<%BANNER%>

Winter Park-Maitland observer ( 09-12-2013 )

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title:
Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication:
Winter Park FL
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates:
28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID:
UF00091444:00280

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title:
Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication:
Winter Park FL
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates:
28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID:
UF00091444:00280


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

WPMOBSERVER.COM Yandell Ramos comes home nearly every day with a new piece of healthy advice for his family. He reads labels and serv ing sizes, demands a strict adher ence to his at least one vegetable per dinner rule dinosaur food asparagus is one of his fa vorite choices relegates sugary juice to just the weekends as a treat and opts for water, and en courages everyone to take a brisk walk in the evenings. We have to follow the rules at home, too, said Yandells mother, Mickey Ramos. These are the rules 8-year-old Yandell has learned at Aloma El ementary School where he is a third grader. His physical educa tion teacher Kathy Styron gives all her students healthy advice as Alomas Healthy School Team Leader, and Yandell has taken it all to heart. Styrons work is part of a group of programs implemented at Winter Park, Maitland and Eatonville schools developed and sponsored by the Winter Park Health Foundation (WPHF) as part of its Coordi nated Youth Initiative. Their aim is to improve the physical and mental well being of students, because healthy kids make better students. Through this program, which has been adopted by all Orange County Public Schools (OCPS) as a model for caring for student health, the district was one of just eight districts in Florida to win the top Gold Award for the Flori da Healthy School District. To get the gold, a school must prove it has developed and implement ed policies to improve student health in categories ranging from physical education and nutrition services, to counseling and offer ing a healthy environment. Debbie Watson, WPHF vice president and program director, said the healthy teams can really change the whole atmosphere of a school and its students views. Yandell isnt the only kid at Alo ma thats excited to be eating more fruits and vegetables and exercising with his family. Kids come up and tell me what vegetables they ate last night, Styron said. Theyre proud to say what they had for PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVER Aloma Elementary kindergartener Nichola Torres shows off his muscles. Orange Countys programs have gotten more kids interested in healthy foods and tness. Orange Countys mightier kids Orange is one of eight Florida districts winning Gold Award for healthy programs BRITTNI LARSON Observer staff Please see HEALTHY KIDS on page 2 Maitland property owners can still expect to pay an increase in taxes next year, but following a contentious vote by the City Council on Monday, as of now its set to be half as high of a hike as was initially drafted in July. There will be one more read ing of the citys budget on Sept. 23, where Council members can choose to lower but not raise the 2014 property tax rate. Mondays 4-1 vote lowered the proposed millage from 4.100 to 4.000, which assistant city man ager Sharon Anselmo said reduc es the anticipated tax increase facing owners of homes valued at $350,000 with a $50,000 home stead exemption from an addi tional $66 to an additional $36 for the year. That adds up to an additional 12 cents charged to taxpayers for each $1,000 of taxable property value they own over what they paid in 2013. The budget approved Sept. 9 rationalizes the increase by add ing additional funding for the city to unfreeze three positions, improve the library, and allocate funds for future park improve ments. Maitland cuts tax increase proposal SARAH WILSON Observer staff The Winter Park City Com mission voted to ban fast food along Park Avenue during Mon days City Commission meeting an action that sets a standard for future restaurants joining the Avenue. The ordinance introduces restaurants dining in the citys zoning regulations, allowing code enforcement to better differentiate between the two. By a unanimous vote, the City Commission supported the new language, as well as the ban on fast food. I do think this is going to take us a long way toward not allowing what some people dont want to see, which are fast food restaurants on the Avenue, Commissioner Sarah Sprinkel said. The new ordinance came about after an uproar from local residents and merchants over Firehouse Subs and BurgerFi joining the Avenue. Concerned about preserving Park Avenues character, a group made up of Winter Park Chamber of Com merce members, Park Avenue merchants and attorney Frank Hamner drafted the ordinance to help clarify restaurant the City Commission considered ambiguous until now. thing else was to maintain the character and experience of the Park Avenue corridor by rein City pulls trigger on Park Avenue fast food ban Two fast food restaurants will be allowed to stay TIM FREED Observer staff Please see BAN on page 2 While I personally loathe to limit any type of business activity, I understand the specialness of Park Avenue.

PAGE 2

HEALTHY KIDS | O range County kids arent just tolerating healthier foods, theyre bragging about them BAN | Commission draws line in the sand, wants more waiters lunch. Lori Gilbert, senior director of OCPS Food and Nutrition Ser vices, tests all new food choices in school lunch on the children to see what they like. Gilbert has got it down to a science. Students eat more apples when theyre sliced, like coleslaw on their pulled pork and plum sauce on their turkey. Its not going to be healthy unless the kids are going to eat it, she said. OCPS students have to take at least one fruit or vegetable when they get school lunch, theres a no soda or candy policy, and nothing is fried. They often try vegetables many students would never get the chance to eat at home. What theyre going to receive through the lunch line is often the healthier choice, Watson said. OCPS has also tripled the num ber of breakfasts served in the past are now allowed to take breakfast into the classroom if their bus is late. Many schools have breakfast carts set up to make it easier and if the schools percentage of free and reduced lunch eligible stu dents is great enough, all students lets students focus on their stud ies, not their growling stomach. Theyve got the fuel to learn, said Aloma Elementary Principal Drew Hawkins. It is so critical to their readi ness to learn, Watson said. Not only are OCPS students eating better, theyre getting in some extra exercise in class. They call it brain breaks. Students take some time out of academ ics to get the wiggles out and re stretch or do some jumping jacks. Styrons students love to run laps, and their monthly school walk and bike to school days continue to grow. Its all part of the WPHF programs, and its making a dif ference; Styron said she doesnt see nearly as many overweight students as she used to. Many students are embracing a health ier lifestyle, she said, just like Yan dell. Because we want to live to be 105, thats his [Yandells] answer, Ramos said. We want to live a long life, a healthy life. the ordinance last month. dining just by providing table service? Well they shouldnt, but they were able to. The list of criteria for what makes a restaurant fast food include payment before food is consumed, customers busing their own tables and disposable tableware. Restaurants that show at least two of these traits are now prohibited from joining Park Avenue, while Firehouse Subs and BurgerFi are protected under a grandfather clause and must out by the city. The new regulations also ing, which include criteria such as table service, a host or hostess Restaurants that dont meet these standards but are a step above fast food will be placed dining restaurants, and will be limited to only 15 percent of the Avenue storefront space. Commissioner Steven Leary supported the ordinance, but said that Park Avenue would have thrived with or without a ban on fast food. The brand for Park Avenue is very, very strong, Leary said. I dont think it needs so much control. Mayor Ken Bradley said he saw Park Avenue as something worth preserving and maintain ing, despite his qualms with regulating businesses. Park Avenue is a very, very unique place, one that we all love, enjoy and want to see continue to thrive and improve, Bradley said. While I personally loathe to limit any type of busi ness activity, I understand the specialness of Park Avenue. If the city of Winter Park owned a mall, wed have a differ ent view of this. C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE PHOTO BY TIM FREED THE OBSERVER A recently approved Firehouse Subs franchise will be allowed to stay on Park Avenue, even though it hasnt been built yet. But after that no more fast food will be allowed. Fresh off their biggest road blowout in school history, the Knights will be looking for an up set in Pennsylvania this Saturday. After trouncing Florida Inter national University 38-0 in Miami to take their season record to 2-0 and scoring differential to 76-7, the Knights are looking to keep the momentum going. And with a win against Penn State, the 2013 season would become only the fourth time in program history that the Knights started 3-0. But that hypothetical would be against history. Though the Knights showcased a dominating performance against the Panthers on Sept. 6, in which they out gained FIU 390 yards to 173, they havent had much luck in college footballs second largest stadium. The Knights seemed headed meeting with the Nittany Lions in 2002, leading by an improbable 24-10 at the half. But thats when the Lions turned on the offense, scored 17 unanswered points and left the Knights behind. Two years later the Knights fell 37-13 to the Lions, in head coach George OLearys only meeting against them. Penn State hasnt lost to the Knights. And, like the Knights, they havent lost this season either, going 2-0 to start. That includes a 45-7 blowout last week against Eastern Michigan that included a Penn State hallmark of nonstop, unanswered touchdowns. The Li ons brick-wall defense didnt al low Eastern Michigan into the end zone all game. The Knights carry that same record into Beaver Stadium in University Park, Pa. Having only given up a touchdown so far this season, theyre rolling through one of their best season starts of all time. And their offense has proven to be relentless. Blake Bortles, who threw a career-high 314 yards passing against Akron on Aug. 29, has the longest-running streak in the Football Bowl Subdivision for passes without an interception at 217, throwing 17 touchdown passes in the meantime. A trio of supporting play ers from last years offense have emerged as breakout stars, with Storm Johnson already 188 yardsdeep into his season at running back, and Rannell Hall catching 127 yards in receptions in just the FIU game alone. Breshad Perriman, who caught less than two passes per game last season, snagged 113 yards of receptions against Akron alone. But with an offensive jugger naut like Penn State looming this weekend, itll be UCFs defense that gets the big test. So far theyve passed against Akron and FIU. They allowed just 31 yards on the ground against the Panthers, from a defensive squad packed with 17 Knights rookies. The biggest play the Knights have allowed all sea son was a 23-yard Akron rush. can break Penn States dominance with a 6 p.m. showdown Satur day, Sept. 14. The game will air live on the Big Ten Network, UCF Gameday, and 740-AM radio. Knights face biggest challenge yet ISAAC BABCOCK Observer staff

PAGE 3

Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Page 3 Member FDICEQUAL HOUSINGLENDER RYour Home Town Bank TRUSTCO BANK407-659-5701 www.TrustcoBank.comFast, Local Decisions Close your First Mortgage in 30 days!*Low Closing Costs No Points and No T ax Escrow requiredSchedule Closing Date at Application 85% of our Loans close as scheduled!* Trustco Mortgages We Close Loans!*Information based on current closings. Circumstances beyond Trustco Banks control may delay closing. Please n ote: W e r eser ve the right to alte r or w ithdraw these products or certain featu res thereof without prior notification. Winter Park City Talk BY RANDY KNIGHT CITY MANAGER Socially behaving canines are welcome! Special drawing for people wearing their team spirit! KEEP UP WITH MAITLAND NEWS AND EVENTS!www.IndependenceLane.com Facebook.com/ItsMyMaitland Sept. 9 City Commission meeting highlights There was a City Commission meeting held Sept. 9 in City Hall Commission Chambers. Below are a few highlights of decisions made at the meeting: Non-action Items 2013 was presented and accepted. Consent Agenda Stephens, Lovelace for RFP-262013, External Audit Services, was approved and the Mayor was au thorized to execute the contract. execute the Settlement Agreement and Mutual Release with Duke Energy Florida. vices Agreement (Radio Main tenance, Network Security and Monitoring) expenditure from State Forfeiture Funds in compli ance with Florida State Statute 932.7055(5)(1) was approved. Public Hearings ordinance revising the permitted and conditional uses regulations for restaurants and other food service establishments, provid other restaurants was approved. nance allowing the city manager to make special exception for dogs to be in Central Park and other events was approved with an amendment limiting the number of such events in Central Park to two per year. Budget Public Hearings adopting the millage rate was ap proved. nual budget was approved with an amendment to move $300,000 from vehicle replacement into General Reserves. A full copy of the Sept. 9 City Commission minutes will be available at cityofwinterpark.org the week of Sept. 23, pending ap proval by the City Commission. CoffeeTalk featuring Commissioner Steve Leary If you have a latt beans to grind or you simply want to espresso your thoughts, Cof feeTalk may be the cup for you. Please join an informal conver sation with Commissioner Steve Leary on Thursday, Sept. 12, from 8 to 9 a.m. at the Winter Park Wel come Center, located at 151 W. Lyman Ave. CoffeeTalk gives the community an opportunity to sit down and talk with the Commis sioner over a cup of coffee and chat about any city issues that are of interest to them. Special thanks to Palmanos Cafe, Coffee & Wine Bar for donat ing the coffee for this special series. For more information, please call 407599-3428. Park Avenue closed to through trafc Sept. 25 The Winter Park High School Annual Parade and Pep Rally will make its way down Park Avenue on Wednesday, Sept. 25, begin ning at 5:15 p.m. Park Avenue will the parade route from Webster Avenue to Lyman Avenue from 5 to 6 p.m. Side streets will also be closed at the Park Avenue intersections as the parade passes. In order to a rolling fashion and will reopen immediately after the parade has safely passed. Got beans to grind? $104,000 $108,160 $111,405 $115,861 $119,950 $119,950 $124,748 $129,738 $129,738 $134,928 $131,080 $171,819 $183,846 $225,219 $240,985 $89,861 $78,141 $59,882 $75,679 $82,486 $96,532 $99,939 $61,477 $75,896 $85,597 $85,595 $97,069 $84,961 W h i c h l i n e g i v e s y o u t h e b e s t c h a n c e f o r s u cce s s ? I llustr a tion per iod: 1 -1-2000 thr ough 1-1-2012. Each e xample sho wn assumes $100,000 initial pr emium with no withdr a w als M ar ket v alue based on the S&P 500 Index. H i s t o r i c a l perf o r m a n c e o f the S & P 5 0 0 I n d e x s h o u l d not be c onsider ed a r epr esen ta tion of cur r en t or futur e per f or manc e of the I nde x or of an y annuit y H ypothetical inde x annuit y pr oduc t illustr a tion assumes cr editing method of a 6% annual poin t -t o -poin t cap and annual r eset H ypothetical I nc ome R ider V alue assumes a 7% annual r a t e of r etur n f or inc ome pur poses I llustr a tion v alues r epr esen t g r oss r etur ns A ssumed annuit y r a t es and ac tual hist or ical pr ic es of the S&P 500 I nde x w er e used in this purely hypothetical example for the purpose of illustrating comparitive values and to illustrate how the Interest-Crediting Strategy might have guaranteed. Past performance does not guarantee future results. O N E S H OTY o u o n l y h a v e a t r et i r em en t w i ll f a ll6 0% o f A m er i c a n s s h o r t. M ember of(407)-644-6646w w w .aS af eHar b or .c omB ob A dams P r esiden t/CEOA S af eHar bor LL C bob@asaf ehar bor .c om Illustration period: 12-31-1999 though 12-31-2012According to paycheckforlife.com, three out of ve middle-class Americans entering retirement today are projected to outlive their nancial assets. Learn how to protect your retirement account from losses, maintain upside potential and maximize your lifetime income. Call us today for your PERSONALIZED SAFE MONEY REPORT.

PAGE 4

Page 4 | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 Volume 25, Issue 37 PHONE: 407-563-7000 FAX: 407-563-7099 WPMOBSERVER.COM Orlando, FL 32835-5705 PUBLISHER Tracy Craft 407.515.2605 TCraft@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MANAGING EDITOR Isaac Babcock 407.563.7023 IBabcock@TurnstileMediaGroup.com ASSOCIATE EDITOR Sarah Wilson 407.563.7026 SWilson@TurnstileMediaGroup.com DESIGNER Tom Miller 407.563.7032 TMiller@TurnstileMediaGroup.com STAFF WRITERS Brittni Larson Megan Stokes Tim Freed Allison Olcsvay Kristy Vickery COLUMNISTS Chris Jepson Jepson@MediAmerica.us Louis Roney LRoney@cfl.rr.com Josh Garrick JoshGarrick9@gmail.com ADVERTISING SALES Linda Stern 407.376.2434 LStern@TurnstileMediaGroup.com LEGAL NOTICE ADVERTISING Ashley McBride 407.286.0807 Legal@FLALegals.com SUBSCRIPTIONS/CIRCULATION Luana Baez 407.563.7013 LBaez@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MEMBER OF: -Florida Press Association -Winter Park/Maitland/Goldenrod Chambers of Commerce Winter Park/Maitland Observer is published by Turnstile Media Group. Founded in 1990 and headquartered in Orlando, Fla., Turnstile Media Group is also the parent of Golfweek, Golfweek Custom Media, TurfNet, Professional Artist, Seminole Voice, Baldwin Park Living and Turnstile Connect. TURNSTILE MEDIA GROUP CHAIRMAN Rance Crain PRESIDENT/CEO Francis X. Farrell VICE PRESIDENTS Patti Green & Jeff Babineau USPS #00-6186 ISSN 1064-3613 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Winter Park / Maitland Observer 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835 Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster Maitland City Talk BY HOWARD SCHIEFERDECKER MAYOR Change is coming to Maitland! Starting the week of Sept. 23, residents will be receiving new green garbage carts and new blue recycling carts. The new blue re cycling cart can hold 64 gallons and will replace the current dualbin system with a single stream cart. Single stream means that residents no longer have to sepa rate their recyclables, although containers must still be clean and boxes broken down. More items are included in the list of accepted recyclables, and recyclable items include: all paper products (clean and dry), aluminum cans and foil, steel/tin cans, all plastics (except bottles and jars, and aseptic and gable-top containers (milk and juice cartons). Because the cart has a non-removable, hinged lid, recyclables will stay clean and dry, ensuring items stay out of the With the new solid waste pro gram comes a new disposal facil ity. The city has entered into an inter-local agreement with the Seminole County Solid Waste Management Division, which will provide residents with ac cess to the residential household hazardous waste collection center. Starting on Oct. 1 residents can drop off their household hazard ous waste at the Seminole County Central Transfer Station at 1950 State Route 419 in Longwood. The Central Transfer Station is open Monday through Saturday from 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Residents with large quantities of household hazardous waste should contact Seminole County in advance of delivering the materials to the col lection center. Residents can sim ply bring their Florida drivers proof of residency, check in at the front desk and follow the signs for the household waste drop off collection center. Some common household hazardous waste items include the following: Hazardous material that is not accepted includes dioxins, medi cations, radioactive material, ex plosives and biologically active material. The program will include a new system for the pick-up of bulk waste. The twice yearly clean up weeks will be replaced with weekly bulk pick up collection for residential households. Those days will be posted on the citys website after Sept. 30. No more stacking items in your garage waiting for November or May to roll around. Residents will be able to place bulk items, such as furni ture, appliances, lawn equipment, furnaces, and bicycles at the curb for collection on a weekly basis for no additional charge. Finally, there will be no change in the current collection days for garbage, recycling or yard waste. For additional information, con tact the Utility Billing division at 407-539-6265 or by email at utili ties@itsmymaitland.com Written by Sharon Anselmo, Assistant City Manager New recycling options Nows your chance to showcase just how beautiful your community really is. Submit your best photo of the area, and your shot could be featured in the 2014 Winter Park-Maitland Observer calendar!Visit WPMObserver.com/Photo for more details and to upload your winning submission. Enter the Winter ParkMaitla nd Observer Calendar Photo Contest today! CALENDAR PHOTO CONTEST The Winter Park Wildcats showed they can win on the road with a 33-7 trouncing of East Riv er Sept. 6 on the gridiron. The win put the Wildcats record up to 2-0, already besting their start last sea son. By the time East River scored already led 33-0 in a game that they dominated from the out set. Jacob Gregorys interception From that point the Wildcats cruised, with quarterback J.P. Colton showing some arm with a 35-yard pass touchdown to complement his TD run from just the night for the Wildcats. But the workhorse was Malik Foy, who rushed to nearly 150 yards and touchdowns. The Wildcats return home to host Ocoee at 7 p.m. Friday. The Knights (1-1) lost 7-0 to University last week after blanking Colonial 27-0 to start the season. Edgewater In a sour turn after a surprising preseason kickoff, the Edgewater Eagles are 0-2 in the regular sea son. They fell to the Wekiva Mus tangs 18-15 last week, but only af ter a late comeback was dashed by The Eagles hadnt scored un til a few minutes into the fourth when running back Craig Rucker found a lane and hit the gas for a 50-yard touchdown. A touch down later the Eagles sealed a trip to overtime with a two-point con version run courtesy of Joe Clark. The Eagles travel across the street to face Bishop Moore at 7 p.m. Friday. The Hornets are 2-0 after shutting out Harmony 10-0 Sept. 6. Wildcats trounce East River ISAAC BABCOCK Observer staff Anti-Freeze Automobile Batteries Compact Fluorescent Lights Computer Components Fluorescent Light Tubes Gasoline and Cans (up to 5 gallons) Glues Insecticides Paints Lawn Chemicals Mercury-Containing Devices Paints Poisons Pool Chemicals Propane Tanks Rechargeable Batteries Solvents Televisions Thermostats Thermometers Used Oil COMMON HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE

PAGE 5

Purchase a FlamingoFor just $10, youll get one amingo for your yard and another to place among the growing ocks in Winter Park. Available at: Join the Pink Army Join the Pink Army and be part of a unied effort to end breast cancer. As a Florida and hope to the people of our community. Visit JointhePinkArmy.comGet a Mammogram A yearly mammogram is the single most effective method for detecting breast cancer early, when it is most treatable and beatable. To schedule your annual WinterParkHospital.com .Now Open services, comprehensive breast health and much more!PinkOutWinterPark.comJoin the ock! Support Pink Out 2013.Get involved! October 2013 WPMH-13-14780 PinkOut FPad.indd 1 9/5/13 2:36 PM

PAGE 6

Page 6 | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Philharmonic buys Plaza After months of planning, the Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra purchased the property known as The Plaza Live, located at 425 Bumby Ave., for $3.4 million in August. The sale included the Plaza Live building, all its contents and the Plaza Live business, which currently presents more than 135 events each year. The Philharmonic is planning extensive renova tions that will provide a new home for the orchestra, including ofces, a rehearsal hall and performance space for the orchestra, as well as an upgrade to the venue so it can continue operating as a one of Floridas premiere rock, pop, jazz and contemporary concert venues. Fitness studio arrives NAI Realvest recently negotiated new industrial leases totaling 14,500 square feet at Airport Indus trial Center, Goldenrod CommerCenter and on Divi sion Street south of downtown Orlando. Michael Heidrich, a principal in the rm, brokered all three transactions representing the landlords, including a 6,000-square-foot lease to PTS Fitness Studio opening in the Goldenrod CommerCenter. Business Briefs Community Bulletin Clothing kids in need Dr. Phillips Charities a Central Florida philanthropic organization, continues its COOL FIT program (Cloth ing Orange & Osceola Learners of Families In Tran sition). This program provides new back-to-school clothing to all homeless students (meeting McKin ney-Vento standards) in grades kindergarten through 12. Approximately 60,000 pieces of top-selling Levis brand apparel including jeans, khakis, cargo shorts, polo shirts and graphic tees have been purchased by Dr. Phillips and distributed to children in need. Restore donations grow The Habitat for Humanity of Greater Orlando Area ReStore recently collected nearly six truckloads worth of donations. The items, which included desks, chairs, countertops, sinks, lab stools, other furnish ings, will be resold to fund Habitat building projects. The furniture was donated as part of Rollins Colleges preparation for the opening of the Bush Science Cen ter in September. For more information about the Habitat for Humanity Restore call 407-480-2493 or visit orlandorestore.org Savannah Court and Cove Excellence in Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation 1301 W. Maitland Blvd. Maitland, FL 32751407-645-3990www.SavannahCourtMaitland.comAssisted Living Facility License No. 8447 Skilled Nursing Facility License No. 1635096 Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above!A Senior Living Community where Hospitality is a Way of Life.Join us forSavannah Under The StarsEntertainment by theFaith and Jazz BandDate: September 24, 2013 Time: 6:30PM to 8:30PM Please RSVP 407-645-3990 PHOTOS BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVER Orange County Animal Services brought out its mobile adoption vehicle to Baldwin Parks First Friday Art Festival on Sept. 6. bringing adoptable cats and dogs to the community.

PAGE 7

Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Page 7 Lifestyles Its become routine for many people tion. From how we travel, to switching light bulbs, to turning off unused appli save money. Like home consumers, local schools also have to consider energy con servation in their budget cutting strategies. Facility teams in Orange and Seminole County are busy putting their conserva tion strategies in place for the new school year to ensure that every energy dollar is well spent. ings is good for us, [Orange County Public Schools], its good for the taxpayer and it generates less carbon dioxide, which is better for the environment, said Orange County Public Schools Facilities Manager John Brennan. Orange County In Orange County, savings starts in the kitchen. Brennan said school kitchens are working on overhauling procedures to help reduce energy costs. Kitchen workers are being provided with energy saving training and a spread sheet tool to enable them to calculate their energy consumption. Based on this data, Brennan said, each school will formulate a new savings plan detailing how they will reduce energy usage in the kitchens, such as unplugging less frequently used equip ment, working in batches or switching off lights. Following the implementation of these new plans, the facilities department will do energy audits to help keep them on said Orange County Public Schools hopes to save $1 million using this strategy alone. Energy costs can also cool off though centrally controlled thermostats. Ther mostats in Orange County Schools are centrally controlled through the facilities department, requiring individual class rooms and build ings to operate at a range. In addition, Orange County Public Schools gets rebates from Duke Energy and the Orlando Utilities Commission for using more energynew schools such as Walker Middle, Oakridge High, Edgewater High and Aloma Elemen tary School. We are aim ing to increase our in Orange County nan said. Seminole County Seminole County Energy Manager Hec tor Barbosa said Seminole County Public Schools are shining light on several new ways for the county to save on electricity. e Mayf lower is an incredible safety net. At The Mayower, Nancy Klingler benets from the wisdom of proactive planning. She enjoys her stunning, customized villa along with a maintenance-free lifestyle that enables her to travel regularly and maintain her social circle. And having moved here with her late husband Bob, the advantages extend even further. Wed always planned to make the move later on, but we fast-tracked our decision when Bob became ill, Nancy says. He wanted to make sure I was taken care of and I am. You never know what will happen in the future, so you have to prepare. No matter what comes my way, The Mayower is an incredible safety net that provides a sense of security for me and my children.Whats your plan for the future? Call today, and lets talk about it: 407 .672 1620. 8 8 1 4 1 P R AD WPO 9/2013 Wi nt e r Pa r k' s Di s t i nc t i ve Re t i r e me nt Co mmu ni t y www.themayf lower .com 1620 Mayower Court Winter Park, FL 32792 PROACTIVE PLANNING [ and lifelong security ] MAY 972 Klinger Ad_WPO.indd 1 8/13/13 12:14 PM When an elderly opera singer goes to a concert, he may choose an aisle seat so he can vamoose if things dont pan out to please him. On Friday, Sept. 6, when Florida Opera Theaters Opera In The Park Series showcased baritone Gabriel Preisser at the Winter Park Community Center, this old-timer stayed glued to his seat from Baritone Preisser demonstrated the req uisites of an accomplished concert singer. His voice is excellent, and pliable enough to deliver everything his very musical mind imagines. At Preissers side was pianist Robin Stamper, a virtuoso pro who, I hope, never again is sentenced to play an instrument such as what served as a piano on this occasion. Preissers program was varied enough to have suited him well in New Yorks Town Hall. This fact made me wonder how his voice would carry in a full-sized concert hall with an orchestra pit. from his energetic opening, Rossinis Lar go al Factotum, to his encore, Germonds aria Di Provenza from Traviata. Along the way Mr. Preisser tossed in a tasteful rendition of Menottis When the Air Sings of Summer from The Old Man and the Thief. Familiar songs by Johannes Brahms and F. Paolo Tosti were welcome hearing and emphasized good diction, and pleasing legato line. I personally enjoyed Preissers touching rendition of Tostis Ideale, a song I sang on countless programs. Preissers range from top to bottom is easy and cut from one cloth. A special treat was three French cabaret songs by Francis Poulenc. Here Preissers panache and humorous interpretation brought smiles to the faces of his audi ence. Stamper soloed ably in piano pieces by Scriabin and Liszt. Gabriel Preisser ended a delightful evening with Broadway selections from Paint Your Wagon, The Fantasticks and Carousel. Versatile baritone scores in Winter Park concert LOUIS RONEY Observer columnist Local schools gear up for energy savings ALLISON OLCSVAY Observer staff PHOTOS BY ALLISON OLCSVAY THE OBSERVER New energy-efcient kitchens cut down on food preparation costs in local schools. Please see ENERGY on page 8

PAGE 8

Page 8 | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer FAMILY CALENDAR Calendar SEPT. 12 Its the Mingle at the Museum! The Al bin Polasek Museum and Sculpture Gar dens invites you to have cocktails while networking, listening to poetry, and look ing at sculpture. Its from 6 to 9 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 12, at the museum, lo cated at 633 Osceola Ave. in Winter Park. Visit polasek.org for more information. Come enjoy wine and Park Avenue busi nesses at the Sip and Stroll from 5-8 p.m. Sept. 12. Visit winterpark.org for more information. SEPT. 14 The Winter Park Public Library presents Bash for Books at 7 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 14, at the Winter Park Civic Cen ter. This years party will feature food, wine, a silent auction and rafes to raise money for library programs and services. The event will transport guests to Alices Wonderland, complete with live entertain ment, a casino, and great food and spirits. Visit wppl.org for more information. A rally to help save Winter Parks Capen House will be held at Central Park from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sept. 14. Come out to show your support for the project to move it across Lake Osceola! SEPT. 15 The Center for Contemporary Dance takes audiences into the rehearsal studio for an intimate preview of evolving works from Moore Dance Project. Performances take place at 3 p.m. on Sundays, Sept. 8 and 15, at 3580 Aloma Ave. No. 7 in Winter Park. Tickets are $12 and may be purchased by calling 407-695-8366 or visiting thecenterfordance.org. Sept. 12 Popcorn Flicks in Central Park will fol low the Park Avenue Sip & Stroll with a family-friendly movie on the lawn. The Shaggy Dog, presented by The Enzian, will start at 8 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 12, at Winter Parks Central Park Main Stage. Bring the family, a blanket or some chairs, and a picnic for inexpensive family fun under the stars. Sept. 13 The Art & History Museums Maitland (concludes its Summer Concert Series on Friday, Sept. 13, at 7 p.m. with a con cert by Central Florida band The Master Blasters The Concert Series, held on the second Friday every month from May to September, takes place in the A&Hs Main Garden, located at 231 W. Packwood Ave. in Maitland. ENERGY | Schools taking the leap into a high tech future to save millions of dollars on energy costs Starting with the basics, schools are switching from old, high wattage T8 lights to new, blubs. And, in areas where light gyms, new LED lights may be installed over the next year. And at the end of the day, schools will no longer look like cruise ships all lit up in the night. Non-essential parking lot lights will go out after midnight. New programmable ther mostats are also being installed, which Barbosa said will be set at 77 during peak hours and 85 dur ing off hours. Like OCPS, Seminole County Public Schools also receive rebates from Duke Energy for mable thermostats. Four schools installed, four more are under construction and an additional nine schools are planned. Ac cording to the Energy Conserva tion Task Force, the cumulative rebate dollars earned since 2007 is $338,123.47. Also, the four-day work week instituted during summer break will continue during winter and spring breaks, allowing schools to save energy on the extra days when buildings are empty. Both Brennan and Barbosa said that more than any indi vidual programs, the cost saving measure that will be most effec tive is simple common sense. Were just doing what any one would do, Barbosa said. Switching off lights when you leave a room, turning off comput ers when you leave for the day, its all just common sense stuff that when you add it up, saves a lot of money. C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 7 PHOTO COURTESY OF ORANGE COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS Repainting roofs more reective colors cuts down on cooling costs by reducing the amount of heat absorbed into school buildings. Maitland Chamber of Commerce 407-644-0741 jlee@maitlandchamber.com www.maitlandchamber.com 110 N. Maitland Ave. Maitland, FL 32751 PRODUC TIONS WIMBERL Y WOLFECatered By Event Coordinator Printing & Design Corporate Sponsor A DIVIS I O N OF VS M EDIA GR OUP INC. Community Chamber Luncheon Craig Carter Brighthouse NetworksCreating an Exceptional Customer Experience. Luncheon Sponsored byWednesday, September 18, 11:30 am 1:00 pm Maitland Civic Center, 641 S. Maitland Avenue Cost: $15.00 Chamber Members with RSVP by 5:00 pm Monday, September 16 After the deadline $20.00 $20.00 Non-Members Reservations Required! 407-644-0741 September.indd 1 9/10/13 11:49 AM

PAGE 9

LOCAL NEWS. BIG IMPACT.Subscribe now to keep up with the latest news unfolding in your community.Get one year (52 issues) of the Winter Park-Maitland Observer for only $30 Plus, as a thank you for subscribing, youll receive a complimentary copy of the 2014 Winter Park-Maitland Observer Calendar in your December 5 issue! Bonus Offer Subscribe or renew before November 15 and youll get three more months of the Winter Park-Maitland Observer at no additional charge! A SPECIAL OFFER FOR NEW AND RETURNING SUBSCRIBERS Visit WPMObserver.com/Subscribe or call 407.563.7013 to order today!

PAGE 10

Page 10 | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Homes Observer IN THE HEART OF THE TREE STREETS IN OLDE WP CHAIN OF LAKES EXECUTIVE ESTATE W/GUEST HOUSE BEAUTIFUL FAMILY HOME IN TIMBERLANE SHORES CHARMING WP HOME W/MIDCENTURY MODERN FEATURES Voted Best Real Estate Agency by Winter Park/Maitland Observer Readers www.fanniehillman.com When you step back and take a look at the real estate market in Orange and Seminole counties everything seems to be going well, right now. People are purchasing existing homes at a brisk pace as reflected by the growing number of transactions, and prices for single-family homes and condomini ums have taken a steep climb north of where they were just a year ago. The problem: afford ability has become an issue once again for some buyers as rap idly rising home prices have priced some fami lies right out of the market. The median price for a home in the Orlando area in July was up over 20 percent from July 2012 which was the largest annual increase in seven years, and condo prices were up a lofty 29.5 percent in the past year. Couple rising prices with rising mortgage interest rates (an average of 4.58 percent on a 30-year fixed loan and 3.6 percent for a 15-year fixed loan as of August 23) and its a potentially dangerous mix for first-time buyers trying to find a home with an affordable price point. While mortgage rates are still relatively low by historic standards, even the slightest increase can make a huge difference in af fordability for many families. Mix in a thin ning inventory of existing homes, especially those in the lower prices ranges, and it cre ates an even greater affordability dilemma for some buyers. Affordability becomes an even greater prob lem when you consider that 67.5 percent of the pending sales in Orange and Seminole counties on August 23 were lower priced distressed properties, while 25 percent of the active listings in the two-county area were distressed properties mostly in lower price ranges. The old adage Theres never been a better time to buy still holds true. Many economists expect mortgage rates to keep climbing and in markets like Orange and Seminole counties where inventory levels are well below the 4-6-month supply that typically defines a market balanced between buyers and sellers, home values will likely continue to increase at a rapid pace due to demand. The uptick in rising home prices and mortgage interest rates, coupled with a dwindling inventory of homes, especially those in lower price ranges, has created a sense of urgency amongst many buyers trying to lock in a deal before prices and interest rates climb too far out of reach for homebuyers. On the one hand, rising prices means more homeowner equity which could lead to more available inventory if more folks jump off the fence and list their homes for sale. It also could lead to more buyers, especially first-timers, being priced out of the housing market. While there remain a number of issues to be resolved in the local housing market, namely reducing the number of distressed properties and increasing inven tory in all price ranges, now seems like the obvious time for Orange and Seminole county homebuyers to say Carpe diem, especially for those who have been waiting to buy their first home. Just be ready to act fast and make sure you are pre-approved for a loan which will make your offer even more viable. Scott Hillman is president of Fannie Hillman + Associates, a 32-year-old Winter Park-based real estate company specializ ing in residential real estate sales. He can be reached at (407) 644-1234 or at scott@fanniehillman.com. Afforability remains a problem for some LISA FLEMING Realtor Fannie Hillman + Associates (407) 644-1234 ext. 223 (321) 228-8341 cell www.fanniehillman.com lcfrealty@yahoo.comVoted Orlandos Best Residential Real Estate Oce Ranked a Top Producer since 2002Born and raised in the Winter Park/Maitland area DEDICATION. COMMUNICATION. NEGOTIATION.My skills will get you the results youre looking for. e real estate market is moving fast, thanks to low inventory and high buyer count, so contact me today to buy or sell your home quickly! H O U S E S W A N T E D ! G e t a F R E E N o O b l i g a o n C A S H O e r O n Y o u r H o u s e W i t h i n 2 4 H o u r s (8 5 5 ) 7 5 5 1 8 1 8 w w w C i r c l e 1 8 H o m e s c o m C A S H $ $ $ Q U I C K C L O S E A N Y P R I C E R A N G E A N Y C O N D I T I O N A N Y S I T U A T I O N Serving Central Florida Over 32 Yearswww.fanniehillman.com 407.644.1234 Homes brought to you by: Serving Central Florida Over 32 Yearswww.fanniehillman.com 407.644.1234 Homes brought to you by: Scott Hillman

PAGE 11

Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Page 11 Central Florida homeowners have been on an equity roller coaster ride over the past few years. First came the produc tion boom starting in 2004. Me teoric was a common term used to describe the rapid increase of home values, and it was common for builders to have exten sive waiting lists to purchase in new communities. Then came the crash. Many builders shuttered their doors and homeowners fell victim to foreclosure as they watched their equity evaporate before their very eyes. Buyers had an overwhelming amount of homes to choose from and foreclosures exploded on to the scene. Often times the foreclosed homes, while in disrepair, were far cheaper to buy than tradi tional sales or buying new. Put simply, they were some of the best values out there. Distressed homes dominated the market. That is no longer the case. Over the past two years the real estate market here in Orange and Seminole counties has is due to several factors, two of decrease of available homes for sale. In late-2012 and 2013 Central Florida saw investors with cash explode onto the scene, buying in with the lack of available homes, and bidding wars erupted while sellers experienced a 25 percent increase over 2012 in median sales price. Moreover, the days of distressed homes representing the largest segment of the market of homes for sale are gone. In July there were 2,836 home sales in Orlando, of which only 491 were foreclosures and 490 short sales. The other 1,855 home sales were traditional. In fact the number of traditional sales (sales of homes by the homeowner and not a bank), were up 56 percent while sales of foreclosures and short sale homes were down 15 percent and 30 percent respec tively. Not only are there fewer foreclosures for homeowners to contend with, they are no longer priced below other homes on the market. The Orlando Regional Realtor Association also stated in its market statistics report for July that the median price for fore closures was up 17 percent that month while regular home sales increased 11 percent. National data provider Core Logic stated in late August that the amount of homes in foreclo sure was 949,000 nationwide, a 32 percent decrease from June and down 20 percent from 2012s total. Not only that but 8.3 mil lion homeowners are projected to be above water in terms of equity in the next 15 months according to RealtyTrac. Fewer foreclosures and moderate price gains mean an overall improvement in the housing sectors health. And with more homeowners experiencing positive equity in their homes, its a win-win situation for everyone. www.BaldwinParkLiving.com Jeff ClarkColdwell Banker Residential 407.733.0773 j.clark@coldwellbanker.com www.BaldwinParkLiving.comWelcoming More Families To Our Neighborhood Than Any Other RE ALTOR. Sold in Baldwin Park WHERE QUALITY MEETS EFFICIENCY216 S. Park Ave, Ste. 1 | Winter Park, FL 32789email: titledesk@midtowntitlellc.com www.midtowntitlellc.comP: 407.644.1157 F: 407.644.1357Serving Central Florida Homeowners & Lenders since 2006 Residential. Commercial. Loan-Purchase. Renance Closings. Satellite closing services available throughout state of Florida Bonded. Licensed. Insured. Positive equity on the rise for local homeowners Christina Rordam is a local Realtor. Con tact her at 407-928-8294 or ChristinaS ellsOrlando.com Christina Rordam Keepin it Real Estate INTEGRITY LOYALTY UNWAVERING ENTHUSIASM Kelly L. PriceBrokerTiffany PrewittRealtor Sales Assoc.407.645.4321 Winter Park $1,125,000 2 BR | 3 BA | 2,450 SF Maitland $2,690,000 4 BR | 4 BA | 7,430 SF Orlando $1,299,000 4 BR | 4.5 BA | 5,369 SF

PAGE 12

Page 12 | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer rfff ntbt rf f ffnrn btt WINTER PARK, FL---The residential real estate market in Orange and Seminole Counties continued to get healthier over existing home sales and prices showed marked improvement over a comparable period last year, according to the 2013 MidYear Hillman Report published by Fannie Hillman + Associates. Overall transactions for sin gle-family homes (9140) were up 10.6 percent with sales of homes priced from $300,001 to in excess of $1 million up and average of 48.1 percent. Higher priced condos also did well with sales of those priced from $200,000 to in excess of $500,000 up an average of 53.4 percent. On the surface everything in the local real estate market is go ing well. Although overall sales and prices have shown marked improvement in almost every category, my concern continues to be one of available affordable product which, when combined with rising mortgage interest at an affordable price point, said Scott Hillman, president of that twice a year takes a compre hensive look at existing home and condo trends in Orange and Seminole counties by employing information based on My Florida Regional MLS Database. There continues to be a very limited supply of affordable homes priced under $300,000 and few available condos under $200,000, said Hillman said, noting sales of homes under $300,000 showed only a four per cent hike year-to-year, while sales of condos under 200,000 were One the other hand, lakefront properties in the area continued to perform extremely well over Winter Park (zip 32789) where sales of 11 homes on the Chain of Lakes were up 267 percent and sales of 12 homes on other lakes were up 140 percent. Sales of seven lakefront homes in Colo nialtown and Orlando (zip 32803) were up 40 percent, despite a 177 percent increase in median price, while sales of 18 lakefront homes in downtown Orlando (zips 32801 and 32806) were up 80 percent, median price. Topping the list of best sell ing condo areas was College Park and Orlando (zip 32804) were sales of 33 condos was up 50 per cent, despite a 46 percent increase in median price. A member of the Orlando Regional Realtor Association, Fannie Hillman + Associates is listed in Whos Who in Luxury Real Estate. The company main tains a global presence through and Chicago-based RELOHome Search, a website run by Lead ing Real Estate Companies of the World, the worlds largest network of premier independent senting 600 companies with 5,000 ates in more than 30 countries. Fannie Hillman+ Associates is located at 205 W. Fairbanks Avenue. For more information call (407) 644-1234 or visit the companys web site at fanniehill man.com. Mid-year sales up 10.6 percent over 2012 according to the Hillman Report TEL: 407-896-5520 REALTOR MLS John Penne9 year resident of Baldwin Park Orlando Top 100 Real Estate Agents Orlando Magazine 2011, 2012 & 2013AFFORDABLE REAL ESTATE COMMISSIONS31/2% Commission Full MLS ServiceEMAIL: pennybrokers@earthlink.net WEB: pennybrokersorlando.com COMPARE THE SAVINGSSALES PRICE 6% TRADITIONAL BROKER 3.5% PENNY BROKER SELLER SAVES 1% PENNY BROKERS SELLER SAVES$200,000. $12,000. $7,000. $5,000. $2,000. $10,000. $300,000. $18,000. $10,500. $7,500. $3,000. $15,000. $400,000. $24,000. $14,000. $10,000. $4,000. $20,000. $500,000. $30,000. $17,500. $12,500. $5,000. $25,000. $600,000. $36,000. $21,000. $15,000. $6,000. $30,000. $700,000. $42,000. $24,500. $17,500. $7,000. $35,000. $800,000. $48,000. $28,000. $20,000. $8,000. $40,000. $900,000. $54,000. $31,500. $22,500. $9,000. $45,000. $1,000,000. $60,000. $35,000. $25,000. $10,000. $50,000. WHEN SELLING YOUR HOME, THERE IS A DIFFERENCE Sold over 40 homes in Baldwin ParkJoin the 4,000 home sellers who have S-A-V-E-D between $5,000 and $50,000 on the sale of their home Orlando Magazine has once again awarded John Penne Licensed Real Estate Broker Designation of one of the top one hundred honored agents in Orlando 2013 4094 MARKHAM PL Baldwin Park 3 Br+ Ofce $415,000 4097 WARDELL Baldwin Park 4/3 $530,000 5326 ARDSDALE LANE 3BR + 2025 COULSON ALL Y $359,900 SOLD SOLD SOLD SOLDPenny Brokers the smart choice when buying or selling!Call 407-896-55201625 LAKE BALDWIN LANE $353,000 open patio deck (park and lake view)BALDWIN PARK 999 JUEL SREE $379,900 3 bdrm/3 baORL ANDO 2020 SHA W LANE BALDWIN PARK ORRINE DR home and beautiful garden BALDWIN PARK PENDING PENDING + G AR A PT H O M E BEA U TI FU L Three months ago, Dennis Sinns and his longtime girlfriend Rhonda Weaver were sharing a tent in the woods near Sanford. Three tents, actually. One was liv ing space the couple shared with their rescued cat, Midnight; the other two stored their combined possessions. Everything they had in the world, books to clothes to trinkets that they hoped would one day decorate a home, were carefully stored in those nylon shelters, protected by a shell a millimeter thick. Today the couple shares a cozy one-bedroom apartment in Sanford thanks to the HUDVASH, a new program dedicated to helping veterans like Sinns HUD VASH stands for the Department of Housing and Urban Development VA Sup ported Housing. According to program literature, the target population for HUD-VASH is the vulnerable chronically homeless veteran who often has severe mental or physical health problems and/or substance use disorders. Under the program, veterans like Sinns are provided with case management services, health care through Veterans Affairs and permanent housing support. Seminole County was recently awarded 15 new vouchers and Orange County 110, meaning an additional 125 veterans between the two counties will get the help homes. We feel that [veterans] have done enough, said Seminole County Housing Authority Ex ecutive Director Shannon Young. We want to cut through the red tape and do all we can to make the process as easy as possible to get them in an apartment. Through the program, Sinns and Weaver were partnered with Lisa Goodwin, a VA social worker who Sinns enthusiastical ly describes as one of the best. She came every week and gave me inspiration and hope that this would actually happen, Sinns said. She stayed by their side throughout the entire process; helping them gather the needed paperwork, search for an apart ment that would take them and their cat, and even helping them move when it came time. She was very respectful and intel ligent. said Sinns. She really went out of her way to help us out. Sinns is a 10-year Marine veteran who places such as Vietnam, Cuba and Japan. His only regret, he said, was that he didnt con tinue on to retirement with the military. After years of offand-on jobs, relation ships and dangerous nally made it to a VA of his years of struggles. It turned out the restlessness, anxiety and recurring anger he had experienced over the years were the result of undiagnosed post-traumatic stress disorder, a psychiatric condition common to Homeless soldier nally comes home veterans and putting them on a path to a better life, with 125 locals getting new homes ALLISON OLCSVAY Observer staff Please see NEW HOME on next page Existing home sales and prices show marked improvement PHOTO BY ALLISON OLCSVAY THE OBSERVER Dennis Sinns and girlfriend Rhonda Weaver lived out of three tents in the Sanford woods before a federal program helped them nd a home. Now the couple shares a one-bedroom apartment.

PAGE 13

Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Page 13 One Senior Place ... See our full Calendar of Events at OneSeniorPlace.com407.949.6733715 Douglas Avenue Altamonte Springs, FL 32714M-F 8:30am 5pmFRI DA Y, S EP T EM B E R 13 Hosted By Freedom Health Chair Pilates M O N DA Y, S EP T EM B E R 16 T U ESDA Y, S EP T EM B E R 17 W ED N ESDA Y, S EP T EM B E R 18 T HUR SDA Y, S EP T EM B E R 19 Calendar of Events September 2013 NEW HOME | Caseworkers helped keep couple together through housing process Sinns has suffered more than his fair share of internal and of uniform. he was still a Marine, due in part to his long deployments. The loss of his second wife in a tragic accident sent him into a tailspin that resulted in the loss of his job and eventually his home. Following a destructive cycle of job loss and substance abuse, Sinns ended up virtually home less, living in storage sheds, on friends couches, in tents and sometimes in a travel van that he owned, always on the lookout for good woods to camp in. Good woods, he said, being safe-ish places that no one else had already camped in, and pref erably near a convenience store. Different locations led Sinns and Weaver to make friends with the storeowners, and often pick up odd jobs for a little extra cash. Even after being shot at in their camp one day, it was still their compound in the woods. As Sinns says, his psychiatrist bugged him for two years to get more help, but he always declined, fearing what would hap pen to Weaver, his girlfriend of eight years, if he were to leave her behind to seek individual help through the VA. But caseworkers were persistent and earlier this year a social worker at the to convince him that they would be able to help both him and his girlfriend through the HUD-VASH program. After searching for just the right place with the help of their caseworker, Goodwin, the couple settled in a one-bedroom apartment in May, not too far from the site of their former camp. Together the couple have they had been saving for just such a day. On one wall of their new Sanford home, theres a built-in bookcase. On one side Sinns books are proudly displayed, on the other Weaver has artfully ar the couple gathered during their life together. In the center section, Sinns set up a shrine to his fellow sol diers, complete with miniature mentos of his days as a Marine. Each piece is a reminder of the long journey to this place they Sinns can now sit down on his own sofa to read his books and no longer has to worry whether his things will still be there when he returns. I looked like Santa back then, Sinns says of his days in the woods. Except not the kind that kids would go see, he said with a chuckle. Today he looks proud; glancing over the home he shares with Weaver, their cat Midnight, and the lat est addition, a kitten named Whiskers. This is a great program, Sinns said. The best Ive ever dealt with through the VA. I cant thank them enough, especially Lisa, for getting us this far. Sinns still has a few obstacles to overcome, such as dealing with a recurring foot prob optimism in his tone says hes prepared to face them. Life is looking up, everyday things seem better and better. C ONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE ARCHIVE PHOTO BY ALLISON OLCSVAY THE OBSERVER A former Marine, Dennis Sinns had someone ghting for him in VA social worker Lisa Goodwin, who helped him navigate a jungle of paperwork. Winter Park Home Custom Built on Lake Conway Lancaster Park THE JERRY OLLER & SHIRLEY JONES TEAM Offering personalized service & attention to detail to every client. NEW LISTING NEW PRICE Celebrating Over 100 Years of Handshake Integrity! Since 1904...407-644-2900www.winterparkland.comWP CHAIN OF LAKES ACCESS Florida lifestyle at its best! Almost 2,000 s.f. open plan, sparkling secluded pool. Huge lot many multi-million dollar homes nearby. 3/2 and a half. $469,000 WHISPERING WATERS Lk. Osceola views and breezes from this Walk to Park Ave.restaurants, Farmers Market $325,000. SOLD

PAGE 14

Page 14 | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Tonight! Sip & Stroll in Winter Park The Winter Park Chamber of Commerce and Park Avenue Merchants Association invite us to an evening of wine and hors doeuvres at 25 participating mer chants in downtown Winter Park. The Sip & Stroll events invite attendees to visit local shops and restaurants, each of which offers a preview of their latest fashions, gift ideas and menu items. Its the perfect opportunity to experi ence new destinations along Park Avenue and return to long-time favorites. Admission is $25. Each attendee receives a wine glass and passport at check-in. Call 407-644-8281 or visit experien ceparkavenue.com Now through Oct. 6 The Taming of the Shrew in the Wild West Shakespeares most outra geous comedy kicks off the 25th season at the Orlando Shake speare Theater as Director Jim Helsinger presents a very Ameri can version of The Taming of the Shrew set in the Wild West. Weve never done the play set in the Wild West, and I think it is a perfect setting for a rootin tootin trick-shot shootin version of this battle of the sexes, Helsinger says. This high-energy battle of the sexes runs through Oct. 6. Call 407-447-1700 or visit orland oshakes.org Sept. 13 to Oct. 5 I Love You, Youre Perfect, Now Change Among the most successful musicals presented at the Winter Park Playhouse, one of the most hilarious and most popular is I Love You, Youre Perfect, Now Change. Now the second longest-running Off-Broadway show is returning to the Play house by popular demand. This musical comedy sings about everything youve ever thought about dating, romance, marriage, lovers, husbands, wives and inCall 407-645-0145 or visit winter parkplayhouse.org Sept. 13 to 15 Disney On Ice Princesses and Heroes You can be a hero to your little ones by taking them to Disney On Ice, as they present Prin cesses and Heroes with short versions of the stories of favorite princesses and their heroes in cluding Snow White, Jasmine and Aladdin, Cinderella and Prince Charming, and Ariel and Prince Eric. Tinker Bell and Mickey Mouse show up to present links between segments. Beware the show includes pyrotechnics with ice during the Sleeping Beauty sequence. Its playing at the Am way Center from Sept. 13 to 15 with six performances scheduled. Call 800-745-3000 or visit Ticket master.com Sept. 13 Performing Arts of Maitland hosts A Havana Night Sept. 13 promises to be an evening packed with music and dance beginning with the Mai tland Stage Band featuring the singing her favorite big band tunes. This wonderfulness will be followed by Nannettes Ballroom Dance, performing and inspiring a night recalling romantic Old Havana. Hors doeuvres from ZaZas Cuban Diner complete the Latin theme. Tickets, available online at MaitlandCivicCenter. com, are $20 advance or $25 at the door. Sept. 14 and 15 Jazz, Food and Wine at Lakeridge Winery Festival Lakeridge Winery, in Cl ermont, will host Jazz at the Winery, showcasing favorite local bands in an event with live mu sic, food and award-winning Lak eridge Wines on Sept. 14 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sept. 15 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. A $2 donation will be accepted at the gate to of Commerce Scholarship Fund. The music schedule includes Air tight and Tory Wynter on Sept. 14, and The Groovemasters and the Robert Harris Group on Sept 15. Free tours and wine tastings will be offered throughout the weekend. Call 352-394-8627 or visit lakeridgewinery.com Sept. 20 CityKidz! Buddys Benet for Children more than $1 million for youth programs in Orlandos Parramore community. These funds have helped open doors of opportu nity for more than 2,000 young people, providing them with tutoring, healthcare, pre-school education, college assistance and more. The outstanding results have helped education achieve ment rates, while lowering the numbers on juvenile crime. The evening includes live perfor mances and dinner beginning at 7 p.m. Contact Renee Jackson at 407-246-4299 or Renee.Jackson@ cityfoforlando.net Sept. 20 to Jan. 11 Eleven artists present Art from the Heart of Florida Art from the Heart of Florida, set to open Sept. 20 and run through Jan. 11, is inspired by the diverse visual artists who call Central Florida home. The exhibit presents the work of 11 artists including sculpture, painting and photography in two-location venues: Crealds main campus and at the Hannibal Square Heri tage Center in Winter Park. The opening reception will take place on Sept. 20 from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at the Creald campus followed by a continued reception at the Hannibal Square Center from 8:30 to 10 p.m. Call 407-671-1886 or visit crealde.org Josh Garrick Culture worthy of your calendar rfrf n rfftbbfb ff b bfb tbffb fb This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORG @EnzianTheater Wednesday Night Pitcher Show BATTLEFIELD EARTH Wed 8PM FREE Held Over! RENOIR Fri Sun 3:30, 6:30, 9:30 Mon-Thu 6:30, 9:30 Local Indie Film Showcase FilmSlam Sun 1PM Only $5 Saturday Matinee Classics: REAR WINDOW Sat 12PM Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906. BUDDYS BENEFIT

PAGE 15

Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Page 15 Opinions King Features Weekly ServiceSeptember 9, 2013 EDITORIAL CARTOONS Chris Jepson Perspectives not have health insurance. Last month I contacted Congressman John Micas 7th providing good health care and coverage for all Floridians. I received, via email, a 14-Point Plan, guidelines as the Congress Obamacare. I leave it to you to determine the sincer ity of his guidelines to actually cover Floridas uninsured. Micas number one plank for insuring Floridas uninsured and I quote is Focus on increasing access to existing plans. OK, Congressman, and how would you accomplish that? This is banality. Its like telling an individual experiencing an asthmatic attack to take in more air. Access Congressman? Congressman Micas second plank for insuring Floridas uninsured (I am not kidding) is increasing the number of insured Americans with competing plans. Congressman, the question on the table is Floridas uninsured. Oh, did I mention that Congressman Mica is a Republican hence, planks number three and four. Three is to ad dress issues that drive health care costs up and lessen needless regulatory burdens. Yes, of course, it is regulatory burdens that leave Floridas poor without health care. Number four reads create more jobs and greater economic growth by not placing needless regulatory burdens to improve coverage. I trust you are beginning to see the pattern. viduals maximum choice and lower health care premiums which only increased com petition provides. Republicans sure love the idea of maximum choice except when it comes to a womans body. Plank number 11 reads maintain the 30 year Federal policy that prohibits taxpayer funding of abortions and provide conscience protections for health care pro viders. Do either of these planks address insuring Floridas uninsured? Actually, yes, they do. In a manner of speaking. Plank eight is a personal favorite. Keep the government out of patients sick beds by protecting the doctor-patient man. That supposes the uninsured sick are actually patients in a bed. Oh, yes, of course, I see their own. There has to be a plank (number 10) that reads, Expand incentives to encour age personal responsibility for health care coverage and costs. Youd think poverty (being poor/poorer), according to Repub lican values, would be incentive enough. onto something. By increasing poverty in America, more citizens will take respon sibility and self-insure. Sure sounds like a plan to me. Republicans at the state level are do ing their part, as well, to ensure that the uninsured remain that way. This year the Florida legislature passed, and Gov. Rick Scott signed into law, a bill preventing Floridas insurance commissioner from regulating insurance premiums. Now, you might quite reasonably ask, why would you want to prevent the state insurance commissioner from negotiating with insurance companies (on behalf of Floridians) for lower premiums? Think. Oh, did I mention that the law is in affect for the next two years? Will the Republican State Legislature, in its attempt to sandbag Obamacare, have insurance premiums rise for all Florid ians? Unfortunately, this is health care in Florida. Congressman Mica opened his letter to me with I have long been an advocate for access to affordable health care for all Americans. He omitted eight words but only for those Floridians who can afford it. Health careless in Florida Louis Roney Play On! A football coach of mine used to tell us to block or tackle a guy as hard as we could, and then help him back to his feet for such an action weakens the oppo nents desire for revenge. When I was a kid, it often seemed to me that people who were wronged and didnt get even were essentially cowards. Later on, I began to see that it is sometimes more effective and, in fact, accomplishes more, if one leaves things in place and does not indulge in the feral justice of revenge. anything by hitting someone else al though even today, I would not allow someone to hit me unanswered. Getting revenge often turns an unleashed force back upon itself. As John Milton said, that he has painted himself into a corner of bitterness. Lord Byron must have had a special experience when he wrote the peculiar quote: Sweet is revengeespecially to women. (It is best not to give a woman Sorts of revenge have their just pur For mere vengeance I would do nothing. This nation is too great to look for mere revenge. But, for the security of the future, I would do everything. Revenge spawns special retaliatory strike-backs. As Shakespeare said, If you prick us do we not bleed? If you tickle us do we not laugh? If you poison us do we not die? And if you wrong us shall we not revenge? As Olin Miller said, Its far easier to forgive an enemy after youve gotten even with him. And then theres the unattributed quote, The longest odds in the world are those against getting even. Sasha Guitry says, When a man steals your wife, there is no better revenge than to let him keep her. And a warning from George Bernard Shaw, Beware of a man who does not return your blow: He neither forgives you nor allows you to forgive yourself. Football elevens and other sports teams must often wait a long time to revenge a that leaves teams in anticipation of another chance. Neither side can realistically rest on its laurels, or have reason to be deterred by hopelessness. Revenge does more for the legal profes sion than any other human emotion. Time spent getting even is better spent getting ahead. Your own success will make you happy and put you above all your en emies. People who want to get even with others are usually at odds with them selves, and stand in the way of their own success. Revenge is the only debt that is wrong to pay, says an anonymous quote i.e. you let the other guy off the hook. When you get even with people it always leaves them with the impression that they owe you something something you may not relish collecting. Some people do odd things to get even.Anonymous A man that studieth revenge keeps his own wounds green. Sir Francis Bacon. A wise king never leaves his enemies wounded. Time is the great revenger. Anony mous Revenge does not long remain un avenged. German proverb Revenge is a morsel reserved for God, says a proverb. Revenge is mine, saith the Lord. If we could really count on Gods avenging us, we would put more money with George Herbert who says, Living Thoughts on revenge Jepson is a 27-year resident of Central Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.US About Roney: HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney)

PAGE 16

Page 16 | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer

PAGE 17

Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Page 17

PAGE 18

Page 18 | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer

PAGE 19

Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Page 19

PAGE 20

Page 20 | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer

PAGE 21

Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Page 21

PAGE 22

Page 22 | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer

PAGE 23

Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Page 23

PAGE 24

Page 24 | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer

PAGE 25

Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Page 25

PAGE 26

Page 26 | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer

PAGE 27

Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Page 27

PAGE 28

Page 28 | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer ANNOUNCEMENTS Adoption=Love. Nurturing, single woman will provide stable home/support of large, extended family. Lets help each other. Financial security. Expenses paid. Deborah, tollfree (855)-779-3699. Sklar Law Firm, LLC FL Bar #0150789 CAKE DECORATING & PASTRY CLASSES: Sofelle Confections offers group and cus tomized classes in all areas of pastry, baking and cake decorating! Contact: Lucy sofelleconfections@bellsouth.net or call (407) 579-1962 www.facebook.com/ SofelleConfections Hablamos Espaol! Winter Park Benefit Shop 140 Lyman Ave, Winter Park needs items to sell: clothing, bedding, jewelry, kitchenware and bric-a brac. Also need ing volunteers. Contact Elizabeth Comer 407-647-8276. Open Tues & Fri at 9:30am; Sat 10am-1pm. All proceeds support childrens programs & the Or lando Blind Association. AUTOS 2008 Saab 9-3 turbo $9900 Excellent condition, 74700 miles (motor has 28,000, Saab dealer installed), one owner, nonsmoker,garage kept, sport wheels, powered sun roof, biege leather seats & wood trim power steering,locks,seats,windows & mirrors, cruise control, AM/FM/XM/CD Player, keyless entry,security system. Tom Dougherty 407 703 6091 tjdougherty@ aol.com EDUCATION Heavy Equipment Operator Training! Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. 3wks Hands On Program. Local Job Placement Assistance. National Certifications. GI Bill Benefits Eligible. 866-362-6497. HELP WANTED CAREGIVER for my 104 Year Mother, Winter Park Lovely home Lake Sue. Hours to be ar ranged weekdays 8am-4pm; weekends 8am-10pm. Must lift/transfer (5#) through the day. Light whole meals. Supplemental tube feeding. Housekeep ing/Cleaning. Sedan not SUV take to doctors. Non-smoker. Pet friendly. Quiet house. CNA or comparable. Best Caregiv ing References. 317-506-4400 after 10am. rosemail@comcast.net AVON Representatives needed in your area! Just $10 starts your business! Easy, Fun and Flexible! Works great with any schedule. Your Time Your Terms Your Money! Call Anita,ISR 1-877-871-4275 or email aaa4avon@yahoo.com. Online appointments also available at start. youravon.com Enter Reference Code aal baghli Driver Trainees Needed NOW! Become a driver for Werner Enterprises. Earn $800 per week! Local CDL Training. 877-214-3624 Now hiring: Class A-CDL Drivers $2500 Sign -On Bonus, Great Pay, Full Benefits, and Achievable Bonuses! Call us now at 1-888-378-9691 or apply at www.heyl. net MISCELLANEOUS Airline Careers begin here! Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Finan cial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866314-3769. WANTED: HAM Radio Equip ment! Buying HAM Radio Equipment, Glass Tubes, Vintage Hi-Fi Audio Gear, Test & Meas. Equip. & MORE! Matt 775-2251159 PROFESSIONAL SERVICE House Cleaner. $50 New Client Special! A fresh, sparkling clean house so you can relax! Deep cleaned, sanitized, attention to detail. Personalized one on one ser vice. Satisfaction guaranteed. Offer weekly, bi-weekly, monthly, one time. New Blog! HomeCleaned4U.blogspot. com for cleaning tips. Schedule YOUR clean home with Carolyn. Home Cleaned 4U 407-782-1405]homecleaned4u@ gmail.com REAL ESTATE: COMMERCIAL Offices for Rent Winter Park Real Estate Offices for rent (Winter Park/Goldenrod/University). Doc tors office w/5 exam rooms + extra fea tures. Other office units available from 800-3000 SF. New Orleans style bldg; great prices. Call Ann 407-293-1934. an npolasek@cfl.rr.com REAL ESTATE: COMMERCIAL SANFORD: Free standing retail/office building, 2640 SF, great signage & visibility. Lease for $2800 per month (also for sale). Call John, owner/broker, 407-492-7111 REAL ESTATE: FOR SALE MINI FARMS JUST OUTSIDE CHATTANOOGA! 10-25 Acres Starting at Only $56,000. Located on Signal Mountain. Ideal for horses and gentleman farming. Call 877282-4409 SALES: ESTATE Estate & Moving Sale Chapman Circle in Winter Park (Wind song Community) 3 Homes with an Es tate & Moving Sale on September 20-21. Steve R. 321-295-7438 stevetore14@ gmail.com SALES: GARAGE HUGE RUMMAGE SALE! Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd, 331 Lake Ave., Maitland Friday, Oct. 4th & Saturday, Oct. 5th, 8 am to 4 pm From Hwy. 17-92, go west one block on Lake Ave; church is on the right immediately after railroad tracks. Phone: (407) 6445350 Multi Family Garage Sale Winter Park Friday/Saturday Sept. 13-14 7am-3pm Kids items, electronics, furniture, kitchen items 1700 Walnut Avenue 32789 Order your classified ad online! At WPMObserver.com you can create, customize and pay for your ad in one convenient place! Sunday, September 15th 1563 Hanks Avenue, Orlando FL 32814 3 BR | 2.5 BA | 1,962 SF | $425,000 Fully reconstructed two story traditional brick estate on acre bordering Howell Creek & Mead Gardens in Sevilla. Gourmet kitchen, bonus/game room, and luxuri ous first floor master suite with incredible bath. Top-of-the-line finishes throughout, including 4 fireplace, sophisticated secu rity and state of the art audio/video sys tem. Fantastic outdoor spaces include an air conditioned gym, sparkling pool, lush landscaping and dock on Howell Creek! Hosted by: Jennifer King from 1-4 PM 1655 Barcelona Way, Winter Park FL 32789 5 BR | 4.5 BA | 5,371 SF | $1,500,000 Fully reconstructed two story traditional brick estate on acre bordering Howell Creek & Mead Gardens in Sevilla. Gourmet kitchen, bonus/game room, and luxurious first floor master suite with incredible bath. Top-of-the-line finishes throughout, including 4 fireplace, sophisticated security and state of the art audio/video system. Fantastic outdoor spaces include an air conditioned gym, sparkling pool, lush landscaping and dock on Howell Creek! Hosted by: Elim Cintron from 1-4 PM 3241 Inverness Court, Orlando FL 32806 3 BR | 2 BA | 1,954 SF | $199,000 Won derful home in a great neighborhood! Nice sized kitchen with dinette space and huge pantry, large living/dining room combination and office. Master bedroom has a private bath. Tons of closet space inside and carport storage space outside! Untouched terrazzo floors under the car pet and vintage touches throughout. Ac cess to Lake Pineloch! Hosted by: Teresa Jones-Cintron from 1-4 PM 263 Minorca Beach Way Unit 802, New Smyrna Beach FL 32169 3 BR | 2 BA | 1,655 SF | $635,000 Magnificent 8th floor Minorca unit with amazing water views! Fabulous white kitchen, large master suite, great room plan and open porch. Absolutely stunning opportunity to live in this fantastic New Smyrna Beach Community. Minorca offers tennis courts, community pool, full beach access, 24hour security with guard gate and mani cured grounds. Hosted by: Kelly L. Price from 2-4 PM pool and fenced yard. Three car garage, great closet space, and neighborhood playground. Walk to Skate Park and Lake Mary Sports Park. $399,900 SUNDAY 12-3 NEW LISTING IN WINTER PARK PINES 520 Cornwall Road, Winter Park. 3BD/2BA, 1,498SF. Pristine single owner home with beautifully manicured lawn, amazing oak tree and pavered drive. Fenced backyard, screened pool and pa tio. Updated kitchen and brand new AC. Two car garage with large utility room and workshop. A rated schools within walking distance as well as Cady Way pool and trail. $248,400 SUNDAY 1-4 POOL HOME IN GREAT LOCATION 519 Worthington Drive, Winter Park. 4BD/2.5BA, 2,285SF. One story split plan home offers natural hardwood floors and newly renovated master suite with ample closet space. Extra large great room with fireplace and bookcase. French doors open to Florida room for views of lush backyard and pool. Circular driveway and tandem two car garage. $460,000 1935 GAMBLE ROGERS HOME IN PRIME LOCATION 851 Georgia Avenue, Winter Park. 4BD/3.5BA, 4,314SF. Olde World with a European flair, this home features a living OBSERVER Open Houses THE MARKE T PLA C E MindGym September 9, 2013 NEW LISTING! ADORABLE WINTER PARK BUNGALOW 340 North Phelps Avenue, Winter Park. 2BD/1.5BA, 1,150SF. Fantastic hardwood floors throughout this charmer with an updated kitchen. Located on a beautifully landscaped corner lot. Serene open pa tio offers a perfect spot for entertaining. Upgrades include roof in 2005 and AC in 2008. Conveniently located and excellent Winter Park schools. $299,000 SUNDAY 2-5 GREAT OPPORTUNITY TO LIVE IN DOWN TOWN WINTER PARK 557 Osceola Avenue, Winter Park. 5BD/4.5BA, 2,911SF. Walk to Park Ave nue and walk to Rollins College! Home on the Winter Park Historic Register. Dutch colonial home with all systems updated. Hardwood floors, wood burning fireplace and a basement for storage. Eat-in space in kitchen. $649,000 BEAUTIFUL HOME IN DESIRABLE NEIGH BORHOOD 1811 Winchester Drive, Winter Park. 4BD/2.5BA. 2,733SF., Quiet neighbor hood with wide, tree-lined streets. Home features large, bright living spaces, hard wood floors, wood burning brick fire places, and large eat-in kitchen. Built ins, vaulted ceilings, lush landscaping, and bonus tree fort. Plenty of room for pool or expansion! $579,000 When Gambling is No Longer a Game 888-ADMIT-IT(888-236-4848)24-HOUR | CONFIDENTIAL HELPLINE MULTILINGUAL | SE HABLA ESPAOLwww.gamblinghelp.org MindGymSeptember 9, 2013 2810 Central Drive, Sanford, FL 32773 sold by Rhonda Chesmore 528 Cornwall Road, Winter Park FL 32792 sold by Pamela Ryan 946 Moss Lane, Winter Park FL 32789 sold by Pamela Ryan 1906 Old Club Point, Maitland FL 32751 sold by Jennifer King & Kelly L. Price OBSERVER Just Sold Homes room with fireplace and a wall of French doors leading to brick patio. Florida room has views of grounds and pool. Spacious master has French doors and large mas ter bath with marble floors and walls. Detached 1BR apartment. $2,250,000 LAKEVIEW HOME IN TREE STREETS 1600 Spruce Avenue, Winter Park. 3BD/2BA, 2,417SF. Offers direct views of Lake Wilbar, xeriscape landscaping and great location. Newly renovated kitchen and bathrooms including granite counters and stainless appliances. Large family room with vaulted ceilings and fireplace. Large bonus room on back of home with great potential. Fresh exterior paint, newer AC, re-plumbed and newer roof. $409,000 NEW PRICE! CHARMING HOME IN QUIET NEIGHBOR HOOD 502 Coachlight Way, Winter Park. 3BD/2BA. 1,336SF. Winter Park schools, newly renovated/remodeled and painted. New roof in new plumbing in custom Kraftmaid cabinets in new windows in Attached storage room. $155,000 NEW PRICE! COMPLETELY REMODELED WINTER PARK HOME 810 North Phelps Avenue, Winter Park. 4BD/3BA. 2,086SF. Tastefully appointed interior with wood and travertine floors and crown molding. Fabulous open floor plan featuring a spacious, eat-in kitchen with stainless, granite & island. The dining area flows from the kitchen into a large family room which leads to a screened pool and spa. Close to shop ping, dining, recreation (park, tennis and YMCA) and downtown Winter Park. $439,000 SUNDAY 12-3 NEW LISTING! RESERVE AT LAKE MARY 918 Arbormoor Place, Lake Mary. 5BD/3BA, 3,006SF. Gorgeous pool home with updates galore including beautiful spacious kitchen cabinets and upgraded appliances. Overlooks beautiful Jackie OLeary 7912 Lk Waunatta Dr, Winter Park $213,000. 08/30/2013 Cindy Kuykendall 5037 Shoreway Loop, Orlando $255,000. 08/27/2013 The Nancy Bagby Team 1673 Chatfield Cir, Orlando $359,900. 09/05/2013 Elaine Bell 8632 Rosa Vista, Orlando $129,900. 09/06/2013 Lisa Fleming 2 Katrina Cove, Long wood $279,180. 08/26/2013 Ann Elizabeth Christensen 6239 Manu script St. Winter Garden $293,333. 08/27/2013 Jackie OLeary 12066 Jewell Fish Ln, Orlando $352,000. 08/27/2013 Patty Munsey 1480 Bridlebrook Ct. Casselberry $149,900. 08/28/2013 Meg Dolan 615 Ellendale Dr, Winter Park $185,000 08/29/2103 Jackie OLeary 2459 Falmouth Road, Maitland $172,500. 08/30/2013 Glad Messeroff 1425 Northridge Ct, Longwood $240,000. 08/30/2013



PAGE 1

WPMOBSERVER.COM Yandell Ramos comes home nearly every day with a new piece of healthy advice for his family. He reads labels and serv ing sizes, demands a strict adher ence to his at least one vegetable per dinner rule dinosaur food asparagus is one of his fa vorite choices relegates sugary juice to just the weekends as a treat and opts for water, and en courages everyone to take a brisk walk in the evenings. We have to follow the rules at home, too, said Yandells mother, Mickey Ramos. These are the rules 8-year-old Yandell has learned at Aloma El ementary School where he is a third grader. His physical education teacher Kathy Styron gives all her students healthy advice as Alomas Healthy School Team Leader, and Yandell has taken it all to heart. Styrons work is part of a group of programs implemented at Winter Park, Maitland and Eatonville schools developed and sponsored by the Winter Park Health Foundation (WPHF) as part of its Coordi nated Youth Initiative. Their aim is to improve the physical and mental well being of students, because healthy kids make better students. Through this program, which has been adopted by all Orange County Public Schools (OCPS) as a model for caring for student health, the district was one of just eight districts in Florida to win the top Gold Award for the Florida Healthy School District. To get the gold, a school must prove it has developed and implement ed policies to improve student health in categories ranging from physical education and nutrition services, to counseling and offer ing a healthy environment. Debbie Watson, WPHF vice president and program director, said the healthy teams can really change the whole atmosphere of a school and its students views. Yandell isnt the only kid at Alo ma thats excited to be eating more fruits and vegetables and exercising with his family. Kids come up and tell me what vegetables they ate last night, Styron said. Theyre proud to say what they had for PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVERAloma Elementary kindergartener Nichola Torres shows off his muscles. Orange Countys programs have gotten more kids interested in healthy foods and tness. Orange Countys mightier kidsOrange is one of eight Florida districts winning Gold Award for healthy programsBRITTNI LARSON Observer staff Please see HEALTHY KIDS on page 2Maitland property owners can still expect to pay an increase in taxes next year, but following a contentious vote by the City Council on Monday, as of now its set to be half as high of a hike as was initially drafted in July. There will be one more reading of the citys budget on Sept. 23, where Council members can choose to lower but not raise the 2014 property tax rate. Mondays 4-1 vote lowered the proposed millage from 4.100 to 4.000, which assistant city man ager Sharon Anselmo said reduces the anticipated tax increase facing owners of homes valued at $350,000 with a $50,000 home stead exemption from an additional $66 to an additional $36 for the year. That adds up to an additional 12 cents charged to taxpayers for each $1,000 of taxable property value they own over what they paid in 2013. The budget approved Sept. 9 rationalizes the increase by add ing additional funding for the city to unfreeze three positions, improve the library, and allocate funds for future park improve ments. Maitland cuts tax increase proposalSARAH WILSON Observer staffThe Winter Park City Com mission voted to ban fast food along Park Avenue during Mondays City Commission meeting an action that sets a standard for future restaurants joining the Avenue. The ordinance introduces restaurants dining in the citys zoning regulations, allowing code enforcement to better differentiate between the two. By a unanimous vote, the City Commission supported the new language, as well as the ban on fast food. I do think this is going to take us a long way toward not allowing what some people dont want to see, which are fast food restaurants on the Avenue, Commissioner Sarah Sprinkel said. The new ordinance came about after an uproar from local residents and merchants over Firehouse Subs and BurgerFi joining the Avenue. Concerned about preserving Park Avenues character, a group made up of Winter Park Chamber of Commerce members, Park Avenue merchants and attorney Frank Hamner drafted the ordinance to help clarify restaurant the City Commission considered ambiguous until now. thing else was to maintain the character and experience of the Park Avenue corridor by rein City pulls trigger on Park Avenue fast food banTwo fast food restaurants will be allowed to stayTIM FREED Observer staff Please see BAN on page 2 While I personally loathe to limit any type of business activity, I understand the specialness of Park Avenue.

PAGE 2

HEALTHY KIDS | Orange County kids arent just tolerating healthier foods, theyre bragging about themBAN | Commission draws line in the sand, wants more waiterslunch. Lori Gilbert, senior director of OCPS Food and Nutrition Ser vices, tests all new food choices in school lunch on the children to see what they like. Gilbert has got it down to a science. Students eat more apples when theyre sliced, like coleslaw on their pulled pork and plum sauce on their turkey. Its not going to be healthy unless the kids are going to eat it, she said. OCPS students have to take at least one fruit or vegetable when they get school lunch, theres a no soda or candy policy, and nothing is fried. They often try vegetables many students would never get the chance to eat at home. What theyre going to receive through the lunch line is often the healthier choice, Watson said. OCPS has also tripled the num ber of breakfasts served in the past are now allowed to take breakfast into the classroom if their bus is late. Many schools have breakfast carts set up to make it easier and if the schools percentage of free and reduced lunch eligible students is great enough, all students lets students focus on their stud ies, not their growling stomach. Theyve got the fuel to learn, said Aloma Elementary Principal Drew Hawkins. It is so critical to their readi ness to learn, Watson said. Not only are OCPS students eating better, theyre getting in some extra exercise in class. They call it brain breaks. Students take some time out of academ ics to get the wiggles out and re stretch or do some jumping jacks. Styrons students love to run laps, and their monthly school walk and bike to school days continue to grow. Its all part of the WPHF programs, and its making a dif ference; Styron said she doesnt see nearly as many overweight students as she used to. Many students are embracing a health ier lifestyle, she said, just like Yan dell. Because we want to live to be 105, thats his [Yandells] answer, Ramos said. We want to live a long life, a healthy life. the ordinance last month. dining just by providing table service? Well they shouldnt, but they were able to. The list of criteria for what makes a restaurant fast food include payment before food is consumed, customers busing their own tables and disposable tableware. Restaurants that show at least two of these traits are now prohibited from joining Park Avenue, while Firehouse Subs and BurgerFi are protected under a grandfather clause and must out by the city. The new regulations also ing, which include criteria such as table service, a host or hostess Restaurants that dont meet these standards but are a step above fast food will be placed dining restaurants, and will be limited to only 15 percent of the Avenue storefront space. Commissioner Steven Leary supported the ordinance, but said that Park Avenue would have thrived with or without a ban on fast food. The brand for Park Avenue is very, very strong, Leary said. I dont think it needs so much control. Mayor Ken Bradley said he saw Park Avenue as something worth preserving and maintaining, despite his qualms with regulating businesses. Park Avenue is a very, very unique place, one that we all love, enjoy and want to see continue to thrive and improve, Bradley said. While I personally loathe to limit any type of busi ness activity, I understand the specialness of Park Avenue. If the city of Winter Park owned a mall, wed have a differ ent view of this. CONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE CONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE PHOTO BY TIM FREED THE OBSERVERA recently approved Firehouse Subs franchise will be allowed to stay on Park Avenue, even though it hasnt been built yet. But after that no more fast food will be allowed. Fresh off their biggest road blowout in school history, the Knights will be looking for an up set in Pennsylvania this Saturday. After trouncing Florida Inter national University 38-0 in Miami to take their season record to 2-0 and scoring differential to 76-7, the Knights are looking to keep the momentum going. And with a win against Penn State, the 2013 season would become only the fourth time in program history that the Knights started 3-0. But that hypothetical would be against history. Though the Knights showcased a dominating performance against the Panthers on Sept. 6, in which they outgained FIU 390 yards to 173, they havent had much luck in college footballs second largest stadium. The Knights seemed headed meeting with the Nittany Lions in 2002, leading by an improbable 24-10 at the half. But thats when the Lions turned on the offense, scored 17 unanswered points and left the Knights behind. Two years later the Knights fell 37-13 to the Lions, in head coach George OLearys only meeting against them. Penn State hasnt lost to the Knights. And, like the Knights, they havent lost this season either, going 2-0 to start. That includes a 45-7 blowout last week against Eastern Michigan that included a Penn State hallmark of nonstop, unanswered touchdowns. The Lions brick-wall defense didnt al low Eastern Michigan into the end zone all game. The Knights carry that same record into Beaver Stadium in University Park, Pa. Having only given up a touchdown so far this season, theyre rolling through one of their best season starts of all time. And their offense has proven to be relentless. Blake Bortles, who threw a career-high 314 yards passing against Akron on Aug. 29, has the longest-running streak in the Football Bowl Subdivision for passes without an interception at 217, throwing 17 touchdown passes in the meantime. A trio of supporting play ers from last years offense have emerged as breakout stars, with Storm Johnson already 188 yardsdeep into his season at running back, and Rannell Hall catching 127 yards in receptions in just the FIU game alone. Breshad Perriman, who caught less than two passes per game last season, snagged 113 yards of receptions against Akron alone. But with an offensive jugger naut like Penn State looming this weekend, itll be UCFs defense that gets the big test. So far theyve passed against Akron and FIU. They allowed just 31 yards on the ground against the Panthers, from a defensive squad packed with 17 Knights rookies. The biggest play the Knights have allowed all sea son was a 23-yard Akron rush. can break Penn States dominance with a 6 p.m. showdown Satur day, Sept. 14. The game will air live on the Big Ten Network, UCF Gameday, and 740-AM radio. Knights face biggest challenge yetISAAC BABCOCK Observer staff

PAGE 3

Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Page 3 Member FDICEQUAL HOUSINGLENDER RYour Home Town Bank TRUSTCO BANK407-659-5701 www.TrustcoBank.comFast, Local Decisions Close your First Mortgage in 30 days!*Low Closing Costs No Points and No Tax Escrow requiredSchedule Closing Date at Application 85% of our Loans close as scheduled!* Trustco Mortgages We Close Loans!*Information based on current closings. Circumstances beyond Trustco Banks control may delay closing. Please note: We reserve the right to alter or withdraw these products or certain features thereof without prior notification. Winter Park City TalkBY RANDY KNIGHT CITY MANAGER Socially behaving canines are welcome! Special drawing for people wearing their team spirit! KEEP UP WITH MAITLAND NEWS AND EVENTS!www.IndependenceLane.com Facebook.com/ItsMyMaitland Sept. 9 City Commission meeting highlightsThere was a City Commission meeting held Sept. 9 in City Hall Commission Chambers. Below are a few highlights of decisions made at the meeting:Non-action Items 2013 was presented and accepted.Consent Agenda Stephens, Lovelace for RFP-262013, External Audit Services, was approved and the Mayor was au thorized to execute the contract. execute the Settlement Agreement and Mutual Release with Duke Energy Florida. vices Agreement (Radio Main tenance, Network Security and Monitoring) expenditure from State Forfeiture Funds in compli ance with Florida State Statute 932.7055(5)(1) was approved.Public Hearings ordinance revising the permitted and conditional uses regulations for restaurants and other food service establishments, providother restaurants was approved. nance allowing the city manager to make special exception for dogs to be in Central Park and other events was approved with an amendment limiting the number of such events in Central Park to two per year.Budget Public Hearings adopting the millage rate was ap proved. nual budget was approved with an amendment to move $300,000 from vehicle replacement into General Reserves. A full copy of the Sept. 9 City Commission minutes will be available at cityofwinterpark.org the week of Sept. 23, pending ap proval by the City Commission.CoffeeTalk featuring Commissioner Steve LearyIf you have a latt beans to grind or you simply want to espresso your thoughts, CoffeeTalk may be the cup for you. Please join an informal conver sation with Commissioner Steve Leary on Thursday, Sept. 12, from 8 to 9 a.m. at the Winter Park Wel come Center, located at 151 W. Lyman Ave. CoffeeTalk gives the community an opportunity to sit down and talk with the Commis sioner over a cup of coffee and chat about any city issues that are of interest to them. Special thanks to Palmanos Cafe, Coffee & Wine Bar for donat ing the coffee for this special series. For more information, please call 407599-3428. Park Avenue closed to through trafc Sept. 25The Winter Park High School Annual Parade and Pep Rally will make its way down Park Avenue on Wednesday, Sept. 25, begin ning at 5:15 p.m. Park Avenue will the parade route from Webster Avenue to Lyman Avenue from 5 to 6 p.m. Side streets will also be closed at the Park Avenue intersections as the parade passes. In order to a rolling fashion and will reopen immediately after the parade has safely passed.Got beans to grind? $104,000 $108,160 $111,405 $115,861 $119,950 $119,950 $124,748 $129,738 $129,738 $134,928 $131,080 $171,819 $183,846 $225,219 $240,985 $89,861 $78,141 $59,882 $75,679 $82,486 $96,532 $99,939 $61,477 $75,896 $85,597 $85,595 $97,069 $84,961 Which line gives you the best chance for su ccess? Illustration period: 1 -1-2000 through 1-1-2012. Each example shown assumes $100,000 initial premium with no withdrawals. Market value based on the S&P 500 Index. Historical performance o f the S&P 500 Index should not be considered a representation of current or future performance of the Index or of any annuity. Hypothetical index annuity product illustration assumes crediting method of a 6% annual point-to-point cap and annual reset. Hypothetical Income Rider Value assumes a 7% annual rate of return for income purposes. Illustration values represent gross returns. Assumed annuity rates and actual historical prices of the S&P 500 Index were used in this purely hypothetical example for the purpose of illustrating comparitive values and to illustrate how the Interest-Crediting Strategy might have guaranteed. Past performance does not guarantee future results. ONE SHOTYou only have at retirement will fall60% of Americans short. Member of(407)-644-6646www.aSafeHarbor.comBob Adams President/CEOA SafeHarbor, LLC bob@asafeharbor.com Illustration period: 12-31-1999 though 12-31-2012According to paycheckforlife.com, three out of ve middle-class Americans entering retirement today are projected to outlive their nancial assets. Learn how to protect your retirement account from losses, maintain upside potential and maximize your lifetime income. Call us today for your PERSONALIZED SAFE MONEY REPORT.

PAGE 4

Page 4 | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 Volume 25, Issue 37 PHONE: 407-563-7000 FAX: 407-563-7099 WPMOBSERVER.COMOrlando, FL 32835-5705PUBLISHERTracy Craft407.515.2605TCraft@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MANAGING EDITORIsaac Babcock 407.563.7023IBabcock@TurnstileMediaGroup.comASSOCIATE EDITORSarah Wilson 407.563.7026SWilson@TurnstileMediaGroup.comDESIGNERTom Miller 407.563.7032TMiller@TurnstileMediaGroup.comSTAFF WRITERSBrittni Larson Megan Stokes Tim Freed Allison Olcsvay Kristy VickeryCOLUMNISTSChris JepsonJepson@MediAmerica.usLouis RoneyLRoney@cfl.rr.comJosh GarrickJoshGarrick9@gmail.comADVERTISING SALESLinda Stern407.376.2434LStern@TurnstileMediaGroup.comLEGAL NOTICE ADVERTISINGAshley McBride 407.286.0807Legal@FLALegals.comSUBSCRIPTIONS/CIRCULATIONLuana Baez 407.563.7013LBaez@TurnstileMediaGroup.comMEMBER OF: -Florida Press Association -Winter Park/Maitland/Goldenrod Chambers of CommerceWinter Park/Maitland Observer is published by Turnstile Media Group. Founded in 1990 and headquartered in Orlando, Fla., Turnstile Media Group is also the parent of Golfweek, Golfweek Custom Media, TurfNet, Professional Artist, Seminole Voice, Baldwin Park Living and Turnstile Connect.TURNSTILE MEDIA GROUPCHAIRMANRance CrainPRESIDENT/CEOFrancis X. FarrellVICE PRESIDENTSPatti Green & Jeff BabineauUSPS #00-6186 ISSN 1064-3613POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:Winter Park / Maitland Observer 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835 Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster Maitland City TalkBY HOWARD SCHIEFERDECKER MAYOR Change is coming to Maitland! Starting the week of Sept. 23, residents will be receiving new green garbage carts and new blue recycling carts. The new blue re cycling cart can hold 64 gallons and will replace the current dualbin system with a single stream cart. Single stream means that residents no longer have to separate their recyclables, although containers must still be clean and boxes broken down. More items are included in the list of accepted recyclables, and recyclable items include: all paper products (clean and dry), aluminum cans and foil, steel/tin cans, all plastics (except bottles and jars, and aseptic and gable-top containers (milk and juice cartons). Because the cart has a non-removable, hinged lid, recyclables will stay clean and dry, ensuring items stay out of the With the new solid waste pro gram comes a new disposal facility. The city has entered into an inter-local agreement with the Seminole County Solid Waste Management Division, which will provide residents with access to the residential household hazardous waste collection center. Starting on Oct. 1 residents can drop off their household hazardous waste at the Seminole County Central Transfer Station at 1950 State Route 419 in Longwood. The Central Transfer Station is open Monday through Saturday from 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Residents with large quantities of household hazardous waste should contact Seminole County in advance of delivering the materials to the col lection center. Residents can sim ply bring their Florida drivers proof of residency, check in at the front desk and follow the signs for the household waste drop off collection center. Some common household hazardous waste items include the following: Hazardous material that is not accepted includes dioxins, medi cations, radioactive material, explosives and biologically active material. The program will include a new system for the pick-up of bulk waste. The twice yearly clean up weeks will be replaced with weekly bulk pick up collection for residential households. Those days will be posted on the citys website after Sept. 30. No more stacking items in your garage waiting for November or May to roll around. Residents will be able to place bulk items, such as furni ture, appliances, lawn equipment, furnaces, and bicycles at the curb for collection on a weekly basis for no additional charge. Finally, there will be no change in the current collection days for garbage, recycling or yard waste. For additional information, contact the Utility Billing division at 407-539-6265 or by email at utili ties@itsmymaitland.comWritten by Sharon Anselmo, Assistant City ManagerNew recycling options Nows your chance to showcase just how beautiful your community really is. Submit your best photo of the area, and your shot could be featured in the 2014 Winter Park-Maitland Observer calendar!Visit WPMObserver.com/Photo for more details and to upload your winning submission. Enter the Winter Park-Maitland Observer Calendar Photo Contest today! CALENDAR PHOTO CONTEST The Winter Park Wildcats showed they can win on the road with a 33-7 trouncing of East Riv er Sept. 6 on the gridiron. The win put the Wildcats record up to 2-0, already besting their start last season. By the time East River scored already led 33-0 in a game that they dominated from the out set. Jacob Gregorys interception From that point the Wildcats cruised, with quarterback J.P. Colton showing some arm with a 35-yard pass touchdown to complement his TD run from just the night for the Wildcats. But the workhorse was Malik Foy, who rushed to nearly 150 yards and touchdowns. The Wildcats return home to host Ocoee at 7 p.m. Friday. The Knights (1-1) lost 7-0 to University last week after blanking Colonial 27-0 to start the season. EdgewaterIn a sour turn after a surprising preseason kickoff, the Edgewater Eagles are 0-2 in the regular sea son. They fell to the Wekiva Mustangs 18-15 last week, but only af ter a late comeback was dashed by The Eagles hadnt scored un til a few minutes into the fourth when running back Craig Rucker found a lane and hit the gas for a 50-yard touchdown. A touch down later the Eagles sealed a trip to overtime with a two-point con version run courtesy of Joe Clark. The Eagles travel across the street to face Bishop Moore at 7 p.m. Friday. The Hornets are 2-0 after shutting out Harmony 10-0 Sept. 6. Wildcats trounce East RiverISAAC BABCOCK Observer staff Anti-Freeze Automobile Batteries Compact Fluorescent Lights Computer Components Fluorescent Light Tubes Gasoline and Cans (up to 5 gallons) Glues Insecticides Paints Lawn Chemicals Mercury-Containing Devices Paints Poisons Pool Chemicals Propane Tanks Rechargeable Batteries Solvents Televisions Thermostats Thermometers Used Oil COMMON HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE

PAGE 5

Purchase a FlamingoFor just $10, youll get one amingo for your yard and another to place among the growing ocks in Winter Park. Available at: Join the Pink Army Join the Pink Army and be part of a unied effort to end breast cancer. As a Florida and hope to the people of our community. Visit JointhePinkArmy.comGet a Mammogram A yearly mammogram is the single most effective method for detecting breast cancer early, when it is most treatable and beatable. To schedule your annual WinterParkHospital.com .Now Open services, comprehensive breast health and much more!PinkOutWinterPark.comJoin the ock! Support Pink Out 2013.Get involved! October 2013 WPMH-13-14780 PinkOut FPad.indd 1 9/5/13 2:36 PM

PAGE 6

Page 6 | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Philharmonic buys PlazaAfter months of planning, the Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra purchased the property known as The Plaza Live, located at 425 Bumby Ave., for $3.4 million in August. The sale included the Plaza Live building, all its contents and the Plaza Live business, which currently presents more than 135 events each year. The Philharmonic is planning extensive renova tions that will provide a new home for the orchestra, including ofces, a rehearsal hall and performance space for the orchestra, as well as an upgrade to the venue so it can continue operating as a one of Floridas premiere rock, pop, jazz and contemporary concert venues. Fitness studio arrivesNAI Realvest recently negotiated new industrial leases totaling 14,500 square feet at Airport Indus trial Center, Goldenrod CommerCenter and on Divi sion Street south of downtown Orlando. Michael Heidrich, a principal in the rm, brokered all three transactions representing the landlords, including a 6,000-square-foot lease to PTS Fitness Studio opening in the Goldenrod CommerCenter.Business Briefs Community Bulletin Clothing kids in need Dr. Phillips Charities, a Central Florida philanthropic organization, continues its COOL FIT program (Cloth ing Orange & Osceola Learners of Families In Transition). This program provides new back-to-school clothing to all homeless students (meeting McKinney-Vento standards) in grades kindergarten through 12. Approximately 60,000 pieces of top-selling Levis brand apparel including jeans, khakis, cargo shorts, polo shirts and graphic tees have been purchased by Dr. Phillips and distributed to children in need. Restore donations growThe Habitat for Humanity of Greater Orlando Area ReStore recently collected nearly six truckloads worth of donations. The items, which included desks, chairs, countertops, sinks, lab stools, other furnishings, will be resold to fund Habitat building projects. The furniture was donated as part of Rollins Colleges preparation for the opening of the Bush Science Cen ter in September. For more information about the Habitat for Humanity Restore call 407-480-2493 or visit orlandorestore.org Savannah Court and Cove Excellence in Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation 1301 W. Maitland Blvd. Maitland, FL 32751407-645-3990www.SavannahCourtMaitland.comAssisted Living Facility License No. 8447 Skilled Nursing Facility License No. 1635096 Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above!A Senior Living Community where Hospitality is a Way of Life.Join us forSavannah Under The StarsEntertainment by theFaith and Jazz BandDate: September 24, 2013 Time: 6:30PM to 8:30PM Please RSVP 407-645-3990 PHOTOS BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVEROrange County Animal Services brought out its mobile adoption vehicle to Baldwin Parks First Friday Art Festival on Sept. 6. bringing adoptable cats and dogs to the community.

PAGE 7

Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Page 7Lifestyles Its become routine for many people tion. From how we travel, to switching light bulbs, to turning off unused appli save money. Like home consumers, local schools also have to consider energy con servation in their budget cutting strategies. Facility teams in Orange and Seminole County are busy putting their conserva tion strategies in place for the new school year to ensure that every energy dollar is well spent. ings is good for us, [Orange County Public Schools], its good for the taxpayer and it generates less carbon dioxide, which is better for the environment, said Orange County Public Schools Facilities Manager John Brennan. Orange County In Orange County, savings starts in the kitchen. Brennan said school kitchens are working on overhauling procedures to help reduce energy costs. Kitchen workers are being provided with energy saving training and a spread sheet tool to enable them to calculate their energy consumption. Based on this data, Brennan said, each school will formulate a new savings plan detailing how they will reduce energy usage in the kitchens, such as unplugging less frequently used equip ment, working in batches or switching off lights. Following the implementation of these new plans, the facilities department will do energy audits to help keep them on said Orange County Public Schools hopes to save $1 million using this strategy alone. Energy costs can also cool off though centrally controlled thermostats. Ther mostats in Orange County Schools are centrally controlled through the facilities department, requiring individual classrooms and buildings to operate at a range. In addition, Orange County Public Schools gets rebates from Duke Energy and the Orlando Utilities Commission for using more energynew schools such as Walker Middle, Oakridge High, Edgewater High and Aloma Elemen tary School. We are aiming to increase our in Orange County nan said. Seminole County Seminole County Energy Manager Hector Barbosa said Seminole County Public Schools are shining light on several new ways for the county to save on electricity. e Mayflower is an incredible safety net.At The Mayower, Nancy Klingler benets from the wisdom of proactive planning. She enjoys her stunning, customized villa along with a maintenance-free lifestyle that enables her to travel regularly and maintain her social circle. And having moved here with her late husband Bob, the advantages extend even further. Wed always planned to make the move later on, but we fast-tracked our decision when Bob became ill, Nancy says. He wanted to make sure I was taken care of and I am. You never know what will happen in the future, so you have to prepare. No matter what comes my way, The Mayower is an incredible safety net that provides a sense of security for me and my children.Whats your plan for the future? Call today, and lets talk about it: 407 .672. 1620. 88141 PR AD WPO 9/2013 Wi nt er Pa r k' s Di sti nc ti ve Re tire me nt Co mmu ni ty www.themayf lower.com 1620 Mayower Court Winter Park, FL 32792 PROACTIVE PLANNING [ and lifelong security ] MAY 972 Klinger Ad_WPO.indd 1 8/13/13 12:14 PM When an elderly opera singer goes to a concert, he may choose an aisle seat so he can vamoose if things dont pan out to please him. On Friday, Sept. 6, when Florida Opera Theaters Opera In The Park Series showcased baritone Gabriel Preisser at the Winter Park Community Center, this old-timer stayed glued to his seat from Baritone Preisser demonstrated the requisites of an accomplished concert singer. His voice is excellent, and pliable enough to deliver everything his very musical mind imagines. At Preissers side was pianist Robin Stamper, a virtuoso pro who, I hope, never again is sentenced to play an instrument such as what served as a piano on this occasion. Preissers program was varied enough to have suited him well in New Yorks Town Hall. This fact made me wonder how his voice would carry in a full-sized concert hall with an orchestra pit. from his energetic opening, Rossinis Lar go al Factotum, to his encore, Germonds aria Di Provenza from Traviata. Along the way Mr. Preisser tossed in a tasteful rendition of Menottis When the Air Sings of Summer from The Old Man and the Thief. ( Familiar songs by Johannes Brahms and F. Paolo Tosti were welcome hearing and emphasized good diction, and pleasing legato line. I personally enjoyed Preissers touching rendition of Tostis Ideale, a song I sang on countless programs. Preissers range from top to bottom is easy and cut from one cloth. A special treat was three French cabaret songs by Francis Poulenc. Here Preissers panache and humorous interpretation brought smiles to the faces of his audience. Stamper soloed ably in piano pieces by Scriabin and Liszt. Gabriel Preisser ended a delightful evening with Broadway selections from Paint Your Wagon, The Fantasticks and Carousel. ( Versatile baritone scores in Winter Park concertLOUIS RONEY Observer columnistLocal schools gear up for energy savingsALLISON OLCSVAY Observer staff PHOTOS BY ALLISON OLCSVAY THE OBSERVERNew energy-efcient kitchens cut down on food preparation costs in local schools. Please see ENERGY on page 8

PAGE 8

Page 8 | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer FAMILY CALENDAR Calendar SEPT. 12 Its the Mingle at the Museum! The Albin Polasek Museum and Sculpture Gar dens invites you to have cocktails while networking, listening to poetry, and look ing at sculpture. Its from 6 to 9 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 12, at the museum, lo cated at 633 Osceola Ave. in Winter Park. Visit polasek.org for more information. Come enjoy wine and Park Avenue busi nesses at the Sip and Stroll from 5-8 p.m. Sept. 12. Visit winterpark.org for more information. SEPT. 14The Winter Park Public Library presents Bash for Books at 7 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 14, at the Winter Park Civic Center. This years party will feature food, wine, a silent auction and rafes to raise money for library programs and services. The event will transport guests to Alices Wonderland, complete with live entertain ment, a casino, and great food and spirits. Visit wppl.org for more information. A rally to help save Winter Parks Capen House will be held at Central Park from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sept. 14. Come out to show your support for the project to move it across Lake Osceola! SEPT. 15The Center for Contemporary Dance takes audiences into the rehearsal studio for an intimate preview of evolving works from Moore Dance Project. Performances take place at 3 p.m. on Sundays, Sept. 8 and 15, at 3580 Aloma Ave. No. 7 in Winter Park. Tickets are $12 and may be purchased by calling 407-695-8366 or visiting thecenterfordance.org. Sept. 12Popcorn Flicks in Central Park will fol low the Park Avenue Sip & Stroll with a family-friendly movie on the lawn. The Shaggy Dog, presented by The Enzian, will start at 8 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 12, at Winter Parks Central Park Main Stage. Bring the family, a blanket or some chairs, and a picnic for inexpensive family fun under the stars. Sept. 13The Art & History Museums Maitland (concludes its Summer Concert Series on Friday, Sept. 13, at 7 p.m. with a con cert by Central Florida band The Master Blasters. The Concert Series, held on the second Friday every month from May to September, takes place in the A&Hs Main Garden, located at 231 W. Packwood Ave. in Maitland. ENERGY | Schools taking the leap into a high tech future to save millions of dollars on energy costsStarting with the basics, schools are switching from old, high wattage T8 lights to new, blubs. And, in areas where light gyms, new LED lights may be installed over the next year. And at the end of the day, schools will no longer look like cruise ships all lit up in the night. Non-essential parking lot lights will go out after midnight. New programmable ther mostats are also being installed, which Barbosa said will be set at 77 during peak hours and 85 dur ing off hours. Like OCPS, Seminole County Public Schools also receive rebates from Duke Energy for mable thermostats. Four schools installed, four more are under construction and an additional nine schools are planned. According to the Energy Conserva tion Task Force, the cumulative rebate dollars earned since 2007 is $338,123.47. Also, the four-day work week instituted during summer break will continue during winter and spring breaks, allowing schools to save energy on the extra days when buildings are empty. Both Brennan and Barbosa said that more than any individual programs, the cost saving measure that will be most effec tive is simple common sense. Were just doing what any one would do, Barbosa said. Switching off lights when you leave a room, turning off comput ers when you leave for the day, its all just common sense stuff that when you add it up, saves a lot of money. CONTINUED FROM PAGE 7 PHOTO COURTESY OF ORANGE COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLSRepainting roofs more reective colors cuts down on cooling costs by reducing the amount of heat absorbed into school buildings. Maitland Chamber of Commerce 407-644-0741 jlee@maitlandchamber.com www.maitlandchamber.com 110 N. Maitland Ave. Maitland, FL 32751 PRODUCTIONS WIMBERLY WOLFECatered By Event Coordinator Printing & Design Corporate Sponsor A DIVISIO N OF VS M EDIA GR OUP, INC. Community Chamber Luncheon Craig Carter Brighthouse NetworksCreating an Exceptional Customer Experience. Luncheon Sponsored byWednesday, September 18, 11:30 am 1:00 pm Maitland Civic Center, 641 S. Maitland Avenue Cost: $15.00 Chamber Members with RSVP by 5:00 pm Monday, September 16 After the deadline $20.00 $20.00 Non-Members Reservations Required! 407-644-0741 September.indd 1 9/10/13 11:49 AM

PAGE 9

LOCAL NEWS. BIG IMPACT.Subscribe now to keep up with the latest news unfolding in your community.Get one year (52 issues) of the Winter Park-Maitland Observer for only $30 Plus, as a thank you for subscribing, youll receive a complimentary copy of the 2014 Winter Park-Maitland Observer Calendar in your December 5 issue! Bonus Offer Subscribe or renew before November 15 and youll get three more months of the Winter Park-Maitland Observer at no additional charge! A SPECIAL OFFER FOR NEW AND RETURNING SUBSCRIBERS Visit WPMObserver.com/Subscribe or call 407.563.7013 to order today!

PAGE 10

Page 10 | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer HomesObserver IN THE HEART OF THE TREE STREETS IN OLDE WP CHAIN OF LAKES EXECUTIVE ESTATE W/GUEST HOUSE BEAUTIFUL FAMILY HOME IN TIMBERLANE SHORES CHARMING WP HOME W/MIDCENTURY MODERN FEATURES Voted Best Real Estate Agency by Winter Park/Maitland Observer Readers www.fanniehillman.com When you step back and take a look at the real estate market in Orange and Seminole counties everything seems to be going well, right now. People are purchasing existing homes at a brisk pace as reflected by the growing number of transactions, and prices for single-family homes and condomini ums have taken a steep climb north of where they were just a year ago. The problem: af ford ability has become an issue once again for some buyers as rapidly rising home prices have priced some fami lies right out of the market. The median price for a home in the Orlando area in July was up over 20 percent from July 2012 which was the largest annual increase in seven years, and condo prices were up a lofty 29.5 percent in the past year. Couple rising prices with rising mortgage interest rates (an average of 4.58 percent on a 30-year fixed loan and 3.6 percent for a 15-year fixed loan as of August 23) and its a potentially dangerous mix for first-time buyers trying to find a home with an affordable price point. While mortgage rates are still relatively low by historic standards, even the slightest increase can make a huge difference in af fordability for many families. Mix in a thin ning inventory of existing homes, especially those in the lower prices ranges, and it cre ates an even greater affordability dilemma for some buyers. Affordability becomes an even greater prob lem when you consider that 67.5 percent of the pending sales in Orange and Seminole counties on August 23 were lower priced distressed properties, while 25 percent of the active listings in the two-county area were distressed properties mostly in lower price ranges. The old adage There s never been a better time to buy still holds true. Many economists expect mortgage rates to keep climbing and in markets like Orange and Seminole counties where inventory levels are well below the 4-6-month supply that typically defines a market balanced between buyers and sellers, home values will likely continue to increase at a rapid pace due to demand. The uptick in rising home prices and mortgage interest rates, coupled with a dwindling inventory of homes, especially those in lower price ranges, has created a sense of urgency amongst many buyers trying to lock in a deal before prices and interest rates climb too far out of reach for homebuyers. On the one hand, rising prices means more homeowner equity which could lead to more available inventory if more folks jump off the fence and list their homes for sale. It also could lead to more buyers, especially first-timers, being priced out of the housing market. While there remain a number of issues to be resolved in the local housing market, namely reducing the number of distressed properties and increasing inven tory in all price ranges, now seems like the obvious time for Orange and Seminole county homebuyers to say Carpe diem, especially for those who have been waiting to buy their first home. Just be ready to act fast and make sure you are pre-approved for a loan which will make your offer even more viable.Scott Hillman is president of Fannie Hillman + Associates, a 32-year-old Winter Park-based real estate company specializing in residential real estate sales. He can be reached at (407) 644-1234 or at scott@fanniehillman.com. Afforability remains a problem for some LISA FLEMING Realtor Fannie Hillman + Associates (407) 644-1234 ext. 223 (321) 228-8341 cell www.fanniehillman.com lcfrealty@yahoo.comVoted Orlandos Best Residential Real Estate Oce Ranked a Top Producer since 2002Born and raised in the Winter Park/Maitland area DEDICATION. COMMUNICATION. NEGOTIATION.My skills will get you the results youre looking for. e real estate market is moving fast, thanks to low inventory and high buyer count, so contact me today to buy or sell your home quickly! HOUSES WANTED!!! Get a FREE No Obliga on CASH O er On Your House Within 24 Hours! (855) 755-1818 www.Circle18Homes.com CASH $$$ QUICK CLOSE ANY PRICE RANGE ANY CONDITION ANY SITUATION Serving Central Florida Over 32 Yearswww.fanniehillman.com 407.644.1234 Homes brought to you by: Serving Central Florida Over 32 Yearswww.fanniehillman.com 407.644.1234 Homes brought to you by: Scott Hillman

PAGE 11

Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Page 11Central Florida homeowners have been on an equity roller coaster ride over the past few years. First came the production boom starting in 2004. Meteoric was a common term used to describe the rapid increase of home values, and it was common for builders to have extensive waiting lists to purchase in new communities. Then came the crash. Many builders shuttered their doors and homeowners fell victim to foreclosure as they watched their equity evaporate before their very eyes. Buyers had an overwhelming amount of homes to choose from and foreclosures exploded on to the scene. Often times the foreclosed homes, while in disrepair, were far cheaper to buy than tradi tional sales or buying new. Put simply, they were some of the best values out there. Distressed homes dominated the market. That is no longer the case. Over the past two years the real estate market here in Orange and Seminole counties has is due to several factors, two of decrease of available homes for sale. In late-2012 and 2013 Central Florida saw investors with cash explode onto the scene, buying in with the lack of available homes, and bidding wars erupted while sellers experienced a 25 percent increase over 2012 in median sales price. Moreover, the days of distressed homes representing the largest segment of the market of homes for sale are gone. In July there were 2,836 home sales in Orlando, of which only 491 were foreclosures and 490 short sales. The other 1,855 home sales were traditional. In fact the number of traditional sales (sales of homes by the homeowner and not a bank), were up 56 percent while sales of foreclosures and short sale homes were down 15 percent and 30 percent respec tively. Not only are there fewer foreclosures for homeowners to contend with, they are no longer priced below other homes on the market. The Orlando Regional Realtor Association also stated in its market statistics report for July that the median price for foreclosures was up 17 percent that month while regular home sales increased 11 percent. National data provider Core Logic stated in late August that the amount of homes in foreclosure was 949,000 nationwide, a 32 percent decrease from June and down 20 percent from 2012s total. Not only that but 8.3 mil lion homeowners are projected to be above water in terms of equity in the next 15 months according to RealtyTrac. Fewer foreclosures and moderate price gains mean an overall improvement in the housing sectors health. And with more homeowners experiencing positive equity in their homes, its a win-win situation for everyone. www.BaldwinParkLiving.com Jeff ClarkColdwell Banker Residential 407.733.0773 j.clark@coldwellbanker.com www.BaldwinParkLiving.comWelcoming More Families To Our Neighborhood Than Any Other RE ALTOR. Sold in Baldwin Park WHERE QUALITY MEETS EFFICIENCY216 S. Park Ave, Ste. 1 | Winter Park, FL 32789email: titledesk@midtowntitlellc.com www.midtowntitlellc.comP: 407.644.1157 F: 407.644.1357Serving Central Florida Homeowners & Lenders since 2006 Residential. Commercial. Loan-Purchase. Renance Closings. Satellite closing services available throughout state of Florida Bonded. Licensed. Insured. Positive equity on the rise for local homeowners Christina Rordam is a local Realtor. Contact her at 407-928-8294 or ChristinaS ellsOrlando.com Christina Rordam Keepin it Real Estate INTEGRITY LOYALTY UNWAVERING ENTHUSIASM Kelly L. PriceBrokerTiffany PrewittRealtor Sales Assoc.407.645.4321 Winter Park $1,125,000 2 BR | 3 BA | 2,450 SF Maitland $2,690,000 4 BR | 4 BA | 7,430 SF Orlando $1,299,000 4 BR | 4.5 BA | 5,369 SF

PAGE 12

Page 12 | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer rfff ntbt rf f ffnrn btt WINTER PARK, FL---The residential real estate market in Orange and Seminole Counties continued to get healthier over existing home sales and prices showed marked improvement over a comparable period last year, according to the 2013 MidYear Hillman Report published by Fannie Hillman + Associates. Overall transactions for sin gle-family homes (9140) were up 10.6 percent with sales of homes priced from $300,001 to in excess of $1 million up and average of 48.1 percent. Higher priced condos also did well with sales of those priced from $200,000 to in excess of $500,000 up an average of 53.4 percent. On the surface everything in the local real estate market is go ing well. Although overall sales and prices have shown marked improvement in almost every category, my concern continues to be one of available affordable product which, when combined with rising mortgage interest at an affordable price point, said Scott Hillman, president of that twice a year takes a compre hensive look at existing home and condo trends in Orange and Seminole counties by employing information based on My Florida Regional MLS Database. There continues to be a very limited supply of affordable homes priced under $300,000 and few available condos under $200,000, said Hillman said, noting sales of homes under $300,000 showed only a four per cent hike year-to-year, while sales of condos under 200,000 were One the other hand, lakefront properties in the area continued to perform extremely well over Winter Park (zip 32789) where sales of 11 homes on the Chain of Lakes were up 267 percent and sales of 12 homes on other lakes were up 140 percent. Sales of seven lakefront homes in Colo nialtown and Orlando (zip 32803) were up 40 percent, despite a 177 percent increase in median price, while sales of 18 lakefront homes in downtown Orlando (zips 32801 and 32806) were up 80 percent, median price. Topping the list of best sell ing condo areas was College Park and Orlando (zip 32804) were sales of 33 condos was up 50 per cent, despite a 46 percent increase in median price. A member of the Orlando Regional Realtor Association, Fannie Hillman + Associates is listed in Whos Who in Luxury Real Estate. The company main tains a global presence through and Chicago-based RELOHome Search, a website run by Lead ing Real Estate Companies of the World, the worlds largest network of premier independent senting 600 companies with 5,000 ates in more than 30 countries. Fannie Hillman+ Associates is located at 205 W. Fairbanks Avenue. For more information call (407) 644-1234 or visit the companys web site at fanniehill man.com.Mid-year sales up 10.6 percent over 2012 according to the Hillman Report TEL: 407-896-5520 REALTOR MLS John Penne9 year resident of Baldwin Park Orlando Top 100 Real Estate Agents Orlando Magazine 2011, 2012 & 2013AFFORDABLE REAL ESTATE COMMISSIONS31/2% Commission Full MLS ServiceEMAIL: pennybrokers@earthlink.net WEB: pennybrokersorlando.com COMPARE THE SAVINGSSALES PRICE 6% TRADITIONAL BROKER 3.5% PENNY BROKER SELLER SAVES 1% PENNY BROKERS SELLER SAVES$200,000.$12,000.$7,000.$5,000.$2,000.$10,000. $300,000.$18,000.$10,500.$7,500.$3,000.$15,000. $400,000.$24,000.$14,000.$10,000.$4,000.$20,000. $500,000.$30,000.$17,500.$12,500.$5,000.$25,000. $600,000.$36,000.$21,000.$15,000.$6,000.$30,000. $700,000.$42,000.$24,500.$17,500.$7,000.$35,000. $800,000.$48,000.$28,000.$20,000.$8,000.$40,000. $900,000.$54,000.$31,500.$22,500.$9,000.$45,000. $1,000,000.$60,000.$35,000.$25,000.$10,000.$50,000. WHEN SELLING YOUR HOME, THERE IS A DIFFERENCE Sold over 40 homes in Baldwin ParkJoin the 4,000 home sellers who have S-A-V-E-D between $5,000 and $50,000 on the sale of their home Orlando Magazine has once again awarded John Penne Licensed Real Estate Broker Designation of one of the top one hundred honored agents in Orlando 2013 4094 MARKHAM PL Baldwin Park 3 Br+ Ofce $415,000 4097 WARDELL Baldwin Park 4/3 $530,000 5326 ARDSDALE LANE 3BR + 2025 COULSON ALLY $359,900 SOLD SOLD SOLD SOLDPenny Brokers the smart choice when buying or selling!Call 407-896-55201625 LAKE BALDWIN LANE $353,000 open patio deck (park and lake view)BALDWIN PARK 999 JUEL SREE $379,900 3 bdrm/3 baORL ANDO 2020 SHAW LANE BALDWIN PARK ORRINE DR home and beautiful garden BALDWIN PARK PENDING PENDING + GAR. APT. HOME BEAUTIFUL Three months ago, Dennis Sinns and his longtime girlfriend Rhonda Weaver were sharing a tent in the woods near Sanford. Three tents, actually. One was liv ing space the couple shared with their rescued cat, Midnight; the other two stored their combined possessions. Everything they had in the world, books to clothes to trinkets that they hoped would one day decorate a home, were carefully stored in those nylon shelters, protected by a shell a millimeter thick. Today the couple shares a cozy one-bedroom apartment in Sanford thanks to the HUDVASH, a new program dedicated to helping veterans like Sinns HUD VASH stands for the Department of Housing and Urban Development VA Supported Housing. According to program literature, the target population for HUD-VASH is the vulnerable chronically homeless veteran who often has severe mental or physical health problems and/or substance use disorders. Under the program, veterans like Sinns are provided with case management services, health care through Veterans Affairs and permanent housing support. Seminole County was recently awarded 15 new vouchers and Orange County 110, meaning an additional 125 veterans between the two counties will get the help homes. We feel that [veterans] have done enough, said Seminole County Housing Authority Ex ecutive Director Shannon Young. We want to cut through the red tape and do all we can to make the process as easy as possible to get them in an apartment. Through the program, Sinns and Weaver were partnered with Lisa Goodwin, a VA social worker who Sinns enthusiastically describes as one of the best. She came every week and gave me inspiration and hope that this would actually happen, Sinns said. She stayed by their side throughout the entire process; helping them gather the needed paperwork, search for an apart ment that would take them and their cat, and even helping them move when it came time. She was very respectful and intelligent. said Sinns. She really went out of her way to help us out. Sinns is a 10-year Marine veteran who places such as Vietnam, Cuba and Japan. His only regret, he said, was that he didnt continue on to retirement with the military. After years of offand-on jobs, relationships and dangerous nally made it to a VA ofhis years of struggles. It turned out the restlessness, anxiety and recurring anger he had experienced over the years were the result of undiagnosed post-traumatic stress disorder, a psychiatric condition common to Homeless soldier nally comes home veterans and putting them on a path to a better life, with 125 locals getting new homesALLISON OLCSVAY Observer staff Please see NEW HOME on next page Existing home sales and prices show marked improvement PHOTO BY ALLISON OLCSVAY THE OBSERVERDennis Sinns and girlfriend Rhonda Weaver lived out of three tents in the Sanford woods before a federal program helped them nd a home. Now the couple shares a one-bedroom apartment.

PAGE 13

Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Page 13 One Senior Place ... See our full Calendar of Events at OneSeniorPlace.com407.949.6733715 Douglas Avenue Altamonte Springs, FL 32714M-F 8:30am 5pmFRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 13 Hosted By Freedom Health Chair Pilates MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16 TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17 WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18 THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19 Calendar of Events September 2013 NEW HOME | Caseworkers helped keep couple together through housing process Sinns has suffered more than his fair share of internal and of uniform. he was still a Marine, due in part to his long deployments. The loss of his second wife in a tragic accident sent him into a tailspin that resulted in the loss of his job and eventually his home. Following a destructive cycle of job loss and substance abuse, Sinns ended up virtually homeless, living in storage sheds, on friends couches, in tents and sometimes in a travel van that he owned, always on the lookout for good woods to camp in. Good woods, he said, being safe-ish places that no one else had already camped in, and preferably near a convenience store. Different locations led Sinns and Weaver to make friends with the storeowners, and often pick up odd jobs for a little extra cash. Even after being shot at in their camp one day, it was still their compound in the woods. As Sinns says, his psychiatrist bugged him for two years to get more help, but he always declined, fearing what would happen to Weaver, his girlfriend of eight years, if he were to leave her behind to seek individual help through the VA. But caseworkers were persistent and earlier this year a social worker at the to convince him that they would be able to help both him and his girlfriend through the HUD-VASH program. After searching for just the right place with the help of their caseworker, Goodwin, the couple settled in a one-bedroom apartment in May, not too far from the site of their former camp. Together the couple have they had been saving for just such a day. On one wall of their new Sanford home, theres a built-in bookcase. On one side Sinns books are proudly displayed, on the other Weaver has artfully ar the couple gathered during their life together. In the center section, Sinns set up a shrine to his fellow soldiers, complete with miniature mentos of his days as a Marine. Each piece is a reminder of the long journey to this place they Sinns can now sit down on his own sofa to read his books and no longer has to worry whether his things will still be there when he returns. I looked like Santa back then, Sinns says of his days in the woods. Except not the kind that kids would go see, he said with a chuckle. Today he looks proud; glancing over the home he shares with Weaver, their cat Midnight, and the latest addition, a kitten named Whiskers. This is a great program, Sinns said. The best Ive ever dealt with through the VA. I cant thank them enough, especially Lisa, for getting us this far. Sinns still has a few obstacles to overcome, such as dealing with a recurring foot prob optimism in his tone says hes prepared to face them. Life is looking up, everyday things seem better and better. C ONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE ARCHIVE PHOTO BY ALLISON OLCSVAY THE OBSERVERA former Marine, Dennis Sinns had someone ghting for him in VA social worker Lisa Goodwin, who helped him navigate a jungle of paperwork. Winter Park Home Custom Built on Lake Conway Lancaster Park THE JERRY OLLER & SHIRLEY JONES TEAM Offering personalized service & attention to detail to every client. NEW LISTING NEW PRICE Celebrating Over 100 Years of Handshake Integrity! Since 1904...407-644-2900www.winterparkland.comWP CHAIN OF LAKES ACCESS Florida lifestyle at its best! Almost 2,000 s.f. open plan, sparkling secluded pool. Huge lot many multi-million dollar homes nearby. 3/2 and a half. $469,000 WHISPERING WATERS Lk. Osceola views and breezes from this Walk to Park Ave.restaurants, Farmers Market $325,000. SOLD

PAGE 14

Page 14 | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Tonight! Sip & Stroll in Winter ParkThe Winter Park Chamber of Commerce and Park Avenue Merchants Association invite us to an evening of wine and hors doeuvres at 25 participating mer chants in downtown Winter Park. The Sip & Stroll events invite attendees to visit local shops and restaurants, each of which offers a preview of their latest fashions, gift ideas and menu items. Its the perfect opportunity to experi ence new destinations along Park Avenue and return to long-time favorites. Admission is $25. Each attendee receives a wine glass and passport at check-in. Call 407-644-8281 or visit experienceparkavenue.comNow through Oct. 6 The Taming of the Shrew in the Wild WestShakespeares most outrageous comedy kicks off the 25th season at the Orlando Shakespeare Theater as Director Jim Helsinger presents a very Ameri can version of The Taming of the Shrew set in the Wild West. Weve never done the play set in the Wild West, and I think it is a perfect setting for a rootin tootin trick-shot shootin version of this battle of the sexes, Helsinger says. This high-energy battle of the sexes runs through Oct. 6. Call 407-447-1700 or visit orlandoshakes.orgSept. 13 to Oct. 5 I Love You, Youre Perfect, Now ChangeAmong the most successful musicals presented at the Winter Park Playhouse, one of the most hilarious and most popular is I Love You, Youre Perfect, Now Change. Now the second longest-running Off-Broadway show is returning to the Play house by popular demand. This musical comedy sings about everything youve ever thought about dating, romance, marriage, lovers, husbands, wives and inCall 407-645-0145 or visit winter parkplayhouse.orgSept. 13 to 15 Disney On Ice Princesses and HeroesYou can be a hero to your little ones by taking them to Disney On Ice, as they present Prin cesses and Heroes with short versions of the stories of favorite princesses and their heroes including Snow White, Jasmine and Aladdin, Cinderella and Prince Charming, and Ariel and Prince Eric. Tinker Bell and Mickey Mouse show up to present links between segments. Beware the show includes pyrotechnics with ice during the Sleeping Beauty sequence. Its playing at the Amway Center from Sept. 13 to 15 with six performances scheduled. Call 800-745-3000 or visit Ticketmaster.comSept. 13 Performing Arts of Maitland hosts A Havana NightSept. 13 promises to be an evening packed with music and dance beginning with the Mai tland Stage Band featuring the singing her favorite big band tunes. This wonderfulness will be followed by Nannettes Ballroom Dance, performing and inspiring a night recalling romantic Old Havana. Hors doeuvres from ZaZas Cuban Diner complete the Latin theme. Tickets, available online at MaitlandCivicCenter. com, are $20 advance or $25 at the door.Sept. 14 and 15 Jazz, Food and Wine at Lakeridge Winery FestivalLakeridge Winery, in Cl ermont, will host Jazz at the Winery, showcasing favorite local bands in an event with live music, food and award-winning Lak eridge Wines on Sept. 14 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sept. 15 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. A $2 donation will be accepted at the gate to of Commerce Scholarship Fund. The music schedule includes Air tight and Tory Wynter on Sept. 14, and The Groovemasters and the Robert Harris Group on Sept 15. Free tours and wine tastings will be offered throughout the weekend. Call 352-394-8627 or visit lakeridgewinery.comSept. 20 CityKidz! Buddys Benet for Children more than $1 million for youth programs in Orlandos Parramore community. These funds have helped open doors of opportu nity for more than 2,000 young people, providing them with tutoring, healthcare, pre-school education, college assistance and more. The outstanding results have helped education achievement rates, while lowering the numbers on juvenile crime. The evening includes live perfor mances and dinner beginning at 7 p.m. Contact Renee Jackson at 407-246-4299 or Renee.Jackson@ cityfoforlando.netSept. 20 to Jan. 11 Eleven artists present Art from the Heart of FloridaArt from the Heart of Florida, set to open Sept. 20 and run through Jan. 11, is inspired by the diverse visual artists who call Central Florida home. The exhibit presents the work of 11 artists including sculpture, painting and photography in two-location venues: Crealds main campus and at the Hannibal Square Heri tage Center in Winter Park. The opening reception will take place on Sept. 20 from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at the Creald campus followed by a continued reception at the Hannibal Square Center from 8:30 to 10 p.m. Call 407-671-1886 or visit crealde.org Josh Garrick Culture worthy of your calendar rfrf n rfftbbfb ff b bfb tbffb fb This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORG @EnzianTheater Wednesday Night Pitcher Show BATTLEFIELD EARTH Wed 8PM FREE Held Over! RENOIR Fri Sun 3:30, 6:30, 9:30 Mon-Thu 6:30, 9:30 Local Indie Film Showcase FilmSlam Sun 1PM Only $5 Saturday Matinee Classics: REAR WINDOW Sat 12PM Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906. BUDDYS BENEFIT

PAGE 15

Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Page 15Opinions King Features Weekly ServiceSeptember 9, 2013 EDITORIAL CARTOONS Chris Jepson Perspectives not have health insurance. Last month I contacted Congressman John Micas 7th providing good health care and coverage for all Floridians. I received, via email, a 14-Point Plan, guidelines as the CongressObamacare. I leave it to you to determine the sincer ity of his guidelines to actually cover Floridas uninsured. Micas number one plank for insuring Floridas uninsured and I quote is Focus on increasing access to existing plans. OK, Congressman, and how would you accomplish that? This is banality. Its like telling an individual experiencing an asthmatic attack to take in more air. Access Congressman? Congressman Micas second plank for insuring Floridas uninsured (I am not kidding) is increasing the number of insured Americans with competing plans. Congressman, the question on the table is Floridas uninsured. Oh, did I mention that Congressman Mica is a Republican hence, planks number three and four. Three is to ad dress issues that drive health care costs up and lessen needless regulatory burdens. Yes, of course, it is regulatory burdens that leave Floridas poor without health care. Number four reads create more jobs and greater economic growth by not placing needless regulatory burdens to improve coverage. I trust you are beginning to see the pattern. viduals maximum choice and lower health care premiums which only increased competition provides. Republicans sure love the idea of maximum choice except when it comes to a womans body. Plank number 11 reads maintain the 30 year Federal policy that prohibits taxpayer funding of abortions and provide conscience protections for health care pro viders. Do either of these planks address insuring Floridas uninsured? Actually, yes, they do. In a manner of speaking. Plank eight is a personal favorite. Keep the government out of patients sick beds by protecting the doctor-patient man. That supposes the uninsured sick are actually patients in a bed. Oh, yes, of course, I see their own. There has to be a plank (number 10) that reads, Expand incentives to encour age personal responsibility for health care coverage and costs. Youd think poverty (being poor/poorer), according to Repub lican values, would be incentive enough. onto something. By increasing poverty in America, more citizens will take responsibility and self-insure. Sure sounds like a plan to me. Republicans at the state level are do ing their part, as well, to ensure that the uninsured remain that way. This year the Florida legislature passed, and Gov. Rick Scott signed into law, a bill preventing Floridas insurance commissioner from regulating insurance premiums. Now, you might quite reasonably ask, why would you want to prevent the state insurance commissioner from negotiating with insurance companies (on behalf of Floridians) for lower premiums? Think. Oh, did I mention that the law is in affect for the next two years? Will the Republican State Legislature, in its attempt to sandbag Obamacare, have insurance premiums rise for all Florid ians? Unfortunately, this is health care in Florida. Congressman Mica opened his letter to me with I have long been an advocate for access to affordable health care for all Americans. He omitted eight words but only for those Floridians who can afford it.Health careless in FloridaLouis Roney Play On!A football coach of mine used to tell us to block or tackle a guy as hard as we could, and then help him back to his feet for such an action weakens the opponents desire for revenge. ( When I was a kid, it often seemed to me that people who were wronged and didnt get even were essentially cowards. Later on, I began to see that it is sometimes more effective and, in fact, accomplishes more, if one leaves things in place and does not indulge in the feral justice of revenge. ( anything by hitting someone else al though even today, I would not allow someone to hit me unanswered. ( Getting revenge often turns an unleashed force back upon itself. As John Milton said, that he has painted himself into a corner of bitterness. ( Lord Byron must have had a special experience when he wrote the peculiar quote: Sweet is revengeespecially to women. (It is best not to give a woman ( Sorts of revenge have their just pur For mere vengeance I would do nothing. This nation is too great to look for mere revenge. But, for the security of the future, I would do everything. ( Revenge spawns special retaliatory strike-backs. As Shakespeare said, If you prick us do we not bleed? If you tickle us do we not laugh? If you poison us do we not die? And if you wrong us shall we not revenge? As Olin Miller said, Its far easier to forgive an enemy after youve gotten even with him. ( And then theres the unattributed quote, The longest odds in the world are those against getting even. ( Sasha Guitry says, When a man steals your wife, there is no better revenge than to let him keep her. ( And a warning fr om George Bernard Shaw, Beware of a man who does not return your blow: He neither forgives you nor allows you to forgive yourself. ( Football elevens and other sports teams must often wait a long time to revenge a that leaves teams in anticipation of another chance. Neither side can realistically rest on its laurels, or have reason to be deterred by hopelessness. ( Revenge does more for the legal profession than any other human emotion. Time spent getting even is better spent getting ahead. Your own success will make you happy and put you above all your en emies. People who want to get even with others are usually at odds with themselves, and stand in the way of their own success. ( Revenge is the only debt that is wrong to pay, says an anonymous quote i.e. you let the other guy off the hook. ( When you get even with people it always leaves them with the impression that they owe you something something you may not relish collecting. Some people do odd things to get even.Anonymous ( A man that studieth revenge keeps his own wounds green. Sir Francis Bacon. A wise king never leaves his enemies wounded. ( Time is the great revenger. Anony mous ( Revenge does not long remain unavenged. German proverb Revenge is a morsel reserved for God, says a proverb. ( Revenge is mine, saith the Lord. If we could really count on Gods avenging us, we would put more money ( with George Herbert who says, Living ( ( Thoughts on revenge Jepson is a 27-year resident of Central Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.US About Roney: HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney)

PAGE 16

Page 16 | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer

PAGE 17

Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Page 17

PAGE 18

Page 18 | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer

PAGE 19

Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Page 19

PAGE 20

Page 20 | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer

PAGE 21

Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Page 21

PAGE 22

Page 22 | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer

PAGE 23

Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Page 23

PAGE 24

Page 24 | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer

PAGE 25

Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Page 25

PAGE 26

Page 26 | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer

PAGE 27

Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Page 27

PAGE 28

Page 28 | Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer ANNOUNCEMENTSAdoption=Love.Nurturing, single woman will provide stable home/support of large, extended family. Lets help each other. Financial security. Expenses paid. Deborah, tollfree (855)-779-3699. Sklar Law Firm, LLC FL Bar #0150789CAKE DECORATING & PASTRY CLASSES:Sofelle Confections offers group and customized classes in all areas of pastry, baking and cake decorating! Contact: Lucy sofelleconfections@bellsouth.net or call (407) 579-1962 www.facebook.com/ SofelleConfections Hablamos Espaol!Winter Park Benefit Shop140 Lyman Ave, Winter Park needs items to sell: clothing, bedding, jewelry, kitchenware and bric-a brac. Also need ing volunteers. Contact Elizabeth Comer 407-647-8276. Open Tues & Fri at 9:30am; Sat 10am-1pm. All proceeds support childrens programs & the Or lando Blind Association.AUTOS2008 Saab 9-3 turbo $9900Excellent condition, 74700 miles (motor has 28,000, Saab dealer installed), one owner, nonsmoker,garage kept, sport wheels, powered sun roof, biege leather seats & wood trim power steering,locks,seats,windows & mirrors, cruise control, AM/FM/XM/CD Player, keyless entry,security system. Tom Dougherty 407 703 6091 tjdougherty@ aol.com EDUCATIONHeavy Equipment Operator Training!Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. 3wks Hands On Program. Local Job Placement Assistance. National Certifications. GI Bill Benefits Eligible. 866-362-6497.HELP WANTEDCAREGIVER for my 104 Year Mother, Winter ParkLovely home Lake Sue. Hours to be ar ranged weekdays 8am-4pm; weekends 8am-10pm. Must lift/transfer (5#) through the day. Light whole meals. Supplemental tube feeding. Housekeep ing/Cleaning. Sedan not SUV take to doctors. Non-smoker. Pet friendly. Quiet house. CNA or comparable. Best Caregiv ing References. 317-506-4400 after 10am. rosemail@comcast.netAVONRepresentatives needed in your area! Just $10 starts your business! Easy, Fun and Flexible! Works great with any schedule. Your Time Your Terms Your Money! Call Anita,ISR 1-877-871-4275 or email aaa4avon@yahoo.com. Online appointments also available at start. youravon.com Enter Reference Code aal baghliDriver Trainees Needed NOW!Become a driver for Werner Enterprises. Earn $800 per week! Local CDL Training. 877-214-3624Now hiring: Class A-CDL Drivers $2500Sign -On Bonus, Great Pay, Full Benefits, and Achievable Bonuses! Call us now at 1-888-378-9691 or apply at www.heyl. netMISCELLANEOUSAirline Careers begin here!Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Finan cial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866314-3769.WANTED: HAM Radio Equipment!Buying HAM Radio Equipment, Glass Tubes, Vintage Hi-Fi Audio Gear, Test & Meas. Equip. & MORE! Matt 775-2251159PROFESSIONAL SERVICEHouse Cleaner. $50 New Client Special!A fresh, sparkling clean house so you can relax! Deep cleaned, sanitized, attention to detail. Personalized one on one ser vice. Satisfaction guaranteed. Offer weekly, bi-weekly, monthly, one time. New Blog! HomeCleaned4U.blogspot. com for cleaning tips. Schedule YOUR clean home with Carolyn. Home Cleaned 4U 407-782-1405]homecleaned4u@ gmail.com REAL ESTATE: COMMERCIALOffices for RentWinter Park Real Estate Offices for rent (Winter Park/Goldenrod/University). Doc tors office w/5 exam rooms + extra features. Other office units available from 800-3000 SF. New Orleans style bldg; great prices. Call Ann 407-293-1934. an npolasek@cfl.rr.comREAL ESTATE: COMMERCIALSANFORD:Free standing retail/office building, 2640 SF, great signage & visibility. Lease for $2800 per month (also for sale). Call John, owner/broker, 407-492-7111REAL ESTATE: FOR SALEMINI FARMS JUST OUTSIDE CHATTANOOGA!10-25 Acres Starting at Only $56,000. Located on Signal Mountain. Ideal for horses and gentleman farming. Call 877282-4409SALES: ESTATEEstate & Moving SaleChapman Circle in Winter Park (Wind song Community) 3 Homes with an Es tate & Moving Sale on September 20-21. Steve R. 321-295-7438 stevetore14@ gmail.comSALES: GARAGEHUGE RUMMAGE SALE!Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd, 331 Lake Ave., Maitland Friday, Oct. 4th & Saturday, Oct. 5th, 8 am to 4 pm From Hwy. 17-92, go west one block on Lake Ave; church is on the right immediately after railroad tracks. Phone: (407) 6445350 Multi Family Garage Sale Winter ParkFriday/Saturday Sept. 13-14 7am-3pm Kids items, electronics, furniture, kitchen items 1700 Walnut Avenue 32789 Order your classified ad online! At WPMObserver.com you can create, customize and pay for your ad in one convenient place! Sunday, September 15th 1563 Hanks Avenue, Orlando FL 32814 3 BR | 2.5 BA | 1,962 SF | $425,000 Fully reconstructed two story traditional brick estate on acre bordering Howell Creek & Mead Gardens in Sevilla. Gourmet kitchen, bonus/game room, and luxuri ous first floor master suite with incredible bath. Top-of-the-line finishes throughout, including 4 fireplace, sophisticated secu rity and state of the art audio/video sys tem. Fantastic outdoor spaces include an air conditioned gym, sparkling pool, lush landscaping and dock on Howell Creek! Hosted by: Jennifer King from 1-4 PM 1655 Barcelona Way, Winter Park FL 32789 5 BR | 4.5 BA | 5,371 SF | $1,500,000 Fully reconstructed two story traditional brick estate on acre bordering Howell Creek & Mead Gardens in Sevilla. Gourmet kitchen, bonus/game room, and luxurious first floor master suite with incredible bath. Top-of-the-line finishes throughout, including 4 fireplace, sophisticated security and state of the art audio/video system. Fantastic outdoor spaces include an air conditioned gym, sparkling pool, lush landscaping and dock on Howell Creek! Hosted by: Elim Cintron from 1-4 PM 3241 Inverness Court, Orlando FL 32806 3 BR | 2 BA | 1,954 SF | $199,000 Won derful home in a great neighborhood! Nice sized kitchen with dinette space and huge pantry, large living/dining room combination and office. Master bedroom has a private bath. Tons of closet space inside and carport storage space outside! Untouched terrazzo floors under the car pet and vintage touches throughout. Ac cess to Lake Pineloch! Hosted by: Teresa Jones-Cintron from 1-4 PM 263 Minorca Beach Way Unit 802, New Smyrna Beach FL 32169 3 BR | 2 BA | 1,655 SF | $635,000 Magnificent 8th floor Minorca unit with amazing water views! Fabulous white kitchen, large master suite, great room plan and open porch. Absolutely stunning opportunity to live in this fantastic New Smyrna Beach Community. Minorca offers tennis courts, community pool, full beach access, 24hour security with guard gate and mani cured grounds. Hosted by: Kelly L. Price from 2-4 PM pool and fenced yard. Three car garage, great closet space, and neighborhood playground. Walk to Skate Park and Lake Mary Sports Park. $399,900 SUNDAY 12-3 NEW LISTING IN WINTER PARK PINES 520 Cornwall Road, Winter Park. 3BD/2BA, 1,498SF. Pristine single owner home with beautifully manicured lawn, amazing oak tree and pavered drive. Fenced backyard, screened pool and pa tio. Updated kitchen and brand new AC. Two car garage with large utility room and workshop. A rated schools within walking distance as well as Cady Way pool and trail. $248,400 SUNDAY 1-4 POOL HOME IN GREAT LOCATION 519 Worthington Drive, Winter Park. 4BD/2.5BA, 2,285SF. One story split plan home offers natural hardwood floors and newly renovated master suite with ample closet space. Extra large great room with fireplace and bookcase. French doors open to Florida room for views of lush backyard and pool. Circular driveway and tandem two car garage. $460,000 1935 GAMBLE ROGERS HOME IN PRIME LOCATION 851 Georgia Avenue, Winter Park. 4BD/3.5BA, 4,314SF. Olde World with a European flair, this home features a living OBSERVER Open Houses THE MMARKEt T PLAc C E MindGym September 9, 2013 NEW LISTING! ADORABLE WINTER PARK BUNGALOW 340 North Phelps Avenue, Winter Park. 2BD/1.5BA, 1,150SF. Fantastic hardwood floors throughout this charmer with an updated kitchen. Located on a beautifully landscaped corner lot. Serene open pa tio offers a perfect spot for entertaining. Upgrades include roof in 2005 and AC in 2008. Conveniently located and excellent Winter Park schools. $299,000 SUNDAY 2-5 GREAT OPPORTUNITY TO LIVE IN DOWNTOWN WINTER PARK 557 Osceola Avenue, Winter Park. 5BD/4.5BA, 2,911SF. Walk to Park Avenue and walk to Rollins College! Home on the Winter Park Historic Register. Dutch colonial home with all systems updated. Hardwood floors, wood burning fireplace and a basement for storage. Eat-in space in kitchen. $649,000 BEAUTIFUL HOME IN DESIRABLE NEIGH BORHOOD 1811 Winchester Drive, Winter Park. 4BD/2.5BA. 2,733SF., Quiet neighbor hood with wide, tree-lined streets. Home features large, bright living spaces, hard wood floors, wood burning brick fire places, and large eat-in kitchen. Built ins, vaulted ceilings, lush landscaping, and bonus tree fort. Plenty of room for pool or expansion! $579,000 When Gambling is No Longer a Game 888-ADMIT-IT(888-236-4848)24-HOUR | CONFIDENTIAL HELPLINE MULTILINGUAL | SE HABLA ESPAOLwww.gamblinghelp.org MindGymSeptember 9, 2013 2810 Central Drive, Sanford, FL 32773 sold by Rhonda Chesmore 528 Cornwall Road, Winter Park FL 32792 sold by Pamela Ryan 946 Moss Lane, Winter Park FL 32789 sold by Pamela Ryan 1906 Old Club Point, Maitland FL 32751 sold by Jennifer King & Kelly L. Price OBSERVERJust Sold Homes room with fireplace and a wall of French doors leading to brick patio. Florida room has views of grounds and pool. Spacious master has French doors and large mas ter bath with marble floors and walls. Detached 1BR apartment. $2,250,000 LAKEVIEW HOME IN TREE STREETS 1600 Spruce Avenue, Winter Park. 3BD/2BA, 2,417SF. Offers direct views of Lake Wilbar, xeriscape landscaping and great location. Newly renovated kitchen and bathrooms including granite counters and stainless appliances. Large family room with vaulted ceilings and fireplace. Large bonus room on back of home with great potential. Fresh exterior paint, newer AC, re-plumbed and newer roof. $409,000 NEW PRICE! CHARMING HOME IN QUIET NEIGHBOR HOOD 502 Coachlight Way, Winter Park. 3BD/2BA. 1,336SF. Winter Park schools, newly renovated/remodeled and painted. New roof in new plumbing in custom Kraftmaid cabinets in new windows in Attached storage room. $155,000 NEW PRICE! COMPLETELY REMODELED WINTER PARK HOME 810 North Phelps Avenue, Winter Park. 4BD/3BA. 2,086SF. Tastefully appointed interior with wood and travertine floors and crown molding. Fabulous open floor plan featuring a spacious, eat-in kitchen with stainless, granite & island. The dining area flows from the kitchen into a large family room which leads to a screened pool and spa. Close to shop ping, dining, recreation (park, tennis and YMCA) and downtown Winter Park. $439,000 SUNDAY 12-3 NEW LISTING! RESERVE AT LAKE MARY 918 Arbormoor Place, Lake Mary. 5BD/3BA, 3,006SF. Gorgeous pool home with updates galore including beautiful spacious kitchen cabinets and upgraded appliances. Overlooks beautiful Jackie OLeary 7912 Lk Waunatta Dr, Winter Park $213,000. 08/30/2013 Cindy Kuykendall 5037 Shoreway Loop, Orlando $255,000. 08/27/2013 The Nancy Bagby Team 1673 Chatfield Cir, Orlando $359,900. 09/05/2013 Elaine Bell 8632 Rosa Vista, Orlando $129,900. 09/06/2013 Lisa Fleming 2 Katrina Cove, Long wood $279,180. 08/26/2013 Ann Elizabeth Christensen 6239 Manuscript St. Winter Garden $293,333. 08/27/2013 Jackie OLeary 12066 Jewell Fish Ln, Orlando $352,000. 08/27/2013 Patty Munsey 1480 Bridlebrook Ct. Casselberry $149,900. 08/28/2013 Meg Dolan 615 Ellendale Dr, Winter Park $185,000 08/29/2103 Jackie OLeary 2459 Falmouth Road, Maitland $172,500. 08/30/2013 Glad Messeroff 1425 Northridge Ct, Longwood $240,000. 08/30/2013