org Work Well Winter Park is a movement spearheaded by the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce to improve the health and well-being of our workforce by creating lasting cultural change. Visit workwellwinterpark.org.What you should know Ask about our CHRISTMAS SPECIAL! Before Before Before Before 407.680.4263www.180DegreeFitness.com1595 Meeting Place, Orlando, FL 32814After After After AfterMy goal was to lose another 10 pounds and Monica Meier Loreen Lott Elisa Ochoa Rebekah Loweke Twice the results-half the time...Guaranteed or your money back Savannah Court and Cove Excellence in Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation 1301 W. Maitland Blvd. Maitland, FL 32751407-645-3990www.SavannahCourtMaitland.comAssisted Living Facility License No. 8447 Skilled Nursing Facility License No. 1635096 Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above. You are always welcome!A Senior Living Community where Hospitality is a Way of Life. 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com r fntbt f rtt ftbt bt bnr nr rt b bb f b tb off trtnCoupon redeemable for cash, check or credit card purchases only. Not redeemable for insurance transactions. Excludes custom/special orders & nutritional supplements. May not be combined with any other dis counts. Coupon has no cash value. MARY | Volunteer pushed for bigger pool to serve more kidsVolunteerism is wonder ful, but if its a lifetime of volunteerism like my mom, it really seems to be something special, said Molly Domin, Rumbergers daughter. ished. The lifelong YMCA supporter fought to expand her local Y even further all the way up until her passing, advocating for a new pool and parking lot for the past in local neighborhoods telling residents about how the new pool and, in turn, the community. Winter Park YMCAs goal to one. The Y had previously agreed not to expand any further, but knew that a pool and new parking lot would create more opportunities for members. Many residents pushed back against the expansion, believing that the Winter Park YMCA wouldnt stop expanding if given the opportunity. But after several years of advocacy, speaking at City Commission meetings, getting input from the community and the continued support from Rumberger, the additions were approved by the Winter Park City Commission in November of last year. The construction for the pool and parking lot nears completion, with a ribbon cutting set for Nov. 21. Since Rumbergers passing, the Winter Park YMCA now takes donations in her name and looks to put a plaque in the building in her honor. It wasnt about her, it was about how she could help, Oliver said. I think it was that way right up until the end. She was more worried about other people than she was about herself. Oliver still remembers Rumberger visiting the Winter Park YMCA like anybody else, a Winter Park resident who came to the Y three to four times a week to power walk on the treadmill. A known leader, but away from the spotlight. Never asking for recognition, just a passionate resident serving her community. CONTINUED FROM P AGE 13 PHOTO BY TIM FREED THE OBSERVER

PAGE 15

Winter P ark / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013 | Page 15 H O U S E S W A N T E D ! G e t a F R E E N o O b l i g a o n C A S H O e r O n Y o u r H o u s e W i t h i n 2 4 H o u r s (8 5 5 ) 7 5 5 1 8 1 8 w w w C i r c l e 1 8 H o m e s c o m C A S H $ $ $ Q U I C K C L O S E A N Y P R I C E R A N G E A N Y C O N D I T I O N A N Y S I T U A T I O N $10.00 OFF Initial Purchase $100 or more CANADIAN MEDS SAVE UP TO 80% on Prescription Drug PricesORDER by phone No Store Visit required Advair Benicar Celebrex Cialis Crestor Cymbalta Flomax Levitra Lexapro Lipitor Nexium Spiriva Viagra Zetia CALL for a FREE Quote! We Ship Anywhere in the U.S.A. Locally owned & operated. 744 South US Hwy 441 Lady Lake, FL 32159(352) 633-3301 WellMed accepts patients with Medicare and a select Medicare Advantage Plan*.ATTENTION MEDICARE PATIENTSWellMed is a group of doctors working as a team to help senior patients live healthier lives. *Plans vary by location and county.WellMed doctors focus on the health and well-being of Senior patients. We believe preventive care is the key to keeping you healthy and out of the hospital. We make getting quality healthcare easy. WellMed offers: On-site laboratory and other medical resources at most locations Call us rst doctors or nurses on-call 24 hours a day, 7 days a week Same-day appointments Assistance applying for Medicare Savings Programs And more Experience WellMed for yourself. Call today to meet our doctors or tour our clinic. We are here for you.Live Well. Live WellMed.407-865-5909 WellMedHealthcare.comDr. Carol A. Stewart-Francisco WellMed at Longwood 2735 W State Road 434, Ste 1031 Longwood, FL 32779AEPMEDI_AD TJ07232013 WM_AEPMediAd_WP-MObserver(10.25x8)_v2.indd 1 10/16/13 3:54 PM If you get around on Facebook at all, you may have noticed that many people are doing Days of Thanks postings leading up to Thanksgiving Day. Ive been tracking some of those and they go all the way from the sublime to the ridiculous. Some of the sublime: thanks for getting my dad back from Afghanistan, thanks for friends who stood by me in a time of great need. Some of the ridiculous: thankful that my designer bag didnt get scuffed, thankful dog person myself.) There is something in us that wants to speak of gratitude, but often we remain silent. Thats too bad. An article in the Harvard com/Harvard-mental-health) outlines how expressing thanks improves physical health. I think the problem for us is that except for the times when we hit lifes jackpots the birth of a baby, a promotion at work, receiving an inheritance, getting cured of a disease the things we could be grateful for simply play in the background of life. It is far more tempting to foness: missing a deadline, having a misunderstanding with someone, losing an item. Even if the problems are not large ones, they have a way of capturing our attention. We complain about unfairness and try to manage our way out of the circumstances. Im not trying to be Pollyannaish. Bad things do happen in life and they must be confronted. But we cant lose sight of the good things that are playing silently in the background. To do so leads us down the road of despair. In the history of America, there have been several important Thanksgiving proclamations issued by prominent leaders. The ford of Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1623, three years after the PilRock. In his proclamation, Gov. Bradford thanks God for a bountiful harvest and protection from ter in America claimed the lives of nearly half the settlers. In remembering to let the Thanksgiving playing in the background of the great national tragedy of Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln was able to call forth would not be the last word on life. If you notice Lincoln did not just thank the air, either. He thanked lead the country through its great Besides all the other health even greater. Thankfulness, when it is rooted in someone greater than ourselves give us hope greater than our circumstances. So, what am I thankful for? I dont have a whole 28 days yet, but heres a start: My dog, who is ready to ers eat your hearts out!) My family, which provides unconditional love. My church family, who walks with me on the adventure of loving our part of Winter Park. Jesus Christ, who gave me a new life. An interesting and challenging job. Whats in your thanker?Not enough days to say thank you Jim Govatos Reality Lines

PAGE 16

Page 16 | Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013 | Winter P ark / Maitland Observer at Winter Park Towers Your room is waiting for you if you need Pain and Symptom Management Hospital Follow-up Complex Treatments, or Crisis Care Referrals 866-742-6655#5019096 www.cornerstonehospice.org www.SeriousIllness.org/cornerstoneMedicare, Medicaid, most commercial insurances accepted Second Annual Health Living Expo Slated for Next February Second Annual Health Living Expo Slated for Next February Our Whole Community s (OWC) second annual Healthy Living Expo held in partnership with the City of Winter Park, has been scheduled for February 15, 2014, 9 a.m 1 p.m., at the Winter Park Community Center. Last year, more than 200 people took advantage of the demonstrations, workshops and health assess ments offered by more than 20 health-based spon sors and exhibitors. The 2014 event will feature assessments such as blood pressure and vision checks and nutrition education from the UCF Col lege of Nursing, speakers on topics focusing on Mind, Body and Spirit and health-based exhibitors and demonstrations. The attendance and positive feedback we received after our inaugural Healthy Living Expo was so encour aging, says OWC Board Chair Lavon Williams. Our goal is to create a healthy living experience that will be to be even stronger in that respect. The event is free to the public. Jason See ley, Division Chief at the City of Winter Park, says the partnership will allow the City to continue to enhance its popular health-related initiatives. For more information on the Healthy Living Expo or to volunteer or inquire about booth space please contact Our Whole Community Execu tive Director Leah Nash at owc_ed@me.com or call 407.758.5324. OWC wishes all a happy and healthy holiday season! Dont forget to stop by the Winter Park Harvest Festival this weekend and check out the mobile community garden from OWC and the Winter Park Memorial Hospital. The Winter Park Harvest Festival will be on Saturday, November 23rd from 10 am 4 pm at Central Parks West Meadow. faith-based organization that brings communities to gether to establish relationships and share resources re sulting in innovative programs that inspire, motivate and educate individuals in their pursuit of optimal health. For more information on Our Whole Community, please visit ourwholecommunity.org. Our Whole Community is pleased to contribute monthly to the Winter Park Observer. Email owc_ed@me.com for inquiries about OWC. After almost 35 years of cooking, Ive had my share of Thanksgiving Day disasters! Here are some secrets to saving your sanity and your Thanksgiving dinner: HOW TO DEFROST A TURKEY Youll need at least 24 to 48 pound) to thaw a frozen turkey in the refrigerator. If you need to do a quick thaw, place the wrapped, frozen turkey in your kitchen sink or a large container like an ice chest. Cover the turkey with water every half-hour because as the bird thaws out, the water will get warmer. Using this method, the turkey will thaw at the rate of about a half-hour for each pound. PREPARING THE BIRD FOR COOKING Remove the giblet package from inside the cavity of the bird and check the neck cavity. Some manufacturers place the giblet package in the neck cavity and others place it inside the cavity closest to the legs. Most turkeys come with the legs already trussed or plastic bracket). If youre not going to stuff your bird, theres no need to truss the legs. Trussing an unstuffed bird hinders the hot oven air from circulating inside and around the legs. This means that the dark meat will take longer to cook and the breast meat will cook faster and probably dry out before the legs ever get completely done. THE TURKEY ISNT DONE Dont rely on the pop-up timer in the turkey, as it usually means that the breast is over cooked and the dark meat isnt done. If the dark meat isnt done, remove the wings and breast meat from the rest of the turkey, in one piece, if possible. Cover the breast and wing portion with foil and set it aside. Put the drumsticks and thigh portion of the turkey back into the oven to continue cooking until done. You can re-assemble the whole turkey and garnish it, or just cut it into serving portions and arrange it on a platter. STUFFING SAVERS wet, spread it out in a thin layer on a sheet pan so that it will dry quickly. Place it back into the oven for 5 to 7 minutes. If its too dry, add more pan drippings or chicken broth to the mixture. If you dont have any more drippings or broth, you can combine a chicken bouillon cube teaspoon of poultry seasoning, three tablespoons of butter and 1 cup of water. Cook the mixture in the microwave for 3 to 5 minutes or until it comes to a boil. Stir to combine and then add it, a little at a time, to the dressing until its moist. SOUPY MASHED POTATOES Add unseasoned dry breadcrumbs to soupy mashed potatoes to absorb any excess liquid. GRAVY RESCUE TIPS If the gravy is lumpy, pour it through a strainer into a new pan and bring it to a simmer, stirring gently. If its too thin, mix a tablespoon of melted butter with a taup to a boil and whisk in the butter mixture to thicken your gravy. If the gravy is too thick, add a little more chicken broth, pan drippings or a little water and butter to thin it out. BURNT OFFERINGS If the turkey begins to burn over immediately and continue to cook it. After the turkey is done, you can remove and discard any blackened skin and about half an inch of the meat below any burnt area. Slice the remaining breast meat, arrange it on a platter and ladle gravy over it. If your vegetables or gravy burn on the bottom, carefully remove the layer that isnt burned into another pot or serving dish. Dont scrape the bottom of the pan! If the dinner rolls are burned on the bottom, just cut off as much as you can, butter them, and fold them in half to cover the missing ends. Whipped cream is the perfect make-up for desserts that arent quite up to par. You can cut the top layer off a burnt pie and cover it with whipped cream. Hopefully, these tips will rescue you from any Thanksgiving Day disasters, but remember, its about gathering together to give thanks with the people you love not the perfect meal! Have a blessed Thanksgiving! Angela Shelf Medearis is an awardwinning childrens author, culinary historian and author of seven cookbooks. Her new cookbook is The Kitchen Divas Diabetic Cookbook. Her website is divapro.com. T o see how-to videos, recipes and more, like Angela Shelf Medearis, The Kitchen Diva!, on Facebook and go to Hulu.com. Recipes may not be reprinted without permission from Angela Shelf Medearis. 2013 King Features Synd. Inc.Dont let mishaps ruin Thanksgiving dinner PHOTO BY DANIELLE PLANK THE OBSERVER

PAGE 17

Winter P ark / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013 | Page 17 One Senior Place ... See our full Calendar of Events at OneSeniorPlace.com407.949.6733715 Douglas Avenue Altamonte Springs, FL 32714M-F 8:30am 5pmFRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22 WellCare Seminar Fri, Nov 22nd 9:30am-10:30am Mon, Nov 25th 3pm-4pm Tues, Nov 26th 9:30am-10:30am Wed, Nov 27th 9:30am-10:30am Presented by Medicare Plan Options RSVP 407.949.6723 Medicare Educational Workshop 12:30pm 2pm By Medicare Plan Options RSVP 407.949.6723 ADRC Workshop How to Survive Your Role as Caregiver 2pm -3:30pm Presented by Jerry Hamilton, MSEd RSVP 407.843.1910 MONDAY, NOVEMBER 25 Senior Club Sponsored by Family Physicians Group Every Monday, 10am 12pm November 25th Casino Day The Real Estate Specialists are IN 10am-1pm Presented by Exit Real Estate Results By Appointment Only 407.949.6714 TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 26 AARP Medicare Complete 2pm-3:30pm Presented by LTC Advisors RSVP 407.949.6722 Health Care Reform 3:30pm-5pm Presented by LTC Advisors RSVP 407.949.6722 WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 27 Bingo Bash 3pm-4pm Hosted by Orlando Family Physicians Open to the Public. Hearing Aids Users Improve Relationships & Self Image! Come Hear Why! 3pm-4:30pm Presented by Harmony Hearing Centers of America RSVP 407.949.6737 TUESDAY, DECEMBER 3RD FROM 9AM 12NOON Dementia: Everything you want to know, but were afraid to ask. Guest speakers in clude: Dr. Goodman, MD, with Compass Research; Gloria Gluskin, LCSW, with Arden Courts Memory Care Community and Jerry Hamilton with the Alzheimers & Dementia Resource Center. RSVP to 407.949.6733 HAPPY THANKSGIVING! One Senior Place will be closed for the Thanksgiving Holiday on Thursday, November 28th and Friday, November 29th. We hope you have a wonderful Holiday!Calendar of Events November 2013 shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM here should be more to life than maintenance-free living. To learn more about our community in Kissimmee, call (407) 933-1999. Whats the hardest and warmest job? Caregiving. It hits you on so many levels: heart, home, head, back muscles, social life. It starts with a warm, caring heart for a loved one. The journey calls for thousands of adjustments big and small. Relationships change, navigating the medical maze taxes the brain and patience, attending to physical needs uses muscles you didnt know you had, and the social isolation of it all adds to the challenge. November is National Caregivers Month, a month dedicated to recognizing and appreciating the caregivers among us. That does not make the journey shorter, but it does put a spotlight on one of lifes biggest challenges. In the U.S., about one of every three adults cares for someone who is ill, disabled or aged. Chances are pretty high that you or someone you know is a caregiver. As baby boomers age, caregiving is the trend. Caregiving can be checking on a friend or family member periodically to caring for a call it the 36-hour day), and everything in between. A friend or family member may need help with shopping, preparing food, transportation, housekeeping, laundry or medication. He or she may need help with feeding, dressing, bathing, reading mail or paying bills. Family caregivers provide emotional support in ways that only kin can do. One of the biggest challenges is coordinating medical care, with all its dysfunctional disparate parts. Medications are a huge hurdle, with pills that look alike when they are different and look different when they are the same, changing prescriptions, and a dizzying array of interactions and sideeffects. AARPs caregiving website aarp.org/caregiving offers tools and support to help you with the caregiving journey. In the chat room you can connect with other caregivers and pose your perplexing questions to the experts. Click on the link for you know you are a caregiver if to enjoy a humorous video laughing at the surreal twists of caregiver life. Help for caregivers comes in many forms. Home health nurses not only understand the health issues and medication, but can also assess the psychological and social needs and make recommendation for care and resources. Your employer may have an Employee Assistance Program or senior care management services. A local care manager may help you determine what you need, identify financial options, be the neutral counselor to help the person in need express her needs, and develop a plan of care. The many local agencies on aging, such as the Senior Resource Alliance or Area Agency on Aging can be resources. In some religious congregations, parish nurses help caregivers. Working at a job and caring for someone is a tricky balancing act. One of Bill Clintons legacy legislative successes is the Family Medical Leave Act. Based on the premise that no American should have to choose between caring for family and keeping his job, FMLA provides job protection to caregivers who may be off the job for up to 60 days in a year in or der to care for a family member. Not everyone is eligible for this benefit, but it is worth investigating your options. We are all connected as humans and need one another; caregiving is natural for many of us. Caregiving can also be its own reward. What can be more fulfilling and meaningful than helping someone you care about? The rewarding challenges of caregiving Dr. Nancy Rudner LugoHealth Action

PAGE 18

Page 18 | Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013 | Winter P ark / Maitland ObserverCurrent New Sculptures in Orlando The City Beautiful In the past week the visual image of Orlando, already called the City Beautiful, was public sculptures were unveiled throughout the city. Last week Mayor Buddy Dyer dedicated a sculpture honoring the Tuskegee Airmen outside the Orlando Science Center and then illuminated the much-upgraded Tower of Light at City Hall. This week, the festivities included the unveiling of eight new See Art Orlando sculptures around downtown Orlando. Then Nov. 19 saw the the Urban Art Museum on Mills Avenue. Countless communityminded corporations and individuals are to be thanked for this unprecedented unveiling of creativity. For now, lets celebrate the extraordinary new art and the people who inspire us by making the City Beautiful ever more deserving of that beautiful title. Now through Nov. 24 Orlando Museum of Arts F estival of T rees The holiday season in Orlando begins with the annual Festival of Trees, running through Nov. 24 as the Council of 101 transforms the Orlando Museum of Art into a holiday wonderland. Gener ous Florida businesses, clubs, and designers sponsor trees and decorations to be auctioned off, making this one of the Museums biggest fundraisers of the year. This is sculpture of a different sort and not-to-be-missed. Call 407-896-4231, ext. 254, or email councilof101@aol.comNow through Dec. 14 Crazy for Gershwin at the Winter Park Playhouse The creatives at the Winter Park Playhouse often create a musical based on the work of a great composer or performer. Their newest effort is Crazy for Gershwin A Tribute to George & Ira Gershwin. Running through Dec. 14, this tribute to the Gershwins sung by some of the best voices in Florida reminds us of the unbelievable number of songs created by this all-American duo including Embraceable You, I Got Rhythm, Someone to Watch Over Me, and SWonderful! Who could ask for anything more? Call 407645-0145 or visit winterparkplayhouse.orgNov. 22 Beethoven Sonatas to be performed by Leonidas LipovetskyCritically acclaimed since his debut recital at age 12, Leonidas Lipovetsky will perform the third Josh Garrick Culture worthy of your calendar Please see CULTURE on next page FESTIVAL OF TREES CRAZY FOR GERSHWIN

PAGE 19

Winter P ark / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013 | Page 19 rfntbbbrb rfntbff fbbfft ft rbtf bffrff rbrbt bfrtrrb tbf ntrt ttrr tbt ttttr tttrtrtf bft rtft rrfrfntfb rbrbbbrfr rfnrtbrn CULTURE | In the mood for a more whimsical holiday tale? T ake your kids to Seussical the Musical, Jr.in a series of eight performances of all 32 Beethoven Sonatas on Nov. 22. Presented by the Florida International Piano Competition, Lipovetsky has recorded for the BBC, Radio Moscow, and PBS; Van Cliburn Scholarship; and he taught at Florida State University. Lipovetsky will perform Sonata No. 2; Sonata No. 7; Sonata No. 19; Sonata No. 20; and Sonata No. Shakespeare Center in Orlando. piano.orgNov. 22 and 23 Seussical the Musical, Jr. being transported to the Circus McGurkus, where the Cat in the Hat narrates the story of Horton, the elephant who discovers the tiny people called the Whos. The story tells how the powers of friendship, loyalty, and family are challenged and emerge triumphant! Performed by members of the Children & Youth Arts Program at Central Florida Commuthe Musical Jr. will be presented on Nov. 22 and 23 at 7 p.m. at the Cornerstone Charter Academy in dren age 3 and younger are free). Visit cfcarts.com CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS P AGE Please see CULTURE on page 20 LEONIDAS LIPOVETSKY SEUSSICAL This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORG @EnzianTheater Cult Classic: GET SHORTY Tues 9:30 PMHELD OVER!Cast | Chiwetel Ejiofor, Benedict Cumberbatch, Paul Giamatti, Brad Pitt 12 YEARS A SLAVE Fri, Sat, Sun 3:30 PM, 6:45 PM, 9:45 PM Mon 6:30 PM, 9:45 PM Tues 6:30 PM Wed, Thurs 6:30 PM, 9:45 PM 22nd ANNUAL BROUHAHA FILM AND VIDEO SHOWCASE A Short Film Celebration of Florida Filmmakers Sat & Sun 11 AM & 1:15 PM 4 Unique Programs Only $5 or $10 Showcase Pass

PAGE 20

Page 20 | Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013 | Winter P ark / Maitland Observer Central Florida Zoo & Botanical Gardens Citizens Bank City of Longwood Elevation Health Lake Mary Chiropractic The Orlando Sentinel South Seminole Hospital United Legacy Bank WasteProJoin us November 23 & 24, 2013Always the Weekend Before ThanksgivingHours: Saturday: 9:00am to 5:00pm & Sunday: 9:00am to 4:00pmLocated in Historic Longwood just west of the Hwy 434/427 intersection.For more information, call: 407-331-7354 Free AdmissionFree Parking (Kids 8 and under) for Historical Preservation: 407-331-7354 italiokitchen.com rfntrbr 276 South Orlando Ave., Winter Park, FL 32789Italio is a modern Italian kitchen created with freshness in mind. Every meal is completely customizable and handcrafted in our open kitchen with only the finest and freshest ingredients. We believe in fast, flavorful meals. And we believe great food shouldnt break the bank.Winter Park WITH PURCHASE OF AN ENTREE Coupon is required. Coupon cannot be combined with any other offer. One coupon per person, per visit. FREE CALAMARIExpires: 12/31/2013 | Code: WPMO5 CULTURE | W ant a fuller Thanksgiving? Volunteer to give out meals!Nov. 27 Lake Mary/ Heathrow 4th W ednesday Art StrollAdd 4th Wednesday to the days of the month given over to an art and wine walk this one at Colonial Town Center in Lake Mary. In addition to loads of original art, this family friendly nesses offering free wine samples as we Art Stroll. Presented by the Colonial Townpark Mer chant Association and Art for All Spaces, you can begin your stroll at 951 Market Promenade Ave. in Lake Mary. Visit facebook.com/ events/322832001195022/ or call 407-450-2255. Nov. 28 Thanksgiving Day Golden Corral hosts 25,000More than 25,000 meals will be served at the Salvation Army Gymnasium at 440 W. Colonial Drive on Thanksgiving Day as Golden Corral offers its 21st annual Helpings from the Heart Thanksgiving Dinner. For 21 years Eric Holm, president of Metro Corral Partners, has given back to the community, returning the favor to The Salvation Army, which provided a Thanksgiving meal to the Holm family when he was a child. We feel blessed that we can not only share in the experience, but most importantly ensure our Central Florida community is fed, Holm said. All are invited, and more than 1,000 volunteers are needed to help serve the free meals, which begin at 11 a.m. and are served through 5 p.m. Please pass this information along to any who needs it, and should you wish to volunteer at the event, please call 407-4238581. Nov. 30 Home for the Holidays with the Orlando Philharmonic The Orlando Philharmonic will call out the troops for their annual Home for the Holidays concert featuring The Holiday Singers, Florida Opera Childrens Chorus, dancers, bagpipers, aerialist Amanda Cariotto and the Orchestra! In two perfor mances, on Nov. 30 at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. at the Bob Carr PAC, Home for the Holidays will include seasonal favorites such as The Little Drummer Boy, along with classical selections and a special perfor mance of Twas the Night Before Christmas. Concert attendees are encouraged to bring a food item to help restock the Second Harvest Food Bank. Call 407-7700071 or visit OrlandoPhil.org CONTINUED FROM P AGE 19 SEEAR T ORLANDO HELPINGS FROM THE HEAR T Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906.

PAGE 21

Winter P ark / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013 | Page 21Statistics reveal that almost 80% of women suffer from some kind of hor monal imbalance resulting in a slew of physical and mental health challenges. But what comes to mind when we think of hormones? Menopause? Pregnancy? That time of the month? The truth is, our hormones contribute continually to numerous functions in the body, including heart rate, body temperature, blood quality, respiration, and bone health. It is simply too difficult to separate a hormones from overall physical health. But hormones do more than just keep our bodies fully functional. They are our internal GPS. They help us tap into our very best self. This is possible when we sync up our hormonal blueprint and let it guide the way. When our hormones are out of whack, everything is affected. Symptoms range from acne, dandruff, headaches, cramps, exhaustion, digestive problems, irregular or painful periods, weight gain, anxiety, insomnia, low libido, inexplicable food cravings to mood swings and irritability and depression. So what causes hormonal imbalances? 1. Internal imbalance. Problems with elimination, poor liver and thyroid health, lack of appropriate nutrients and roller coaster blood sugar levels all can result in hormonal imbalances. Digestive health tops the list followed closely by erratic blood sugar levels. When we understand our bodys requirements, we can meet them and maintain hormonal balance. 2. External toxicity. Hormones in meat and dairy, pesticides in food, chemicals in cosmetic products, toxic household cleaning products, disinfectants, dry cleaning fluids, BPAs and PCBs, lead in paints and other dirt in our air and water affect our hormonal health significantly. Its always a good idea to use safe, chemicalfree household cleaning and cosmetic products. Herbs like cilantro and parsley are great for getting rid of heavy metals and other toxins in the body. 3. Stress. Stress triggers a specific set of hor mones that wreck havoc on our bodys delicate infrastructure. In even a mildly stressful situation, the brain will tap into our progesterone reserve to counteract the building anxiety. Most stress today is caused by non-life threatening situations and yet we constantly fall victim to this enormous hormone disruptor. What if you could learn some ways to tame the monkey mind and operate from a calmer space? 4. Rejecting our femininity. A majority of women learn early in life to hate their bodies and period. Truth is our cycle offers a perfectly systematic blueprint that can guide you towards a healthy, productive, creative lifestyle. Its really time to embrace, heal, nurture and celebrate every aspect of our femininity. A life of vitality, freedom and happiness is possible if you can understand the wisdom of your body and monthly cycle. So whats keeping you? Which of these four is contributing to an imbalance in your body and mind right now? Puja Madan is a womens health coach, writer and speaker. She has received her training from the world-renowned Institute for Integrative Nutrition, New Y ork. Puja offers powerful health and wellness programs for young women, in person or online, empowering them through healthier food and lifestyle choices. Puja practises Y oga and meditation daily and believes that all inner growth starts with a love affair with oneself! For more information visit www.innerscientist.com or www.facebook.com/ innerscientist

PAGE 22

Page 22 | Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013 | Winter P ark / Maitland Observer King Features Weekly ServiceNovember 18, 2013 EDITORIAL CARTOON In my heart, I think a woman has two choices: either shes a feminist or a masochist. Gloria Steinem My life abruptly changed with the birth of my daughter in 1970. Having a child was challenging enough but having a daughter prompted my asking myself, Would I raise this child, my daughter, differently if she were male? I probably did not articulate that question then as clearly as I do today, but I quickly determined that I wanted for her whatever she could imagine. I came of age in the 1960s and I am grateful for that. I was privileged to have a mother who saw no limits to what she could personally achieve. Her example, no dent, intelligent, creative, independent and witty women have been an integral part of my life. I applaud these qualities and believe they are an essential part of a womans femininity. The 1960s and s had feminism move to the front of the national conscience and conversation. Americas daughtersawakenedwerent going to take it anymore and in an effort to institutionalize the new reality, an effort was made to achieve a constitutional amendment assuring equal rights for women. In 1972 both houses of Congress passed The Equal Rights Amendment which read: Equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex. Radical, huh? I jest. What happened next is important because of its relevance to todays political landscape. The amendment was well on its way to national approval when Phylorganized Americas rightwing base to this dubious achievement through fear and deceit. Former U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright suggests, There is a special place in hell for women who do not help other women. Move ahead to today and you have a Republican Party that is consistently losing national elections, in part, because it is losing the female vote. What triggered this column was a recent announcement by three Republican women creating a new companyBurning Glass Consulting to communicate smarter about the Republican message to women. I laughed out loud when I read this. Republican message to women? What exactly might that be? What would prompt any woman, of any age, to identify with the Republican Party? Uh, Check your brain at the door, Maam? Nationwide, Republicans fervently oppose reproductive freedom for women. They consider a woman incapable of deciding for herself if and when she will become pregnant. Republican state legislatures nationwide, if left to their own devices, intrusively insert themselves into probe bill). They will restrict access to birth control. Women, according to Republicans, do not have the ability or evidently the right to own and manage their own bodies. Any number of issues that have a direct impact on Americas women, Republicans oppose, whether it be the SNAP program, the environment or access to healthcare. I marvel that any woman would publicly align herself with the Republican Party. If, as a woman, you prefer the boot heel of oppression on the back of your neck, todays GOP is just the Boys Club for you. As the early American feminist Sarah Grimk observed, I ask no favors for my sex. All I ask of our brethren is that they will take their feet from off our necks.The choice is yours, woman Jepson is a 27-year resident of Central Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.US College when I was a boy. Junior year in high school I asked him, What is the greatest university in the United States? Harvard, he answered. Thats where I want to go, I said. Getting there involved more than wishing. I took competitive examinations, and afterwards a representative from Harvard came to see my family one evening in Winter Park. The result was a full scholarship, a necessity for me in those Depression days. Harvard has played a great part in my life since my graduation in 1942. Now, I learn that the lad across the street, son of good friends, has received a letter from Harvard asking him if he would like to apply for entrance. I told my b.w. with a smile, Maybe Har Park this time! How I wish I could relive those four years! And I wish neighbor Henry, God speed. The Pilgrims landed at Plymouth Rock in 1620. Sixteen years later Harvard! forever by answering the question, What time is it? with, You mean now? In my whole life I dont think I have said anything any more beautifully to the point than did Yogi! Armistice Day, reminds us of the many wars in which this country has invested wealth and blood. We have fought to save and to serve millions of people, but we have never taken one square-foot of their land. The day after Pearl Harbor, I took the subway to Boston and joined the U.S. Navy. By late spring, I was in uniform at Notre Dame University, and then Northwesterns downtown Chicago campus. Later, Commander Gene Tunney, the great boxer, handed me my Ensigns commission, and I was off to the wars as returned to civilian life in January of 1946. Veterans Day brings back my memories in full living color. Im glad that I served and Im also glad I survived. I lost a lot of friends in the war, guys who will always remain young in my memories. Both the enemy countries, Germany and Japan, are now staunch allies and friends, so what was it all about anyhow? In the world on that good people could not tolerate, and we were good people with enormous power to wage war and put things right. Thank God the good people were stronger than the bad! I had that uneasy feeling again, the same kind of feeling I had when I heard of FDRs death, the shooting of JFK, and now, the unending bald-faced lies of a president who scares me with intimations of things that would perhaps serve some purposeful plans of his own but, that also might bankrupt our great nation. Once again I able to control my own destiny and am simply treading water until there is some solid ground under my feet. I feel as lacking in resolution as T.S. Eliot when, in The Lovesong of J. Alfred Prufrock he cannot decide whether or not to peel a peach. Mr. Obama seems to think that our health care, which is one-sixth of our economy, can be manipulated to address almost anything he may have in mind. As I never feel that he is talking straight to me, I am at a loss to anticipate his end me, You can keep your doctor if you want him, and your insurance if it suits you, period! Those are pretty simple words. But can I count on them to mean what they say? The presidents compulsion to inter pret everything he tells us puts a second spin on most of his utterances. Off we go Ive that old feeling again!That old feeling again About Roney: HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney) Letters to the editorSend your thoughts (400 words or less) to Managing Editor Isaac Babcock at ibabcock@turnstilemediagroup.com THE WEST WINTER P ARK TALKSYears before East Winter Park decided to spend $90,000 on a marketing consultant, a whitemale graduate marketing instructor, community activist, and Rollins College alum, inspired by his parents and a couple of relatives, wondered to himself how he could help West Winter Park a predominantly AfricanAmerican community promote and preserve its historic brand, and offer free scholarships to give the areas youth a leg up in life. And, for added measure, why not showcase what makes Winter Park special, and appoint a mayor and vice mayor? OK, breathe in and out... have a seat... relax. This isnt what you think it is. And it certainly wont cost West Winter Park $90,000. The idea would be to accept a conditional donation, from this white male, of time and expertise for a one-year period only. Parttime, of course. In fact, thats what a group of West Winter Park leaders have been mulling over for quite some time. Should Rev. A. C. Cobb of Mt. Moriah Church be appointed Honorary Mayor of West Winter Park an honorary title with dignity and respect. And should appointed Honorary Vice Mayor to one year and ineligible to be Honorary Mayor per his personal wishes). Mr. Graves conceived of the entire idea and would be donating ample time and exper tise for free in keeping with the tradition of his family members who played major national roles in helping African-Americans groundbreaking preservationist Barbara Drew Hoffstot, and JFKs Deputy Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach who later became an I.B.M. director. Will Graves would donate Will Graves Scholarships taught by himself on self-improvement topics based upon his 13 years of university teaching experience improvement newspaper columnist in a town with three times the population of Winter Park. He would also work on a stretch-goal of using his national business networking ties to try to attract an I Have A Dream Foundation grant. If Will Graves is willing to try to obtain free college educations for every West Winter Park child who graduates from high school, what have you got to lose except ignorance? The titles are ceremonial. We ing legislation. Its all about respect for West Winter Park residents. Will Graves Donor Will Graves Scholarships Commemorating the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington Opinions Chris Jepson P erspectivesLouis Roney Play On!

PAGE 23

Winter P ark / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013 | Page 23Opinions Schuberts music is as entrancing in Winter Park, Fla., as in Vienna, Austria, where his genius graced the landscape for a mere 30 short years. On Nov. 17, the Bach Festival Guest Artist Series presented the Mir String Quartet, resident artists at the University of Texas, in an all-Schubert program in Tiedtke Hall at Rollins College. Schubert Quartet No. 12 in C minor pact gem of writing and remains, like Schuberts famous Eighth SymSchubert was one of the great masters of melody, and his amicable tunes marked the programs entirety. The 12th Quartet set the tone for the afternoon with melodious inspiration. The Mir Quartet of world-class players approached virtuosic perfection and reached it convincingly. String Quartet in E Major Op. 125 No. 2 brought four crystal-clear instrumental voices that gave full meaning to Schuberts compositional form and myriad winning tunes. Cheerful, immaculate The programs second half brought the well-known String Quar tet No. 14 in D minor, known worldwide as Death and the Maiden. This music is Schubert at his most mature, and the hearer can anticipate here predictions of Beethovens profound inventions that were to come. The rapidity of the Mirs performance in the last movement of the quartet made one wonder if they could maintain the speed in the even faster tempo of the coda, which ends the Quar tet. They did! Winter Parkers can be grateful indeed to be able to hear at their own doorstep of the Mir Quartet, with its ineffably beautiful performance. The audiences standing and cheering expressed enormous, well-deserved gratitude. An afternoon to remember! Autumn is a great time to visit one of District 5s many outdoor recreational amenities that include hiking and bike trails, environmental lands, community parks, and historical sites. You are only a few minutes drive from many of these great facilities regardless of where you live in the district. One of my favorite Orange County parks is the Fort Christmas Historical Park located 2 miles north of East State Road 50 in Christmas on Fort Christmas Road. The site dates back to Dec. 25, 1837, when a force of 2,000 U.S. Army troops and Alabama Volunteers established the fort during the Second Seminole War. Today, the park contains a recreation of the original 19th century fort along with several restored Florida Cracker style homes and a historical depiction of the school and farms used by the areas early settlers. The site hosts one of the most attended community events in District 5, Cracker Christmas. Thousands of to the park to take part in food, crafts, and living history demonstrations of 19th century life in Christmas. I hope youll join me this Dec. 7 and 8 for this years Cracker Christmas celebration. District 5 has thousands of acres of environmental lands available to the public for hiking, birding, camping, horseback riding, and other outdoor activities. These lands contain many of the habitats that are representative of Central Floridas ecology, including freshwater marshes, oak hammocks, pine domes, riverine swamps, and forested wetlands. The largest of District 5s environmental lands is the Hal Scott Preserve preserves main trailhead is located 2 miles north of the Beachline on Dallas Boulevard. The preserve is an 8,000-acre parcel that protects a large portion of the Econlockhatchee River. The preserve is an excellent location for hiking and birding and includes primitive campsites for those seeking to enjoy the natural beauty of the area overnight. Immediately adjacent to the Hal Scott Preserve is Long Branch Park, an area that preserves the habitats associated with the Long Branch Tributary of the Econlockhatchee River. Orange County also operates Pine Lily Preserve, which is approximately 431 acres in size and is located next to Hal Scott Preserve and Long Branch. On the northern side of District 5, the 4,608-acre Charles Bronson State Forest awaits with many great trails for both hiking and horseback riding. Savage/Christmas Creek Preserve is a 1,126acre parcel that was acquired by Orange County in 1999. Future plans call for an active park site that will be located on 229 acres of the parcel that is located on East State Road 50. The parks are a symbol of Orange Countys commitment to establishing wildlife corridors that ensure that native Two paved trails, the Cady Way Trail and the Little Econ Greenway, stretch 14.4 miles across District 5 and provide recreation for many East Orange County residents. The Little Econ Greenway currently extends 7.9 miles from the intersection of Alafaya Trail and Lokanotosa Trail through Blanchard Park and eventually ending on Forsyth Road. The trail features riverside recreation, picnicking, wildlife watching and canoeing. The Cady Way Trail is a 6.5-mile paved corridor that links Orlando and Winter Park, and connects with the Cross Seminole Trail in Seminole County. Orange County will be expanding the trail system to link the Cady Way and Little Econ trails together, as well as provide trail access to the University of Central Florida, the Cross Seminole Trail system, and the city of Oviedo. District 5 has several community parks available for many types of outdoor activities. Bithlo residents can enjoy the Bithlo Community Park. The park, also the site of the Bithlo Community the recently opened Bithlo Splash Pad. Goldenrod Park on East Aloma Drive includes a playground, tennis court, small pavilion, restroom facility, and an Orange County Orlando Magic Recreation Center. Although not located within District 5, Blanchard Park is a great facility located minutes from many District 5 residents between Dean and Rouse roads. The park straddles the beautiful Little Econ River with canoeing, picnicking facilities, and a trailhead for the Little Econ Greenway. District 5 is home to many great parks, environmental lands, and recreational amenities that set it apart from the rest of the county. I hope youll take advantage of many of these facilities available in District 5. It is an honor to serve as your District 5 commissioner. If you have any questions or concerns about Orange Countys parks and environmental lands please log on to the Orange County Parks aspx. My staff and I are also available to answer any questions you may have. We can be reached at 407-836-7350 or by email See you at Cracker Christmas this Dec. 7 and 8!Miro String Quartet wows at Bach F estT is the season for Cracker Christmas King Features Weekly ServiceNovember 18, 2013 EDITORIAL CARTOONS T ed EdwardsCommissioners Corner LOUIS RONEY Observer columnistThe Miro Quartet of world-class players approached virtuousic perfection and reached it convincingly Join me Dec. 7 and 8 for this years Cracker Christmas

PAGE 24

Page 24 | Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013 | Winter P ark / Maitland Observer

PAGE 25

Winter P ark / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013 | Page 25

PAGE 26

Page 26 | Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013 | Winter P ark / Maitland Observer

PAGE 27

Winter P ark / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013 | Page 27

PAGE 28

Page 28 | Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013 | Winter P ark / Maitland Observer

PAGE 29

Winter P ark / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013 | Page 29

PAGE 30

Page 30 | Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013 | Winter P ark / Maitland Observer

PAGE 31

Winter P ark / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013 | Page 31

PAGE 32

Page 32 | Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013 | Winter P ark / Maitland Observer

PAGE 33

Winter P ark / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013 | Page 33

PAGE 34

Page 34 | Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013 | Winter P ark / Maitland Observer

PAGE 35

Winter P ark / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013 | Page 35

PAGE 36

Page 36 | Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013 | Winter P ark / Maitland Observer

PAGE 37

Winter P ark / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013 | Page 37

PAGE 38

Page 38 | Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013 | Winter P ark / Maitland Observer

PAGE 39

Winter P ark / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013 | Page 39 SATURD AY 12-3 NEW LISTING! TOWNHOME IN TERRIFIC LOCA TION 2211 Hawick Lane, Winter P ark. 3BD/2.5BA, 1,744SF. Gourmet kitchen with granite countertops, stainless appliances, pantry and breakfast bar. Great room with 10 ft. ceilings, lighted archways, porcelain tile floors and surround sound. New AC and exterior paint. French doors open to brick pavered patio and fenced courtyard. $325,000 SATURD AY 1-4 SP ACIOUS FAMIL Y HOME 5512 Chenault Avenue, Orlando. 4BD/3BA, 2,649SF. Home offers kitchen with an eat-in area, large family room with a wood burning fireplace, split bedroom plan, 2 car attached garage, large screen porch with the beginnings of a summer kitchen, plenty of room for a pool. Also, a 440SF heated & cooled workshop/storage room in back of attached garage. $204,900 SUND AY 12-3 NEW LISTING! CONTEMPORARY HOME WITH POOL 1736 Barcelona W ay, Winter P ark. 4BD/3.5BA, 3,371SF. P ool home with detached 1/1 guest house in Sevilla. T wo large master suites, large loft, soaring ceilings, wood-burning fireplace, laundry Sunday, November 24th 1955 King Arthur Circle, Maitland FL 32751 4 BR | 3 BA | 3,195 SF | $650,000 Fabulous Maitland pool home in soughtafter Kings Row neighborhood! Gorgeous eat-in kitchen, private master suite, cozy den off the living room and crown molding. Huge family room offers a wall of built-ins around the fireplace, vaulted ceilings and French doors that lead to the pool area. Great central location, just minutes to the Famers Market at Lake Lily and Downtown Winter P ark! Hosted by: Debbie T assell from 1-4 PM 2350 T emple Drive, Winter P ark FL 32789 4 BR | 4 BA | 2,006 SF | $450,000 Gorgeous Winter P ark home featuring a formal living room, office with pocket doors, and kitchen with breakfast bar open to the dining room area. The spacious family room features a fireplace, built-ins and two sets of French doors that lead to the covered patio and fenced backyard. Gorgeous finishes throughout including crown molding, wood floors and plantation shutters! Bonuses include a guest suite above the detached two car garage. Hosted by: Kelly L. Price from 1-4 PM 812 Nottingham Street, Orlando FL 32803 2 BR | 2 BA | 1,164 SF | $237,000 Adorable bungalow in Orwin Manor! Oversized windows draw in the natural light and provide unobstructed views of the serene shaded yard. Recent updates to the kitchen include butcher block counters and stainless steel appliances. Relaxing master suite offers an updated bath with slate floors, new soaking tub, separate shower and updated fixtures. Additional features include cypress wood floors, new A/C unit and electrical panel. Fantastic location, just minutes to shopping, dining and entertainment! Hosted by: T iffany Prewitt from 1-4 PM 219 Flame Avenue, Maitland FL 32751 4 BR | 2.5 BA | 3,430 SF | $425,000 Stunning ranch style home nestled in a OBSER VEROpen Houses OBSER VERJust Sold Homes ANNOUNCEMENTSPublic Auction:Multiple Companies Online & Onsite Saturday, Nov 23 at 10am 5553 Anglers Ave, Bldg 4, Dania Beach, Fl 33312 Vehicles, Computers, Office Furniture, Office Equipment, Dymo Drills, P aint Machine, W arehouse Items and more!Visit www. moeckerauctions.com for details Moecker Auctions (800) 840-BIDS. $100 ref. cash dep.15% -18%BP Subj to confirm. AB-1098 AU-3219, Eric Rubin Public Auction: Exclusive Millwork Inc.December 3rd at 10am Preview: 12/02 10-5pm 3277 SE 14 Ave, Fort Lauder dale, Fl 33316 Huge Inventory of Doors, Frames, Accessories & Machinery. www. moeckerauctions.com Moecker Auctions (800) 840-BIDS $100 ref. cash dep.15% -18%BP Subj to confirm. AB-1098 AU3219,Eric Rubin Winter P ark Benefit Shop140 Lyman Ave, Winter P ark needs items to sell: clothing, bedding, jewelry, kitchenware and bric-a brac. Also needing volunteers. Contact Elizabeth Comer 407-647-8276. Open T ues & Fri at 9:30am; Sat 10am-1pm. All proceeds support childrens programs & the Or lando Blind Association.HELP WANTEDDriver T rainees Needed NOW!Become a driver for W erner Enterprises. Earn $800 per week! Local CDL T raining. 1-877-214-3624.Now Hiring: OTR CDLA Drivers New P ay P ackageand $2500 Sign-On Bonus! Mostly 5-10 days out, full benefits, achievable bonuses. Call for details 1-888-378-9691/ apply at www.heyl.netMISCELLANEOUSAIRLINE CAREERS begin here Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance T echnician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769 THEMARKE T PLA C E MindGym November 18, 2013 150 E. Robinson Street Unit 3207, Orlando, FL 32801 sold by Kelly L. Price & P amela Ryan 4213 Cardinal Boulevard, Wilbur-ByThe-Sea, Florida 32127 sold by Renee Dee Morgan 2161 Forrest Road, Winter P ark, Florida 32789 sold by Rhonda Chesmore 1665 Comanche T rail, Maitland, FL 32751 sold by Mary Ann Steltenkamp 2414 Summerfield Road, Winter P ark, FL 32792 sold by Sherri Dyer 150 E. Robinson Street Unit 3010, Or lando, FL 32801 sold by P amela Seibert T rish Sanders 91 Sunrise Lane, Eustis $154,000. 11/12/2013 The Nancy Bagby T eam 1631 Summerland A ve, Winter P ark $849,250. 11/12/2013 Allison Chambers 810 N Phelps A ve, Winter P ark $430,000 11/13/2013 Ann Lee Ann Lee 3889 Water view Loop, Winter P ark $150,000. 11/13/2013 MaryStuart Day /Megan Cross 1760 T ippicanoe T rl, Maitland $225,000. 11/14/2013 Cindy Kuykendall 635 Dunblane Dr, Winter P ark $314,000. 11/15/2013 Catherine DAmico 820 Mayfield A ve, Winter P ark $987,000. 11/15/2013 The Nancy Bagby T eam 1215 Via Del Mar, Winter P ark $490,000. 11/15/2013 Catherine DAmico 250 Carolina A ve #206, Winter P ark $325,000. 11/18/2013 Shirley Jones 19737 Strathaven Road, Winter P ark $230,000. 10/15/2013 lovely Maitland neighborhood situated on stunning park-like lot. Features include a large eat-in kitchen, family room with fireplace, wet bar, and bright Florida room that leads out to a beautifully pavered patio. Enjoy relaxing in the lush backyard near the waterfall and pond! Hosted by: Erica Sears from 1-4 PM 1163 W ashington Avenue, Winter P ark FL 32789 2 BR | 2 BA | 1,263 SF | $239,500 W alk to P ark Avenue from this amazing condo! Beautifully maintained and movein ready. This ground floor unit offers an updated eat-in kitchen with sliding glass doors that lead to a small deck, open dining and living areas, and large master suite with walk-in closet. Beautiful fourseasons room adds additional living space and overlooks the nicely shaded backyard. Additional features include tile floors throughout, attached one car garage and lush landscaping. Hosted by: T eresa Jones-Cintron from 2-5 PM chute all on large landscaped lot. T wo car garage and parking pad. T ucked away at the end of a quiet cul-de-sac. SUND AY 12-3 NEW PRICE! ADORABLE WINTER P ARK BUNGALOW 340 North Phelps Avenue, Winter P ark. 2BD/1.5BA, 1,150SF. Fantastic hardwood floors throughout this charmer with an updated kitchen. Located on a beautifully landscaped corner lot. Serene open patio offers a perfect spot for entertaining. Upgrades include roof in 2005 and AC in 2008. Conveniently located and excellent Winter P ark schools. $275,000 SUND AY 1-4 TRADITIONAL POOL HOME IN IDEAL LOCA TION 451 Sylvan Drive, Winter P ark. 4BD/3BA, 3,150SF. Light and bright home wrapped in French doors that open to large covered brick patio. W et bar with wine fridge in butlers area. Split bedroom plan. Master bath has double sinks, jetted tub and separate shower. Large fenced yard with brick paver pool deck and heated spa. $699,000 NICEL Y RENOVA TED POOL HOME 1872 Jessica Court, Winter P ark. 4BD/2.5BA, 2,607SF. Upgrades to this two story home include Italian porcelain tile throughout, updated kitchen with granite countertops, stainless appliances, and Kraft maid cabinets. All windows are double insulated Hurd windows. Most lighting is LED. Brand new full house sound and music system inside and out. W aterbridge community features tennis courts and is secluded with only two entrances. $489,000 NEW PRICE! WONDERFUL IN OLDE WINTER P ARK 1551 Oakhurst Avenue. Winter P ark. 4BD+OFC/5BA. 3,854SF. Situated on a great double lot, this remarkable home offers so much! W onderfully spacious kitchen with granite countertops; Open great room floor plan with soaring vaulted ceilings; Lovely downstairs master suite; Large bonus room and 2 guest suites upstairs; Fantastic heated pool and spa; T remendous backyard and open wooden deck make it perfect for enter taining! $899,000 SOUGHT AFTER WINGFIELD 2159 Deer Hollow Circle, Longwood. 4BD/3BA. 3,100SF. Enjoy the Seminole County Lifestyle in this beautifully cared for home. W arm colors, extensive crown molding, newly re-done hard wood floors and incredible media room are just a few of the features in this Family Home. Relax in your tropical amazing screened pool area and lanai. Enjoy coming home to this beauty. $569,000 MAITLAND POOL HOME 280 White Oak Circle, Maitland. 4BD/2.5BA, 2,276SF. Lovingly well-maintained pool home in Maitland Grove subdivision close to Lake Sybelia Elementary walkway. Split plan with spacious rooms and good flow. W ood burning fireplace, built in bookshelves, inside utility and large interior storage room. Newer AC, plumbing, roof, hot water heater, and electric box. Huge screened patio over looking pool and oversized yard. $359,000 SUND AY 2-5 LARGE POOL HOME ON QUIET STREET 2006 Oakhurst Avenue, Winter P ark. 4BD/3.5BA, 3,529SF. Three way split plan on quiet street. Downstairs master suite, bonus room, family room, den/office and media room as well as an art studio. Updated bathrooms and kitchen recently remodeled to include gas appliances, double ovens, double sinks and granite counters. Large covered porch and lanai with screened pool and spa. $499,000 Nancy Bagby T eam 851 Geor gia A ve, Winter P ark $1,875,000. 10/16/2013 Maria Van W arner 150 E. Robinson Street #810, Orlando $250,000. 10/18/2013 Janis Fuller 2999 Sabel Oak, Oviedo $200,000. 10/18/2013 Kelly Maloney 137 Norris Place, Casselberry $209,900. 10/18/2013 Lisa Fleming 127 Dalton Dr, Oviedo $192,000. 10/18/2013

PAGE 40

Page 40 | Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013 | Winter P ark / Maitland Observer ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Deci sions involving your finances might seem to be foolproof. But they could have underlying risks you should know about. Dont act on anything until all the facts are in. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Youre attracted to a situation that appeals to your Bovine intellect. And thats good. But dont neglect your passionate side when romance comes calling later in the week. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) A recent development enhances that special relationship. Spending more time together also helps make the bonding process stronger. Expect news about a possible career change. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) A sus picious situation should be dealt with before it leads to serious problems. Get all the facts needed to resolve it. Then refocus your energies on those tasks that need your attention. LEO (July 23 to August 22) Try to be more open-minded in working toward a resolution of that standoff between yourself and a colleague or family member. A little flexibility now could work to your advantage later. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) You might feel a bit threatened by a proposed workplace change. The best way to deal with it is to ask questions. Youll find that those involved will be happy to provide you with the facts. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Feeling alone in a crowd during the early part of the week is an unsettling emotion. But your spirits soon perk up, putting you into the right mood to start making holiday plans. SCORPIO (October 23 to Novem ber 21) A pesky problem should be dealt with immediately so you can put your time and effort into something more important. Someone from your past could have significant news for you. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) High-energy aspects dominate, both on the job and at home. Use this time to put some long-range plans into operation. Things level off later in the week. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Even the usually gregari ous Goat might feel overwhelmed by a flurry of activities. Be patient. Things soon return to your normal social routine. AQUARIUS (January 20 to Febru ary 18) Career choices that seem too confusing to deal with at this point probably are. More information would help uncomplicate them. On the per sonal side, a friend might need your advice. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Your Piscean imagination is stimulated by possibilities you see in a new opportunity. But keep those ideas to yourself until you feel ready to trans late them into a workable format. BORN THIS WEEK: You have an ingratiating way of helping people deal with their fears. Have you considered a career in social work or with the clergy? 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. Dec. 8, 1542, in Linlithgow Palace in Scotland, a daughter is born to James V, the dying king of Scotland. Named Mary, she was the only surviving child of her father and ascended to the Scottish throne when the king died just six days after her birth. Dec. 2, 1777, legend has it that Philadelphia housewife and nurse Lydia Darragh single-handedly saves the lives of Gen. George Washington and his Continental Army. She made notes when she overheard the Brit ish planning a surprise attack and got them to Washington. Dec. 6, 1921, The Irish Free State, comprising four-fifths of Ireland, is declared, ending a five-year Irish struggle for independence from Britain. The Irish Free State was renamed Eire, and is now called the Republic of Ireland. Dec. 5, 1933, the 21st Amendment to the U.S. Constitution is ratified, bringing an end to the prohibition of alcohol. Prohibition did little more than slow the flow of booze, and bootleggers like Al Capone built criminal empires out of illegal distribution. Dec. 4, 1945, the U.S. Senate approves U.S. participation in the United Nations. The U.N. allowed world leaders to observe each other as never before, as in the 1961 incident when Russian leader Nikita Khrush chev presented a spectacle by pounding his table with his shoe for emphasis during a U.N. debate. Dec. 3, 1979, the last Pacer rolls off the assembly line at the American Motors Corp. (AMC) factory. In 1975, the ads said, When you buy any other car, all you end up with is todays car. When you get a Pacer, you get a piece of tomorrow. Today polls and experts agree: The Pacer was one of the worst cars of all time. Dec. 7, 1982, the first execution by lethal injection takes place at the state penitentiary in Huntsville, Texas. Charles Brooks, Jr., convicted of mur dering an auto mechanic, received an intravenous injection of sodium pentothal, the barbiturate that is known as a truth serum when administered in lesser doses. 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. King Features Weekly ServiceNovember 18, 2013 ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Deci sions involving your finances might seem to be foolproof. But they could have underlying risks you should know about. Dont act on anything until all the facts are in. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Youre attracted to a situation that appeals to your Bovine intellect. And thats good. But dont neglect your passionate side when romance comes calling later in the week. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) A recent development enhances that special relationship. Spending more time together also helps make the bonding process stronger. Expect news about a possible career change. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) A sus picious situation should be dealt with before it leads to serious problems. Get all the facts needed to resolve it. Then refocus your energies on those tasks that need your attention. LEO (July 23 to August 22) Try to be more open-minded in working toward a resolution of that standoff between yourself and a colleague or family member. A little flexibility now could work to your advantage later. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) You might feel a bit threatened by a proposed workplace change. The best way to deal with it is to ask questions. Youll find that those involved will be happy to provide you with the facts. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Feeling alone in a crowd during the early part of the week is an unsettling emotion. But your spirits soon perk up, putting you into the right mood to start making holiday plans. SCORPIO (October 23 to Novem ber 21) A pesky problem should be dealt with immediately so you can put your time and effort into something more important. Someone from your past could have significant news for you. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) High-energy aspects dominate, both on the job and at home. Use this time to put some long-range plans into operation. Things level off later in the week. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Even the usually gregari ous Goat might feel overwhelmed by a flurry of activities. Be patient. Things soon return to your normal social routine. AQUARIUS (January 20 to Febru ary 18) Career choices that seem too confusing to deal with at this point probably are. More information would help uncomplicate them. On the per sonal side, a friend might need your advice. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Your Piscean imagination is stimulated by possibilities you see in a new opportunity. But keep those ideas to yourself until you feel ready to trans late them into a workable format. BORN THIS WEEK: You have an ingratiating way of helping people deal with their fears. Have you considered a career in social work or with the clergy? 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. Dec. 8, 1542, in Linlithgow Pal ace in Scotland, a daughter is born to James V, the dying king of Scotland. Named Mary, she was the only surviving child of her father and ascended to the Scottish throne when the king died just six days after her birth. Dec. 2, 1777, legend has it that Philadelphia housewife and nurse Lydia Darragh single-handedly saves the lives of Gen. George Washington and his Continental Army. She made notes when she overheard the Brit ish planning a surprise attack and got them to Washington. Dec. 6, 1921, The Irish Free State, comprising four-fifths of Ireland, is declared, ending a five-year Irish struggle for independence from Britain. The Irish Free State was renamed Eire, and is now called the Republic of Ireland. Dec. 5, 1933, the 21st Amendment to the U.S. Constitution is ratified, bringing an end to the prohibition of alcohol. Prohibition did little more than slow the flow of booze, and bootleggers like Al Capone built criminal empires out of illegal distribution. Dec. 4, 1945, the U.S. Senate approves U.S. participation in the United Nations. The U.N. allowed world leaders to observe each other as never before, as in the 1961 incident when Russian leader Nikita Khrush chev presented a spectacle by pounding his table with his shoe for emphasis during a U.N. debate. Dec. 3, 1979, the last Pacer rolls off the assembly line at the American Motors Corp. (AMC) factory. In 1975, the ads said, When you buy any other car, all you end up with is todays car. When you get a Pacer, you get a piece of tomorrow. Today polls and experts agree: The Pacer was one of the worst cars of all time. Dec. 7, 1982, the first execution by lethal injection takes place at the state penitentiary in Huntsville, Texas. Charles Brooks, Jr., convicted of mur dering an auto mechanic, received an intravenous injection of sodium pentothal, the barbiturate that is known as a truth serum when administered in lesser doses. 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. King Features Weekly ServiceNovember 18, 2013 MindGym November 18, 2013 MindGym November 18, 2013 MindGym November 18, 2013 MindGym November 18, 2013 MISCELLANEOUSDISH TV Retailer.Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) & High Speed Internet starting at $14.95/ month (where available.) SAVE! Ask About SAME DA Y Installation! CALL Now! 1-800-745-2645Six day vacation in Orlando, Florida!Regularly $1,175. Y ours today for only $389! Y ou SAVE 67%. PLUS One-week car rental included. Call for details. 1-800-985-1463 PROFESSIONAL SERVICEELITE RELIABLE SERVICESDONT HAVE TIME FOR CLEANING? LET US DO THE JOB FOR YOU! 10 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE. A FAMIL Y OPERA TED COMP ANY WE ALSO PROVIDE WINDOW CLEANING AND PRESSURE W ASHING SERVICES. CALL US TODA Y FOR YOUR FREE ESTIMA TE.Find Guaranteed, Local A/C Sales & Installation Pros!800-763-7108 Air Conditioner Sales, Service and Installation. All pros are prescreened and relentlessly reviewed! Call now for a no obligation estimate! 800763-7108House Cleaning ServicesNeed your home cleaned? I am the one who can do it. Honest & Experienced. References upon request. W eekly, Biweekly, monthly. Reasonable rates. Free Estimates. Please call Brenda 321-2394403.REAL ESTATE: COMMERCIALOFFICE FOR RENT WINTER PARKExecutive office available in prestigious bank building. Approximately 10 x 12 with windows on two sides. Additional space available for assistant, now or later, at additional charge. Aloma and Lakemont Avenues. 24-hour access. Minimum one year term. Broker. $500 per month. Lou Nimkoff 407-405-3368 office@briofl.com REAL ESTATE: COMMERCIALReal Estate:CommercialAvailable for Social Occasions or Meetings, (seats 80), Goldenrod Civic Club, 4763 P almetto Ave. Winter P ark, FL 32792, 407-678-7727.REAL ESTATE: FOR SALEBACK ON MARKET! Priced to sell!8 beautiful acres originally offered at $139,900. NOW just $39,900. Fully complete community. No time frame to build. Call for more info: (888)434-9611. Gulf Atlantic Land Sales, LLC, Broker.North Georgia Mountain Land Bargain!17 Acres abuts US National Forest only $59,900. was $199,900. Gorgeous mountain top setting, gentle slope, crystal clear mountain streams. Enjoy tremendous privacy. RV friendly. Only one like this. Must see. Excellent financing. Call now 866-952-5303, x 76TENNESSEE LAND BARGAIN WITH FREE BOA T SLIP!1.70 acres meadows overlooks 140 acre Nature Preserve, streams & ponds. Only $19,900. 6.1 acre hardwoods Only $27,900. FREE boat slips. Excellent financing, little down. Call now 1-877888-0267, x446



PAGE 1

WPMOBSERVER.COM USPS 00-6186 Publisher statement on page 2 VISIT WPMOBSER vV ER.COM SS UBSCRIBE NOW! LOCAL CC AR TOONIST TURNS AUTHORLIFESTYLES, 9Knights ready for RR utgersAfter a heart-attack comeback, UCF readies for stronger foe. SPORTS, 10 AA mighty heartFriends say goodbye to woman who gave her life to the YMCA. HEALTHY LIVING, 13COMMUNITY BULLETIN ........... 8 cC ALENDAR ................... 8 LL IFESTYLES ................... 9 A THLETI c C S .................. 10 HEAL THY LIVING ............... 13 cC ULTURE .................... 18 OPINIONS ................... 21 cC LASSIFIEDS ................. 39 The Winter Park City Commission may have a new solution to the citys downtown parking woes: tapping into private parking held by businesses and landowners. City Commissioners made a dent in the citys downtown parking problem during their meeting last Monday by approving two parking projects, including the relocation of their public works building to free up 73 parking spaces in its place. The other project will restripe 75 feet of New York Avenue at new spaces. In just one month, the city has nearly reached its goal of creating 100 spots in a 12-month period, an objective set in place after a parking study earlier this year showed the city was 237 spaces short on weekdays and 280 spaces short on weekends. I hope city staff have heard from our conversation that weve got to get to the 275 number, Mayor Ken Bradley said. Its probably something more than that. I think we would be deceiving ourselves if we dont think theres a parking problem in downtown Winter Park. But another potential project may create more spaces at the cost of certain merchants along the Avenue. Winter Park resident Sally Flynn addressed the Commission for resident Vicki Krueger and suggested that businesses share their private parking spaces for the greater good of the downtown area, noting that some spaces arent being used as often as they could be. The option intrigued the City Commission, particularly Mayor Bradley. I think thats an amen to that, Bradley said. Anybody that has private parking in the downtown corridor, we need to look at how thats being utilized. Business owners stressed that the parking problem needs to be addressed to bring in more foot The Enzian Theater in Maitland is pulling back the cur tain this week and showing the public its proposed expansion plans that could nearly triple it in size and add two additional screens. Central Floridas time alternative theater is presenting preliminary plans to the city of Maitlands Development Review Committee on Thursday that would add an additional 19,500 square feet to the existing 7,150-squarefoot cinema and bar space. Enzians Executive Vice President Elizabeth Tiedtke said the expansion is something the Theaters been dreaming of for nearly 15 years the addition of new theaters allowing them to increase showings and community programming on site and could Its something ally gotten into the past year, year and a half, and now were really excited to start to turn it from a dream into a reality, she said. The current plans add two new theaters one with 80 seats, the other with 50 while keeping the existing 200-seat venue intact. The plans also add a second valet parking, and additional bathrooms. In total, Tiedtke said the additions are estimated to cost $6 million, which will be funded by community donors. Right now were bursting at the seams, Tiedtke said. Well be able to even [our programing] all out with the two additional screens. Maitland Community Development Director Dick Wells said the meeting on Thursday is for exploratory purposes to see how the plans line up with Maitlands development codes and ideals. He said no development applithe project. Public comment will be taken after the plans are presented during the meeting, which begins at 6:30 p.m. in City Hall. Tiedtke said she hopes to get the ball rolling toward construction after this weeks meeting PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVER TT he Enzian has brought stars such as EE mma S S tone with high-prole lm festivals.Enzian theater could triple in size$6 million addition could bring in bigger movies, more stars Commissioner to run for re-electionTIM FREED OO bserver S S taff Please see ENZIAN on page 2Commissioner Sarah Sprinkel was set to announce her run for re-election as a Winter Park City Commissioner Tuesday night at press time at Palmanos Trattoria and Wine Bar. When I ran three years ago, I ran because I wanted to bring the community together, Sprinkel said. Were all really looking after the community in a very positive way I think thats why I want to continue. Ive seen the products of what happens when we work together. Sprinkel originally joined the City Commission in 2011 after winning a close campaign battle with attorney Bonnie Jackson. The City Commissioner wont know whether shell be opposed for her seat until Jan. 7 when qualifying for the election ends. I have people all the time who say to me Boy, our town has never looked this good, Sprinkel said. I kind of feel that way too. Those are the things that make me want to stay for another three years. This year marks the end of Commissioner Steve Learys term as well, but hes yet to for mally announce a campaign for re-election. Winter Parks next municipal election will be Tuesday, March 11. If necessary, a primary will be held Feb. 11. TT hree more for S S prinkel?SARAH WILSON OO bserver S S taff CC ity mulls taking away private parkingCity Commission plans to add new parking in downtownTIM FREED OO bserver S S taff 407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC Winter Park Recovery CenterExecutive Drug & Alcohol Treatment Protocols 20 and 40-Week Outpatient Programs Suboxone/Subutex For Opioid Abuse Privacy and Confidentiality AssuredMedically Managed Dual Diagnosis Evidenced Based Programs2056 Aloma Ave, Suite 100, Winter Park, FL 32792 www.WinterParkRecoveryCenter.com 407-629-0413 PHOTO COURTESY OF ENZIAN

PAGE 2

Page 2 | T T hursday, NN ov. 21, 2013 | W W inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver eE NZIAN | pP AR k K ING | CC ity says some businesses not using their spacesand into early 2014. The goal, she said, is to break ground in April and have the expansion complete by the annual Florida Film Festival to be hosted there in spring 2015. In 2008, the theater expanded its dining options with installation of the popular dinner and drinks destination, Eden Bar. And more recently earlier this year, overhauled the interior of its current theater by refurbishing its dine-in seating area. Tiedtke said current operations would continue as normal during the proposed construction, as all additions wrap around the back of the building, leaving the existing areas untouched. during the crucial holiday season. Talk to people who are trying said Peterbrooke Chocolatier coowner Kevin Wray. We actually offer curbside service; were running things out to peoples cars. From November to December, thats our most critical time of the year to make our sales and pay for those slower summer months. To have parking around those times is just critical. Commissioner Carolyn Cooper saw more opportunity to free up spaces by using the municipal Blake Yard and the Swoope Water Treatment Plant parking lot, paved areas that would be ready for use in a matter of days at no cost to the city. City employees and merchants volunteering to use the lots would free up that much more space along Park Avenue for customers, Cooper said. If we have places that we can make available free of charge to the employees on the Avenue and the city employees those who might be willing to go and voluntarily park there I think we could have something that would work for everyone, Cooper said. Were all in this together, we all want the merchants to be successful. But one potential project that came one vote away from passing had residents up in arms: a proposal to pave over a portion of the West Meadow to add 12 new parking spaces. It took us a while to get that green space, Winter Park resident Marti Miller said. If you change it back to 14 spaces today, then it will be 24 spaces next year, then it will be 36 spaces. It will only grow and we will lose our West Meadow once again. Leave that green space alone. City Commissioners chose to abandon the project after discussing it further. I dont see why we would want all of this upheaval for 12 spots, Deputy Mayor Sarah Sprinkel said. The city plans to have the 73 parking spots from public works building project ready in time for the Winter Park Sidewalk Art Festival in March 2014. City Commissioners will further discuss private parking, the Blake Yard and the Swoope Water Treatment Plant parking lot at a future meeting. CCOO N TT IN UEUE D FROFRO M FRO nN T pP A GE C COO N T T IN UE UE D FRO FRO M FRO n N T p P A GE Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013 PHONE: 407-563-7000 FAX: 407-563-7099 WPMOBSERVER.COMPUBLISHERTracy Craft407.515.2605TCraft@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MANAG iI NG EDITORIsaac Babcock 407.563.7023IBabcock@TurnstileMediaGroup.comA ssoSSO C iI A teTE editorEDITOR Sarah Wilson 407.563.7026SWilson@TurnstileMediaGroup.comDESI GNGN ERTom Miller 407.563.7032TMiller@TurnstileMediaGroup.com stST AFF W ritersRITERS Brittni Larson Megan Stokes Tim Freed AA llison O O lcsvay Kristy Vickery CC OLU MNMN ISTSChris JepsonJepson@MediAmerica.usLouis RoneyLRoney@cfl.rr.comJosh GarrickJoshGarrick9@gmail.com AA DVERTISI NGNG S AA LESLinda Stern407.376.2434LStern@TurnstileMediaGroup.comL eE GA lL NotiNOTI C eE AdvertisiADVERTISI NG AA shley McBride 407.286.0807Legal@FLALegals.com subsSUBS C riptioRIPTIO N sS /C irIR C ulUL A tioTIO NLuana Baez 407.563.7013LBaez@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MeME M berBER oO F: Florida Press Association -Winter Park/Maitland/Goldenrod Chambers of CommerceWinter Park/Maitland Observer is published by Turnstile Media Group. Founded in 1990 and headquartered in Orlando, Fla., Turnstile Media Group is also the parent of Golfweek, Golfweek Custom Media, TurfNet, Professional Artist, Seminole Voice, Baldwin Park Living and Turnstile Connect.TU rR N stilSTIL E MED iI A G rR OU pPCC H AA IR MANMAN Rance CrainPRESIDE NN T/ CC EOFrancis XX FarrellV iI C eE P resideRESIDE N tsTS Patti Green & Jeff BabineauUSPS #00-6186 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:Winter Park / Maitland Observer 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835 EE stablished in 1989 by Gerhard J. WW M M unster FEATURING ... 250 North Orlando Ave. Winter Park, FL 32789407.677.9777 Duette Architella Honeycomb Shades Duette Architella Honeycomb Shades every climate...every season A Premier Flooring Source Area Rugs Window Treatments... AND MUCH MORE! KEEP UP WITH MAITLAND NEWS AND EVENTS!www.IndependenceLane.com Facebook.com/ItsMyMaitland PP HOTO BY TIM FR eeEE D THE OBSER vV ER TT he city is already ahead in its plan to add nearly 300 spaces. Orlandos Only Doggie Daycare with a Gym! Customized workouts Training Indoor warm water swimming 2826 Shader Rd. Orlando, 32808 407-295-3888 BarkingDogFitness.com Fact A lean dog lives an average 2 years longer than an overweight dog AND is healthier and happier!

PAGE 3

WW inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver | T T hursday, NN ov. 21, 2013 | Page 3The kitchen is the heart of a home, especially during the holiday seasons. Children love to be a part of meal preparations, par ticularly during these special family gathering times. So we must be observant and provide for the safety of our loved ones while preparing foods. Simply staying in the kitchen is essential, and if you must leave even for a short period of time turn off the stove. Use a timer to remind you that you are cooking. With everyone visiting its easy to get distracted. To protect little ones, set up a kid free zone around the stove and areas where hot food or drinks are prepared; around 3 feet away is good. We also want to watch out for dangling power cords for hand mixers, electric carving knives, coffee pots, and plate warmers. Remember to have oven mitts or hot pads available to help ing or voluminous sleeves when working around the stove. Remember to keep wood utensils, paper products, or towels away from the stovetop. One of latest trends in cooking a turkey involves deep-frying, whether using an electric fryer indoors or a propane gas fryer outdoors. It can be messy, and if accomplished improperly or without caution, it can be danger ous. Be sure to wear closed toe shoes, long pants or a long apron, a long sleeved shirt and have gloves handy. For starters, you will want to determine the correct amount of oil you are going to use in the cooking of the bird. Place the tur key in the pot and add water until the bird is completely covered plus 2 inches. There should be several inches of room between the turkey and top of the pot. If its too close you need a smaller bird or larger pot. Remove the tur key and measure the water, this is the amount of oil youll need for cooking. Drain the water and thoroughly dry the pot. Preparing the turkey is very important. Be sure the bird is thoroughly defrosted and all contents inside the body cavity are removed. A fresh turkey alleviates the defrost cycle. Be sure there are no pop up tender-timer devices or anything left inside the bird and the turkey is really, really dry. You dont want to witness what happens when you put water into boiling oil! Add the oil to the pot and bring it up to the recommended cooking temperature. Use a really good thermometer to get the temperature right. Once youve reached the desired temperature, be sure the turkey is completely dry and at room temperature. You should have a means of lowering the turkey into the pot that does not place you too close to the pot or burner. Turn off the burner and slowly lower the tur key or the oil will splatter. A good method is to dunk the turkey a little at a time. A couple of dunks and the turkey should be nicely settled. Turn the burner back on wander too far away; remember deep-frying a turkey goes much quicker than oven roasting. tinguisher may not be needed, but its good to have just in case. wish you and yours a happy and safety holiday season. Dennis Marshall, CET, FCO Fire Marshal Maitland Fire Rescue Dept. Maitland City TalkBY HH OWARD SS CHI eE F eE RD eE C keKE R MAYOR HH oliday cooking safety 407-659-5701 www.TrustcoBank.com*Information based on current closings. Circumstances beyond Trustco Banks control may delay closing. Please note: We reserve the right to alter or withdraw these products or certain features thereof without prior notification.Member FDICEQUAL HOUSINGLENDER RYour Home Town Bank TRUSTCO BANKFast, Local Decisions Close your First Mortgage in 30 days!*Schedule Closing Date at Application Our loans close on time!Low Closing Costs No Points and No Tax Escrow required Trustco Mortgages We Close Loans! We are large enough to give you what you want and small enough to provide it the way you want it. To learn more, please visit any of our banking centers from Orlando to Miami or call us at 1-800-435-8839.13-0089/rev090113 citynational.com Member FDIC Personal Relationships | Local Decisions | StabilityREDEFINING BANKING. 1112-1 CNwinterPrk.indd 1 11/15/13 12:11 PM Rooted & grounded in Jesus Christ. The Learning Tree is a Ministry of First Baptist Church of Winter ParkWe offer Full-Day Infant Care and Childcare Year-Round, Preschool Classes, Summer Camp, and much more! 1021 New York Avenue N., Winter Park, Florida 32789 Established in 1972 we are celebrating 41 years of service this year.

PAGE 4

JOSH GARRICK Observer Sta The brand new Italio Restaurant in a perfect location just north of the busy intersection of Fairbanks and 17-92 in Winter Park has raised the concept of fast food to a level this reviewer never thought possible, AND theyve done it with (my favorite) Italian food! And here is the essence of what I have to share with you today. This is the best food you can get for the price anywhere in Central Florida. quick-service food concept in 2012 in Boca Raton where their customers quickly accepted this stand-inline, on-thego alternative to traditional Italian dining. Italios concept offers patrons literally hundreds of options to create the ideal meal we only wish we could cook at home with each ingredient pre-cooked by the restaurant and chosen by us. One happy customer summed it up by commenting, Do you like Italian? Do you want your meal fast? Do you understand how to order at Chipotle? If so, youll like Italio. Since were residents of Central Florida, we know how to stand in line better than any other people in the world, and remembering this is fast food, you can use your time (while standing in line) to make is to be served. It can be a Pasta Bowl, Salad Bowl or a Piadina, an Italian wrap, much like a French crepe that actually has its history in ancient Roman street food. Step two offers a choice of meats such as Chicken breast (marinated in lemon-herb vinaigrette at $6.98); Meatball of ground beef and pork $6.98; Grilled sirloin steak $6.98; Grilled shrimp $8.98; Italian sausage $6.98; or the Veggie medley at $6.78. You see what I mean about the value. Step three taps into our inner-chef and challenges us with varying combinations of sauces, dressings and pestos ranging from Alfredo to traditional Pomodoro to Roasted Red Pepper pesto. The over 20 toppings, including bruschetta, chickpeas, olive tapenade and a variety of cheeses. Please keep in mind these low prices come with the traditional fast food compromises of eating from cardboard bowls with plastic knives and forks. But there is NO compromising on the food. I was proud of myself for creating a dish consisting of whole-wheat pasta, steak, fresh basil pesto, and aged, shaved Parmesan cheese and it was delicious. Thats really the whole point here. Italio allows us to eat all our favorite comfort foods, and we can do it anytime, because the prices are so low. This was witnessed as I visit there exactly one month after the restaurant opened and it was already full of happy, pasta-loving customers. All around me, people were truly enjoying their food, which speaks to the atmosphere in Italio. Its a truly happy place. ferent readers who spotted me and shared how happy they were that I would be writing about what has already become a favorite restaurant for them. The Kids Menu is even cheaper ($3.98), and I enjoyed watching an experienced family as the kids professionally pulled their noodles into their mouths. Families cannot hope for more than a beautifully designed, clean restaurant that offers fresh ingredients at affordable prices for the casual diner. And theres more. As Italio wishes to be known as a good neighbor as well as being a good restaurant, they recently initiated Mangia Mondays a month-long charitable initiative and Outreach Center (CFOC). On every Monday through May Mondays will be contributed to the Central Florida charity, which transforms lives though education and employment opportunities. In addition, Italio and CFOCs employment division are collaborating to secure job placements for members at the Winter Park restaurant. Impressive. I love the food AND I love the ease of this new concept restaurant, and since Italian is my favorite, I invite you to come over and share your thoughts when you Its so cool its like pasta has its own happy hour all day long at Italio. The Winter Park location is at 276 South Orlando Avenue and is open 7 days a week from 10:45 a.m. to 10 pm. Visit ItalioKitchen. comRestaurant Review of the NEW Italio (Winter Park) From the Corner Table

PAGE 5

Welcome to a place all about health, healing and you. The new Florida Hospital for Women at Winter Park Memorial Hospital fulfills all your needs under one roof with our onestop boutique approach for your mindbody-spirit called Full Embrace Health Care. Our network of womens physicians provides you with comprehensive womens services and the latest in wellness and health advancements, including your very own Life Designer. Its an elegant retreat, a haven designed exclusively for you. for W omen Winter Park PMS: 294 100% K 70% K Florida Hospital Font: Friz Quadrata Tag Line Font: Adobe Garamond italic C = 100 M = 56 Y = 0 K = 18 The skill to heal. The spirit to care. A ONE-STOP, BOUTIQUE CENTRE FOR HEALTH, DESIGNED EXCLUSIVELY FOR YOU.To schedule an appointment with one of our physicians or the Life Designer, call (407) 646-7999. NUTRITION UROGYNECOLOGY DIGESTIVE HEALTH MAMMOGRAPHY BREAST HEALTH ADVANCED GYNECOLOGY COMPREHENSIVE HEALTH ASSESSMENT MENOPAUSE HEART HEALTH LIFE DESIGNER BONE HEALTHMost insurance accepted.WPMH-13-15651 WPMH-13-15651 Maitland Observer Nov.indd 1 10/15/13 1:03 PM

PAGE 6

Page 6 | T T hursday, NN ov. 21, 2013 | W W inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver CC offee TT alk featuring CC ommissioner M M c M M ackenIf you have a latt beans to grind or you simply want to espresso your thoughts, CoffeeTalk may be the cup for you. Please join an informal conversation with Commissioner Tom McMacken Thursday, Nov. 21, from 8 to 9 a.m. at the Winter Park Welcome Center located at 151 W. Lyman Ave. CoffeeTalk gives the community an opportunity to sit down and talk with Commissioner McMacken over a cup of coffee and chat about any city issues that are of interest to them. Special thanks to Palmanos Cafe, Coffee & Wine Bar for donating the coffee for this special series. For more information, please call 407-599-3428. NN ov. 25 CC ity CC ommission meeting There will be a City Commission meeting Monday, Nov. 25, at 3:30 p.m. in City Hall Commission Chambers located at 401 S. Park Ave. For the most up-to-date agenda, please visit cityofwinter park.org > Government > City Commission > Agenda. Below are a few topics of interest: CC onsent AA genda complete listing, please visit cityofwinterpark.org/ccpackets). ecute Amendment One to the amended and restated Power Sales Agreement between Seminole Electric Cooperative Inc. and the city of Winter Park dated Jan. 15, 2013. AA ction II tems RR equiring DD iscussion Franchise with Waste Pro. Inc. Public HH earingston, LLC: proval to divide the property at 1280 Arlington Place, Zoned R-2, into two lots. to amend Chapter 58, Land Development Code, Article I Comprehensive Plan Future Land Use Map so as to establish Commercial Future Land Use on the annexed property at 656 Overspin Drive and to indicate the annexation of this property on the other maps within the Comprehensive Plan. amend Chapter 58, Land Development Code, Article III, Zon3) Zoning on the annexed property at 656 Overspin Drive. to vacate and abandon a portion of Gaines Way lying between 610 Gaines Way and 1760 Gaines Way, but retaining and reserving to the city a utility easement over the entire area thereof. sions full agenda on the home page of cityofwinterpark.org under Whats New > City Commission Agenda. LL ast week to help support F F eed the N N eed This is the last week for our opportunity to support Feed the munitywide fundraiser to end hunger in Central Florida. The city of Winter Park has partnered with Rollins College, Sodexo, Think Creative Inc. and the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce to create this powerful fundraising engine to raise money to help Second Harvest Food Bank provide food for those in need. The Feed the Need fundraising campaign will end this Friday, Nov. 22. Some important facts to know: $9 worth of grocery products is provided for those in need. goes straight to feeding people. central Florida population 732,000 people needed food assistance last year. This is a 152 percent increase from 2006. children struggle with hunger. When these kids have no food, we have no choice but to respond. If you are able, please assist us in this worthy cause by joining the City of Winter Park Team and donating online at http://bit.ly/ cityofwinterpark. Remember, we paign so please dont hesitate. Thank you for helping Winter Park Feed the Need. II ce rink is open!Now through Sunday, Jan. 5, 2014, the city of Winter Park will bundle up once again for Winter in the Park, the citys annual holiday ice skating rink in Central Park West Meadow. The West Meadow is located at 150 N. New York Ave., on the corner of New York Avenue and Morse Boulevard, in downtown Winter Park. levels are invited to chill out as they glide, spin and turn at Winter in the Park: p.m. to 9 p.m. See website for extended school holiday hours. Snow angels are invited to skate all day for only $10 per a blizzard of 20 or more people, some cool group discounts are available for all this frigid fun. If you are interested in bringing your whole igloo to celebrate birthdays, special events, private parties or corporate holiday gatherings, the rink is available for rental opportunities. Advance reservations are required for private party and group reservations to avoid an icy avalanche of skaters at the rink. Holiday music, games, carolaround you as you enjoy Winter in the Park. For more information, please call 407-599-3203 or visit cityofwinterpark.org/witp at cityofwinterpark.org, like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and watch us on Vimeo. Winter Park City TalkBY RR ANDY KNIGHT CITY MANAGER HH elp feed the need THOUSANDS OF PEOPLE IN OUR OWN COMMUNITY WILL GO HUNGRY THIS SEASON WITHOUT OUR HELP. WE'D LOVE TO FEED THEM ALL. AND WE'RE ONLY HALFWAY THERE. FEED NEEDthe A COMMUNITY-WIDE EFFORT TO RAISE FUNDS FOR SECOND HARVEST FOOD BANK OF CENTRAL FLORIDA. WINTER PARK PLEASE DONATE TODAY TO HELP US PROVIDE ENOUGH FOOD TO FILL UP EVERY HUNGRY MAN, WOMAN AND CHILD. DONATE TODAY AT FEEDTHENEEDWP.ORG $50,000 GOAL $39,108 RAISEDIn Partnership with: Presented by:

PAGE 7

Mornings 4:30am 7:00am Trust Amy Sweezey and get Central Floridas most accurate weather forecast. | Wake up to WESH 2 News Sunrise for First Alert Weather, Traffic and Breaking News. WESH 2 First Alert Weather is recognized as delivering the most accurate forecast by by WeatheRate, an independent research company for six consecutive years.

PAGE 8

Page 8 | T T hursday, NN ov. 21, 2013 | W W inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver CC alendar FAMILY CALENDAR NONO V. 21 TT he Goldenrod HH istorical SS ociety is taking a eld trip to the Lake M M ary H H istorical MM useum at 10 a.m. N N ov. 21. II n addition to the regular museum exhibits, the museum will feature its C C hristmas display of vintage C C hristmas trees, toys and decorations so make sure you mark your calendars now for this great event. I I nvite friends and family and let us know how many will be coming. As with our own museum, the admission is free but they do accept donations. WW e will be enjoying lunch in a local restaurant so bring your lunch money and your appetite for a great meal. I I ts at 158 N N C C ountry C C lub R R oad in Lake M M ary. CC offee T T alk fea turing CC ommissioner T T om MM c M M acken runs from 8 to 9 a.m. TT hursday N N ov. 21 at the WW inter P P ark WW elcome CC enter at the WW inter P P ark C C hamber of CC ommerce. Got a latte on your mind or some beans to grind? NN ows your chance. Visit cityofwinterpark.org for more infor mation. NONO V. 23 TT he 22nd annual BB rouhaha FF ilm and V ideo S S howcase kicks off at the E E nzian TT heater at 11 a.m. N N ov. 23. I I ts a series of four programs of multiple short lms from acclaimed lmmakers. II ts only $5 per program or $10 for all four. I I t goes on through S S unday, N N ov. 24. ONGOINGONGOINGTT ake a stroll do wn memory lane at the WW inter Park Playhouse as we pay tribute to two of Americas most well-loved composers of all time, G G eorge and I I ra GG ershwin! TT his high-energy song and dance celebration will put a smile on your face and a song in your heart! Featuring a collection of Gershwin favorites, including E E mbraceable YY ou, I I ve Got a C C rush on YY ou, I I Got RR hythm, S S omeone to W W a tch OO ver M M e, and S S W W onderful! WW ho could ask for anything more? II ts NN ov. 21-24 and Dec. 5-14. II ts all conceived by R R oy Alan with the narrative by TT odd Allen Long and musical arrangements by C C hristopher Leavy. BB usiness BB riefs SS winging for the fences TT he annual FF lorida LL eague CC elebrity GG olf T T ournament presented by UBS UBS PP rivate WW ealth, took place N N ov. 11 and proved to be a continued success. TT he tournament, now in its sixth year, elded 28 ve-somes, as well as top MM ajor League B B aseball celebrities with a combined 191 years of M M L B B service, 851 home runs, 4,940 strike outs, 15 AllS S tar appearances, six rst round picks, three S S ilver S S luggers, ve WW orld SS eries titles, and one C C y YY oung Award. TT he tournament was once again played at the prestigious I I nterlachen C C ountry C C lub in WW inter P P ark. All proceeds throughout the weekend beneted the Florida C C ollegiate S S ummer League, which is a 501(c)(3) non-prot organization. RR eaders thank RR ollins EE arlier this year, RR ollins CC ollege, on behalf of the OO lin library staff and faculty, presented FF ern C C reek Elementary SS chool with a check for $3,000 to pur chase non-ction books for its school library. TT he elementary school recently purchased the books. TT he money for the donation came when the R R ollins O O lin Library was presented with the 2013 E E xcellence in Academic Libraries Award in the college category from Association of CC ollege and R R esearch Libraries. Friday, December 6; 5 p.m. in Central Park Presented by: Supported by: City of Winter ParkSaturday, December 7; 7 10:30 a.m. at the Central Park StagePresented by: Saturday, December 7; 9 a.m. along Park Avenue Presented by: Supported by: Centennial Bank For more information or tickets for the Pancake Breakfast, visit winterpark.org or call (407) 644-8281. NONO V. 21 TT he UCFUCF Knights football team takes on Americas oldest college football team, RR utgers, at 7:30 p.m. TT hursday at B B right HH ouse N N etworks S S tadium at UC UC F. I I tll also be televised on ESPN ESPN Visit UC UC FKnights. com for more information. NONO V. 22 RR ollins CC ollege mens soccer is in the third round of the NC NC AA regional soccer tournament, and they get to play for their home crowd at B B arker Family S S tadium at RR ollins. TT his Friday, N N ov. 22, theyre the top seed against N N o. 2 WW est Florida a t 7 p.m. TT hen S S aturday the winner of that game will face N N o. 3 Lander or N N o. 4 C C ar sonN N ewman at 1 p.m. for the quarternal match. C C ome out and support the team! NONO V. 23A Local Folkus, LL CC continues its commitment to the local food movement by celebrating their fourth annual WW inter Park HH arvest F F estiv al this fall on S S aturday, NN ov. 23, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. TT hroughout the day, a local producer-only market in C C entral P P ark s WW est M M eadow will offer festivalgoers the chance to gobble up all of the ingredients to create a completely local TT hanksgiving meal. WW ith more than 50 local farmers, food artisans and gar deners, its a great opportunity to get some holiday gift shopping done too! Kids activities by Florida H H ospitals M M ission Fit program, cooking demonstrations, and do-it-yourself gardening sessions will offer everyone a chance to learn more about building a healthy and vibrant local food system. A mobile community garden, organized by O O ur WW hole C C ommunity, will display over fty grow boxes, grown by local elementary schools. M M usic will rock the stage courtesy of B B arnstorm, Just TT wistin H H ay, E E van TT aylor Jones, C C arolyn NN icely, H H eather Lee and Jordan WW ynn, and Kattya Graham. For more information visit wpharvest.com A bike valet will be provided at the WW inter PP ark H H arvest Festival from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. to help store your bike and encour age riders to leave their car behind for the day. Visit wpharvest.com for more infor mation. NONO V. 28 EE ach year on TT hanksgiving morning, thousands of participants come out for the TT urkey T T rot, a 5K (3.1 miles) run/ power walk and TT ot TT rot to benet S S eniors First. Last year, the race drew more than 5,600 participants to downtown O O rlandos Lake E E ola. R R unners of all ages and levels are encouraged to attend. S S eniors First is a nonprot social service organization dedicated to serving the needs of CC entral Floridas elderly population with a broad spectrum of nutrition, home improvement and support services. TT he funds raised as a result of the TT urkey TT rot directly benet the seniors of O O range and S S eminole counties. C C ostume judging begins at 7 a.m. so get there early on TT hanksgiving! Visit tur keytrotorlando.com for more information. ONGOINGONGOINGNN ow through SS unday, Jan. 5 the city of WW inter P P ark is bundling up once a gain for W W inter in the Park, the citys annual holiday ice skating rink in C C entral P P ark WW est M M eadow. TT he WW est M M eadow is located at 150 N N N N ew YY ork Ave., on the corner of NN ew YY ork Avenue and M M orse B B oulevard, in downtown WW inter P P ark. S S nowakes of all ages and skill levels are invited to chill out as they glide, spin and turn at W W inter in the PP ark S S now angels are invited to skate all day for only $10 per skater (skate rental included). Advance reservations are required for private party and group reservations to avoid an icy avalanche of skaters at the rink. HH oliday music, games, carolers and so much more will urry around you as you enjoy W W inter in the P P ark. For more infor mation, please call 407-599-3203 or visit cityofwinterpark.org/ WITP WITP II f you are interested in showcasing your business during the busy holiday season to the 30,000-plus expected attendees, please visit our website and click on the SPONSOR SPONSOR tab for information on how to become an ice rink dasher board sponsor.

PAGE 9

WW inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver | T T hursday, NN ov. 21, 2013 | Page 9 LL ifestyles Theres just something about their eyes. Sure, most times theyre just two big white circles, a simple concept. But then theres the fact that one is bigger than the other, or the crazy placement of those important little black-dot pupils. Its remarkable how Ethan Longs characters can change with the addition of the dash of an eyebrow or the deliberate scribble of a sleepy eyelid. Many have called him the master of the googly eye. Longs zany characters have danced across the pages of dozens of childrens books, many of which hes authored himself. The College Park resident has won the Theodor Seuss Geisel Award, the highest honor given to a book for beginning readers for his book Up, Tall and High! and has a show on Disney Channel based on his characters and concept called Tasty Time with ZeFronk. Most of his fans say that his quick wit is what sets him apart, and keeps kids coming back to his books. He draws silly cats, sweet and colorful chameleons, and approachable monsters. He tends to keep things simple, and let all the humor do the work and Im always amazed at how he can move an eyebrow and it totally changes a face, and an expression makes things funnier, said his wife Heather Long. Just the simple things, and I think he can do that like few people can. Long grabs a scrap of paper and draws some of his famous eyes, sketching one pair under neath another in sharp black ink. Quickly they go happy, sad, angry and crazy. His illustrations always seem to compel a smile. He can tell a story without a single word if he wants to, said Mary Cash, vice president and editor-in-chief of Holiday House, a publisher of Longs books. You almost know what a character is thinking by looking at his or her googly eyes, the expression on their faces. And Long is a bit of what youd expect from a childrens book author. He likes to goof around, and is immediately comfortable choosing his own poses when he has his photo taken holding his book over his face with his surprised eyes peeking out, or sticking out his tongue when he makes it to the page where his frog character does the same. He makes funny voices when a story hes telling dictates it. Once at dinner with his wife and children, they spotted their pose, its haunches looking like giant ears, tail like the nose of an elephant. Long immediately hopped up, drew some eyes on a post-it note and stuck them right on the cats butt, completing the picture. Thats life in the Long house, his wife said with a laugh. But Long is certainly not just all funny. Hes serious about art. Hes full of expression as he talks about his work, pulling out some more ing in its smell, knocking on the wood. He shows how spontaneity PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVER CC ollege Parks Ethan LL ong is famous for his googly eyed drawings, but thats just the beginning of his talents. Childrens book illustrator Ethan Long goes HollywoodBRITTNI LL ARSON OO bserver S S taff Please see CARTOONS on page 11 Pizza & more ... rfntb rf ntbfCannot be combined with any other coupon or offer. Expires 1/1/14.ntnfrnfrr Located at the 20-20 Super Center Plaza near the corner of SR 436 and Howell Branch Rd. btbCannot be combined with any other coupon or offer. Expires 1/1/14. $2 OFF Any Sub, Chip and Large Drink purchase. Visit our tasty new Winter Park restaurant location at: 528 S. Park Avenue 407.960.7827 By Rollins College Park Avenue near Fairbanks. 2010 Firehouse Subs. This offer valid with coupon at participating restaurants. Prices and participation may vary, see restaurant for details. Limit one per customer, per visit. Not valid with any other offers. Exp. 3/31/14. Theres a new Firehouse Subs right here on Park Avenue in Winter Park. Get ready for steamin hot subs piled high with top notch meats and cheeses. ( WERE OPEN )Stop, Drop, And Roll On In. Visit FirehouseSubs.com to order online and find your nearest location. MM ore than just a pair of googly eyes

PAGE 10

Page 10 | T T hursday, NN ov. 21, 2013 | W W inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver Four quarters after enter ing their game against Temple as 17-point favorites, the UCF Knights left a game with an unexpected storyline: Stunning comeback. I told the players when they go to church tomorrow, make sure theyre in the front pew, head coach George OLeary told UCFKnights.com after the game. Somebodys looking out for them. A game after the Knights defense held off what appeared to be a certain game-winning touchdown by Houston with a fourminute of the game, the Knights allowed the Owls P.J. Walker to throw a career-high 382 yards. In the process the Owls posted their second-highest scoring game of the season. But the defense made game, forcing a Temple punt that would lead to the game-winning UCF score. The Knights will have to shake off their near-nightmare against Temple as they face a tougher team in Rutgers this week. The off a 52-17 battering by Cincinnati tied for their most lopsided loss of the year. But the more telling game for Rutgers may be the one before it on Nov. 2, when they played Temple and won by three points, just like UCF. That game had a similar signature to the Knights narrow escape. The teams traded scores the whole game. Temple had the lead gers, the favorite, had to pull off a last-second comeback to win. game against Temple Nov. 16, the Knights were narrowly holding off a demon that seems to come up once every season an unusually tough basement-dwelling team. The Knights in 2013 had largely evaded the specter of seasons past in which they lost or nearly lost to teams with only a win or two on the season. They had narrowly escaped Memconference play) Oct. 5 in a bizarre two-touchdownsin-nine-seconds comeback that ended 24-17. They had seemingly banished that ghost with a 62-17 bamboozling of UConn on Oct. 26. But a minute into the second quarter of their game against Temple, a program that hadnt won a conference game all season, the Knights were already in trouble. The Owls entered the end zone Walker to Jamie Gilmore, and the Knights suddenly were trailing a team that had lost eight games of their last nine. The Knights struck back when Will Stanback, the on-off hero of several games this season, broke free down the right sideline and blazed to a 49-yard short-passturned-long-run touchdown, and the Knights seemingly had things back in hand. But Temple had other plans, exchanging the lead with the Knights 10 times in the game, more than triple what theyd averaged this season. Only thanks to goal did the Knights go into halftime leading the game. Little did they know that two quarters later hed be doing it again, sealing an unlikely Knights comeback with a And the Knights only were at that point in the game after two highlight reel plays by wide receiver J.J. Worton that kept them within reach. His second improbable catch, diving horizontally at gers barely reaching enough to snag an overthrown bomb into the end zone, tied the game for the Knights with only a minute ARCH iI VE PHOTO BY ISAAC bB A bB COCK THE OBSERVERKnights Q BB BB lake BB ortles threw for 404 yards against TT emple.Knights football reloads for RR utgersISAAC bB A bB COCK OO bserver S S taff PP lease see kK NIGHTS on page 12

PAGE 11

WW inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver | T T hursday, NN ov. 21, 2013 | Page 11ing touch on a piece just the act of blowing on wet ink to create a per fect splatter across the paper. He said he loves the action of making art, the moments when all his senses are engaged. And Longs childrens books start in an unexpected way. They all begin with a blank, white page, with that little bar blinking in front of him on the computer, waiting for the words. He starts by journaling, writing whatever is on his mind, just typing away. He gets everything out, and then he can begin a story. Writing out his everyday frustrations and mundane moments clear the path for creativity. I never save it, Long said. I just write it just kind of cleans me up. And then the hours of productivity start, and he is in his world. It just feels like nothing its kind of a numbing quality, because nothing bothers me, nothing matters, which is good, he said. It takes the weight off my shoulders and I dont have to think; it just takes me to another place. Its an interesting source for his sunny material, but friend and fellow childrens book author Ann Paul said his depth is what makes his work so special. He can tell a story that seems silly but theres something beneath the surface, and thats probably what makes his work so powerful, she said. They all come from a place deep inside him. PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVER LL ong sketches out ideas at his CC ollege PP ark home. New Holiday Merchandise! Annual Percentage Yields (APYs) are accurate as of 11/14/2013. Rates subject to change at any time without prior notice. Fees may reduce earnings. Offer applies to new accounts only; Public Funds are not eligible. Account must be opened on or before December 31, 2013 to qualify. 1. Minimum opening deposit of $10,000 (up to a maximum of $500,000) will earn the disclosed rate of .60% APY for the initial 6-month portion of the term of the CD and 1.00% APY for the second 6-month portion of the term of the CD, resulting in a blended APY of .80%. Offer applicable to initial 12-month term only. CD will automatically renew to a standard 12-month CD in affect at that time at the current rate and APY. You may exercise your option to withdraw funds one time on this account during the second 6-month portion of the term of the CD, without being charged an early withdrawal penalty. You may exercise this withdrawal option within ve (5) calendar days from the last day of the rst 6-month portion of the term of the CD. If any withdrawal causes the balance to drop below the minimum opening deposit amount, an early withdrawal fee will be assessed. Additionally, withdrawals made within the rst six (6) business days after we receive your opening deposit will be subject to an early withdrawal fee. 2. Minimum opening deposit of $10,000 (up to a maximum of $500,000) will earn .75% APY. Rate applies to the rst six (6) months from opening date. Afterwards the rate will revert to the standard rates in effect, which as of 11/14/2013 are: For Personal High Yield Money Market, balances of $0.00 $99,999.99 earns 0.05% APY; balances of $100,000.00 and above earns 0.30% APY and for Business Money Market, balances of $0.00$49,999.99 earns 0.05% APY; balances of $50,000.00 $99,999.99 earns 0.15% APY; and balances $100,000.00 and above earns 0.30% APY. Maintain an average daily balance of $2,500 to avoid the $12.00 monthly maintenance fee. These Accounts are governed by Federal Regulation which limits the number of certain types of transactions; no more than six (6) transfers and withdrawals, or a combination of such to your other accounts or to a third party per month or statement cycle. Excessive transaction fee of $5.00 will be assessed for each transaction in excess of six (6) during a month. 896 1113 FloridaCommunityBank.com Florida based. Florida focused. Get Your Money Working HARDER. Limited Stop by your local FCB banking center and open your account TODAY Money Market 12-Month CD PENALTY-FREE withdrawal1 FCB JUM UP 1Blended Rate11 1.00%APY.60%APY.80%APY2 Money Market .75%APY CARTOONS | CC reativity from frustration CCOO N TT IN UEUE D FROFRO M pP A GE 9 PP HOTOS BY SARAH WILSON T T HE OO BSER v V ER EE atonville took the top prize with the most team walkers on N N ov. 16. Mayors Sole Challenge PP HOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOC kK T T HE OO BSER v V ER TT he BB istro on PP ark Ave. hosted a Flock P P arty to raise money for L I I bbys Legacy B B reast C C ancer Foundation, displaying art from 1350 WW est Galler y on N N ov. 13. Flamingos

PAGE 12

Page 12 | T T hursday, NN ov. 21, 2013 | W W inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver kK NIGHTS | WW orton had mirac le catchleft to go. Worton would grab 179 yards of catches in the game, a career high. would be the only offensive score of the game for which the Owls didnt have an answer. A minute goal soared through the uprights, averting what could have been a disastrous loss for the Knights. The Knights went 657 yards on offense in the game the third highest in team history. They allowed 518 yards, a more ignominious milestone allowed largely by the Knights secondary defense, which gave up 382 passing yards. But they came up with the crucial fourth quarter stop when it counted. Coming up for the Knights, two more games with wide point spreads will give them back-toback chances at polishing their gameplay against teams looking to make a statement. Against Rutgers theyll face an unfamiliar squad. The only other time the two teams have met was at the St. Petersburg Bowl in 2009, when the Scarlet Knights defeated UCF 45-24. Not a single current Knights player was on that squad, though offensive linemen Jordan and Justin McCrays older brother Cliff was a UCF left guard in the game. They kick off at 7:30 p.m. Thursday at the Bright House, televised on ESPN. CCOO N TT IN UEUE D FROFRO M pP A GE 10 of the game, but the Winter Park Wildcats edged out a berth into with a 38-35 nail-biter over West Orange on Friday night. Less than 15 seconds were left on the clock with the Wildcats driving toward the end zone bewouldnt be enough to even the score. They needed a touchdown. On a fourth down play with time nearly expired, quarterback J.P. Colton heaved a pass into double ing receiver Gabe McClary on the other end. The win gave the Wildcats an avenue into the semis against an Apopka team thats the reigning state champion in Class 8A. By the numbers the game appears to be by far the toughest challenge the Wildcats will face. Last season Apopka defeated playoffs 45-35. This season they did it by a 77-21 blowout one of the biggest blowouts in a decade in class 8A. lost to a team from this state this season, winning their 11 games by an average margin of 39 points, including four shutouts where they scored six TDs or more. The Wildcats havent played Apopka since 2008, when they lost 27-14. The Wildcats would go year en route to a regional championship runner up spot. The Wildcats will have to travel to Apopka for this one, with kickoff set for 7:30 p.m. Nov. 22. If the Wildcats can manage an upset, theyll be in to the regional championship round. VolleyballThe Winter Park girls volleyball team won a four-game thriller against Lake Mary to punctuate their rise in the big-school division over the past few years. In 2010 they didnt make the playoffs. In 2011 they bowed out in the regional championship in East Lake. In 2012 they made it all the way to the state championship match before falling in yet another to Boca Raton. Not this year. In a stacked bracket the Wildcats had three go to four games or more. The squeaked out a win, going 25-22, 17-25, 25-12, 25-20. WW inter Park dominates gridiron, volleyball courtISAAC bB A bB COCK OO bserver S S taff Member of: LOCAL NEWS. BIG IMPACT.Subscribe now to keep up with the latest news unfolding in your community.BOGO Offer Two years for the price of one! Get one year (52 issues) of the Winter Park Maitland Observer for only $30, and youll receive a second year for FREE! Plus, as a thank you for subscribing, youll get a complimentary copy of the 2014 Winter Park/Maitland Observer 25th Anniversary Calendar in your December 26 issue! SPECIAL BOGO OFFER: BUY ONE YEAR, GET ONE FREE! Visit WPMObserver.com/Subscribe or call 407.563.7013 to order today!BOGO offer expires 12/31/13.

PAGE 13

WW inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver | T T hursday, NN ov. 21, 2013 | Page 13On a Monday afternoon, families from all over Winter Park enter the glass double doors of the Winter Park YMCA. Theyre families of all ethnicities and backgrounds, joining together to play sports, exercise and socialize. But some residents stop for a moment before they begin their beside the front desk plays a continuous slideshow of photos of a tiny woman with white hair and a broad smile. Moments of joy captured at birthday parties, weddings and family photos run in sequence dozens of smiles frozen in time across the face of a Winter Park resident who dedicated her life to family and her local YMCA. Winter Park resident and YMCA volunteer Mary Rumberger passed away from lung disease last month, leaving behind a legacy of generosity and dedication to supporting families in her city. Rumberger championed her local Y, serving on multiple boards and supporting fundraising efforts, lending her time and talent for more than 30 years. Mary is going to be missed, Winter Park YMCA Executive Director Bud Oliver said. Mary was one of a kindShe had the passion and was always willing to help. Winter Park YMCA as a proud parent, bringing her children to its sports programs after moving to the city in 1974. The Winter Park YMCA became a home away from home for Rumberger and her family, a place for swimming, gymFriday night spaghetti dinners. Her love for the Winter Park YMCA and its programs led her to serve as scholarship chair and board chair on the Winter Park YMCA Board. In 2001, she joined the YMCA of Central Florida Metropolitan Board of Directors, later becoming the board chair in 2006. She continued all the while to dive into annual fundraising campaigns, whether hunting down funding or coordinating events. She was a leader in a quiet way, but she could get more people to do things before you realized that you were involved, said Joan Ballard, who served on the YMCA of Central Florida Metropolitan Board of Directors with Rumberger. She was an inspiration, she was a friend, and she cer tainly leaves a huge legacy to the Y and to the community. Rumberger knew that a college education meant more opportunity for Winter Parks youth, continuously supporting the Teen Achievers program, which brings high school students to colleges to inspire them to succeed. She served as a chaperone on two college tours in 2011, hopping aboard a charter bus University of Miami, Stetson University and Bethune-Cookman University. She even provided monetary support to bring in guest speakers from different professions to motivate the students further. I see the outreach as part of her legacy, Oliver said. She was passionate about that giving back and making sure those kids had a chance. In 2005, the YMCA recognized Rumberger with the John Sterchi Award for generous lifetime ser vice, putting an exclamation mark on almost 30 years of time, love and funds given to the Y. Please see MARY on page 14 HH ealthy LL iving PHOTOS COURTESY OF WINTER PARK YMCA MM ary RR umberger was best known for her smiling face volunteering to help residents live healthier lives. AA fond farewell to the YY s quiet leaderWinter Park resident dedicated life to building familiesTIM FREED OO bserver S S taff

PAGE 14

Page 14 | T T hursday, NN ov. 21, 2013 | W W inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserverAutumn has arrived and with changes in the weather and the impending holiday season comes an important and timely tradition that should not be overlooked tagious respiratory illness that spreads mainly via droplets in the air. It spreads between people and can cause mild to severe illnesses that last one to two weeks. It can even with regular hand-washing. The best way to keep you and your family safe from the virus is Flu vaccines are designed to protect against three viruses that experts predict will be the most common in the upcoming season. The three commonly circulated viruses among people today shots are inactivated vaccines containing the dead virus and are given with a needle. The nasal spray is a vaccine made with live weakable to healthy people between the ages of 2-49 who are not pregnant. It is recommended that everyvaccine every year. It is especially important for certain people that include the following: of developing pneumonia if they medical conditions including asthma, diabetes and chronic lung disease as well as those who live with them years old Flu vaccines are constantly changing so its important to get the formulated vaccine every year. Healthy people are usually able quick but senior citizens, young children and people on the list above may have a harder time reyou from coming down with the illness, then it will also prevent the loved ones and those around you. A double win! www.centracare.org Work Well Winter Park is a movement spearheaded by the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce to improve the health and well-being of our workforce by creating lasting cultural change. Visit workwellwinterpark.org.What you should know Ask about our CHRISTMAS SPECIAL! Before Before Before Before 407.680.4263www.180DegreeFitness.com1595 Meeting Place, Orlando, FL 32814After After After AfterMy goal was to lose another 10 pounds and Monica Meier Loreen Lott Elisa Ochoa Rebekah Loweke Twice the results-half the time...Guaranteed or your money back Savannah Court and Cove Excellence in Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation 1301 W. Maitland Blvd. Maitland, FL 32751407-645-3990www.SavannahCourtMaitland.comAssisted Living Facility License No. 8447 Skilled Nursing Facility License No. 1635096 Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above. You are always welcome!A Senior Living Community where Hospitality is a Way of Life. 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com r fntbt f rtt ftbt bt bnr nr rt b bb f b tb off trtnCoupon redeemable for cash, check or credit card purchases only. Not redeemable for insurance transactions. Excludes custom/special orders & nutritional supplements. May not be combined with any other discounts. Coupon has no cash value. MARY | Volunteer pushed for bigger pool to serve more kidsVolunteerism is wonder ful, but if its a lifetime of volunteerism like my mom, it really seems to be something special, said Molly Domin, Rumbergers daughter. ished. The lifelong YMCA supporter fought to expand her local Y even further all the way up until her passing, advocating for a new pool and parking lot for the past in local neighborhoods telling residents about how the new pool and, in turn, the community. Winter Park YMCAs goal to one. The Y had previously agreed not to expand any further, but knew that a pool and new parking lot would create more opportunities for members. Many residents pushed back against the expansion, believing that the Winter Park YMCA wouldnt stop expanding if given the opportunity. But after several years of advocacy, speaking at City Commission meetings, getting input from the community and the continued support from Rumberger, the additions were approved by the Winter Park City Commission in November of last year. The construction for the pool and parking lot nears completion, with a ribbon cutting set for Nov. 21. Since Rumbergers passing, the Winter Park YMCA now takes donations in her name and looks to put a plaque in the building in her honor. It wasnt about her, it was about how she could help, Oliver said. I think it was that way right up until the end. She was more worried about other people than she was about herself. Oliver still remembers Rumberger visiting the Winter Park YMCA like anybody else, a Winter Park resident who came to the Y three to four times a week to power walk on the treadmill. A known leader, but away from the spotlight. Never asking for recognition, just a passionate resident serving her community. CCOO N TT IN UEUE D FROFRO M pP A GE 13 PHOTO BY TIM FREED THE OBSERVER

PAGE 15

WW inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver | T T hursday, NN ov. 21, 2013 | Page 15 HOUSES WANTED!!! Get a FREE No Obliga on CASH O er On Your House Within 24 Hours! (855) 755-1818 www.Circle18Homes.com CASH $$$ QUICK CLOSE ANY PRICE RANGE ANY CONDITION ANY SITUATION $10.00 OFF Initial Purchase $100 or more CANADIAN MEDS SAVE UP TO 80% on Prescription Drug PricesORDER by phone No Store Visit required Advair Benicar Celebrex Cialis Crestor Cymbalta Flomax Levitra Lexapro Lipitor Nexium Spiriva Viagra Zetia CALL for a FREE Quote! We Ship Anywhere in the U.S.A. Locally owned & operated. 744 South US Hwy 441 Lady Lake, FL 32159(352) 633-3301 WellMed accepts patients with Medicare and a select Medicare Advantage Plan*.ATTENTION MEDICARE PATIENTSWellMed is a group of doctors working as a team to help senior patients live healthier lives. *Plans vary by location and county.WellMed doctors focus on the health and well-being of Senior patients. We believe preventive care is the key to keeping you healthy and out of the hospital. We make getting quality healthcare easy. WellMed offers: On-site laboratory and other medical resources at most locations Call us rst doctors or nurses on-call 24 hours a day, 7 days a week Same-day appointments Assistance applying for Medicare Savings Programs And more Experience WellMed for yourself. Call today to meet our doctors or tour our clinic. We are here for you.Live Well. Live WellMed.407-865-5909 WellMedHealthcare.comDr. Carol A. Stewart-Francisco WellMed at Longwood 2735 W State Road 434, Ste 1031 Longwood, FL 32779AEPMEDI_AD TJ07232013 WM_AEPMediAd_WP-MObserver(10.25x8)_v2.indd 1 10/16/13 3:54 PM If you get around on Facebook at all, you may have noticed that many people are doing Days of Thanks postings leading up to Thanksgiving Day. Ive been tracking some of those and they go all the way from the sublime to the ridiculous. Some of the sublime: thanks for getting my dad back from Afghanistan, thanks for friends who stood by me in a time of great need. Some of the ridiculous: thankful that my designer bag didnt get scuffed, thankful dog person myself.) There is something in us that wants to speak of gratitude, but often we remain silent. Thats too bad. An article in the Harvard com/Harvard-mental-health) outlines how expressing thanks improves physical health. I think the problem for us is that except for the times when we hit lifes jackpots the birth of a baby, a promotion at work, receiving an inheritance, getting cured of a disease the things we could be grateful for simply play in the background of life. It is far more tempting to foness: missing a deadline, having a misunderstanding with someone, losing an item. Even if the problems are not large ones, they have a way of capturing our attention. We complain about unfairness and try to manage our way out of the circumstances. Im not trying to be Pollyannaish. Bad things do happen in life and they must be confronted. But we cant lose sight of the good things that are playing silently in the background. To do so leads us down the road of despair. In the history of America, there have been several important Thanksgiving proclamations issued by prominent leaders. The ford of Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1623, three years after the PilRock. In his proclamation, Gov. Bradford thanks God for a bountiful harvest and protection from ter in America claimed the lives of nearly half the settlers. In remembering to let the Thanksgiving playing in the background of the great national tragedy of Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln was able to call forth would not be the last word on life. If you notice Lincoln did not just thank the air, either. He thanked lead the country through its great Besides all the other health even greater. Thankfulness, when it is rooted in someone greater than ourselves give us hope greater than our circumstances. So, what am I thankful for? I dont have a whole 28 days yet, but heres a start: My dog, who is ready to ers eat your hearts out!) My family, which provides unconditional love. My church family, who walks with me on the adventure of loving our part of Winter Park. Jesus Christ, who gave me a new life. An interesting and challenging job. Whats in your thanker? NN ot enough days to say thank you Jim GG ovatos RR eality Lines

PAGE 16

Page 16 | T T hursday, NN ov. 21, 2013 | W W inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver at Winter Park Towers Your room is waiting for you if you need Pain and Symptom Management Hospital Follow-up Complex Treatments, or Crisis Care Referrals 866-742-6655#5019096 www.cornerstonehospice.org www.SeriousIllness.org/cornerstoneMedicare, Medicaid, most commercial insurances accepted Second Annual Health Living Expo Slated for Next February Second Annual Health Living Expo Slated for Next February Our Whole Community s (OWC) second annual Healthy Living Expo held in partnership with the City of Winter Park, has been scheduled for February 15, 2014, 9 a.m 1 p.m., at the Winter Park Community Center. Last year, more than 200 people took advantage of the demonstrations, workshops and health assessments offered by more than 20 health-based sponsors and exhibitors. The 2014 event will feature assessments such as blood pressure and vision checks and nutrition education from the UCF College of Nursing, speakers on topics focusing on Mind, Body and Spirit and health-based exhibitors and demonstrations. The attendance and positive feedback we received after our inaugural Healthy Living Expo was so encouraging, says OWC Board Chair Lavon Williams. Our goal is to create a healthy living experience that will be to be even stronger in that respect. The event is free to the public. Jason Seeley, Division Chief at the City of Winter Park, says the partnership will allow the City to continue to enhance its popular health-related initiatives. For more information on the Healthy Living Expo or to volunteer or inquire about booth space please contact Our Whole Community Executive Director Leah Nash at owc_ed@me.com or call 407.758.5324. OWC wishes all a happy and healthy holiday season! Dont forget to stop by the Winter Park Harvest Festival this weekend and check out the mobile community garden from OWC and the Winter Park Memorial Hospital. The Winter Park Harvest Festival will be on Saturday, November 23rd from 10 am 4 pm at Central Parks West Meadow. faith-based organization that brings communities together to establish relationships and share resources resulting in innovative programs that inspire, motivate and educate individuals in their pursuit of optimal health. For more information on Our Whole Community, please visit ourwholecommunity.org. Our Whole Community is pleased to contribute monthly to the Winter Park Observer. Email owc_ed@me.com for inquiries about OWC. After almost 35 years of cooking, Ive had my share of Thanksgiving Day disasters! Here are some secrets to saving your sanity and your Thanksgiving dinner: HOW TO DEFROST A TURKEY Youll need at least 24 to 48 pound) to thaw a frozen turkey in the refrigerator. If you need to do a quick thaw, place the wrapped, frozen turkey in your kitchen sink or a large container like an ice chest. Cover the turkey with water every half-hour because as the bird thaws out, the water will get warmer. Using this method, the turkey will thaw at the rate of about a half-hour for each pound. PREPARING THE BIRD FOR COOKING Remove the giblet package from inside the cavity of the bird and check the neck cavity. Some manufacturers place the giblet package in the neck cavity and others place it inside the cavity closest to the legs. Most turkeys come with the legs already trussed or plastic bracket). If youre not going to stuff your bird, theres no need to truss the legs. Trussing an unstuffed bird hinders the hot oven air from circulating inside and around the legs. This means that the dark meat will take longer to cook and the breast meat will cook faster and probably dry out before the legs ever get completely done. THE TURKEY ISNT DONE Dont rely on the pop-up timer in the turkey, as it usually means that the breast is over cooked and the dark meat isnt done. If the dark meat isnt done, remove the wings and breast meat from the rest of the turkey, in one piece, if possible. Cover the breast and wing portion with foil and set it aside. Put the drumsticks and thigh portion of the turkey back into the oven to continue cooking until done. You can re-assemble the whole turkey and garnish it, or just cut it into serving portions and arrange it on a platter. STUFFING SAVERS wet, spread it out in a thin layer on a sheet pan so that it will dry quickly. Place it back into the oven for 5 to 7 minutes. If its too dry, add more pan drippings or chicken broth to the mixture. If you dont have any more drippings or broth, you can combine a chicken bouillon cube teaspoon of poultry seasoning, three tablespoons of butter and 1 cup of water. Cook the mixture in the microwave for 3 to 5 minutes or until it comes to a boil. Stir to combine and then add it, a little at a time, to the dressing until its moist. SOUPY MASHED POTATOES Add unseasoned dry breadcrumbs to soupy mashed potatoes to absorb any excess liquid. GRAVY RESCUE TIPS If the gravy is lumpy, pour it through a strainer into a new pan and bring it to a simmer, stirring gently. If its too thin, mix a tablespoon of melted butter with a taup to a boil and whisk in the butter mixture to thicken your gravy. If the gravy is too thick, add a little more chicken broth, pan drippings or a little water and butter to thin it out. BURNT OFFERINGS If the turkey begins to burn over immediately and continue to cook it. After the turkey is done, you can remove and discard any blackened skin and about half an inch of the meat below any burnt area. Slice the remaining breast meat, arrange it on a platter and ladle gravy over it. If your vegetables or gravy burn on the bottom, carefully remove the layer that isnt burned into another pot or serving dish. Dont scrape the bottom of the pan! If the dinner rolls are burned on the bottom, just cut off as much as you can, butter them, and fold them in half to cover the missing ends. Whipped cream is the perfect make-up for desserts that arent quite up to par. You can cut the top layer off a burnt pie and cover it with whipped cream. Hopefully, these tips will rescue you from any Thanksgiving Day disasters, but remember, its about gathering together to give thanks with the people you love not the perfect meal! Have a blessed Thanksgiving! Angela SS helf MM edearis is an awardwinning children s author, culinary historian and author of seven cookbooks. HH er new cookbook is T T he Kitchen Divas Diabetic C C ookbook. H H er website is divapro.com. TT o see ho w-to videos, recipes and more, like Angela SS helf M M edearis, TT he Kitchen Diva!, on Facebook and go to H H ulu.com. R R ecipes may not be reprinted without permission from Angela S S helf M M edearis. 2013 King Features S S ynd. I I nc. DD ont let mishaps ruin TT hanksgiving dinner PHOTO BY DANIELLE PLANK THE OBSERVER

PAGE 17

WW inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver | T T hursday, NN ov. 21, 2013 | Page 17 One Senior Place ... See our full Calendar of Events at OneSeniorPlace.com407.949.6733715 Douglas Avenue Altamonte Springs, FL 32714M-F 8:30am 5pmFRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22 WellCare Seminar Fri, Nov 22nd 9:30am-10:30am Mon, Nov 25th 3pm-4pm Tues, Nov 26th 9:30am-10:30am Wed, Nov 27th 9:30am-10:30am Presented by Medicare Plan Options RSVP 407.949.6723 Medicare Educational Workshop 12:30pm 2pm By Medicare Plan Options RSVP 407.949.6723 ADRC Workshop How to Survive Your Role as Caregiver 2pm -3:30pm Presented by Jerry Hamilton, MSEd RSVP 407.843.1910 MONDAY, NOVEMBER 25 Senior Club Sponsored by Family Physicians Group Every Monday, 10am 12pm November 25th Casino Day The Real Estate Specialists are IN 10am-1pm Presented by Exit Real Estate Results By Appointment Only 407.949.6714 TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 26 AARP Medicare Complete 2pm-3:30pm Presented by LTC Advisors RSVP 407.949.6722 Health Care Reform 3:30pm-5pm Presented by LTC Advisors RSVP 407.949.6722 WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 27 Bingo Bash 3pm-4pm Hosted by Orlando Family Physicians Open to the Public. Hearing Aids Users Improve Relationships & Self Image! Come Hear Why! 3pm-4:30pm Presented by Harmony Hearing Centers of America RSVP 407.949.6737 TUESDAY, DECEMBER 3RD FROM 9AM 12NOON Dementia: Everything you want to know, but were afraid to ask. Guest speakers include: Dr. Goodman, MD, with Compass Research; Gloria Gluskin, LCSW, with Arden Courts Memory Care Community and Jerry Hamilton with the Alzheimers & Dementia Resource Center. RSVP to 407.949.6733 HAPPY THANKSGIVING! One Senior Place will be closed for the Thanksgiving Holiday on Thursday, November 28th and Friday, November 29th. We hope you have a wonderful Holiday!Calendar of Events November 2013 shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM here should be more to life than maintenance-free living. To learn more about our community in Kissimmee, call (407) 933-1999. Whats the hardest and warmest job? Caregiving. It hits you on so many levels: heart, home, head, back muscles, social life. It starts with a warm, caring heart for a loved one. The journey calls for thousands of adjustments big and small. Relationships change, navigating the medical maze taxes the brain and patience, attending to physical needs uses muscles you didnt know you had, and the social isolation of it all adds to the challenge. November is National Caregivers Month, a month dedicated to recognizing and appreciating the caregivers among us. That does not make the journey shorter, but it does put a spotlight on one of lifes biggest challenges. In the U.S., about one of every three adults cares for someone who is ill, disabled or aged. Chances are pretty high that you or someone you know is a caregiver. As baby boomers age, caregiving is the trend. Caregiving can be checking on a friend or family member periodically to caring for a call it the 36-hour day), and everything in between. A friend or family member may need help with shopping, preparing food, transportation, housekeeping, laundry or medication. He or she may need help with feeding, dressing, bathing, reading mail or paying bills. Family caregivers provide emotional support in ways that only kin can do. One of the biggest challenges is coordinating medical care, with all its dysfunctional disparate parts. Medications are a huge hurdle, with pills that look alike when they are different and look different when they are the same, changing prescriptions, and a dizzying array of interactions and sideeffects. AARPs caregiving website aarp.org/caregiving offers tools and support to help you with the caregiving journey. In the chat room you can connect with other caregivers and pose your perplexing questions to the experts. Click on the link for you know you are a caregiver if to enjoy a humorous video laughing at the surreal twists of caregiver life. Help for caregivers comes in many forms. Home health nurses not only understand the health issues and medication, but can also assess the psychological and social needs and make recommendation for care and resources. Your employer may have an Employee Assistance Program or senior care management services. A local care manager may help you determine what you need, identify financial options, be the neutral counselor to help the person in need express her needs, and develop a plan of care. The many local agencies on aging, such as the Senior Resource Alliance or Area Agency on Aging can be resources. In some religious congregations, parish nurses help caregivers. Working at a job and caring for someone is a tricky balancing act. One of Bill Clintons legacy legislative successes is the Family Medical Leave Act. Based on the premise that no American should have to choose between caring for family and keeping his job, FMLA provides job protection to caregivers who may be off the job for up to 60 days in a year in or der to care for a family member. Not everyone is eligible for this benefit, but it is worth investigating your options. We are all connected as humans and need one another; caregiving is natural for many of us. Caregiving can also be its own reward. What can be more fulfilling and meaningful than helping someone you care about? TT he rewarding challenges of caregiving Dr. NN ancy RR udner L L ugo HH ealth Action

PAGE 18

Page 18 | T T hursday, NN ov. 21, 2013 | W W inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver CC urrent NN ew SS culptures in O O rlando T T he C C ity BB eautiful In the past week the visual image of Orlando, already called the City Beautiful, was public sculptures were unveiled throughout the city. Last week Mayor Buddy Dyer dedicated a sculpture honoring the Tuskegee Airmen outside the Orlando Science Center and then illuminated the much-upgraded Tower of Light at City Hall. This week, the festivities included the unveiling of eight new See Art Orlando sculptures around downtown Orlando. Then Nov. 19 saw the the Urban Art Museum on Mills Avenue. Countless communityminded corporations and individuals are to be thanked for this unprecedented unveiling of creativity. For now, lets celebrate the extraordinary new art and the people who inspire us by making the City Beautiful ever more deserving of that beautiful title. NN ow through NN ov. 24 OO rlando M M useum of A A rts FF estiv al of T T rees The holiday season in Orlando begins with the annual Festival of Trees, running through Nov. 24 as the Council of 101 transforms the Orlando Museum of Art into a holiday wonderland. Generous Florida businesses, clubs, and designers sponsor trees and decorations to be auctioned off, making this one of the Museums biggest fundraisers of the year. This is sculpture of a different sort and not-to-be-missed. Call 407-896-4231, ext. 254, or email councilof101@aol.com NN ow through DD ec. 14 C C razy for G G ershwin at the WW inter Park Playhouse The creatives at the Winter Park Playhouse often create a musical based on the work of a great composer or performer. Their newest effort is Crazy for Gershwin A Tribute to George & Ira Gershwin. Running through Dec. 14, this tribute to the Gershwins sung by some of the best voices in Florida reminds us of the unbelievable number of songs created by this all-American duo including Embraceable You, I Got Rhythm, Someone to Watch Over Me, and SWonderful! Who could ask for anything more? Call 407645-0145 or visit winterparkplayhouse.org NN ov. 22 BB eethoven SS onatas to be performed by L L eonidas LL ipovetskyCritically acclaimed since his debut recital at age 12, Leonidas Lipovetsky will perform the third Josh Garrick Culture worthy of your calendar PP lease see CULTUR eE on next page FES tT IVAL OF tT REES CRAZY FOR GERSHWI nN

PAGE 19

WW inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver | T T hursday, NN ov. 21, 2013 | Page 19 rfntbbbrb rfntbff fbbfft ft rbtf bffrff rbrbt bfrtrrb tbf ntrt ttrr tbt ttttr tttrtrtf bft rtft rrfrfntfb rbrbbbrfr rfnrtbrn CULTUR eE | II n the mood for a more whimsical holiday tale? TT ake your kids to S S eussical the M M usical, Jr.in a series of eight performances of all 32 Beethoven Sonatas on Nov. 22. Presented by the Florida International Piano Competition, Lipovetsky has recorded for the BBC, Radio Moscow, and PBS; Van Cliburn Scholarship; and he taught at Florida State University. Lipovetsky will perform Sonata No. 2; Sonata No. 7; Sonata No. 19; Sonata No. 20; and Sonata No. Shakespeare Center in Orlando. piano.org NN ov. 22 and 23 SS eussical the M M usical, Jr. being transported to the Circus McGurkus, where the Cat in the Hat narrates the story of Horton, the elephant who discovers the tiny people called the Whos. The story tells how the powers of friendship, loyalty, and family are challenged and emerge triumphant! Performed by members of the Children & Youth Arts Program at Central Florida Commuthe Musical Jr. will be presented on Nov. 22 and 23 at 7 p.m. at the Cornerstone Charter Academy in dren age 3 and younger are free). Visit cfcarts.com CCOO N TT IN UEUE D FROFRO M pP REV iI OUS pP A GE PP lease see CULTUR eE on page 20 LEO nN IDAS LIPOVE tT SKY SEUSSICAL This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORG @EnzianTheater Cult Classic: GET SHORTY Tues 9:30 PMHELD OVER!Cast | Chiwetel Ejiofor, Benedict Cumberbatch, Paul Giamatti, Brad Pitt 12 YEARS A SLAVE Fri, Sat, Sun 3:30 PM, 6:45 PM, 9:45 PM Mon 6:30 PM, 9:45 PM Tues 6:30 PM Wed, Thurs 6:30 PM, 9:45 PM 22nd ANNUAL BROUHAHA FILM AND VIDEO SHOWCASE A Short Film Celebration of Florida Filmmakers Sat & Sun 11 AM & 1:15 PM 4 Unique Programs Only $5 or $10 Showcase Pass

PAGE 20

Page 20 | T T hursday, NN ov. 21, 2013 | W W inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver Central Florida Zoo & Botanical Gardens Citizens Bank City of Longwood Elevation Health Lake Mary Chiropractic The Orlando Sentinel South Seminole Hospital United Legacy Bank WasteProJoin us November 23 & 24, 2013Always the Weekend Before ThanksgivingHours: Saturday: 9:00am to 5:00pm & Sunday: 9:00am to 4:00pmLocated in Historic Longwood just west of the Hwy 434/427 intersection.For more information, call: 407-331-7354 Free AdmissionFree Parking (Kids 8 and under) for Historical Preservation: 407-331-7354 italiokitchen.com rfntrbr 276 South Orlando Ave., Winter Park, FL 32789Italio is a modern Italian kitchen created with freshness in mind. Every meal is completely customizable and handcrafted in our open kitchen with only the finest and freshest ingredients. We believe in fast, flavorful meals. And we believe great food shouldnt break the bank.Winter Park WITH PURCHASE OF AN ENTREE Coupon is required. Coupon cannot be combined with any other offer. One coupon per person, per visit. FREE CALAMARIExpires: 12/31/2013 | Code: WPMO5 CULTUR eE | WW ant a fuller T T hanksgiving? Volunteer to give out meals! NN ov. 27 LL ake MM ary/ HH eathrow 4th W W ednesday AA rt S S trollAdd 4th Wednesday to the days of the month given over to an art and wine walk this one at Colonial Town Center in Lake Mary. In addition to loads of original art, this family friendly nesses offering free wine samples as we Art Stroll. Presented by the Colonial Townpark Merchant Association and Art for All Spaces, you can begin your stroll at 951 Market Promenade Ave. in Lake Mary. Visit facebook.com/ events/322832001195022/ or call 407-450-2255. NN ov. 28 TT hanksgiving DD ay G G olden C C orral hosts 25,000More than 25,000 meals will be served at the Salvation Army Gymnasium at 440 W. Colonial Drive on Thanksgiving Day as Golden Corral offers its 21st annual Helpings from the Heart Thanksgiving Dinner. For 21 years Eric Holm, president of Metro Corral Partners, has given back to the community, returning the favor to The Salvation Army, which provided a Thanksgiving meal to the Holm family when he was a child. We feel blessed that we can not only share in the experience, but most importantly ensure our Central Florida community is fed, Holm said. All are invited, and more than 1,000 volunteers are needed to help serve the free meals, which begin at 11 a.m. and are served through 5 p.m. Please pass this information along to any who needs it, and should you wish to volunteer at the event, please call 407-4238581. NN ov. 30 HH ome for the HH olidays with the O O rlando Philharmonic The Orlando Philharmonic will call out the troops for their annual Home for the Holidays concert featuring The Holiday Singers, Florida Opera Childrens Chorus, dancers, bagpipers, aerialist Amanda Cariotto and the Orchestra! In two performances, on Nov. 30 at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. at the Bob Carr PAC, Home for the Holidays will include seasonal favorites such as The Little Drummer Boy, along with classical selections and a special performance of Twas the Night Before Christmas. Concert attendees are encouraged to bring a food item to help restock the Second Harvest Food Bank. Call 407-7700071 or visit OrlandoPhil.org CCOO N TT IN UEUE D FROFRO M pP A GE 19 SS EE AA R tT O O RLA n N DO HELPI nN GS FROM tT HE HEAR tT Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. H H e is a member of the C C uratorial C C ouncil for the MM useum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906.

PAGE 21

WW inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver | T T hursday, NN ov. 21, 2013 | Page 21Statistics reveal that almost 80% of women suffer from some kind of hor monal imbalance resulting in a slew of physical and mental health challenges. But what comes to mind when we think of hormones? Menopause? Pregnancy? That time of the month? The truth is, our hormones contribute continually to numerous functions in the body, including heart rate, body temperature, blood quality, respiration, and bone health. It is simply too difficult to separate a hormones from overall physical health. But hormones do more than just keep our bodies fully functional. They are our internal GPS. They help us tap into our very best self. This is possible when we sync up our hormonal blueprint and let it guide the way. When our hormones are out of whack, everything is affected. Symptoms range from acne, dandruff, headaches, cramps, exhaustion, digestive problems, irregular or painful periods, weight gain, anxiety, insomnia, low libido, inexplicable food cravings to mood swings and irritability and depression. So what causes hormonal imbalances? 1. Internal imbalance. Problems with elimination, poor liver and thyroid health, lack of appropriate nutrients and roller coaster blood sugar levels all can result in hormonal imbalances. Digestive health tops the list followed closely by erratic blood sugar levels. When we understand our bodys requirements, we can meet them and maintain hormonal balance. 2. External toxicity. Hormones in meat and dairy, pesticides in food, chemicals in cosmetic products, toxic household cleaning products, disinfectants, dry cleaning fluids, BPAs and PCBs, lead in paints and other dirt in our air and water affect our hormonal health significantly. Its always a good idea to use safe, chemicalfree household cleaning and cosmetic products. Herbs like cilantro and parsley are great for getting rid of heavy metals and other toxins in the body. 3. Stress. Stress triggers a specific set of hor mones that wreck havoc on our bodys delicate infrastructure. In even a mildly stressful situation, the brain will tap into our progesterone reserve to counteract the building anxiety. Most stress today is caused by non-life threatening situations and yet we constantly fall victim to this enormous hormone disruptor. What if you could learn some ways to tame the monkey mind and operate from a calmer space? 4. Rejecting our femininity. A majority of women learn early in life to hate their bodies and period. Truth is our cycle offers a perfectly systematic blueprint that can guide you towards a healthy, productive, creative lifestyle. Its really time to embrace, heal, nurture and celebrate every aspect of our femininity. A life of vitality, freedom and happiness is possible if you can understand the wisdom of your body and monthly cycle. So whats keeping you? Which of these four is contributing to an imbalance in your body and mind right now? PP uja MM adan is a womens health coach, writer and speaker S S he has received her training from the world-renowned I I nstitute for I I ntegrative N N utrition, NN ew YY ork. P P uja offers powerful health and wellness programs for young women, in person or online, empowering them through healthier food and lifestyle choices. P P uja practises YY oga and medita tion daily and believes that all inner growth starts with a love affair with oneself! For more information visit www.innerscientist.com or www.facebook.com/ innerscientist

PAGE 22

Page 22 | T T hursday, NN ov. 21, 2013 | W W inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver King Features Weekly ServiceNovember 18, 2013 EDITORIAL CARTOON In my heart, I think a woman has two choices: either shes a feminist or a masochist. Gloria Steinem My life abruptly changed with the birth of my daughter in 1970. Having a child was challenging enough but having a daughter prompted my asking myself, Would I raise this child, my daughter, differently if she were male? I probably did not articulate that question then as clearly as I do today, but I quickly determined that I wanted for her whatever she could imagine. I came of age in the 1960s and I am grateful for that. I was privileged to have a mother who saw no limits to what she could personally achieve. Her example, no dent, intelligent, creative, independent and witty women have been an integral part of my life. I applaud these qualities and believe they are an essential part of a womans femininity. The 1960s and s had feminism move to the front of the national conscience and conversation. Americas daughtersawakenedwerent going to take it anymore and in an effort to institutionalize the new reality, an effort was made to achieve a constitutional amendment assuring equal rights for women. In 1972 both houses of Congress passed The Equal Rights Amendment which read: Equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex. Radical, huh? I jest. What happened next is important because of its relevance to todays political landscape. The amendment was well on its way to national approval when Phylorganized Americas rightwing base to this dubious achievement through fear and deceit. Former U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright suggests, There is a special place in hell for women who do not help other women. Move ahead to today and you have a Republican Party that is consistently losing national elections, in part, because it is losing the female vote. What triggered this column was a recent announcement by three Republican women creating a new companyBurning Glass Consulting to communicate smarter about the Republican message to women. I laughed out loud when I read this. Republican message to women? What exactly might that be? What would prompt any woman, of any age, to identify with the Republican Party? Uh, Check your brain at the door, Maam? Nationwide, Republicans fervently oppose reproductive freedom for women. They consider a woman incapable of deciding for herself if and when she will become pregnant. Republican state legislatures nationwide, if left to their own devices, intrusively insert themselves into probe bill). They will restrict access to birth control. Women, according to Republicans, do not have the ability or evidently the right to own and manage their own bodies. Any number of issues that have a direct impact on Americas women, Republicans oppose, whether it be the SNAP program, the environment or access to healthcare. I marvel that any woman would publicly align herself with the Republican Party. If, as a woman, you prefer the boot heel of oppression on the back of your neck, todays GOP is just the Boys Club for you. As the early American feminist Sarah Grimk observed, I ask no favors for my sex. All I ask of our brethren is that they will take their feet from off our necks. TT he choice is yours, woman Jepson is a 27-year resident of CC entral Florida. HH es scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. R R each him at Jepson@ ME ME D I I America. US US College when I was a boy. Junior year in high school I asked him, What is the greatest university in the United States? Harvard, he answered. Thats where I want to go, I said. Getting there involved more than wishing. I took competitive examinations, and afterwards a representative from Harvard came to see my family one evening in Winter Park. The result was a full scholarship, a necessity for me in those Depression days. Harvard has played a great part in my life since my graduation in 1942. Now, I learn that the lad across the street, son of good friends, has received a letter from Harvard asking him if he would like to apply for entrance. I told my b.w. with a smile, Maybe HarPark this time! How I wish I could relive those four years! And I wish neighbor Henry, God speed. The Pilgrims landed at Plymouth Rock in 1620. Sixteen years later Harvard! forever by answering the question, What time is it? with, You mean now? In my whole life I dont think I have said anything any more beautifully to the point than did Yogi! Armistice Day, reminds us of the many wars in which this country has invested wealth and blood. We have fought to save and to serve millions of people, but we have never taken one square-foot of their land. The day after Pearl Harbor, I took the subway to Boston and joined the U.S. Navy. By late spring, I was in uniform at Notre Dame University, and then Northwesterns downtown Chicago campus. Later, Commander Gene Tunney, the great boxer, handed me my Ensigns commission, and I was off to the wars as returned to civilian life in January of 1946. Veterans Day brings back my memories in full living color. Im glad that I served and Im also glad I survived. I lost a lot of friends in the war, guys who will always remain young in my memories. Both the enemy countries, Germany and Japan, are now staunch allies and friends, so what was it all about anyhow? In the world on that good people could not tolerate, and we were good people with enormous power to wage war and put things right. Thank God the good people were stronger than the bad! I had that uneasy feeling again, the same kind of feeling I had when I heard of FDRs death, the shooting of JFK, and now, the unending bald-faced lies of a president who scares me with intimations of things that would perhaps serve some purposeful plans of his own but, that also might bankrupt our great nation. Once again I able to control my own destiny and am simply treading water until there is some solid ground under my feet. I feel as lacking in resolution as T.S. Eliot when, in The Lovesong of J. Alfred Prufrock he cannot decide whether or not to peel a peach. Mr. Obama seems to think that our health care, which is one-sixth of our economy, can be manipulated to address almost anything he may have in mind. As I never feel that he is talking straight to me, I am at a loss to anticipate his end me, You can keep your doctor if you want him, and your insurance if it suits you, period! Those are pretty simple words. But can I count on them to mean what they say? The presidents compulsion to interpret everything he tells us puts a second spin on most of his utterances. Off we go Ive that old feeling again! TT hat old feeling again About RR oney: HH arvardDistinguished P P rof, E E m. UC UC F 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy R R oney) LL etters to the editor SS end your thoughts (400 words or less) to MM anaging EE ditor II saac BB abcock at ibabcock@turnstilemedia group.com THTH E WW E STST WINTWINT E RR P ARAR K TALT AL K S S Years before East Winter Park decided to spend $90,000 on a marketing consultant, a whitemale graduate marketing instructor, community activist, and Rollins College alum, inspired by his parents and a couple of relatives, wondered to himself how he could help West Winter Park a predominantly AfricanAmerican community promote and preserve its historic brand, and offer free scholarships to give the areas youth a leg up in life. And, for added measure, why not showcase what makes Winter Park special, and appoint a mayor and vice mayor? OK, breathe in and out... have a seat... relax. This isnt what you think it is. And it certainly wont cost West Winter Park $90,000. The idea would be to accept a conditional donation, from this white male, of time and expertise for a one-year period only. Parttime, of course. In fact, thats what a group of West Winter Park leaders have been mulling over for quite some time. Should Rev. A. C. Cobb of Mt. Moriah Church be appointed Honorary Mayor of West Winter Park an honorary title with dignity and respect. And should appointed Honorary Vice Mayor to one year and ineligible to be Honorary Mayor per his personal wishes). Mr. Graves conceived of the entire idea and would be donating ample time and expertise for free in keeping with the tradition of his family members who played major national roles in helping African-Americans groundbreaking preservationist Barbara Drew Hoffstot, and JFKs Deputy Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach who later became an I.B.M. director. Will Graves would donate Will Graves Scholarships taught by himself on self-improvement topics based upon his 13 years of university teaching experience improvement newspaper columnist in a town with three times the population of Winter Park. He would also work on a stretch-goal of using his national business networking ties to try to attract an I Have A Dream Foundation grant. If Will Graves is willing to try to obtain free college educations for every West Winter Park child who graduates from high school, what have you got to lose except ignorance? The titles are ceremonial. We ing legislation. Its all about respect for West Winter Park residents. Will Graves Donor Will Graves Scholarships Commemorating the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington OO pinions CC hris Jepson PP erspectivesLouis RR oney PP lay OO n!

PAGE 23

WW inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver | T T hursday, NN ov. 21, 2013 | Page 23 OO pinions Schuberts music is as entrancing in Winter Park, Fla., as in Vienna, Austria, where his genius graced the landscape for a mere 30 short years. On Nov. 17, the Bach Festival Guest Artist Series presented the Mir String Quartet, resident artists at the University of Texas, in an all-Schubert program in Tiedtke Hall at Rollins College. Schubert Quartet No. 12 in C minor pact gem of writing and remains, like Schuberts famous Eighth SymSchubert was one of the great masters of melody, and his amicable tunes marked the programs entirety. The 12th Quartet set the tone for the afternoon with melodious inspiration. The Mir Quartet of world-class players approached virtuosic perfection and reached it convincingly. String Quartet in E Major Op. 125 No. 2 brought four crystal-clear instrumental voices that gave full meaning to Schuberts compositional form and myriad winning tunes. Cheerful, immaculate The programs second half brought the well-known String Quartet No. 14 in D minor, known worldwide as Death and the Maiden. This music is Schubert at his most mature, and the hearer can anticipate here predictions of Beethovens profound inventions that were to come. The rapidity of the Mirs performance in the last movement of the quartet made one wonder if they could maintain the speed in the even faster tempo of the coda, which ends the Quartet. They did! Winter Parkers can be grateful indeed to be able to hear at their own doorstep of the Mir Quartet, with its ineffably beautiful performance. The audiences standing and cheering expressed enormous, well-deserved gratitude. An afternoon to remember! Autumn is a great time to visit one of District 5s many outdoor recreational amenities that include hiking and bike trails, environmental lands, community parks, and historical sites. You are only a few minutes drive from many of these great facilities regardless of where you live in the district. One of my favorite Orange Coun ty parks is the Fort Christmas Historical Park located 2 miles north of East State Road 50 in Christmas on Fort Christmas Road. The site dates back to Dec. 25, 1837, when a force of 2,000 U.S. Army troops and Alabama Volunteers established the fort during the Second Seminole War. Today, the park contains a recreation of the original 19th century fort along with several restored Florida Cracker style homes and a historical depiction of the school and farms used by the areas early settlers. The site hosts one of the most attended community events in District 5, Cracker Christmas. Thousands of to the park to take part in food, crafts, and living history demonstrations of 19th century life in Christmas. I hope youll join me this Dec. 7 and 8 for this years Cracker Christmas celebration. District 5 has thousands of acr es of environmental lands available to the public for hiking, birding, camping, horseback riding, and other outdoor activities. These lands contain many of the habitats that are representative of Central Floridas ecology, including freshwater marshes, oak hammocks, pine domes, riverine swamps, and forested wetlands. The largest of District 5s environmental lands is the Hal Scott Preserve preserves main trailhead is located 2 miles north of the Beachline on Dallas Boulevard. The preserve is an 8,000-acre parcel that protects a large portion of the Econlockhatchee River. The preserve is an excellent location for hiking and birding and includes primitive campsites for those seeking to enjoy the natural beauty of the area overnight. Immediately adjacent to the Hal Scott Preserve is Long Branch Park, an area that preserves the habitats associated with the Long Branch Tributary of the Econlockhatchee River. Orange County also operates Pine Lily Preserve, which is approximately 431 acres in size and is located next to Hal Scott Preserve and Long Branch. On the northern side of District 5, the 4,608-acre Charles Bronson State Forest awaits with many great trails for both hiking and horseback riding. Savage/Christmas Creek Preserve is a 1,126acre parcel that was acquired by Orange County in 1999. Future plans call for an active park site that will be located on 229 acres of the parcel that is located on East State Road 50. The parks are a symbol of Orange Countys commitment to establishing wildlife corridors that ensure that native T wo paved trails, the Cady Way Trail and the Little Econ Greenway, stretch 14.4 miles across District 5 and provide recreation for many East Orange County residents. The Little Econ Greenway currently extends 7.9 miles from the intersection of Alafaya Trail and Lokanotosa Trail through Blanchard Park and eventually ending on Forsyth Road. The trail features riverside recreation, picnicking, wildlife watching and canoeing. The Cady Way Trail is a 6.5-mile paved corridor that links Orlando and Winter Park, and connects with the Cross Seminole Trail in Seminole County. Orange County will be expanding the trail system to link the Cady Way and Little Econ trails together, as well as provide trail access to the University of Central Florida, the Cross Seminole Trail system, and the city of Oviedo. District 5 has several community parks available for many types of out door activities. Bithlo residents can enjoy the Bithlo Community Park. The park, also the site of the Bithlo Community the recently opened Bithlo Splash Pad. Goldenrod Park on East Aloma Drive includes a playground, tennis court, small pavilion, restroom facility, and an Orange County Orlando Magic Recreation Center. Although not located within District 5, Blanchard Park is a great facility located minutes from many District 5 residents between Dean and Rouse roads. The park straddles the beautiful Little Econ River with canoeing, picnicking facilities, and a trailhead for the Little Econ Greenway. District 5 is home to many great parks, environmental lands, and recreational amenities that set it apart from the rest of the county. I hope youll take advantage of many of these facilities available in District 5. It is an honor to serve as your District 5 commissioner. If you have any questions or concerns about Orange Countys parks and environmental lands please log on to the Orange County Parks aspx. My staff and I are also available to answer any questions you may have. We can be reached at 407-836-7350 or by email See you at Cracker Christmas this Dec. 7 and 8! MM iro SS tring Quartet wows at BB ach FF est TT is the season for C C racker C C hristmas King Features Weekly ServiceNovember 18, 2013 EDITORIAL CARTOONS TT ed E E dwardsCommissioners Corner LOUIS RONEY OO bserver columnistThe Miro Quartet of world-class players approached virtuousic perfection and reached it convincingly Join me Dec. 7 and 8 for this years Cracker Christmas

PAGE 24

Page 24 | T T hursday, NN ov. 21, 2013 | W W inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver

PAGE 25

WW inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver | T T hursday, NN ov. 21, 2013 | Page 25

PAGE 26

Page 26 | T T hursday, NN ov. 21, 2013 | W W inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver

PAGE 27

WW inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver | T T hursday, NN ov. 21, 2013 | Page 27

PAGE 28

Page 28 | T T hursday, NN ov. 21, 2013 | W W inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver

PAGE 29

WW inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver | T T hursday, NN ov. 21, 2013 | Page 29

PAGE 30

Page 30 | T T hursday, NN ov. 21, 2013 | W W inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver

PAGE 31

WW inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver | T T hursday, NN ov. 21, 2013 | Page 31

PAGE 32

Page 32 | T T hursday, NN ov. 21, 2013 | W W inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver

PAGE 33

WW inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver | T T hursday, NN ov. 21, 2013 | Page 33

PAGE 34

Page 34 | T T hursday, NN ov. 21, 2013 | W W inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver

PAGE 35

WW inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver | T T hursday, NN ov. 21, 2013 | Page 35

PAGE 36

Page 36 | T T hursday, NN ov. 21, 2013 | W W inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver

PAGE 37

WW inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver | T T hursday, NN ov. 21, 2013 | Page 37

PAGE 38

Page 38 | T T hursday, NN ov. 21, 2013 | W W inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver

PAGE 39

WW inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver | T T hursday, NN ov. 21, 2013 | Page 39 SATSAT U RR D AYAY 12-3 NEWNEW L ISTIN ISTIN G! TOWNHOMETOWNHOME IN IN TERRITERRI F IC IC L OC OC A TIONTION 2211 H H awick Lane, WW inter P P ark. 3 B B D/2.5 B B A, 1,744 S S F. Gourmet kitchen with granite countertops, stainless appliances, pantry and breakfast bar. Great room with 10 ft. ceilings, lighted archways, porcelain tile floors and surround sound. N N ew A C C and exterior paint. French doors open to brick pavered patio and fenced courtyard. $325,000 SATSA T U R R D AYA Y 1-4 SPSP A CIOUS CIOUS FA MI MI L YY HOME HOME 5512 CC henault Avenue, OO rlando. 4 B B D/3 B B A, 2,649 S S F. H H ome offers kitchen with an eat-in area, large family room with a wood burning fireplace, split bedroom plan, 2 car attached garage, large screen porch with the beginnings of a summer kitchen, plenty of room for a pool. Also, a 440 S S F heated & cooled workshop/storage room in back of attached garage. $204,900 SS U N N D AYA Y 12-3 NEWNEW L ISTIN ISTIN G! CONTEMPORCONTEMPOR A RY RY HOME HOME WITHWITH POO POO L 1736 BB arcelona W W ay W W inter PP ark. 4 B B D/3.5 B B A, 3,371 S S F. P P ool home with detached 1/1 guest house in S S evilla. TT wo large master suites, large loft, soaring ceilings, wood-burning fireplace, laundry SS unday, NN ovember 24th 1955 King Arthur CC ircle, MM aitland FL 32751 4 BR BR | 3 B B A | 3,195 S S F | $650,000 Fabulous M M aitland pool home in soughtafter Kings R R ow neighborhood! Gorgeous eat-in kitchen, private master suite, cozy den off the living room and crown molding. H H uge family room offers a wall of built-ins around the fireplace, vaulted ceilings and French doors that lead to the pool area. Great central location, just minutes to the Famers M M arket at Lake Lily and Downtown WW inter P P ark! HH osted by: Debbie TT assell from 1-4 PM PM 2350 TT emple Drive, WW inter P P ark FL 32789 4 BR BR | 4 B B A | 2,006 S S F | $450,000 Gorgeous WW inter P P ark home fea turing a formal living room, office with pocket doors, and kitchen with breakfast bar open to the dining room area. TT he spacious family room features a fireplace, built-ins and two sets of French doors that lead to the covered patio and fenced backyard. Gorgeous finishes throughout including crown molding, wood floors and plantation shutters! BB onuses include a guest suite above the detached two car garage. HH osted by: Kelly L. P P rice from 1-4 PM PM 812 N N ottingham S S treet, O O rlando FL 32803 2 BR BR | 2 B B A | 1,164 S S F | $237,000 Adorable bungalow in O O rwin M M anor! OO versized windows draw in the natural light and provide unobstructed views of the serene shaded yard. R R ecent updates to the kitchen include butcher block counters and stainless steel appliances. RR elaxing master suite offers an updated bath with slate floors, new soaking tub, separate shower and updated fixtures. Additional features include cypress wood floors, new A/ C C unit and electrical panel. Fantastic location, just minutes to shopping, dining and entertainment! HH osted by: TT iffan y P P rewitt from 1-4 PM PM 219 Flame Avenue, M M aitland FL 32751 4 BR BR | 2.5 B B A | 3,430 S S F | $425,000 SS tunning ranch style home nestled in a OO B SERSER V ER EROO pen HH ouses OO B SERSER V ER ER Just SS old HH omes ANNOUNCANNOUNC E MM E NTSNTSPP ublic Auction: MM ultiple CC ompanies OO nline & OO nsite SS aturday, N N ov 23 at 10am 5553 Anglers Ave, B B ldg 4, Dania B B each, Fl 33312 Vehicles, C C omputers, O O ffice Furniture, O O ffice EE quipment, Dymo Drills, P P aint M M achine, WW arehouse I I tems and more!Visit www. moeckerauctions.com for details M M oecker Auctions (800) 840BI BI D S S $100 ref. cash dep.15% -18% BP BP S S ubj to confirm. A B B -1098 A U U -3219, E E ric R R ubin PP ublic Auction: EE xclusive MM illwork II nc.December 3rd at 10am PP review: 12/02 10-5pm 3277 SE SE 14 Ave, Fort Lauder dale, Fl 33316 H H uge I I nventory of Doors, Frames, Accessories & M M achinery. www. moeckerauctions.com MM oecker Auctions (800) 840BI BI D S S $100 ref. cash dep.15% -18% BP BP S S ubj to confirm. A B B -1098 A U U 3219, E E ric R R ubin WW inter PP ark B B enefit S S hop140 Lyman Ave, WW inter P P ark needs items to sell: clothing, bedding, jewelry, kitchenware and bric-a brac. Also needing volunteers. C C ontact E E lizabeth CC omer 407-647-8276. O O pen TT ues & F ri at 9:30am; S S at 10am-1pm. All proceeds support childrens programs & the O O r lando BB lind Association. HH E LL P WANTWANT E DD Driver TT rainees N N eeded NOW NOW BB ecome a driver for WW erner E E nterprises. EE arn $800 per week! Local C C DL TT raining. 1-877-214-3624. NN ow HH iring: OTROTR CC DLA Drivers NN ew P P ay P P acka geand $2500 SS ignOO n BB onus! MM ostly 5-10 days out, full benefits, achievable bonuses. C C all for details 1-888-378-9691/ apply at www.heyl.net MISCMISC E LLANLLAN E OUSOUS A IRIR L INEINE CC A REERSREERS begin here Get FAA approved Aviation MM aintenance TT echnician training. H H ousing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. C C all A IM IM 866-314-3769 THEMMARKEt T PLAc C E MindGym November 18, 2013 150 EE RR obinson SS treet Unit 3207, OO rlando, FLFL 32801 sold by Kelly L. P P rice & P P amela R R yan 4213 Cardinal Boulevard, Wilbur-ByTT heS S ea, F F lorida 32127 sold by R R enee Dee M M organ 2161 F F orrest R R oad, Winter P P ark, FF lorida 32789 sold by R R honda C C hesmore 1665 Comanche T T r ail, Maitland, FL FL 32751 sold by M M ary Ann S S teltenkamp 2414 S S ummerfield R R oad, Winter PP ark, FL FL 32792 sold by S S herri Dyer 150 E E R R obinson S S treet Unit 3010, O O r lando, FL FL 32801 sold by P P amela S S eibert TT rish S S anders 91 SS unrise LL ane, EE ustis $154,000. 11/12/2013 TT he N N ancy B B agby TT eam 1631 SS ummerland AA v e, Winter PP ark $849,250. 11/12/2013 Allison C C hambers 810 N N P P helps AA v e, Winter P P ark $430,000 11/13/2013 Ann Lee Ann Lee 3889 Water view L L oop, Winter P P ark $150,000. 11/13/2013 MM ary S S tuart Day / M M egan CC ross 1760 T T ippicanoe T T rl, Maitland $225,000. 11/14/2013 C C indy Kuykendall 635 Dunblane Dr, Winter P P ark $314,000. 11/15/2013 C C atherine DAmico 820 Mayfield A A v e, Winter P P ark $987,000. 11/15/2013 TT he NN ancy BB agby TT eam 1215 V V ia Del Mar, Winter P P ark $490,000. 11/15/2013 C C atherine DAmico 250 Carolina AA v e #206, Winter P P ark $325,000. 11/18/2013 SS hirley Jones 19737 S S trathaven RR oad, Winter PP ark $230,000. 10/15/2013 lovely M M aitland neighborhood situated on stunning park-like lot. Features include a large eat-in kitchen, family room with fireplace, wet bar, and bright Florida room that leads out to a beautifully pavered patio. E E njoy relaxing in the lush backyard near the waterfall and pond! HH osted by: E E rica S S ears from 1-4 PM PM 1163 W W ashington Avenue, W W inter PP ark FL 32789 2 BR BR | 2 B B A | 1,263 S S F | $239,500 WW alk to P P ark Avenue from this amazing condo! B B eautifully maintained and movein ready. TT his ground floor unit offers an updated eat-in kitchen with sliding glass doors that lead to a small deck, open dining and living areas, and large master suite with walk-in closet. B B eautiful fourseasons room adds additional living space and overlooks the nicely shaded backyard. Additional features include tile floors throughout, attached one car garage and lush landscaping. HH osted by: TT eresa JonesC C intron from 2-5 PM PM chute all on large landscaped lot. TT wo car garage and parking pad. TT ucked a way at the end of a quiet cul-de-sac. SS U N N D AYA Y 12-3 NEWNEW PRICE PRICE AD OR OR A B B L E E WINTERWINTER P P A R R K BUN BUN GAL OW OW 340 N N orth P P helps Avenue, WW inter P P ark. 2 B B D/1.5 B B A, 1,150 S S F. Fantastic hardwood floors throughout this charmer with an updated kitchen. Located on a beautifully landscaped corner lot. S S erene open patio offers a perfect spot for entertaining. UU pgrades include roof in 2005 and A C C in 2008. CC onveniently located and excellent WW inter P P ark schools. $275,000 SS U N N D AYA Y 1-4 TRTR AD ITION ITION AL POO POO L HOME HOME IN IN I I D E E AL L O O CC A TIONTION 451 S S ylvan Drive, WW inter P P ark. 4 B B D/3 B B A, 3,150 S S F. Light and bright home wrapped in French doors that open to large covered brick patio. WW et bar with wine fridge in butler s area. S S plit bedroom plan. M M aster bath has double sinks, jetted tub and separate shower. Large fenced yard with brick paver pool deck and heated spa. $699,000 NICENICE L YY RENO RENO VA TETE D POO POO L HOME HOME 1872 Jessica CC ourt, WW inter P P ark. 4 B B D/2.5 B B A, 2,607 S S F. U U pgrades to this two story home include I I talian porcelain tile throughout, updated kitchen with granite countertops, stainless appliances, and Kraft maid cabinets. All windows are double insulated H H urd windows. M M ost lighting is L E E D. B B rand new full house sound and music system inside and out. WW a terbridge community features tennis courts and is secluded with only two entrances. $489,000 NEWNEW PRICE PRICE WONWON D ER ER F U U L IN IN O O LD E E WINTERWINTER P P A R R K 1551 OO akhurst Avenue. W W inter PP ark. 4 B B D+ O O F C C /5 B B A. 3,854 S S F. S S ituated on a great double lot, this remarkable home offers so much! WW onderfully spacious kitchen with granite countertops; OO pen great room floor plan with soaring vaulted ceilings; Lovely downstairs master suite; Large bonus room and 2 guest suites upstairs; Fantastic heated pool and spa; TT remendous backy ard and open wooden deck make it perfect for enter taining! $899,000 SOUSOU G HT HT AF TER TER WIN WIN GF IE IE LD 2159 Deer H H ollow C C ircle, Longwood. 4 B B D/3 B B A. 3,100 S S F. E E njoy the S S eminole CC ounty Lifestyle in this beautifully cared for home. WW arm colors, extensive crown molding, newly re-done hard wood floors and incredible media room are just a few of the features in this Family HH ome. RR elax in your tropical amazing screened pool area and lanai. E E njoy coming home to this beauty. $569,000 MM A IT IT LA N N D POO POO L HOME HOME 280 WW hite OO ak CC ircle, MM aitland. 4 B B D/2.5 B B A, 2,276 S S F. Lovingly well-maintained pool home in M M aitland Grove subdivision close to Lake S S ybelia E E lementary walkway. S S plit plan with spacious rooms and good flow. WW ood burning fireplace, built in bookshelves, inside utility and large interior storage room. N N ewer A C C plumbing, roof, hot water heater, and electric box. H H uge screened patio over looking pool and oversized yard. $359,000 SS U N N D AYA Y 2-5 LA R R G E E POO POO L HOME HOME ON ON Q UIET UIET STREET STREET 2006 OO akhurst Avenue, W W inter PP ark. 4 B B D/3.5 B B A, 3,529 S S F. TT hree way split plan on quiet street. Downstairs master suite, bonus room, family room, den/office and media room as well as an art studio. U U pdated bathrooms and kitchen recently remodeled to include gas appliances, double ovens, double sinks and granite counters. Large covered porch and lanai with screened pool and spa. $499,000 NN ancy BB agby TT eam 851 G G eor gia A A v e, Winter P P ark $1,875,000. 10/16/2013 MM aria Van W W arner 150 EE R R obinson S S treet #810, O O rlando $250,000. 10/18/2013 Janis Fuller 2999 SS abel OO ak, OO viedo $200,000. 10/18/2013 Kelly M M aloney 137 NN orris PP lace, Casselberry $209,900. 10/18/2013 Lisa Fleming 127 Dalton Dr, OO viedo $192,000. 10/18/2013

PAGE 40

Page 40 | T T hursday, NN ov. 21, 2013 | W W inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Deci sions involving your finances might seem to be foolproof. But they could have underlying risks you should know about. Dont act on anything until all the facts are in. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Youre attracted to a situation that appeals to your Bovine intellect. And thats good. But dont neglect your passionate side when romance comes calling later in the week. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) A recent development enhances that special relationship. Spending more time together also helps make the bonding process stronger. Expect news about a possible career change. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) A sus picious situation should be dealt with before it leads to serious problems. Get all the facts needed to resolve it. Then refocus your energies on those tasks that need your attention. LEO (July 23 to August 22) Try to be more open-minded in working toward a resolution of that standoff between yourself and a colleague or family member. A little flexibility now could work to your advantage later. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) You might feel a bit threatened by a proposed workplace change. The best way to deal with it is to ask questions. Youll find that those involved will be happy to provide you with the facts. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Feeling alone in a crowd during the early part of the week is an unsettling emotion. But your spirits soon perk up, putting you into the right mood to start making holiday plans. SCORPIO (October 23 to Novem ber 21) A pesky problem should be dealt with immediately so you can put your time and effort into something more important. Someone from your past could have significant news for you. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) High-energy aspects dominate, both on the job and at home. Use this time to put some long-range plans into operation. Things level off later in the week. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Even the usually gregari ous Goat might feel overwhelmed by a flurry of activities. Be patient. Things soon return to your normal social routine. AQUARIUS (January 20 to Febru ary 18) Career choices that seem too confusing to deal with at this point probably are. More information would help uncomplicate them. On the per sonal side, a friend might need your advice. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Your Piscean imagination is stimulated by possibilities you see in a new opportunity. But keep those ideas to yourself until you feel ready to trans late them into a workable format. BORN THIS WEEK: You have an ingratiating way of helping people deal with their fears. Have you considered a career in social work or with the clergy? 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. Dec. 8, 1542, in Linlithgow Palace in Scotland, a daughter is born to James V, the dying king of Scotland. Named Mary, she was the only surviving child of her father and ascended to the Scottish throne when the king died just six days after her birth. Dec. 2, 1777, legend has it that Philadelphia housewife and nurse Lydia Darragh single-handedly saves the lives of Gen. George Washington and his Continental Army. She made notes when she overheard the Brit ish planning a surprise attack and got them to Washington. Dec. 6, 1921, The Irish Free State, comprising four-fifths of Ireland, is declared, ending a five-year Irish struggle for independence from Britain. The Irish Free State was renamed Eire, and is now called the Republic of Ireland. Dec. 5, 1933, the 21st Amendment to the U.S. Constitution is ratified, bringing an end to the prohibition of alcohol. Prohibition did little more than slow the flow of booze, and bootleggers like Al Capone built criminal empires out of illegal distribution. Dec. 4, 1945, the U.S. Senate approves U.S. participation in the United Nations. The U.N. allowed world leaders to observe each other as never before, as in the 1961 incident when Russian leader Nikita Khrush chev presented a spectacle by pounding his table with his shoe for emphasis during a U.N. debate. Dec. 3, 1979, the last Pacer rolls off the assembly line at the American Motors Corp. (AMC) factory. In 1975, the ads said, When you buy any other car, all you end up with is todays car. When you get a Pacer, you get a piece of tomorrow. Today polls and experts agree: The Pacer was one of the worst cars of all time. Dec. 7, 1982, the first execution by lethal injection takes place at the state penitentiary in Huntsville, Texas. Charles Brooks, Jr., convicted of mur dering an auto mechanic, received an intravenous injection of sodium pentothal, the barbiturate that is known as a truth serum when administered in lesser doses. 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. King Features Weekly ServiceNovember 18, 2013 ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Deci sions involving your finances might seem to be foolproof. But they could have underlying risks you should know about. Dont act on anything until all the facts are in. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Youre attracted to a situation that appeals to your Bovine intellect. And thats good. But dont neglect your passionate side when romance comes calling later in the week. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) A recent development enhances that special relationship. Spending more time together also helps make the bonding process stronger. Expect news about a possible career change. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) A sus picious situation should be dealt with before it leads to serious problems. Get all the facts needed to resolve it. Then refocus your energies on those tasks that need your attention. LEO (July 23 to August 22) Try to be more open-minded in working toward a resolution of that standoff between yourself and a colleague or family member. A little flexibility now could work to your advantage later. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) You might feel a bit threatened by a proposed workplace change. The best way to deal with it is to ask questions. Youll find that those involved will be happy to provide you with the facts. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Feeling alone in a crowd during the early part of the week is an unsettling emotion. But your spirits soon perk up, putting you into the right mood to start making holiday plans. SCORPIO (October 23 to Novem ber 21) A pesky problem should be dealt with immediately so you can put your time and effort into something more important. Someone from your past could have significant news for you. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) High-energy aspects dominate, both on the job and at home. Use this time to put some long-range plans into operation. Things level off later in the week. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Even the usually gregari ous Goat might feel overwhelmed by a flurry of activities. Be patient. Things soon return to your normal social routine. AQUARIUS (January 20 to Febru ary 18) Career choices that seem too confusing to deal with at this point probably are. More information would help uncomplicate them. On the per sonal side, a friend might need your advice. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Your Piscean imagination is stimulated by possibilities you see in a new opportunity. But keep those ideas to yourself until you feel ready to trans late them into a workable format. BORN THIS WEEK: You have an ingratiating way of helping people deal with their fears. Have you considered a career in social work or with the clergy? 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. Dec. 8, 1542, in Linlithgow Pal ace in Scotland, a daughter is born to James V, the dying king of Scotland. Named Mary, she was the only surviving child of her father and ascended to the Scottish throne when the king died just six days after her birth. Dec. 2, 1777, legend has it that Philadelphia housewife and nurse Lydia Darragh single-handedly saves the lives of Gen. George Washington and his Continental Army. She made notes when she overheard the Brit ish planning a surprise attack and got them to Washington. Dec. 6, 1921, The Irish Free State, comprising four-fifths of Ireland, is declared, ending a five-year Irish struggle for independence from Britain. The Irish Free State was renamed Eire, and is now called the Republic of Ireland. Dec. 5, 1933, the 21st Amendment to the U.S. Constitution is ratified, bringing an end to the prohibition of alcohol. Prohibition did little more than slow the flow of booze, and bootleggers like Al Capone built criminal empires out of illegal distribution. Dec. 4, 1945, the U.S. Senate approves U.S. participation in the United Nations. The U.N. allowed world leaders to observe each other as never before, as in the 1961 incident when Russian leader Nikita Khrush chev presented a spectacle by pounding his table with his shoe for emphasis during a U.N. debate. Dec. 3, 1979, the last Pacer rolls off the assembly line at the American Motors Corp. (AMC) factory. In 1975, the ads said, When you buy any other car, all you end up with is todays car. When you get a Pacer, you get a piece of tomorrow. Today polls and experts agree: The Pacer was one of the worst cars of all time. Dec. 7, 1982, the first execution by lethal injection takes place at the state penitentiary in Huntsville, Texas. Charles Brooks, Jr., convicted of mur dering an auto mechanic, received an intravenous injection of sodium pentothal, the barbiturate that is known as a truth serum when administered in lesser doses. 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. King Features Weekly ServiceNovember 18, 2013 MindGym November 18, 2013 MindGym November 18, 2013 MindGym November 18, 2013 MindGym November 18, 2013 MISCMISC E LLANLLAN E OUSOUS D ISHISH TT V RR etailer. SS tarting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) & HH igh SS peed II nternet starting at $14.95/ month (where available.) SS AV E E Ask About S S A ME ME DA YY I I nstallation! C C ALL N N ow! 1-800-745-2645 SS ix day vacation in OO rlando, Florida! RR egularly $1,175. YY ours today for only $389! YY ou S S AV E E 67%. P P L US US O O ne-week car rental included. C C all for details. 1-800-985-1463 P ROFROF E SSIONALSSIONAL SS E RR V ICIC E ELITEELITE RELIARELIA B LELE SERVISERVI C ESES D ONON TT HH AV EE TIMETIME F OR OR C C L E E A NIN NIN G? L ET ET USUS D O O THETHE J OB OB F OR OR YOUYOU 10 YEYE A RS RS OO F E E X PERIENCE PERIENCE A FA MI MI L YY OPER OPER A TETE D COMPCOMP A NY NY WE WE AL SO SO PROPRO V I I D E E WIN WIN D OW OW CC L E E A NIN NIN G A N N D PRESSUREPRESSURE W W A SHIN SHIN G SERSER V ICES ICES CC ALL USUS TOTO DA YY F OR OR YOURYOUR F REE REE ESTIM ESTIM A TETE .Find Guaranteed, Local A/ CC SS ales & II nstallation P P ros!800-763-7108 Air CC onditioner SS ales, SS ervice and I I nstallation. All pros are prescreened and relentlessly reviewed! C C all now for a no obligation estimate! 800763-7108 HH ouse CC leaning SS ervices NN eed your home cleaned? II am the one who can do it. H H onest & E E xperienced. RR eferences upon request. WW eekly B B iweekly, monthly. R R easonable rates. Free EE stimates. P P lease call B B renda 321-2394403. RR E ALAL E STATSTAT E: COMMCOMM E RCIALRCIALOFFIOFFI C EE FORFOR RENTRENT W INTER INTER PARP AR K EE xecutive office available in prestigious bank building. Approximately 10 x 12 with windows on two sides. Additional space available for assistant, now or later, at additional charge. Aloma and Lakemont Avenues. 24-hour access. MM inimum one year term. B B roker. $500 per month. Lou N N imkoff 407-405-3368 office@briofl.com RR E ALAL E STATSTAT E: COMMCOMM E RCIALRCIALRR eal EE state: CC ommercialAvailable for SS ocial OO ccasions or MM eetings, (seats 80), Goldenrod C C ivic C C lub, 4763 P P almetto Ave. WW inter P P ark, FL 32792, 407-678-7727. RR E ALAL E STATSTAT E: FORFOR SALSAL E BB A CC K ONON MM A RR K ETET PP riced to sell!8 beautiful acres originally offered at $139,900. NOW NOW just $39,900. Fully complete community. N N o time frame to build. CC all for more info: (888)434-9611. Gulf Atlantic Land S S ales, LL C C B B roker. NN orth Georgia MM ountain Land BB argain!17 Acres abuts USUS NN ational Forest only $59,900. was $199,900. Gorgeous mountain top setting, gentle slope, crystal clear mountain streams. E E njoy tremendous privacy. R R V friendly. O O nly one like this. M M ust see. E E xcellent financing. CC all now 866-952-5303, x 76 TENNESSEETENNESSEE LA NN D BB A RR GA ININ WITHWITH F REE REE BO BO A TT S S L IP IP !1.70 acres meadows overlooks 140 acre N N ature P P reserve, streams & ponds. OO nly $19,900. 6.1 acre hardwoods O O nly $27,900. F REE REE boat slips. E E xcellent financing, little down. C C all now 1-877888-0267, x446