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Winter Park-Maitland observer ( 09-05-2013 )

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Material Information

Title:
Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title:
Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication:
Winter Park FL
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates:
28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID:
UF00091444:00279

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title:
Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication:
Winter Park FL
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates:
28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID:
UF00091444:00279


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WPMOBSERVER.COM Jeremy Bush had just returned to his suburban Tampa home from work. The time was around 10 p.m. when he walked to his brother Jeffs bedroom and spoke to him through the closed door, telling him he wouldnt be work ing that day at his second job. Jeff responded back with an OK, and continued to lie in bed trying to sleep. Bush went back to his own room, but heard a sudden crash just moments later that sounded like a car coming through the house. He heard his brother screaming, and rushed to his room while Jeremys wife turned on the bedroom light. All that was left in the room mattress his brother slept on. Bush slid down into the 15foot deep hole after his brother and started to dig with his hands, The scientists searching for holes UCF professors work to predict where sinkholes may strike Please see SINKHOLES on page 2 Stand-up paddleboard tours and other Winter Park business es using the citys chain of lakes could face stricter regulations in coming months. The Winter Park Lakes and Waterways Advisory Board dis cussed the idea of tighter regu lations last month in response to overcrowding and safety con cerns issued during a City Com mission meeting in June. Public Works Assistant Direc tor Don Marcotte mentioned the ongoing issues to the Board at its August meeting, and introduced the idea of a possible change in the regulations. Its kind of questionable whether we can regulate that, and if we can, how should we go about doing that, Marcotte said. Residents ques tioned the current codes regulating nonmotorized vehicles in lakes during a City Commis sion meeting in late June, which included the approval of a new lakeside shopping center with a paddleboard shop on Lake Killarney. People buy boards, try them out and take them home and want to come back to the same place again; I think that is a concern, said resident Con rad Necrason. I think the way you have it written, not only for paddleboards but for non-motor ized vessels of all kinds any amount at any time combined whether its canoes, kayaks, sail boats or whatever I think it in vites too many all at once. I just think its a big safety concern. Industry statistics indicate the possibility of even more paddle board riders entering waters in the coming years. More than 1.2 million people tried the recre ational sport in 2011, 18 percent more than the previous year, ac cording to the Outdoor Industry Association (OIA). Statistics from the OIA also showed board sales doubling from 2010 to 2011, earning a total of $150,000. At the June meeting, Commissioner Carolyn Cooper also raised concern regarding a local business es using Lake Maitland to rent out a JETLEV R200, a backpack that propels rid ers up in the air using a high-power, water-pumping en gine. I have the concern at my own home not just about paddle boarders but about the guy with the power pack thats got people PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Too many paddleboards have made the city consider clamping down on lake users. Paddling the paddlers Potential ordinance in the works for lakefront businesses High-tech bus system unlikely to start before SunRail TIM FREED Observer staff TIM FREED Observer staff Please see PADDLEBOARD on page 2 An update on FlexBus at last weeks Maitland City Council meeting boasted a lengthy list of long-awaited good news prog ress for the recently faltering in telligent transit system, with one wont be ready until more than a year after SunRail starts rolling through Central Florida. Maitland Community Devel opment Director Dick Wells said the transportation consulting company for FlexBus, TranSys tems, told city staffers at its most recent workshop that the tech nology for the on-demand bus system may not be ready to roll and three months from SunRails scheduled start date in May 2014. Theres been a lot of hic cups in the process, Wells said. I dont think theres any way its going to be right at the same time SunRail starts, which was the goal from the beginning Theres just a lot to be done. Original plans had the sys tems demonstration phase, which would test the technology the on-demand shuttle services, FlexBus rolls on, but start date stalls SARAH WILSON Observer staff Please see FLEXBUS on page 2 I have the concern at my own home not just about paddleboarders but about the guy with the power pack thats got Commissioner Carolyn Cooper. PHOTO BY TIM FREED THE OBSERVER The Winter Park sinkhole was one of the countrys most notorious, swallowing a handful of cars, a home and parts of two roads before growing to more than 300 feet.

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Page 2 | Thursday, Sept. 5, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer H O U S E S W A N T E D ! G e t a F R E E N o O b l i g a o n C A S H O e r O n Y o u r H o u s e W i t h i n 2 4 H o u r s (8 5 5 ) 7 5 5 1 8 1 8 w w w C i r c l e 1 8 H o m e s c o m C A S H $ $ $ Q U I C K C L O S E A N Y P R I C E R A N G E A N Y C O N D I T I O N A N Y S I T U A T I O N PADDLEBOARD | Ordinance may affect sailors know some cities do restrict it, but person ally I was wondering if we could at least fees being high enough we can discourage it. City Attorney Larry Brown said that the city could pass an ordinance that would regulate the amount of people entering wa ter, but couldnt see a legal way to charge a royalty every time a business owner uses a lake. Brown wrote a treatise on what could and could not be regulated near the water shortly after the City Commission meeting in June. Marcotte said he plans to present a sum marized version of the treatise to the Lakes and Waterways Advisory Board during its next meeting later this month, where the board will discuss any changes that need to be made in regulating businesses that use lakes. Its been an ongoing concern in this some advice from a legal counsel, said Lakes and Waterways Advisory Board Chair Jesse Graham Jr. C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE SINKHOLES | New science may be able to predict sinkholes before developers buy or build on risky land calling to his wife to get a shovel. He continued to dig, but there no sign of his brother. He could have sworn he heard Jeff calling his name. An hour and a half drive from the sinkhole that swallowed Jeff Bush in his sleep in March, a team of University of Central Florida professors is conducting research that could lead to the ability to predict sinkholes before they happen. UCF professors Dr. Manoj Chopra, Dr. Hae-Bum Yun, Dr. Dingbao Wang and Dr. BooHyun Nam are working together to collect data on when and where sinkholes occur in Florida, as well as what triggers the sinkholes to begin with. By monitoring these numbers and factors, the team hopes to reach their ultimate goal of sink hole prediction. It damages the infrastructure nitely understand the sinkhole issue here in Florida, especially Central Florida, Nam said. The research continues in the wake of another sinkhole that struck just minutes away from Walt Disney World resort earlier this month. A three-story build ing at the Summer Bay Resort in Clermont sank and collapsed into a 60-foot-wide hole that suddenly opened in the ground. There was no sign whatso ever on the surface, and then sud denly, because there was a cavity underneath, the roof of the cavity collapsed, Chopra said. Nam explained that there are different kinds of sinkholes, with the most dangerous being a cover collapse. Areas with clay-like soil collect ground water over many years, building up weight beneath the rock surface. Rainwater that manages to trickle down through the soil and get to the limestone below slowly eats it away due to the carbonic acid it contains. Over hundreds of years, a cavity begins to form while the clay layer above stays intact, until a change in the groundwa ter pressure due to heavy rain or welling causes the top layer to collapse. Central Floridas thick soil makes the area a prime location for these types of sinkholes. Nam said these are the most dangerous because of their unpredictability. The reason people are very scared is because no one expects it, Nam said. Nobody can predict it. Chopra said that he estimates Central Florida to have at least 100 sinkholes every year, often hidden from public view in rural areas. One of the largest sinkholes in the state of Florida happened in Winter Park in 1981. Di rectly along Denning Drive, the sinkhole slowly opened up and swallowed a house, a swimming pool and several Porsches from a nearby car dealership. By the time it stopped expanding, it had reached 350-feet-wide and 125-feet-deep. The cavity that swallowed a city block now sits as a lake at the southeast corner of Martin Luther King Jr. Park. Part of Nams research in cavities are below the surface, which could help people become more aware of the potential threat of a sinkhole, and allow scientists to categorize and rank areas by how dangerous they are, Nam said. Chopras research focuses on tween groundwater levels below and a potential sinkhole. If we notice, for example, that theres a sudden drop in the water table level, is that an indication for a sinkhole maybe opening up in the future? Cho pra said. The research piqued the interest of Jim Rothrock, principal engineer and vice president of Windermere Engineering Services Inc., an engineering company that provides foren sic evaluation for potential sinkholes. If you were able to get very tion and at what time a sinkhole could potentially occur, youd have the opportunity to take preventive action or eliminate the sinkhole through restorative work, Rothrock said. On the other hand, if youre dealing with raw land, you could simply avoid developing that area. The teams research is current ly funded by an in-house grant at UCF, but the group hopes to eventually receive federal fund ing, which will allow them to take on more detailed research. Next year, Nam plans to use ground-penetrating radar that sends electromagnetic waves into the ground, allowing him to detect large limestone cavities to help move the research forward. I think we can provide a said. That is our goal: to predict the sinkhole and save lives. C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE That is out goal: to predict the sinkhole and save lives. Tickets are available while supplies last. Seating is NOT guaranteed and is on a rst-come, rst-served basis. Theater is overbooked to ensure a full house. Film is rated R ITS NOT JUST ORGANIZED CRIMEITS FAMILY.INVITE YOU TO AN ADVANCE SCREENING ON SEPTEMBER 11THTO RECEIVE AN ADVANCE SCREENING PASS FOR TWO GO TO WWW.GOFOBO.COM/RSVP AND ENTER THE CODE: WPMOENGE IN THEATERS SEPTEMBER 13 PHOTO BY TIM FREED THE OBSERVER Researchers are analyzing different soils to determine how to predict holes underneath. FLEXBUS | May be a year behind SunRail system starting before the end of 2013. But the sys tem hit a snag in March when LYNX pulled out of its partnership with the four partner cities involved in the original agreement to Maitland City Council members previ ously referred to FlexBus, and its ability to transport non-traditional bus riders from each side from each side of Maitland to the SunRail station without automobiles, as the key to SunRails ultimate success in the city. Wells said he and representatives from way to speed up the anticipated start date to align more closely with SunRails launch to keep with the systems goal of serving rail riders. Over a year after it starts, people are going to develop other habits by then were afraid, Wells said. Despite that setback, Wells and Mait land federal lobbyist Louis Rotundo said FlexBus future looks much rosier today than it did a month ago. Issues have been ironed out with the spilt with LYNX, and the Federal Transportation Authority is working to help the cities get access to grant money to get FlexBus moving. I think were on the right track now, Rotundo said. Were not home, but were a long, long way from where we were just two weeks ago. C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE

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Page 4 | Thursday, Sept. 5, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Winter Park (1-0) bounced back from their preseason loss with a big win over Lake Nona (01) on Friday. The 44-21 rout came on a big defensive effort from the Wildcats, who forced eight turn overs in the game to hand the ball back to the Winter Park offense. Four interceptions and four fumbles, all recovered by the Wildcats, made up for some mis and gave them second chances within scoring range to help keep up with the Lions. That helped a lot considering Lake Nona quarterback Tucker Israel threw for 287 yards in the game, helping personally engi neer all three of the Lions touch downs. But those three touchdowns were all part of a failed comeback after the Wildcats leapt out to a 24-0 lead early in the game. By already had enough for the deci sive margin of victory, thanks to Rafael Lopes, who would rack up four touchdowns on the ground. Lopes would also force a fumble in that game. Winter Parks rookie starting quarterback J.P. Colton was more of an option player in the game, throwing a single TD pass but picking up another score on the ground en route to 92 yards rush ing. The Wildcats hit the road this Friday to face East River (1-0), which blasted Cypress Creek 49-6 last week. That game kicks off at 7 p.m. Edgewater A 16-7 loss to Evans altered the Eagles trajectory after their kickoff win against Winter Park. It was yet another low scoring game for Edgewater (0-1), which has had trouble mobilizing its offense beyond a touchdown so far. The Eagles will host the Weki va Mustangs (1-0), who are com ing off a 27-0 blasting of Jones last week to start the season. The game kicks off at 7 p.m. on Friday. Lake Howell The Silver Hawks (0-1) couldnt capitalize on their trouncing of St. Cloud in their kickoff game, fal tering badly against Lake Mary in a 57-14 loss. Garrett Kruczek threw for 165 yards for the Silver Hawks, who grabbed two touchdowns in the game, but threw two intercep tions in the process. Meanwhile the Silver Hawks defense and special teams gave up eight TDs. The Hawks hit the road for Hagerty (0-1) on Friday, kicking off at 7:30 p.m. The Huskies nar rowly lost to Lake Brantley last week. Trinity Prep They took down Windermere Prep in their preseason kickoff lar season game the Saints (0-1) overcome Crescent City. They fell 48-36 in an offensive slugfest last week. Theyll get to stay at home this week for their third game of a sixgame homestand, facing Father Lopez (0-1), which fell 22-13 to Holy Trinity Episcopal last week. That game kicks off at 7 p.m. on Friday. The UCF Knights football team walked away with a big 38-7 win against Akron on Aug. 29, but not without early stumbles that left the game in question before the half. Most of quarterback Blake Bortles pass es hit his receivers square in the numbers Thursday night, but that didnt translate into consistent catches early. Most of his passes beyond 20 yards went in and out of the hands of experienced receivers who had few receptions last year, particularly with Breshad Perriman. the second quarter came on Akron pen alties rather than offensive successes. But the Knights rusty offense eventu ally smoothed things out and started working. Once receivers started con sistently catching Bortles passes, the Knights started to walk away with the game. halftime Bortles had nearly 250 yards in the air and the Knights were sitting on a 24-0 cushion. In the second half, the Knights turned up the pressure again, with running backs Storm Johnson and Rannell Hall helping move the versatile receiver J.J. Wor ton used tricky footwork to make defenders miss. Meanwhile an untested UCF defensive crew domi nated the Zips, forcing punt after punt after stall ing drives, most of which ended before the Zips By the fourth quarter the Knights were largely platooning second string ers and younger players to test them out. Though backup quarterback Ty ler Gabbert, who entered to start the fourth, largely directed handoffs to run out the clock, he connected on one 5-yard pass out of three attempts, redeeming himself for nearly attempt of the night. ceiver of the night with 113 yards on just three receptions, though he likely would have had more had he caught every ball that hit him between the numbers. The Knights head to FIU for a show down at 8 p.m. on Sept. 6. The last time the Knights played the Panthers a year ago they won 33-20. In that game Bortles threw for 261 yards, most of them coming Knights defense was far more experienced last season. Winter Park bounces back to thrash Lake Nona After a blowout against Akron, Knights head to FIU ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER The Knights dominated in their 2013 debut, thrashing Akron in front of a near-capacity crowd at Bright House Networks Stadium Aug. 29. Above left, UCF hall-of-fame quarterback Daunte Culpepper stopped by to cheer on his former team. His Orlando restaurant opened this fall. Above, a fan wears beer armor in support of the Knights. Left, quarterback Blake Bortles threw for more than 300 yards in a career high game as a Knight. Below, cheerleaders pump up the crowd.

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Sept. 5, 2013 | Page 5 Thursday, Sept. 5, 2013 Volume 25, Issue 36 PHONE: 407-563-7000 FAX: 407-563-7099 WPMOBSERVER.COM Orlando, FL 32835-5705 PUBLISHER Tracy Craft 407.515.2605 TCraft@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MANAGING EDITOR Isaac Babcock 407.563.7023 IBabcock@TurnstileMediaGroup.com ASSOCIATE EDITOR Sarah Wilson 407.563.7026 SWilson@TurnstileMediaGroup.com DESIGNER Tom Miller 407.563.7032 TMiller@TurnstileMediaGroup.com STAFF WRITERS Brittni Larson Megan Stokes Tim Freed Allison Olcsvay Kristy Vickery COLUMNISTS Chris Jepson Jepson@MediAmerica.us Louis Roney LRoney@cfl.rr.com Josh Garrick JoshGarrick9@gmail.com ADVERTISING SALES Linda Stern 407.376.2434 LStern@TurnstileMediaGroup.com LEGAL NOTICE ADVERTISING Ashley McBride 407.286.0807 Legal@FLALegals.com SUBSCRIPTIONS/CIRCULATION Luana Baez 407.563.7013 LBaez@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MEMBER OF: -Florida Press Association -Winter Park/Maitland/Goldenrod Chambers of Commerce Winter Park/Maitland Observer is published by Turnstile Media Group. Founded in 1990 and headquartered in Orlando, Fla., Turnstile Media Group is also the parent of Golfweek, Golfweek Custom Media, TurfNet, Professional Artist, Seminole Voice, Baldwin Park Living and Turnstile Connect. TURNSTILE MEDIA GROUP CHAIRMAN Rance Crain PRESIDENT/CEO Francis X. Farrell VICE PRESIDENTS Patti Green & Jeff Babineau USPS #00-6186 ISSN 1064-3613 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Winter Park / Maitland Observer 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835 Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster Business Briefs Elite lawyers Two shareholders with the law rm of Winderweedle, Haines, Ward and Wood man, Bradley M. Saxton and Randolph J. Rush were selected as 2013 Legal Elite attorneys by Florida Trend magazine. The Legal Elite designation represents the top 2 percent of Florida Bars more than 67,000 members who practice in the state. New president The Henin Group, with headquarters lo cated in Winter Park and a luxury com munity in DeBary, has named Elizabeth Henin president of its Henin Realty divi sion. Jerome Henin, principal at The Henin Group, said Elizabeth Henin has more than 10 years of experience in real estate brokerage sales and management. Disability rm moves in NAI Realvest recently negotiated two of ce lease agreements at University Court located at 3361 Rouse Road off University Boulevard in east Orlando. Senior Broker Associate Mary Frances West, CCIM ne gotiated the transactions representing the landlord, RREF Interchange-FL, Rouse, LLC of Daytona Beach. Myler Disability, a Social Security disability law rm headquartered in Lehi, Utah, is a new tenant who leased Suite 120 in University Court. Mevesi Inc., a business intelligence service provider for pharmacies, renewed its lease of 1,380 square feet in suite 175 at University Court. New shepherd Shepherds Hope Inc., a faith-based or ganization of volunteers that exists to provide access to health care for the uninsured, announced the appointment of Marni Stahlman to the position of president for the organization. In this role, Marni is responsible for the overall executive direction, funding, operations, and management of Shepherds Hope Health Centers to ensure quality health care for patients. Marni comes to Shep herds Hope as the former senior direc tor of operations at United Cerebral Palsy of Central Florida (ucpc.org) where she raised agency development revenues to more than 1.3 million (10 percent of total revenue budget) in the rst year through cultivation of major donors, pledges, an nual giving campaigns and annual events. New car sharing program Downtown residents, visitors and com muters have more options thanks to a new carshare program beginning in Orlando this fall at no cost to the tax payers. Under the no-cost contract, Hertz 24/7 is providing carshare services at six locations in the city of Orlando. The con tract is through the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT). The carshare program provides commuters access to vehicles rented by the hour allowing drivers to run errands or attend meet ings. The vehicles are also available to downtown Orlando residents who have chosen a car-lite lifestyle but still need occasional access to a car. Rates will start at $8 an hour depending on the type of vehicle rented and will include gas, main tenance, parking and insurance. Six locations around Orlando will feature twelve available cars at the CNL parking garage, I-4 surface parking lot at W. Cen tral Blvd., Creative Village, Thornton Park, Landmark Center, and Florida Hospital. Carshare programs have been opera tional for many years in other major cities across the United States, including Bos ton, New York City and Miami. Plans for expanding the program beyond the city of Orlando depend upon the success of this program, as well as interest from other municipalities that have the employ ment and residential density to continue the program at no cost to the FDOT. Visit reThinkYourCommute.com for more infor mation. Breastfeeding clinic celebrates The Florida Department of Health in Or ange Countys Women, Infants and Chil dren program, commonly known as WIC, celebrated the rst year anniversary of its Walk-In Breastfeeding Clinic and Moms Support Group during World Breastfeed ing week. The WICs Breastfeeding Walk In Clinic is open every Friday from 10 a.m. to noon at the Central Ofce located at 901 W. Church St. in Orlando. During these sessions, certied lactation consul tants and peer counselors work to meet participants breastfeeding goals, provide a venue for learning good parenting skills, and help moms achieve healthy outcomes for their babies. It is a walk-in service, so no appointment is necessary. It is also open to the general public. WINTER PARK VILLAGE Community Bulletin

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Page 6 | Thursday, Sept. 5, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer City Council agenda of Sept. 9 City Council meets the second and fourth Monday of the month at 6:30 p.m. The next meeting is scheduled for Sept. 9 in the Coun cil Chambers, 1776 Independence Lane. Below is the draft agenda for that meeting. Public Hearing posed Millage Rate for Fiscal Year 2014 Consent Agenda utes of Aug. 26, 2013 Advisory Board Meeting Minutes of July 11, 2013 Decision Items: provements Program (CIP) (FY2014-2018); Capital Improve ments Element (CIE) of the Maitland City Code Lease Extension Discussion view For updates, please check our website at itsmymaitland.com Budget talks coming Maitland City Talk BY HOWARD SCHIEFERDECKER MAYOR Socially behaving canines are welcome! Special drawing for people wearing their team spirit! Disney241897disneyonice.com #D isne yOnI ce SAVE $4 on Tickets!*Use offer code: SAVEDOI3 Easy Ways to Redeem Your Savings: 1. Bring this ad to Amway Center Box Office 2. Call at 1-800-745-3000 3. Log on to Ticketmaster.com Appearing: SEPT. 13 15 Tickets Start at $16! Additional fees may apply. GOOD ONLYSat. SEPT. 14 11:00 AM & 7:00 PM Sun. SEPT. 15 5:00 PM*Excludes Opening Night performance, Rinkside and VIP seats. Not valid day of show. No double discounts. Presented locally by Rollins College Fall 2013 Soccer & Volleyball Scheduleswww.rollinssports.comLook for the insert in todays paper

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Sept. 5, 2013 | Page 7 Winter Park City Talk BY RANDY KNIGHT CITY MANAGER Sept. 6 City Commission Strategic Planning Session The City Commission will hold a strategic planning session on Friday, Sept. 6, beginning at 9 a.m. until 2 p.m., at the Winter Park Community Center located at 721 W. New England Avenue. The City Commission is scheduled to discuss the following topics: Lines tem The public is invited to attend, however, no public comment will be taken. Free Winter Park Farmers Mar ket Bike Valet On Saturday, Sept. 7, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Keep Winter Park Beautiful (KWPB) and the Pedes trian & Bicycle Advisory Board will be providing a free Bike Valet service at the Winter Park Farm ers Market as an incentive for al ternative modes of transportation in the city of Winter Parks beauti ful downtown. For more informa tion, please call 407-599-3364 or visit cityofwinterpark.org/kwpb Sept. 9 City Commission Work Session There will be a City Commis sion Work Session on Monday, Sept. 9, at 2 p.m. in City Hall Com mission Chambers. The public is invited to attend, however, no public comment will be taken. Sept. 9 City Commission meet ing There will be a City Commis sion meeting Monday, Sept. 9, at 3:30 p.m. in City Hall Commission Chambers following the work session. Below are a few topics of interest. Please visit cityofwin terpark.org for the most current agenda: Non-action Items Consent Agenda mal solicitation: Award purchase order to Moore, Stephens, Lovelace for RFP-26-2013, External Audit Ser vices, and authorize the mayor to execute the contract. ecute the Settlement Agreement and Mutual Release with Duke Energy Florida. tions Services Agreement (Radio Maintenance, Network Security and Monitoring) expenditure from State Forfeiture Funds in compliance with Florida State Statute 932.7055(5)(1). Public hearings Park: nance revising the permitted and conditional uses regulations for restaurants and other food service restaurants. allowing the city manager to make special exception for dogs to be in Central Park and other prohibited effective Oct. 1, 2013. Budget Public Hearings (Must be held after 5 p.m.) adopting the millage rate. adopting Fiscal Year 2014 budget. sions full agenda on the home page of cityofwinterpark.org un der Whats New > City Commis sion Agenda. CoffeeTalk featuring Commissioner Steve Leary If you have a latt beans to grind or you simply want to espresso your thoughts, Cof feeTalk may be the cup for you. Please join an informal conver sation with Commissioner Steve Leary Thursday, Sept. 12, from 8 a.m. to 9 a.m., at the Winter Park Welcome Center located at 151 W. Lyman Ave. CoffeeTalk gives the communi ty an opportunity to sit down and talk with the Commissioner over a cup of coffee and chat about any city issues that are of interest to them. Special thanks to Palma nos Cafe, Coffee & Wine Bar for donating the coffee for this spe cial series. For more information, please call 407-599-3428. On Thursday, Sept. 12, at 8 p.m. The Shaggy Dog will be presented by Ruths Chris and Winter Park CRA and produced by Enzian Theater as part of Pop corn Flicks in the Park. We en courage you to bring your family and friends, a blanket, a picnic or snacks, and join us in Downtown Central Park! Free popcorn for ev eryone. Rain date will be Sept. 26. For more information, please call 407-629-0054 or visit enzian.org/ at cityofwinterpark.org, like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and watch us on Vimeo. Planning our future FEATURING ...... AND MUCH MORE! 250 North Orlando Ave. Winter Park, FL 32789407.677.9777 A Premier Flooring Source r rfntbWe offer Full-Day Infant Care and Childcare Year-Round, Preschool Classes, Summer Camp, and much more! rfntbrn n n

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Page 8 | Thursday, Sept. 5, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Lifestyles Rollins College Fall 2013 Soccer & Volleyball Scheduleswww.rollinssports.comLook for the insert in todays paper Tammy Benjamin stared down at the white-faced clock she held ticking away. She looked back up at the 10 young faces in her small classroom, and gave a warning. Fifteen seconds left, Ben jamin said. The deepest U.S. canyon is on the border of this state. The students through study guides, searching for the correct answer among the pages. The children range from ages 10 to 17 and come from differ ent cities across Florida, but all belong in the same class. Theyre well aware of the clock that Benjamin holds, but cant see the invisible clock that counts years instead of hours. A clock that runs out at the age of 18, when the safety net vanishes and the young adults must an swer to the law. The children are residents of the Intervention and Assessment Center at Boys Town of Central Florida, an organization that reaches out to children across the state whove suffered from abuse, early struggles that could send their lives on a path of rebellion, crime and self-destruction. Boys Town of Central Florida in Oviedo aims to keep children between the ages of 10 and 17 on the right path and teach them to be respectable members of society through a number of different programs, including In-Home Family Services, which consults families with children showing behavioral problems, and the Intervention and Assess ment Center, which serves as an emergency shelter. Boys Town of Central Florida and its programs help 1,600 to 1,800 children every year whove suffered from abuse and neglect. Our kids really are typically victims of the situation that theyre in, said Gregory Zbylut, president and executive director of Boys Town of Central Florida. Theyre born into situations with not a lot of structure. There may be substance abuse going on in their home environment, broken fami lies, physical or sexual abuse and a lot of things happening to them and around them in the environ ment that leads to bad decision making and role modeling. The emergency shelter at Boys Town gives children from all different avenues a temporary environment to stay in. Children on probation, runaways, and children on respite staying away from broken families all call the shelter home, whether its for one night or for several weeks. Children receive meals, a shared bedroom, and a classroom education at the shelter. Class may end in the afternoon, but the students start learning as soon as they wake up; putting behavioral skills into practice like introducing yourself, accept ing consequences and following instructions. The center is the only ado lescent emergency shelter in Seminole County, and serves 300 children a year. We take kids that a lot of peo ple dont want, said Aleundro McCray, program director for Planning for the countdown to adulthood Boys Town works to keep families together and endangered children on the right path TIM FREED Observer staff Please see BOYS TOWN on page 10 PHOTO BY TIM FREED THE OBSERVER Boys Town of Central Florida data analyst Kristen Sweany is one of the many alumna who went through the In-Home Family Services program and graduated to a better life. Our kids really are typically victims of the situation that theyre in, said Gregory Zbylut.

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Sept. 5, 2013 | Page 9 FAMILY CALENDAR 37TH Annual Maitland Rotary Art FestivalOctober 4-6, 2013Around Beautiful Lake Lily in Maitland www.maitlandrotaryartfestival.comFestival Hours: Friday 6 pm 10 pm, Saturday 10 am 10 pm, Sunday 10 am 5 pm ART the STARSUNDER Presented by: Supported by: Featuring: David Richard, PhD Come for a morning of coffee and conversation. Meet and greet with the new dean. Learn more about adult education and lifelong learning programs available through the college. Friday, September 13, 2013 7:45 a.m. Networking/ 8:15 a.m. Program WINTER PARK WELCOME CENTER 151 W. Lyman Avenue, Winter Park, FL 32789 A complimentary continental breakfast will be served. The event is free and open to the public. For more information, call (407) 644-8281 or visit www.winterpark.org. BeWellWithin Calendar SEPT. 5 Do you love playing cribbage ? Have a great time and meet new friends when the Greater Orlando Cribbage Club meets at 6:45 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 5, at the Elks Lodge at 4755 Howell Branch Road in Winter Park. For more information, con tact Dave at 407-695-1902. SEPT. 6 The Art & History Museums Maitland (A&H) continues its popular program La dies Art Lounge on Friday, Sept. 6 at 5:30 p.m. in the A&Hs Germaine Marvel Building, 210 W. Packwood Ave., Mait land. Ladies Art Lounge is designed for women who want an evening out with friends where they can talk, have a glass of wine, and learn something new in a casual and fun atmosphere. The program is held on the rst Friday of every month from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. The Orlando Fall Home and Garden Show will welcome a star-studded lineup of guest appearances when it comes to the Orange County Convention Center on Sept. 6 to 8. Visit orlandohomeandgar denshow.com for more information. Gabriel Preisser is returning to Orlando for a solo concert at 7 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 6, Winter Park Community Center; 721 W. New England Ave., Winter Park. Get further information at FLOperaThe atre.org or 407-718-4367. SEPT. 7 Its a Dinky Dock Landscaping Party! Come join the city of Winter Park in help ing beautify and control erosion in Winter Parks Dinky Dock Park from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 7. Visit cityofwin terpark.org for more information. SEPT. 8 The Center for Contemporary Dance takes audiences into the rehearsal studio for an intimate preview of evolving works from Moore Dance Project the areas only African-American professional dance ensemble. Performances take place at 3 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 8 and 15, at 3580 Aloma Ave., No. 7, in Winter Park. may be purchased by calling 407-695-8366 or visiting thecenterfordance.org SEPT. 7 Its a Dinky Dock Landscaping Party! Come join the city of Winter Park in help ing beautify and control erosion in Winter Parks Dinky Dock Park from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 7. Visit cityofwin terpark.org for more information. SEPT. 11 Orlando Shakespeare Theater in Partner ship with UCF is pleased to present Cen tral Florida audiences with a fresh take on William Shakespeares The Taming of the Shrew. Set in the Wild West and di rected by Orlando Shakes Artistic Director Jim Helsinger, The Taming of the Shrew begins Sept. 11 and runs through Oct. 6 at the John and Rita Lowndes Shakespeare Center in Loch Haven Park. Tickets, priced from $17 to $40, are on sale now at 407447-1700 or orlandoshakes.org SEPT. 12 Popcorn Flicks in Central Park will fol low the Park Avenue Sip and Stroll with a family-friendly movie on the lawn. The Shaggy Dog, presented by The Enzian will start at 8 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 12 at Winter Parks Central Park Main Stage. Bring the family, a blanket or some chairs, and a picnic for family fun under the stars. SEPT. 13 The Art & History Museums Maitland (A&H) concludes its 2012-2013 Sum mer Concert Series on Friday, Sept. 13 at 7 p.m. with a concert by Central Florida band The Master Blasters. The Summer Concert Series, held on the second Friday of every month from May to September, takes place in the A&Hs beautiful Main Garden, located at 231 W. Packwood Ave. in Maitland. The series is presented by the A&H Associates, volunteer corps of the Art & History Museums Maitland in partner ship with Performing Arts of Maitland. The Master Blasters take the stage on Sept. 13 with a program of music that audiences are sure to enjoy, by seasoned professional musicians.

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Page 10 | Thursday, Sept. 5, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer A DANCE & CONCERT TO BENEFITPERFORMING ARTS OF MAITLANDVENUE ON THE LAKE THE MAITLAND CIVIC CENTER FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2013$20 in Advance $25 at the Door VIP RESERVED SEATING $35Cash Bar Auction FEATURINGThe Maitland Stage Band The Legendary Miss Jacqueline Jones Nannette Sweet Mark Arnott Ballroom Dance & MusicLight Hor doeuvres ZaZa New Cuban Diner KEEP UP WITH MAITLAND NEWS AND EVENTS!www.IndependenceLane.com Facebook.com/ItsMyMaitland September 12 | 5 8 p.m. | Park AvenueExperience the charm of Park Avenue on a fun fall evening Winter Park Sip & Stroll$25 | www.ExperienceParkAvenue.com | 407-644-8281and enjoy wine samples and hors doeuvres at more than 25 local merchants along the way. the Intervention and Assessment Center. Weve been known to take any kids, because we feel any kid can be helped. The children earn points based on how they do with behavioral skills. These points are used to earn privileges such as going out to the movies or going bowling as a group. Boys Town of Central Florida hopes that this will help to get rid of negative behaviors that can develop into more rebel lious attitudes. Boys Town Family Homes on the programs campus also allows children to stay for long periods of time if their family situation deems it necessary. Mar ried couples volunteer and live in these homes full-time to look after up to seven children. Other programs bring coun seling directly to the homes of families. The In-Home Family Services program uses family consultants who identify areas solutions. Family Consultant Justin Colson learned the importance Growing up in Brooklyn, N.Y., Colson an Irish gang offered to protect him when he was walk ing home from school. Before long, the gang was asking him for favors. Colson was only 11 years old. It was your typical gang activity, Colson said. If you can think of it, I probably did it. Colson said his mother tried to keep him from falling by the wayside, but ultimately the gang with him more often. Time is the most important thing with a child, Colson said. If youre not spending time with your child, someone else is. Someone else is talking to your child. Someone else is instructing your child. Colsons mother later sent him to live with his grandfather, who ultimately turned Colsons life around by keeping him account able for his actions. He moved to Florida several years later after getting his life on track, and has since dedicated his life to helping families stay together, volunteering at a com munity center in DeLand and eventually coming to Boys Town of Central Florida. Boys Town of Central Florida data analyst Kristen Sweany is one of the many alumni who went through the In-Home Fam ily Services program. Sweanys family received In-Home Family Services when her sister Victoria was struggling with an eating disorder. Her mother was looking for more stability in the home, which had been thrown off by Victorias condition that forced her to stay at several medical facilities to receive treatment. The fam ily became dysfunctional, with Sweanys mother constantly leav ing home to take care of Victoria. Thats where the services came in. Not only did it help me with a lot of the behavioral issues that I had, but it helped my mom learn to understand where I was coming from and learn to teach differently, she said. I felt like it made me and my mom closer. In the past three years, Boys Town of Central Florida has put an even greater focus on the parents. Boys Town of Central Floridas Common Sense Parent ing classes teach parents how to effectively and positively respond to their children. ways to address problems such as talking back and not follow ing instructions, it could have a better impact on the child in the long run, Zbylut said. The basic behavioral skills of following instructions and accepting con sequences also better prepare the children in Boys Town of Cen tral Florida to be better parents themselves. Heres what we know: these kids are going to have children of their own, Zbylut said. If we dont teach them how to be strong individuals and, in the future, good parents, then theyre going to repeat the cycles of abuse or neglect that they initially potentially grew up in. C ONTINUED FROM PAGE X PHOTO BY TIM FREED THEOBSERVER Providing a comfort during a storm, Boys Town helps kids survive tough times at home. BOYS TOWN | Without Boys Town, teen may have kept gun running for Irish gang

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Nows your chance to showcase just how beautiful your community really is. Submit your best photo of the area, and your shot could be featured in the 2014 Winter Park-Maitland Observer calendar!Visit WPMObserver.com/Photo for more details and to upload your winning submission. Enter the Winter ParkMaitla nd Observer Calendar Photo Contest today! CALENDAR PHOTO CONTEST

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Page 12 | Thursday, Sept. 5, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORG @EnzianTheater Cult Classics Only $5! REPULSION Tue 9:30PM Hit of the 2013 Florida Film Festival! RENOIR Fri Sun 3:30, 6:30, 9:30 Mon, Wed, Thu 6:30, 9:30 Tue 6:30 only National Theatre Live THE AUDINCE Sat 11AM For most, 4 a.m. is an unfamiliar hour, a time still spent slumbered between sheets encompassed by the darkness of closed eyelids. For Desiree Funchess, its a whirl wind hour of quick showers, breakfast ce real and changing buses. While the rest of the world sleeps, young mothers like Funchess, rise early to prepare themselves and their children for the day ahead. For Funchess that may mean a quick shower and breakfast, then at least two buses to catch to get her 7-month-old son Desmond to daycare and herself to work. If she wants to go school to better her chances at a good job, she has to somehow coordinate that into her already exhausting schedule. Every day is a challenge, just trying to get everything done, Funchess said. And thats just for transportation. Factor any number of other life stressors, and she says the tasks can sometimes seem insur mountable. But this summer, Funchess found help through local organizations coming to gether to help young single mothers from Orlando succeed. Orlandos pregnancy and parenthood resource hub, BETA Center, teamed up with Workforce Central Floridas Project CoNEXTions, which offers a youth intern ship program for 16to 21-year-olds experiencing chal lenges entering the workforce. At BETA, young women are able to complete their high school educa tion, get counseling and job search sup port and access to quality childcare. The CoNEXTions program provides the girls with job skills training and the opportunity to put those skills to practice in a sevenweek internship. Funchess and two other women from BETA completed the program this summer, interning at BETA Center doing clerical work, customer service and learn ing to be responsible employees. We expected them to act as any em ployee, clocking in, calling in if necessary and taking responsibility for their actions, said Residence Case Manager Aja Smith, who supervised the interns. In many cases, Smith said the remain ing challenge that stands between these young mothers and independence is their program taught them the basics of being a good employee, while providing free childcare and allowing the women to earn hourly part-time paychecks for their work Smith met bi-weekly with the interns to evaluate their progress and offer sugges tions or praise as needed. They learned a lot about their strengths and weaknesses and that is a huge help when going out into the workforce, she said. Funchess said she saw the internship as an opportunity to build skills and network for the future. I learned the proper way to provide great customer service and I worked on taking initiative, which I know is really im portant on the job, Funchess said. Funchess plans to start classes in Janu ary at Valencia College, and is currently looking for a job where she can use her new skills. Desiree was an outstanding intern, Smith said. She took responsibility like a pro. She tackled every task to make herself more employable and really grew in both Funchess said after her experiences in both BETAs residential program and the internship over the summer, she feels ready to take on lifes challenges in the real world. Im really thankful to have BETA in my life, Funchess said. Its been a blessing, its like another family. Smith said the greatest thing she hopes girls will get from the program is the gift of independence. No one ever takes the time to recognize the challenges for these girls, Smith said. If we can help them make it just that much easier to get there, we have achieved our goal. PHOTOS BY TERRY ROEN WORKFORCE CENTRAL FLORIDA BETA Center successes Amandah Rivers, above, Jacqueline Ramirez, top right, and Desiree Fuchness learned valuable work skills at the center, which helps young women gain a foothold in the working world. BETA Center partnership gives real world internship experience to young women ALLISON OLCSVAY Observer Staff

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Page 14 | Thursday, Sept. 5, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Opinions Chris Jepson Perspectives My father had a question for me any time I became overly prescriptive in my Thou shalt assertions. Hed ask, Who died and made you Pope? Wed laugh (actually he laughed and I backtracked) and Id acknowledge, Point taken. The question of the moment is whether or not America should unilaterally punish Syrian leader Bashar al-Assad for alleged ly gassing his own people with poisonous gas. Upwards of 1,400 Syrians died from a Sarin gas attack purportedly delivered by Syrian forces loyal to Assad. Can foreign governments and dictators murder and terrorize their own people in ways so egregious as to warrant unilateral American intervention? Upwards of 100,000 Syrians have international reports have nearly 2 million Syrians as refugees, now living in camps in surrounding countries. To recap, 100,000 dead, 2 million refugees and 1,400 dead from an alleged gas attack. An estimated 98,600 Syrians have died conventional weapons and collateral damage. Another 1,400 or so have died of poisonous gas. All 100,000 died as a result of violence. Why did the deaths of 98,600 Syrians trigger no unilateral American action but 1,400 deaths by Sarin gas does? I point out that as a consistent national policy, intervention on the grounds of egregious behavior has been at best an intermittent foreign policy. I point to our own national comport pause when claiming moral rectitude. In 1838, American military troops forcemarched Cherokee Indians off their Georgia tribal lands for resettlement in Oklahoma. Five thousand Cherokee died in that march, known infamously as The Trail of Tears. In 1906, the U.S. Army massacred 600 mostly unarmed Moro villagers during the Philippine-American War. Read Mark Twains incredible account of that cow ardly slaughter of innocence. In May of 1939, the transatlantic liner St. Louis was denied access to American ports by the U.S. state department and President Roosevelt. On board were nearly 1,000 Jews who were denied asylum and forced to return to Europe and the Nazi onslaught. In the 1950s, America subverted the democratically elected government of Guatemala. Lobbied by an American cor poration, United Fruit Company, America poured weapons, training and money into overthrowing that socialist government. Over the next four decades an estimated 250,000 Guatemalans died or disappeared. Do cheap bananas wash that blood off our hands, or from our conscience? In 2003, America invaded and occupied Since 1848, since the Mexican-American War we have been an imperialistic power. No ifs, no ands, no buts. We too often pick and chose our moral ity, like our wars, in support of those with I am of two minds when it comes to Assad. Hes a two-bit dictator who will slaughter his own people. Yet in the name of Manifest Destiny did America not once relentlessly slaughter people (see Indian wars/policy)? President Barack Obama said the use of chemical weapons was a red line, not to be crossed. Will America be perceived as weak if we waver? Does it matter? How relevant is our history of ques morality) as we debate yet another ques tionable foreign intervention? We will bomb Syria and America will inevitably receive the predictable whatgoes-around-comes-around payback. My father would have legitimately asked, Who died and made America Emperor? I await the Congressional war vote with a jaundiced eye. Kettle bombing the pot Jepson is a 27-year resident of Central Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.US Louis Roney Play On! Ben Franklins words are a tall order, but like most of the things he left us they are reachable gems of logic. When a per son who has lived a long life attempts to set down on paper his inventions worth reading, he should exercise a considerable degree of self-criticism. What have you done that was worth the effort? How well did you succeed in doing it? Do all the successes in your life add up to one big success? We all know people who, for one reason or another, have never needed or wanted to accomplish anything noteworthy. Such people are often our favorite neighbors, friends and relatives, while some who live near us and who have won much acclaim, may remain distant. The inspiration to make ones life add up to something worthy is often inborn, but can certainly be helped by ones family and schooling. In the end, all our arguments seem to do no more than to reinforce our own prejudices. Education is in retrospect, not unlike a staircase. At likewise at the end of high school. College a bachelors degree lays open territory for greater exploration of voluntary further education. The most valuable aspect of learning is learning how to learn; how to be the problem-solver of the myriad prob lems that life holds. If you take calculus in college, are you going to employ calculus in your later life? For most probably not, but your brain will nancial and other quandaries ahead. Every weight that you pick up strengthens the arm that you used in lifting it. Use it or lose it is a very apt, although worn, piece of advice. Having the potential in your mind to do something of value is like hav ing money in the bank upon which you can draw to make desirable things happen. Deciding how to use your minds con tents is a nonstop activity during all your waking hours. Our recollection of dreams is something on the same order. Human a new automobile, or they are extended generally throughout life, such as wishing to increase ones knowledge. I recently asked my b.w. if there was anything material that she wanted and does not have. She couldnt think of a thing, nor could I, when she asked me the same question. I have never been jealous of anybody else in my life. However, I have greatly wished that I had learned to speak more languages. Languages are doors that open into new countries full of exhilarating people and vistas. No one else can learn for me a language as a favor. He can, of course, teach me a language that I want to learn. Even a childs learning of table man ners must often be propelled by parental energy. Girls learn to dance much quicker than boys because the desire in boys to dance may be harder to awaken. What lies beyond the learning of some thing new is the spark that inspires: The idea of driving a car makes most boys very impatient to get their hands on the steer ing wheel. Cars represent a whole world of freedom to boys who reach driving age, a may we add! Every freedom carries its own accom panying risks, and handling these risks employs personal judgment that we hope our kids will acquire adequately along the way. I used to have a liberal acquaintance/ friend who had the gall to tell me that my right-wing points of view were not worth hearing. We dont talk much any more Learning to learn About Roney: HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney) Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing Benjamin Franklin King Features Weekly ServiceSeptember 2, 2013 King Features Weekly ServiceSeptember 2, 2013 EDITORIAL CARTOONS

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Sept. 5, 2013 | Page 15 Opinions No matter what age or academic level, employing effective studying strategies can make all the difference between acing a class, barely passing or worse, failing miserably. Unfortunately, many of todays most common study methods can lead to utter disappointment despite best efforts and intentions. In fact, recent research out of found that many popular study habits are actually detrimental. This year, ditch the surprisingly shoddy study habits and, instead, utilize proven, effective and emerging technology-based in school and, ultimately, in life. With this in mind, EdTech authority and academic futurist Ashish Rangnekar, CEO of BenchPrep (a ground-breaking online/mobile/interactive scholastic prep solution enabling 21st century high school and college students achieve greater academic success), offers this insight on six unexpectedly bad study habits to avoid and six good-sense study habits sure to keep students on track toward academic success: Six bad study habits students should change immediately Studying at home: Studying at home might be convenient and easy, but there are way too many distractions lurking around the residence. Maybe its a talk ative roommate, the TV, texts and the lure of Facebook, or the growing pile of clothes that are just begging to be washed. Any of these can break concentration and make studying less effective. Consider going desk away from all of these diversions. tening to music while studying have been argued time after time. Although classical music was once believed to increase spatial abilities and improve learning, subse quent research was not able to support this theory. In fact, recent studies show that music may actually impair cognitive abilities and hinder memorization because of the changing words and notes in songs. Studying in silence or amid a little white noise will not distract from thinking and can help a student concentrate without the disruption of lyrics and changing tempos. Procrastinating: Every student is guilty of procrastination at one time or another, but just because its common doesnt mean its acceptable. Procrastination can lead to doing things halfway and not retaining enough information to ace an exam. If a student is pulling frequent all-nighters or essay or project, then it is time to work on time management skills and schedule earlier, and calmer, study sessions. Not making an outline: If a student is not making outlines while studying or writing a paper, then the results most like ly will not be the intended grade. There are many reasons to make an outline. It helps to keep track of large amounts of informa tion, organize ideas, and present the class material in a logical way. Instead of trying to reread a textbook or write an essay from scratch, make an outline to organize thoughts and study more effectively. Highlighting the textbook: Some study advice books recommend reading a text book and marking the pages with a neon highlighter as the best way to study for an upcoming exam, but, in actuality, this is one of the least effective ways for students to remember content. Instead of coloring entire pages with highlighters and trying to reread the text, a student can quiz them selves on the material they just read. This will help to retain more information and score higher on exams. Pulling all-nighters: Many at the high school and college level are particularly guilty of it, but staying up all night cram ming for an exam has been shown to do very little good for test preparation or performance. Not only does sleep depri vation turn students into zombies, but it also takes a serious toll on happiness and overall well-being. The best way to avoid pulling all-nighters is to study ahead of time. Its easier said than done, but the only way to avoid pulling an all-nighter besides not studying at all. Dedicate a few days a week (or more) to study and review the material to avoid trying to cram every thing into that brain in one night. So, what can a student do to make their studying endeavors more effective? Six good study habits for success Pay attention to study location: Find a quiet, uncluttered, distraction-free area away from the residence, and try a few locations until the ideal study place is dis covered. Different spots may work for dif ferent subjects, too! Whatever the location, leverage new powerful mobile and interac tive study solutions that allow high school and college students to better prepare for tests and course work through any por table device from anywhere, at any time. Such engagement helps students better prepare and minimizes stress, providing everything needed to study in one place, including hundreds of practice questions, detailed explanations, guided study plans, and high-quality reading content from the worlds most respected publishers. Vary study topics: Psychologists say alternating topics rather than cramming a deeper impression on the brain. Change it up, take breaks and re-visit the material days if possible, which has been proven to enhance retention even further. Make information meaningful: Whether its creating rhymes or patterns, or even relating material to something else per haps through word or scenario associa tions, such tactics can make information more meaningful and, thus, will enhance information recollection. The University of Maryland reports that mnemonic devices, or memory tricks, are particularly useful for remembering factual information like names, dates, formulas, or other informa tion that requires rote memorization. Tap online resources: Dont get stuck on a problem or resigned to an ill-fated grade example, companies like Academic Earth offer a comprehensive online collection of accessible at no cost. Other companies like OpenStudy enable Internet users to readily connect and engage with other students who are learning the same subjects at the mand, peer-to-peer assistance support and other helpful interactions. Engage in social learning: Research ing with friends. In one recent study from the Jacobs School of Engineering at the University of California San Diego, it was revealed that the higher the volume of interaction, the more likely the students were willing to exchange information in more complex ways and with greater fre quency, forming information cascades, a mechanism that spreads information from a single source to one or multiple sources. The data showed that the higher the scores of the students, the higher the percentage of their interactions that were constant. Have a great study attitude: Think posi tive and focus on skills. Rather than dread ing the experience, thinking positive will make the time to study easier to approach and mindshare wont be expended on feeling resentful. In fact, study attitudes pillars that play a critical and central role in determining students academic perfor mance. In short, study time is a friend. Regard it that way and, soon enough, any student can look forward to a productive, Ultimately, students should iden works for them on a consistent basisand act accordingly, Rangnekar says. For example, some students study better in the morning or can better focus in smaller chunks of time rather than a marathon session. Knowing exactly what does and does not work on a personal level, even tracking study patterns and correlating it with related grades, and then proactively creating a study plan and schedule around the proven effective methods, is the most powerful study tool of all. Education futurist Ashish Rangnekar is CEO of BenchPrep, a pioneering EdTech company that uniquely creates test prep and other subject-based interactive courses that can be accessed via computer, iPhone, Android and iPad for on-demand, on-location learning. He may be reached online at BenchPrep.com Six study habits to avoid and adopt ASHISH RANGNEKAR Guest columnist Howard Beale had it right in the movie Network: Im as mad as hell, and Im not going to take this anymore. You could look it up. Having observed education for the past 14 years, Ive become more and more disillusioned as time goes by. From the view out my window, where I went to yell as Beale asked me to do, things have gone from bad to worse at every level. I will admit there are glimmers of hope, but if we dont start acting like adults Im afraid were doomed to the decline and fall of American education and society. Here are a few examples of why were headed down the path to perdition: Funding. With appreciation for the fact that money makes the world go round, as we cycle through the ups and downs of economic growth and decline, educa tion continues to take a back seat at all levels. We cut back and then give back. But it seems like one step forward, two steps back. At the level of the individual, the corporation and the government, the majority often seem unwilling to make the that made this nation proud and great. Whether it is taxpayers, corporate philanthropists, or policy makers, too few seem to understand that education is truly a foundational underpinning of all that we treasure in American society. Many states and school districts have stopped funding support of the extraordinarily effective for teachers. Heres a program that identi creative, and talented individuals in the teaching profession, only to have the fund ing yanked out from under its feet. The recent announcement by North Carolina that the state will no longer pay more for teachers who hold a masters are devaluing education. That is wrong on every level. MBAs, more pay; licensed doc tors, more pay; accredited lawyers, higher pay than an apprentice. But teachers? Sorry, Charlie. Dont tell me that research shows most teachers holding masters degrees wont achieve better student outcomes than those who lack that credential. Common Core too tough for your kids? Give me a break. This country was found ed on squishing like bugs those challenges deemed too tough. If we dont raise the bar, the bar will fall and crush us like an anorexic weightlifter. Weve seen it happen in the past. Nationalizing education? Puhleeze. We gripe about being second tier to Singapore, South Korea and Finland but are unable to put our national shoulder to the wheel to achieve excellence. We dragged each of those nations out of the degradation of war, put them on a sound economic post-war footing and dence, conscience and smarts to kick our educational butts. Uncle Sam, take charge and get us out of this mess! Arne Duncan, in my opinion, is the most visible, vocal and proactive secretary of education in our nations history. While I may not subscribe to everything he wants to do, I applaud his bringing education to the forefront of the nations challenges. Beyond the issue of pay, the way we treat our teachers is just short of disgrace ful. I believe in accountability and view it as another tool in the box that can improve outcomes in learning. But asking teachers to pay out of pocket for things they deem important and necessary to the learning process is crazy. I suppose thats always been the case in some school environ ments, but in this and any economy, such expectations are disrespectful and prob ably at odds with some employment law. And the work hours! At some point necessary to come in early, stay late, work weekends. But consistently meeting your clients when they arrive before sunup, by the bus load? And taking Wednesdays off for golf? Ive been present at a number of charitable golf tournaments, but Ill be darned if Ive ever seen a foursome of teachers teeing off together. There is no single solution that will solve the issues of education in America today. But without resolve and some sort of consensus that education is the chal lenge of the century, Im afraid were destined to backslide in ways that are too uncomfortable for me to consider. professional life as a public school teacher, and actually went so far as to gain certi teacher in Florida. The work was too hard and I buried that dream along with Kin escopes of Our Miss Brooks. You could look it up. Rich Sloane is director of community relations for the University of Central Floridas College of Education and Human Performance. He can be reached at Rich.Sloane@ucf.edu Disgracing our teachers, hurting our kids RICH SLOANE UCF Forum

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Page 28 | Thursday, Sept. 5, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Order your classified ad online! At WPMObserver.com you can create, customize and pay for your ad in one convenient place! OBSERVER Just Sold Homes Sunday, September 8th: 140 E. Morse Boulevard Unit C, Winter Park FL 32789 2 BR | 3 BA | 2,450 SF | $1,125,000 Sophisticated one story condo in the heart of Downtown Winter Park at The Landmark! This corner unit includes a beautiful foyer, gourmet and luxurious kitchen with island, gas appliances and granite countertops. Private master suite with balcony, office, formal dining room, crown molding and high ceilings. Unit includes two parking spaces next to the ground floor elevators in a secure park ing garage. Hosted by: Tiffany Prewitt from 2-4 PM 3881 Corrine Drive, Orlando FL 32814 3 BR | 2.5 BA | 2,488 SF | $439,000 Charming three bedroom, two bath Bald win Park home with wood floors, open floor plan, inviting covered patio and spacious yard. Enjoy all the amenities of Baldwin Park and the convenient location to Orlando and Winter Park. Hosted by: Gwyn Clark from 2-5 PM 2612 Parkland Drive, Winter Park FL 32789 4 BR | 4.5 BA | 3,282 SF | $819,000 Custom-built pool home with top of the line details and finishes throughout! Chefs dream kitchen offers a six-burner gas range/oven, stainless steel and con crete countertops, a Butcher block station and a breakfast bar. Open family room with fireplace, formal dining area with great built-ins and under-counter wine/ beverage refrigerators and a formal living room with a two-story ceiling. Enjoy the Florida weather by relaxing by the pool ~ a great summer kitchen with a Wolf grill, sink and under-counter fridge is located on the covered lanai. Hosted by: Mary Ann Steltenkamp from 2-5 PM 1420 Chapman Circle, Winter Park FL 32789 3 BR | 3.5 BA | 3,313 SF | $809,000 Immaculate Custom Built home in pres tigious Windsong! Home features a spa cious open floor plan with high end fin ishes galore. Kitchen equipped with gas stove and large island perfect for enter taining all chef enthusiasts. Hosted by: Pamela Seibert from 2-5 PM 2 Woodbound Lane, Debary FL 32713 3 BR | 2.5 BA | 2,009 SF | $185,000 Move-in ready home in desirable Wood bound Lakes. The neighborhood is wel coming with large manicured lots, green areas and lake views to enjoy while walk ing and bike riding. This home features a master retreat with a large dressing area, dual sinks, roman tub and separate shower. Separate living, dining and family room with brick fireplace. The home has two large screened porches and a spa cious, private backyard. Hosted by: Renee Dee Morgan from 1-4 PM 2350 Temple Drive, Winter Park FL 32789 4 BR | 4 BA | 2,006 SF | $465,000 Fabulous Winter Park home featuring a formal living room, office with pocket doors, and kitchen with breakfast bar open to the dining room area. The spa cious family room features a fireplace, built-ins and two sets of French doors that lead to the covered patio and fenced backyard. Gorgeous finishes throughout including crown molding, wood floors and plantation shutters! Bonuses include a guest suite above the detached two car garage! Hosted by: Kelly L. Price from 1-3 PM OBSERVER Open Houses THE MARKE T PLA C E MindGym September 2, 2013 633 Canton Avenue, Winter Park FL 32789 sold by Audra Wilks 410 Genius Drive, Winter Park FL 32789 sold by Kelly L. Price 1301 College Point, Winter Park FL 32789 sold by Kelly L. Lisa Fleming 2 Katrina Cove, Long wood $279,180. 08/26/2013 Ann Elizabeth Christensen 6239 Manuscript St. Winter Garden $293,333. 08/27/2013 Jackie OLeary 12066 Jewell Fish Ln, Orlando $352,000. 08/27/2013 Patty Munsey 1480 Bridlebrook Ct. Casselberry $149,900. 08/28/2013 Meg Dolan 615 Ellendale Dr, Winter Park $185,000. 08/29/2103 Jackie OLeary 2459 Falmouth Road, Maitland $172,500. 08/30/2013 Glad Messeroff 1425 Northridge Ct, Longwood $240,000. 08/30/2013 SUNDAY 12-3 NEW LISTING! 479 HOLT CATHERINES OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 1-4 NEW PRICE! CUSTOM BUILT POOL HOME 194 Varsity Circle, Altamonte Springs. 5BD/4BA, 3,355SF. Conveniently located within the quiet and upscale Acad emy Cove. Pool has water feature and screened enclosure. Sliding doors fully recess into the wall. Spacious kitchen with 42 cabinets and walk-in pantry. Large master bedroom with French doors, tray ceilings, walk in closets, and Jacuzzi tub. Tons of storage. Three car garage. $400,000 TRADITIONAL SPACIOUS HOME 635 Dunblane Drive, Winter Park. 3BD/2BA, 1,733SF. Open living and din ing room spaces, fireplace, back porch and private backyard. Updated hardwood floors, newer AC and roof. Luscious land scaping and great curb appeal. Great lo cation and A rated schools. $334,000 NEW PRICE! WONDERFUL IN OLDE WINTER PARK 1551 Oakhurst Avenue. Winter Park. 4BD+OFC/5BA. 3,854SF. Situated on a great double lot, this remarkable home offers so much! Wonderfully spacious kitchen with granite countertops; Open great room plan with soaring vaulted ceilings; Lovely downstairs master suite; Large bonus room and 2 guest suites upstairs; Fantastic heated pool and spa; Tremendous backyard and open wooden deck make it perfect for entertaining! $949,500 rfntb rf ntand soreness nb naches THG-13902 ANNOUNCEMENTS ADOPT: A childless couple seeks to adopt. Loving home with tenderness, warmth, happiness. Financial security. Expenses paid. Regis & David (888)9861520 or text (347)406-1924; www.davi dandregisadopt.com -Adam B. Sklar FL# 0150789 Sklar Law Firm Adoption CAKE DECORATING & PASTRY CLASSES: Sofelle Confections offers group and cus tomized classes in all areas of pastry, baking and cake decorating! Contact: Lucy sofelleconfections@bellsouth.net or call (407) 579-1962 www.facebook. com/SofelleConfections Hablamos Espa ol! MindGymSeptember 2, 2013 690 Osceola Avenue Unit 208, Winter Park FL 32789 2 BR | 2 BA | 1,148 SF | $293,000 Sought after condo at Lake Virginia Condos! Fantastic location, within walk ing distance to Park Avenue. Kitchen with breakfast bar overlooking the din ing room and living room. Walk out the sliding glass doors to the porch to enjoy views of Lake Virginia and a freshwater canal. Master bedroom also has sliders to the balcony as well as a dressing area. Hosted by: Mark Traugott from 2-5 PM 1432 W. Yale Street, Orlando FL 32804 4 BR | 2 BA | 1,734 SF | $345,000 Charming College Park home with great curb appeal! Excellent hardwood floors, new kitchen with plenty of cabinet space, granite counter tops and breakfast bar. Spacious open floor plan with large fam ily room and picturesque living room with pretty views. Nice-sized master and master bath with shower and garden tub. New double paned windows, large breezeway makes a perfect office or bonus room. Enjoy entertaining on porch, back deck and lush back yard. Hosted by: Jennifer Sloan from 2-5 PM 780 Virginia Drive, Winter Park FL 32789 6 BR | 4.5 BA | 4,275 SF | $895,000 Gorgeous home in Olde Winter Park featuring a wood burning fireplace, hardwood floors, original quarry tile, plantation shutters and French doors. The spacious, gourmet kitchen has a large granite island with six burner gas cooktop, built in wine refrigerator and stainless steel appliances including a chalk board front refrigerator. The own ers suite has French doors leading to a brick patio and a large walk in closet and bathroom has dual sinks, a Garden tub and separate shower. Enjoy entertaining by the beautiful saltwater pool, covered lanai, fenced-in yard and tropical land scaping. Hosted by: Audra Wilks from 2-5 PM NEW LISTING! POOL HOME IN SOUGHT AFTER SEVILLA 319 Santiago Drive, Winter Park. 5BD/4.5BA, 3,536SF. Large upstairs bo nus room with bath. Master suite has French doors that open to oversized screened lanai with new Chattahoochee decking and newer screened enclosure. Eight paneled doors throughout. Central vac. Cabinets galore in garage. Well kept and ready for updating or move right in as is. $650,000 NEW LISTING! 1848 LINDEN SHIRLEYS OPEN HOUSE JEFF FRIEDMANS OPEN HOUSE OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 2-5 UPDATED COTTAGE ON CORNER LOT 500 Live Oak, Maitland. 3BD/2BA, 1,594SF. Cottage located on private cor ner lot with upgrades including granite and stainless kitchen, terracotta and wood floors, crown molding, iron rail staircase and fireplace. Indoor laundry. French doors, fenced yard with landscap ing and patio. Two-car garage. $257,900 ANNOUNCEMENTS Winter Park Benefit Shop 140 Lyman Ave, Winter Park needs items to sell: clothing, bedding, jewelry, kitchenware and bric-a brac. Also need ing volunteers. Contact Elizabeth Comer 407-647-8276. Open Tues & Fri at 9:30am; Sat 10am-1pm. All proceeds support childrens programs & the Or lando Blind Association. Winter Park Ben efit Shop EDUCATION Heavy Equipment Operator Training! Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. 3wks Hands On Program. Local Job Placement Assistance. National Certifications. GI Bill Benefits Eligible. 866-362-6497. HELP WANTED AVON Representatives needed in your area! Just $10 starts your business! Easy, Fun and Flexible! Works great with any schedule. Your Time Your Terms Your Money! Call Anita,ISR 1-877-871-4275 or email aaa4avon@yahoo.com. Online appointments also available at start. youravon.com Enter Reference Code aal baghli Anita Business Opportunity for the right person: I am looking for 1 HIGHLY moti vated sales professional with strong closing skills to sell placemat advertising in the Orlando and Central Florida mar ketplace. The ideal candidate must be a self starter with experience in B2B sales. You will be making sales calls (both cold calls and by appointments set by you). You have the ability to circumvent the various gatekeepers that usually sur round the decision-makers in prospect companies, and gain access to targeted person. There are 12 full color ads per mat, How many placemats can you close per week.? I design all ads and print the placemats. This is a business partner ship, we split ALL profits. The only cost to you is your time. Interested? Send your resume or questions. to lari@larithaw. com HELP WANTED Drivers-HIRING EXPERIENCED/ INEXPERIENCED TANKER DRIVERS! Earn up to $.51 per MILE! New Fleet Vol vo Tractors! 1 Year OTR Exp. Req. Tank er Training Available. Call Today: 877882-6537. www.OakleyTransport.com CAREGIVER for my 104 Year Mother, Winter Park Lovely home Lake Sue. Hours to be ar ranged weekdays 8am-4pm; weekends 8am-10pm. Must lift/transfer (5#) through the day. Light whole meals. Supplemental tube feeding. Housekeep ing/Cleaning. Sedan not SUV take to doctors. Non-smoker. Pet friendly. Quiet house. CNA or comparable. Best Caregiv ing References. 317-506-4400 after 10am. rosemail@comcast.net Driver Trainees Needed NOW! Become a driver for Werner Enterprises. Earn $800 per week! Local CDL Training. 877-214-3624 Now hiring: Class A-CDL Drivers $2500 Sign -On Bonus, Great Pay, Full Benefits, and Achievable Bonuses! Call us now at 1-888-378-9691 or apply at www.heyl. net MISCELLANEOUS Airline Careers begin here! Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Finan cial aid for qualified students. Job place ment assistance. Call AIM 866-3143769. WANTED: HAM Radio Equipment! Buying HAM Radio Equipment, Glass Tubes, Vintage Hi-Fi Audio Gear, Test & Meas. Equip. & MORE! Matt 775-2251159 REAL ESTATE: COMMERCIAL SANFORD: Free standing retail/office building, 2640 SF, great signage & visibility. Lease for $2800 per month (also for sale). Call John, owner/broker, 407-492-7111 REAL ESTATE: COMMERCIAL Offices for Rent Winter Park Real Estate Offices for rent (Winter Park/Goldenrod/University). Doc tors office w/5 exam rooms + extra fea tures. Other office units available from 800-3000 SF. New Orleans style bldg; great prices. Call Ann 407-293-1934. an npolasek@cfl.rr.com REAL ESTATE: FOR SALE ABSOLUTE AUCTION Sept 21 Sewanee, TN 230 Acres in 3 Tracts and 14 Bluff/View Tracts 800-476-3939 www.targetauction.com TNAU #6650 TN #260531 Volunteer Land Consultants, LLC REAL ESTATE: FOR SALE LAND & CABIN PACKAGE ON CUMBERLAND PLATEAU! 30 Acres and 1200 sq. ft. cabin $79,000. Minutes from 4 State Parks & TN River. Call 877-282-4409 Mobile Homes with acreage. Ready to move in. Seller Financing with approved credit. 3Br 2Ba. No renters. 850-308-6473 LandHomesExpress.com SALES: GARAGE HUGE RUMMAGE SALE! Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd, 331 Lake Ave., Maitland Friday, Oct. 4th & Saturday, Oct. 5th, 8 am to 4 pm From Hwy. 17-92, go west one block on Lake Ave; church is on the right immediately after railroad tracks. Phone: (407) 6445350