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Winter Park-Maitland observer ( 09-26-2013 )

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Material Information

Title:
Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title:
Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication:
Winter Park FL
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates:
28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID:
UF00091444:00282

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title:
Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication:
Winter Park FL
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates:
28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID:
UF00091444:00282


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WPMOBSERVER.COM You can smell them before you see them. A slight northerly shift of the wind, and a stench neighbors can only describe as ammonia-laced old urine makes breathing in through your nose outside of 82-year-old Maitland resident Willie Bell Gibbons front porch nearly unbearable. A few footsteps past where the gravel road of Amado Lane ends and newly paved Mechanic Street begins, and you can start to hear their sound. A screeching symphony thousands of voices strong sings from the cracks of the Maitland Boulevard over pass. At midday, the masses remain tucked intently out of sight except for a handful of colony members now silent, their over lying dead in the grass. One mangled winged body didnt make it that far, meeting its end hanging from the twisted metal top of a bordering chain-link fence. Its a fate Gibbons, her family and neighbors hopelessly wish all the thousands of bats taking residence under the bridge would meet. You cant even sit outside, its terrible, Gibbons daughter Katrina Jones said. Sometimes you cant even walk over there to get your mail it smells so bad. Mailboxes for the few houses still standing in the predominantly African-American Maitland neighborhood off of Mechanic Street sit under the bridge. Two-inches of dark brown bat feces known as guano settles in a think layer on top of the boxes. You get your mail, and you know its in your mail. And its on the ground and now its on your shoes, and now youre taking it into your house, Jones said. In her home next door, Mar tha Bryant-Hall says the bats are making themselves even more comfortable. Months ago, she stopped enter ing her house at night through the garage after she found bats hanging out in there after dark. Then earlier this month, a roofer found more making a home out of the eaves of her front porch, leaving bats standing between her and both entrances. Enough is enough, and when the bats decide theyre coming to live with me, thats enough, Bryant-Hall said. She dug out the familiar phone numbers shes been dialing for decades hoping for and the Florida Department of Transportation, which maintains the bridge, to take action and do something about the bats. But Maitland Public Works director Rick Lemke said by Florida state law, killing the bats is illegal. Forcing them out is an in-depth process. And keeping them out of a structure as large and crevassed as the underside of the overpass is nearly impossible. It is a problem, its frustrating for us as well, but its state Winter Parks railway station this Saturday, as local residents and politicians gathered to get a sneak peak of what the new light rail system will look like when in launches next spring. Winter Park Mayor Ken Bradley and Maitland Mayor Howard Schieferdecker, along with Winter Park commissiontogether to cut the ribbon for the systems newest completed railcar on Sept. 21. Isnt it great to see it come to reality? Bradley said, snapping cell phone photos of the railcars shiny white and colorfully striped exterior. Hundreds of residents lined inside the car, checking out the moment to relish the reality of a project many years and billions of dollars in the making. Taking a seat in a booth with Seminole County Commissioner Lee Constantine and Florida Department of Transportation District 5 Secretary Noranne Downs, Bradley said he was imI can tell its going to be something people are going to be really excited to ride, he said. FDOT spokesman Steve Olson said the SunRail trains are set to start running from DeBary to Sand Lake Road in south Or lando in the spring. He said the trains will run Monday through Friday every 30 minutes at peak commuter hours between 5:30 and 8:30 a.m. and 4 to 7 p.m. Then from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. and from 7 to 10 p.m. theyll drop to two-hour cycles. Getting aboard the railroad will cost riders $2 per trip, with an additional $1 added on when crossing county lines and trains will be equipped with free WiFi and bike storage space. Its fun to see our station taking shape and the cars coming into place, Bradley said. Its going to be a great addition to our city and our region.PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVERLocal ofcials cut the ribbon on a new SunRail car to give the public a rst look.SunRail sneak peakSARAH WILSON Observer staff Bridge-roosting bats swarm Maitland homes Please see BATS on page 2 PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVERBodies of dead bats litter the road under a Maitland bridge.SARAH WILSON Observer staffAfter months of talk about higher taxes to fund additional meeting on Monday the Maitland City Council backtracked property tax rates to the same theyve been since 2007. By keeping the millage rate at 3.88 mils, Maitland residents can expect to continue to pay $3.88 for every $1,000 of taxable property value they own. But even by City Manager Sharon Anselmo said the city will garner 1.63 per cent more revenue than in 2013. The approved $22.45 million budget included additional funding for library renovations, Performing Arts of Maitland programing, and restoring three moved a proposed designated allocation of an additional $188,000 in funding for parks, leaves 17 $627,591 from the citys fund balance.Maitland votes down tax hikeSARAH WILSON Observer staff

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Page 2 | Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland ObserverThe Albin Polasek Museum guaranteed the safety of the 128-year-old Capen House from demolition this week. Preservationists in Winter Park had until Oct. 1 to raise at least $650,000 to move the house by barge across Lake Osceola to the grounds of the museum. Albin Polasek Museum Board of Trustees President Mark Terry shared the news with City Commissioners on Monday night to the cheering applause of Winter Park residents. This is so important that we as a board decided to ensure that the house will be moved by funding the difference of the $400,000, Terry said. We can can move that house.Budget passesThe Winter Park City Commission voted 5-0 on Monday to hold the line on the citys millage rate for the property values increasing and raising the citys property tax revenue by 2.17 percent. The operating millage rate established each year by the city remains at 4.0923 mills for the sixth year in a row, continuing the trend that began in 2008. Residents will pay higher taxes due to increasing property values but at a relatively low rate. Our nations economy even though its getting better isnt such where people can just be paying more and more in taxes, so we try to be very effective and and what we charge, Mayor Ken Bradley said. The millage rates are being kept at what I think is very competitive. City Manager Randy Knight said that the current millage rate remains competitive locally, as the third lowest in the county. I think it shows a real strong commitment on the part of the City Commission to strive to keep the same level of service without having to raise the rate, especially during the down economy weve gone through, Knight said.BATS | SunRail construction had stalled battle against swarm of neighborhood batslaw, Lemke said. FDOT spokesman Steve Olson said the department maintains many bridges that bats call home, but none as close to nearby neighborhoods as where Maitland Boulevard crosses over Mechanic Street. In other areas, Olson said people actually praise the bats for ridding places of mosquitoes and other insects. But, he said, Those people probably arent living directly downwind. FDOT Maintenance Engineer Mike Danos said the department close and a lot too many. He said FDOT is scheduled to send crews to pressure wash the bridge to rid it of guano buildup this week. Washing the bridge and spraying the ground with fungicide, Olson said, has been the departments best plan of action to clean up after the bats. But, at Mechanic Street, its been more than a year since the last washing. We havent been able to get in there and clean as much as we wanted, or probably should, Olson said. With SunRail workers prepar ing the tracks under the bridge for the past six months readying for the commuter rails launch, he said its prohibited FDOT from getting under it to clean. He said the additional activity also could be the reason why the bats have sought shelter in Bryant-Halls house. Bryant-Hall said during the months the workers were there, theyd wear masks to alleviate the smell, and ask her how she could stand living there breathing it in everyday. She didnt have an answer, adding that the nighttime intruders are only one of many nuisances shes taken issue with in her neighborhood since moving in more than 30 years ago. A decade after Maitland annexed the area, same battles for basic equality of services as she was decades ago. What Im experiencing in my neighborhood isnt what youre getting in yours, she said. Maitland is still a city of the haves and have-nots. If it was happening in [city in two weeks weve been dealing with it here for years, Jones added. Lemke said no matter where the bats call home in Maitland, the same issues and laws are in place for relocating them. He said a bat house was installed in 2000 at Community Park to give bats an alternative place to live, but that theres been little to no evidence that bats have decided to use it. But, he said, there are currently no other areas in the like the one at Mechanic Street. He said its a mix of perfectly imperfect factors combining in the neighborhood Gibbons, Bryant-Hall and the thousands of bats all call home. Bryant-Hall said she loves her home just as much as the bats seem to love theirs in the bridge. But, she said, there needs to be a line drawn between whose wellbeing is more worth protecting: the taxpayers or the bats. They say theyre endangered, but Im endangered getting into my house, she said. As of now, shes betting on the bats. CONTINUED FROM FRONT P AGE r f r f n f nn t b n t b t n n f f n rfnr Savannah Court and Cove Excellence in Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation 1301 W. Maitland Blvd. Maitland, FL 32751407-645-3990www.SavannahCourtMaitland.comAssisted Living Facility License No. 8447 Skilled Nursing Facility License No. 1635096 Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above. You are always welcome!A Senior Living Community where Hospitality is a Way of Life. Capen House saved by PolasekTIM FREED Observer staff

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013 | Page 3 LOCAL NEWS. BIG IMPACT.Subscribe now to keep up with the latest news unfolding in your community.Get one year (52 issues) of the Winter Park-Maitland Observer for only $30 Plus, as a thank you for subscribing, youll receive a complimentary copy of the 2014 Winter Park-Maitland Observer Calendar in your December 5 issue! Bonus Offer Subscribe or renew before November 15 and youll get three more months of the Winter Park-Maitland Observer at no additional charge! A SPECIAL OFFER FOR NEW AND RETURNING SUBSCRIBERS Visit WPMObserver.com/Subscribe or call 407.563.7013 to order today! The Knights have only beaten one ranked team on the gridiron ever. This Saturday, theyll try to take down their second. The anticipation is high: As of Monday No. 12 South Carolina (2-1) was already sold out. This is a big game for the Knights, who started their 1988. When the South Carolina Gamecocks march into the Bright House for a noon kickoff, it wont be the same as that time UCF beat No. 13 Houston 37-32 at home in 2009. Houston hasnt appeared in the Associated Press Top 25 rankings since 2011. South Carolina hasnt gone unranked for a full season since 2006. Itll be a challenge for the Knights offense, though theyve already won three games with more than 30 points per game. The Knights have brought a their offensive mix to balance out an improving passive attack, with Storm Johnson emerging as the teams lead rusher. But the Knights will need to rely heavily on quarterback Blake Bortles, who has shown himself capable of throwing consistent 250-yard games or more, with a careerhigh 314 yards to start the season against Akron. Hell contend with a tough Gamecocks defense that allowed just 147 passing yards against Vanderbilt Sept. 14, one of two sub-200-yard passing games theyve allowed this season. But South Carolina has also struggled against solid pass defenses, with quar terback Connor Shaw held to less than 200 yards against North Carolina to start the season. The Knights allowed 262 yards in the air in their win against Penn State on Sept. 14, but only allowed 258 passing yards comtwo opponents. One factor thats conspicuously absent for the Knights this year is forced turnovers. Theyve only caused one this season, a 6-yard interception return by defensive end Troy Gray. Last season they picked off 11 passes in 14 games. In the the Knights havent recovered a fumble. Last season they did it 16 times. Defense has also lagged beLast season the Knights allowed etrations to become a touchdown. Penn State they couldnt stop the Lions at all, letting them into the came within 20 yards. The key for the Knights defense could be getting stops closer to the visitors side of the only allowed 40 percent of thirddown conversions and 41 percent of fourth-down conversions. In that category the Knights have more than kept pace with last seasons defense. So far this season theyve allowed only 33 percent of third-down conver sions and 66 percent of fourthdown conversions. Against Penn State, their toughest opponent so far this season, they stopped 75 percent of third-down attempts and 50 percent of fourth downs. That may be the best defensive performance against Penn State that the Knights have ever had. Theyll have to keep up their famous jacked-up intensity against tough teams if they want a memorable moment in the Bright House thatll be seen Knights, theyll be broadcast on network television when they kick off at noon Saturday, Sept. 28, aired nationally on ABC. Rollins The Tars are off to another strong start as they trounced Longwood University 20-2 on Sept. 21 in Morgantown, W.Va., making a tradition out of season-opening wins. And they did it all in a driving rainstorm that dumped more than an inch of rain in chilly temperatures. The home weather advantage didnt do much to help Longwood, who suffered four sacks at the hands of Matt Hunt and two forced fumbles courtesy of Anthony Krause. Quarterback Jeff Hoblick aired out the ball with 173 yards passing plus another 62 yards through the mud to lead the team in total yardage. Two Alex Politis way to 20 points. Will Reischmann and J.D. Brady also had touchdowns in the game. The Tars will skip their scheduled showdown against the University of South Carolina club team and a subsequent road trip to Kennesaw State, taking two weeks off before they host Middle Georgia State on Oct. 12. Four games into the season the Winter Park Wildcats are 4-0 on the gridiron after outlasting University 27-22 on Sept. 20. And win under their belts thanks to a three-touchdown performance by quarterback J.P. Colton. Colton ran for nearly 150 scampers that took him all the The Wildcats will host Boone at 7:30 p.m. Friday. The Braves are 0-4 after a 44-14 trouncing by Apopka on Sept. 20. Edgewater The Eagles may be having the most frustrating season in Central Florida with an 0-4 overall record thats been decided by an average of four points per game. But the most recent home loss to Olympia in double overtime may be the most painful yet. The Eagles had the lead near the end of regulation when a 47yard Titans pass and extra point evened things up. The Eagles before allowing a passing TD to even the score. In the second goal and the Eagles were left with a 34-31 loss. Edgewater will take a week off before hosting Leesburg at 7 p.m. Oct. 4. Knights await No. 12 GamecocksWildcats unbeatenISAAC BABCOCK Observer staff ISAAC BABCOCK Observer staff ARCHIVE PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERBlake Bortles will face his toughest test yet on Saturday. rfnrtbr trrtt

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Page 4 | Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer FAMILY CALENDAR Member FDICEQUAL HOUSINGLENDER RYour Home Town Bank TRUSTCO BANK407-659-5701 www.TrustcoBank.comFast, Local Decisions Close your First Mortgage in 30 days!*Low Closing Costs No Points and No T ax Escrow requiredSchedule Closing Date at Application 85% of our Loans close as scheduled!* Trustco Mortgages We Close Loans!*Information based on current closings. Circumstances beyond Trustco Banks control may delay closing. Please n ote: W e r eser ve the right to alte r or w ithdraw these products or certain featu res thereof without prior notification. Maitland City TalkBY HOW ARD SCHIEFERDECKER MAYOR How often has the doorbell rung or a child interrupted you while you were cooking, causing you to forget about the chicken If this scenario or a similar one sounds familiar to you, you may want to think about kitchen safety a little more since its likely that you, a friend or family member have run the risk of having a the ways they can stay safe in their homes. Unfortunately, sometimes we have that talk after theyve sufWe hope that people reading this article wont have to learn the hard way. If there were one could give, it would be: Keep an eye on what you fry! Why? Because according to the Association (NFPA), cooking is The latest statistics from NFPA say to an estimated annual average of tween 2007-2011. joining forces with NFPA and ments across North America to commemorate Fire Prevention Week, Oct. 6-12, Prevent Kitchen Fires. Often when were called to a tell us they only left the kitchen for a few minutes. Sadly, thats to start. The bottom line is that theres really no safe period of time for the cook to step away. A few key points to remember: you are frying, grilling or broiling food. If you must leave the room even for a short period of time, turn off the stove. baking or roasting food, check it regularly, stay in the home, and use a timer to remind you. clear of combustibles (e.g. potholders, towels, rags, drapes and food packaging). cooking areas by enforcing a kidstove. crowave, turn it off immediately and keep the door closed. Never pletely out. If in doubt, get out of ment. and a lid nearby. If a small grease over the pan (make sure you are wearing the oven mitt). Turn off the burner. Do not move the pan. Do not remove the lid until it is completely cool. out of the home and call 911. would like to be in your kitchen, but only if you invited us to dinner.Dennis Marshall, CET, FCO Maitland Fire MarshalStand by your pan KEEP UP WITH MAITLAND NEWS AND EVENTS!www.IndependenceLane.com Facebook.com/ItsMyMaitland WELCOMENew M embersMONTHLY CHAMBER NEWS & EVENTSOctober 3: Success Leads Group: Meets the 1st Thursday each month 11:30am-1pm October 8: Coffee Connection with the Maitland Chamber of Commerce Making business connections one cup at a time Meets 2nd Tuesday each month 8-9am October 10: Francescos, 400 S. Orlando Avenue, Maitland Community Partners: Meets the 2nd Thursday each month 11:30am1pm October 16: Maitland Civic Center, 641 S. Maitland Avenue Monthly Community Luncheon: 11:30am 1pm Reservations Required 407-644-0741 Featuring: SunRail. SunRail speakers will bring us up-to-date on the latest including construction progress, commuting 101, Flexbus project, etc. There will be several speakers to cover the topics. October 23: Wednesday, Women and Wisdom: Meets the 4th Wednesday each month 11:30am-1pm Business After Hours: check our website or call 407-644-0741 for updates. www.maitlandchamber.com First Transact, Oviedo Homewood Suites by Hilton, Maitland Coldwell Banker Residential Real Estate, Winter ParkOUR MISSI ONTo foster growth among the areas established businesses, and lend assistance to new rms locating to the area. The Maitland Area Chamber of Commerce takes great pride in our community. Come to Maitland, land of 18 parks and 21 lakes with over 1000 acres of water! TAS T E OF M AIT LAN DLOCA TION: CTIONS/INFORMA TION: A TIMINFORMA TION: CONT ACT INFORMA TION: Maitland Chamber of Commerce S/AISSION: Under 3 yr. free. Enjoy a relaxing evening at beautiful Lake Lily visit over 40 restaurants taste their specialties! You wont go away hungry!

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013 | Page 5 Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013 Volume 25, Issue 39 PHONE: 407-563-7000 FAX: 407-563-7099 WPMOBSERVER.COMOrlando, FL 32835-5705PUBLISHERTracy Craft407.515.2605TCraft@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MANAGING EDITORIsaac Babcock 407.563.7023IBabcock@TurnstileMediaGroup.comASSOCIATE EDITORSarah Wilson 407.563.7026SWilson@TurnstileMediaGroup.comDESIGNERTom Miller 407.563.7032TMiller@TurnstileMediaGroup.comSTAFF WRITERSBrittni Larson Megan Stokes Tim Freed Allison Olcsvay Kristy VickeryCOLUMNISTSChris JepsonJepson@MediAmerica.usLouis RoneyLRoney@cfl.rr.comJosh GarrickJoshGarrick9@gmail.comADVERTISING SALESLinda Stern407.376.2434LStern@TurnstileMediaGroup.comLEGAL NOTICE ADVERTISINGAshley McBride 407.286.0807Legal@FLALegals.comSUBSCRIPTIONS/CIRCULATIONLuana Baez 407.563.7013LBaez@TurnstileMediaGroup.comMEMBER OF: -Florida Press Association -Winter Park/Maitland/Goldenrod Chambers of CommerceWinter Park/Maitland Observer is published by Turnstile Media Group. Founded in 1990 and headquartered in Orlando, Fla., Turnstile Media Group is also the parent of Golfweek, Golfweek Custom Media, TurfNet, Professional Artist, Seminole Voice, Baldwin Park Living and Turnstile Connect.TURNSTILE MEDIA GROUPCHAIRMANRance CrainPRESIDENT/CEOFrancis X. FarrellVICE PRESIDENTSPatti Green & Jeff BabineauUSPS #00-6186 ISSN 1064-3613POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:Winter Park / Maitland Observer 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835 Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster One Senior Place ... See our full Calendar of Events at OneSeniorPlace.com407.949.6733715 Douglas Avenue Altamonte Springs, FL 32714M-F 8:30am 5pmTU ESDA Y, O CTO B E R 1 Health Care Reform 9:30am-11am Also: Mon, Oct 7th 3pm-4:30pm Wed, Oct 10th 9am-10:30am Mon, Oct 14th 3pm-4:30pm Fri, Oct 25th 9am-10:30am By Florida Blue-McBride Insurance Agency RSVP 407.230.7825 AARP Medicare Complete 2pm-3:30pm (also 8th, 15th, 22nd & 29th ) Presented by LTC Advisors, RSVP 407.949.6722 Health Care Reform 3:30pm-5pm (also 8th, 15th, 22nd & 29th) Presented by LTC Advisors RSVP 407.949.6722 W ED N ESDA Y, O CTO B E R 2 Why do hearing aids cost so much? 3pm-4:30pm (also 9th, 16th, 23rd & 30th) Presented by Harmony Hearing Centers of America RSVP 407.949.6737 THUR SDA Y, O CTO B E R 3 One Senior Place Presents The Affordable Care Act & More Learn what it really means, plus Medicare help before open enroll ment! 1pm 4pm Information, Resources, Door Prizes Guests speakers from Medicare Plan Options and LTC Advisors. RSVP 407.949.6733 FRI DA Y, O CTO B E R 4 Memory Screenings 2pm 4pm Hosted by Arden Courts Memory Care Community By Appointment Only407.949.6733 M O N DA Y, O CTO B E R 7 Senior Club Sponsored by Family Physicians Group 10am 12pm October 7th Bingo October 14th Computer Club October 21st Movie Day Big Wedding October 28th Casino Day The Real Estate Specialists are IN 10am-1pm (also 14th, 21st, 28th) Presented by Exit Real Estate Results By Appointment Only 407.949.6714Calendar of Events October 2013 Winter Park City TalkBY RANDY KNIGHT CITY MANAGER Sept. 23 City Commission highlights There was a City Commission meeting held Sept. 23 in City Hall Commission Chambers. Below are a few highlights of decisions made at the meeting:Consent Agenda were approved (for a complete listing, please visit cityofwinter ment with Orange County for the future maintenance of the faux brick thermoplastic pedestrian crosswalks on Jackson and Har old avenues at the intersection of Fairbanks Avenue was approved. ments with Mead Botanical Gar den, Inc., and the Winter Park Historical Association, Inc., for Fiscal Year 2014 were approved.Budget Public Hearings dinance adopting the millage rate was approved. dinance adopting the Fiscal Year 2014 budget was approved. A full copy of the Sept. 23 City Commission minutes will be available at cityofwinterpark.org the week of Oct. 14, pending approval by the City Commission.Public Hearings ordinance allowing the City Manager to make special exception for up to two dog events to be in events in other prohibited park proved with an amendment. Park Racquet Club to amend their conditional use approval for the existing facilities and operations to add a new tennis court and to rearrange their parking and driveways on their property at 2111 Via Tuscany was approved. Polasek Museum to relocate the Capen House now at 520 Inter lachen Avenue to the Polasek Museum at 633 Osceola Ave. and to amend the existing development agreement to revise the number of weddings, receptions and other events that may be held on the Polasek Museum property was approved. dinance amending Section 34-30, Title and Ownership of Lots and Spaces in city cemeteries, to clarify the ownership interest that may be conferred and add a provision for the city to regain ownership of abandoned rights to be buried within a municipal cemetery was approved. Schedule effective Tuesday, Oct. 1, was approved.50+ FYI ExpoDont miss the Fall 50+ FYI EXPO hosted by the City of Winter Park on Thursday, Oct. 3, from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., at the Winter Park Community Center located at 721 W. New England Ave. Attendees will have an opportual Council on Agings Flu+You, obtain free health screenings, and attend free seminars on identity theft, self-defense, elder abuse, fall prevention, and Medicare whats hot and whats not from trends in healthy lifestyle options to resources available. Area ser vice providers, agencies, housing pros, health care representatives, Medicare specialists and other professionals who provide valuable products and services to the community will be in attendance to answer any questions related to their individual services. Special guest appearances will be made by magician and master balloon Jacqueline Jones and classical guitarist Fred P. Hodes. Admission and parking are free. For more information, visit 50plusFYI.org. at cityofwinterpark.org, like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and watch us on Vimeo.Setting the budget

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Page 6 | Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland ObserverLifestyles If you are a true prime steak and lobster lover, then you already know that the 20-yearold landmark restaurant on Lee Road, synonymous with great steak, has evolved from its old name (Del Friscos) to take on the name of Christners. The name change is a charming homage to Russ Christner, who opened the restaurant with his wife Carole in 1993. At the time Christner was given a 20-year license to use the name of a famous Dallas restaurant, and for all of those years it was the textbook example of a high-end, special occasion, superior quality steakhouse. One of the most welcoming experiences when dining in the clubby atmosphere of the red brick walls, dark wood trim and white tablecloths that virtually steakhouse was the fact that Russ Christner and his wife Carole seemed to always be there. Few diners came and went without a tableside visit from either or both of them making sure their guests enjoyed a world class dining experience. Russ Christner lost his personal battle with cancer in 2005, leaving the ever-charming Carole in charge. Soon, their son David and his wife Alice joined Carole, thereby enhancing the family ties and making the name change to Christners that much more appropriate. The thrill for this reviewer was to return to this home of steakhouse glory under its new name and tell my readers that the glory is all still there, and then some. I had attended the early June celebration of the name change in which this family-owned business paid homage to their father, Friscos brand, and raised more Hospital Diabetes Institute. Happily standing in line for what was and remains my favorite perfectly spicy Cajun sauce, I mentally applauded their decision to honor the memory of Russ Christner while maintaining the standards he set. Returning for a full meal, I was immediately reminded that the superior quality of the food and service also means the restaurant is a special occasion destination, and the general feel even on a weeknight is one of celebration. Over the years, the venue has grown into nine private dining rooms, but I still prefer the tufted red leather booths from the original restaurant. The temptation begins immediately when a simple, but incredibly delicious, loaf of freshfrom-the-oven bread is delivered to your table. Normally because I know Ill taste several things I stay away from the bread service, but this is impossible to pass up. And as you follow the menus suggestion and tear off a piece of the bread, take a moment to savor the fresh-baked smell of that special loaf. From the choices, we shared the already noted favorite crab cake, famous for its luxuriously all-crab consistency that got divided into portions to simply extend the pleasure. We loved the unique taste and preparation of the Shanghaiing its just-right spicy perfection. We ordered the lettuce wedge for the sheer joy of tasting all three of Christners homemade salad dressings the chunkiest Bleu Cheese dressing ever known to man; the honey mustard; and the Avocado Goddess. The buttery richness of the Lobster Bisque (called Soup in the menu) is so outrageous that we each got a serious serving of lobster in every chunky bite. For our main courses, my dining partner ordered the grade tuna served warm with a surprisingly subtle and tasty wasabi cream sauce. Considering tion of our waiter questioning whether we had been given the dinner portion; only to be assured the dinner portion would had before us. U.S.D.A. Choice Plus, was even more tender and more tasteful than I remembered from previous visits, and it reminded me in royal fashion about why this resa steakhouse is and can be. It happened that on the evening we dined there, all three of the restaurateurs Carole, David and Alice Christner were in-house. Each of the three stopped by the table to make sure everything was to our satisfaction, and we were more than happy to assure them that our meal exceeded expectations. Beginning with that very special hot bread and continuing with personal touches throughout the meal, the Christner family has built a restaurant that provides meticulous service in own sincerely friendly and caring personalities. Christners new name honors its founder not only in name, but by consistently ofwill ever eat in Central Florida. PHOTO COUR TESY OF CHRISTNERSThe name has changed but the steaks and ambiance remain at Winter Parks Christners. From the Corner TableSteak icon changes names, keeps quality THANK YOU, THANK YOU, THANK YOU! The businesses, organizations and individuals below have chosen to support your local chamber of commerce again in 2013 by renewing their membership. Please join us in thanking them for their investment in our community the next time you shop, dine, or call on their place of business. ANNUAL SUPPORTERS 4 Rivers Smokehouse Annie Russell Theatre Community Based Care of Central Florida Cox Events Group Florida Symphony Youth Orchestra Hannibal Square Community Land Trust, Inc. Hyperion Global Wealth Management Insurance Consultants of Central Florida Jewish Community Center of Greater Orlando Kimberly Roberts, AP, LMT, LLC Leading Edge Title Partners Light Bulbs Unlimited Main Street Children's Dentistry National University Orange Bank of Florida Parker Events Robert Clayton Roesch Smith & Fleming, LLC Sonny's Franchise Company St. John Lutheran Church Stonebridge Financial Planning Group The Meat House mi TOMATINA, Paella Bar Towncare Dental Winter Park Tranquil Oaks Cremation Garden Walgreens Wells Fargo Advisors Financial Network 5+ YEARS ADT Security, LLC Aloma Bowl Alpha Christian Academy Big Brothers, Big Sisters of Central Florida Binson's Home Health Care Centers B r i o P r o p e r t i e s Byrd & Associates, LLC Gary Munson Heating & A/C Service, Inc. Hemophilia Foundation of Greater Florida Hillstone Restaurant International Association of Administrative Professionals Winter Park Chapter Orlando Foot & Ankle Clinic, Inc. Shafran Gastroenterology Center Sweet! Vose Law Firm, LLP Bill & Robbi Walker 10+ YEARS Ferrell Wealth Management Michael Collard Properties, Inc. Ruth's Chris Steak House, Inc. 15+ YEARS Majestic Jewelers, Inc. Winter Park Sidewalk Art Festival 20+ YEARS Nancy Bagby Center State Bank Cornell Fine Arts Museum Glenridge Middle School Lowndes, Drosdick, Doster,Kantor & Reed, P.A. Michael Abufaris, D.D.S. Pohl & Short, P.A. 30+ YEARS American Lock & Door Specialists Compass Investment Properties, Inc. Donald W. McIntosh Associates, Inc. Park East & Park Knowles Apartments Stanley Steemer C h a m b e r T r u s t e e F o r m o r e i n f o r m a t i o n a b o u t t h e W i n t e r P a r k C h a m b e r o f C o m m e r c e o u r m e m b e r s a n d u p c o m i n g e v e n t s v i s i t u s a t t h e W i n t e r P a r k W e l c o m e C e n t e r c a l l ( 4 0 7 ) 6 4 4 8 2 8 1 o r l o g o n t o w w w w i n t e r p a r k o r g EVENTS & PROGRAMS P A R K A V E N U E S I D E W A L K S A L E October 10 13 Participating Park Avenue Merchants G O O D M O R N I N G W I N T E R P A R K Friday, October 11 at 7:45 a.m. Winter Park Welcome Center Topic: Central Florida Veterans Memorial Park W I N T E R P A R K A U T U M N A R T F E S T I V A L October 12 & 13, 9 a.m. 5 p.m. both days Central Park Artists, Entertainment and Event Details at autumnartfestival.org H A R R I E T T S P A R K A V E N U E F A S H I O N W E E K October 13 19 Schedule of Events and Ru nway Show Tickets at parkavenuefashionweek.com B U S I N E S S A F T E R H O U R S Thursday, October 18 at 5:30 p.m. Hosted by WUCF-FM at Hannibal Square Heritage Center JOSH GARRICK Observer staff

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013 | Page 7 rf rfntb ntbnb ff f rf ff ff f fn f r ft ff f nff tttrf tttf ttt ff f ff f ff ffff fff f fff rf ff f tf frf ffff ff ff f r rfffntrfffnbr Calendar SEPT 28The Art & History Museums Maitland announces its 15th annual gala event, Evening in the Grove, an Orange, White and Green Gala, to be held on Satur day, Sept. 28, from 6 to 10 p.m. at the Sheraton Orlando North Hotel in Maitland. Evening in the Grove has been lauded as one of Central Floridas best fundraising events for its unique historical theme and entertainment, combined with an exciting auction, friends and fun. Visit artandhistory.org for more information. The Maitland Womans Club will be holding its fall Antiques and Collectibles sale at the Maitland Civic Center on Lake Lily in Maitland. Hours are from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sept. 28. Have something to sell? Reserve a vendor table. For information call Linda at 407-830-6373. Raul Colon will be at the Orlando Museum of Art for a free, public presentation on Sept. 28 at 12:15 p.m. His art is on display at the museum through Nov. 3. Visit omart.org for more information. SEPT 29 A paper marbling workshop will be offered on consecutive Sundays at the Albin Polasek Museum. Marbling is an ancient paint or ink technique that has been used for centuries in Turkey, Japan and Europe to decorate paintings and books. Its from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sept. 29 and Oct. 6. Register at polasek.org or by phone at 407-647-6294. SEPT 30Winter Park is hosting a city blood drive from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at City Hall and the Public Works Compound. The city will also hold an urban forestry public planning meeting from 6 to 8 p.m. Visit cityofwinterpark.org for more information. OCT 2 Food T ruck Cinema arrives in Maitland at 1776 Independence Lane, featuring more than a dozen food trucks and Iron Man 3. Y ou bring the chair, well show you the stars! Visit itsmymaitland.com for more information. SEPT 28Project Walk Orlando is pleased to announce that the fourth annual Walk-NRoll-A-Thon will be held on Saturday, Sept. 28, at Cranes Roost Park in Altamonte Springs. The Walk-N-Roll-AThon is held during September, which is Spinal Cord Injury Awareness Month, to raise awareness and raise money for people living with spinal cord injuries. All Central Florida residents are invited to lace up sneakers and roll out wheelchairs for this family-friendly event. Registration is at 8:15 a.m. with a start at 9 a.m. Visit projectwalkorlando.org to register. Join us for our third annual Munich-Style Oktoberfest at the Bahia Festival Grounds at 2300 Pembrook Drive, Orlando, just west of Maitland. The event is from 3 to 11 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 28. Visit oktoberfestorlando.org for more information. OCT 1A National Night Out Open House will be at the Winter Park Public Safety Facility from 5:30-8:30 p.m. on Oct. 1. Visit cityofwinterpark.org for more information. FAMILY CALENDAR

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Page 8 | Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Interactive Whiteboard Technology Affordable Tuition Program / Accepting VPK Small Class Sizes / Ages 2-Grade 8 Extended Care Hours 6:30am-6:30pm Music, Art and Spanish ClassesO PEN H OUSE T OURS OPEN HOUSE TOURS407.324.1144 Towne Center100 Aero Lane, Sanford, FL 32771407.678.0333 University Park10250 University Blvd., Orlando, FL 32871 P A GE P RIVATE S CHOOL Our 105th Year Open House Savings Online visit www.pageschool.com Accredited by: Ai AISF AdvancED-SACS MSA CESS NCPSA Florida Gold Seal of Excellence October 1-4 9am-11am October 1-4 9am-11am October 5 10am-12pm October 5 10am-12pm $104,000 $108,160 $111,405 $115,861 $119,950 $119,950 $124,748 $129,738 $129,738 $134,928 $131,080 $171,819 $183,846 $225,219 $240,985 $89,861 $78,141 $59,882 $75,679 $82,486 $96,532 $99,939 $61,477 $75,896 $85,597 $85,595 $97,069 $84,961 W h i c h l i n e g i v e s y o u t h e b e s t c h a n c e f o r s u cce s s ? I llustr a tion per iod: 1 -1-2000 thr ough 1-1-2012. Each e xample sho wn assumes $100,000 initial pr emium with no withdr a w als M ar ket v alue based on the S&P 500 Index. H i s t o r i c a l perf o r m a n c e o f the S & P 5 0 0 I n d e x s h o u l d not be c onsider ed a r epr esen ta tion of cur r en t or futur e per f or manc e of the I nde x or of an y annuit y H ypothetical inde x annuit y pr oduc t illustr a tion assumes cr editing method of a 6% annual poin t -t o -poin t cap and annual r eset H ypothetical I nc ome R ider V alue assumes a 7% annual r a t e of r etur n f or inc ome pur poses I llustr a tion v alues r epr esen t g r oss r etur ns A ssumed annuit y r a t es and ac tual hist or ical pr ic es of the S&P 500 I nde x w er e used in this purely hypothetical example for the purpose of illustrating comparitive values and to illustrate how the Interest-Crediting Strategy might have guaranteed. Past performance does not guarantee future results. O N E S H OTY o u o n l y h a v e a t r et i r em en t w i ll f a ll6 0% o f A m er i c a n s s h o r t. M ember of(407)-644-6646w w w .aS af eHar b or .c omB ob A dams P r esiden t/CEOA S af eHar bor LL C bob@asaf ehar bor .c om Illustration period: 12-31-1999 though 12-31-2012According to paycheckforlife.com, three out of ve middle-class Americans entering retirement today are projected to outlive their nancial assets. Learn how to protect your retirement account from losses, maintain upside potential and maximize your lifetime income. Call us today for your PERSONALIZED SAFE MONEY REPORT. Community Bulletin School supply driveWinter Park Day Nursery, an accredited, not-for-prot preschool, is launching a Back to School Drive seeking educational supplies that will help give every one of its students a great 2013-2014 school year. The school is requesting donations of items including everything from arts and crafts supplies like construction paper, crayons, glue sticks, poster board and washable nger paints to sensory activities such as bubbles, stickers and PlayDoh. As a nonprot organization, the school relies on the generous support of community donors and volunteers to continue nurturing and educating children. One item the school will not need is new tricycles, according to Executive Director Ali DeMaria. Thats because a recent, gener ous $1,500 grant from the Track Shack Foundation made it possible for the day nursery to purchase brand new tricycles for the childrens outdoor recreation and tness.Representing seniorsU.S. Rep. Daniel Webster was presented with the Summer 2013 Champion of Seniors A ward by The Grange, a national, nonpartisan grassroots organization that advocates on behalf of Americas rural seniors, for Websters outstanding leadership on behalf of seniors. Webster has received the award for their unwaver ing efforts to protect the health benets and security of Floridas seniors and citizens with disabilities. Dial 2-1-1 Heart of Florida United Ways (HFUW) 2-1-1 helpline was recently selected as the after-hours provider for the National Epilepsy Foundation. HFUWs 2-1-1 is a free, 24-hour information, referral and crisis helpline that links people in need to health and human service programs. Operators will assist callers from across the country in need of assistance with a medical issue related to epilepsy.Business Briefs Hit the acceleratorSeacoast National Bank has named Diane VelazquezAcevedo as accelerator of Accelerates Bayhill Fuel Cell. In her new role, V elazquezAcevedo will develop and accelerate the commercial business within a designated micro-market, with the ability to transition the business owner from traditional full-service retail branch services over to electronic banking ser vices. Previously, V elazquez Acevedo was vice president, commercial relationship manager for Seacoast National Bank in Central Florida. She has more than 20 years of commercial banking experience.Brookshires new lookTeachers and students moved into a new, modern administration and pre-kindergarten through fth grade classroom building in August before school began at Brookshire Elementary School, an Orange County Public School located in Winter Park at the intersection of Greene Drive and Cady Way. HuntonBrady Architects of Orlando was selected to design the two-story school, which consists of 78,700 square feet of new construction and 4,522 square feet of renovated space to accommodate 539 student stations. It includes new spaces for administration, music, media/library, food services and classrooms.Americas top lawyerFlorida law rm Shutts & Bowen is proud to announce that 60 lawyers, including 15 in Orlando, have been selected by their peers for inclusion in The Best Lawyers in America 2014. Two of the rms Orlando partners were among the four Shutts & Bowen lawyers selected as Lawyers of the Y ear in their practice areas: Charles Robinson F awsett in labor law and Michael J. Grindstaff in real estate law. H O U S E S W A N T E D ! G e t a F R E E N o O b l i g a o n C A S H O e r O n Y o u r H o u s e W i t h i n 2 4 H o u r s (8 5 5 ) 7 5 5 1 8 1 8 w w w C i r c l e 1 8 H o m e s c o m C A S H $ $ $ Q U I C K C L O S E A N Y P R I C E R A N G E A N Y C O N D I T I O N A N Y S I T U A T I O N

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013 | Page 9 the business of showing people something new. But for Winter Park resident Wanda Salerno, its something more than that. Its the business of showing people something she loves. The Winter Park Chamber of for more than 30 years of promoting tourism in Winter Park by awarding her with the Park Avenue Merchant Association Lifetime Achievement Award at last weeks City Commission meeting. Salernos ability to build relationships and her dedication to keeping hotels up to date on events helped propel local businesses and tourism in the area, said Chamber Vice President Debra Hendrickson, who presented Salerno with her award. The achievement came as a surprise to the Salerno, who always saw her work as simply getting the word out about the city she loved. I cant help it, Salerno said. I just want all of the tourists that come here to know about Winter Park, because theres no place like us. I dont work, its just fun, and Im not going to quit until Salerno and her husWinter Park in 1974, and started promoting the city as business owners in 1981 when they bought the historic Winter Park Scenic Boat Tour. They ran the business for 15 years through heavy promotion in hotels along International Drive. Salerno surrounded herself in the tourism industry, creating relationships with concierges and joining Convention & Visitors Bureau and the Central Florida Concierges Association. Instead of picking up the phone, Wanda always came to the concierges in person, leaving a personal touch thats left an impression to this day as she remains a familiar face to almost everyone in the local industry. merchant along Park Avenue, which motivated her to continue promoting not only her own business, but also the city as a whole. Wanda Salerno was not selfish, said Hendrickson, who owned her own womens clothing store along the Avenue from 1986 to 1998. She knew that all the merchants of Park Avenue would the business community would Salerno keeps an eye on the local tourism industry, giving it a jumpstart whenever business is slow by planning tion Tours. The Winter Park expert brings concierges, travel writers and other people in the tourism business right into the heart of Winter Park, giving them a chance to take in everything the Avenue has to offer. The tours usually included lunch and dinner, along with a visit to one of Winter Parks museums and a ride on the scenic boat tour. Shes set up at least one of these tours every year since 1981. You have to put yourself out there, Salerno said. Salerno at last weeks Commission meeting for her years of promoting Winter Park, as well as her current work dropping off brochures to hotels across Orlando from Altamonte Springs to U.S. Highway 192. found for our city in so many ways, Bradley said. Salerno said she appreciates all that comes with the award, but moting tourism in Winter Park whenever she can. Salerno said the city and the Avenue havent changed much almost 40 years ago. The brick streets and small town feel always reminded her old hometown in New England. Salerno said its all part of the citys charm that just cant keep to herself. When you really appreciate something, like I do with this city, the people in it and the Chamber, you dont really need recognition, Salerno said. I was doing what I loved. I love this city and wanted everybody else to see it. Salerno continues to promote Winter Park through her brochure runs and keeping concierges in the know on the latest happenings in Winter Park. She plans to do another FAM tour by the end of this year.PHOTO BY TIM FREED THE OBSERVERWanda Salerno has spent more than 30 years boosting Winter Park.Putting Winter Park on the mapTIM FREED Observer staff Autumn Art FestivalWinter Park40th Annual ENTER FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN A BLU-RAY COMBO PACKAVAILABLE SEPTEMBER 24th ON DIGITAL HD & OCTOBER 8TH ON BLU-RAY COMBO PACK & DVD Send us your name and mailing address totcraft@turnstilemediagroup.comNo purchase necessary

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Page 10 | Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland ObserverWhen you hear the term chamber of commerce, you might automatically think of an promote and sustain the local business climate and that is true here in Winter Park. Our staff works day-in and day-out to advocate, support and grow local businesses. However, our mission is two-fold. The other half is to initiate support and enhance the civic, educational and economic well being of the community. We believe that when the community thrives, so does business. This fall, the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce has several opportunities to support businesses that are the backbone of our economy, while contributing to the civic well being of Winter Park at the same time. Local artists, local veteransThe 40th annual Winter Park Autumn Art Festival is the only Florida artists exclusively, and has done so for 40 years. These local artists, many of whom call Central Florida home, appreciate your support. Come out for a fun weekend from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Its a Gym for Y our Dog! Unlike traditional doggie daycare, ou r Day Fitness and Care program oers: customized workout p rograms weight loss and tness indoor warm water aqua therap y canine massage one-on-one attention due to small class sizes 2826 Shader Rd. Orlando, FL 32808 www.BarkingDogFitness.com info@BarkingDogFitness.co m Conveniently located at... Me non this ad and re ceive a 10% discount for life! Limite d me oe r. 407-295-3888 A New Concept in Doggie Daycare TOO BUSY TO EXERCISE YOUR DOG? We have the Answer! Served steamin hot, and stuffed way over code, get ready to enjoy your meatiest, cheesiest, feastiest, tastiest sub ever. FREE Chips and Medium Fountain Drink when you buy any Sub. Visit our tasty restaurant location at: Firehouse Subs Park Avenue 528 S. Park Avenue Winter Park, FL 32789 407.960.7827 2013 Firehouse Subs. This offer valid with coupon at participating restaurants. Prices and participation may vary, see restaurant for details. Limit one per customer, per visit. Not valid with any other offers. Exp. 12/31/13. COMBO$SUB While I think dogs of any age are wonderful, theres something very special about an older dog who has been your beloved companion, even if you recently adopted him. My dog Yankee is now almost 6, and as he and the new dogs who come into my life grow older, I want to make sure I do whatever I can to slow the aging process and help my dogs have the best quality of life possible for as long as possible. Im sure you feel the same way! Genetics aside, what can we do to help our dogs live longer, healthier, and happier lives? Here are six suggestions. level, yet we often continue to feed the same amount of food weve always fed. Cut back on the amount youre feeding. Educate yourself on ingredients and make sure youre feeding the highest quality food you can afford. overweight or arthritic dogs, swimming, especially in a warm water pool is the best exercise possible because it works the entire body. added oils and nutrients. is to monitor your dog for physical and behavioral changes and if you think these changes may not be normal, Sherri Cappabianca The Wet Nose Report Its all local Dog GracefullyOct. 12-13, to experience their artwork, enjoy live entertainment on the Central Park stage, and a sidewalk sale at local merchants along Park Avenue. Weve even lined up art workshops for the kids led by instructors at Creald School of Art. Details at autumnartfestival.org This years poster features a moonlit scene of the Veterans Fountain in Central Park painted by local artist Stephen Bach. A percentage of the poster sales will be donated to Central Florida Veterans Memorial Park Foundation in support of their effort to honor veterans with a memorial park near Lake Nonas VA Hospital. Learn more about their project at cfvmpf.org, or attend the Chambers Good Morning Winter Park on Oct. 11 to hear a presentation from Maj. Gen. Douglas Metcalf (ret.) and members of the team.Local designers, local merchantsOn the heels of the Autumn Art Festival, Harrietts Park Avenue Fashion Week returns Oct. 13 19 with a seven-day celebration of fashion and design. The Emerging Designer Contest, which showcases the talent of several local designers, recently held a fashion show at Maxines on Shine to determine designers will complete a Project Runway-inspired challenge featuring supplies from Tuni on Park Avenue. The winner will receive a 10-look runway show during the Park Avenue Fashion Week Runway Show on Saturday, can learn more about the designers, one of which is only 18, at emerging-designer In addition to the contest, Park Avenue Fashion Week showcases the diverse fashion scene on the Avenue. Throughout the week, stores host designer meet-andgreets, trunk shows and special events. A full schedule of events can be found at parkavenuefashionweek.com, along with ticket information for the Runway Show in Central Park.Erika Spence is the senior director of marketing and communications at the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce.Erika Spence Business in the Park

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013 | Page 11Now through Oct. 27 DISenchanted! the musical DISenchanted!, the musical featuring fairy-tale princesses who are none too happy with the exploitation theyve suffered in fully storming the castle of one of Floridas largest employers at The Abbey through Oct. 27. This story of six bold women who refuse to be damsels-in-distress, Sleeping Beauty, and friends singing the truth about the once-upon-a-time life. Featur ing personal favorites Michelle Knight and Andrea Canny, the show is directed by Fiely Matias with music, book and lyrics by Dennis Giacino. Visit TicketWeb. com or call 866-468-7630. Sept. 27 Mad Cow opens season with Other Desert CitiesIn the drama Other Desert Brooke Wyeth returns to her family home to visit her parents after a six-year absence. A promising novelist, she announces the imminent publication of a memoir based on a tragic event in the familys history a wound her parents do not want reopened. Not surprisingly, Brookes par ents fall into old habits and plead with her to keep their story quiet. The show opens Sept. 27. Call 407-297-8788 or visit madcowtheatre.com Sept. 28 Orlando Philharmonics Opening Night The not-to-be-missed Opening Nights of the Orlando Philhar monic Orchestra, conducted by Maestro Christopher Wilkins, are always big nights with each Opening Night including a huge symphonic masterwork. On Sept. 28 at 8:30 p.m., the Philharmonics program begins with Ron Nelsons bold but lyrical Savannah River Holiday, followed Concerto No. 20 performed by the brilliant Jon Kimura Parker. Finally Strausss massive Ein Heldenleben (A Heros Life) will to explore the heroic themes inspired by Beethoven. For tickets, call 407-770-0071 or visit orlandophil.orgSept. 28 to Jan. 5 Sesame Street at the Orlando Science Center The Orlando Science Center invites us to take a walk down one of the best-known streets in the world with their new exhibit Sesame Street Presents: The Body. Big Bird, Elmo and the Sesame Street residents arrive on Sept. 28 and will be in residence through Jan. 5. The Body is an interactive exhibit created in response to the childhood obesity crisis in the U.S. with experiences that teach families to maintain healthy lifestyles. Set in the familiar and reassuring world of Sesame Street, each exhibit has multiple activities to provide ageappropriate learning experiences for all children. Sesame Street Presents: The Body is included with admission to the Science Center. Call 407-514-2000 or visit osc.orgOct. 2, 11, 18, and 25 Gallery T alks and Free Film Series at the Morse Museum Beginning Oct. 2, that jewel of Winter Park, the Morse Museum, will host gallery talks related to its new exhibition Lifelines Forms and Themes of Art Nouveau. Docents will conduct the talks at 11 a.m. on Wednesdays, and Curator Donna Climenhage will give the talks at 2:30 p.m. on Wednesdays. Lifelines explores Art Nouveau with more than that illustrate themes, including nature, the female form, and exoticism. In addition, the Museum will present free screenings of the Sex and Sensibility: The Allure of Art Nouveau including Paris on Oct. 11; Britain on Oct. 18; and Vienna on Oct. 25. Call 407-645-5311 or visit morsemuseum.orgOct. 3 to 9 Mamma Mia! The smash hit musical with songs by ABBA Seen by more than 50 million people around the world, Mamma Mia is celebrating its 12th year on Broadway. Meansuccessful movie musical of all time. The story woven around beloved hit tunes by ABBA is about a single mother who owns a small hotel on a Greek island. She is about to watch the daughter shes raised alone get married, but the wedding guests provide their own version of love and romance in this celebration of mothers and daughters, friends and family. Visit OrlandoBroadway.com or call 1-800-982-2787 or 407-704-6116. Oct. 4, 5, and 6 The Maitland Rotary Art F estival, Art Under the Stars Surrounding beautiful Lake Lily, the Maitland Rotary Art Festival features 150 artists vying for $26,000 in awards. The Florida, its a magical experience for artists and patrons alike as Performing Arts of Maitland provides live entertainment, including the Symphonic Orchestra on Saturday night, and the Stage Band on Friday night. Visit maitlandrotaryartfestival.com Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906.Josh Garrick Culture worthy of your calendar This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORG @EnzianTheater SALMA Sun 11AM MIDNIGHTS CHILDREN Sun 1:30PM Hit of the Sundance Film Festival! IN A WORLD. Fri 3:45, 6:30, 9:15 Sat & Sun 4:45, 7:15, 9:45 Mon Only 9:15 Tue-Thu 6:30, 9:15 THE RELUCTANT FUNDAMENTALIST Sat 1:30PM 16 Annual Manhattan Short Film Festival Mon 6:30PM JADOO preceded by UNRAVEL Sat 11AM South Asian Film Festival One Weekend Only!

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Page 12 | Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland ObserverOpinions Chris Jepson PerspectivesA great empire, like a great cake, is most easily diminished at the edges. Benjamin Franklin Have you considered that an economic system is a philosophy? Its a perspective wrapped in baggage. Its what is allowed. Because it is a philosophy, we can rationally consider altering outcomes. We can decide to change course as a nation. Im in the pragmatic camp of that great American, John Dewey. If its not working option a try. See what works and what tweaking. We need to rethink, a tweak perhaps, our American Dream. Maybe a major overhaul. The New York Times last week had an article about Auburn Universitys program to construct the ideal $20,000 house for the poor. It even has thoughtful design features high ceilings, for example, to channel the summer heat out. How do you house low-income other large democracy, India, for housing guidance. Where do we expect more and more couples with low wage jobs to live? Experts speculate America will continue to lose middle class jobs through a process America. We will experience lots of distance separating the rich from the rest and a general coarsening of society. If America is sliding inexorably toward India, if poverty is growing, our middle class shrinking, what we as a democracy are doing needs a review. Republicans have an economic philosophy of two essential tenets: More of the same and twice as hard for the rest of America. More for the favored, less for America. I suggest an economic review, a national conversation, just so we get all the economic cards on the table. Whos getting richer? Whos losing ground? Why? And is there anything we can do, as a people, to turn it around? If we have an economic philosophy (our current American economy) that favors certain elements of America at the expense of others, well, lets have that discussion and see if we cannot pragmatically develop an economic approach that lifts more Americans boats. Republicans tirelessly chant, More of the same and twice as hard. If only Americas impoverished worked harder? Or, worked at all. If only Americas middle class had more moxie, worked more creatively, were more productive, offer House Republicans. Yes, thats it. ing big agriculture. Thats the ticket. Tax labor income at higher rates than investment income. Slip special tax favors and federal and state legislation. worth of such Republican policies. If poverty wages and $20,000 homes are just the market working its magic, if street corner begging legless vets with food bowls the new norm well, that is an indictment of our democracy and of ourselves. Oh, you cant mess with the sacredness talism is God and the truth of maximum Songwriter Leonard Cohen wrote, Everybody knows that the dice are loaded . poor stay poor, the rich get rich. the crumbs.Indiacation of America Jepson is a 27-year resident of Central Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.USLouis Roney Play On!A recent letter from a relative took pains to describe the mundane activities of many other family members. Once again, I was jolted into the world of dilettantism and reminded that human intercourse may all too often be just that and nothing more. Artists must put up with well-meaning dilettantes for often the artist, in truth, is dependent upon them to pay the rent. dilettantes than around artistic equals, for the equality of great artiness in others. The artist when he labors at his calling, no matter his sartorial artistic armor, stands stark naked before the world. This commentator, an artist all his life in World War II never felt the pull to be part of the crowd. The crowd spends a great deal of its earthly substance in selfexplanation. You dont know the real me is the song of the masses. The artist, on the other hand says, If you observe me, Ill show you exactly who I am and all that I am. French writer Jean Cocteau, whom I met many years ago when we appeared together on a program at the Thtre des Champs lyses in Paris said, An artist cannot explain his art any more than a plant can discuss horticulture. The artist, in a profound sense, is the sum and substance of his own art. The greatest annoyance to the artist is not the rowdy fan, but the dilettante. The dilettante imagines himself to be privy to the special aesthetics that propel the artist. The dilettante may even assume that he is the alter ego of the artist. As a matter of fact, the dilettante is further from the psyche of the artist than is the simplest fan. For the fan is honest as to who he is while, to the artist, the dilettante Parvenus, arrivistes and dilettantes are often highly visible as they hover around the boards of art museums and performing of real artists long to be in the milieu of the artists whom they try vainly to emulate: people who disdain them as nuisances, which they often are, of course. In the canteens of every European opera house chat coffee-drinking dilettantes, invited by someone active on the stage or behind it. Leading singers hear snatches of conversation about a Tosca done at this or that opera house, a stint as a chorus singer in this or that Traviata, or of carrying a spear in this or that Aida. Have you ever chatted with a mechanic while he was working on your car? Did you throw in words like calipers and voltage regulators? An auto-dilettante such as I am had best sit in a corner and read a newspaper until the car is ready! The arts have social connotations that make them fair game for every nouveau experts usually dont speak the same language. An artists success is artistic. A has no or little talent for success in the Commonly, most artists are sadly not reciprocally titillated when in the presence of experts in real estate or stock speculation. Are real artists generally less interested in material things than are most other people? And, if so, why? True, the artist is concerned primarily with things that no one can buy. He obeys a compulsion to perfect a God-given talent. He and his art are inseparable, ergo the artists quest is at heart, self-perfection. Failure, if it comes, can be complete and self-destructive. The rich person, who hopes to control the lives of artists through the power of money, may well be enjoying himself, but he may be wasting both his time and his lucre. Dilettantism About Roney: HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney) King Features Weekly ServiceSeptember 23, 2013 EDITORIAL CARTOON Letters to the editorSend your thoughts (400 words or less) to Managing Editor Isaac Babcock at ibabcock@turnstilemediagroup.com A consensus, not a controversyRecently, the City Commission unanimously passed a new ordinance to revise the rules for restaurants in the Park Avenue area. Despite the urge by local television news and newspaper columnists Tony Winter Park Barring Fast-food, the issue was resolved with no opposition and with universal approval. How is that? How does a community often known for their public squabbles on tennis centers, historic homes and dog parks quietly get consensus on dining on the Avenue? The answer: a lot of hard work, open conversation, listening and compromise by all the stakeholders involved. The issue of what type of restaurant should go on the Avenue was debated several times by the Planning and Zoning Board and City Commission in 2012. Howtook a bottom-up approach, one in which broad dialogue and conciliation was done well before it ever got to the City Commission. Although the Chamber participated, the real kudos goes to Lambrine Macejew214), Daniel Butts (COO Battaglia Group Management) and Frank Hamner (Attorney at Law). These folks spent months, and easily 50 hours, meeting and listening to stakeholders, city staff, attorneys, merchants and residents. All, I might add, as volunteers. It was refreshing to watch as they focused on the issues most people agreed upon rather than getting caught in the emotional entanglements of disagreement. They welcomed input and became advocates of the collective process rather than authors of a pre-determined product. In order to create an ordinance that was fair, clear and balanced this group championed cooperation and what was best for most versus the notion that someone must win and someone must lose. For example, the Holler family, extensive property owners on the Avenue, gave their attorney, Frank Hamner, their blessing and support and encouraged him to help resolve this issue in the context of what is right for the Avenue, not for their personal interests. Lambrine, Daniel and Frank never let their own professional interests or the interest of one particular group get in the way of doing what was right for Winter Park as a whole. I was proud to work with them and I thank them for their effort and leadership. Patrick Chapin President and CEO, Winter Park Chamber of Commerce

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013 | Page 23 Saturday, September 28th 263 Minorca Beach Way Unit 802, New Smyrna Beach FL 32169 3 BR | 2 BA | 1,655 SF | $635,000 Gorgeous 8th floor unit in the Evissa building. Immaculate and professionally decorated with breathtaking views of the Intercoastal Waterway and the expansive Atlantic Ocean from every room. Kitchen is open to the dining room. Living room with bar and sliding glass doors to the private balcony. World-class amenities including 24-hour manned gatehouse, heated pools, Har Tru Tennis Center, clubhouse with catered kitchen, billards, library and lounge, fitness center, gated beach and 64 boat slip marina. Hosted by: Kelly L. Price from 2-5 PM Sunday, September 29th 1420 Chapman Circle, Winter Park FL 32789 4 BR | 3.5 BA | 3,313 SF | $809,000 Immaculate custom built home in prestigious Windsong! Features include a gourmet kitchen with breakfast nook, great room with fireplace and large master suite with tray ceiling. Private office or 4th bedroom is located on the first floor. Additional features include a spacious bonus room and finished storage room. Enjoy entertaining on the open lanai with wet bar! Hosted by: Pamela Seibert from 2-5 PM 1131 Audubon Way, Maitland FL 32751 3 BR | 2.5 BA | 2,420 SF | $674,000 Lakefront living at its finest! This completely remodeled home is located on a quiet cul-de-sac of Maitland Cove and offers sweeping views of Lake Sybelia from almost every room. Spacious and open floor plan is perfect for entertaining, featuring crown molding, stainless steel appliances, wood burning fireplaces, large open porches, plantation shutters and boat dock with lift! Hosted by: Sherri Dyer from 2-5 PM 2350 Temple Drive, Winter Park FL 32789 4 BR | 4 BA | 2,006 SF | $450,000 Fabulous Winter Park home featuring a formal living room, office with pocket doors, and kitchen with breakfast bar open to the dining room area. The spacious family room features a fireplace, built-ins and two sets of French doors that lead to the covered patio and fenced backyard. Gorgeous finishes throughout including crown molding, wood floors and plantation shutters! Bonuses include a guest suite above the detached two car garage! Hosted by: Debbie Tassell from 2-5 PM 3881 Corrine Drive, Orlando FL 32814 3 BR | 2.5 BA | 2,488 SF | $439,000 Charming three bedroom, two bath Baldwin Park home with wood floors, open floor plan, kitchen with island and breakfast bar and elegant dining area. Wonderful covered patio and spacious yard. Enjoy all the amenities of Baldwin Park and the convenient location to Orlando and Winter Park. Hosted by: Tiffany Prewitt from 2-5 PM 2221 Howard Drive, Winter Park FL 32789 5 BR | 3 BA | 4,086 SF | $749,000 Beautiful home with fantastic features! V ersatile three-way split bedroom floor plan offers an option for a sixth bedroom, den or game room. Home offers Mexican tile and wood floors, office, large family room with fireplace and a formal living room with soaring ceilings and skylights. Spacious kitchen has a breakfast bar. Outdoor living spaces include a sparkling screened pool with spacious deck and an additional covered patio showcasing serene Lake Forest views. Hosted by: Erica Sears from 2-5 PM 219 Flame Avenue, Maitland FL 32751 4 BR | 2.5 BA | 3,430 SF | $449,000 Gorgeous ranch style home nestled in a lovely Maitland neighborhood situated on stunning park-like lot. Features include a large eat-in kitchen, family room with fireplace, wet bar, and bright Florida room that leads out to a beautifully pavered patio. Enjoy relaxing in the lush backyard near the waterfall and pond! Hosted by: Rhonda Chesmore from 2-5 PM OBSER VEROpen Houses THEMARKE T PLA C E MindGym September 23, 2013 1415 Stetson Street, Orlando FL 32804 sold by Patrick Higgins 2001 Common Way Road, Orlando FL 32814 sold by Pamela Ryan 7606 Pacific Heights Circle, Orlando FL 32835 sold by Rhonda Chesmore 1136 Vassar Street, Orlando FL 32804 sold by Jennifer King 403 Friary Road, Winter Park FL 32792 sold by Kelly L. Price & Mary Ann Steltenkamp 2306 Peel Avenue, Orlando FL 32806 sold by Sherri dyer OBSER VERJust Sold Homes Jerry Oller 1800 E. Shell Lane, Vero Beach $2,900,000. 09/17/2013 Trish Sanders 812 Clayton St, Orlando $251,500. 09/17/2013 The Nancy Bagby Team 1650 Apache Trl, Maitland $515,000. 09/18/2013 LauraLyn Lane 4390 Sadler Road, Mount Dora $90,000. 09/18/2013 MaryStuart Day/Megan CrossMaryStuart Day/Megan Cross 116 Cove Colony, Maitland $855,000. 09/20/2013 SUNDAY 12-3 PRIME LOCA TION IN OLDE WINTER P ARK 1605 Highland Road, Winter Park. 3BD/2BA, 1,994SF. Walk to Park Avenue. Beautiful homeready to move in. Split plan with large rooms, skylights and hardwood floors. Oversized master bedroom with large walk-in closet. Kitchen has granite countertops. Florida room with heat and AC. Oversized deck in private backyard. $299,000 SUNDAY 1-4 LARGE POOL HOME ON QUIET STREET 2006 Oakhurst Avenue, Winter Park. 4BD/3.5BA, 3,529SF. Three way split plan on quiet street. Downstairs master suite, bonus room, family room, den/office and media room as well as an art studio. Updated bathrooms and kitchen recently remodeled to include gas appliances, double ovens, double sinks and granite counters. Large covered porch and lanai with screened pool and spa. $499,000 COMSTOCK P ARK BEAUTY 925 Bonita Drive, Winter Park. 3BD/2BA. 1,744SF. Charming home with loads of curb appeal. Newly renovated and just minutes from Park Avenue. Open floor plan boasts vaulted ceilings, hardwood floorings, and sun-lit skylights. Kitchen with GE Profile stainless steel appliances, Murano glass lighting, and exquisite, granite counter tops. Newly renovated bathrooms, hardwood and travertine floors. From the sun room, French doors open onto a beautiful deck and backyard. $457,000 NEW PRICE! TRADITIONAL SP ACIOUS HOME 635 Dunblane Drive, Winter Park. 3BD/2BA, 1,733SF. Open living and dining room spaces, fireplace, back porch and private backyard. Updated hardwood floors, newer AC and roof. Luscious landscaping and great curb appeal. Great location and A rated schools. $327,900 JOB RESOURCES at EmployFlorida.com helped Jasmine choose a career path and land a job she loves.You too can discover REAL RESULTS with Employ Florida.JASMINE GREENMonitor Support Technician, Shands HospitalEmploy Florida is an equal opportunity program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. The Employ Florida telephone number may be reached by persons using TTY/TTD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711. Disponible en Espanol.1-866-FLA-2345EmployFlorida.com MindGymSeptember 23, 2013 MEDITTERRANEAN HOME IN BALDWIN P ARK 4401 Fox Street, Orlando. 4BD/2.5BA, 2,680SF. Spacious two story park front home is a Cambridge built Milan floor plan with downstairs master suite. Kitchen has cherry cabinets, eat in space, island and butler pantry. Inside utility. Separate living and dining rooms with crown molding and large windows. Great location. $519,900 POOL HOME IN W A TERFORD LAKES 12689 Lakebrook Drive, Orlando. 4BD/2.5BA, 2,487SF. First time on the market, this home boasts high ceilings, a chefs kitchen with granite counters, downstairs master suite with garden tub and newly resurfaced pool deck. Upgrades include new plumbing in 2010, AC and exterior paint in 2011, new roof in 2005 and new water heater in 2007. Move-in ready! $257,900 SUNDAY 2-5 GREA T OPPOR TUNITY TO LIVE IN DOWNTOWN WINTER P ARK 557 Osceola Avenue, Winter Park. 5BD/4.5BA, 2,911SF. Walk to Park Avenue and walk to Rollins College! Home on the Winter Park Historic Register. Dutch colonial home with all systems updated. Hardwood floors, wood burning fireplace and a basement for storage. Eat-in space in kitchen. $649,000 MindGymSeptember 23, 2013 Order your classified ad online!At WPMObserver.com you can create, customize and pay for your ad in one convenient place!

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Page 24 | Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer MindGym September 23, 2013 ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Your Aries charm helps persuade others to listen to your proposal. But its still a long way from acceptance, unless you can stand up to the tough questions that are set to follow. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Plan to share a weekend getaway from all the pressures of your hectic workaday world with a very special someone. You could be pleasantly surprised at what develops. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Your keen insight once again helps you handle a challenging situation with a clearer perception of what its really all about. What you learn helps you make a difficult decision. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) If you want to steer clear of getting involved in a new family dispute, say so. Your stand might cause hurt feelings for some, but overall, youll be respected for your honesty. LEO (July 23 to August 22) Expect recognition for your efforts in getting a project into operation. Besides the more practical rewards, your Lions heart will be warmed by the admiration of your colleagues. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Set aside time to rid yourself of clutter that might well be drawing down your creative energies. Consider asking someone to help you decide what stays and what goes. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) A colleague could make a request that might place you in an awkward position with co-workers. Best advice: Share your concerns with an associate you can trust. SCORPIO (October 23 to Novem ber 21) Your energy levels are way up, allowing you to take on the added challenge of a task youve been hop ing to secure. Expect this move to lead to an important opportunity. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Your continuing sense of confidence in what youve set out to do gives encouragement to others. Expect to see more people asking to add their efforts to yours. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) You might think it would be best to reject a suggestion others insist would be unworkable. But you might be surprised by what you find if you give it a chance. AQUARIUS (January 20 to Febru ary 18) Changing a decision might disappoint some people, but the important thing is that you be honest with your self. Dont go ahead with anything you have doubts about. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) There could be some fallout from an emotional confrontation that you really should deal with before moving on. Best to start fresh with a clean, clear slate. BORN THIS WEEK: Your honesty not only helps you make decisions for yourself, but also helps others find the right choices for themselves. 2013 King Features Syndicate, Inc. Oct. 12, 1492, Italian explorer Christopher Columbus reaches the New World. Columbus, and most oth ers, underestimated the worlds size. The expedition probably first landed at Watling Island in the Bahamas. Columbus later sighted Cuba, which he thought was mainland China. Oct. 10, 1845, The United States Naval Academy opens in Annapolis, Md., with 50 midshipmen students and seven professors. Known as the Naval School until 1850, the curriculum included mathematics and navigation, gunnery and steam, chemistry, English, natural philosophy and French. Oct. 8, 1871, flames spark in the Chicago barn of Patrick and Catherine OLeary, igniting a two-day blaze that kills hundreds of people, destroys 17,450 buildings and leaves 100,000 homeless. Legend has it that the fire started when a cow kicked over a lan tern in the OLeary barn. Oct. 9, 1936, harnessing the power of the mighty Colorado River, the Hoover Dam begins sending elec tricity over 266 miles of transmission lines to Los Angeles. The central reason for the dam, however, was the col lection, preservation and distribution of water. Oct. 7, 1943, Rear Adm. Shigematsu Sakaibara, commander of the Japanese garrison on Wake Island, orders the execution of 96 Americans POWs, claiming they were trying to make radio contact with U.S. forces. The execution of those POWs remains one of the more brutal episodes of the war in the Pacific. Oct. 13, 1953, the worlds first art museum on wheels, the Artmobile, opens in Fredericksburg, Va., carrying 16 paintings by 15thand 16th-cen tury masters. Today, there are dozens of Artmobile-inspired museums on wheels in cities and towns across the United States and around the world. Oct. 11, 1975, Saturday Night Live, a topical comedy sketch show featuring Chevy Chase, John Belushi, Dan Aykroyd, Gilda Radner, Gar rett Morris, Jane Curtin and Laraine Newman, makes its debut on NBC. It would go on to become the longestrunning, highest-rated show on latenight television. 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. King Features Weekly ServiceSeptember 23, 2013 ANNOUNCEMENTSAUCTIONS Roofing Company Liquidation,Online Auction Only, Bid September 17 thru September 26, Items Located in Maryland & Florida. Motleys Auction & Realty Group, 804-232-3300, www.motleys.com, VAAL #16.CAKE DECORATING & PASTRY CLASSES:Sofelle Confections offers group and customized classes in all areas of pastry, baking and cake decorating! Contact: Lucy sofelleconfections@bellsouth.net or call (407) 579-1962 www.facebook.com/ SofelleConfections Hablamos Espaol!Winter Park Benefit Shop140 Lyman Ave, Winter Park needs items to sell: clothing, bedding, jewelry, kitchenware and bric-a brac. Also needing volunteers. Contact Elizabeth Comer 407-647-8276. Open Tues & Fri at 9:30am; Sat 10am-1pm. All proceeds support childrens programs & the Or lando Blind Association.AUTOSSell Y our Classic! Get top dollar for your classic car at Lake Mirror Classic Auto Auction in Lakeland, Fl on October 19th! Call 1-800-257-4161 M.E. Higgenbotham, FL Lic# AU305AB158EDUC ATIONHeavy Equipment Operator Training!Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. 3 Weeks Hands On Program. Local Job Placement Assistance. National Certifications. GI Bill Benefits Eligible. 1-866362-6497 HEAL TH & MEDIC ALRN/LPNRN/LPN Monday and Tuesday 3-11. The job is in a home caring for disabled adults. Y ou will be required to submit to a drug test, background screen. The facility as well as the grounds are smoke-free. Mike 407 971 8115 mpruner1@cfl. rr.comHELP W ANTEDDriver Trainees Needed NOW!Become a driver for Werner Enterprises. Earn $800 per week! Local CDL Training. 877-214-3624HELP W ANTEDCAREGIVER for my 104 Y ear Mother, Winter ParkLovely home Lake Sue. Hours to be ar ranged weekdays 8am-4pm; weekends 8am-10pm. Must lift/transfer (5#) through the day. Light whole meals. Supplemental tube feeding. Housekeeping/Cleaning. Sedan not SUV take to doctors. Non-smoker. Pet friendly. Quiet house. CNA or comparable. Best Caregiving References. 317-506-4400 after 10am. rosemail@comcast.netNow Hiring: CDL-A Drivers New Pay Packageand $2500 Sign-On Bonus! Mostly 5-10 days out, full Benefits, and Achievable Bonuses! Call today for details 1-888378-9691MISCELLANEOUSAirline Careers begin here!Get F AA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-3143769.PROFESSIONAL SERVICEHouse Cleaner. $50 New Client Special!A fresh, sparkling clean house so you can relax! Deep cleaned, sanitized, attention to detail. Personalized one on one service. Satisfaction guaranteed. Offer weekly, bi-weekly, monthly, one time. New Blog! HomeCleaned4U.blogspot. com for cleaning tips. Schedule YOUR clean home with Carolyn. 407-782-1405 (homecleaned4u@gmail.com) PROFESSIONAL SERVICEThe Paint ManagerResidential/Commercial painting. Pressure washing. Safe roof cleaning. Call us today! Lic/Ins Ray Wheeler 4075929935 thepaintmanager@aol.comREAL ESTATE: COMMERCIALOffices for RentWinter Park Real Estate Offices for rent (Winter Park/Goldenrod/University). Doctors office w/5 exam rooms + extra features. Other office units available from 800-3000 SF. New Orleans style bldg; great prices. Call Ann 407-293-1934. annpolasek@cfl.rr.comSANFORD:Free standing retail/office building, 2640 SF, great signage & visibility. Lease for $2800 per month (also for sale). Call John, owner/broker, 407-492-7111REAL ESTATE: FOR RENTQUIET JOURNALIST SEEKING WINTER P ARK RENT ALIm a female non-smoker age 59 with a mild vision disability preventing me from driving. If you have a nice home or apartment in a safe neighborhood near busline available for annual lease, Id appreciate your call or email. Thank you. Stephanie Y oung 239-424-0182 youngsb30@gmail.comREAL ESTATE: FOR SALEBlue Ridge Mountain Land Liquidation!1.37 acres, national forest access, only $9,800. Was $74,900. Hardwood setting, breathtaking mountain/ valley views. Mild climate, Tremendous 4 season recreation. Paved rds, UG utilities, water. Excellent financing Call 1-866-952-5303, x21 MUST SEE Properties -WNC Mountainviews for only $19,900 Water, Electric, Paved Roads. Starting at $7,900. Lots available for liquidation Oct. 12th only. Call 877-717-5263 ext91.UNRESTRICTED ACREAGE ON CUMBERLAND PLA TEAU!50-89 Acres Starting at $78,000. Heavily Wooded, Minutes from 4 State Parks & TN River. Call 877-282-4409 REAL ESTATE: FOR SALEWESTERN NOR TH Carolina -Huge Views, Creek, Paved Roads ready to build. Pick your lot starting $7,900, cash discounts. Liquidating on Oct. 12. Call 877-717-5263 ext91.SALES: ESTATELily Lace Antique Market HUGE Sidewalk SaleSunday, Sept.29th *10 4* Over 50 dealers with treasures for sale. 160 Lake Ave (17/92) Connie Gilbert 4079518883 connie@lilylace.com SALES: ESTATEBank A pproved Sale. Smith Lake Alabama.Deep Dockable Home Sites from $59,900 (Take Virtual Tour @ LiveLakefront.com). 26 Prime Lake front lots ordered sold October 12th. Buy at pennies on the dollar all must go! Open or wooded level throughout to the waters edge. Make an early appointment. Banks loss Y our gain! Dont miss this. Its unbelievable land at an unbelievable price Call now for early appointment! 1-877-448-6816. SALES: GARAGEHUGE RUMMAGE SALE!Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd, 331 Lake Ave., Maitland Friday, Oct. 4th & Saturday, Oct. 5th, 8 am to 4 pm From Hwy. 17-92, go west one block on Lake Ave; church is on the right immediately after railroad tracks. (407) 644-5350 Lily Lace Antique Market HUGE Sidewalk SaleSunday Sept. 29th *10-4* Over 50 dealers with treasures for sale. 160 Lake Ave (17/92) Connie Gilbert 4079518883 connie@lilylace.com THEMARKE T PLA C E MindGym September 23, 2013 MindGym September 23, 2013



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WPMOBSERVER.COM You can smell them before you see them. A slight northerly shift of the wind, and a stench neighbors can only describe as ammonia-laced old urine makes breathing in through your nose outside of 82-year-old Maitland resident Willie Bell Gibbons front porch nearly unbearable. A few footsteps past where the gravel road of Amado Lane ends and newly paved Mechanic Street begins, and you can start to hear their sound. A screeching symphony thousands of voices strong sings from the cracks of the Maitland Boulevard overpass. At midday, the masses remain tucked intently out of sight except for a handful of colony members now silent, their over lying dead in the grass. One mangled winged body didnt make it that far, meeting its end hanging from the twisted metal top of a bordering chain-link fence. Its a fate Gibbons, her family and neighbors hopelessly wish all the thousands of bats taking residence under the bridge would meet. You cant even sit outside, its terrible, Gibbons daughter Katrina Jones said. Sometimes you cant even walk over there to get your mail it smells so bad. Mailboxes for the few houses still standing in the predominantly African-American Maitland neighborhood off of Mechanic Street sit under the bridge. Two-inches of dark brown bat feces known as guano settles in a think layer on top of the boxes. You get your mail, and you know its in your mail. And its on the ground and now its on your shoes, and now youre taking it into your house, Jones said. In her home next door, Martha Bryant-Hall says the bats are making themselves even more comfortable. Months ago, she stopped entering her house at night through the garage after she found bats hanging out in there after dark. Then earlier this month, a roofer found more making a home out of the eaves of her front porch, leaving bats standing between her and both entrances. Enough is enough, and when the bats decide theyre coming to live with me, thats enough, Bryant-Hall said. She dug out the familiar phone numbers shes been dialing for decades hoping for and the Florida Department of Transportation, which maintains the bridge, to take action and do something about the bats. But Maitland Public Works director Rick Lemke said by Florida state law, killing the bats is illegal. Forcing them out is an in-depth process. And keeping them out of a structure as large and crevassed as the underside of the overpass is nearly impossible. It is a problem, its frustrating for us as well, but its state Winter Parks railway station this Saturday, as local residents and politicians gathered to get a sneak peak of what the new light rail system will look like when in launches next spring. Winter Park Mayor Ken Bradley and Maitland Mayor Howard Schieferdecker, along with Winter Park commissiontogether to cut the ribbon for the systems newest completed railcar on Sept. 21. Isnt it great to see it come to reality? Bradley said, snapping cell phone photos of the railcars shiny white and colorfully striped exterior. Hundreds of residents lined inside the car, checking out the moment to relish the reality of a project many years and billions of dollars in the making. Taking a seat in a booth with Seminole County Commissioner Lee Constantine and Florida Department of Transportation District 5 Secretary Noranne Downs, Bradley said he was imI can tell its going to be something people are going to be really excited to ride, he said. FDOT spokesman Steve Olson said the SunRail trains are set to start running from DeBary to Sand Lake Road in south Orlando in the spring. He said the trains will run Monday through Friday every 30 minutes at peak commuter hours between 5:30 and 8:30 a.m. and 4 to 7 p.m. Then from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. and from 7 to 10 p.m. theyll drop to two-hour cycles. Getting aboard the railroad will cost riders $2 per trip, with an additional $1 added on when crossing county lines and trains will be equipped with free WiFi and bike storage space. Its fun to see our station taking shape and the cars coming into place, Bradley said. Its going to be a great addition to our city and our region.PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVERLocal ofcials cut the ribbon on a new SunRail car to give the public a rst look.SunRail sneak peakSARAH WILSON OO bserver staff Bridge-roosting bats swarm Maitland homes Please see BATS on page 2 PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVERBodies of dead bats litter the road under a Maitland bridge.SARAH WILSON OO bserver staffAfter months of talk about higher taxes to fund additional meeting on Monday the Maitland City Council backtracked property tax rates to the same theyve been since 2007. By keeping the millage rate at 3.88 mils, Maitland residents can expect to continue to pay $3.88 for every $1,000 of taxable property value they own. But even by City Manager Sharon Anselmo said the city will garner 1.63 percent more revenue than in 2013. The approved $22.45 million budget included additional funding for library renovations, Performing Arts of Maitland programing, and restoring three moved a proposed designated allocation of an additional $188,000 in funding for parks, leaves 17 $627,591 from the citys fund balance.Maitland votes down tax hikeSARAH WILSON OO bserver staff

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Page 2 | Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland ObserverThe Albin Polasek Museum guaranteed the safety of the 128-year-old Capen House from demolition this week. Preservationists in Winter Park had until Oct. 1 to raise at least $650,000 to move the house by barge across Lake Osceola to the grounds of the museum. Albin Polasek Museum Board of Trustees President Mark Terry shared the news with City Commissioners on Monday night to the cheering applause of Winter Park residents. This is so important that we as a board decided to ensure that the house will be moved by funding the difference of the $400,000, Terry said. We can can move that house.Budget passesThe Winter Park City Commission voted 5-0 on Monday to hold the line on the citys millage rate for the property values increasing and raising the citys property tax revenue by 2.17 percent. The operating millage rate established each year by the city remains at 4.0923 mills for the sixth year in a row, continuing the trend that began in 2008. Residents will pay higher taxes due to increasing property values but at a relatively low rate. Our nations economy even though its getting better isnt such where people can just be paying more and more in taxes, so we try to be very effective and and what we charge, Mayor Ken Bradley said. The millage rates are being kept at what I think is very competitive. City Manager Randy Knight said that the current millage rate remains competitive locally, as the third lowest in the county. I think it shows a real strong commitment on the part of the City Commission to strive to keep the same level of service without having to raise the rate, especially during the down economy weve gone through, Knight said. bB AT sS | SunRail construction had stalled battle against swarm of neighborhood batslaw, Lemke said. FDOT spokesman Steve Olson said the department maintains many bridges that bats call home, but none as close to nearby neighborhoods as where Maitland Boulevard crosses over Mechanic Street. In other areas, Olson said people actually praise the bats for ridding places of mosquitoes and other insects. But, he said, Those people probably arent living directly downwind. FDOT Maintenance Engineer Mike Danos said the department close and a lot too many. He said FDOT is scheduled to send crews to pressure wash the bridge to rid it of guano buildup this week. Washing the bridge and spraying the ground with fungicide, Olson said, has been the departments best plan of action to clean up after the bats. But, at Mechanic Street, its been more than a year since the last washing. We havent been able to get in there and clean as much as we wanted, or probably should, Olson said. With SunRail workers preparing the tracks under the bridge for the past six months readying for the commuter rails launch, he said its prohibited FDOT from getting under it to clean. He said the additional activity also could be the reason why the bats have sought shelter in Bryant-Halls house. Bryant-Hall said during the months the workers were there, theyd wear masks to alleviate the smell, and ask her how she could stand living there breathing it in everyday. She didnt have an answer, adding that the nighttime intruders are only one of many nuisances shes taken issue with in her neighborhood since moving in more than 30 years ago. A decade after Maitland annexed the area, same battles for basic equality of services as she was decades ago. What Im experiencing in my neighborhood isnt what youre getting in yours, she said. Maitland is still a city of the haves and have-nots. If it was happening in [city in two weeks weve been dealing with it here for years, Jones added. Lemke said no matter where the bats call home in Maitland, the same issues and laws are in place for relocating them. He said a bat house was installed in 2000 at Community Park to give bats an alternative place to live, but that theres been little to no evidence that bats have decided to use it. But, he said, there are currently no other areas in the like the one at Mechanic Street. He said its a mix of perfectly imperfect factors combining in the neighborhood Gibbons, Bryant-Hall and the thousands of bats all call home. Bryant-Hall said she loves her home just as much as the bats seem to love theirs in the bridge. But, she said, there needs to be a line drawn between whose wellbeing is more worth protecting: the taxpayers or the bats. They say theyre endangered, but Im endangered getting into my house, she said. As of now, shes betting on the bats. C OO N TT INU EE D F RORO M fF RO nN T pP A GE rf r f n fnnt bntb t n n ffnrfnr Savannah Court and Cove Excellence in Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation 1301 W. Maitland Blvd. Maitland, FL 32751407-645-3990www.SavannahCourtMaitland.comAssisted Living Facility License No. 8447 Skilled Nursing Facility License No. 1635096 Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above. You are always welcome!A Senior Living Community where Hospitality is a Way of Life. Capen House saved by PolasekTIM FREED OO bserver staff

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013 | Page 3 LOCAL NEWS. BIG IMPACT.Subscribe now to keep up with the latest news unfolding in your community.Get one year (52 issues) of the Winter Park-Maitland Observer for only $30 Plus, as a thank you for subscribing, youll receive a complimentary copy of the 2014 Winter Park-Maitland Observer Calendar in your December 5 issue! Bonus Offer Subscribe or renew before November 15 and youll get three more months of the Winter Park-Maitland Observer at no additional charge! A SPECIAL OFFER FOR NEW AND RETURNING SUBSCRIBERS Visit WPMObserver.com/Subscribe or call 407.563.7013 to order today! The Knights have only beaten one ranked team on the gridiron ever. This Saturday, theyll try to take down their second. The anticipation is high: As of Monday No. 12 South Carolina (2-1) was already sold out. This is a big game for the Knights, who started their 1988. When the South Carolina Gamecocks march into the Bright House for a noon kickoff, it wont be the same as that time UCF beat No. 13 Houston 37-32 at home in 2009. Houston hasnt appeared in the Associated Press Top 25 rankings since 2011. South Carolina hasnt gone unranked for a full season since 2006. Itll be a challenge for the Knights offense, though theyve already won three games with more than 30 points per game. The Knights have brought a their offensive mix to balance out an improving passive attack, with Storm Johnson emerging as the teams lead rusher. But the Knights will need to rely heavily on quarterback Blake Bortles, who has shown himself capable of throwing consistent 250-yard games or more, with a careerhigh 314 yards to start the season against Akron. Hell contend with a tough Gamecocks defense that allowed just 147 passing yards against Vanderbilt Sept. 14, one of two sub-200-yard passing games theyve allowed this season. But South Carolina has also struggled against solid pass defenses, with quarterback Connor Shaw held to less than 200 yards against North Carolina to start the season. The Knights allowed 262 yards in the air in their win against Penn State on Sept. 14, but only allowed 258 passing yards comtwo opponents. One factor thats conspicuously absent for the Knights this year is forced turnovers. Theyve only caused one this season, a 6-yard interception return by defensive end Troy Gray. Last season they picked off 11 passes in 14 games. In the the Knights havent recovered a fumble. Last season they did it 16 times. Defense has also lagged beLast season the Knights allowed etrations to become a touchdown. Penn State they couldnt stop the Lions at all, letting them into the came within 20 yards. The key for the Knights defense could be getting stops closer to the visitors side of the only allowed 40 percent of thirddown conversions and 41 percent of fourth-down conversions. In that category the Knights have more than kept pace with last seasons defense. So far this season theyve allowed only 33 percent of third-down conversions and 66 percent of fourthdown conversions. Against Penn State, their toughest opponent so far this season, they stopped 75 percent of third-down attempts and 50 percent of fourth downs. That may be the best defensive performance against Penn State that the Knights have ever had. Theyll have to keep up their famous jacked-up intensity against tough teams if they want a memorable moment in the Bright House thatll be seen Knights, theyll be broadcast on network television when they kick off at noon Saturday, Sept. 28, aired nationally on ABC. Rollins The Tars are off to another strong start as they trounced Longwood University 20-2 on Sept. 21 in Morgantown, W.Va., making a tradition out of season-opening wins. And they did it all in a driving rainstorm that dumped more than an inch of rain in chilly temperatures. The home weather advantage didnt do much to help Longwood, who suffered four sacks at the hands of Matt Hunt and two forced fumbles courtesy of Anthony Krause. Quarterback Jeff Hoblick aired out the ball with 173 yards passing plus another 62 yards through the mud to lead the team in total yardage. Two Alex Politis way to 20 points. Will Reischmann and J.D. Brady also had touchdowns in the game. The Tars will skip their scheduled showdown against the University of South Carolina club team and a subsequent road trip to Kennesaw State, taking two weeks off before they host Middle Georgia State on Oct. 12. Four games into the season the Winter Park Wildcats are 4-0 on the gridiron after outlasting University 27-22 on Sept. 20. And win under their belts thanks to a three-touchdown performance by quarterback J.P. Colton. Colton ran for nearly 150 scampers that took him all the The Wildcats will host Boone at 7:30 p.m. Friday. The Braves are 0-4 after a 44-14 trouncing by Apopka on Sept. 20. Edgewater The Eagles may be having the most frustrating season in Central Florida with an 0-4 overall record thats been decided by an average of four points per game. But the most recent home loss to Olympia in double overtime may be the most painful yet. The Eagles had the lead near the end of regulation when a 47yard Titans pass and extra point evened things up. The Eagles before allowing a passing TD to even the score. In the second goal and the Eagles were left with a 34-31 loss. Edgewater will take a week off before hosting Leesburg at 7 p.m. Oct. 4. Knights await No. 12 GamecocksWildcats unbeaten II SAAC BA bB COCK OO bserver staff ISAAC b B A b B COCK OO bserver staff ARCHIVE PH otoOTO BY I sS AA cC bB A bcBC O ckCK tT HE oO B s S ERVERBlake Bortles will face his toughest test yet on Saturday. rfnrtbr trrtt

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Page 4 | Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer FAMILY CALENDAR Member FDICEQUAL HOUSINGLENDER RYour Home Town Bank TRUSTCO BANK407-659-5701 www.TrustcoBank.comFast, Local Decisions Close your First Mortgage in 30 days!*Low Closing Costs No Points and No Tax Escrow requiredSchedule Closing Date at Application 85% of our Loans close as scheduled!* Trustco Mortgages We Close Loans!*Information based on current closings. Circumstances beyond Trustco Banks control may delay closing. Please note: We reserve the right to alter or withdraw these products or certain features thereof without prior notification. Maitland City Talk bB Y HO wW A r R D S ch CH I e E F er ER D ecker ECKER MAYOR How often has the doorbell rung or a child interrupted you while you were cooking, causing you to forget about the chicken If this scenario or a similar one sounds familiar to you, you may want to think about kitchen safety a little more since its likely that you, a friend or family member have run the risk of having a the ways they can stay safe in their homes. Unfortunately, sometimes we have that talk after theyve sufWe hope that people reading this article wont have to learn the hard way. If there were one could give, it would be: Keep an eye on what you fry! Why? Because according to the Association (NFPA), cooking is The latest statistics from NFPA say to an estimated annual average of tween 2007-2011. joining forces with NFPA and ments across North America to commemorate Fire Prevention Week, Oct. 6-12, Prevent Kitchen Fires. Often when were called to a tell us they only left the kitchen for a few minutes. Sadly, thats to start. The bottom line is that theres really no safe period of time for the cook to step away. A few key points to remember: you are frying, grilling or broiling food. If you must leave the room even for a short period of time, turn off the stove. baking or roasting food, check it regularly, stay in the home, and use a timer to remind you. clear of combustibles (e.g. potholders, towels, rags, drapes and food packaging). cooking areas by enforcing a kidstove. crowave, turn it off immediately and keep the door closed. Never pletely out. If in doubt, get out of ment. and a lid nearby. If a small grease over the pan (make sure you are wearing the oven mitt). Turn off the burner. Do not move the pan. Do not remove the lid until it is completely cool. out of the home and call 911. would like to be in your kitchen, but only if you invited us to dinner.Dennis Marshall, CECE T, F CC O Maitland F ire MarshalStand by your pan KEEP UP WITH MAITLAND NEWS AND EVENTS!www.IndependenceLane.com Facebook.com/ItsMyMaitland WELCOMENew M embersMONTHLY CHAMBER NEWS & EVENTSOctober 3: Success Leads Group: Meets the 1st Thursday each month 11:30am-1pm October 8: Coffee Connection with the Maitland Chamber of Commerce Making business connections one cup at a time Meets 2nd Tuesday each month 8-9am October 10: Francescos, 400 S. Orlando Avenue, Maitland Community Partners: Meets the 2nd Thursday each month 11:30am1pm October 16: Maitland Civic Center, 641 S. Maitland Avenue Monthly Community Luncheon: 11:30am 1pm Reservations Required 407-644-0741 Featuring: SunRail. SunRail speakers will bring us up-to-date on the latest including construction progress, commuting 101, Flexbus project, etc. There will be several speakers to cover the topics. October 23: Wednesday, Women and Wisdom: Meets the 4th Wednesday each month 11:30am-1pm Business After Hours: check our website or call 407-644-0741 for updates. www.maitlandchamber.com First Transact, Oviedo Homewood Suites by Hilton, Maitland Coldwell Banker Residential Real Estate, Winter ParkOUR MISSI ONTo foster growth among the areas established businesses, and lend assistance to new rms locating to the area. The Maitland Area Chamber of Commerce takes great pride in our community. Come to Maitland, land of 18 parks and 21 lakes with over 1000 acres of water! TAS T E OF M AIT LANDLOCATION: CTIONS/INFORMATION: A TIMINFORMATION: CONTACT INFORMATION: Maitland Chamber of Commerce S/AISSION: Under 3 yr. free. Enjoy a relaxing evening at beautiful Lake Lily visit over 40 restaurants taste their specialties! You wont go away hungry!

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013 | Page 5 Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013 Volume 25, Issue 39 PHONE: 407-563-7000 FAX: 407-563-7099 WPMOB s S ER v V ER.COM OO rlando, FL 32835-5705PUBLISHERTracy Craft407.515.2605TCraft@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MANAG iI NG EDITORIsaac Babcock 407.563.7023IBabcock@TurnstileMediaGroup.comA ssoSSO C iI A teTE editorEDITOR Sarah Wilson 407.563.7026SWilson@TurnstileMediaGroup.comDESI GNGN ERTom Miller 407.563.7032TMiller@TurnstileMediaGroup.com stST AFF W ritersRITERS Brittni Larson Megan Stokes Tim Freed AA llison O O lcsvay Kristy Vickery CC OLU MNMN ISTSChris JepsonJepson@MediAmerica.usLouis RoneyLRoney@cfl.rr.comJosh GarrickJoshGarrick9@gmail.com AA DVERTISI NGNG S AA LESLinda Stern407.376.2434LStern@TurnstileMediaGroup.comL eE GA lL NotiNOTI C eE AdvertisiADVERTISI NG AA shley McBride 407.286.0807Legal@FLALegals.com subsSUBS C riptioRIPTIO N sS /C irIR C ulUL A tioTIO NLuana Baez 407.563.7013LBaez@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MeME M berBER oO F: Florida Press Association -Winter Park/Maitland/Goldenrod Chambers of CommerceWinter Park/Maitland Observer is published by Turnstile Media Group. Founded in 1990 and headquartered in Orlando, Fla., Turnstile Media Group is also the parent of Golfweek, Golfweek Custom Media, TurfNet, Professional Artist, Seminole Voice, Baldwin Park Living and Turnstile Connect.TU rR N stilSTIL E MED iI A G rR OU pPCC H AA IR MANMAN Rance CrainPRESIDE NN T/ CC EOFrancis XX FarrellV iI C eE P resideRESIDE N tsTS Patti Green & Jeff BabineauUSPS #00-6186 ISSN 1064-3613POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:Winter Park / Maitland Observer 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835 EE stablished in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster One Senior Place ... See our full Calendar of Events at OneSeniorPlace.com407.949.6733715 Douglas Avenue Altamonte Springs, FL 32714M-F 8:30am 5pmTUESDAY, OCTOBER 1 Health Care Reform 9:30am-11am Also: Mon, Oct 7th 3pm-4:30pm Wed, Oct 10th 9am-10:30am Mon, Oct 14th 3pm-4:30pm Fri, Oct 25th 9am-10:30am By Florida Blue-McBride Insurance Agency RSVP 407.230.7825 AARP Medicare Complete 2pm-3:30pm (also 8th, 15th, 22nd & 29th ) Presented by LTC Advisors, RSVP 407.949.6722 Health Care Reform 3:30pm-5pm (also 8th, 15th, 22nd & 29th) Presented by LTC Advisors RSVP 407.949.6722 WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2 Why do hearing aids cost so much? 3pm-4:30pm (also 9th, 16th, 23rd & 30th) Presented by Harmony Hearing Centers of America RSVP 407.949.6737 THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3 One Senior Place Presents The Affordable Care Act & More Learn what it really means, plus Medicare help before open enrollment! 1pm 4pm Information, Resources, Door Prizes Guests speakers from Medicare Plan Options and LTC Advisors. RSVP 407.949.6733 FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4 Memory Screenings 2pm 4pm Hosted by Arden Courts Memory Care Community By Appointment Only407.949.6733 MONDAY, OCTOBER 7 Senior Club Sponsored by Family Physicians Group 10am 12pm October 7th Bingo October 14th Computer Club October 21st Movie Day Big Wedding October 28th Casino Day The Real Estate Specialists are IN 10am-1pm (also 14th, 21st, 28th) Presented by Exit Real Estate Results By Appointment Only 407.949.6714Calendar of Events October 2013 Winter Park City Talk bB Y RA nN DY K nN I ghGH T CITY MANAGER Sept. 23 City Commission highlights There was a City Commission meeting held Sept. 23 in City Hall Commission Chambers. Below are a few highlights of decisions made at the meeting:Consent AA genda were approved (for a complete listing, please visit cityofwinter ment with Orange County for the future maintenance of the faux brick thermoplastic pedestrian crosswalks on Jackson and Har old avenues at the intersection of Fairbanks Avenue was approved. ments with Mead Botanical Gar den, Inc., and the Winter Park Historical Association, Inc., for Fiscal Year 2014 were approved.Budget Public Hearings dinance adopting the millage rate was approved. dinance adopting the Fiscal Year 2014 budget was approved. A full copy of the Sept. 23 City Commission minutes will be available at cityofwinterpark.org the week of Oct. 14, pending approval by the City Commission.Public Hearings ordinance allowing the City Manager to make special exception for up to two dog events to be in events in other prohibited park proved with an amendment. Park Racquet Club to amend their conditional use approval for the existing facilities and operations to add a new tennis court and to rearrange their parking and driveways on their property at 2111 Via Tuscany was approved. Polasek Museum to relocate the Capen House now at 520 Inter lachen Avenue to the Polasek Museum at 633 Osceola Ave. and to amend the existing development agreement to revise the number of weddings, receptions and other events that may be held on the Polasek Museum property was approved. dinance amending Section 34-30, Title and Ownership of Lots and Spaces in city cemeteries, to clarify the ownership interest that may be conferred and add a provision for the city to regain ownership of abandoned rights to be buried within a municipal cemetery was approved. Schedule effective Tuesday, Oct. 1, was approved.50+ FYIFYI ExpoDont miss the Fall 50+ FYI EXPO hosted by the City of Winter Park on Thursday, Oct. 3, from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., at the Winter Park Community Center located at 721 W. New England Ave. Attendees will have an opportual Council on Agings Flu+You, obtain free health screenings, and attend free seminars on identity theft, self-defense, elder abuse, fall prevention, and Medicare whats hot and whats not from trends in healthy lifestyle options to resources available. Area ser vice providers, agencies, housing pros, health care representatives, Medicare specialists and other professionals who provide valuable products and services to the community will be in attendance to answer any questions related to their individual services. Special guest appearances will be made by magician and master balloon Jacqueline Jones and classical guitarist Fred P. Hodes. Admission and parking are free. For more information, visit 50plusFYI.org. at cityofwinterpark.org, like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and watch us on Vimeo.Setting the budget

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Page 6 | Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland ObserverLifestyles If you are a true prime steak and lobster lover, then you already know that the 20-yearold landmark restaurant on Lee Road, synonymous with great steak, has evolved from its old name (Del Friscos) to take on the name of Christners. The name change is a charming homage to Russ Christner, who opened the restaurant with his wife Carole in 1993. At the time Christner was given a 20-year license to use the name of a famous Dallas restaurant, and for all of those years it was the textbook example of a high-end, special occasion, superior quality steakhouse. One of the most welcoming experiences when dining in the clubby atmosphere of the red brick walls, dark wood trim and white tablecloths that virtually steakhouse was the fact that Russ Christner and his wife Carole seemed to always be there. Few diners came and went without a tableside visit from either or both of them making sure their guests enjoyed a world class dining experience. Russ Christner lost his personal battle with cancer in 2005, leaving the ever-charming Carole in charge. Soon, their son David and his wife Alice joined Carole, thereby enhancing the family ties and making the name change to Christners that much more appropriate. The thrill for this reviewer was to return to this home of steakhouse glory under its new name and tell my readers that the glory is all still there, and then some. I had attended the early June celebration of the name change in which this family-owned business paid homage to their father, Friscos brand, and raised more Hospital Diabetes Institute. Happily standing in line for what was and remains my favorite perfectly spicy Cajun sauce, I mentally applauded their decision to honor the memory of Russ Christner while maintaining the standards he set. Returning for a full meal, I was immediately reminded that the superior quality of the food and service also means the restaurant is a special occasion destination, and the general feel even on a weeknight is one of celebration. Over the years, the venue has grown into nine private dining rooms, but I still prefer the tufted red leather booths from the original restaurant. The temptation begins immediately when a simple, but incredibly delicious, loaf of freshfrom-the-oven bread is delivered to your table. Normally because I know Ill taste several things I stay away from the bread service, but this is impossible to pass up. And as you follow the menus suggestion and tear off a piece of the bread, take a moment to savor the fresh-baked smell of that special loaf. From the choices, we shared the already noted favorite crab cake, famous for its luxuriously all-crab consistency that got divided into portions to simply extend the pleasure. We loved the unique taste and preparation of the Shanghaiing its just-right spicy perfection. We ordered the lettuce wedge for the sheer joy of tasting all three of Christners homemade salad dressings the chunkiest Bleu Cheese dressing ever known to man; the honey mustard; and the Avocado Goddess. The buttery richness of the Lobster Bisque (called Soup in the menu) is so outrageous that we each got a serious serving of lobster in every chunky bite. For our main courses, my dining partner ordered the grade tuna served warm with a surprisingly subtle and tasty wasabi cream sauce. Considering tion of our waiter questioning whether we had been given the dinner portion; only to be assured the dinner portion would had before us. U.S.D.A. Choice Plus, was even more tender and more tasteful than I remembered from previous visits, and it reminded me in royal fashion about why this resa steakhouse is and can be. It happened that on the evening we dined there, all three of the restaurateurs Carole, David and Alice Christner were in-house. Each of the three stopped by the table to make sure everything was to our satisfaction, and we were more than happy to assure them that our meal exceeded expectations. Beginning with that very special hot bread and continuing with personal touches throughout the meal, the Christner family has built a restaurant that provides meticulous service in own sincerely friendly and caring personalities. Christners new name honors its founder not only in name, but by consistently ofwill ever eat in Central Florida. PH otoOTO C oO UR tT E s S Y of OF chr CHR I s S T ner NER s STT he name has changed but the steaks and ambiance remain at Winter Parks CC hristners. From the Corner TableSteak icon changes names, keeps quality THANK YOU, THANK YOU, THANK YOU! The businesses, organizations and individuals below have chosen to support your local chamber of commerce again in 2013 by renewing their membership. Please join us in thanking them for their investment in our community the next time you shop, dine, or call on their place of business. ANNUAL SUPPORTERS 4 Rivers Smokehouse Annie Russell Theatre Community Based Care of Central Florida Cox Events Group Florida Symphony Youth Orchestra Hannibal Square Community Land Trust, Inc. Hyperion Global Wealth Management Insurance Consultants of Central Florida Jewish Community Center of Greater Orlando Kimberly Roberts, AP, LMT, LLC Leading Edge Title Partners Light Bulbs Unlimited Main Street Children's Dentistry National University Orange Bank of Florida Parker Events Robert Clayton Roesch Smith & Fleming, LLC Sonny's Franchise Company St. John Lutheran Church Stonebridge Financial Planning Group The Meat House mi TOMATINA, Paella Bar Towncare Dental Winter Park Tranquil Oaks Cremation Garden Walgreens Wells Fargo Advisors Financial Network 5+ YEARS ADT Security, LLC Aloma Bowl Alpha Christian Academy Big Brothers, Big Sisters of Central Florida Binson's Home Health Care Centers B r i o P r o p e r t i e s Byrd & Associates, LLC Gary Munson Heating & A/C Service, Inc. Hemophilia Foundation of Greater Florida Hillstone Restaurant International Association of Administrative Professionals Winter Park Chapter Orlando Foot & Ankle Clinic, Inc. Shafran Gastroenterology Center Sweet! Vose Law Firm, LLP Bill & Robbi Walker 10+ YEARS Ferrell Wealth Management Michael Collard Properties, Inc. Ruth's Chris Steak House, Inc. 15+ YEARS Majestic Jewelers, Inc. Winter Park Sidewalk Art Festival 20+ YEARS Nancy Bagby Center State Bank Cornell Fine Arts Museum Glenridge Middle School Lowndes, Drosdick, Doster,Kantor & Reed, P.A. Michael Abufaris, D.D.S. Pohl & Short, P.A. 30+ YEARS American Lock & Door Specialists Compass Investment Properties, Inc. Donald W. McIntosh Associates, Inc. Park East & Park Knowles Apartments Stanley Steemer C h a m b e r T r u s t e e F o r m o r e i n f o r m a t i o n a b o u t t h e W i n t e r P a r k C h a m b e r o f C o m m e r c e o u r m e m b e r s a n d u p c o m i n g e v e n t s v i s i t u s a t t h e W i n t e r P a r k W e l c o m e C e n t e r c a l l ( 4 0 7 ) 6 4 4 8 2 8 1 o r l o g o n t o w w w w i n t e r p a r k o r g EVENTS & PROGRAMS P A R K A V E N U E S I D E W A L K S A L E October 10 13 Participating Park Avenue Merchants G O O D M O R N I N G W I N T E R P A R K Friday, October 11 at 7:45 a.m. Winter Park Welcome Center Topic: Central Florida Veterans Memorial Park W I N T E R P A R K A U T U M N A R T F E S T I V A L October 12 & 13, 9 a.m. 5 p.m. both days Central Park Artists, Entertainment and Event Details at autumnartfestival.org H A R R I E T T S P A R K A V E N U E F A S H I O N W E E K October 13 19 Schedule of Events and Runway Show Tickets at parkavenuefashionweek.com B U S I N E S S A F T E R H O U R S Thursday, October 18 at 5:30 p.m. Hosted by WUCF-FM at Hannibal Square Heritage Center JOSH GARRICK OO bserver staff

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013 | Page 7 rf rfntb ntbnb ff f rf ff ff f fn f r ft ff f nff tttrf tttf ttt ff f ff f ff ffff fff f fff rf ff f tf frf ffff ff ff f r rfffntrfffnbr Calendar SEP TT 28The AA rt & H H istory Museums Maitland announces its 15th annual gala event, Evening in the Grove, an O O range, White and Green Gala, to be held on Satur day, Sept. 28, from 6 to 10 p.m. at the Sheraton Orlando North H H otel in Maitland. EE vening in the Grove has been lauded as one of CC entral Floridas best fundraising events for its unique historical theme and entertainment, combined with an exciting auction, friends and fun. VV isit artandhistory.org for more information. The Maitland Womans C C lub will be holding its fall A A ntiques and Collectibles sale at the Maitland C C ivic CC enter on Lake Lily in Maitland. H H ours are from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sept. 28. HH ave something to sell? R R eserve a vendor table. For information call Linda at 407-830-6373. Raul Colon will be at the Orlando Museum of AA rt for a free, public presentation on Sept. 28 at 12:15 p.m. HH is art is on display at the museum through Nov. 3. VV isit omart.org for more information. SEP TT 29 AA paper marbling workshop will be offered on consecutive Sundays at the AA lbin Polasek Museum. Marbling is an ancient paint or ink technique that has been used for centuries in Turkey, Japan and E E urope to decorate paintings and books. I I ts from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sept. 29 and Oct. 6. RR egister at polasek.org or by phone at 407-647-6294. SEP TT 30Winter Park is hosting a city blood drive from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at C C ity H H all and the Public Works CC ompound. The city will also hold an urban forestry public planning meeting from 6 to 8 p.m. VV isit cityofwinterpark.org for more information. OO C TT 2 FF ood TT ruck Cinema arrives in Maitland at 1776 I I ndependence Lane, featuring more than a dozen food trucks and I I ron Man 3. YY ou bring the chair well show you the stars! VV isit itsmymaitland.com for more information. SEP TT 28Project Walk Orlando is pleased to announce that the fourth annual Walk-NRollA A T T hon will be held on Saturday, Sept. 28, at C C ranes R R oost Park in AA ltamonte Springs. The Walk-NR R ollA A Thon is held during September, which is Spinal C C ord I I njury AA wareness Month, to raise awareness and raise money for people living with spinal cord injuries. AA ll CC entral Florida residents are invited to lace up sneakers and roll out wheelchairs for this family-friendly event. R R egistration is at 8:15 a.m. with a start at 9 a.m. VV isit projectwalkorlando.org to register. Join us for our third annual Munich-Style OO ktoberfest at the BB ahia Festival Grounds at 2300 Pembrook Drive, Orlando, just west of Maitland. The event is from 3 to 11 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 28. VV isit oktoberfestorlando.org for more information. OO C TT 1 AA National Night OO ut Open HH ouse will be at the Winter Park Public Safety Facility from 5:30-8:30 p.m. on Oct. 1. VV isit cityofwinterpark.org for more information. FAMILY CALENDAR

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Page 8 | Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Interactive Whiteboard Technology Affordable Tuition Program / Accepting VPK Small Class Sizes / Ages 2-Grade 8 Extended Care Hours 6:30am-6:30pm Music, Art and Spanish ClassesO PEN H OUSE T OURS OPEN HOUSE TOURS407.324.1144 Towne Center100 Aero Lane, Sanford, FL 32771407.678.0333 University Park10250 University Blvd., Orlando, FL 32871 P A GE P RIVATE S CHOOL Our 105th Year Open House Savings Online visit www.pageschool.com Accredited by: Ai AISF AdvancED-SACS MSA CESS NCPSA Florida Gold Seal of Excellence October 1-4 9am-11am October 1-4 9am-11am October 5 10am-12pm October 5 10am-12pm $104,000 $108,160 $111,405 $115,861 $119,950 $119,950 $124,748 $129,738 $129,738 $134,928 $131,080 $171,819 $183,846 $225,219 $240,985 $89,861 $78,141 $59,882 $75,679 $82,486 $96,532 $99,939 $61,477 $75,896 $85,597 $85,595 $97,069 $84,961 Which line gives you the best chance for su ccess? Illustration period: 1 -1-2000 through 1-1-2012. Each example shown assumes $100,000 initial premium with no withdrawals. Market value based on the S&P 500 Index. Historical performance o f the S&P 500 Index should not be considered a representation of current or future performance of the Index or of any annuity. Hypothetical index annuity product illustration assumes crediting method of a 6% annual point-to-point cap and annual reset. Hypothetical Income Rider Value assumes a 7% annual rate of return for income purposes. Illustration values represent gross returns. Assumed annuity rates and actual historical prices of the S&P 500 Index were used in this purely hypothetical example for the purpose of illustrating comparitive values and to illustrate how the Interest-Crediting Strategy might have guaranteed. Past performance does not guarantee future results. ONE SHOTYou only have at retirement will fall60% of Americans short. Member of(407)-644-6646www.aSafeHarbor.comBob Adams President/CEOA SafeHarbor, LLC bob@asafeharbor.com Illustration period: 12-31-1999 though 12-31-2012According to paycheckforlife.com, three out of ve middle-class Americans entering retirement today are projected to outlive their nancial assets. Learn how to protect your retirement account from losses, maintain upside potential and maximize your lifetime income. Call us today for your PERSONALIZED SAFE MONEY REPORT. Community Bulletin School supply driveWinter Park Day Nursery, an accredited, not-for-prot preschool, is launching a Back to School D D rive seeking educational supplies that will help give every one of its students a great 2013-2014 school year. The school is requesting donations of items including everything from arts and crafts supplies like construction paper, crayons, glue sticks, poster board and washable nger paints to sensory activities such as bubbles, stickers and PlayDoh. AA s a nonprot organization, the school relies on the generous support of community donors and volunteers to continue nurturing and educating children. One item the school will not need is new tricycles, according to E E xecutive Director AA li DeMaria. Thats because a recent, gener ous $1,500 grant from the Track Shack Foundation made it possible for the day nursery to purchase brand new tricycles for the childrens outdoor recreation and tness.Representing seniorsU.S. Rep. DD aniel Webster was presented with the Summer 2013 Champion of Seniors A A ward by The Grange, a national, nonpartisan grassroots organization that advocates on behalf of AA mericas rural seniors, for Websters outstanding leadership on behalf of seniors. Webster has received the award for their unwaver ing efforts to protect the health benets and security of Floridas seniors and citizens with disabilities. DD ial 2-1-1 HH eart of Florida UU nited Ways ( HH F UU W) 2-1-1 helpline was recently selected as the after-hours provider for the National EE pilepsy Foundation. HH F U U Ws 2-1-1 is a free, 24-hour information, referral and crisis helpline that links people in need to health and human service programs. Operators will assist callers from across the country in need of assistance with a medical issue related to epilepsy.Business Briefs Hit the acceleratorSeacoast National Bank has named DD iane V elazquez A A cevedo as accelerator of AA ccelerates B B ayhill Fuel C C ell. I I n her new role, VV elazquez A A cevedo will develop and accelerate the commercial business within a designated micro-market, with the ability to transition the business owner from traditional full-service retail branch services over to electronic banking ser vices. Previously, VV elazquez A A cevedo was vice president, commercial relationship manager for Seacoast National B B ank in C C entral Florida. She has more than 20 years of commercial banking experience.Brookshires new lookTeachers and students moved into a new, modern administration and pre-kindergarten through fth grade classroom building in AA ugust before school began at Brookshire Elementary School, an Orange C C ounty Public School located in Winter Park at the intersection of Greene Drive and C C ady Way. H H unton B B rady AA rchitects of Orlando was selected to design the two-story school, which consists of 78,700 square feet of new construction and 4,522 square feet of renovated space to accommodate 539 student stations. I I t includes new spaces for administration, music, media/library, food services and classrooms. AA mericas top lawyerFlorida law rm Shutts & BB owen is proud to announce tha t 60 lawyers, including 15 in Orlando, have been selected by their peers for inclusion in The BB est Lawyers in AA merica 2014. Two of the rms Orlando partners were among the four Shutts & B B owen lawyers selected as Lawyers of the YY ear in their practice areas: Charles Robinson F F a wsett in labor law and Michael J. Grindstaff in real estate law. HOUSES WANTED!!! Get a FREE No Obliga on CASH O er On Your House Within 24 Hours! (855) 755-1818 www.Circle18Homes.com CASH $$$ QUICK CLOSE ANY PRICE RANGE ANY CONDITION ANY SITUATION

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013 | Page 9 the business of showing people something new. But for Winter Park resident Wanda Salerno, its something more than that. Its the business of showing people something she loves. The Winter Park Chamber of for more than 30 years of promoting tourism in Winter Park by awarding her with the Park Avenue Merchant Association Lifetime Achievement Award at last weeks City Commission meeting. Salernos ability to build relationships and her dedication to keeping hotels up to date on events helped propel local businesses and tourism in the area, said Chamber Vice President Debra Hendrickson, who presented Salerno with her award. The achievement came as a surprise to the Salerno, who always saw her work as simply getting the word out about the city she loved. I cant help it, Salerno said. I just want all of the tourists that come here to know about Winter Park, because theres no place like us. I dont work, its just fun, and Im not going to quit until Salerno and her husWinter Park in 1974, and started promoting the city as business owners in 1981 when they bought the historic Winter Park Scenic Boat Tour. They ran the business for 15 years through heavy promotion in hotels along International Drive. Salerno surrounded herself in the tourism industry, creating relationships with concierges and joining Convention & Visitors Bureau and the Central Florida Concierges Association. Instead of picking up the phone, Wanda always came to the concierges in person, leaving a personal touch thats left an impression to this day as she remains a familiar face to almost everyone in the local industry. merchant along Park Avenue, which motivated her to continue promoting not only her own business, but also the city as a whole. Wanda Salerno was not selfish, said Hendrickson, who owned her own womens clothing store along the Avenue from 1986 to 1998. She knew that all the merchants of Park Avenue would the business community would Salerno keeps an eye on the local tourism industry, giving it a jumpstart whenever business is slow by planning tion Tours. The Winter Park expert brings concierges, travel writers and other people in the tourism business right into the heart of Winter Park, giving them a chance to take in everything the Avenue has to offer. The tours usually included lunch and dinner, along with a visit to one of Winter Parks museums and a ride on the scenic boat tour. Shes set up at least one of these tours every year since 1981. You have to put yourself out there, Salerno said. Salerno at last weeks Commission meeting for her years of promoting Winter Park, as well as her current work dropping off brochures to hotels across Orlando from Altamonte Springs to U.S. Highway 192. found for our city in so many ways, Bradley said. Salerno said she appreciates all that comes with the award, but moting tourism in Winter Park whenever she can. Salerno said the city and the Avenue havent changed much almost 40 years ago. The brick streets and small town feel always reminded her old hometown in New England. Salerno said its all part of the citys charm that just cant keep to herself. When you really appreciate something, like I do with this city, the people in it and the Chamber, you dont really need recognition, Salerno said. I was doing what I loved. I love this city and wanted everybody else to see it. Salerno continues to promote Winter Park through her brochure runs and keeping concierges in the know on the latest happenings in Winter Park. She plans to do another FAM tour by the end of this year.PHOTO BY TIM FREED THE OBSERVERWanda Salerno has spent more than 30 years boosting Winter Park.Putting Winter Park on the mapTIM FREED OO bserver staff Autumn Art FestivalWinter Park40th Annual ENTER FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN A BLU-RAY COMBO PACKAVAILABLE SEPTEMBER 24th ON DIGITAL HD & OCTOBER 8TH ON BLU-RAY COMBO PACK & DVD Send us your name and mailing address totcraft@turnstilemediagroup.comNo purchase necessary

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Page 10 | Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland ObserverWhen you hear the term chamber of commerce, you might automatically think of an promote and sustain the local business climate and that is true here in Winter Park. Our staff works day-in and day-out to advocate, support and grow local businesses. However, our mission is two-fold. The other half is to initiate support and enhance the civic, educational and economic well being of the community. We believe that when the community thrives, so does business. This fall, the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce has several opportunities to support businesses that are the backbone of our economy, while contributing to the civic well being of Winter Park at the same time. Local artists, local veteransThe 40th annual Winter Park Autumn Art Festival is the only Florida artists exclusively, and has done so for 40 years. These local artists, many of whom call Central Florida home, appreciate your support. Come out for a fun weekend from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Its a Gym for Your Dog! Unlike traditional doggie daycare, our Day Fitness and Care program oers: customized workout programs weight loss and tness indoor warm water aqua therapy canine massage one-on-one attention due to small class sizes 2826 Shader Rd. Orlando, FL 32808 www.BarkingDogFitness.com info@BarkingDogFitness.com Conveniently located at... Menon this ad and receive a 10% discount for life! Limited me oer. 407-295-3888 A New Concept in Doggie Daycare TOO BUSY TO EXERCISE YOUR DOG? We have the Answer! Served steamin hot, and stuffed way over code, get ready to enjoy your meatiest, cheesiest, feastiest, tastiest sub ever. FREE Chips and Medium Fountain Drink when you buy any Sub. Visit our tasty restaurant location at: Firehouse Subs Park Avenue 528 S. Park Avenue Winter Park, FL 32789 407.960.7827 2013 Firehouse Subs. This offer valid with coupon at participating restaurants. Prices and participation may vary, see restaurant for details. Limit one per customer, per visit. Not valid with any other offers. Exp. 12/31/13. COMBO$SUB While I think dogs of any age are wonderful, theres something very special about an older dog who has been your beloved companion, even if you recently adopted him. My dog Yankee is now almost 6, and as he and the new dogs who come into my life grow older, I want to make sure I do whatever I can to slow the aging process and help my dogs have the best quality of life possible for as long as possible. Im sure you feel the same way! Genetics aside, what can we do to help our dogs live longer, healthier, and happier lives? Here are six suggestions. level, yet we often continue to feed the same amount of food weve always fed. Cut back on the amount youre feeding. Educate yourself on ingredients and make sure youre feeding the highest quality food you can afford. overweight or arthritic dogs, swimming, especially in a warm water pool is the best exercise possible because it works the entire body. added oils and nutrients. is to monitor your dog for physical and behavioral changes and if you think these changes may not be normal, Sherri CC appabianca The Wet Nose Report II ts all local Dog GracefullyOct. 12-13, to experience their artwork, enjoy live entertainment on the Central Park stage, and a sidewalk sale at local merchants along Park Avenue. Weve even lined up art workshops for the kids led by instructors at Creald School of Art. Details at autumnartfestival.org This years poster features a moonlit scene of the Veterans Fountain in Central Park painted by local artist Stephen Bach. A percentage of the poster sales will be donated to Central Florida Veterans Memorial Park Foundation in support of their effort to honor veterans with a memorial park near Lake Nonas VA Hospital. Learn more about their project at cfvmpf.org, or attend the Chambers Good Morning Winter Park on Oct. 11 to hear a presentation from Maj. Gen. Douglas Metcalf (ret.) and members of the team.Local designers, local merchantsOn the heels of the Autumn Art Festival, Harrietts Park Avenue Fashion Week returns Oct. 13 19 with a seven-day celebration of fashion and design. The Emerging Designer Contest, which showcases the talent of several local designers, recently held a fashion show at Maxines on Shine to determine designers will complete a Project Runway-inspired challenge featuring supplies from Tuni on Park Avenue. The winner will receive a 10-look runway show during the Park Avenue Fashion Week Runway Show on Saturday, can learn more about the designers, one of which is only 18, at emerging-designer In addition to the contest, Park Avenue Fashion Week showcases the diverse fashion scene on the Avenue. Throughout the week, stores host designer meet-andgreets, trunk shows and special events. A full schedule of events can be found at parkavenuefashionweek.com, along with ticket information for the Runway Show in Central Park. EE rika Spence is the senior director of marketing and communica tions at the Winter Park C C hamber of C C ommerce. EE rika Spence Business in the Park

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013 | Page 11Now through OO ct. 27 DI DI Senchanted! the musical DISenchanted!, the musical featuring fairy-tale princesses who are none too happy with the exploitation theyve suffered in fully storming the castle of one of Floridas largest employers at The Abbey through Oct. 27. This story of six bold women who refuse to be damsels-in-distress, Sleeping Beauty, and friends singing the truth about the once-upon-a-time life. Featuring personal favorites Michelle Knight and Andrea Canny, the show is directed by Fiely Matias with music, book and lyrics by Dennis Giacino. Visit TicketWeb. com or call 866-468-7630. Sept. 27 Mad Cow opens season with O O ther D D esert CitiesIn the drama Other Desert Brooke Wyeth returns to her family home to visit her parents after a six-year absence. A promising novelist, she announces the imminent publication of a memoir based on a tragic event in the familys history a wound her parents do not want reopened. Not surprisingly, Brookes parents fall into old habits and plead with her to keep their story quiet. The show opens Sept. 27. Call 407-297-8788 or visit madcowtheatre.com Sept. 28 OO rlando Philharmonic s O O pening Night The not-to-be-missed Opening Nights of the Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Maestro Christopher Wilkins, are always big nights with each Opening Night including a huge symphonic masterwork. On Sept. 28 at 8:30 p.m., the Philharmonics program begins with Ron Nelsons bold but lyrical Savannah River Holiday, followed Concerto No. 20 performed by the brilliant Jon Kimura Parker. Finally Strausss massive Ein Heldenleben (A Heros Life) will to explore the heroic themes inspired by Beethoven. For tickets, call 407-770-0071 or visit orlandophil.orgSept. 28 to Jan. 5 Sesame Street at the O O rlando Science Center The Orlando Science Center invites us to take a walk down one of the best-known streets in the world with their new exhibit Sesame Street Presents: The Body. Big Bird, Elmo and the Sesame Street residents arrive on Sept. 28 and will be in residence through Jan. 5. The Body is an interactive exhibit created in response to the childhood obesity crisis in the U.S. with experiences that teach families to maintain healthy lifestyles. Set in the familiar and reassuring world of Sesame Street, each exhibit has multiple activities to provide ageappropriate learning experiences for all children. Sesame Street Presents: The Body is included with admission to the Science Center. Call 407-514-2000 or visit osc.org OO ct. 2, 11, 18, and 25 Galler y T T alks and F F ree F F ilm Series at the Morse Museum Beginning Oct. 2, that jewel of Winter Park, the Morse Museum, will host gallery talks related to its new exhibition Lifelines Forms and Themes of Art Nouveau. Docents will conduct the talks at 11 a.m. on Wednesdays, and Curator Donna Climenhage will give the talks at 2:30 p.m. on Wednesdays. Lifelines explores Art Nouveau with more than that illustrate themes, including nature, the female form, and exoticism. In addition, the Museum will present free screenings of the Sex and Sensibility: The Allure of Art Nouveau including Paris on Oct. 11; Britain on Oct. 18; and Vienna on Oct. 25. Call 407-645-5311 or visit morsemuseum.org OO ct. 3 to 9 Mamma Mia! TT he smash hit musical with songs by A A BB A A Seen by more than 50 million people around the world, Mamma Mia is celebrating its 12th year on Broadway. Meansuccessful movie musical of all time. The story woven around beloved hit tunes by ABBA is about a single mother who owns a small hotel on a Greek island. She is about to watch the daughter shes raised alone get married, but the wedding guests provide their own version of love and romance in this celebration of mothers and daughters, friends and family. Visit OrlandoBroadway.com or call 1-800-982-2787 or 407-704-6116. OO ct. 4, 5, and 6 TT he Maitland Rotar y A A rt F F estiv al, AA rt Under the Stars Surrounding beautiful Lake Lily, the Maitland Rotary Art Festival features 150 artists vying for $26,000 in awards. The Florida, its a magical experience for artists and patrons alike as Performing Arts of Maitland provides live entertainment, including the Symphonic Orchestra on Saturday night, and the Stage Band on Friday night. Visit maitlandrotaryartfestival.com Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. H H e is a member of the C C uratorial C C ouncil for the Museum of Florida AA rt. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906.Josh Garrick Culture worthy of your calendar This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORG @EnzianTheater SALMA Sun 11AM MIDNIGHTS CHILDREN Sun 1:30PM Hit of the Sundance Film Festival! IN A WORLD. Fri 3:45, 6:30, 9:15 Sat & Sun 4:45, 7:15, 9:45 Mon Only 9:15 Tue-Thu 6:30, 9:15 THE RELUCTANT FUNDAMENTALIST Sat 1:30PM 16 Annual Manhattan Short Film Festival Mon 6:30PM JADOO preceded by UNRAVEL Sat 11AM South Asian Film Festival One Weekend Only!

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Page 12 | Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer OO pinions CC hris Jepson PerspectivesA great empire, like a great cake, is most easily diminished at the edges. Benjamin Franklin Have you considered that an economic system is a philosophy? Its a perspective wrapped in baggage. Its what is allowed. Because it is a philosophy, we can rationally consider altering outcomes. We can decide to change course as a nation. Im in the pragmatic camp of that great American, John Dewey. If its not working option a try. See what works and what tweaking. We need to rethink, a tweak perhaps, our American Dream. Maybe a major overhaul. The New York Times last week had an article about Auburn Universitys program to construct the ideal $20,000 house for the poor. It even has thoughtful design features high ceilings, for example, to channel the summer heat out. How do you house low-income other large democracy, India, for housing guidance. Where do we expect more and more couples with low wage jobs to live? Experts speculate America will continue to lose middle class jobs through a process America. We will experience lots of distance separating the rich from the rest and a general coarsening of society. If America is sliding inexorably toward India, if poverty is growing, our middle class shrinking, what we as a democracy are doing needs a review. Republicans have an economic philosophy of two essential tenets: More of the same and twice as hard for the rest of America. More for the favored, less for America. I suggest an economic review, a national conversation, just so we get all the economic cards on the table. Whos getting richer? Whos losing ground? Why? And is there anything we can do, as a people, to turn it around? If we have an economic philosophy (our current American economy) that favors certain elements of America at the expense of others, well, lets have that discussion and see if we cannot pragmatically develop an economic approach that lifts more Americans boats. Republicans tirelessly chant, More of the same and twice as hard. If only Americas impoverished worked harder? Or, worked at all. If only Americas middle class had more moxie, worked more creatively, were more productive, offer House Republicans. Yes, thats it. ing big agriculture. Thats the ticket. Tax labor income at higher rates than investment income. Slip special tax favors and federal and state legislation. worth of such Republican policies. If poverty wages and $20,000 homes are just the market working its magic, if street corner begging legless vets with food bowls the new norm well, that is an indictment of our democracy and of ourselves. Oh, you cant mess with the sacredness talism is God and the truth of maximum Songwriter Leonard Cohen wrote, Everybody knows that the dice are loaded . poor stay poor, the rich get rich. the crumbs. II ndiacation of AA merica Jepson is a 27-year resident of CC entral Florida. HH es scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. R R each him at Jepson@M E E D IA IA merica. U U SLouis RR oney Play On!A recent letter from a relative took pains to describe the mundane activities of many other family members. Once again, I was jolted into the world of dilettantism and reminded that human intercourse may all too often be just that and nothing more. Artists must put up with well-meaning dilettantes for often the artist, in truth, is dependent upon them to pay the rent. dilettantes than around artistic equals, for the equality of great artiness in others. The artist when he labors at his calling, no matter his sartorial artistic armor, stands stark naked before the world. This commentator, an artist all his life in World War II never felt the pull to be part of the crowd. The crowd spends a great deal of its earthly substance in selfexplanation. You dont know the real me is the song of the masses. The artist, on the other hand says, If you observe me, Ill show you exactly who I am and all that I am. French writer Jean Cocteau, whom I met many years ago when we appeared together on a program at the Thtre des Champs lyses in Paris said, An artist cannot explain his art any more than a plant can discuss horticulture. The artist, in a profound sense, is the sum and substance of his own art. The greatest annoyance to the artist is not the rowdy fan, but the dilettante. The dilettante imagines himself to be privy to the special aesthetics that propel the artist. The dilettante may even assume that he is the alter ego of the artist. As a matter of fact, the dilettante is further from the psyche of the artist than is the simplest fan. For the fan is honest as to who he is while, to the artist, the dilettante Parvenus, arrivistes and dilettantes are often highly visible as they hover around the boards of art museums and performing of real artists long to be in the milieu of the artists whom they try vainly to emulate: people who disdain them as nuisances, which they often are, of course. In the canteens of every European opera house chat coffee-drinking dilettantes, invited by someone active on the stage or behind it. Leading singers hear snatches of conversation about a Tosca done at this or that opera house, a stint as a chorus singer in this or that Traviata, or of carrying a spear in this or that Aida. Have you ever chatted with a mechanic while he was working on your car? Did you throw in words like calipers and voltage regulators? An auto-dilettante such as I am had best sit in a corner and read a newspaper until the car is ready! The arts have social connotations that make them fair game for every nouveau experts usually dont speak the same language. An artists success is artistic. A has no or little talent for success in the Commonly, most artists are sadly not reciprocally titillated when in the presence of experts in real estate or stock speculation. Are real artists generally less interested in material things than are most other people? And, if so, why? True, the artist is concerned primarily with things that no one can buy. He obeys a compulsion to perfect a God-given talent. He and his art are inseparable, ergo the artists quest is at heart, self-perfection. Failure, if it comes, can be complete and self-destructive. The rich person, who hopes to control the lives of artists through the power of money, may well be enjoying himself, but he may be wasting both his time and his lucre. DD ilettantism AA bout RR oney: HH arvardDistinguished Prof, E E m. UC UC F 2004 Fla. AA lliance for the AA rts award ( A A ssisted by beautiful wife Joy R R oney) King Features Weekly ServiceSeptember 23, 2013 EDITORIAL CARTOON Letters to the editorSend your thoughts (400 words or less) to Managing EE ditor II saac B B abcock at ibabcock@turnstilemediagroup.com AA consensus, not a controversyRecently, the City Commission unanimously passed a new ordinance to revise the rules for restaurants in the Park Avenue area. Despite the urge by local television news and newspaper columnists Tony Winter Park Barring Fast-food, the issue was resolved with no opposition and with universal approval. How is that? How does a community often known for their public squabbles on tennis centers, historic homes and dog parks quietly get consensus on dining on the Avenue? The answer: a lot of hard work, open conversation, listening and compromise by all the stakeholders involved. The issue of what type of restaurant should go on the Avenue was debated several times by the Planning and Zoning Board and City Commission in 2012. Howtook a bottom-up approach, one in which broad dialogue and conciliation was done well before it ever got to the City Commission. Although the Chamber participated, the real kudos goes to Lambrine Macejew214), Daniel Butts (COO Battaglia Group Management) and Frank Hamner (Attorney at Law). These folks spent months, and easily 50 hours, meeting and listening to stakeholders, city staff, attorneys, merchants and residents. All, I might add, as volunteers. It was refreshing to watch as they focused on the issues most people agreed upon rather than getting caught in the emotional entanglements of disagreement. They welcomed input and became advocates of the collective process rather than authors of a pre-determined product. In order to create an ordinance that was fair, clear and balanced this group championed cooperation and what was best for most versus the notion that someone must win and someone must lose. For example, the Holler family, extensive property owners on the Avenue, gave their attorney, Frank Hamner, their blessing and support and encouraged him to help resolve this issue in the context of what is right for the Avenue, not for their personal interests. Lambrine, Daniel and Frank never let their own professional interests or the interest of one particular group get in the way of doing what was right for Winter Park as a whole. I was proud to work with them and I thank them for their effort and leadership. Patrick Chapin President and CEO, Winter Park Chamber of Commerce

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013 | Page 23 Saturday, September 28th 263 Minorca B B each Way U U nit 802, New Smyrna B B each FL 32169 3 BR BR | 2 BA BA | 1,655 SF | $635,000 Gorgeous 8th floor unit in the EE vissa building. I I mmaculate and professionally decorated with breathtaking views of the II ntercoastal Waterway and the expansive AA tlantic Ocean from every room. Kitchen is open to the dining room. Living room with bar and sliding glass doors to the private balcony. World-class amenities including 24-hour manned gatehouse, heated pools, H H ar Tru Tennis C C enter, clubhouse with catered kitchen, billards, library and lounge, fitness center, gated beach and 64 boat slip marina. HH osted by: Kelly L. Price from 2-5 PM Sunday, September 29th 1420 CC hapman CC ircle, Winter Park FL 32789 4 BR BR | 3.5 BA BA | 3,313 SF | $809,000 II mmaculate custom built home in prestigious Windsong! Features include a gourmet kitchen with breakfast nook, great room with fireplace and large master suite with tray ceiling. Private office or 4th bedroom is located on the first floor. AA dditional features include a spacious bonus room and finished storage room. EE njoy entertaining on the open lanai with wet bar! HH osted by: Pamela Seibert from 2-5 PM 1131 AA udubon Way, Maitland FL 32751 3 BR BR | 2.5 BA BA | 2,420 SF | $674,000 Lakefront living at its finest! This completely remodeled home is located on a quiet cul-de-sac of Maitland C C ove and offers sweeping views of Lake Sybelia from almost every room. Spacious and open floor plan is perfect for entertaining, featuring crown molding, stainless steel appliances, wood burning fireplaces, large open porches, plantation shutters and boat dock with lift! HH osted by: Sherri Dyer from 2-5 PM 2350 Temple Drive, Winter Park FL 32789 4 BR BR | 4 BA BA | 2,006 SF | $450,000 Fabulous Winter Park home featuring a formal living room, office with pocket doors, and kitchen with breakfast bar open to the dining room area. The spacious family room features a fireplace, built-ins and two sets of French doors that lead to the covered patio and fenced backyard. Gorgeous finishes throughout including crown molding, wood floors and plantation shutters! B B onuses include a guest suite above the detached two car garage! HH osted by: Debbie Tassell from 2-5 PM 3881 C C orrine Drive, Orlando FL 32814 3 BR BR | 2.5 BA BA | 2,488 SF | $439,000 CC harming three bedroom, two bath B B aldwin Park home with wood floors, open floor plan, kitchen with island and breakfast bar and elegant dining area. Wonderful covered patio and spacious yard. EE njoy all the amenities of B B aldwin Park and the convenient location to Orlando and Winter Park. HH osted by: Tiffany Prewitt from 2-5 PM 2221 H H oward Drive, Winter Park FL 32789 5 BR BR | 3 BA BA | 4,086 SF | $749,000 BB eautiful home with fantastic features! VV ersa tile three-way split bedroom floor plan offers an option for a sixth bedroom, den or game room. H H ome offers Mexican tile and wood floors, office, large family room with fireplace and a formal living room with soaring ceilings and skylights. Spacious kitchen has a breakfast bar. Outdoor living spaces include a sparkling screened pool with spacious deck and an additional covered patio showcasing serene Lake Forest views. HH osted by: E E rica Sears from 2-5 PM 219 Flame AA venue, Maitland FL 32751 4 BR BR | 2.5 BA BA | 3,430 SF | $449,000 Gorgeous ranch style home nestled in a lovely Maitland neighborhood situated on stunning park-like lot. Features include a large eat-in kitchen, family room with fireplace, wet bar, and bright Florida room that leads out to a beautifully pavered patio. E E njoy relaxing in the lush backyard near the waterfall and pond! HH osted by: R R honda C C hesmore from 2-5 PM OO B SERSER V ER EROO pen HH ouses THEMMARKEt T PLAc C E MindGym September 23, 2013 1415 Stetson Street, Orlando FL 32804 sold by Patrick H H iggins 2001 Common Way Road, Orlando FL 32814 sold by Pamela R R yan 7606 Pacific Heights Circle, Orlando FL 32835 sold by Rhonda Chesmore 1136 Vassar Street, Orlando FL 32804 sold by Jennifer King 403 Friary Road, Winter Park FL 32792 sold by Kelly L. Price & Mary AA nn Steltenkamp 2306 Peel Avenue, Orlando FL 32806 sold by Sherri dyer OO B SERSER V ER ER Just SS old HH omes Jerry Oller 1800 E. Shell Lane, Vero Beach $2,900,000. 09/17/2013 Trish Sanders 812 Clayton St, Orlando $251,500. 09/17/2013 The Nancy BB agby Team 1650 Apache Trl, Maitland $515,000. 09/18/2013 LauraLyn Lane 4390 Sadler Road, Mount Dora $90,000. 09/18/2013 MaryStuart Day/Megan C C rossMaryStuart Day/Megan Cross 116 Cove Colony, Maitland $855,000. 09/20/2013 SUNDAY 12-3 P RI RI M E E LO CA CA T I I ON I I N OLD E E W I I NT ER ER P ARAR K 1605 H H ighland R R oad, Winter Park. 3 B B D/2 BA BA 1,994SF. Walk to Park AA venue. BB eautiful homeready to move in. Split plan with large rooms, skylights and hardwood floors. Oversized master bedroom with large walk-in closet. Kitchen has granite countertops. Florida room with heat and ACAC Oversized deck in private backyard. $299,000 SUNDAY 1-4 L AR AR G E E POOL H H OM E E ON Q UIE UIE T ST REE REE T 2006 Oakhurst A A venue, Winter Park. 4 B B D/3.5 BA BA 3,529SF. Three way split plan on quiet street. Downstairs master suite, bonus room, family room, den/office and media room as well as an art studio. UU pdated bathrooms and kitchen recently remodeled to include gas appliances, double ovens, double sinks and granite counters. Large covered porch and lanai with screened pool and spa. $499,000 CC OMSTO C C K P ARAR K BEAU BEAU T Y Y 925 BB onita Drive, Winter Park. 3 B B D/2 BA BA 1,744SF. C C harming home with loads of curb appeal. Newly renovated and just minutes from Park AA venue. Open floor plan boasts vaulted ceilings, hardwood floorings, and sun-lit skylights. Kitchen with G E E Profile stainless steel appliances, Murano glass lighting, and exquisite, granite counter tops. Newly renovated bathrooms, hardwood and travertine floors. From the sun room, French doors open onto a beautiful deck and backyard. $457,000 N E E W P RICE RICE T RA RA D I I T I I ON A A L SP ACIACI O U U S H H OM E E 635 Dunblane Drive, Winter Park. 3 B B D/2 BA BA 1,733SF. Open living and dining room spaces, fireplace, back porch and private backyard. U U pdated hardwood floors, newer ACAC and roof. Luscious landscaping and great curb appeal. Great location and A A rated schools. $327,900 JOB RESOURCES at EmployFlorida.com helped Jasmine choose a career path and land a job she loves.You too can discover REAL RESULTS with Employ Florida.JASMINE GREENMonitor Support Technician, Shands HospitalEmploy Florida is an equal opportunity program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. The Employ Florida telephone number may be reached by persons using TTY/TTD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711. Disponible en Espanol.1-866-FLA-2345EmployFlorida.com MindGymSeptember 23, 2013 M EE D II TT ERRAERRA N EAEA N HH OM EE II N BABA LDW II N P ARAR K 4401 Fox Street, Orlando. 4 B B D/2.5 BA BA 2,680SF. Spacious two story park front home is a C C ambridge built Milan floor plan with downstairs master suite. Kitchen has cherry cabinets, eat in space, island and butler pantry. I I nside utility. Separate living and dining rooms with crown molding and large windows. Great location. $519,900 POOL H H OM E E I I N W AA T ER ER FO R R D L A A K E E S 12689 Lakebrook Drive, Orlando. 4 B B D/2.5 BA BA 2,487SF. First time on the market, this home boasts high ceilings, a chefs kitchen with granite counters, downstairs master suite with garden tub and newly resurfaced pool deck. U U pgrades include new plumbing in 2010, ACAC and exterior paint in 2011, new roof in 2005 and new water heater in 2007. Move-in ready! $257,900 SUNDAY 2-5 G REA REA T OPPO R R T U U N I I T Y Y TO L IVE IVE I I N DOWNTOWN W I I NT ER ER P ARAR K 557 Osceola A A venue, Winter Park. 5 B B D/4.5 BA BA 2,911SF. Walk to Park AA venue and walk to R R ollins C C ollege! H H ome on the Winter Park H H istoric R R egister. Dutch colonial home with all systems updated. HH ardwood floors, wood burning fireplace and a basement for storage. E E at-in space in kitchen. $649,000 MindGymSeptember 23, 2013 Order your classified ad online! AA t WPMObserver.com you can crea te, customize and pay for your ad in one convenient place!

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Page 24 | Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer MindGym September 23, 2013 ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Your Aries charm helps persuade others to listen to your proposal. But its still a long way from acceptance, unless you can stand up to the tough questions that are set to follow. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Plan to share a weekend getaway from all the pressures of your hectic workaday world with a very special someone. You could be pleasantly surprised at what develops. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Your keen insight once again helps you handle a challenging situation with a clearer perception of what its really all about. What you learn helps you make a difficult decision. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) If you want to steer clear of getting involved in a new family dispute, say so. Your stand might cause hurt feelings for some, but overall, youll be respected for your honesty. LEO (July 23 to August 22) Expect recognition for your efforts in getting a project into operation. Besides the more practical rewards, your Lions heart will be warmed by the admiration of your colleagues. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Set aside time to rid yourself of clutter that might well be drawing down your creative energies. Consider asking someone to help you decide what stays and what goes. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) A colleague could make a request that might place you in an awkward position with co-workers. Best advice: Share your concerns with an associate you can trust. SCORPIO (October 23 to Novem ber 21) Your energy levels are way up, allowing you to take on the added challenge of a task youve been hop ing to secure. Expect this move to lead to an important opportunity. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Your continuing sense of confidence in what youve set out to do gives encouragement to others. Expect to see more people asking to add their efforts to yours. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) You might think it would be best to reject a suggestion others insist would be unworkable. But you might be surprised by what you find if you give it a chance. AQUARIUS (January 20 to Febru ary 18) Changing a decision might disappoint some people, but the important thing is that you be honest with your self. Dont go ahead with anything you have doubts about. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) There could be some fallout from an emotional confrontation that you really should deal with before moving on. Best to start fresh with a clean, clear slate. BORN THIS WEEK: Your honesty not only helps you make decisions for yourself, but also helps others find the right choices for themselves. 2013 King Features Syndicate, Inc. Oct. 12, 1492, Italian explorer Christopher Columbus reaches the New World. Columbus, and most oth ers, underestimated the worlds size. The expedition probably first landed at Watling Island in the Bahamas. Columbus later sighted Cuba, which he thought was mainland China. Oct. 10, 1845, The United States Naval Academy opens in Annapolis, Md., with 50 midshipmen students and seven professors. Known as the Naval School until 1850, the curriculum included mathematics and navigation, gunnery and steam, chemistry, English, natural philosophy and French. Oct. 8, 1871, flames spark in the Chicago barn of Patrick and Catherine OLeary, igniting a two-day blaze that kills hundreds of people, destroys 17,450 buildings and leaves 100,000 homeless. Legend has it that the fire started when a cow kicked over a lan tern in the OLeary barn. Oct. 9, 1936, harnessing the power of the mighty Colorado River, the Hoover Dam begins sending elec tricity over 266 miles of transmission lines to Los Angeles. The central reason for the dam, however, was the col lection, preservation and distribution of water. Oct. 7, 1943, Rear Adm. Shigematsu Sakaibara, commander of the Japanese garrison on Wake Island, orders the execution of 96 Americans POWs, claiming they were trying to make radio contact with U.S. forces. The execution of those POWs remains one of the more brutal episodes of the war in the Pacific. Oct. 13, 1953, the worlds first art museum on wheels, the Artmobile, opens in Fredericksburg, Va., carrying 16 paintings by 15thand 16th-cen tury masters. Today, there are dozens of Artmobile-inspired museums on wheels in cities and towns across the United States and around the world. Oct. 11, 1975, Saturday Night Live, a topical comedy sketch show featuring Chevy Chase, John Belushi, Dan Aykroyd, Gilda Radner, Gar rett Morris, Jane Curtin and Laraine Newman, makes its debut on NBC. It would go on to become the longestrunning, highest-rated show on latenight television. 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. King Features Weekly ServiceSeptember 23, 2013 AA NN OO UNCEMEN TT S AUCAUC T II ONS RR oofing CC ompany Liquida tion,Online AA uction Only, BB id September 17 thru September 26, I I tems Located in Maryland & Florida. Motleys AA uction & RR ealty Group, 804-232-3300, www.motleys.com, VAA VAA L #16.CAKE DECORATING & PASTRY CLASSES:Sofelle CC onfections offers group and customized c lasses in all areas of pastry, baking and cake decorating! C C ontact: Lucy sofelleconfections@bellsouth.net or call (407) 579-1962 www.facebook.com/ Sofelle C C onfections H H ablamos E E spaol!Winter Park BB enefit Shop140 Lyman AA ve, Winter Park needs items to sell: clothing, bedding, jewelry, kitchenware and bric-a brac. AA lso needing volunteers. C C ontact E E lizabeth CC omer 407-647-8276. Open Tues & Fri at 9:30am; Sat 10am-1pm. AA ll proceeds support childrens programs & the Or lando BB lind A A ssociation. AUAU TOSSell YY our C C lassic! Get top dollar for your classic car at Lake Mirror C C lassic AA uto AA uction in Lakeland, Fl on October 19th! CC all 1-800-257-4161 M. E E H H iggenbotham, FL Lic# AUAU 305 AB AB 158E DD UC ATIOATIO N HH eavy EE quipment Operator Training! BB ulldozers, BB ackhoes, EE xcavators. 3 Weeks H H ands On Program. Local Job Placement AA ssistance. National C C ertifications. G I I B B ill B B enefits E E ligible. 1-866362-6497 HE AA L TT H & ME DI DI C AA L RR N/LPN RR N/LPN Monday and Tuesday 3-11. The job is in a home caring for disabled adults. YY ou will be required to submit to a drug test, background screen. The facility as well as the grounds are smoke-free. Mike 407 971 8115 mpruner1@cfl. rr.comHELP W AA N T T E D D Driver Trainees Needed NOW! BB ecome a driver for Werner EE nterprises. EE arn $800 per week! Local C C DL Training. 877-214-3624HELP W AA N T T E D DCARECARE G IVERIVER for my 104 YY ear Mother Winter ParkLovely home Lake Sue. HH ours to be ar ranged weekdays 8am-4pm; weekends 8am-10pm. Must lift/transfer (5#) through the day. Light whole meals. Supplemental tube feeding. H H ousekeeping/ C C leaning. Sedan not S UV UV take to doctors. Non-smoker. Pet friendly. Quiet house. CC N A A or comparable. BB est CC aregiving RR eferences. 317-506-4400 after 10am. rosemail@comcast.netNow HH iring: CC DLAA Drivers New Pay P ackageand $2500 Sign-On BB onus! Mostly 5-10 days out, full B B enefits, and AA chievable BB onuses! C C all today for details 1-888378-9691M II SCELL AA NE OO US AA irline CC areers begin here!Get F AAAA approved AA viation Maintenance Technician training. H H ousing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. C C all AIAI M 866-3143769.PR OFOF ESS IOIO N AA L SERV II CEHouse Cleaner. $50 New Client Special! AA fresh, sparkling clean house so you can relax! Deep c leaned, sanitized, attention to detail. Personalized one on one service. Satisfaction guaranteed. Offer weekly, bi-weekly, monthly, one time. New B B log! H H ome C C leaned4 U U .blogspot. com for cleaning tips. Schedule YY O UR UR c lean home with C C arolyn. 407-782-1405 (homecleaned4u@gmail.com) PR OFOF ESS IOIO N AA L SERV II CEThe Paint Manager RR esidential/ CC ommercial painting. Pressure washing. Safe roof cleaning. C C all us today! Lic/ I I ns R R ay Wheeler 4075929935 thepaintmanager@aol.comRE AA L ES TATTAT E: C OO MMERC IAIA LOffices for RR entWinter Park RR eal EE state Offices for rent (Winter P ark/Goldenrod/ U U niversity). Doctors office w/5 exam rooms + extra features. Other office units available from 800-3000 SF. New Orleans style bldg; great prices. C C all AA nn 407-293-1934. annpolasek@cfl.rr.comS AA NFO RR D:Free standing retail/office building, 2640 SF, great signage & visibility. Lease for $2800 per month (also for sale). C C all John, owner/broker, 407-492-7111RE AA L ES TATTAT E: FOFO R REN TT Q UIEUIE T JO URUR N AA L II ST S EEEE K II NG W I I NT ER ER P ARAR K RE RE NT AA L II m a female non-smoker age 59 with a mild vision disability preventing me from driving. I I f you have a nice home or apartment in a safe neighborhood near busline available for annual lease, I I d appreciate your call or email. Thank you. Stephanie YY oung 239-424-0182 youngsb30@gmail.comRE AA L ES TATTAT E: FOFO R S AA LE BB lue RR idge Mountain Land Liquida tion!1.37 acres, national forest access, only $9,800. Was $74,900. H H ardwood setting, breathtaking mountain/ valley views. Mild climate, Tremendous 4 season recreation. Paved rds, U U G utilities, water. E E xcellent financing C C all 1-866-952-5303, x21 M UU ST S EEEE Properties -WN CC Mountainviews for only $19,900 W ater, E E lectric, Paved R R oads. Starting at $7,900. Lots available for liquidation Oct. 12th only. C C all 877-717-5263 ext91. UU N RERE ST RICRIC T EE D ACREAACREA G EE ON CUCU M BER BER L A A ND PL A A T EAU EAU !50-89 AA cres Starting at $78,000. H H eavily Wooded, Minutes from 4 State Parks & TN RR iver. C C all 877-282-4409 RE AA L ES TATTAT E: FOFO R S AA LEW EE ST ERER N NO RR T H H C C arolina HH uge VV iews, C C reek, Paved R R oads ready to build. Pick your lot starting $7,900, cash discounts. Liquidating on Oct. 12. C C all 877-717-5263 ext91.S AA LES: ES TATTAT ELily Lace AA ntique Market HU HU G E E Sidewalk SaleSunday, Sept.29th *10 4* Over 50 dealers with treasures for sale. 160 Lake AA ve (17/92) C C onnie Gilbert 4079518883 connie@lilylace.com S AA LES: ES TATTAT E BB ank AA pproved Sale. Smith Lake AA labama.Deep Dockable HH ome Sites from $59,900 (Take V V irtual Tour @ LiveLakefront.com). 26 Prime Lake front lots ordered sold October 12th. B B uy at pennies on the dollar all must go! Open or wooded level throughout to the waters edge. Make an early appointment. B B anks loss YY our gain! Dont miss this. I I ts unbelievable land at an unbelievable price CC all now for early appointment! 1-877-448-6816. S AA LES: G AA R AA GE HUHU G EE RURU MM AA G EE S AA L EE EE piscopal CC hurch of the Good Shepherd, 331 Lake AA ve., Maitland Friday, Oct. 4th & Saturday, Oct. 5th, 8 am to 4 pm From HH wy. 17-92, go west one block on Lake AA ve; church is on the right immediately after railroad tracks. (407) 644-5350 Lily Lace AA ntique Market HU HU G E E Sidewalk SaleSunday Sept. 29th *10-4* Over 50 dealers with treasures for sale. 160 Lake AA ve (17/92) C C onnie Gilbert 4079518883 connie@lilylace.com THEMMARKEt T PLAc C E MindGym September 23, 2013 MindGym September 23, 2013