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Winter Park-Maitland observer ( 10-17-2013 )

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Material Information

Title:
Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title:
Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication:
Winter Park FL
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates:
28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID:
UF00091444:00285

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title:
Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication:
Winter Park FL
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates:
28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID:
UF00091444:00285


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Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013Serving Winter Park, Maitland, Baldwin Park, College Park and Goldenrod50+ tax WPMOBSERVER.COM Winter Park Commissioners voted to continue the use of red light cameras during Mondays City Commission meeting a contrast to the state legislature who might ban the devices early next year. The city originally purchased a three-year red light camera agreement with Gatso USA back in 2009, now choosing to renew their services for another year. Vice Mayor Sarah Sprinkel spoke in support of the red light cameras, noting them as an asset to the community. Why do this if its not having some kind of positive impact on your community? Sprinkel said. Because no, we dont want it to be just another source for income. But talk among Florida residents and politicians continues to question the usefulness of red light cameras. A bill currently in the pipeline at the state level aims to ban red light cameras altogether. The Senates Transportation Committee Chairman Jeff month, believing that the cameras are simply an alternative source of revenue for municipalities. We just have to wait and see where the legislature acts out on it, said City Commissioner Steven Leary. Let them have the discussion, see where they are, see if we agree with it and see what we can do. USPS 00-6186 Publisher statement on page 46 VISIT WPMOBSERVER.COMSUBSCRIBE NOW! DITCHING THE BUSMAITLAND CITY TALK, 4The road to LouisvilleKnights face the No. 6 Cardinals. SPORTS, 10Houses that power the gridThese Winter Park homes may be selling electricity to yours. LIFESTYLES, 12A killer workoutCrossFit moves into Winter Park, but is the workout overkill? HEALTHY LIVING, 14CALENDAR .................... 6 COMMUNITY BULLETIN ............ 7 SPORTS ..................... 10 LIFESTYLES ................... 12 HEALTHY LIVING ................ 14 CULTURE ..................... 18 OPINIONS .................... 22 CLASSIFIEDS .................. 39 Winter Park City Commission may get in the way of the comen House to a new home across Lake Osceola. A local organization called Concerned Citizens for Historic Preservation Inc. initiated the lawsuit, expressing that the City Commission removed the houses historic designation in a matter that was inconsistent with the Defendant Citys Historic Preservation Ordinance. The lawsuit further accuses the City Commissioners of engaging in unauthorized private communications between one another and with third parties interested in removing the designation. the lawsuit on behalf of the organization on Sept. 30, just seven days after Mark Terry, president of the Board of Trustees for the Albin Polasek Museum and Sculpture Garden, announced to the Commission that they would tap their reserves to guarantee that the historic home be moved to the grounds of the museum. The removal of the historic designation left the house vulnerable to the wrecking ball ear lier this year when new homeowners decided they wanted to build a new home on the property, thus starting the community effort to save it. The owners held off on demolition while the community rallied to save it. came up with a very good future plan for the house, and one that will make it a community asset, said Debbie Komanski, executive director of the museum. We very much hope that we can car ry forward and still accomplish the project successfully as soon as possible. Komanski said that while the Albin Polasek Museum and Sculpture Garden stepped for ward to fund the remaining cost to move the house, another $250,000 is still needed to stabilize it on the museum grounds. This process includes securing the foundation of the home and renovating its inside for public use. It would be a tragedy to see this lawsuit result in uprooting all the plans that have been made, Komanski said. Preservation Capen Project Director Christine French assured that the lawsuit wouldnt affect the progress of the relocation effort and that movers will begin preparing the house to move this week. I have read the lawsuit that dont expect that it will impact our work there, French said. Were moving ahead with our plans to move the house. Winter Park Director of Communications Clarissa Howard said that the City Commission members hadnt seen the lawsuit yet and were unable to comment.ARCHIVE PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVERWinter Parks Capen House was being prepared to oat south on Lake Osceola to its new home at the Albin P olasek Museum and Sculpture Gardens, but a suit may stop it. Stopping a moving houseLawsuit may interfere home across a lakeTIM FREED Observer staff For 25 years a covered bridges 6-foot 6-inches tall opening served as a gateway to Maitlands Trotter Drive Lake Nina-fronted neighborhood, until Monday night when an 8-foot-tall trailer brought the whole thing tumbling down in a matter of minutes. On Monday night a black GMC SUV made it halfway out from under the bridge before the 8to 10-foot-tall trailer it was towing caught the top canopy and brought the whole wood structure crashing down on top of it. The driver wasnt hurt, but Maitland Public Works Director Rick Lemke said the bridge is beyond repair. Right now its all in splinters, theres nothing to salvage, Lemke said. The patches of grass making up Covered Bridge Park now grow nearby with no noticeable landmark for its name. Lemke said its too soon to tell whether the city, which covered the 55-year-old bridge in 1988, will decide to rebuild the parks namesake. For now, he said, the public works department is concentrating on cleanup and getting the now open-air bridge up to code. the bridge is safe then well make the decision about what to Maitland bridge collapsesSARAH WILSON Observer staff Please see COLLAPSE on page 2 Giving the green light for red light camerasWinter Park extends its red light camera program for a year while the state takes a closer look at banning them forever. If those cameras can save one life a year, theres no amount of money in the world that can equate to that.TIM FREED Observer staff Please see CAMERAS on page 2 407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC

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Page 2 | Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013 | Winter P ark / Maitland ObserverCOLLAPSE | Roof fell on moving truck after taking final hitC AMERAS | City extends program while state tries to stop itthe red light cameras ultimately make roads safer and help police dents by capturing photographic evidence. information on whether theyre creating more safety, Leary said. I think that if people know theyre there, people will slow down and not go through them. In May, June and July of this year, between 1,400 and 1,600 red light camera violations occurred each month. Winter Park police records show that 15 to 20 percent of those ticketed tried to tions. City Commissioners nearly triggered more public ire in July when they came within a single vote of doubling the fee residents must pay to challenge red light camera citations. The City Commission voted to hold the line at $137 as opposed to the proposed $250. For Winter Park Police Deputy Chief Arthur King, the issue of safety transcends any concerns Red light cameras are for one thing: for safety, to protect the motorist, King said. If those cameras can save one life a year, theres no amount of money in the world that can equate to that. It can reduce crashes, you cant compare dollars to something like that its safety, thats why its so important. do about the cover, Lemke said. Weight restrictions werent mandated for the bridge, he said, because the cover kept large vehicles from getting through. Now theyll have to add new signs and reinforce the bridges concrete side barriers. Lemke said the bridge has been hit a number of times before by those not obeying the 6-foot 6-inch clearance warning sign, with a bump warranting repairs last year. He said keeping the wooden structure maintained costs the city up to $2,000 a year, but brought value in its aesthetic appeal. You cant put a bigger sign than we had, Lemke said. You 8-foot trailer under a 6-foot 6-inch bridge. According to an online guide of covered bridges composed by enthusiast Dale Travis, the Maitland bridge was one of 52 left standing in the state as of May 13 of this year. Travis guide shows that hur ricanes and construction projects have taken down 13 others in recent decades. CONTINUED FROM FRONT P AGE CONTINUED FROM FRONT P AGE Savannah Court and Cove Excellence in Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation 1301 W. Maitland Blvd. Maitland, FL 32751407-645-3990www.SavannahCourtMaitland.comAssisted Living Facility License No. 8447 Skilled Nursing Facility License No. 1635096 Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above. You are always welcome!A Senior Living Community where Hospitality is a Way of Life. Antique Road ShowSavannah Court Maitland 1301 West Maitland Boulevard Tuesday, October 22, 2013 2:00 p.m. 3:30 p.m. Bring you favorite antiques or prized possessions! Assessments done by Doug White, auctioneer, owner of A-1 Auction Light refreshments served Please call to RSVP! FEATURING ...... AND MUCH MORE! 250 North Orlando Ave. Winter Park, FL 32789407.677.9777 A Premier Flooring Source PHOTO BY ALISON OLCSV A Y THE OBSERVERMaitlands only covered bridge is no more as clean up of its collapse continued T uesday.PHOTO BY TIM FREED THE OBSERVERCameras peer at passing cars near T emple Drive in Winter P ark. The citys deputy police chief said the cameras improve safety, but legislators have called them a cash grab.

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Welcome to a place all about health, healing and you. The new Florida Hospital for Women at Winter Park Memorial Hospital fulfills all your needs under one roof with our onestop boutique approach for your mindbody-spirit called Full Embrace Health Care. Our network of womens physicians provides you with comprehensive womens services and the latest in wellness and health advancements, including your very own Life Designer. Its an elegant retreat, a haven designed exclusively for you. for W omen Winter Park PMS: 294 100% K 70% K Florida Hospital Font: Friz Quadrata Tag Line Font: Adobe Garamond italic C = 100 M = 56 Y = 0 K = 18 The skill to heal. The spirit to care. A ONE-STOP, BOUTIQUE CENTRE FOR HEALTH, DESIGNED EXCLUSIVELY FOR YOU.To schedule an appointment with one of our physicians or the Life Designer, call (407) 646-7999. NUTRITION UROGYNECOLOGY DIGESTIVE HEALTH MAMMOGRAPHY BREAST HEALTH ADVANCED GYNECOLOGY COMPREHENSIVE HEALTH ASSESSMENT MENOPAUSE HEART HEALTH LIFE DESIGNER BONE HEALTHMost insurance accepted.WPMH-13-15651 WPMH-13-15651 Maitland Observer Nov.indd 1 10/15/13 1:03 PM

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Page 4 | Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013 | Winter P ark / Maitland ObserverThe Maitland City Council met on Oct. 14, 2013 at 6:30 p.m. in the City Hall Council Chambers. Below is a synopsis of that meeting. Old Business: source Ordinance: The city manager stated that there was nothing new to report at this time. nity development director, provided an update on the FlexBus project. Public Hearings: There were no scheduled Public Hearings. Consent Items: Council meeting minutes of Sept. 23, 2013 were approved. & Zoning Commission meeting of Sept. 5, 2013 were accepted. Zoning Adjustments of May 23, 2013 were accepted. Lobbying Services Agreement Alcalde & Fay, Ltd. after discussion this item was tabled to the next Council meeting. Services were approved. Chevy Volt after discussion, this item was tabled to the next Council meeting. Catherine Drive Paving was approved. Maitland City TalkBY HOWARD SCHIEFERDECKER MAYOR Funding our parks H O U S E S W A N T E D ! G e t a F R E E N o O b l i g a o n C A S H O e r O n Y o u r H o u s e W i t h i n 2 4 H o u r s (8 5 5 ) 7 5 5 1 8 1 8 w w w C i r c l e 1 8 H o m e s c o m C A S H $ $ $ Q U I C K C L O S E A N Y P R I C E R A N G E A N Y C O N D I T I O N A N Y S I T U A T I O N FIXED INCOME EXPERTS SINCE 1982 www.Shop4Bonds.com Check out the more than 50,000 bonds on our website at:Email fwright@jwkorth.com for more info.A Service of J W KORTH & COMPANY SIPC* Tax equiv. yield based on FL residency and 35% tax bracket. Subject to prior sale and price change. Maitland Fla LTD Tax General Obligation Bonds (Baa1/BBB)Coupon: 4.40% Maturity: 7/1/2034 Next Call: 1/1/15 @ 100 Sinking Fund: 7/1/31 @ 100 Price: 94.00 Yield to Worst: 4.859% Federal and State Tax Exempt 7.475%*Tax Equivalent Yield Contact Fred Wright at 407-758-7486 617 E Washington Street, Ste 3 Orlando, Florida 32801S HOP 4B ONDSJWKORTH/ S HOP 4B ONDS.COM Its a Gym for Y our Dog! Unlike traditional doggie daycare, ou r Day Fitness and Care program oers: customized workout p rograms weight loss and tness indoor warm water aqua therap y canine massage one-on-one attention due to small class sizes 2826 Shader Rd. Orlando, FL 32808 www.BarkingDogFitness.com info@BarkingDogFitness.com Conveniently located at... Me non this ad and re ceive a 10% discount for life! Limite d me oe r. 407-295-3888 A New Concept in Doggie Daycare TOO BUSY TO EXERCISE YOUR DOG? We have the Answer! Decision Items:tion for Park & Recreation move to establish a designation for Parks and Recreation in the unreserved portion of General Fund Balance and transfer $188,000 from Undesignated General Fund Balance to Designation for General Fund Balance. ter Language/Billboards after discussion, this item was tabled to the next Council meeting. Discussion Items: Police Department, presented a Power Point Presentation for the Pension Review Committee. vices director, presented a Power Point Presentation on Communications. To listen to a recording of the meeting, please check our website at itsmymaitland.com National Walk to School DayPHOTOS BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVERCouncilwoman Joy Goff-Marcil led the W alking School Bus to Lake Sybelia Elementary on National W alk to School Day, Oct. 9.

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Youre Invited to Our Free Midwife Seminar SeriesThe Choice Is Here Ageless Midwifery Care Lesann L. Dwyer, CNM, MSN Cathy M. Rudolph, CNM, MPH Andrea D. Messel, CNM, MS, CLC Allison King, CNM, MSNWHAT IS A NURSE MIDWIFE:A partner in womens health. Tuesday, October 22 | 6-7:30 pm Chatlos Conference Room (Located inside FH Altamonte) HOW TO PREPARE FOR PREGNANCY:Before you grow, its good to know. Thursday, November 7 | 6-7:30 pm Chatlos Conference Room (Located inside FH Altamonte) MONTHS 1 THRU 9:Small stuff to big news, delivered in due time. Wednesday, November 20 | 6-7:30 pm Chatlos Conference Room (Located inside FH Altamonte) POST PARTUM:Prepare for the aftermath of this addition. Thursday, December 5 | 6-7:30 pm Family Resource Center (Located on the other side of parking lot from the Main Entrance of FH Altamonte) 661 East Altamonte Drive, Suite 318, Altamonte Springs, Florida 32701 Providing women with a voice in their care at every age.A unique cornerstone of our practice is providing individualized midwifery care to women throughout the entire life cyclepuberty to post menopause. Our board-certied nurse-midwives work with women to promote optimal health whether expecting a baby or experiencing a gynecologic issue. A woman may need special education or support during these times and that is exactly what midwives provide. Each of the four lectures in our FREE Midwife Seminar Series is led by one of our four, certied nurse midwives at Florida Hospital Altamonte. The series provides invaluable information about midwifery services, pregnancy, delivery, newborn care and complete GYN carecreated by women for women. Midwife Services Engage patient in every stage of care Oer lifestyle changes education and support Provide physical and emotional support during labor Attend to cultural, spiritual and personal beliefs Support choice of an un-medicated childbirth Respect choice for a medicated labor and birth Assist in optimal bonding and breast feeding plan All seminars are FREE. Healthy refreshments will be served. Demonstrations and giveaways. Plus, receive a complimentary pregnancy book and enter to win a handmade baby quilt. Reserve your seat by calling 407.599.6111 well be expecting you!

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Page 6 | Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013 | Winter P ark / Maitland Observer Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013 PHONE: 407-563-7000 FAX: 407-563-7099 WPMOBSERVER.COMPUBLISHERTracy Craft407.515.2605TCraft@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MANAGING EDITORIsaac Babcock 407.563.7023IBabcock@TurnstileMediaGroup.comASSOCIATE EDITORSarah Wilson 407.563.7026SWilson@TurnstileMediaGroup.comDESIGNERTom Miller 407.563.7032TMiller@TurnstileMediaGroup.comSTAFF WRITERSBrittni Larson Megan Stokes Tim Freed Allison Olcsvay Kristy VickeryCOLUMNISTSChris JepsonJepson@MediAmerica.usLouis RoneyLRoney@cfl.rr.comJosh GarrickJoshGarrick9@gmail.comADVERTISING SALESLinda Stern407.376.2434LStern@TurnstileMediaGroup.comLEGAL NOTICE ADVERTISINGAshley McBride 407.286.0807Legal@FLALegals.comSUBSCRIPTIONS/CIRCULATIONLuana Baez 407.563.7013LBaez@TurnstileMediaGroup.comMEMBER OF: -Florida Press Association -Winter Park/Maitland/Goldenrod Chambers of CommerceWinter Park/Maitland Observer is published by Turnstile Media Group. Founded in 1990 and headquartered in Orlando, Fla., Turnstile Media Group is also the parent of Golfweek, Golfweek Custom Media, TurfNet, Professional Artist, Seminole Voice, Baldwin Park Living and Turnstile Connect.TURNSTILE MEDIA GROUPCHAIRMANRance CrainPRESIDENT/CEOFrancis X. FarrellVICE PRESIDENTSPatti Green & Jeff BabineauUSPS #00-6186 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:Winter Park / Maitland Observer 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835 Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W Munster Yarda Linnea Rusterholz 1919 2013 Rusterholz, Yarda Linneaage 93, of Oviedo, FL, passed away on Thursday, October 3, 2013 at Orlando, FL. She was born on No vember 2, 1919 in Aspen, CO, USA to her parents, Olaf Carlson and Laura Anderson. Yarda was the second of 4 children. She attended Rollins College and graduated in 1950 with a Bachelor's Degree in Science. She served in the Army during World War II as a nurse and was a 1st Lieutenant. She was a resident of Golden rod, Florida. She was employed by Winter Park Hospital and Florida Hospital as a nurse anesthetist for many years. Yarda was a member of the Goldenrod Cham ber of Commerce, Goldenrod Historical gardening, cooking, entertaining. Yarda will be remembered by her loving daugh ter Rosemary O'Shea. She is also sur vived by her brother and sister-in-law Bill and Nancy Carlson, her sister and brother-in-law Florida and Gil Gilmartin, seven nieces and nephews. Relatives and friends are invited to a memorial service and celebration of life for Yarda at the Baldwin-Fairchild Funeral Home, Goldenrod Chapel, 7520 Aloma Ave., Winter Park, Sunday, October 13th at 3:00pm. All are invited to share fellowship and refreshments of sympathy may be made to the Goldenrod Historical Society, P.O. sign guestbook at www.baldwinfairchild.com. Calendar FAMILY CALENDAR OCT 17If you have a latt beans to grind or you simply want to espresso your thoughts, CoffeeT alk may be the cup for you. Please join an informal conversation with City Commissioner Carolyn Cooper Thursday, Oct. 17 from 8 to 9 a.m. at the Winter P ark W elcome Center located at 151 W Lyman Ave. CoffeeT alk gives the community an opportunity to sit down and talk with the Commissioner over a cup of coffee and chat about any city issues that are of interest to them. Special thanks to P almanos Cafe, Coffee & Wine Bar for donating the coffee for this special series. For more information, please call 407-599-3428. OCT 19Harrietts P ark Avenue F ashion Week Runway Show is Winter P arks premier fashion event. Mingle with Central Floridas fashion elite at this stunning event in a Bryant P ark-style tent in Central P arks W est Meadow. This years runway show is Saturday, Oct. 19. Doors open at 6 p.m. and the show starts at 7 p.m. Runway show tickets and limited VIP seats are now on sale. Make you reservation today at P arkavenuefashionweek.comOCT 26Buy hard-to-nd Central Florida native trees, shrubs, grasses and wildowers Saturday, Oct. 26 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m, at Mead Botanical Gardens rst annual Backyard Biodiversity Day and Native Plant Sale. Enjoy a variety of speakers, hikes, and exhibits to learn how to enhance the beauty, sense of place, and changing seasons of your yard by incor porating native plants. Mead Botanical Garden is located at 1500 S. Denning Drive, Winter P ark. The public is invited to this free event. The event will feature presentations by knowledgeable speakers, including author and lmmaker Bill Belleville, on a variety of topics designed to explore the beauty, health, and diversity of our backyard plants, soils, and wildlife. Visit tarower.fnpschapters.org for more information.OCT 27Free bagel breakfast and live entertainment will be enjoyed at the F all F estival and Walk on Sunday, Oct. 27 at 9:30 a.m. at Cranes Roost P ark in Altamonte Springs. The festivities will include activities for children such as face painting, bounce houses and clowns. A health fair, vendors and more will be available for adults. Proceeds benet the Jewish P avilion. The P avilion ensures that our elders in long term care are visited and enjoy holiday celebrations, intergenerational activities and ice cream socials. P avilion staff and volunteers visit more than a thousand seniors all over Orlando. For more information, visit us at jewishpavilion.orgOCT 30The streets will ll with dancing, waving, cheering, candy-throwing revelers at the Winter Park High School Parade and Pep Rally. Come cheer on the undefeated Wildcats as they enter their nal home game of the football season that week. Its along P ark Avenue starting at 5 p.m. W ednesday, Oct. 30, heading south along Central P ark. OCT 31 Pumpkins and Munchkins Halloween celebration comes to Shady P ark from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. on Halloween night. Children of all ages are invited to join for games, bounce houses, a costume contest, T rick-or-T reat T rail and lots of fun for the entire family. Its free at 721 W New England Ave. Call 407-599-3275 for more information. NOV 8On Friday, Nov. 8, at 10 a.m. the city of Winter P ark will be presenting its third annual V eterans Day Celebration. This event will be held in honor of all of the veterans of Winter P ark at the Winter P ark Community Center Ruby Ball Amphitheater located at 721 W New England Ave. W e are calling all veterans that have served in any military campaign (W orld W ar II, Korean W ar, Vietnam W ar, Desert Storm, Iraqi Freedom or Afghanistan) or have served in any military branch in honor of our nations freedom. The city is holding this event to pay tribute to your dedicated service to our country. For more information regarding the citys third annual Veterans Day Celebration, please call 407-599-3428. OCT 19Double The Pleasure, Double The Fun, T wo Orchestras P erforming a Concert of One! Enjoy the autumn weather with the Florida Y oung Artists Orchestra and the Maitland Symphony Orchestra on Oct. 19 for a double treat! There will be two concerts in the same program. Both will be presented on the beautiful stage at Mead Garden in Winter P ark. The FY AO will present a classical concert at 5:30 p.m. followed by the Maitland Symphony Orchestra in a pops concert at 7 p.m. The Maitland Symphony Orchestra will open its program with the famous starstudded Jupiter from Gustav Holsts The Planets. While you contemplate the heavens from your lawn chair, other favorites will include a medley of Star T rek movie themes, Star T rek Through the Y ears, and a nostalgic version of Benny Goodmans Moonglow, featuring our principal clarinetist, P at Burket. Proud to be living in America, MSO will play an inspiring version of America the Beautiful, and John Philip Sousas famous march, Semper Fidelis and other favorites at Mead Garden, 1500 S. Denning Drive on Oct. 19 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. The concerts are free, family friendly, and open to all. Call 321-303-1404. Its a Saturday night Glow Party for ages 18 months to third grade. Everything glows! Glow in the dark arts and crafts, glow in the dark activities and games. If you wear white, you can glow too! Its $30 for the rst child and $20 for the second. Free for each additional child beyond two. Its at 5 p.m. on Oct. 19. Register at 407387-5330. OCT 24The Halloween Hustle 5K race to end childhood hunger will take place on Thursday, Oct. 24. This Halloween-themed event includes a 5K run/walk, Community-Based Care of Central Florida Kids Fun Run and Halloween party with activities for adults and children from 5 to 10 p.m. in Baldwin P ark. From trick-or-treating to Halloween-themed carnival games for the kids to live entertainment, food trucks and beer/wine for the adults, the frightening festivities are t for all ages. Costumes are strongly encouraged. Visit jlgo.org for more information. OCT 26The Goldenrod Area Chamber of Commerce would like to invite all to come out and join us for a very exciting 35th annual Goldenrod F estival & Parade on Saturday, Oct. 26, at 4755 N. P almetto Ave. in Winter P ark at the Goldenrod Station off of Aloma Avenue and Goldenrod Road. The day will begin at 7 a.m. with a P ancake Breakfast sponsored by Matthew Roberts Air Conditioning & Heating. All you can eat pancakes, sausages, coffee and juice for $5 per person! All are welcome to attend. The parade will begin at 11 a.m. down Aloma Avenue from Forsyth Road to Goldenrod Road eastbound. W e are very pleased to have the Shriners P arade of Units and many more exciting groups. Following the parade, the United Legacy BBQ Cookout at the Goldenrod Station will feature hamburgers and hotdogs and all the trimmings for a donation of $5 until 2 p.m. There will be a Kids Corner full of bounce houses, carnival games, face painting, crafts, cotton candy, popcorn, snow-cones and more at no charge for the children at the Goldenrod Station following the parade. For more information or for Sponsorship Opportunities contact Darlene Dangel, executive director of the Goldenrod Chamber, at 407-677-5980. Kids T rick or T reat on Park Avenue is from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. along P ark Avenue. Visit P ark Avenue merchants and have a good time at this annual tradition. Visit cityofwinterpark.org for more information. OCT 27Its the 14th annual Park Avenue Pet Costume Contest! This year the costume contest will be held on stage at Central P ark in a fenced in area, especially for your pets! The event benets the Sebastian Haul Fund, helping transport greyhounds to new homes. The large pet contest begins at 11 a.m., the small pet contest is 1 p.m., and pet trick-or-treating is from noon to 3 p.m. For more information call The Doggie Door at 407-644-2969.

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Winter P ark / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013 | Page 7 Florida Institute of Technology is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award associate, baccalaureate, masters, education specialist and doctoral degrees. Florida Institute of Technology does not discriminate on the basis of race, gender, color, religion, creed, national origin, ancestry, marital status, age, disability, sexual orientation, Vietnam-era veterans status or any other discrimination prohibited by law in the admission of students, administration of its educational policies, scholarship and loan programs, employment policies, and athletic or other university sponsored programs or activities.OC-681-913 WE PREPARE EXCEPTIONAL LEADERS Orlando CONTACT US TODAY www.fit.edu/orlando(407) 629-7132 | orlando@fit.edu*Admittance is contingent upon receipt of ofcial academic records.Considering pursuing a masters degree from Florida Techs Orlando site? Join us for: Information session Meet & greet with faculty/staff Food and drinks Easily apply and enroll* INSTANT DECISION DAY THURSDAY, NOV. 7 3 P.M.2420 Lakemont Ave., Suite 190 Orlando, FL 32814 Register by Nov. 5 to orlando@t.edu Application Fee Waived! Socially conscious studiersRollins College has announced two new majors and minors designed for the socially conscious student who also wants to be successful in the business environment. The business and social entrepreneurship majors will focus on sustainability, social responsibility, entrepreneurship and innovation. Courses are slated for the 2014 academic school year.Help preserve historyThe Orange County Regional History Center is asking those in the Central Florida community to contribute to a new exhibition, History Is Important to Me Because... History is being dropped from school curriculums and left in the shadow of the STEM subjects. The History Center is looking to change that. Community members are asked to submit their thoughts about why history is important, even vital. P articipants can submit their responses through text, video, or interpretive photos on the History Centers Facebook, T witter, or Instagram (@ochistorycenter) accounts. Onsite submissions will also be accepted. The exhibit will be up through Dec. 13. with submissions accepted through Nov. 22. Visit thehistorycenter.org for info.F eed the NeedThe Winter P ark Chamber of Commerce is leading the charge to recruit members of the business community to become Community Champions, organizations who commit to raising a minimum of $500 toward feeding hungry families in our community through the Second Harvest Food Bank. Community Champions that sign up by Friday, Oct. 25 will be recognized at the campaign kick-off on Oct. 31 at city hall. Visit tinyurl. com/feedtheneedWP to sign up.Business Briefs Directing the artsThe College of Arts and Humanities at the University of Central Florida is pleased to announce the appointment of Jeff Moore as director of the School of the P erforming Arts. The director, a new position at the university, will be responsible for overseeing the Music and Theatre departments and advancing the development of a new P erforming Arts Center on the east Orlando campus. New leader on top at EverestT errance T .J. Harris has been named president of Everest Universitys North Orlando campus. Harris is an executive with 15 years of experience in education administration and is a veteran in the eld of information technology. Harris comes to Everest University after serving as chief information ofcer for Prospect Education, the parent company of Charter College based in Reno, Nev. In his new position, Harris will oversee all administrative departments, including admissions, student affairs, education programs, and community and business relations.T raveling up the ladderMaitland-based T ravel Planners International, one of the industrys oldest and largest host agencies with more than 2,000 independent travel agents nationwide, announced the promotion of 16year company veteran Erwing Hernandez, general manager, to the position of corporate vice president of operations. In this newly created post, Hernandez will be in charge of the research and development of a variety of new solution-based projects and operations for TPI and its subsidiaries.New lease on AlomaNAI Realvest recently negotiated a new lease agreement for 3,200 square feet of retail space in Aloma Square Shopping Center at 6700-6864 Aloma Ave. in Winter P ark. Associate Mitch Heidrich negotiated the lease representing the local tenant Debarco Inc. Cheri Hendricks-Kelly of Noble Management Company represented the landlord, Hart Proper ties II Ltd. of P alm Beach Gardens.Community Bulletin Winter Park Chamber of Commerce MemberAmericas Achievement ExpertSpeaker, Trainer, Coach, FacilitatorWhen Results CountGoal Setting Beyond The MotivationCorporate Training Team Building Marketing Consulting FacilitationBest Selling Author DEB CHESLOW www.DebCheslow.com Former Air Force Fighter Pilot Deb Cheslow Shares Her Systemized Strategy For Success

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Page 8 | Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013 | Winter P ark / Maitland ObserverOct. 14 City Commission highlights There was a City Commission meeting held Oct. 14 in City Hall Commission Chambers. Below are a few highlights of decisions made at the meeting: Mayors Report claring the week of Nov. 2 as the Week of the Family. sory Board, Pedestrian & Bicycle Advisory Board were approved.Consent Agenda meeting were approved. mal solicitations were approved (for a complete listing, please visit cityofwinterpark. org/ccpackets). independent contractors who provide spevices on behalf of the High Intensity Drug rized, and the purchase order for facility expenses of HIDTA were approved. Local 1598 IAFF Labor Contract was approved. less for co-location of cell antennae on the public safety cell tower was approved, and the Mayor was authorized to execute the ground lease and Memorandum of Lease. Action Items Requiring Discussion Plan was discussed and staff was directed to have the Tree Preservation Board review the draft plan and summarize the impor tant decisionmaking points prior to bringing forward to the Commission for approval. staff to work with the various advisory boards prior to bringing the visioning planning process back for consideration. Public Hearings nance amending Section 34-30, Title and Ownership of lots and spaces in the city cemeteries, to clarify the ownership interest that may be conferred and to add provision for the city to regain ownership of abandoned rights to be buried within a municipal cemetery, was approved. amending Chapter 26 Article III Film Inprocess and amend certain provisions was approved. was approved. A full copy of the Oct. 14 City Commission minutes will be available at cityofwinterpark.org the week of Oct. 28, pending approval by the City Commission.CoffeeT alk featuring Commissioner Carolyn CooperIf you have a latt beans to grind or you simply want to espresso your thoughts, CoffeeTalk may be the cup for you. Please join an informal conversation with Commissioner Carolyn Cooper Thursday, Oct. 17 from 8 to 9 a.m., at the Winter Park Welcome Center located at 151 W. Lyman Ave. CoffeeTalk gives the community an opportunity to sit down and talk with the Commissioner over a cup of coffee and chat about any city issues that are of interest to them. Special thanks to Palmanos Cafe, Coffee & Wine Bar for donating the coffee for this special series. For more information, please call 407-599-3428. Seeking applicants for Code Enforcement BoardThe city is looking for interested resiment Board. This board is charged with examining cases presented by the citys the cases are in compliance with city code. city residents with experience as an architect, engineer, general contractor, subcontractor, realtor and/or businessperson. Approximately three hours per month is devoted to this board and members serve three-year terms. To be considered for this position, please submit an application online at cityofwinterpark.org/BoardApplicationForm.aspxOperation Gratitude remembers soldiers this Halloween seasonThe Winter Park Fire-Rescue Department is once again supporting Operation Gratitude Orlando, a program designed to collect candy and gifts for American ser vice men and women who are currently deployed in the remote regions of Afghanistan and other hostile regions of the world. Residents of the community are encour aged to drop off candy and letters of appreciation between now and Monday, Nov. 18, to one of the following Winter Park locations: Road Items will also be collected at the citys annual Veterans Day Celebration Friday, Nov. 8. Since 2009, local event organizer, 17-year-old resident Andrew Weinstock, has collected more than 20,000 pounds of Halloween candy in support of Operation Gratitude. Last year, he collected 10,460 pounds of candy and his goal this year is to collect 12,000 pounds with the help of the local community. For more information, please call 407454-0878, email opgratitudeorlando@ gmail.com or visit operationgratitude.com.Winter Park veterans save the dateOn Friday, Nov. 8, at 10 a.m. the city of Winter Park will be presenting its third annual Veterans Day Celebration. This event will be held in honor of all of the veterans of Winter Park at the Winter Park Community Center Ruby Ball Amphitheater locatWe are calling all veterans that have served in any military campaign (World War II, Korean War, Vietnam War, Desert Storm, Iraqi Freedom or Afghanistan) or have served in any military branch in honor of our nations freedom. The city is holding this event to pay tribute to your dedicated service to our country. For more information regarding the citys third annual Veterans Day Celebration, please call 407-599-3428. winterpark.org, like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and watch us on Vimeo. Winter Park City TalkBY RANDY KNIGHT CITY MANAGER Give candy in gratitude Limited time offer. Rates and terms are subject to change without notice and may be withdrawn at any time. All credit applications are subject to standard credit underwriting guidelines and approval. Security property must be residential property (does not include seasonal homes or investment properties) in Florida only. Property insurance is required. Flood and Wind insurance may be required. You must qualify for a minimum credit line of $10,000. Consult your tax advisor about the deductibility of interest. 1. The variable Annual Percentage Rate (APR) for a new home equity line will vary with Prime Rate (plus index) as published in the Wall Street Journal. As of 9/27/2013, the Wall Street Journal Prime Rate is 3.25% plus a margin of 1% and will not exceed the lesser of 18.00% or the maximum rate allowed by applicable law. The APR offered is 4.25% and is a variable rate, and is subject to change. Your APR will be based on several factors, including your credit history, loan-to-value ratio, property type, and lien status. Offer subject to normal credit qualications and program guidelines. Annual fee of $50.00 applies. 2. Offer valid on line amounts up to $500,000. Some restrictions may apply. Fee for full FNMA appraisal and title insurance will be charged. If you pay off your line within the rst three (3) years, we may require you to reimburse the bank for the closing costs we paid in connection with the opening of your line. Ask us for details. 790 1013 NMLS #486539 Harness Your Homes EQUITY FOR LESS with FCB! A Home Equity Line of Credit as LOW as Prime +1% (4.25% APR)1 Immediate (consult your tax advisor)LIMITED-TIME OFFER!NO CLOSING COSTS ON LOANS UP TO $500,000!2 | 407.622.5000 | 407.909.1744 | 407.333.2246 | 407.814.0491 | 407.774.3000 | 321.453.5800 | 321.868.3580

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Winter P ark / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013 | Page 9Gabriel Preisser has an excellent baritone voice that he uses with skillful excellence. Preisser opened his concert Oct. 10, 2013 in Rollins Colleges Tiedtke Hall with a very slow rendition of Henry Purcells Music For A While, followed by that composers If Music Be The Food Of Love, and Sweeter Than Roses. These Purcell songs immediately demonstrated Preissers compelling sound and agile coloratura. Four favorite Richard Strauss songs, all of which, coincidentally, I used to sing in concert, were pleasing events whose vocal passion was reflected not only in the singer, but in the remarkable piano accompaniRothmel. The French language received melodious attention in Maurice ne, which gave the singer opportunity to expand his acting talents. After intermission came three of todays now-neglected Paolo Tosti songs. The singers even production and flowing breath enhanced his impressive vocal artistry. I especially relished Lalba Separa Dalla Luce Lombra. Three Samuel Barber songs and three Broadway songs brought the program to a close with the audience on its feet giving the artists a well-deserved standing ovation. This commentator was happy to see the large number of enthusiastic younger people in the highly appreciative crowd. Served steamin hot, and stuffed way over code, get ready to enjoy your meatiest, cheesiest, feastiest, tastiest sub ever. FREE Chips and Medium Fountain Drink when you buy any Sub. Visit our tasty restaurant location at: Firehouse Subs Park Avenue 528 S. Park Avenue Winter Park, FL 32789 407.960.7827 2013 Firehouse Subs. This offer valid with coupon at participating restaurants. Prices and participation may vary, see restaurant for details. Limit one per customer, per visit. Not valid with any other offers. Exp. 12/31/13. COMBO$SUB Pumpkin Bash! Saturday, October 26th 10:00 AM 12:00 PM For A Frightfully Fun Time!Come Dressed in Your Best Halloween Costume & Enjoy: PLAYGROUND Magazines Costume Contest Cupcake Decorating Balloon Artist Monster Paws (Popcorn Treat) The Pumpkin Pick (Everyone is a winner!) Pumpkin Patch Photo Sessions by Jessica Friend Photography Admission is FREE! Be sure to visit our website for more information and subscribe to receive our e-mails. Event takes place by the fountain area near The Cheesecake Factory. Come Dressed in Your Best Halloween Costume & Enjoy: VILLAGE STEVE JOHNSON'S PAINTING SERVICE 407-679-0111 www.OTownInteriors.com Since 1980 Choose From Any Color Palette Licensed & Insured Check our Local Reviews Online No Mark Ups on Paint Choices No Job Too Large or Too SmallSPECIALIZING IN INTERIOR PAINTING FREE ESTIMATES! Gabriel Preisser glows in triumphLOUIS R ONEY Observer columnistThree Broadway songs brought the program to a close with the audience on its feet...

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Page 10 | Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013 | Winter P ark / Maitland ObserverIts been 28 years since the UCF Knights faced Louisville on the gridiron. Back then the Knights were NCAA Division II facing gram history. It wasnt pretty: a 42-21 loss for the Knights. They havent faced the Cardinals since. That changes Friday night when the Knights travel to Kenagainst teams from the Bluegrass State. Thatll be a tall order for the Knights, who are facing one of the most dominant teams in the NCAA this season. The No. 8/6 Cardinals have scored 41 points per game this season, with an average point differential of more than 30. And in the Cardinals, the Knights face one of the most potent defenses seen in NCAA football in years, allowing only 7.3 points per game in their 6-0 winning streak to start the season. Already bowl eligible with their six wins, the Cardinals have nailed teams for 23 sacks in 2013 near ly four per game. Against the tough defense of No. 11 South Carolina on Sept. 28 the Knights only allowed two sacks. But they allowed the Gamecocks into the pocket enough to startle quarterback Blake Bortles into throwing two crucial interceptions, one of which was in the red zone. Both teams defenses are expected to be big factors in the game, with oddsmakers already talking up UCFs potential strategy of slowing the game and trying to hold back Thatll be a tough offense to stop, with Louisvilles junior quarterback Teddy Bridgewater throwing for an average of nearly 300 yards per game while completing 71 percent of his pass attempts to a wide variety of receivers. Six of his receivers have 14 catches or more in the season, giving him plenty of room on the Its that variety that could test UCFs secondary defense, which is young and has struggled in giving up crucial big plays so far, both on the ground and with the long ball. Theyve also had trouble seeking out short pass reapart by South Carolina in a second half bamboozling that put up 28 unanswered points. In that game the Knights defense had little trouble forcing third downs. They did have trouble stopping conversions, allowing 60 percent of third and fourth down conversions against South Carolina, and that could be an issue against the Cardinals, who have the best conversion rate in NCAA football at 63.6 percent. But the Knights havent been slouches in offense either, with quarterback Blake Bortles leading the way with 270 yards passing per game, though hes been less mobile this season than last to make good plays out of bad ones. The vast majority of his rushing attempts this season have turned into sacks or losses. But Bortles has had help from receivers Breshad Perriman and Rannell Hall, who have comgames, both of them nearing or eclipsing their 2012 numbers already. Against big opponents, the r rfntbWe offer Full-Day Infant Care and Childcare Year-Round, Preschool Classes, Summer Camp, and much more! rfntbrn n n CONGRATULATIONS: Maitland Rotary Art Festival Winners for 2013 BEST OF SHOW: Rolly Rae Reel Fine Crafts: John Mascoll Graphics, Drawings: Jeff Eckert Jewelry: Christian Nevin Mixed Media: Lynn Whipple P ainting: John Whipple Photography: Elle Diez-Massaro P ottery: Jinsong Kim Sculpture: Katherine Mathisen A wards of Excellence presented to: Carol Napoli, Painting Charles Hazelaar, Sculpture Douglas Adams, Pottery Patricia Karnes, Jewelry Jaeryon Ha, Graphics/Drawings Sana Doumet, Jewelry Jason Hunt, Graphics/Drawings John Margerum, Graphics/Drawings Bill Slade, Sculpture Eddie Myers, Mixed Media Cheryl Mackey, Mixed Media John Petrey, Sculpture **The Maitland Rotary Art Festival has also committed $40,000 to the Art & History Museum in Maitland to revitalize timeworn shufeboard courts, located in Quinn Strong Park. The courts will be transformed into an event plaza that can accommodate a variety of community activities, such as concerts, mini art festivals, camp activities, and additional programs ARCHIVE PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERThe Knights have shined against tough teams so far, but face a difcult challenge against a surging Louisville team. UCF quarterback Blake Bortles, above, threw for a career-high 358 yards against USC. Knights face Cardinals No. 1 defenseISAAC BABCOCK Observer staff Please see KNIGHTS on next page Its the Hotsy-Totsy 1920's...Benefit for Homeless Women and Children. Heart to Heart: a Community Care Home, Inc. nonprofit since 1992.Dressy Attire or Costume Party Casino Games, No Limit BlackJack Tournament Swingin' music by the Performing Arts of Maitland Dance Band Speakeasy Bars and Fabulous Foods provided by Tim Webber Catering The Gold Sponsors of this EventThe Gold Sponsors for this Exceptional Evening of Entertainment Saturday, November 2, 2013Doors open 6:00pm Hosted at Mercedes-Benz of Orlando 810 N. Orange Avenue (Hwy 17/92) Maitland, FL 32751 TICKETS, TABLES OR SPONSORSHIPwww.H2HCentralFlorida.org/events For Reservations call 407-463-6297 orri s Resor Grand Cayman Islan

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Winter P ark / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013 | Page 11 italiokitchen.com rfntrbr 276 South Orlando Ave., Winter Park, FL 32789Italio is a modern Italian kitchen created with freshness in mind. Every meal is completely customizable and handcrafted in our open kitchen with only the finest and freshest ingredients. We believe in fast, flavorful meals. And we believe great food shouldnt break the bank.Winter Park WITH PURCHASE OF AN ENTREE Coupon is required. Coupon cannot be combined with any other offer. One coupon per person, per visit. FREE CALAMARIExpires: 10/10/2013 | Code: WPMO5 BECOME A PATRON OF THE ARTS!Benets:$225 in art dollars to use at Festival Artist of your choice to receive a recognition ribbon Tickets to Wayne Densch Performing Arts Center Membership to Seminole Cultural Arts Council Free admission to the Improv Comedy Club Invitation to Meet the Artists party Two V.I.P. passes to art festival Festival Poster Listing as Patron And More! Get Information at www.WSFOTA.com/patrons Presented byOctober 19th and 20thOctober 19th and 20th 10am -5pmWinter Springs Town Centerwww.WSFOTA.org New Fall & Holiday Merchandise! ARCHIVE PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERUCFs special teams has caused key turnovers to keep the Knights in games, including a fumble and recovery that led to a game-winning score against Memphis on Oct. 5. Wildcats ready for Huskies KNIGHTS | F ace No. 8/6 Cards SaturdayKnights have a tendency to rack up yards. Both of those receivers snagged 100-yard-plus games against South Carolina, while Bortles threw for a career-long 358 yards in the game. And running back Storm Johnson shores up the run game with 455 yards on the ground and seven touchdowns so far. With an ability to rise up against tough opponents, the Knights have shined in the national spotlight. But in their last game against unranked confer ence rival Memphis, they were stunned until an unusual set of scores put them on top in an unorthodox win. Losing that game for most Knights only tied it back up with two minutes left, then watched their special teams squad force a kickoff fumble and return it for a touchdown to put the Knights on a 14-point swing in 9 seconds. After the next kickoff, a wild halfback pass turned into a Knights interception to end the game. Turnovers have been a massive contributor to UCFs wins of late, with three interceptions against Memphis, and a total of seven recovered fumbles of nine forced so far this season. Meanwhile theyve only lost one fumble of seven theyve dropped. The game will be live nationOct. 18, from Cardinal Stadium in Louisville. CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS P AGE Its been a week since the Wildcats narrowly escaped Timber Creek with a 34-29 squeaker win their narrowest this season. But the road trip for the 6-0 Wildcats isnt over yet. They head to face Hagerty this Friday. The Huskies (2-4) have strugfour games. But their last two have been surprises. They beat Orange Park Univer sity on Sept. 27 in a 24-21 shocker game they faced an undefeated Bishop Moore team in the Hor nets stadium and scored four unanswered touchdowns in the terback Jeff Driskel would go on to complete a 73-yard TD pass to Tristan Tucker and race 71 yards for a touchdown scramble of his own. By the time the Hornets put two scores together, it was already too late. The Wildcats will need to stop the Huskies offense if they want to win. Last season the Huskies only lost once when they scored more than 18 points. But those high-scoring games were few and far between. The Wildcats have proven themselves in tight games, winning all but two of their games by a touchdown or less. They tend to have high-scoring games regardless. Only one time this season were the Wildcats held to less than 20 points. They still won. The game kicks off at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 18. Edgewater so far has been less heartbreaking losses of late. With an 0-7 record, not crossed into the win column. Lately thats gotten worse. In their them by a touchdown or less. In their last two, theyve lost by an increasing margin. They travel to Lake Minneola for a 7 p.m. Oct. 18 showdown. ISAAC BABCOCK Observer staff

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Page 12 | Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013 | Winter P ark / Maitland ObserverLifestyles Many days, especially in the mild Florida spring and winter, when the sun is shining and theres not a cloud in the sky, and windows are opened wide to let in the breeze, the electricity meter at the Wilson familys home ticks backward. home instead of in from the powon the meter represents the ding of a credit on their bill. This past spring, the Wilsons paid just 25 cents for their electricity, water and sewage consumption. The Winter Park family owns a net-zero home, meaning they have a renewable energy system that on average creates more month that happens, they receive a credit on their utility bill to use toward the next month. Instead of a roof on their patio, their home has a solar panel system that absorbs sunlight from both sides, generating power to operate their air conditioning, appliances, everything. Right now, the Wilson home is one of only six in Winter Park with a renewable energy system hooked up to the city grid. Solar panels are a big up-front investment, with an average three bedroom home with a monthly utility bill of $200 needing a system costing about $30,000 to power it, according to solar power-selling website solarcity.com. Government rebates and tax credits can drop the cost by near ly half, but cost may still be prohibitive for many homeowners looking to go green. Its more of a feel good investment, said Rob Smith, founder of Winter Park based e2 Homes, the green residential helped build the Wilson home. I think there are some nonA smaller carbon footprint is one of them, said homeowner Rebekkah Wilson. Its important for people to consider it because even though each of us is a small piece of the bigger picture, the more small people that go toward alternative energy sources, the more of an impact we can have on preserving the resources we use, she said. In addition to the solar panand sustainable. Theres a cistern that provides water for irrigation and toilets, no grass to water, and windows up high to draw out hot air and give light to reduce lamp use. It was made for warm, sunny days. I dont think they build houses now that take advantage of our environment, said homeowner Rick Wilson. I was passionate about what I wanted and what I think Florida living should be. Rick said his motivation for building his green house was to save money, and hell recoup his solar panel cost through electricity bill savings in about eight years. Its a long-view investment, but one that Tim Maslow, the city of Winter Parks sustainabil-PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVERRick Wilson stands beneath the solar array that covers the back patio in his familys Winter P ark home. Six homes in the city currently are hooked up to the electric grid to sell electricity back to the city. Winter Parks personal power companiesSome of Winter Parks homes take power from the sun and sell it back to the grid. Now the citys electric utility is looking to the future. BRITTNI LARSON Observer staff Please see SOLAR on next page Checks Payable To: Edgewater Baseball. Orders due: November 13th Pick-up/delivery on: November 30th Mailing Address: Edgewater Baseball, c/o Pam Hamner, 1160 Willowbrook Trail, Maitland, Florida 32751 To Place an Order or get more information, please call: Pam Hamner #407-539-0756 or Lynette Earley #407-222-8397 or email edgewaterbaseball@gmail.com. about how much money Let us help you! Call today!(407)-644-6646www.aSafeHarbor.com Member of Bob Adams President/CEO A SafeHarbor, LLC bob@asafeharbor.comS T OP Worryingyou have for retirement.Instead of being concerned with the value of your retirement account, you should be more concerned with the income that account provides. Income maintains your quality of life so you may live in retirement as you did when you were working. You need to have the income so you can travel, see your grandkids and live whatever retirement dreams you may have. If you would like to see how you can MAXIMIZE YOUR INCOME FOR LIFE call us today. There are options available that most Americans dont know about. Give us one hour to see if we can give you your lifetime.

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Winter P ark / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013 | Page 13ity coordinator, said will increase in popularity as the cost of solar panels decreases. The price has gone down by nearly half in ing programs for incorporating solar costs into mortgages have made it more affordable for homeowners, Smith said. Jerry Warren, directhe city of Winter Park, has even been negotiating a solar panel project to produce energy for the city that he hopes will be approved early next year. Theres a proposed contract to buy solar power produced by rooftop panels put on the citys public works facility from solar company Clean Footprint for 10 years at a rate of 6.5 cents per kilowatt-hour. Thats almost the same price as natural gas, which is about 6 cents, but without the harmful greenhouse gases. Warren, whos been in the power business for 40 years, said he sees a future in solar energy. Thats almost down to the point where its cost competitive with more traditional sources of power, he said. And so, my take is that the reduction in cost of solar is going to make it very competitive over the next 25 years, and the way we make it very competitive as an industry is we begin to incorporate it into our power supply mix in small enough blocks that it doesnt adversely affect our overall cost of power. This would get us on the map for renewables, Maslow said. Until then, the number of alternative energy pioneers in Winter Park will continue to grow slowly, Warren said, with more residents using the sun to their advantage, rather PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVERSolar arrays and alternative water sources save money and cut down electricity bills and reduce the amount of water pulled from the acquifer and nearby water supply. SOLAR | Energy-efficient and ecologically-conscious homes a growing trend in Winter Park neighborhoods CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS P AGE Invite you and a guest to a special advance screening of lastvegasmovie.com facebook.com/lastvegasmovie #LastVegas ON NOVEMBER 1STITS GOING TO BE LEGENDARYFor your chance to win two tickets, log onto: WWW.GOFBO.COM/RSVPand enter the code WPMOMG05The screening is: Monday, October 28, 7:30p.m. at Regal Winter ParkRated PG-13 for sexual content and language. No purchase necessary. Passes are good for two complimentary admissions. You must have a pass to attend. Seating is on a rst-come, rst-served basis and is not guaranteed. Supplies are limited and available only while supplies last. and 21105 LAST VEGAS WINTERPARK / MAITLAND OBSERVER 5" x 8" 4C RUN DATE: 10/17/13 AD DUE: 10/14/13 CREATIVE VISION: 10/11/13 mech02 8 1 8 5 0 9 9 6 6 9 KEEP UP WITH MAITLAND NEWS AND EVENTS!www.IndependenceLane.com Facebook.com/ItsMyMaitland 1 This Free Concert is Sponsored & Presented by 321.303.1404 WWW.PAMAITLAND.ORG SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19TH MEAD GARDENS MAIN STAGE

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Page 14 | Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013 | Winter P ark / Maitland Observer A new CrossFit location opened in Winter Park in early October bringing the city along on a nationwide trend with the may be bringing some controver sy with it. The new gym opened its doors to group classes and individual happened CrossFit Winter Park said that at least 50 members had already signed up. I believe theres a need for ing it to the city of Winter Park, well be able to capture that whole entire group of people, whether theyre 10 years old or 70 years old. The chain of gym franchises has exploded across the country in the past few years, rapidly expanding through Orange and Seminole County. Near Oviedo there are three locations within a few miles. In Casselberry there are three within a short jog of each other. Winter Parks new gym will have an unusual walk-in tube called a cryosauna that allows members to heal from muscle soreness after a day of working out. The machine gently surrounds members with a nitrogen mist and drops their skin temperature down to 32 degrees Fahrenheit for three minutes. Receptors in the skin send signals to the brain to produce collagen, a natural protein that forms connective tissue and promotes healing. CrossFit Winter Park will be CrossFit locations to include a cryosauna in their facility. Its pretty new technology in the U.S.; theyre not as widely owner and coach Stephanie Nickitas, pointing out that there are only four in the state of Florida Its great for athletes in terms of rest and recovery, joint issues and muscle soreness. But recent accounts show that muscle soreness in CrossFit members can cause a potentially deadly disorder. An article on Medium.com written by physical of Regis University shows that the intensity of the program can cause Rhabdomyolysis, a condition where damaged skeletal muscle tissue breaks down rapidly due to excessive working out. Sarah Matthews, a former CrossFit member from Boston, reported that she developed the condition after only one class back in January. The heavy workout session left her arms sore and swollen for a whole week, forcing her to make a trip to the hospital where doctors found a high level of creatine kinase, an enzyme caused by working out that can cause kidney damage in excessive amounts. She received treatment, but wrote in her blog Blonde BosCrossFit. Am I completely turned off from CrossFit? A little bit, Matthews wrote. Am I going to be more careful about pushing my-PHOTO BY TIM FREED THE OBSERVERCrossFit gyms have grown rapidly, known for intense workouts, but an article by a physical therapy professor has raised eyebrows about hospitalizations of some members. A killer workout, but does it go too far?TIM FREED Observer staff Please see GYM on next pageApproximately 100 grow boxes have been distributed to area schools and churches this fall, free of charge thanks to the Winter Park Memorial Hospital, Winter Park Harvest Festival (WPHF) and Our Whole Community (OWC). In a unique partnership, the hospital is donating the money for the growboxes, while WPHF and community health initiatives, will deliver the specially constructed portable gardens to Central Florida classrooms, allowing students to learn about and Our appreciation goes out to Winter Park Memorial Hospital for purchasing the grow boxes from OWC and allowing us and the Winter Park Harvest Festival to distribute these fun and educational learning tools to children and their teachers, says OWC Chairperson Lavon Williams. by 14 inches wide and is equipped with fertilizer, easy instructions and a planting guide. The self-watering, self-fertilizing gardens require no weeding or experience to produce a bountiful harvest. After a couple of months, OWC will gather the growboxes and display them as a Mobile Community Garden at the Winter Park Harvest Festival, November 23 at Central Park Meadows on New York Avenue. The annual fest (winterparkharvestfestival. com) showcases the best of Central Floridas local farmers and artisans in a producer-only market offering everything needed to create a locally sourced Thanksgiving dinner. Growbox awards will be presented in various categories, such as Best Beans and Tallest Tomatoes. The portable gardens will then be returned to the classrooms where they can be tended to for the remainder of the school year. Our Whole Community has been a leader in Central Floridas community gardening efforts since its inception in 2007. We support gardening because it promotes our mind-body-spirit philosophy, Williams says. Growboxes are available for purchase at the OWC website at ourwholecommunity.org and is an OWC fundraiser. Be sure to save these dates for these Fall Garden Plant Your Christmas Dinner October 22nd | 6 8 pm OWC Garden 550 W. Morse Blvd., Winter Park (garden entrance is located on Welbourne) $10 per family to attend Learn what to plan and harvest in time for your Gifts from the Garden November 3rd | 9 am 1 pm St. Mary Magdalen Learning Garden 861 Maitland Avenue, Maitland Free Winter Park Harvest Festival November 23rd | 10 am 4 pm Central Parks West Meadow Free faith-based organization that brings communities together to establish relationships and share resources resulting in innovative programs that inspire, motivate and educate individuals in their pursuit of optimal health. For more information on Our Whole Community, please visit ourwholecommunity.org. Our Whole Community is pleased to contribute ed@me.com for inquiries about OWC. By Leah Nash, Work Well Winter Park of Winter Park (annual sponsor of monthly Work Well lunches) provided a healthy lunch and tutorial to 30+ attendees at the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce. The monthly lunch topics, an integral part of the Work Well Winter Park program, support easy policies that can be implemented at your worksite as part of a workplace wellness program. grams. By providing educational health programs onsite or encouraging employees to seek out informative programs, workplaces are supporting health and wholeness with your team. The more your employees are aware of disease prevention, stress management, healthy eating, and other health-related topics, the more they can take care of themselves and their families and be productive members of your company. At the October Work Well Lunch, Lois Dorotiak, enthusiast, shared tips on how to be healthful and happy in our eating habits. She quizzed attendees on the three leading health chronic diseases in the United States: Heart Disease, Diabetes and Cancer. Diet can help manage these diseases, Dorotiak says. Dorotiak recommends the including the following components for a healthy plate: Whole Foods (unprocessed food, free from additives), Plant Strong (vegetables, beans, nuts, seeds, roots, etc.), Nutrient Dense (foods with high amounts of vitamins and/or minerals) and Healthy Fats (monounsaturated, polyunsaturated and omega-3s found in foods such as almonds, avocados, coconut milk, sesame seeds, etc.). According to Dorotiak, Americans are currently eating over 50% of processed food on their plates. Beyond teaching points such as the ones above, Dorotiak also served up some delicious and easy dishes all prepared, cooked and served within one hour. The dishes served were an apple fennel soup, collard and lentil soup (served both hot and cold) and a refreshing blueberry smoothie. These recipes are available on the Work Well Winter Park blog, found at WorkWellWinterPark. org. Recipes like these can also be found at WholeFoodsMarket. com. Please mark your calendars for these upcoming Work Well Lunches. If you would like to receive Work Well Winter Park emails, please contact workwell@winter park.org. Lunches are free for Work Well teams an $5 per individual not on a team. Lunches are located at the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce the second Wednesday of the month. Flu Shots provided by Winter Park Memorial Hospital November 13th Holiday Health & Happiness by Whole Foods December 11th Work Well Winter Park is committed to making our community the healthiest place to work and is spearheaded by the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce. The Work Well Winter Park mission is to engage and equip local businesses with practical policies which inspire and create a culture of wellness within the workplace. Visit WorkWellWinter Park.org for more information or to get started as a Work Well Team.Area youth receive portable gardens this fall Healthy plates, Photo credit: Rhonda Walsingham of Dark South Photography

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Winter P ark / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013 | Page 15 GYM | Chain rapidly expanding in Florida CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS P AGE at Winter Park Towers Your room is waiting for you if you need Pain and Symptom Management Hospital Follow-up Complex Treatments, or Crisis Care Referrals 866-742-6655#5019096 www.cornerstonehospice.org www.SeriousIllness.org/cornerstoneMedicare, Medicaid, most commercial insurances accepted I am a proud breast cancer survivor. How I have reacted to the obstacles along my cancer journey might come as a sur prise to you, but they are based on my philosophy that life is a choice. In January 2000, I was diagnosed with stage 1 breast cancer at age 30. From the moment of my diagnosis, I have chosen to not be sad and depressed about it, but to face it with my head held high. In February 2000, I had a lumpectomy and 27 lymph nodes removed under my right arm. Then I was treated with chemotherapy and radiation. My cancer went into remission and I consider myself one of the lucky ones because not only was I a stage 1 breast cancer survivor, but I did not miss one day of work nor did I experience any nausea or vomiting from the chemotherapy. I did lose my hair, but that turned out to not be such a bad thing because during the hot summer months I was able to take my wigs off and cool I was able to find some incredible wigs that were so realistic that people always complimented my hair and asked where I had it done. Pleased but embarrassed, Id tell them I had it done out of state. In 2006, I was faced with a second diagnosis of breast cancer. This time, things were much different because the year prior, my mother was diagnosed with stage 3 ovarian cancer. After her diagnosis, my mother, my sister and I all went for genetic testing and we all tested positive for the BRCA-1 gene. With this news and with my second diagnosis of breast cancer still under the age of 40, I opted for a double mastectomy and breast reconstruction surgery and I continued to look at my situation with a silver Then on October 31, 2008, after fighting a five-year battle, my mother passed away from ovarian cancer at the young age of 62. It was a long and hard troubling time for all of us, but mom fought until the very end. My mother was the strongest woman anyone could have known. I think about her every day and I am so proud of her. Over the past 10 years, I have funneled my passion to fight breast cancer into volunteering for the American Cancer Societys (ACS) Making Strides Against Breast Cancer walk. Volunteering for this event helps me share my experiences and spread the word about the importance of early detection as ACS works to create a world with less cancer So I invite you to join me and other breast cancer sur vivors and supporters at this years Making Strides Against Breast Cancer walk. The walk will be on Saturday, October 19 begins at 7 am and the walk begins at 9 am. For more information or to register, please visit www.OrlandoStrides.com. Join the ght at the Orlando Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walk! Geri BellGuest columnistself to the point of failure in the future? Abso-friggin-lutely. Shouldnt the instructors encourage people to not push themselves to absolute failure in CrossFit? CrossFit representatives have acknowledged the danger and said they warn members how to avoid it. safety means everything to CrossFit and that coaches will be stationed throughout the gym to make sure members are pacing themselves. One of the most important things to us is safety in our gym, and as long as youve got coaches that know what theyre doing and they take safety very seriously you can prevent that from hapWere not going to allow people to do more than what they can do. CrossFit Winter Park will offer a variety of clubs in addition to group and individual classes, including a barbell club. If youve never lifted weight in your life or even if its an elite athlete looking for an extra edge, train at CrossFit Winter Park, CrossFit Winter Park will have a grand opening celebration 90 days after the soft opening.If youve never lifted weight in your life or even if its an elite athlete looking for an extra edge, home to train at CrossFit Winter Park.

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Page 16 | Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013 | Winter P ark / Maitland Observer One Senior Place ... See our full Calendar of Events at OneSeniorPlace.com407.949.6733715 Douglas Avenue Altamonte Springs, FL 32714M-F 8:30am 5pmFRI DA Y, O C T O B E R 18 Florida Blue Seminar 10am-11:30am Also: Wed, Oct 23rd 1pm-2:30pm Mon, Oct 28th 10am-11:30am By Florida Blue-McBride Insurance Agency RSVP 407.230.7835 M O N DA Y, O C T O B E R 21 Senior Club Sponsored by Family Physicians Group 10am 12pm October 21st Movie Day Big Wedding October 28th Casino Day The Real Estate Specialists are IN 10am-1pm (also 28th) Presented by Exit Real Estate Results By Appointment Only 407.949.6714 WellCare Seminar 3pm-4pm Also: Wed, Oct 23rd 9:30am-10:30am Thurs, Oct 24th 2:30pm-3:30pm Tues, Oct 29th 9:30am-10:30am Wed, Oct 30th, 9:30am-10:30am Thurs, Oct 31st 2:30pm-3:30pm Presented by Medicare Plan Options RSVP 407.949.6723 T U ESDA Y, O C T O B E R 22 AARP Medicare Complete 2pm-3:30pm (also 29th ) Presented by LTC Advisors, RSVP 407.949.6722 Health Care Reform 3:30pm-5pm (also 29th) Presented by LTC Advisors RSVP 407.949.6722 Estate Planning Workshop: Family Dynamics 9:30am-12:30pm By The Law Ofces of Hoyt & Bryan RSVP 407.977.8080 Medicaid Planning-Truths & Myths about Medicaid and VA Benets 2pm-4pm By The Law Ofces of Hoyt & Bryan RSVP 407.977.8080 W ED N ESDA Y, O C T O B E R 23 Why do hearing aids cost so much? 3pm-4:30pm (also 30th) Presented by Harmony Hearing Cen ters of America RSVP 407.949.6737 Freedom/Optimum Seminar 3:30pm-4:30pm Also: Wed, Oct 30th 11am-1pm Presented by Freedom Health Open to the Public.Calendar of Events October 2013 shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM here should be more to life than maintenance-free living. To learn more about our community in Kissimmee, call (407) 933-1999. As I write this column the U.S. government is in its 14th day of sequestration, or enforced fur loughs for non-essential workers. While the apocalypse did not come when we hit sequestration, we are beginning to feel the pinch a bit right now. The U.S. Department of Agriculture has failed to respond to a devastating snowstorm in South Dakota that has left thousands of heads of cattle dead and some farmers near economic ruin. Thousands of veterans have had to force their way into the memorials that honor their service to our country. And things could get much worse. Why? Because politicians on both sides of the aisle are playing a dangerous game of chicken with each other. tration has been the debate over Obamacare, a program that Congress voted into law several years ago. This program has been a hot topic for the American public in general, with debates often generating more heat than light. As someone who has voted for people in both parties from time-totime, I want to suggest that we at least give the program a try. We need to try because more than 15 percent of the American public has no health insurance at all. This not only leaves them vulnerable; it leaves the rest of us vulnerable as well. We are still a compassionate enough people to ensure that even the uninsured will get compassionate health care of some sort. The cost of this uninsured health care is always passed on, either through the higher funding costs of public hospitals or the higher fees of private ones. In true emergencies, the uninsured still get some attention, though often not enough. In fact they are already getting rather poor universal health coverage under the table. In addition, they are denied some of the preventative services that could have rendered their emergency situations unnecessary. This type of universal coverage is probably more expensive than we can calfor its recipients. One of the great outcries of universal health care opponents is that socialized medicine results in excessive waiting times for medical procedures. Often Canadas failures are cited as examples. Im not so sure that Obamacare could be categorized as socialized medicine, but even if it were it would not be the end of the world. I lived in Australia during the 1980s when Bob Hawkes Labor Government switched the Australian healthcare system from private to socialized overnight. The sky didnt cave in nor was paradise regained, but the aver age person made out all right. In the medical practitioner arena, the disparity in salaries between specialists and family medicine doctors evened out a bit. The only people upset by this were the spegoing to the doctor became simpler, as doctors gave discounts for direct billing. Both of my children were born in an Australian hospital and received the best of care. My wife developed an ulcerated cornea and received swift, excellent treatment. Public health benover-prescribing narcotics and barbiturates were caught more easily. Were there problems with the new system? Yes. But there were problems with the old system as well. Which brings me to the issue of our current healthcare system that is ruled by private healthcare companies. It is not exactly the most functional system in the world. About 14 years ago, the ulcerated cornea in Australia) developed a rare form of cancer. Because of her unusual cancer and her young age, her Johns Hopkins-trained surgical oncologist wanted to treat her with an approved but unusual treatment. Our insurance company refused. I called the company and asked to speak with the medical director who had made the decision. The customer service representative refused. I asked if she would let me speak to the director if I were a doctor or a lawyer. She said, yes. In reviewing the situation, I said, So youre telling me that if I were a doctor or a lawyer, I could speak with the medical director, but because Im a normal person, I cant. In a moment of transparency she replied, Yes, thats right. Months later we won our right to the treatment through the state insurance board, but it was already too late. Im not sure it could get much worse than this, and I supMy point is this: why not give Obamacare a try? If it doesnt work, people can always vote it out later. In the meantime it would let the government, which isnt working, get back to work.Fighting against our own lives Jim Govatos Reality Lines PHOTOS BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVERThe Winter Park Autumn Art F estival took over downtown Winter P ark on Oct. 12 and 13 as Florida artists showed their wares to thousands of weekend visitors. Winter Park Autumn Art Festival

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Winter P ark / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013 | Page 17October, Central Florida, kling October and November weather calls you to get out and walk. The temperatures start in 60s in the early morning, rising into the 80s by day, cooling off with a gentle breeze for your evening the magical world of walking under this weeks full moon. Walking is uncomplicated, with no membership fees, no special equipment, no special hours. Just you, your feet (with good shoes) and a few minutes or hours under the Central Florida skies is all you need. You can walk on canopied streets or by the cafes of Park Avenue. Let your feet take you through one of our linear parks, like the Cady Way, Cross Seminole, Seminole Wekiva and Orlando Urban trails. Check them out at traillink.com. Smaller trails at Casselberrys Wirz Park, Winter Parks Mead Garden, and Maitland Community Park offer more reasons to walk in this great weather. The city of Winter Park website also features walking trail maps. Just how good is walking for you? Walking helps not just the body, but the mind and spirit. And it can boost your social life. Great for the bodyPeople who walk several times a week lower their risks of diabetes, hypertension, and linked to lower cancer risks. Walkers are less likely to get dementia. Walking burns calories. A 155-pound person walking moderately fast (3 mph) expends about 232 calories in an your appetite. Walking builds your heart muscle and boosts endurance. Walking keeps bones strong and joints flexible. As a weight-bear ing exercise, walking is your defense against osteoporosis as you age. Walking is great for your skin. The blood circulation gets those red blood cells moving around, putting a pink glow in your cheeks.Great for the soulWalking increases endor phins, the feel-good hormones. Stress floats away with each step. Walking can be very social. Get to know your neighbors. You can walk with friends and family. Long walks and talks via cell phone give you a chance to reconnect with dear faraway friends. You can walk by yourself. The solitude of walking can help you feel centered and calm. You can solve all the problems of the world.Get readyIf you have any kind of heart, lung or joint problem, check with your health care provider before heading out the door for a walk. Put your feet in good walking shoes, with good socks. The local running store can fit your feet with the cushioning and support you need, especially as you increase your walking. Wear bright colors so drivers and bikers cant miss seeing you. Know where you are walking. Be street smart and safe. Take your cell phone with you, just in case. You may need to bring your glasses with you so you can screen out the calls you dont want. Free smartphone apps can track your distances and map your walks. MapMyWalk and MapMyRun are favorites. Another app can turn your smartphone into a pedometer. If you want to build your strength and enjoy longer walks, increase your distance about 10 percent each week. More than that, and the risks of injury increase too. But most important of all, get out, enjoy your walk under our great Central Florida skies and make it a special part of your routine. BeWellWithin Im John Manjarres, and I used to be just like you unhappy with my body and at a loss where to turn. But with a little motivation and help, Ive managed to become the person I always wanted to be and I can help you do exactly the same! Check me out at almost 280 lbs. then again at 200lbs. The American Cancer Society invests in groundbreaking breast cancer research and helps women in every community. In fact, one in two women newly diagnosed with breast cancer turns to us for everything from information about clinical trials to getting rides to treatments. Join the Orlando Making Strides Against Breast Cancer 5K fundraising walk. Together, we can create a world with less breast cancer and more birthdays. Sign up at MakingStridesWalk.org/OrlandoMetro Saturday, October 19 | Lake Eola | rfnrtbbb 13_Orange Appeal_9.25x11.125.indd 2 8/20/13 2:16 PM Enjoy the outdoors with a walk this autumn Dr. Nancy Rudner LugoHealth Action

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Page 18 | Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013 | Winter P ark / Maitland ObserverOct 19 Harrietts Park Avenue F ashion Week Runway Show Returning for its seventh fashionable season, Harrietts Park Avenue Fashion Week is a celebration of fashion and design, and a weeklong tribute to Central Floridas greatest philanthropist Harriett Lake. The big fashion runway show is this Saturday, Oct. 19, when we mingle with the fashion elite in the tent in Central Park. Doors open at 6 p.m. and the show begins at 7 p.m. Visit parkavenuefashionweek.comNow through Nov. 10 Jackie and Me at the Orlando RepIn this play for young people, Joey is assigned to write a paper about baseball legend Jackie Robinson. Thanks to a magical baseball card, Joey returns to 1947 to meet the legend in person, and sees Robinsons determination and dedication during the time of segregation. Lessons are learned tion of courage. The show will play at the Orlando Rep in Loch Haven Park. Call 407-896-7365 or visit orlandorep.comNow through Nov. 10 Dracula by Shakespeare and Co. Orlando Shakes invites us to experience Dracula in a oneman tour-de-force that uses Bram Stokers original text of journal entries and newspaper clippings for an evening of bloody thrills. Dracula works its dark sorcery through Nov. 10. Call 407-4471700 or visit orlandoshakes.org Now through Oct. 31 Phantasmagoria IV Hell Hath RisenThe fourth installment of what has become an annual Halloween celebration, this year titled Phantasmagoria IV Hell Hath Risen, is the best version so far. With the best written script, choreography, this homage to Poe, Dickens, and other literary masters is under the inspired direction of John DiDonna, Kevin Becker and Seth Kubersky, with choreography by Mila Makarova and Dion Smith. Call 407-3289005 or order online at redchair project.comT oday through Oct. 20 Orlando Ballets 40th anniversaryCelebrating its 40th anniver Hill as artistic director of the Orlando Ballet, the Company will present Tribute on Oct. 18 and 19 at 8 p.m. and Oct 20 at 2 p.m. Tribute promises a weekend of fan favorites and pas de deux from the Companys history. Unfortunately, it also signals the lerina Katia Garza as a member of the Company, and that alone is reason not to miss these perfor 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com r fntbt f rtt ftbt bt bnr nr rt b bb f b tb off trtnCoupon redeemable for cash, check or credit card purchases only. Not redeemable for insurance transactions. Excludes custom/special orders & nutritional supplements. May not be combined with any other discounts. Coupon has no cash value. Josh Garrick Culture worthy of your calendar FASHION WEEK DRACULA Please see CUL TURE on next page

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Winter P ark / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013 | Page 19 o n 4 3 6 i n W i n t e r P a r kF e e l B e t t e r T o d a y !* N e w P at i e n t s o n ly E x p i r e s 1 1 / 3 0 / 1 3 ( 4 0 7 ) 6 7 3 6 7 0 0 F r ee Cons ult ations Mos tI n s u r a n c e A c c e p t e d $50 off f i r s t v i s i t i f y o u m e n t i o n t h i s a d* CUL TURE | The T wilight Zone brings back four classic episodes to thrill and intrigue you live and on stagemances. For tickets, visit orlandoballet.org T oday through Nov. 23 Orlando Shakes introduces young audiences to live jazzThe Orlando Shakespeare Theater will introduce young audiences to jazz in the worldpremiere musical A Night in New Orleans: A Magic Tree House Adventure with music by legendary jazz composer Allen Toussaint. In performance through Nov. 23, Magic Tree House follows Jack and Annie on a mission to inspire young artists to share their talents with the world as they search for the young Louis Armstrong. Complete with live jazz band, this new musical transports audiences back to 1915 New Orleans, where music. Call 407-447-1700 or visit orlandoshakes.org Oct. 18 to Nov. 17 V enus in Fur at the Mad CowIn this sexy, funny hit direct from Broadway the Mad Cow Theatre introduces us to Vanda, an unusual young actress who arrives to audition for the lead in playwright Thomas adaptation of the erotic novel, Venus in Fur. During the heading into dangerous territory as this battle-of-the-sexes asks the audience, Does Art imitate Life? Written by comic master David Ives, for tickets call 407297-8788 or visit madcowtheatre. com Oct. 18 to Nov. 4 Breakthrough Theatre enters The T wilight ZoneThe Breakthrough Theatre will present four episodes from the classic series, The Twilight Zone from Oct. 18 to Nov. 4. The four episodes are: Night Call, in which telephone calls haunt an elderly man; The Lonely (written by Rod Serling); Shadow Play, in which a murderer tries to convince those about him that the world is his recurring nightmare; and The Living Doll, in which a father does battle with his stepdaughters talking doll. The Theatre is at 419 W. Fair banks Ave. in Winter Park. For reservations, call 407-920-4034. Oct 19 Free Concert in the Park at Mead GardenThe Florida Young Artists Orchestra and the Maitland Symphony Orchestra are inviting us to Double the Pleasure, Double the Fun, Two Orchestras Performing a Concert of One in a free concert on Oct. 19. There will be two concerts presented on the stage at Mead Garden in Winter Park with the FYAO offering a classical concert at 5:30 CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS P AGE Please see CUL TURE on next page VENUS IN FUR

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Autumn Art FestivalWinter Park40th Annual Thank You for Celebrating 40 Years of Florida Artists Our sincere appreciation to the artists, sponsors, patrons, volunteers and attendees who made the festival a success! www.autumnartfestival.org presented & hosted by: supported by:Costco Wholesale | C & S Press| Florida Distributing Co. | Hannibal Square Association | Hunter Vision ImageServe | Moss, Krusick & Associates | New York Times | Wall Street Journal | Venture Photography Images A. Fraebel Studios

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Winter P ark / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013 | Page 21p.m. followed by the Maitland Symphony Orchestra in a pops concert at 7 p.m. The concerts are free, family friendly and open to all. Call 321-303-1404. Oct. 23 Emanuel Ax and Johannes BrahmsGreatness is a sometimes an is, without a doubt, one of the great pianists of our time. This guest artist with the Bach Festival Society will perform a program of works by Brahms including his Piano Sonata No. 2 at the Tiedtke Concert Hall on the Rollins College campus. The performance is set for Oct. 23 at 7:30 p.m. Call 407-646-2182 or visit bachfestivalOct. 24 From Christies Auction HouseBefore it closes on Oct. 27, A Passion for Collecting at the Or lando Museum of Art will present Christies Michael Bass, who will discuss Whats Hot and Whats Not on Oct. 24 at 1:30 pm. Bass will speak and then engage the group in a gallery walk through the exhibit. The event is free with paid admission. Call 407-896-4231 or visit omart.org Oct. 26 Cows n Cabs a culinary charity EventABC Fine Wine & Spirits David Larue and celebrity chef John Rivers return with Cows n Cabs, a charity event with a rustic theme presented in Winter Parks West Meadow. Inspired by local cuisine, and working to end poverty in Central Florida, the Community Food & Outreach Along with top culinary talent, attendees enjoy live music; a photo booth; a game of Wine Ring Toss (where guests win bottles of wine); and a silent auction. Admission is $110. Visit cowsncabs.com or email tina@ cowsncabs.com Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906. Lake Lily Park A DIVIS I O N OF VS M EDIA GR OUP INC. Tickets Presale Tickets $25 through October 20 Day of the event $30 Half price admission for children ages 3 12 Have your own table $350.00 Includes one linen covered round table with eight chairs & includes 8 tickets Call 407-644-0741 for Tickets www.TasteofMaitland.comAthena Roasted Chicken Francescos Sam Sneads Tavern SoNapa John and Shirleys Catering Upper Crust Desserts RanGetsu Mitchells Fish Market Mellow Mushroom Costco Romanos Macaroni Grill The Sugar Suite Country Club at Deer Run Sams Smoothie Shack Kobe Japanese Steakhouse Dunkin Donuts Jeremiahs Italian Ice Bahama Breeze Honey Baked Ham Jersey Mikes Subs Crispers Browns NY Deli Publix Enzos Restaurant on the Lake Chick-l-A Maitland CUL TURE | A performance of Brahms from one of the greatest pianists, and a night of cows and cabernets CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS P AGE PHANT ASMAGORIA IV COWS N CABS A P ASSION FOR COLLECTING This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORG @EnzianTheater Wednesday Night Pitcher Show SUSPIRIA FREE on the lawn at Eden Bar Wed 8:00PM One Week Only! THE HUNT Fri-Sun 3:30, 6:30, 9:30 Mon-Thu 6:30, 9:30 Halloween Party at Eden FREE | DJ Spinning all night long Prizes for best dressed gals and ghouls October 26th | 9:00PM 2:00AM Midnight Movies: ALIEN Sat 11:59PM

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Page 22 | Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013 | Winter P ark / Maitland ObserverOpinions Chris Jepson P erspectivesLouis Roney Play On! King Features Weekly ServiceOctober 14, 2013 EDITORIAL CARTOONS Noblesse oblige: the inferred responsibility of privileged people to act with generosity and nobility toward those less privileged. An expression that sums up an aspect of life for me is, There but for the grace of God go I. I do not subscribe to the literal mercy of God, but I appreciate the implied possibilities of that statement. There but for the support of a loving family. There but for the luck of an early mentor. There but for my mother getting a college teaching job. There but for a scholarship. There but for a blind date. You get the idea. In my life Ive encountered a fair number of accomplished, successful, intelligent, wealthy men. Several sold companies netting hundreds of millions of dollars. If I were a betting man, I would wager that a Republican Party. My question is, Why? The Republican Party is a three-legged stool: Lower taxes, fewer regulations and national stability. Space does not allow here the counter-arguments to lower taxes and deregulation (and the historic economic record of both), but I would like to examine the challenge to national stability (see: clean CR and Debt Ceiling) posed by the Republican Party and one recommendation to sensibly change course. What responsibility do we, as citizens, have towards Americas corporations? You could argue that American cor porations have no more obligation for the commonwealth than providing maximum return to shareholders. If they create jobs at all, that is incidental to their primary goal of return on investment. If moving the manufacturing of a widget to a third-world dystopian factory increases American workers (and their communities) are diminished, so what? Not my job, they will say, building better communities. If corporations are now citizens (thank you, Supreme Court) of the republic, well, how should we consider a citizen who pays an unlivable wage while thwarting union-organizing efforts (see: Walmart)? So many issues confront America that it is staggering how America stumble-bums along as well as we do. But for how long? The Republican Party is led by men unthat the best and the brightest are not at the helm of the GOP. Why is that? Surely, such Republican men exist and, importantis paramount but so are a myriad of other social considerations that have a direct impact on national/local stability. America is an amalgam of competing interests but the commonwealth is undeniably suffering and there is no more stark a measurement of our system than the worsening imbalance of wealth in America (the reality of the 1 percent threshold). If America is to devolve into an oligarchy of the moneyed-class, will not national stability inevitably become the issue? America is not immune from history. I remain, at heart, an optimist. I believe rational people can, indeed, agree on the facts in the pursuit of just governance. My recommendation for America is that those Republican men who embrace both at stake for America than another Chamregulatory retrenchment. There must be 40-such thoughtful Republicans in Winter Park alone. The WP Top 40. And, to all those so privileged, all A call to Republican arms Jepson is a 27-year resident of Central Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.US Harvard professor of classics John when he spoke to our class of 1942 at our combine singing as a soloist with Arthur Fiedler and the Boston Pops, and celebrating with classmates and friends in Boston. John Finleys impromptu oration that June day remains to this day as one of the most brilliant extemporaneous utterances I have ever heard. A torrent of classical refmind, and dazzled us to the degree that we were still talking about his perfor mance 45 years later at our 70th reunion. Finley humorously remarked to us, My self-esteem may seem to be ego, but honestly, I havent lived a life that allows me to be modest about things. John Silber was president of Boston University when I met him in New Smyrna at an Atlantic Center for the Arts symposium in which I took part in the early 1980s. Silber was then the highest paid university prexy in the U.S. The subject was arts in education. Silber rose from the table and spoke, followAlbee (Whos afraid of Virginia Woolf?) and noted cynic and Vermont governor, Madeleine Kunin. When Silber spoke, the other speakers were soon eclipsed, even forgotten. Texan Silbers easy disarming delivery brought to bear on present situations the Wisdom of the Ages, which has lived in erudite minds from the 400 B.C. Golden Age of Athens, to today. That night before dinner, my b.w. and I chatted about the arts with Silber for half an hour. I told him that I had not heard a speaker of his caliber since the days of John Finley. I knew Finley, Silber said. Shortly thereafter Silber sent me a signed copy of a book of his that had enjoyed national impact. Later Silber ran for mayor of Boston and lost by a hair. He would have been great, and would have won had he talked less, reported a Boston friend. His erudition was way over the head of the average Joe, and it did To me, my longtime friend, poet James the spoken word a fact Time Magazine downplayed in Jims full-page obituary. Long before Deliverance, the great New Yorker Magazine poetry years, and the Poet Laureate of the Library of Congress honor, Jims spoken voice from his earliest youth had intoned the courtly elegance of an Oxford-educated Southern Antebellum intellectual. Just as naturally, Jim could lapse into the red-clay patois of the rural Georgians he knew and loved. Tall and lanky, Dickey that said, Doan mess with me. Jims or dinary daytime parlance was pure poetry to hear. In his series of PBS TV talks with Bill Moyers, Jim was at his best. The two sat on a dock behind Jims house on the river in Columbia, S.C., and spoke unrestrictedly of Jims way of thinking and of living. I was sorry indeed when those interviews with Jim came to an end. Dickey was a sought-after public speaker, with a high price. But Jim didnt let down in the content or the music of his harmonious sentences at such times as when he was sprawled on the sofa in my New York digs, talking as he gazed out over Central Park. James Dickey brought with him through life his engaging ancestral manner, whether as a young war hero, a later literary lion, a pickin and singin downhome guitar player or, in my case, an entertaining friend and supportive fellow artist. Jim had it all, and all who knew him, knew it.Speaking of speakers About Roney: HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney) Chris Jepson P erspectives Louis Roney Play On!

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Winter P ark / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013 | Page 39 WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.comSunday, October 20th: 4213 Cardinal Boulevard, Wilbur By The Sea, FL 32127 2 BR | 2 BA | 1,055 SF | $229,000 Move in ready beach home. 2 bedroom, 2 bath home, located in Wilbur by the Sea, just north of P once Inlet. W alk 2 short blocks to the beach, one block to the Wilbur Rose water paddling trail. T otally renovated, includes furniture. $229,000.Hosted by: Renee Dee Morgan from 1-4 PM OBSER VEROpen Houses THEMARKE T PLA C E MindGym October 14, 2013 MindGym October 14, 2013 1813 Alice Avenue, Winter P ark FL 32792 sold by P amela Seibert 2001 Geronimo T rial, Maitland FL 32751 sold by Kelly L. Price & Debbie T assell 204 Quayside Circle Unit 504, Maitland FL 32751 sold by P amela Ryan 2053 Dixie Bell Drive, Orlando FL 32812 sold by T eresa Jones-Cintron & Elim Cintron 35 Grand Junction Boulevard, Orlando FL 32835 sold by T eresa Jones-Cintron & Elim Cintron 1150 N. P ark Avenue, Winter P ark FL 32789 sold by P atrick HigginsOBSER VERJust Sold Homes Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the Ocoee Founders Day Festival November 8 & 9, 2013 Registration: 11:30 a.m.Shotgun: 12:30 p.m.Prizes Dinner served after the tournamentSaturday, November 2nd12th Annual Founders' Day Poker Run Registration: 9:30 a.m. Start Location: Sandwich Shop 1113 S. Clarke Road, Ocoee, FL 34761 End Location: The Bar 1107 S. Clarke Road, Ocoee, FL 34761 Friday, November 1stFounders' Day Golf Tournament at Forest Lake Golf CourseAll proceeds benefit the Ocoee Police Departments Holiday Toys for Tots rfntb rf ntand soreness nb naches THG-13902 MindGym October 14, 2013 MindGym October 14, 2013

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Page 40 | Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013 | Winter P ark / Maitland Observer ANNOUNCEMENTSAuction Bank Owned PropertyBland County, Virginia. 425+/acres offered in 13 tracts. 5,500+/ sq ft custom Rocky Mountain Log Home, additional brick bi-level home, horse barn, 2 ponds and great views, plus 405+/acres joining National Forest. Abundant deer, bear, turkey and WILD HOGS! 5% Buyers Premium. Call Russell Seneff. November 8 at 5 PM, Auction Held Quality Inn, Bluefield, WV. W oltz & Associates, Inc. (VA# 321) Real Estate Brokers & Auctioneers. 540Estate Auction--Sat. Oct 26th,5200 SE 26th Ave, Ocala. Preview at 9am, Auction at 10am. Items collected over 6 decades! More information & pictures: www.brewerauctions.com (386)497-4438 AU#2604 AB#1940 12%BPWinter P ark Benefit Shop140 Lyman Ave, Winter P ark needs items to sell: clothing, bedding, jewelry, kitchenware and bric-a brac. Also needing volunteers. Contact Elizabeth Comer 407-647-8276. Open T ues & Fri at 9:30am; Sat 10am-1pm. All proceeds support childrens programs & the Or lando Blind Association.HELP WANTEDDriver T rainees Needed NOW!Become a driver for W erner Enterprises. Earn $800 per week! Local CDL T raining. 1-877-214-3624.Now Hiring: OTR Class A CDL Drivers New P ay P ackageand $1500 Sign-On Bonus! Mostly 5-10 days out. Call today 1-888-378-9691 or apply at www.heyl.netMISCELLANEOUSAIRLINE CAREERS begin here Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance T echnician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769REAL EST A TE: COMMERCIALOffices for RentWinter P ark Real Estate Offices for rent (Winter P ark/Goldenrod/University). Doctors office w/5 exam rooms + extra features. Other office units available from 800-3000 SF. New Orleans style bldg; great prices. Call Ann 407-293-1934. annpolasek@cfl.rr.comSANFORD:Free standing retail/office building, 2640 SF, great signage & visibility. Lease for $2800 per month (also for sale). Call John, owner/broker, 407-492-7111 REAL EST A TE: FOR RENTQUIET JOURNALIST SEEKING WINTER P ARK RENT ALIm a female non-smoker age 59 with a mild vision disability preventing me from driving. If you have a nice home or apartment in a safe neighborhood near busline available for annual lease, Id appreciate your call or email. Thank you. Stephanie Y oung 239-424-0182 youngsb30@ gmail.comREAL EST A TE: FOR SALEBlue Ridge Mountain Land Liquidation!1.37 acres, national forest access, only $9,800. W as $74,900. Hardwood setting, breathtaking mountain/ valley views. Mild climate, T remendous 4 season recreation. P aved rds, UG utilities, water. Excellent financing Call 1-866-9525303, x21 Foreclosed Cabin On 4 Acres!Just $89,900. Bring your hammer & nails. Great fixer upper on beautiful wooded rolling land. Enjoy wildlife, creeks, ponds, lake access. Must see! Call 877-888-0267, x 436HOMESITES JUST OUTSIDE CHA TT ANOOGA!10-25 Acres Starting at Only $56,000. Located on Signal Mountain in T ennessee. Gated Community Phase 2 Just Released. Call 877-282-4409NORTH GEORGIA Long Flowing Creek Property,Secluded on culdesac. P erfect retreat near Oktoberfest in Helen, GA. Utilities in place ready to build for $29,900. 1-877717-8992 ext591. THEMARKE T PLA C E MindGym October 14, 2013 MindGym October 14, 2013 ARIES (March 21 to April 19) The high standards you set for yourself dont always translate into the behav ior you expect of others. That relation ship problem can be resolved if youre more flexible and less judgmental. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Not enough party bids to satisfy the Bovines fun-loving side this week? Go ahead and throw one of your own. Then prepare for some serious work coming up early next week. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) A new and intensely productive cycle is about to kick in. Be careful not to get too stressed out, though. Make time to restore your energies by relaxing with family and friends. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) This could be a good time to share some of your plans with those closest to you. Their comments could give you some added insight into how you might accomplish your goals. LEO (July 23 to August 22) An attack of self-doubt might be unsettling for the usually super-assured Feline. But it could be your inner voice telling you to hold off implementing your plans until youve reassessed them. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) This is a great time for you to reward yourself for all your hard work by tak ing a trip you havent spent months carefully planning, to somewhere you never thought youd be going. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Some misunderstandings resist being resolved. But your sincerity in wanting to soothe those hurt feelings wins the day. By months end, that relationship should begin to show signs of healing. SCORPIO (October 23 to Novem ber 21) A hectic job schedule begins to ease just in time to blow off all that work-generated steam on Halloween. A family situation runs into an unexpected complication. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) A cutting remark in the workplace needs to be handled with finesse. Remember: How you respond could determine the depth of support you gain from colleagues. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Once again, that Capricornean stubborn streak sets in and could keep you from getting muchneeded advice. Fortunately, it lifts by weeks end, in time to make an informed decision. AQUARIUS (January 20 to Febru ary 18) A surprise trip early in the week could lead to other unexpected offers when you return. Word to the wise: Avoid talking too much about this until youve made some decisions. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Learning dominates the week for per spicacious Pisceans, who are always looking to widen their range of knowl edge. A series of important job-linked commitments begins late in the week. BORN THIS WEEK: Your sense of humor generates good feelings and good will everywhere you go. 2013 King Features Syndicate, Inc. Oct. 31, 1517, the priest and scholar Martin Luther nails to the door of the Castle Church in Wittenberg, Germany, a piece of paper containing 95 revolutionary opinions that would begin the Protestant Reformation. In one, Luther condemned the corruption of the Catholic Church for asking for payment for the forgiveness of sins. Oct. 30, 1890, Oakland, Calif., enacts a law against opium, morphine and cocaine. The new regulations allowed only doctors to prescribe these drugs, which had been legal for cures or pain relief. Oct. 29, 1929, Black Tuesday hits Wall Street as investors trade 16,410,030 shares. In the aftermath of Black Tuesday, America and the rest of the industrialized world spiraled downward into the Great Depression. By 1932, stocks were worth only about 20 percent of their value in the summer of 1929. Nov. 2, 1947, the Hughes Flying Boat the largest aircraft ever built is piloted by designer How ard Hughes on its first and only flight. Built with laminated birch and spruce, the Spruce Goose had a wingspan longer than a football field and was designed to carry more than 700 men to battle. Nov. 1, 1952, the United States detonates the worlds first thermo nuclear weapon, the hydrogen bomb, on Eniwetok atoll in the Pacific. The Soviet Union quickly followed suit, and by the late 1970s, seven nations had constructed hydrogen bombs. Oct. 28, 1965, construction is completed on the Gateway Arch, a 630-foot-high parabola of stainless steel in St. Louis. An internal tram sys tem takes visitors to the top, where on a clear day they can see up to 30 miles across the Mississippi and to the Great Plains to the west. Nov. 3, 1986, the Lebanese magazine Ash Shiraa reports that the United States has been secretly selling arms to Iran in an effort to secure the release of seven American hostages held by pro-Iranian groups in Lebanon. Within weeks, Attorney General Edwin Meese revealed that proceeds from the arms sales were diverted to fund Nicaraguan rebels. 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. King Features Weekly ServiceOctober 14, 2013 MindGym October 14, 2013 MindGym October 14, 2013 MindGym October 14, 2013 MindGymOctober 14, 2013



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Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013Serving Winter Park, Maitland, Baldwin Park, College Park and Goldenrod50+ tax WPMOBSERVER.COM Winter Park Commissioners voted to continue the use of red light cameras during Mondays City Commission meeting a contrast to the state legislature who might ban the devices early next year. The city originally purchased a three-year red light camera agreement with Gatso USA back in 2009, now choosing to renew their services for another year. Vice Mayor Sarah Sprinkel spoke in support of the red light cameras, noting them as an asset to the community. Why do this if its not having some kind of positive impact on your community? Sprinkel said. Because no, we dont want it to be just another source for income. But talk among Florida residents and politicians continues to question the usefulness of red light cameras. A bill currently in the pipeline at the state level aims to ban red light cameras altogether. The Senates Transportation Committee Chairman Jeff month, believing that the cameras are simply an alternative source of revenue for municipalities. We just have to wait and see where the legislature acts out on it, said City Commissioner Steven Leary. Let them have the discussion, see where they are, see if we agree with it and see what we can do. USPS 00-6186 Publisher statement on page 46 VISIT WPMOBSER vV ER.COM SS UBSCRIBE NOW! DITCHING THE BUSMAITLAND CITY TALK, 4 TT he road to LouisvilleKnights face the No. 6 Cardinals. SPORT s S 10 HH ouses that power the gridThese Winter Park homes may be selling electricity to yours. LIFE s S TYLE s S 12A killer workoutCrossFit moves into Winter Park, but is the workout overkill? HEALT h H Y LIVING, 14CALENDAR ................... 6 CC OMMUNITY BULLETIN ........... 7 SPOR TS .................... 10 LL IFESTYLES .................. 12 HEAL THY LIVING ............... 14 CUL TURE .................... 18 OPINIONS ................... 22 CLASSIFIEDS ................. 39 Winter Park City Commission may get in the way of the comen House to a new home across Lake Osceola. A local organization called Concerned Citizens for Historic Preservation Inc. initiated the lawsuit, expressing that the City Commission removed the houses historic designation in a matter that was inconsistent with the Defendant Citys Historic Preservation Ordinance. The lawsuit further accuses the City Commissioners of engaging in unauthorized private communications between one another and with third parties interested in removing the designation. the lawsuit on behalf of the organization on Sept. 30, just seven days after Mark Terry, president of the Board of Trustees for the Albin Polasek Museum and Sculpture Garden, announced to the Commission that they would tap their reserves to guarantee that the historic home be moved to the grounds of the museum. The removal of the historic designation left the house vulnerable to the wrecking ball ear lier this year when new homeowners decided they wanted to build a new home on the property, thus starting the community effort to save it. The owners held off on demolition while the community rallied to save it. came up with a very good future plan for the house, and one that will make it a community asset, said Debbie Komanski, executive director of the museum. We very much hope that we can car ry forward and still accomplish the project successfully as soon as possible. Komanski said that while the Albin Polasek Museum and Sculpture Garden stepped for ward to fund the remaining cost to move the house, another $250,000 is still needed to stabilize it on the museum grounds. This process includes securing the foundation of the home and renovating its inside for public use. It would be a tragedy to see this lawsuit result in uprooting all the plans that have been made, Komanski said. Preservation Capen Project Director Christine French assured that the lawsuit wouldnt affect the progress of the relocation effort and that movers will begin preparing the house to move this week. I have read the lawsuit that dont expect that it will impact our work there, French said. Were moving ahead with our plans to move the house. Winter Park Director of Communications Clarissa Howard said that the City Commission members hadnt seen the lawsuit yet and were unable to comment.ARCHIVE PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVERWinter Parks CC apen HH ouse was being prepared to oat south on Lake OO sceola to its new home a t the Albin P P olasek M M useum and S S culpture Gardens, but a suit may stop it. SS topping a moving houseLawsuit may interfere home across a lakeTIM FREED OO bserver staff For 25 years a covered bridges 6-foot 6-inches tall opening served as a gateway to Maitlands Trotter Drive Lake Nina-fronted neighborhood, until Monday night when an 8-foot-tall trailer brought the whole thing tumbling down in a matter of minutes. On Monday night a black GMC SUV made it halfway out from under the bridge before the 8to 10-foot-tall trailer it was towing caught the top canopy and brought the whole wood structure crashing down on top of it. The driver wasnt hurt, but Maitland Public Works Director Rick Lemke said the bridge is beyond repair. Right now its all in splinters, theres nothing to salvage, Lemke said. The patches of grass making up Covered Bridge Park now grow nearby with no noticeable landmark for its name. Lemke said its too soon to tell whether the city, which covered the 55-year-old bridge in 1988, will decide to rebuild the parks namesake. For now, he said, the public works department is concentrating on cleanup and getting the now open-air bridge up to code. the bridge is safe then well make the decision about what to Maitland bridge collapsesSARAH WILSON OO bserver staff Please see COLLAPSE on page 2 GG iving the green light for red light camerasWinter Park extends its red light camera program for a year while the state takes a closer look at banning them forever. If those cameras can save one life a year, theres no amount of money in the world that can equate to that.TIM FREED OO bserver staff Please see CC AMERAS on page 2 407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC

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Page 2 | T T hursday, OO ct. 17, 2013 | W W inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserverCO llapLLAP SE | Roof fell on moving truck after taking final hitC amAM E ra RA S | CC ity extends program while state tries to stop itthe red light cameras ultimately make roads safer and help police dents by capturing photographic evidence. information on whether theyre creating more safety, Leary said. I think that if people know theyre there, people will slow down and not go through them. In May, June and July of this year, between 1,400 and 1,600 red light camera violations occurred each month. Winter Park police records show that 15 to 20 percent of those ticketed tried to tions. City Commissioners nearly triggered more public ire in July when they came within a single vote of doubling the fee residents must pay to challenge red light camera citations. The City Commission voted to hold the line at $137 as opposed to the proposed $250. For Winter Park Police Deputy Chief Arthur King, the issue of safety transcends any concerns Red light cameras are for one thing: for safety, to protect the motorist, King said. If those cameras can save one life a year, theres no amount of money in the world that can equate to that. It can reduce crashes, you cant compare dollars to something like that its safety, thats why its so important. do about the cover, Lemke said. Weight restrictions werent mandated for the bridge, he said, because the cover kept large vehicles from getting through. Now theyll have to add new signs and reinforce the bridges concrete side barriers. Lemke said the bridge has been hit a number of times before by those not obeying the 6-foot 6-inch clearance warning sign, with a bump warranting repairs last year. He said keeping the wooden structure maintained costs the city up to $2,000 a year, but brought value in its aesthetic appeal. You cant put a bigger sign than we had, Lemke said. You 8-foot trailer under a 6-foot 6-inch bridge. According to an online guide of covered bridges composed by enthusiast Dale Travis, the Maitland bridge was one of 52 left standing in the state as of May 13 of this year. Travis guide shows that hur ricanes and construction projects have taken down 13 others in recent decades. CCOO N TITI NU EE D F RORO M fF RO nN T pP A GE C COO N TI TI NU E E D F RO RO M f F RO n N T p P A GE Savannah Court and Cove Excellence in Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation 1301 W. Maitland Blvd. Maitland, FL 32751407-645-3990www.SavannahCourtMaitland.comAssisted Living Facility License No. 8447 Skilled Nursing Facility License No. 1635096 Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above. You are always welcome!A Senior Living Community where Hospitality is a Way of Life. Antique Road ShowSavannah Court Maitland 1301 West Maitland Boulevard Tuesday, October 22, 2013 2:00 p.m. 3:30 p.m. Bring you favorite antiques or prized possessions! Assessments done by Doug White, auctioneer, owner of A-1 Auction Light refreshments served Please call to RSVP! FEATURING ...... AND MUCH MORE! 250 North Orlando Ave. Winter Park, FL 32789407.677.9777 A Premier Flooring Source PP HOTO BY A lL ISON OlOL CSV aA Y T T HE OO BSER v V ERMaitlands only covered bridge is no more as clean up of its collapse continued TT uesday PP HOTO BY TI mM F rR EED THE OBSER vV ER CC ameras peer at passing cars near TT emple D D rive in WW inter P P ark. TT he citys deputy police chief said the cameras improve safety, but legislators have called them a cash grab.

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Welcome to a place all about health, healing and you. The new Florida Hospital for Women at Winter Park Memorial Hospital fulfills all your needs under one roof with our onestop boutique approach for your mindbody-spirit called Full Embrace Health Care. Our network of womens physicians provides you with comprehensive womens services and the latest in wellness and health advancements, including your very own Life Designer. Its an elegant retreat, a haven designed exclusively for you. for W omen Winter Park PMS: 294 100% K 70% K Florida Hospital Font: Friz Quadrata Tag Line Font: Adobe Garamond italic C = 100 M = 56 Y = 0 K = 18 The skill to heal. The spirit to care. A ONE-STOP, BOUTIQUE CENTRE FOR HEALTH, DESIGNED EXCLUSIVELY FOR YOU.To schedule an appointment with one of our physicians or the Life Designer, call (407) 646-7999. NUTRITION UROGYNECOLOGY DIGESTIVE HEALTH MAMMOGRAPHY BREAST HEALTH ADVANCED GYNECOLOGY COMPREHENSIVE HEALTH ASSESSMENT MENOPAUSE HEART HEALTH LIFE DESIGNER BONE HEALTHMost insurance accepted.WPMH-13-15651 WPMH-13-15651 Maitland Observer Nov.indd 1 10/15/13 1:03 PM

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Page 4 | T T hursday, OO ct. 17, 2013 | W W inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserverThe Maitland City Council met on Oct. 14, 2013 at 6:30 p.m. in the City Hall Council Chambers. Below is a synopsis of that meeting. OO ld BB usiness: source Ordinance: The city manager stated that there was nothing new to report at this time. nity development director, provided an update on the FlexBus project. Public HH earings: There were no scheduled Public Hearings. CC onsent II tems: Council meeting minutes of Sept. 23, 2013 were approved. & Zoning Commission meeting of Sept. 5, 2013 were accepted. Zoning Adjustments of May 23, 2013 were accepted. Lobbying Services Agreement Alcalde & Fay, Ltd. after discussion this item was tabled to the next Council meeting. Services were approved. Chevy Volt after discussion, this item was tabled to the next Council meeting. Catherine Drive Paving was approved. Maitland City TalkBY HH O warWAR D SS CHIEFE rR DECKE rR MAYOR FF unding our parks HOUSES WANTED!!! Get a FREE No Obliga on CASH O er On Your House Within 24 Hours! (855) 755-1818 www.Circle18Homes.com CASH $$$ QUICK CLOSE ANY PRICE RANGE ANY CONDITION ANY SITUATION FIXED INCOME EXPERTS SINCE 1982 www.Shop4Bonds.com Check out the more than 50,000 bonds on our website at:Email fwright@jwkorth.com for more info.A Service of J W KORTH & COMPANY SIPC* Tax equiv. yield based on FL residency and 35% tax bracket. Subject to prior sale and price change. Maitland Fla LTD Tax General Obligation Bonds (Baa1/BBB)Coupon: 4.40% Maturity: 7/1/2034 Next Call: 1/1/15 @ 100 Sinking Fund: 7/1/31 @ 100 Price: 94.00 Yield to Worst: 4.859% Federal and State Tax Exempt 7.475%*Tax Equivalent Yield Contact Fred Wright at 407-758-7486 617 E Washington Street, Ste 3 Orlando, Florida 32801S HOP 4B ONDSJWKORTH/ S HOP 4B ONDS.COM Its a Gym for Your Dog! Unlike traditional doggie daycare, our Day Fitness and Care program oers: customized workout programs weight loss and tness indoor warm water aqua therapy canine massage one-on-one attention due to small class sizes 2826 Shader Rd. Orlando, FL 32808 www.BarkingDogFitness.com info@BarkingDogFitness.com Conveniently located at... Menon this ad and receive a 10% discount for life! Limited me oer. 407-295-3888 A New Concept in Doggie Daycare TOO BUSY TO EXERCISE YOUR DOG? We have the Answer! DD ecision II tems:tion for Park & Recreation move to establish a designation for Parks and Recreation in the unreserved portion of General Fund Balance and transfer $188,000 from Undesignated General Fund Balance to Designation for General Fund Balance. ter Language/Billboards after discussion, this item was tabled to the next Council meeting. DD iscussion II tems: Police Department, presented a Power Point Presentation for the Pension Review Committee. vices director, presented a Power Point Presentation on Communications. To listen to a recording of the meeting, please check our website at itsmymaitland.com National Walk to School Day PP HOTOS BY S araARA H wW I lL SON T T HE OO BSER v V ER CC ouncilwoman Joy GG off-Marcil led the W W alking S S chool B B us to Lake S S ybelia E E lementary on N N ational WW alk to SS chool Day, O O ct. 9.

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Youre Invited to Our Free Midwife Seminar SeriesThe Choice Is Here Ageless Midwifery Care Lesann L. Dwyer, CNM, MSN Cathy M. Rudolph, CNM, MPH Andrea D. Messel, CNM, MS, CLC Allison King, CNM, MSNWHAT IS A NURSE MIDWIFE:A partner in womens health. Tuesday, October 22 | 6-7:30 pm Chatlos Conference Room (Located inside FH Altamonte) HOW TO PREPARE FOR PREGNANCY:Before you grow, its good to know. Thursday, November 7 | 6-7:30 pm Chatlos Conference Room (Located inside FH Altamonte) MONTHS 1 THRU 9:Small stuff to big news, delivered in due time. Wednesday, November 20 | 6-7:30 pm Chatlos Conference Room (Located inside FH Altamonte) POST PARTUM:Prepare for the aftermath of this addition. Thursday, December 5 | 6-7:30 pm Family Resource Center (Located on the other side of parking lot from the Main Entrance of FH Altamonte) 661 East Altamonte Drive, Suite 318, Altamonte Springs, Florida 32701 Providing women with a voice in their care at every age.A unique cornerstone of our practice is providing individualized midwifery care to women throughout the entire life cyclepuberty to post menopause. Our board-certied nurse-midwives work with women to promote optimal health whether expecting a baby or experiencing a gynecologic issue. A woman may need special education or support during these times and that is exactly what midwives provide. Each of the four lectures in our FREE Midwife Seminar Series is led by one of our four, certied nurse midwives at Florida Hospital Altamonte. The series provides invaluable information about midwifery services, pregnancy, delivery, newborn care and complete GYN carecreated by women for women. Midwife ServicesEngage patient in every stage of careOer lifestyle changes education and supportProvide physical and emotional support during laborAttend to cultural, spiritual and personal beliefsSupport choice of an un-medicated childbirthRespect choice for a medicated labor and birthAssist in optimal bonding and breast feeding plan All seminars are FREE. Healthy refreshments will be served. Demonstrations and giveaways. Plus, receive a complimentary pregnancy book and enter to win a handmade baby quilt. Reserve your seat by calling 407.599.6111 well be expecting you!

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Page 6 | T T hursday, OO ct. 17, 2013 | W W inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013 PHONE: 407-563-7000 FAX: 407-563-7099 WPM o O BSERVER.C o O MPUBLISHERTracy Craft407.515.2605TCraft@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MANAG iI NG EDITORIsaac Babcock 407.563.7023IBabcock@TurnstileMediaGroup.comA ssoSSO C iI A teTE editorEDITOR Sarah Wilson 407.563.7026SWilson@TurnstileMediaGroup.comDESI GNGN ERTom Miller 407.563.7032TMiller@TurnstileMediaGroup.com stST AFF W ritersRITERS Brittni Larson Megan Stokes Tim Freed AA llison O O lcsvay Kristy Vickery CC OLU MNMN ISTSChris JepsonJepson@MediAmerica.usLouis RoneyLRoney@cfl.rr.comJosh GarrickJoshGarrick9@gmail.com AA DVERTISI NGNG S AA LESLinda Stern407.376.2434LStern@TurnstileMediaGroup.comL eE GA lL NotiNOTI C eE AdvertisiADVERTISI NG AA shley McBride 407.286.0807Legal@FLALegals.com subsSUBS C riptioRIPTIO N sS /C irIR C ulUL A tioTIO NLuana Baez 407.563.7013LBaez@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MeME M berBER oO F: Florida Press Association -Winter Park/Maitland/Goldenrod Chambers of CommerceWinter Park/Maitland Observer is published by Turnstile Media Group. Founded in 1990 and headquartered in Orlando, Fla., Turnstile Media Group is also the parent of Golfweek, Golfweek Custom Media, TurfNet, Professional Artist, Seminole Voice, Baldwin Park Living and Turnstile Connect.TU rR N stilSTIL E MED iI A G rR OU pPCC H AA IR MANMAN Rance CrainPRESIDE NN T/ CC EOFrancis XX FarrellV iI C eE P resideRESIDE N tsTS Patti Green & Jeff BabineauUSPS #00-6186 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:Winter Park / Maitland Observer 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835 EE stablished in 1989 by Gerhard J. WW M M unster Yarda Linnea Rusterholz 1919 2013 Rusterholz, Yarda Linneaage 93, of Oviedo, FL, passed away on Thursday, October 3, 2013 at Orlando, FL. She was born on November 2, 1919 in Aspen, CO, USA to her parents, Olaf Carlson and Laura Anderson. Yarda was the second of 4 children. She attended Rollins College and graduated in 1950 with a Bachelor's Degree in Science. She served in the Army during World War II as a nurse and was a 1st Lieutenant. She was a resident of Goldenrod, Florida. She was employed by Winter Park Hospital and Florida Hospital as a nurse anesthetist for many years. Yarda was a member of the Goldenrod Chamber of Commerce, Goldenrod Historical gardening, cooking, entertaining. Yarda will be remembered by her loving daughter Rosemary O'Shea. She is also survived by her brother and sister-in-law Bill and Nancy Carlson, her sister and brother-in-law Florida and Gil Gilmartin, seven nieces and nephews. Relatives and friends are invited to a memorial service and celebration of life for Yarda at the Baldwin-Fairchild Funeral Home, Goldenrod Chapel, 7520 Aloma Ave., Winter Park, Sunday, October 13th at 3:00pm. All are invited to share fellowship and refreshments of sympathy may be made to the Goldenrod Historical Society, P.O. sign guestbook at www.baldwinfairchild.com. CC alendar FAMILY CALENDAR OCTOCT 17 II f you have a latt beans to grind or you simply want to espresso your thoughts, CC offee T T alk may be the cup for you. PP lease join an informal conversation with C C ity C C ommissioner C C arolyn C C ooper TT hursday, OO ct. 17 from 8 to 9 a.m. at the WW inter PP ark WW elcome CC enter located at 151 WW Lyman Ave. C C offee T T alk gives the community an opportunity to sit do wn and talk with the C C ommissioner over a cup of coffee and chat about any city issues that are of interest to them. S S pecial thanks to P P almano s C C afe, C C offee & WW ine BB ar for donating the coffee for this special series. For more information, please call 407-599-3428. OCTOCT 19 HH arrietts PP ark Avenue F F ashion W eek Runway S S how is WW inter P P ark s premier fashion event. M M ingle with C C entral Floridas fashion elite at this stunning event in a B B ryant P P ark-style tent in C C entral P P ark s WW est M M eadow. TT his years runway show is S S aturday, O O ct. 19. Doors open at 6 p.m. and the show starts at 7 p.m. R R unway show tickets and limited V IP IP seats are now on sale. M M ake you reservation today at P P arka venuefashionweek.com OCTOCT 26 BB uy hard-to-nd CC entral Florida native trees, shrubs, grasses and wildowers SS aturday, OO ct. 26 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m, at MM ead B B otanical G G ardens rst annual BB ackyard B B iodiversity D D ay and N N ative PP lant S S ale. E E njoy a variety of speakers, hikes, and exhibits to learn how to enhance the beauty, sense of place, and changing seasons of your yard by incor porating native plants. M M ead BB otanical Garden is located at 1500 S S Denning Drive, WW inter P P ark. TT he public is invited to this free event. TT he event will feature presentations by knowledgeable speakers, including author and lmmaker B B ill BB elleville, on a variety of topics designed to explore the beauty, health, and diversity of our backyard plants, soils, and wildlife. Visit tarower.fnpschapters.org for more information. OCTOCT 27 FF ree bagel breakfast and live entertainment will be enjo yed at the F F all F F estiv al and Walk on S S unday, O O ct. 27 at 9:30 a.m. at CC ranes R R oost P P ark in Altamonte SS prings. TT he festivities will include activities for children such as face painting, bounce houses and clowns. A health fair, vendors and more will be available for adults. P P roceeds benet the Jewish P P a vilion. TT he P P a vilion ensures that our elders in long term care are visited and enjoy holiday celebrations, intergenerational activities and ice cream socials. P P a vilion staff and volunteers visit more than a thousand seniors all over O O rlando. For more information, visit us at jewishpavilion.org OCTOCT 30 TT he streets will ll with dancing, waving, cheering, candy-throwing revelers at the Winter Park HH igh SS chool Parade and Pep Rally. CC ome cheer on the undefeated WW ildcats as they enter their nal home game of the football season that week. II ts along PP ark Avenue starting at 5 p.m. WW ednesday O O ct. 30, heading south along CC entral P P ark. OCTOCT 31 Pumpkins and Munchkins H H alloween celebration comes to S S hady P P ark from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. on H H alloween night. CC hildren of all ages are invited to join for games, bounce houses, a costume contest, TT rick-or T T rea t TT rail and lots of fun for the entire family. I I ts free at 721 WW N N ew EE ngland Ave. C C all 407-599-3275 for more information. NOVNOV 8 OO n Friday, NN ov. 8, at 10 a.m. the city of WW inter P P ark will be presenting its third annual VV eterans D D ay C C elebration. T T his event will be held in honor of all of the veterans of WW inter P P ark a t the WW inter PP ark CC ommunity CC enter RR uby BB all Amphitheater located at 721 WW N N ew E E ngland Ave. WW e are calling all veterans tha t have served in any military campaign ( W W orld WW ar IIII Korean W W ar Vietnam W W ar Desert SS torm, I I raqi Freedom or Afghanistan) or have served in any military branch in honor of our nations freedom. TT he city is holding this event to pay tribute to your dedicated service to our country. For more information regarding the citys third annual Veterans Day C C elebration, please call 407-599-3428. OCTOCT 19Double TT he P P leasure, Double TT he Fun, TT wo O O rchestras P P erforming a C C oncert of OO ne! EE njoy the autumn weather with the FF lorida Y Y oung Artists O O rchestra and the Maitland S S ymphony O O rchestra on OO ct. 19 for a double treat! TT here will be two concerts in the same program. B B oth will be presented on the beautiful stage at M M ead Garden in WW inter P P ark. TT he F Y Y A O O will present a classical concert at 5:30 p.m. followed by the M M aitland S S ymphony OO rchestra in a pops concert at 7 p.m. TT he M M aitland S S ymphony O O rchestra will open its program with the famous starstudded Jupiter from Gustav H H olsts TT he PP lanets. WW hile you contemplate the heavens from your lawn chair, other favorites will include a medley of S S tar TT rek movie themes, S S tar T T rek T T hrough the Y Y ears, and a nostalgic version of B B enny Goodmans M M oonglow, featuring our principal clarinetist, P P a t B B urket. PP roud to be living in America, MSO MSO will play an inspiring version of America the BB eautiful, and John P P hilip S S ousas famous march, S S emper Fidelis and other favorites at M M ead Garden, 1500 S S Denning Drive on O O ct. 19 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. TT he concerts are free, family friendly, and open to all. C C all 321-303-1404. II ts a S S aturday night G G low Party for ages 18 months to third grade. E E verything glows! Glow in the dark arts and crafts, glow in the dark activities and games. I I f you wear white, you can glow too! I I ts $30 for the rst child and $20 for the second. Free for each additional child beyond two. II ts at 5 p.m. on O O ct. 19. R R egister at 407387-5330. OCTOCT 24 TT he HH alloween H H ustle 5 K K race to end childhood hunger will take place on TT hursday, OO ct. 24. TT his H H alloween-themed event includes a 5K run/walk, C C ommunityB B ased C C are of C C entral Florida Kids Fun RR un and H H alloween party with activities for adults and children from 5 to 10 p.m. in BB aldwin PP ark. From trick-or-treating to HH alloween-themed carnival games for the kids to live entertainment, food trucks and beer/wine for the adults, the frightening festivities are t for all ages. C C ostumes are strongly encouraged. Visit jlgo.org for more information. OCTOCT 26 TT he Goldenrod Area CC hamber of CC ommerce would like to invite all to come out and join us for a ver y exciting 35th annual G G oldenrod F F estiv al & Parade on SS aturday, O O ct. 26, at 4755 N N P P almetto Ave. in WW inter P P ark a t the Goldenrod S S tation off of Aloma Avenue and Goldenrod RR oad. TT he day will begin at 7 a.m. with a PP ancake B B reakfast sponsored by M M atthew RR oberts Air C C onditioning & H H eating. All you can eat pancakes, sausages, coffee and juice for $5 per person! All are welcome to attend. TT he parade will begin at 11 a.m. down Aloma Avenue from Forsyth R R oad to Goldenrod R R oad eastbound. WW e are ver y pleased to have the S S hriners P P arade of UU nits and many more exciting groups. Following the parade, the U U nited Legacy BBBB Q C C ookout at the Goldenrod S S tation will feature hamburgers and hotdogs and all the trimmings for a donation of $5 until 2 p.m. TT here will be a Kids C C orner full of bounce houses, carnival games, face painting, crafts, cotton candy, popcorn, snow-cones and more at no charge for the children at the Goldenrod S S tation following the parade. For more information or for S S ponsorship O O pportunities contact Darlene Dangel, executive director of the Goldenrod C C hamber, at 407-677-5980. KK ids T T rick or T T reat on P ark Avenue is from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. along P P ark Avenue. Visit PP ark Avenue merchants and have a good time at this annual tradition. Visit cityofwinterpark.org for more information. OCTOCT 27 II ts the 14th annual Park Avenue Pet CC ostume C C ontest! TT his year the costume contest will be held on stage at C C entral PP ark in a fenced in area, especially for your pets! TT he event benets the S S ebastian HH aul Fund, helping transport greyhounds to new homes. TT he large pet contest begins at 11 a.m., the small pet contest is 1 p.m., and pet trick-or-treating is from noon to 3 p.m. For more information call TT he Doggie Door at 407-644-2969.

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WW inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver | T T hursday, OO ct. 17, 2013 | Page 7 Florida Institute of Technology is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award associate, baccalaureate, masters, education specialist and doctoral degrees. Florida Institute of Technology does not discriminate on the basis of race, gender, color, religion, creed, national origin, ancestry, marital status, age, disability, sexual orientation, Vietnam-era veterans status or any other discrimination prohibited by law in the admission of students, administration of its educational policies, scholarship and loan programs, employment policies, and athletic or other university sponsored programs or activities.OC-681-913 WE PREPARE EXCEPTIONAL LEADERS Orlando CONTACT US TODAY www.fit.edu/orlando(407) 629-7132 | orlando@fit.edu*Admittance is contingent upon receipt of ofcial academic records.Considering pursuing a masters degree from Florida Techs Orlando site? Join us for: Information session Meet & greet with faculty/staff Food and drinks Easily apply and enroll* INSTANT DECISION DAY THURSDAY, NOV. 7 3 P.M.2420 Lakemont Ave., Suite 190 Orlando, FL 32814 Register by Nov. 5 to orlando@t.edu Application Fee Waived! SS ocially conscious studiers RR ollins CC ollege has announced two new majors and minors designed for the socially conscious student who also wants to be successful in the business environment. TT he business and social entrepreneurship majors will focus on sustainability, social responsibility, entrepreneurship and innovation. C C ourses are slated for the 2014 academic school year. HH elp preserve history TT he OO range CC ounty RR egional HH istor y C C enter is asking those in the CC entral Florida community to contribute to a new exhibition, H H istory I I s I I mportant to M M e B B ecause... H H istory is being dropped from school curriculums and left in the shadow of the STEMSTEM subjects. TT he H H istory C C enter is looking to change that. C C ommunity members are asked to submit their thoughts about why history is important, even vital. P P artici pants can submit their responses through text, video, or interpretive photos on the H H istory C C enters Facebook, TT witter or I I nstagram (@ochistorycenter) accounts. OO nsite submissions will also be accepted. TT he exhibit will be up through Dec. 13. with submissions accepted through N N ov. 22. Visit thehistorycenter.org for info. FF eed the N N eed TT he WW inter P P ark C C hamber of C C ommerce is leading the charge to recruit members of the business community to become C C ommunity C C hampions, organizations who commit to raising a minimum of $500 toward feeding hungry families in our community through the S S econd H H arvest Food B B ank. CC ommunity C C hampions that sign up by Friday, O O ct. 25 will be recognized at the campaign kick-off on O O ct. 31 at city hall. Visit tinyurl. com/feedtheneed WP WP to sign up. BB usiness BB riefs DD irecting the arts TT he CC ollege of Arts and HH umanities a t the U U niversity of CC entral Florida is pleased to announce the appointment of Jeff Moore as director of the S S chool of the PP erforming Arts. T T he director, a new position at the university, will be responsible for overseeing the MM usic and TT heatre departments and advancing the development of a new P P erforming Arts C C enter on the east O O rlando campus. NN ew leader on top at EE verest TT errance T T .J. HH arris has been named president of EE verest UU niversitys N N orth O O rlando campus. HH arris is an executive with 15 years of experience in education administration and is a veteran in the eld of information technology. H H arris comes to E E verest UU niversity after serving as chief information ofcer for P P rospect EE ducation, the parent company of C C harter C C ollege based in R R eno, NN ev. I I n his new position, H H arris will oversee all administrative departments, including admissions, student affairs, education programs, and community and business relations. TT raveling up the ladder MM aitland-based TT ra vel PP lanners II nternational, one of the industrys oldest and largest host agencies with more than 2,000 independent travel agents nationwide, announced the promotion of 16year company veteran E E rwing HH ernandez, general manager, to the position of corporate vice president of operations. I I n this newly created post, H H ernandez will be in charge of the research and development of a variety of new solution-based projects and operations for TPITPI and its subsidiaries. NN ew lease on Aloma NN A II RR ealvest recently negotiated a new lease a greement for 3,200 square feet of retail space in Aloma S S quare S S hopping C C enter at 6700-6864 Aloma Ave. in W W inter PP ark. Associate Mitch HH eidrich negotiated the lease representing the local tenant Debarco I I nc. CC heri H H endricksK K elly of N N oble MM anagement C C ompany represented the landlord, H H art P P roper ties II II Ltd. of P P alm B B each Gardens. CC ommunity BB ulletin Winter Park Chamber of Commerce MemberAmericas Achievement ExpertSpeaker, Trainer, Coach, FacilitatorWhen Results CountGoal Setting Beyond The MotivationCorporate Training Team Building Marketing Consulting FacilitationBest Selling Author DEB CHESLOW www.DebCheslow.com Former Air Force Fighter Pilot Deb Cheslow Shares Her Systemized Strategy For Success

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Page 8 | T T hursday, OO ct. 17, 2013 | W W inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver OO ct. 14 CC ity CC ommission highlights There was a City Commission meeting held Oct. 14 in City Hall Commission Chambers. Below are a few highlights of decisions made at the meeting: Mayors Report claring the week of Nov. 2 as the Week of the Family. sory Board, Pedestrian & Bicycle Advisory Board were approved. CC onsent Agenda meeting wer e approved. mal solicitations were approved (for a complete listing, please visit cityofwinterpark. org/ccpackets). independent contractors who provide spevices on behalf of the High Intensity Drug rized, and the purchase order for facility expenses of HIDTA were approved. Local 1598 IAFF Labor Contract was approved. less for co-location of cell antennae on the public safety cell tower was approved, and the Mayor was authorized to execute the ground lease and Memorandum of Lease. Action Items Requiring Discussion Plan was discussed and staff was directed to have the Tree Preservation Board review the draft plan and summarize the impor tant decisionmaking points prior to bringing forward to the Commission for approval. staff to work with the various advisory boards prior to bringing the visioning planning process back for consideration. Public Hearings nance amending Section 34-30, Title and Ownership of lots and spaces in the city cemeteries, to clarify the ownership interest that may be conferred and to add provision for the city to regain ownership of abandoned rights to be buried within a municipal cemetery, was approved. amending Chapter 26 Article III Film Inprocess and amend certain provisions was approved. was approved. A full copy of the Oct. 14 City Commission minutes will be available at cityofwinterpark.org the week of Oct. 28, pending approval by the City Commission. CC offee TT alk featuring C C ommissioner CC arolyn C C ooperIf you have a latt beans to grind or you simply want to espresso your thoughts, CoffeeTalk may be the cup for you. Please join an informal conversation with Commissioner Carolyn Cooper Thursday, Oct. 17 from 8 to 9 a.m., at the Winter Park Welcome Center located at 151 W. Lyman Ave. CoffeeTalk gives the community an opportunity to sit down and talk with the Commissioner over a cup of coffee and chat about any city issues that are of interest to them. Special thanks to Palmanos Cafe, Coffee & Wine Bar for donating the coffee for this special series. For more information, please call 407-599-3428. SS eeking applicants for CC ode EE nforcement B B oardThe city is looking for interested resiment Board. This board is charged with examining cases presented by the citys the cases are in compliance with city code. city residents with experience as an architect, engineer, general contractor, subcontractor, realtor and/or businessperson. Approximately three hours per month is devoted to this board and members serve three-year terms. To be considered for this position, please submit an application online at cityofwinterpark.org/BoardApplicationForm.aspx OO peration GG ratitude remembers soldiers this H H alloween seasonThe Winter Park Fire-Rescue Department is once again supporting Operation Gratitude Orlando, a program designed to collect candy and gifts for American ser vice men and women who are currently deployed in the remote regions of Afghanistan and other hostile regions of the world. Residents of the community are encour aged to drop off candy and letters of appreciation between now and Monday, Nov. 18, to one of the following Winter Park locations: Road Items will also be collected at the citys annual Veterans Day Celebration Friday, Nov. 8. Since 2009, local event organizer, 17-year-old resident Andrew Weinstock, has collected more than 20,000 pounds of Halloween candy in support of Operation Gratitude. Last year, he collected 10,460 pounds of candy and his goal this year is to collect 12,000 pounds with the help of the local community. For more information, please call 407454-0878, email opgratitudeorlando@ gmail.com or visit operationgratitude.com.Winter Park veterans save the dateOn Friday, Nov. 8, at 10 a.m. the city of Winter Park will be presenting its third annual Veterans Day Celebration. This event will be held in honor of all of the veterans of Winter Park at the Winter Park Community Center Ruby Ball Amphitheater locatWe are calling all veterans that have served in any military campaign (World War II, Korean War, Vietnam War, Desert Storm, Iraqi Freedom or Afghanistan) or have served in any military branch in honor of our nations freedom. The city is holding this event to pay tribute to your dedicated service to our country. For more information regarding the citys third annual Veterans Day Celebration, please call 407-599-3428. winterpark.org, like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and watch us on Vimeo. Winter Park City TalkBY R aA NDY KK NIGHT CITY MANAGER GG ive candy in gratitude Limited time offer. Rates and terms are subject to change without notice and may be withdrawn at any time. All credit applications are subject to standard credit underwriting guidelines and approval. Security property must be residential property (does not include seasonal homes or investment properties) in Florida only. Property insurance is required. Flood and Wind insurance may be required. You must qualify for a minimum credit line of $10,000. Consult your tax advisor about the deductibility of interest. 1. The variable Annual Percentage Rate (APR) for a new home equity line will vary with Prime Rate (plus index) as published in the Wall Street Journal. As of 9/27/2013, the Wall Street Journal Prime Rate is 3.25% plus a margin of 1% and will not exceed the lesser of 18.00% or the maximum rate allowed by applicable law. The APR offered is 4.25% and is a variable rate, and is subject to change. Your APR will be based on several factors, including your credit history, loan-to-value ratio, property type, and lien status. Offer subject to normal credit qualications and program guidelines. Annual fee of $50.00 applies. 2. Offer valid on line amounts up to $500,000. Some restrictions may apply. Fee for full FNMA appraisal and title insurance will be charged. If you pay off your line within the rst three (3) years, we may require you to reimburse the bank for the closing costs we paid in connection with the opening of your line. Ask us for details. 790 1013 NMLS #486539 Harness Your Homes EQUITY FOR LESS with FCB! A Home Equity Line of Credit as LOW as Prime +1% (4.25% APR)1 Immediate (consult your tax advisor)LIMITED-TIME OFFER!NO CLOSING COSTS ON LOANS UP TO $500,000!2 | 407.622.5000 | 407.909.1744 | 407.333.2246 | 407.814.0491 | 407.774.3000 | 321.453.5800 | 321.868.3580

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WW inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver | T T hursday, OO ct. 17, 2013 | Page 9Gabriel Preisser has an excellent baritone voice that he uses with skillful excellence. Preisser opened his concert Oct. 10, 2013 in Rollins Colleges Tiedtke Hall with a very slow rendition of Henry Purcells Music For A While, followed by that composers If Music Be The Food Of Love, and Sweeter Than Roses. These Purcell songs immediately demonstrated Preissers compelling sound and agile coloratura. Four favorite Richard Strauss songs, all of which, coincidentally, I used to sing in concert, were pleasing events whose vocal passion was reflected not only in the singer, but in the remarkable piano accompaniRothmel. The French language received melodious attention in Maurice ne, which gave the singer opportunity to expand his acting talents. After intermission came three of todays now-neglected Paolo Tosti songs. The singers even production and flowing breath enhanced his impressive vocal artistry. I especially relished Lalba Separa Dalla Luce Lombra. Three Samuel Barber songs and three Broadway songs brought the program to a close with the audience on its feet giving the artists a well-deserved standing ovation. This commentator was happy to see the large number of enthusiastic younger people in the highly appreciative crowd. Served steamin hot, and stuffed way over code, get ready to enjoy your meatiest, cheesiest, feastiest, tastiest sub ever. FREE Chips and Medium Fountain Drink when you buy any Sub. Visit our tasty restaurant location at: Firehouse Subs Park Avenue 528 S. Park Avenue Winter Park, FL 32789 407.960.7827 2013 Firehouse Subs. This offer valid with coupon at participating restaurants. Prices and participation may vary, see restaurant for details. Limit one per customer, per visit. Not valid with any other offers. Exp. 12/31/13. COMBO$SUB Pumpkin Bash! Saturday, October 26th 10:00 AM 12:00 PM For A Frightfully Fun Time!Come Dressed in Your Best Halloween Costume & Enjoy: PLAYGROUND Magazines Costume Contest Cupcake Decorating Balloon Artist Monster Paws (Popcorn Treat) The Pumpkin Pick (Everyone is a winner!) Pumpkin Patch Photo Sessions by Jessica Friend Photography Admission is FREE! Be sure to visit our website for more information and subscribe to receive our e-mails. Event takes place by the fountain area near The Cheesecake Factory. Come Dressed in Your Best Halloween Costume & Enjoy: VILLAGE STEVE JOHNSON'S PAINTING SERVICE 407-679-0111 www.OTownInteriors.com Since 1980 Choose From Any Color Palette Licensed & Insured Check our Local Reviews Online No Mark Ups on Paint Choices No Job Too Large or Too SmallSPECIALIZING IN INTERIOR PAINTING FREE ESTIMATES! GG abriel Preisser glows in triumph LL OUIS RR ONEY OO bserver columnistThree Broadway songs brought the program to a close with the audience on its feet...

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Page 10 | T T hursday, OO ct. 17, 2013 | W W inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserverIts been 28 years since the UCF Knights faced Louisville on the gridiron. Back then the Knights were NCAA Division II facing gram history. It wasnt pretty: a 42-21 loss for the Knights. They havent faced the Cardinals since. That changes Friday night when the Knights travel to Kenagainst teams from the Bluegrass State. Thatll be a tall order for the Knights, who are facing one of the most dominant teams in the NCAA this season. The No. 8/6 Cardinals have scored 41 points per game this season, with an average point differential of more than 30. And in the Cardinals, the Knights face one of the most potent defenses seen in NCAA football in years, allowing only 7.3 points per game in their 6-0 winning streak to start the season. Already bowl eligible with their six wins, the Cardinals have nailed teams for 23 sacks in 2013 near ly four per game. Against the tough defense of No. 11 South Carolina on Sept. 28 the Knights only allowed two sacks. But they allowed the Gamecocks into the pocket enough to startle quarterback Blake Bortles into throwing two crucial interceptions, one of which was in the red zone. Both teams defenses are expected to be big factors in the game, with oddsmakers already talking up UCFs potential strategy of slowing the game and trying to hold back Thatll be a tough offense to stop, with Louisvilles junior quarterback Teddy Bridgewater throwing for an average of nearly 300 yards per game while completing 71 percent of his pass attempts to a wide variety of receivers. Six of his receivers have 14 catches or more in the season, giving him plenty of room on the Its that variety that could test UCFs secondary defense, which is young and has struggled in giving up crucial big plays so far, both on the ground and with the long ball. Theyve also had trouble seeking out short pass reapart by South Carolina in a second half bamboozling that put up 28 unanswered points. In that game the Knights defense had little trouble forcing third downs. They did have trouble stopping conversions, allowing 60 percent of third and fourth down conversions against South Carolina, and that could be an issue against the Cardinals, who have the best conversion rate in NCAA football at 63.6 percent. But the Knights havent been slouches in offense either, with quarterback Blake Bortles leading the way with 270 yards passing per game, though hes been less mobile this season than last to make good plays out of bad ones. The vast majority of his rushing attempts this season have turned into sacks or losses. But Bortles has had help from receivers Breshad Perriman and Rannell Hall, who have comgames, both of them nearing or eclipsing their 2012 numbers already. Against big opponents, the r rfntbWe offer Full-Day Infant Care and Childcare Year-Round, Preschool Classes, Summer Camp, and much more! rfntbrn n n CONGRATULATIONS: Maitland Rotary Art Festival Winners for 2013 B EST EST OF OF SHOW SHOW : Rolly Rae Reel FF ine C C rafts: John Mascoll Graphics, D D rawings: Jeff E E ckert Jewelry: C C hristian Nevin MM ixed M M edia: Lynn Whipple PP ainting: John Whipple PP hotography: E E lle Diez-Massaro PP otter y: Jinsong Kim SS culpture: Katherine Mathisen AA war ds of E E xcellence presented to: CC arol Napoli, Painting CC harles H H azelaar, Sculpture Douglas A A dams, Pottery Patricia Karnes, Jewelry Jaeryon H H a, Graphics/Drawings SS ana Doumet, Jewelry Jason H H unt, Graphics/Drawings John Margerum, Graphics/Drawings BB ill S S lade, Sculpture EE ddie Myers, Mixed Media CC heryl Mackey, Mixed Media John Petrey, Sculpture ** TT he Maitland RR otary AA rt Festival has also committed $40,000 to the AA rt & H H istory Museum in Maitland to revitalize timeworn shufeboard courts, located in Quinn S S trong Park. TT he courts will be transformed into an event plaza that can accommodate a variety of community activities, such as concerts, mini art festivals, camp activities, and additional programs ARCHIVE PHOTO BY ISAAC bB A bB COCK THE OBSERVER TT he KK nights have shined against tough teams so far, but face a difcult challenge against a surging Louisville team. UC UC F quarterback B B lake B B ortles, above, threw for a career-high 358 yards against USC USC KK nights face CC ardinals NN o. 1 defense II SAAC bB A bB COCK OO bserver staff Please see KNI gG HTS on next page Its the Hotsy-Totsy 1920's...Benefit for Homeless Women and Children. Heart to Heart: a Community Care Home, Inc. nonprofit since 1992.Dressy Attire or Costume Party Casino Games, No Limit BlackJack Tournament Swingin' music by the Performing Arts of Maitland Dance Band Speakeasy Bars and Fabulous Foods provided by Tim Webber Catering The Gold Sponsors of this EventThe Gold Sponsors for this Exceptional Evening of Entertainment Saturday, November 2, 2013Doors open 6:00pm Hosted at Mercedes-Benz of Orlando 810 N. Orange Avenue (Hwy 17/92) Maitland, FL 32751 TICKETS, TABLES OR SPONSORSHIPwww.H2HCentralFlorida.org/events For Reservations call 407-463-6297 orri s Resor Grand Cayman Islan

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WW inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver | T T hursday, OO ct. 17, 2013 | Page 11 italiokitchen.com rfntrbr 276 South Orlando Ave., Winter Park, FL 32789Italio is a modern Italian kitchen created with freshness in mind. Every meal is completely customizable and handcrafted in our open kitchen with only the finest and freshest ingredients. We believe in fast, flavorful meals. And we believe great food shouldnt break the bank.Winter Park WITH PURCHASE OF AN ENTREE Coupon is required. Coupon cannot be combined with any other offer. One coupon per person, per visit. FREE CALAMARIExpires: 10/10/2013 | Code: WPMO5 BECOME A PATRON OF THE ARTS!Benets:$225 in art dollars to use at Festival Artist of your choice to receive a recognition ribbon Tickets to Wayne Densch Performing Arts Center Membership to Seminole Cultural Arts Council Free admission to the Improv Comedy Club Invitation to Meet the Artists party Two V.I.P. passes to art festival Festival Poster Listing as Patron And More! Get Information at www.WSFOTA.com/patrons Presented byOctober 19th and 20thOctober 19th and 20th 10am -5pmWinter Springs Town Centerwww.WSFOTA.org New Fall & Holiday Merchandise! ARCHIVE PHOTO BY ISAAC bB A bB COCK THE OBSERVER UCFUCF s special teams has caused key turnovers to keep the Knights in games, including a fumble and recover y that led to a game-winning score against M M emphis on O O ct. 5. Wildcats ready for HH uskies KNIGHTS | FF ace N N o. 8/6 C C ards S S aturdayKnights have a tendency to rack up yards. Both of those receivers snagged 100-yard-plus games against South Carolina, while Bortles threw for a career-long 358 yards in the game. And running back Storm Johnson shores up the run game with 455 yards on the ground and seven touchdowns so far. With an ability to rise up against tough opponents, the Knights have shined in the national spotlight. But in their last game against unranked confer ence rival Memphis, they were stunned until an unusual set of scores put them on top in an unorthodox win. Losing that game for most Knights only tied it back up with two minutes left, then watched their special teams squad force a kickoff fumble and return it for a touchdown to put the Knights on a 14-point swing in 9 seconds. After the next kickoff, a wild halfback pass turned into a Knights interception to end the game. Turnovers have been a massive contributor to UCFs wins of late, with three interceptions against Memphis, and a total of seven recovered fumbles of nine forced so far this season. Meanwhile theyve only lost one fumble of seven theyve dropped. The game will be live nationOct. 18, from Cardinal Stadium in Louisville. CCOO N TITI NU EE D F RORO M pP REVIO uU S pP A GE Its been a week since the Wildcats narrowly escaped Timber Creek with a 34-29 squeaker win their narrowest this season. But the road trip for the 6-0 Wildcats isnt over yet. They head to face Hagerty this Friday. The Huskies (2-4) have strugfour games. But their last two have been surprises. They beat Orange Park Univer sity on Sept. 27 in a 24-21 shocker game they faced an undefeated Bishop Moore team in the Hor nets stadium and scored four unanswered touchdowns in the terback Jeff Driskel would go on to complete a 73-yard TD pass to Tristan Tucker and race 71 yards for a touchdown scramble of his own. By the time the Hornets put two scores together, it was already too late. The Wildcats will need to stop the Huskies offense if they want to win. Last season the Huskies only lost once when they scored more than 18 points. But those high-scoring games were few and far between. The Wildcats have proven themselves in tight games, winning all but two of their games by a touchdown or less. They tend to have high-scoring games regardless. Only one time this season were the Wildcats held to less than 20 points. They still won. The game kicks off at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 18. EE dgewater so far has been less heartbreaking losses of late. With an 0-7 record, not crossed into the win column. Lately thats gotten worse. In their them by a touchdown or less. In their last two, theyve lost by an increasing margin. They travel to Lake Minneola for a 7 p.m. Oct. 18 showdown. ISAAC bB A bB COCK OO bserver staff

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Page 12 | T T hursday, OO ct. 17, 2013 | W W inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserverLifestyles Many days, especially in the mild Florida spring and winter, when the sun is shining and theres not a cloud in the sky, and windows are opened wide to let in the breeze, the electricity meter at the Wilson familys home ticks backward. home instead of in from the powon the meter represents the ding of a credit on their bill. This past spring, the Wilsons paid just 25 cents for their electricity, water and sewage consumption. The Winter Park family owns a net-zero home, meaning they have a renewable energy system that on average creates more month that happens, they receive a credit on their utility bill to use toward the next month. Instead of a roof on their patio, their home has a solar panel system that absorbs sunlight from both sides, generating power to operate their air conditioning, appliances, everything. Right now, the Wilson home is one of only six in Winter Park with a renewable energy system hooked up to the city grid. Solar panels are a big up-front investment, with an average three bedroom home with a monthly utility bill of $200 needing a system costing about $30,000 to power it, according to solar power-selling website solarcity.com. Government rebates and tax credits can drop the cost by near ly half, but cost may still be prohibitive for many homeowners looking to go green. Its more of a feel good investment, said Rob Smith, founder of Winter Park based e2 Homes, the green residential helped build the Wilson home. I think there are some nonA smaller carbon footprint is one of them, said homeowner Rebekkah Wilson. Its important for people to consider it because even though each of us is a small piece of the bigger picture, the more small people that go toward alternative energy sources, the more of an impact we can have on preserving the resources we use, she said. In addition to the solar panand sustainable. Theres a cistern that provides water for irrigation and toilets, no grass to water, and windows up high to draw out hot air and give light to reduce lamp use. It was made for warm, sunny days. I dont think they build houses now that take advantage of our environment, said homeowner Rick Wilson. I was passionate about what I wanted and what I think Florida living should be. Rick said his motivation for building his green house was to save money, and hell recoup his solar panel cost through electricity bill savings in about eight years. Its a long-view investment, but one that Tim Maslow, the city of Winter Parks sustainabil-PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVERRick Wilson stands beneath the solar array that covers the back patio in his familys WW inter P P ark home. SS ix homes in the city currently are hooked up to the electric grid to sell electricity back to the city. Winter Parks personal power companiesSome of Winter Parks homes take power from the sun and sell it back to the grid. Now the citys electric utility is looking to the future. BRITTNI LL ARSON OO bserver staff Please see SOLAR on next page Checks Payable To: Edgewater Baseball. Orders due: November 13th Pick-up/delivery on: November 30th Mailing Address: Edgewater Baseball, c/o Pam Hamner, 1160 Willowbrook Trail, Maitland, Florida 32751 To Place an Order or get more information, please call: Pam Hamner #407-539-0756 or Lynette Earley #407-222-8397 or email edgewaterbaseball@gmail.com. about how much money Let us help you! Call today!(407)-644-6646www.aSafeHarbor.com Member of Bob Adams President/CEO A SafeHarbor, LLC bob@asafeharbor.comSTOP Worryingyou have for retirement.Instead of being concerned with the value of your retirement account, you should be more concerned with the income that account provides. Income maintains your quality of life so you may live in retirement as you did when you were working. You need to have the income so you can travel, see your grandkids and live whatever retirement dreams you may have. If you would like to see how you can MAXIMIZE YOUR INCOME FOR LIFE call us today. There are options available that most Americans dont know about. Give us one hour to see if we can give you your lifetime.

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WW inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver | T T hursday, OO ct. 17, 2013 | Page 13ity coordinator, said will increase in popularity as the cost of solar panels decreases. The price has gone down by nearly half in ing programs for incorporating solar costs into mortgages have made it more affordable for homeowners, Smith said. Jerry Warren, directhe city of Winter Park, has even been negotiating a solar panel project to produce energy for the city that he hopes will be approved early next year. Theres a proposed contract to buy solar power produced by rooftop panels put on the citys public works facility from solar company Clean Footprint for 10 years at a rate of 6.5 cents per kilowatt-hour. Thats almost the same price as natural gas, which is about 6 cents, but without the harmful greenhouse gases. Warren, whos been in the power business for 40 years, said he sees a future in solar energy. Thats almost down to the point where its cost competitive with more traditional sources of power, he said. And so, my take is that the reduction in cost of solar is going to make it very competitive over the next 25 years, and the way we make it very competitive as an industry is we begin to incorporate it into our power supply mix in small enough blocks that it doesnt adversely affect our overall cost of power. This would get us on the map for renewables, Maslow said. Until then, the number of alternative energy pioneers in Winter Park will continue to grow slowly, Warren said, with more residents using the sun to their advantage, rather PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVER SS olar arrays and alternative water sources save money and cut down electricity bills and reduce the amount of wa ter pulled from the acquifer and nearby water supply. SO larLAR | EE nergy-efficient and ecologically-conscious homes a growing trend in Winter Park neighborhoods CCOO N TITI NU EE D F RORO M pP REVIO uU S pP A GE Invite you and a guest to a special advance screening of lastvegasmovie.com facebook.com/lastvegasmovie #LastVegas ON NOVEMBER 1STITS GOING TO BE LEGENDARYFor your chance to win two tickets, log onto: WWW.GOFBO.COM/RSVPand enter the code WPMOMG05The screening is: Monday, October 28, 7:30p.m. at Regal Winter ParkRated PG-13 for sexual content and language. No purchase necessary. Passes are good for two complimentary admissions. You must have a pass to attend. Seating is on a rst-come, rst-served basis and is not guaranteed. Supplies are limited and available only while supplies last. and 21105 LAST VEGAS WINTERPARK / MAITLAND OBSERVER 5" x 8" 4C RUN DATE: 10/17/13 AD DUE: 10/14/13 CREATIVE VISION: 10/11/13 mech02 818 509 9669 KEEP UP WITH MAITLAND NEWS AND EVENTS!www.IndependenceLane.com Facebook.com/ItsMyMaitland 1 This Free Concert is Sponsored & Presented by 321.303.1404 WWW.PAMAITLAND.ORG SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19TH MEAD GARDENS MAIN STAGE

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Page 14 | T T hursday, OO ct. 17, 2013 | W W inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver A new CrossFit location opened in Winter Park in early October bringing the city along on a nationwide trend with the may be bringing some controver sy with it. The new gym opened its doors to group classes and individual happened CrossFit Winter Park said that at least 50 members had already signed up. I believe theres a need for ing it to the city of Winter Park, well be able to capture that whole entire group of people, whether theyre 10 years old or 70 years old. The chain of gym franchises has exploded across the country in the past few years, rapidly expanding through Orange and Seminole County. Near Oviedo there are three locations within a few miles. In Casselberry there are three within a short jog of each other. Winter Parks new gym will have an unusual walk-in tube called a cryosauna that allows members to heal from muscle soreness after a day of working out. The machine gently surrounds members with a nitrogen mist and drops their skin temperature down to 32 degrees Fahrenheit for three minutes. Receptors in the skin send signals to the brain to produce collagen, a natural protein that forms connective tissue and promotes healing. CrossFit Winter Park will be CrossFit locations to include a cryosauna in their facility. Its pretty new technology in the U.S.; theyre not as widely owner and coach Stephanie Nickitas, pointing out that there are only four in the state of Florida Its great for athletes in terms of rest and recovery, joint issues and muscle soreness. But recent accounts show that muscle soreness in CrossFit members can cause a potentially deadly disorder. An article on Medium.com written by physical of Regis University shows that the intensity of the program can cause Rhabdomyolysis, a condition where damaged skeletal muscle tissue breaks down rapidly due to excessive working out. Sarah Matthews, a former CrossFit member from Boston, reported that she developed the condition after only one class back in January. The heavy workout session left her arms sore and swollen for a whole week, forcing her to make a trip to the hospital where doctors found a high level of creatine kinase, an enzyme caused by working out that can cause kidney damage in excessive amounts. She received treatment, but wrote in her blog Blonde BosCrossFit. Am I completely turned off from CrossFit? A little bit, Matthews wrote. Am I going to be more careful about pushing my-PHOTO BY TIM FREED THE OBSERVER CC ross FF it gyms have grown rapidly, known for intense workouts, but an article by a physical thera py professor has raised eyebrows about hospitalizations of some members. A killer workout, but does it go too far?TIM FREED OO bserver staff Please see gG YM on next pageApproximately 100 grow boxes have been distributed to area schools and churches this fall, free of charge thanks to the Winter Park Memorial Hospital, Winter Park Harvest Festival (WPHF) and Our Whole Community (OWC). In a unique partnership, the hospital is donating the money for the growboxes, while WPHF and community health initiatives, will deliver the specially constructed portable gardens to Central Florida classrooms, allowing students to learn about and Our appreciation goes out to Winter Park Memorial Hospital for purchasing the grow boxes from OWC and allowing us and the Winter Park Harvest Festival to distribute these fun and educational learning tools to children and their teachers, says OWC Chairperson Lavon Williams. by 14 inches wide and is equipped with fertilizer, easy instructions and a planting guide. The self-watering, self-fertilizing gardens require no weeding or experience to produce a bountiful harvest. After a couple of months, OWC will gather the growboxes and display them as a Mobile Community Garden at the Winter Park Harvest Festival, November 23 at Central Park Meadows on New York Avenue. The annual fest (winterparkharvestfestival. com) showcases the best of Central Floridas local farmers and artisans in a producer-only market offering everything needed to create a locally sourced Thanksgiving dinner. Growbox awards will be presented in various categories, such as Best Beans and Tallest Tomatoes. The portable gardens will then be returned to the classrooms where they can be tended to for the remainder of the school year. Our Whole Community has been a leader in Central Floridas community gardening efforts since its inception in 2007. We support gardening because it promotes our mind-body-spirit philosophy, Williams says. Growboxes are available for purchase at the OWC website at ourwholecommunity.org and is an OWC fundraiser. Be sure to save these dates for these Fall Garden Plant Your Christmas Dinner October 22nd | 6 8 pm OWC Garden 550 W. Morse Blvd., Winter Park (garden entrance is located on Welbourne) $10 per family to attend Learn what to plan and harvest in time for your Gifts from the Garden November 3rd | 9 am 1 pm St. Mary Magdalen Learning Garden 861 Maitland Avenue, Maitland Free Winter Park Harvest Festival November 23rd | 10 am 4 pm Central Parks West Meadow Free faith-based organization that brings communities together to establish relationships and share resources resulting in innovative programs that inspire, motivate and educate individuals in their pursuit of optimal health. For more information on Our Whole Community, please visit ourwholecommunity.org. Our Whole Community is pleased to contribute ed@me.com for inquiries about OWC. By Leah Nash, Work Well Winter Park of Winter Park (annual sponsor of monthly Work Well lunches) provided a healthy lunch and tutorial to 30+ attendees at the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce. The monthly lunch topics, an integral part of the Work Well Winter Park program, support easy policies that can be implemented at your worksite as part of a workplace wellness program. grams. By providing educational health programs onsite or encouraging employees to seek out informative programs, workplaces are supporting health and wholeness with your team. The more your employees are aware of disease prevention, stress management, healthy eating, and other health-related topics, the more they can take care of themselves and their families and be productive members of your company. At the October Work Well Lunch, Lois Dorotiak, enthusiast, shared tips on how to be healthful and happy in our eating habits. She quizzed attendees on the three leading health chronic diseases in the United States: Heart Disease, Diabetes and Cancer. Diet can help manage these diseases, Dorotiak says. Dorotiak recommends the including the following components for a healthy plate: Whole Foods (unprocessed food, free from additives), Plant Strong (vegetables, beans, nuts, seeds, roots, etc.), Nutrient Dense (foods with high amounts of vitamins and/or minerals) and Healthy Fats (monounsaturated, polyunsaturated and omega-3s found in foods such as almonds, avocados, coconut milk, sesame seeds, etc.). According to Dorotiak, Americans are currently eating over 50% of processed food on their plates. Beyond teaching points such as the ones above, Dorotiak also served up some delicious and easy dishes all prepared, cooked and served within one hour. The dishes served were an apple fennel soup, collard and lentil soup (served both hot and cold) and a refreshing blueberry smoothie. These recipes are available on the Work Well Winter Park blog, found at WorkWellWinterPark. org. Recipes like these can also be found at WholeFoodsMarket. com. Please mark your calendars for these upcoming Work Well Lunches. If you would like to receive Work Well Winter Park emails, please contact workwell@winter park.org. Lunches are free for Work Well teams an $5 per individual not on a team. Lunches are located at the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce the second Wednesday of the month. Flu Shots provided by Winter Park Memorial Hospital November 13th Holiday Health & Happiness by Whole Foods December 11th Work Well Winter Park is committed to making our community the healthiest place to work and is spearheaded by the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce. The Work Well Winter Park mission is to engage and equip local businesses with practical policies which inspire and create a culture of wellness within the workplace. Visit WorkWellWinter Park.org for more information or to get started as a Work Well Team.Area youth receive portable gardens this fall Healthy plates, Photo credit: Rhonda Walsingham of Dark South Photography

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WW inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver | T T hursday, OO ct. 17, 2013 | Page 15 GY mM | CC hain rapidly expanding in FF lorida CCOO N TITI NU EE D F RORO M pP REVIO uU S pP A GE at Winter Park Towers Your room is waiting for you if you need Pain and Symptom Management Hospital Follow-up Complex Treatments, or Crisis Care Referrals 866-742-6655#5019096 www.cornerstonehospice.org www.SeriousIllness.org/cornerstoneMedicare, Medicaid, most commercial insurances accepted I am a proud breast cancer survivor. How I have reacted to the obstacles along my cancer journey might come as a sur prise to you, but they are based on my philosophy that life is a choice. In January 2000, I was diagnosed with stage 1 breast cancer at age 30. From the moment of my diagnosis, I have chosen to not be sad and depressed about it, but to face it with my head held high. In February 2000, I had a lumpectomy and 27 lymph nodes removed under my right arm. Then I was treated with chemotherapy and radiation. My cancer went into remission and I consider myself one of the lucky ones because not only was I a stage 1 breast cancer survivor, but I did not miss one day of work nor did I experience any nausea or vomiting from the chemotherapy. I did lose my hair, but that turned out to not be such a bad thing because during the hot summer months I was able to take my wigs off and cool I was able to find some incredible wigs that were so realistic that people always complimented my hair and asked where I had it done. Pleased but embarrassed, Id tell them I had it done out of state. In 2006, I was faced with a second diagnosis of breast cancer. This time, things were much different because the year prior, my mother was diagnosed with stage 3 ovarian cancer. After her diagnosis, my mother, my sister and I all went for genetic testing and we all tested positive for the BRCA-1 gene. With this news and with my second diagnosis of breast cancer still under the age of 40, I opted for a double mastectomy and breast reconstruction surgery and I continued to look at my situation with a silver Then on October 31, 2008, after fighting a five-year battle, my mother passed away from ovarian cancer at the young age of 62. It was a long and hard troubling time for all of us, but mom fought until the very end. My mother was the strongest woman anyone could have known. I think about her every day and I am so proud of her. Over the past 10 years, I have funneled my passion to fight breast cancer into volunteering for the American Cancer Societys (ACS) Making Strides Against Breast Cancer walk. Volunteering for this event helps me share my experiences and spread the word about the importance of early detection as ACS works to create a world with less cancer So I invite you to join me and other breast cancer sur vivors and supporters at this years Making Strides Against Breast Cancer walk. The walk will be on Saturday, October 19 begins at 7 am and the walk begins at 9 am. For more information or to register, please visit www.OrlandoStrides.com. Join the ght at the OO rlando Making SS trides Against B B reast C C ancer Walk! Geri Bell GG uest columnistself to the point of failure in the future? Abso-friggin-lutely. Shouldnt the instructors encourage people to not push themselves to absolute failure in CrossFit? CrossFit representatives have acknowledged the danger and said they warn members how to avoid it. safety means everything to CrossFit and that coaches will be stationed throughout the gym to make sure members are pacing themselves. One of the most important things to us is safety in our gym, and as long as youve got coaches that know what theyre doing and they take safety very seriously you can prevent that from hapWere not going to allow people to do more than what they can do. CrossFit Winter Park will offer a variety of clubs in addition to group and individual classes, including a barbell club. If youve never lifted weight in your life or even if its an elite athlete looking for an extra edge, train at CrossFit Winter Park, CrossFit Winter Park will have a grand opening celebration 90 days after the soft opening.If youve never lifted weight in your life or even if its an elite athlete looking for an extra edge, home to train at CrossFit Winter Park.

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Page 16 | T T hursday, OO ct. 17, 2013 | W W inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver One Senior Place ... See our full Calendar of Events at OneSeniorPlace.com407.949.6733715 Douglas Avenue Altamonte Springs, FL 32714M-F 8:30am 5pmFRIDAY, OCTOBER 18 Florida Blue Seminar 10am-11:30am Also: Wed, Oct 23rd 1pm-2:30pm Mon, Oct 28th 10am-11:30am By Florida Blue-McBride Insurance Agency RSVP 407.230.7835 MONDAY, OCTOBER 21 Senior Club Sponsored by Family Physicians Group 10am 12pm October 21st Movie Day Big Wedding October 28th Casino Day The Real Estate Specialists are IN 10am-1pm (also 28th) Presented by Exit Real Estate Results By Appointment Only 407.949.6714 WellCare Seminar 3pm-4pm Also: Wed, Oct 23rd 9:30am-10:30am Thurs, Oct 24th 2:30pm-3:30pm Tues, Oct 29th 9:30am-10:30am Wed, Oct 30th, 9:30am-10:30am Thurs, Oct 31st 2:30pm-3:30pm Presented by Medicare Plan Options RSVP 407.949.6723 TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22 AARP Medicare Complete 2pm-3:30pm (also 29th ) Presented by LTC Advisors, RSVP 407.949.6722 Health Care Reform 3:30pm-5pm (also 29th) Presented by LTC Advisors RSVP 407.949.6722 Estate Planning Workshop: Family Dynamics 9:30am-12:30pm By The Law Ofces of Hoyt & Bryan RSVP 407.977.8080 Medicaid Planning-Truths & Myths about Medicaid and VA Benets 2pm-4pm By The Law Ofces of Hoyt & Bryan RSVP 407.977.8080 WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23 Why do hearing aids cost so much? 3pm-4:30pm (also 30th) Presented by Harmony Hearing Centers of America RSVP 407.949.6737 Freedom/Optimum Seminar 3:30pm-4:30pm Also: Wed, Oct 30th 11am-1pm Presented by Freedom Health Open to the Public.Calendar of Events October 2013 shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM here should be more to life than maintenance-free living. To learn more about our community in Kissimmee, call (407) 933-1999. As I write this column the U.S. government is in its 14th day of sequestration, or enforced fur loughs for non-essential workers. While the apocalypse did not come when we hit sequestration, we are beginning to feel the pinch a bit right now. The U.S. Department of Agriculture has failed to respond to a devastating snowstorm in South Dakota that has left thousands of heads of cattle dead and some farmers near economic ruin. Thousands of veterans have had to force their way into the memorials that honor their service to our country. And things could get much worse. Why? Because politicians on both sides of the aisle are playing a dangerous game of chicken with each other. tration has been the debate over Obamacare, a program that Congress voted into law several years ago. This program has been a hot topic for the American public in general, with debates often generating more heat than light. As someone who has voted for people in both parties from time-totime, I want to suggest that we at least give the program a try. We need to try because more than 15 percent of the American public has no health insurance at all. This not only leaves them vulnerable; it leaves the rest of us vulnerable as well. We are still a compassionate enough people to ensure that even the uninsured will get compassionate health care of some sort. The cost of this uninsured health care is always passed on, either through the higher funding costs of public hospitals or the higher fees of private ones. In true emergencies, the uninsured still get some attention, though often not enough. In fact they are already getting rather poor universal health coverage under the table. In addition, they are denied some of the preventative services that could have rendered their emergency situations unnecessary. This type of universal coverage is probably more expensive than we can calfor its recipients. One of the great outcries of universal health care opponents is that socialized medicine results in excessive waiting times for medical procedures. Often Canadas failures are cited as examples. Im not so sure that Obamacare could be categorized as socialized medicine, but even if it were it would not be the end of the world. I lived in Australia during the 1980s when Bob Hawkes Labor Government switched the Australian healthcare system from private to socialized overnight. The sky didnt cave in nor was paradise regained, but the aver age person made out all right. In the medical practitioner arena, the disparity in salaries between specialists and family medicine doctors evened out a bit. The only people upset by this were the spegoing to the doctor became simpler, as doctors gave discounts for direct billing. Both of my children were born in an Australian hospital and received the best of care. My wife developed an ulcerated cornea and received swift, excellent treatment. Public health benover-prescribing narcotics and barbiturates were caught more easily. Were there problems with the new system? Yes. But there were problems with the old system as well. Which brings me to the issue of our current healthcare system that is ruled by private healthcare companies. It is not exactly the most functional system in the world. About 14 years ago, the ulcerated cornea in Australia) developed a rare form of cancer. Because of her unusual cancer and her young age, her Johns Hopkins-trained surgical oncologist wanted to treat her with an approved but unusual treatment. Our insurance company refused. I called the company and asked to speak with the medical director who had made the decision. The customer service representative refused. I asked if she would let me speak to the director if I were a doctor or a lawyer. She said, yes. In reviewing the situation, I said, So youre telling me that if I were a doctor or a lawyer, I could speak with the medical director, but because Im a normal person, I cant. In a moment of transparency she replied, Yes, thats right. Months later we won our right to the treatment through the state insurance board, but it was already too late. Im not sure it could get much worse than this, and I supMy point is this: why not give Obamacare a try? If it doesnt work, people can always vote it out later. In the meantime it would let the government, which isnt working, get back to work. FF ighting against our own lives Jim GG ovatos RR eality Lines PP HOTOS BY S araARA H wW I lL SON T T HE OO BSER v V ER TT he Winter Park Autumn Art FF estiv al took over downtown WW inter P P ark on O O ct. 12 and 13 as Florida artists showed their wares to thousands of weekend visitors. Winter Park Autumn Art Festival

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WW inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver | T T hursday, OO ct. 17, 2013 | Page 17October, Central Florida, kling October and November weather calls you to get out and walk. The temperatures start in 60s in the early morning, rising into the 80s by day, cooling off with a gentle breeze for your evening the magical world of walking under this weeks full moon. Walking is uncomplicated, with no membership fees, no special equipment, no special hours. Just you, your feet (with good shoes) and a few minutes or hours under the Central Florida skies is all you need. You can walk on canopied streets or by the cafes of Park Avenue. Let your feet take you through one of our linear parks, like the Cady Way, Cross Seminole, Seminole Wekiva and Orlando Urban trails. Check them out at traillink.com. Smaller trails at Casselberrys Wirz Park, Winter Parks Mead Garden, and Maitland Community Park offer more reasons to walk in this great weather. The city of Winter Park website also features walking trail maps. Just how good is walking for you? Walking helps not just the body, but the mind and spirit. And it can boost your social life. GG reat for the bodyPeople who walk several times a week lower their risks of diabetes, hypertension, and linked to lower cancer risks. Walkers are less likely to get dementia. Walking burns calories. A 155-pound person walking moderately fast (3 mph) expends about 232 calories in an your appetite. Walking builds your heart muscle and boosts endurance. Walking keeps bones strong and joints flexible. As a weight-bear ing exercise, walking is your defense against osteoporosis as you age. Walking is great for your skin. The blood circulation gets those red blood cells moving around, putting a pink glow in your cheeks. GG reat for the soulWalking increases endor phins, the feel-good hormones. Stress floats away with each step. Walking can be very social. Get to know your neighbors. You can walk with friends and family. Long walks and talks via cell phone give you a chance to reconnect with dear faraway friends. You can walk by yourself. The solitude of walking can help you feel centered and calm. You can solve all the problems of the world. GG et readyIf you have any kind of heart, lung or joint problem, check with your health care provider before heading out the door for a walk. Put your feet in good walking shoes, with good socks. The local running store can fit your feet with the cushioning and support you need, especially as you increase your walking. Wear bright colors so drivers and bikers cant miss seeing you. Know where you are walking. Be street smart and safe. Take your cell phone with you, just in case. You may need to bring your glasses with you so you can screen out the calls you dont want. Free smartphone apps can track your distances and map your walks. MapMyWalk and MapMyRun are favorites. Another app can turn your smartphone into a pedometer. If you want to build your strength and enjoy longer walks, increase your distance about 10 percent each week. More than that, and the risks of injury increase too. But most important of all, get out, enjoy your walk under our great Central Florida skies and make it a special part of your routine. BeWellWithin Im John Manjarres, and I used to be just like you unhappy with my body and at a loss where to turn. But with a little motivation and help, Ive managed to become the person I always wanted to be and I can help you do exactly the same! Check me out at almost 280 lbs. then again at 200lbs. The American Cancer Society invests in groundbreaking breast cancer research and helps women in every community. In fact, one in two women newly diagnosed with breast cancer turns to us for everything from information about clinical trials to getting rides to treatments. Join the Orlando Making Strides Against Breast Cancer 5K fundraising walk. Together, we can create a world with less breast cancer and more birthdays. Sign up at MakingStridesWalk.org/OrlandoMetro Saturday, October 19 | Lake Eola | rfnrtbbb 13_Orange Appeal_9.25x11.125.indd 2 8/20/13 2:16 PM EE njoy the outdoors with a walk this autumn DD r. NN ancy RR udner L L ugo HH ealth Action

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Page 18 | T T hursday, OO ct. 17, 2013 | W W inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver OO ct 19 HH arrietts Park A venue F F ashion W eek Runway S S how Returning for its seventh fashionable season, Harrietts Park Avenue Fashion Week is a celebration of fashion and design, and a weeklong tribute to Central Floridas greatest philanthropist Harriett Lake. The big fashion runway show is this Saturday, Oct. 19, when we mingle with the fashion elite in the tent in Central Park. Doors open at 6 p.m. and the show begins at 7 p.m. Visit parkavenuefashionweek.com NN ow through NN ov. 10 Jackie and Me at the OO rlando RepIn this play for young people, Joey is assigned to write a paper about baseball legend Jackie Robinson. Thanks to a magical baseball card, Joey returns to 1947 to meet the legend in person, and sees Robinsons determination and dedication during the time of segregation. Lessons are learned tion of courage. The show will play at the Orlando Rep in Loch Haven Park. Call 407-896-7365 or visit orlandorep.com NN ow through NN ov. 10 D D racula by S S hakespeare and C C o. Orlando Shakes invites us to experience Dracula in a oneman tour-de-force that uses Bram Stokers original text of journal entries and newspaper clippings for an evening of bloody thrills. Dracula works its dark sorcery through Nov. 10. Call 407-4471700 or visit orlandoshakes.org NN ow through OO ct. 31 Phantasmagoria IV IV H H ell HH ath RisenThe fourth installment of what has become an annual Halloween celebration, this year titled Phantasmagoria IV Hell Hath Risen, is the best version so far. With the best written script, choreography, this homage to Poe, Dickens, and other literary masters is under the inspired direction of John DiDonna, Kevin Becker and Seth Kubersky, with choreography by Mila Makarova and Dion Smith. Call 407-3289005 or order online at redchairproject.com TT oday through O O ct. 20 O O rlando B B allets 40th anniversaryCelebrating its 40th anniverHill as artistic director of the Orlando Ballet, the Company will present Tribute on Oct. 18 and 19 at 8 p.m. and Oct 20 at 2 p.m. Tribute promises a weekend of fan favorites and pas de deux from the Companys history. Unfortunately, it also signals the lerina Katia Garza as a member of the Company, and that alone is reason not to miss these perfor2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com r fntbt f rtt ftbt bt bnr nr rt b bb f b tb off trtnCoupon redeemable for cash, check or credit card purchases only. Not redeemable for insurance transactions. Excludes custom/special orders & nutritional supplements. May not be combined with any other discounts. Coupon has no cash value. Josh Garrick CC ulture worthy of y our calendar FASHI oO N WEEK DRACULA PP lease see CU lL TU r R E on next page

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WW inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver | T T hursday, OO ct. 17, 2013 | Page 19 on 436 in Winter ParkFeel Better, Today!* New Patients only. Expires 11/30/13 (407) 673-6700 Free Consultations MostInsurance Accepted $50 off first visit if you mention this ad* CU lL TU r R E | T T he T T wilight Zone brings back four c lassic episodes to thrill and intrigue you live and on stagemances. For tickets, visit orlandoballet.org TT oday through N N ov. 23 OO rlando S S hakes introduces young audiences to live jazzThe Orlando Shakespeare Theater will introduce young audiences to jazz in the worldpremiere musical A Night in New Orleans: A Magic Tree House Adventure with music by legendary jazz composer Allen Toussaint. In performance through Nov. 23, Magic Tree House follows Jack and Annie on a mission to inspire young artists to share their talents with the world as they search for the young Louis Armstrong. Complete with live jazz band, this new musical transports audiences back to 1915 New Orleans, where music. Call 407-447-1700 or visit orlandoshakes.org OO ct. 18 to NN ov. 17 V V enus in F F ur at the Mad C C owIn this sexy, funny hit direct from Broadway the Mad Cow Theatre introduces us to Vanda, an unusual young actress who arrives to audition for the lead in playwright Thomas adaptation of the erotic novel, Venus in Fur. During the heading into dangerous territory as this battle-of-the-sexes asks the audience, Does Art imitate Life? Written by comic master David Ives, for tickets call 407297-8788 or visit madcowtheatre. com OO ct. 18 to NN ov. 4 BB reakthrough T T heatre enters T T he T T wilight ZoneThe Breakthrough Theatre will present four episodes from the classic series, The Twilight Zone from Oct. 18 to Nov. 4. The four episodes are: Night Call, in which telephone calls haunt an elderly man; The Lonely (written by Rod Serling); Shadow Play, in which a murderer tries to convince those about him that the world is his recurring nightmare; and The Living Doll, in which a father does battle with his stepdaughters talking doll. The Theatre is at 419 W. Fairbanks Ave. in Winter Park. For reservations, call 407-920-4034. OO ct 19 FF ree CC oncert in the P ark at Mead G G ardenThe Florida Young Artists Orchestra and the Maitland Symphony Orchestra are inviting us to Double the Pleasure, Double the Fun, Two Orchestras Performing a Concert of One in a free concert on Oct. 19. There will be two concerts presented on the stage at Mead Garden in Winter Park with the FYAO offering a classical concert at 5:30 CCOO N TITI NU EE D F RORO M pP REVIO uU S pP A GE PP lease see CU lL TU r R E on next page VENUS IN fF UR

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Autumn Art FestivalWinter Park40th Annual Thank You for Celebrating 40 Years of Florida Artists Our sincere appreciation to the artists, sponsors, patrons, volunteers and attendees who made the festival a success! www.autumnartfestival.org presented & hosted by: supported by:Costco Wholesale | C & S Press| Florida Distributing Co. | Hannibal Square Association | Hunter Vision ImageServe | Moss, Krusick & Associates | New York Times | Wall Street Journal | Venture Photography Images A. Fraebel Studios

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WW inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver | T T hursday, OO ct. 17, 2013 | Page 21p.m. followed by the Maitland Symphony Orchestra in a pops concert at 7 p.m. The concerts are free, family friendly and open to all. Call 321-303-1404. OO ct. 23 EE manuel Ax and Johannes B B rahmsGreatness is a sometimes an is, without a doubt, one of the great pianists of our time. This guest artist with the Bach Festival Society will perform a program of works by Brahms including his Piano Sonata No. 2 at the Tiedtke Concert Hall on the Rollins College campus. The performance is set for Oct. 23 at 7:30 p.m. Call 407-646-2182 or visit bachfestivalOO ct. 24 FF rom CC hristies Auction H H ouseBefore it closes on Oct. 27, A Passion for Collecting at the Orlando Museum of Art will present Christies Michael Bass, who will discuss Whats Hot and Whats Not on Oct. 24 at 1:30 pm. Bass will speak and then engage the group in a gallery walk through the exhibit. The event is free with paid admission. Call 407-896-4231 or visit omart.org OO ct. 26 CC ows n CC abs a culinar y charity E E ventABC Fine Wine & Spirits David Larue and celebrity chef John Rivers return with Cows n Cabs, a charity event with a rustic theme presented in Winter Parks West Meadow. Inspired by local cuisine, and working to end poverty in Central Florida, the Community Food & Outreach Along with top culinary talent, attendees enjoy live music; a photo booth; a game of Wine Ring Toss (where guests win bottles of wine); and a silent auction. Admission is $110. Visit cowsncabs.com or email tina@ cowsncabs.com Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. H H e is a member of the C C uratorial C C ouncil for the MM useum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906. Lake Lily Park A DIVISIO N OF VS M EDIA GR OUP, INC. Tickets Presale Tickets $25 through October 20 Day of the event $30 Half price admission for children ages 3 12 Have your own table $350.00 Includes one linen covered round table with eight chairs & includes 8 tickets Call 407-644-0741 for Tickets www.TasteofMaitland.comAthena Roasted Chicken Francescos Sam Sneads Tavern SoNapa John and Shirleys Catering Upper Crust Desserts RanGetsu Mitchells Fish Market Mellow Mushroom Costco Romanos Macaroni Grill The Sugar Suite Country Club at Deer Run Sams Smoothie Shack Kobe Japanese Steakhouse Dunkin Donuts Jeremiahs Italian Ice Bahama Breeze Honey Baked Ham Jersey Mikes Subs Crispers Browns NY Deli Publix Enzos Restaurant on the Lake Chick-l-A Maitland CU lL TU r R E | A performance of BB rahms from one of the greatest pianists, and a night of cows and cabernets CCOO N TITI NU EE D F RORO M pP REVIO uU S pP A GE PHAN tT ASMAG o O RIA I I V CoCO WS N CC ABS AA pP ASSI o O N fo FO R C o O LLEC t T ING This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORG @EnzianTheater Wednesday Night Pitcher Show SUSPIRIA FREE on the lawn at Eden Bar Wed 8:00PM One Week Only! THE HUNT Fri-Sun 3:30, 6:30, 9:30 Mon-Thu 6:30, 9:30 Halloween Party at Eden FREE | DJ Spinning all night long Prizes for best dressed gals and ghouls October 26th | 9:00PM 2:00AM Midnight Movies: ALIEN Sat 11:59PM

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Page 22 | T T hursday, OO ct. 17, 2013 | W W inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver OO pinions CC hris Jepson PP erspectivesLouis RR oney PP lay OO n! King Features Weekly ServiceOctober 14, 2013 EDITORIAL CARTOONS Noblesse oblige: the inferred responsibility of privileged people to act with generosity and nobility toward those less privileged. An expression that sums up an aspect of life for me is, There but for the grace of God go I. I do not subscribe to the literal mercy of God, but I appreciate the implied possibilities of that statement. There but for the support of a loving family. There but for the luck of an early mentor. There but for my mother getting a college teaching job. There but for a scholarship. There but for a blind date. You get the idea. In my life Ive encountered a fair number of accomplished, successful, intelligent, wealthy men. Several sold companies netting hundreds of millions of dollars. If I were a betting man, I would wager that a Republican Party. My question is, Why? The Republican Party is a three-legged stool: Lower taxes, fewer regulations and national stability. Space does not allow here the counter-arguments to lower taxes and deregulation (and the historic economic record of both), but I would like to examine the challenge to national stability (see: clean CR and Debt Ceiling) posed by the Republican Party and one recommendation to sensibly change course. What responsibility do we, as citizens, have towards Americas corporations? You could argue that American corporations have no more obligation for the commonwealth than providing maximum return to shareholders. If they create jobs at all, that is incidental to their primary goal of return on investment. If moving the manufacturing of a widget to a third-world dystopian factory increases American workers (and their communities) are diminished, so what? Not my job, they will say, building better communities. If corporations are now citizens (thank you, Supreme Court) of the republic, well, how should we consider a citizen who pays an unlivable wage while thwarting union-organizing efforts (see: Walmart)? So many issues confront America that it is staggering how America stumble-bums along as well as we do. But for how long? The Republican Party is led by men unthat the best and the brightest are not at the helm of the GOP. Why is that? Surely, such Republican men exist and, importantis paramount but so are a myriad of other social considerations that have a direct impact on national/local stability. America is an amalgam of competing interests but the commonwealth is undeniably suffering and there is no more stark a measurement of our system than the worsening imbalance of wealth in America (the reality of the 1 percent threshold). If America is to devolve into an oligarchy of the moneyed-class, will not national stability inevitably become the issue? America is not immune from history. I remain, at heart, an optimist. I believe rational people can, indeed, agree on the facts in the pursuit of just governance. My recommendation for America is that those Republican men who embrace both at stake for America than another Chamregulatory retrenchment. There must be 40-such thoughtful Republicans in Winter Park alone. The WP Top 40. And, to all those so privileged, all A call to Republican arms Jepson is a 27-year resident of CC entral Florida. HH es scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. R R each him at Jepson@ ME ME D I I America. US US Harvard professor of classics John when he spoke to our class of 1942 at our combine singing as a soloist with Arthur Fiedler and the Boston Pops, and celebrating with classmates and friends in Boston. John Finleys impromptu oration that June day remains to this day as one of the most brilliant extemporaneous utterances I have ever heard. A torrent of classical refmind, and dazzled us to the degree that we were still talking about his performance 45 years later at our 70th reunion. Finley humorously remarked to us, My self-esteem may seem to be ego, but honestly, I havent lived a life that allows me to be modest about things. John Silber was president of Boston University when I met him in New Smyrna at an Atlantic Center for the Arts symposium in which I took part in the early 1980s. Silber was then the highest paid university prexy in the U.S. The subject was arts in education. Silber rose from the table and spoke, followAlbee (Whos afraid of Virginia Woolf?) and noted cynic and Vermont governor, Madeleine Kunin. When Silber spoke, the other speakers were soon eclipsed, even forgotten. Texan Silbers easy disarming delivery brought to bear on present situations the Wisdom of the Ages, which has lived in erudite minds from the 400 B.C. Golden Age of Athens, to today. That night before dinner, my b.w. and I chatted about the arts with Silber for half an hour. I told him that I had not heard a speaker of his caliber since the days of John Finley. I knew Finley, Silber said. Shortly thereafter Silber sent me a signed copy of a book of his that had enjoyed national impact. Later Silber ran for mayor of Boston and lost by a hair. He would have been great, and would have won had he talked less, reported a Boston friend. His erudition was way over the head of the average Joe, and it did To me, my longtime friend, poet James the spoken word a fact Time Magazine downplayed in Jims full-page obituary. Long before Deliverance, the great New Yorker Magazine poetry years, and the Poet Laureate of the Library of Congress honor, Jims spoken voice from his earliest youth had intoned the courtly elegance of an Oxford-educated Southern Antebellum intellectual. Just as naturally, Jim could lapse into the red-clay patois of the rural Georgians he knew and loved. Tall and lanky, Dickey that said, Doan mess with me. Jims ordinary daytime parlance was pure poetry to hear. In his series of PBS TV talks with Bill Moyers, Jim was at his best. The two sat on a dock behind Jims house on the river in Columbia, S.C., and spoke unrestrictedly of Jims way of thinking and of living. I was sorry indeed when those interviews with Jim came to an end. Dickey was a sought-after public speaker, with a high price. But Jim didnt let down in the content or the music of his harmonious sentences at such times as when he was sprawled on the sofa in my New York digs, talking as he gazed out over Central Park. James Dickey brought with him through life his engaging ancestral manner, whether as a young war hero, a later literary lion, a pickin and singin downhome guitar player or, in my case, an entertaining friend and supportive fellow artist. Jim had it all, and all who knew him, knew it. SS peaking of speakers About RR oney: HH arvardDistinguished P P rof, E E m. UC UC F 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy R R oney) CC hris Jepson PP erspectives Louis RR oney PP lay OO n!

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WW inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver | T T hursday, OO ct. 17, 2013 | Page 39 WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com SS unday, OO ctober 20th: 4213 C C ardinal B B oulevard, WW ilbur B B y TT he SS ea, FL 32127 2 BR BR | 2 B B A | 1,055 S S F | $229,000 MM ove in ready beach home. 2 bedroom, 2 bath home, located in WW ilbur by the SS ea, just north of P P once I I nlet. WW alk 2 short blocks to the beach, one block to the WW ilbur R R ose water paddling trail. TT otally renovated, includes furniture. $229,000. H H osted by: R R enee Dee M M organ from 1-4 PM PM OO B SERSER V ER EROO pen HH ouses THEMMARKEt T PLAc C E MindGym October 14, 2013 MindGym October 14, 2013 1813 Alice Avenue, WW inter PP ark FL 32792 sold by P P amela S S eibert 2001 Geronimo TT rial, M M aitland FL 32751 sold by Kelly L. P P rice & Debbie TT assell 204 Quayside C C ircle U U nit 504, M M aitland FL 32751 sold by P P amela R R yan 2053 Dixie B B ell Drive, O O rlando FL 32812 sold by TT eresa JonesC C intron & E E lim C C intron 35 Grand Junction B B oulevard, O O rlando FL 32835 sold by TT eresa JonesC C intron & E E lim C C intron 1150 N N P P ark Avenue, WW inter P P ark FL 32789 sold by P P a trick H H iggins OO B SERSER V ER ER Just SS old HH omes Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the Ocoee Founders Day Festival November 8 & 9, 2013 Registration: 11:30 a.m.Shotgun: 12:30 p.m.Prizes Dinner served after the tournamentSaturday, November 2nd12th Annual Founders' Day Poker Run Registration: 9:30 a.m. Start Location: Sandwich Shop 1113 S. Clarke Road, Ocoee, FL 34761 End Location: The Bar 1107 S. Clarke Road, Ocoee, FL 34761 Friday, November 1stFounders' Day Golf Tournament at Forest Lake Golf CourseAll proceeds benefit the Ocoee Police Departments Holiday Toys for Tots rfntb rf ntand soreness nb naches THG-13902 MindGym October 14, 2013 MindGym October 14, 2013

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Page 40 | T T hursday, OO ct. 17, 2013 | W W inter PP ark / M M aitland O O bserver A NNOUNCENNOUNCE M ENTSENTS Auction BB ank OO wned PP ropertyBB land CC ounty, Virginia. 425+/acres offered in 13 tracts. 5,500+/ sq ft custom R R ocky MM ountain Log H H ome, additional brick bi-level home, horse barn, 2 ponds and great views, plus 405+/acres joining N N ational Forest. Abundant deer, bear, turkey and WIWI LD HO HO G S S 5% B B uyers P P remium. C C all R R ussell S S eneff. N N ovember 8 at 5 PM PM Auction H H eld Quality I I nn, B B luefield, WW V. WW oltz & Associates, I I nc. (VA# 321) RR eal E E state B B rokers & Auctioneers. 540EE state Auction-SS at. OO ct 26th,5200 SESE 26th Ave, OO cala. PP review at 9am, Auction at 10am. II tems collected over 6 decades! M M ore information & pictures: www.brewerauctions.com (386)497-4438 A U U #2604 A B B #1940 12% BP BPWW inter PP ark B B enefit S S hop140 Lyman Ave, WW inter P P ark needs items to sell: clothing, bedding, jewelry, kitchenware and bric-a brac. Also needing volunteers. C C ontact E E lizabeth C C omer 407-647-8276. O O pen TT ues & F ri at 9:30am; S S at 10am-1pm. All proceeds support childrens programs & the O O r lando BB lind Association. HEHE LP WA NTEDNTED Driver TT rainees N N eeded NOW NOW BB ecome a driver for WW erner E E nterprises. EE arn $800 per week! Local CC DL TT raining. 1-877-214-3624. NN ow HH iring: OTROTR CC lass A CC DL Drivers N N ew P P ay P P acka geand $1500 SS ignOO n BB onus! MM ostly 5-10 days out. C C all today 1-888-378-9691 or apply at www.heyl.netM ISCEISCE LLA NEOUSNEOUS A IRIR L INEINE CC A REERSREERS begin here Get FAA approved Aviation MM aintenance TT echnician training. H H ousing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. C C all A IM IM 866-314-3769R EE AL ESTEST A TETE : CO CO MM E E R CI CI AL OO ffices for RR ent WW inter PP ark R R eal E E state O O ffices for rent ( W W inter P P ark/Goldenrod/ U U niversity). Doctors office w/5 exam rooms + extra features. O O ther office units available from 800-3000 SS F. NN ew OO rleans style bldg; great prices. C C all Ann 407-293-1934. annpolasek@cfl.rr.com SS A NN F OROR D:Free standing retail/office building, 2640 SS F, great signage & visibility. Lease for $2800 per month (also for sale). C C all John, owner/broker, 407-492-7111 R EE AL ESTEST A TETE : FO FO R R ENT ENT Q UIETUIET J OURNOURN AL ISTIST SEESEE K ININ G WINTERWINTER P P A R R K RENT RENT AL II m a female non-smoker age 59 with a mild vision disability preventing me from driving. I I f you have a nice home or apartment in a safe neighborhood near busline available for annual lease, I I d appreciate your call or email. TT hank you. SS tephanie YY oung 239-424-0182 youngsb30@ gmail.comR EE AL ESTEST A TETE : FO FO R S S AL E EBB lue RR idge MM ountain Land Liquida tion!1.37 acres, national forest access, only $9,800. WW as $74,900. HH ardwood setting, breathtaking mountain/ valley views. MM ild climate, TT remendous 4 season rec reation. PP a ved rds, U U G utilities, water. EE xcellent financing CC all 1-866-9525303, x21 Foreclosed CC abin OO n 4 Acres!Just $89,900. BB ring your hammer & nails. Great fixer upper on beautiful wooded rolling land. E E njoy wildlife, creeks, ponds, lake access. M M ust see! CC all 877-888-0267, x 436 HOMESITESHOMESITES J USTUST OUTSIOUTSI D EE CHCH A TTTT A NOO NOO GA!10-25 Acres SS tarting at OO nly $56,000. Loca ted on S S ignal M M ountain in TT ennes see. Gated C C ommunity P P hase 2 Just RR eleased. C C all 877-282-4409 NORTHNORTH G EOREOR G II A Long Flowing CC reek P P roperty, SS ecluded on culdesac. PP erfect retrea t near O O ktoberfest in H H elen, GA. U U tilities in place ready to build for $29,900. 1-877717-8992 ext591. THEMMARKEt T PLAc C E MindGym October 14, 2013 MindGym October 14, 2013 ARIES (March 21 to April 19) The high standards you set for yourself dont always translate into the behav ior you expect of others. That relation ship problem can be resolved if youre more flexible and less judgmental. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Not enough party bids to satisfy the Bovines fun-loving side this week? Go ahead and throw one of your own. Then prepare for some serious work coming up early next week. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) A new and intensely productive cycle is about to kick in. Be careful not to get too stressed out, though. Make time to restore your energies by relaxing with family and friends. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) This could be a good time to share some of your plans with those closest to you. Their comments could give you some added insight into how you might accomplish your goals. LEO (July 23 to August 22) An attack of self-doubt might be unsettling for the usually super-assured Feline. But it could be your inner voice telling you to hold off implementing your plans until youve reassessed them. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) This is a great time for you to reward yourself for all your hard work by tak ing a trip you havent spent months carefully planning, to somewhere you never thought youd be going. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Some misunderstandings resist being resolved. But your sincerity in wanting to soothe those hurt feelings wins the day. By months end, that relationship should begin to show signs of healing. SCORPIO (October 23 to Novem ber 21) A hectic job schedule begins to ease just in time to blow off all that work-generated steam on Halloween. A family situation runs into an unexpected complication. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) A cutting remark in the workplace needs to be handled with finesse. Remember: How you respond could determine the depth of support you gain from colleagues. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Once again, that Capricornean stubborn streak sets in and could keep you from getting muchneeded advice. Fortunately, it lifts by weeks end, in time to make an informed decision. AQUARIUS (January 20 to Febru ary 18) A surprise trip early in the week could lead to other unexpected offers when you return. Word to the wise: Avoid talking too much about this until youve made some decisions. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Learning dominates the week for per spicacious Pisceans, who are always looking to widen their range of knowl edge. A series of important job-linked commitments begins late in the week. BORN THIS WEEK: Your sense of humor generates good feelings and good will everywhere you go. 2013 King Features Syndicate, Inc. Oct. 31, 1517, the priest and scholar Martin Luther nails to the door of the Castle Church in Wittenberg, Germany, a piece of paper containing 95 revolutionary opinions that would begin the Protestant Reformation. In one, Luther condemned the corruption of the Catholic Church for asking for payment for the forgiveness of sins. Oct. 30, 1890, Oakland, Calif., enacts a law against opium, morphine and cocaine. The new regulations allowed only doctors to prescribe these drugs, which had been legal for cures or pain relief. Oct. 29, 1929, Black Tuesday hits Wall Street as investors trade 16,410,030 shares. In the aftermath of Black Tuesday, America and the rest of the industrialized world spiraled downward into the Great Depression. By 1932, stocks were worth only about 20 percent of their value in the summer of 1929. Nov. 2, 1947, the Hughes Flying Boat the largest aircraft ever built is piloted by designer How ard Hughes on its first and only flight. Built with laminated birch and spruce, the Spruce Goose had a wingspan longer than a football field and was designed to carry more than 700 men to battle. Nov. 1, 1952, the United States detonates the worlds first thermo nuclear weapon, the hydrogen bomb, on Eniwetok atoll in the Pacific. The Soviet Union quickly followed suit, and by the late 1970s, seven nations had constructed hydrogen bombs. Oct. 28, 1965, construction is completed on the Gateway Arch, a 630-foot-high parabola of stainless steel in St. Louis. An internal tram sys tem takes visitors to the top, where on a clear day they can see up to 30 miles across the Mississippi and to the Great Plains to the west. Nov. 3, 1986, the Lebanese magazine Ash Shiraa reports that the United States has been secretly selling arms to Iran in an effort to secure the release of seven American hostages held by pro-Iranian groups in Lebanon. Within weeks, Attorney General Edwin Meese revealed that proceeds from the arms sales were diverted to fund Nicaraguan rebels. 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. King Features Weekly ServiceOctober 14, 2013 MindGym October 14, 2013 MindGym October 14, 2013 MindGym October 14, 2013 MindGymOctober 14, 2013