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Winter Park-Maitland observer ( 08-29-2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00242

Material Information

Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park FL
Publication Date: 08-29-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates: 28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID: UF00091444:00278

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00242

Material Information

Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park FL
Publication Date: 08-29-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates: 28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID: UF00091444:00278


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WPMOBSERVER.COM The Winter Park City Com mission took a large step to re move dead trees in Winter Park that could fall on residents and vehicles last Monday an ongo ing safety issue spanning the past decade. Commissioners voted to mod ify the proposed budget for the $250,000 from the operating con tingency fund to tree trimming and removal. The added funds would cover the remaining tree costs for the mated at a total of $560,000 ac cording to a recent study, City Manager Randy Knight said. Commissioners insisted that the dangerous potential of the dead trees falling and causing in jury or death needed to be taken care of. I have great concern regard ing trees in this city, Commis sioner Steven Leary said. Every time the crew comes out to take down a tree, they mark two more on the way. These trees are falling at a faster rate, and cities around the country are facing lawsuits and losing lawsuits in tens of mil lions of dollars. I know we have liability in surance, but Im still concerned for the safety of our residents. Leary said that city arbor ist Dru Dennisons involvement sheds new light on the tree crisis in Winter Park. To the naked eye or the un educated eye, people say these trees look great, but a strong wind could just take the thing right down, Leary said. Commissioner Sarah Sprin kel said that many of the trees in Winter Park were planted 50 years ago all at once, causing a large wave of dying trees that the city must now contend with. As we move forward, were PHOTO BY TIM FREED THE OBSERVER Hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of cutting could fend off accidents from dead collapsing trees, say Winter Park staffers. With budget, trees get the ax City Commission adjusts new budget to head off dead tree problem TIM FREED The Observer Please see TREES on page 2 Crime rates are trending down in Winter Park a step away from the previous year that saw a spike in burglaries. Police statistics show that months of 2013, burglaries have dropped by 42.9 percent and robberies have dropped by 23.1 percent. Simple assaults also dropped down by 21.4 percent, as well as non-violent crimes by 17.1 percent. Police Chief Brett Railey said the city saw a decrease in and collaboration between the police department and the com munity. street for their high-visibility patrol, our detectives because they were relentless in the work that they did to catch the burglars, our crime analyst who did a fantastic job in helping us put the dots together, and then the neighborhood watch and the public interaction, Railey said. All of those things worked together to make that happen. Last year saw a total of 374 burglaries, with 134 commercial and 240 residential. The total was a 52 percent increase from 2011, which had 246 burglaries. In response to the spike in burglaries from last year, the police department increased the number of patrols in marked and unmarked police cars, and spread the word through neigh borhood watch programs. Sgt. Jamie Loomis of the Win ter Park Police Department said this kind of collaboration is the only way to make a difference in reducing crime. The police department cant totally control crime in an effort, it has to be a collaborative effort between the business owners, the residents, and the police department, Loomis said. Ev erybody in the community has a hand in how safe the community is. Our community is just fabulous here in Winter Park; Community rising against crime Burglaries, robberies drop in Winter Park TIM FREED The Observer Please see CRIME on page 2

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Page 2 | Thursday, Aug. 29, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer TREES | Many dying at the same time CRIME | Community worked with police going to be wiser with what we plant and when we plant it, Sprinkel said. Mayor Ken Bradley agreed on the importance of removing the cern of using half the operating contingency fund and potentially cutting the reserve fund. The City Commission pulls from the operating contingency fund when a study or oth ed cost needs to be paid for in the middle year. Any money that isnt used rolls into the reserves, which the city has now built up to more than $10 million. The reserves, to me, are as sa cred as knocking the trees down, Bradley said. After much deliberation, the City Commission voted to move the $250,000 to tree removal and trimming by a vote of 4-1. Knight said that there are sev eral hundred trees that need to be removed in the city, and that theres currently $100,000 in the tree preservation fund to replace them. Leary ad mitted that the tree issue will always be ongo ing, but said that the city should be able to catch up with the current tree removals in two to three years. The pro posed budget will go before the Commis and the citys urban forestry divi sion will host a public meeting at the Winter Park Community Cen ter on Sept. 30 to discuss its man agement plan. everybody pulled together, we did what were supposed to and it looks like weve been blessed with a reduction. Loomis encouraged residents to use resources such as the crime mapping webpage on the Winter Park Police website to stay in formed about crime in their area. If the community doesnt know that its an issue, then the community cant respond, Loomis said. Its really a handin-hand collaboration between the community and the police department. Moving forward, the Winter Park Police Department will continue tracking crime trends, relying on its crime analyst to target hot spots where the police can allocate time and manpower, Loomis said. Were hoping to hold our ground, Railey said. As long as we have people, were going to have crime, we realize that. There comes a point where you accept that, but Im not willing to accept that as long as Im chief. Im wanting to work toward zero crime. C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE One Senior Place ... See our full Calendar of Events at OneSeniorPlace.com407.949.6733715 Douglas Avenue Altamonte Springs, FL 32714M-F 8:30am 5pmTU ESDA Y, S EPTEM B E R 3 Organizing Help=Personal Peace Lunch & Learn 11:30am-1pm Presented by Creating Divine Order RSVP 407.949.6733 Health Care Reform 2:30pm-4pm Presented by LTC Advisors RSVP 407.949.6722 W ED N ESDA Y, S EPTEM B E R 4 ACA/Obamacare: What does it all mean? 12pm-1pm By Florida Blue-McBride Insurance Company RSVP 407.230.7835 Why do hearing aids cost so much? 3pm-4:30pm (also Sept 11th, 18th, 25th) Presented by Harmony Hearing Centers of America RSVP 407.545.4098 THUR SDA Y, S EPTEM B E R 5 Living Long. Living Healthy. Living Happy. 10am-11:30am By LTC Advisors RSVP 407.949.6722 The Real Estate Specialist are IN 9am-12pm (also Sept 12th, 19th, 26th) By Exit Real Estate Results FRI DA Y, S EPTEM B E R 6 Zumba Class 11:30am-12:30pm Hosted By Freedom Health Memory Screenings 2pm 4pm Hosted by Arden Courts Memory Care Community By Appointment Only407.949.6733Calendar of Events September 2013 PHOTO BY TIM FREED THE OBSERVER More community patrols helped cut crime substantially in 2012, Chief Brett Railey said. To the naked eye or the uneducated eye, people say these trees look great, but a strong wind could just take the thing right down, Leary said. When the Ultimate Interstate-4 becomes a reality in 2020, the in tersection where Sandspur Road hits Maitland Boulevard will function much the same as it does ies and months of debate, the Mai tland City Council voted Monday to approve an alternative plan for the proposed project that will leave the Sandspur eastbound ramp to Maitland Boulevard open as is. Residents and Councilmem bers had issued concerns over ramp, fearing losing it would on the citys residential roads. We want to preserve the com munity of Maitland and not give people who are coming through the city another way to cut through these neighborhoods, Councilwoman Linda Frosch said. Theres got to be a better solu tion. The approved alternative rec ommended by the citys Trans portation Advisory Board Aug. much as they are now, which by the year 2040 is anticipated to in percent, and on Sandspur west of from a 21 percent increase on all of Sandspur as predicted in the original plan. Studies of other options pro but had residents in arms over po tential future complications from proposed cut throughs on Con course Parkway. The Florida Department of proval of the chosen plan before Ultimate I-4 construction begins. Sandspur ramp will stay open SARAH WILSON The Observer

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Aug. 29, 2013 | Page 3 Business Briefs Construction jobs grow The unemployment rate for construction workers fell to the lowest July level in ve years last month, even though employment has stagnated in the past four months, according to an analysis of new government data by the Associated General Contractors of Amer ica. Association ofcials urged Washington leaders to act on stalled infrastructure funding measures to help jump start construction hiring. Banking on life skills The Bank of America Charitable Foundation awarded us a Workforce Development & Education grant to help fund Advancement Via Individual Determina tion, or AVID. The program seeks to help underserved middle and high school students, ages 11-18 and enrolled in Orange County Public Schools, graduate with the education and life skills needed to access post-secondary educational opportunities. Racing supplier moves in NAI Realvest recently negotiated the sale of a 14,500 square foot ofce warehouse building on one acre at 521 South Econ Circle in Oviedo. Paul P. Partyka, managing partner at NAI Realvest represented M&O LP the local seller. The buyer, Brac Racing, a racing parts distributor expanding into larger facilities from a former Longwood location, paid $1,002,000 for the property. Grant for students The Foundation for Orange County Public Schools recently received a $7,000 grant to help fund a pro gram that prepares students for college and career opportunities. Motivational lawyer J. Jeffrey Deery, a business litigation attorney with Winderweedle, Haines, Ward and Woodman, P.A. was a featured speaker at the James Bates, LLP Litiga tion Department Retreat held in Lake Burton, Ga. in June. Mr. Deerys topics included how to develop a successful law practice and the importance of build ing meaningful client relationships. Community Bulletin Backpack giveaway Sponsors, supporters and students from Fifth Third Banks Summer of Dreams, a 10-week program for local homeless children, recently volunteered at A Gift For Teaching to ll backpacks with note books, pencils, rulers, glue and other supplies. The backpacks will be donated to more than 1,300 lo cal homeless children participating in Summer of Dreams. Fifth Third Bank chipped in with 47 school supply drives at its Central Florida branches. Deans lister Rachel Laughlin of Winter Park was one of 337 stu dents named to Denison Universitys 2013 spring semester deans list by provost Bradley Bateman. Laughlin is a member of the Denison class of 2014. Lifetime award winner The Association of Fundraising Professionals (AFP) Central Florida Chapter has announced that Gerald Jerry Hilbrich will be the recipient of the 2013 H. Clifford Lee Lifetime Achievement award. Hilbrich has served as Chairman of the Edyth Bush Charitable Foundation Board since 2006. The award is named for the Foundations second president, H. Clifford Lee, himself a recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award in 2005. The AFP established the award to recognize an individual who demonstrates a history of exceptional leadership in philanthropy. Want to switch careers? Workforce Central Florida is partnering with Valencia College to offer training to ll a shortage of skilled workers in Floridas high-tech manufacturing indus try. WCF is recruiting applicants for entry-level po sitions and will create a foundation for a career in automation and simulation. The $683,412, four-year grant, called Florida TRADE, will educate 200 peo ple and pay up to $4,200 per applicant for classes, books and certication testing in Central Florida. It is part of a $15 million grant to deliver technical train ing to students, displaced and unemployed workers, current workers who want to learn new skills and veterans who are rejoining the workforce. $104,000 $108,160 $111,405 $115,861 $119,950 $119,950 $124,748 $129,738 $129,738 $134,928 $131,080 $171,819 $183,846 $225,219 $240,985 $89,861 $78,141 $59,882 $75,679 $82,486 $96,532 $99,939 $61,477 $75,896 $85,597 $85,595 $97,069 $84,961 W h i c h l i n e g i v e s y o u t h e b e s t c h a n c e f o r s u cce s s ? I llustr a tion per iod: 1 -1-2000 thr ough 1-1-2012. Each e xample sho wn assumes $100,000 initial pr emium with no withdr a w als M ar ket v alue based on the S&P 500 Index. H i s t o r i c a l perf o r m a n c e o f the S & P 5 0 0 I n d e x s h o u l d not be c onsider ed a r epr esen ta tion of cur r en t or futur e per f or manc e of the I nde x or of an y annuit y H ypothetical inde x annuit y pr oduc t illustr a tion assumes cr editing method of a 6% annual poin t -t o -poin t cap and annual r eset H ypothetical I nc ome R ider V alue assumes a 7% annual r a t e of r etur n f or inc ome pur poses I llustr a tion v alues r epr esen t g r oss r etur ns A ssumed annuit y r a t es and ac tual hist or ical pr ic es of the S&P 500 I nde x w er e used in this purely hypothetical example for the purpose of illustrating comparitive values and to illustrate how the Interest-Crediting Strategy might have guaranteed. Past performance does not guarantee future results. O N E S H OTY o u o n l y h a v e a t r et i r em en t w i ll f a ll6 0% o f A m er i c a n s s h o r t. M ember of(407)-644-6646w w w .aS af eHar b or .c omB ob A dams P r esiden t/CEOA S af eHar bor LL C bob@asaf ehar bor .c om Illustration period: 12-31-1999 though 12-31-2012According to paycheckforlife.com, three out of ve middle-class Americans entering retirement today are projected to outlive their nancial assets. Learn how to protect your retirement account from losses, maintain upside potential and maximize your lifetime income. Call us today for your PERSONALIZED SAFE MONEY REPORT. Saturday, September 7, 2013 My Heart. My Life. Sponsor: GreaterOrlandoHeartWalk.org Greater Orlando HEART WALK Greater Orlando HEART WALK Media Sponsors: this week after teams tested themselves in a preseason kickoff last Friday. Will the results pre dict seasons to come? Time will tell. Winter Park and Edgewater the Winter Park Wildcats lost to the Edgewater Eagles on the gridiron. And they did it in odd fashion a defensive stalemate on the board. Last season it was an offensive struggle that ended in a 26-13 win for the Wildcats. This season for the kick off classic it was a defensive struggle reminiscent of Wildcats teams from half a decade ago. Promising wide receiver Gabriel McClary didnt have a chance to show off his hands in the end zone, as the Eagles shut down the Wildcat offense in the 6-0 win. For the Wildcats, who return home this week, their recovery will have to come against a rap idly improving Lake Nona team that went 8-3 last season. The Lions stomped Minneola 27-13 last week in their kickoff game. Theyll play host at 7:30 p.m. Friday. Edgewater will enjoy home season, hosting Evans at 7 p.m. Friday. The Trojans went 9-2 last season, but lost 45-0 to Seminole in their kickoff last week. Lake Howell in a 28-0 shutout, courtesy of some on-again, off-again offense that pulled off some dynamic terback Garrett Kruczek, son of Super Bowl winner and Trinity Prep coach Mike Kruczek, threw a belief-defying touchdown pass into the end of the end zone early in the game to bamboozle St. Cloud. After dominating St. Cloud, switch gears for a road game against a Lake Mary team that they lost to 30-0 last season a season low point. But the Silver for them since 2012. After that blowout loss, they went on a 4-1 run to close out the season their best streak in a decade. Lake Mary didnt play a kickoff game last week. The pair will meet at 7 p.m. Friday in Lake Mary. Eagles soar, Wildcats lick wounds after kickoff ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff

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Page 4 | Thursday, Aug. 29, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Thursday, Aug. 29, 2013 Volume 25, Issue 35 PHONE: 407-563-7000 FAX: 407-563-7099 WPMOBSERVER.COM Orlando, FL 32835-5705 PUBLISHER Tracy Craft 407.515.2605 TCraft@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MANAGING EDITOR Isaac Babcock 407.563.7023 IBabcock@TurnstileMediaGroup.com ASSOCIATE EDITOR Sarah Wilson 407.563.7026 SWilson@TurnstileMediaGroup.com DESIGNER Tom Miller 407.563.7032 TMiller@TurnstileMediaGroup.com STAFF WRITERS Brittni Larson Megan Stokes Tim Freed Allison Olcsvay Kristy Vickery COLUMNISTS Chris Jepson Jepson@MediAmerica.us Louis Roney LRoney@cfl.rr.com Josh Garrick JoshGarrick9@gmail.com ADVERTISING SALES Linda Stern 407.376.2434 LStern@TurnstileMediaGroup.com LEGAL NOTICE ADVERTISING Ashley McBride 407.286.0807 Legal@FLALegals.com SUBSCRIPTIONS/CIRCULATION Luana Baez 407.563.7013 LBaez@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MEMBER OF: -Florida Press Association -Winter Park/Maitland/Goldenrod Chambers of Commerce Winter Park/Maitland Observer is published by Turnstile Media Group. Founded in 1990 and headquartered in Orlando, Fla., Turnstile Media Group is also the parent of Golfweek, Golfweek Custom Media, TurfNet, Professional Artist, Seminole Voice, Baldwin Park Living and Turnstile Connect. TURNSTILE MEDIA GROUP CHAIRMAN Rance Crain PRESIDENT/CEO Francis X. Farrell VICE PRESIDENTS Patti Green & Jeff Babineau USPS #00-6186 ISSN 1064-3613 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Winter Park / Maitland Observer 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835 Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster Aug. 26 City Commission meeting highlights There was a City Commission Commission Chambers. Below are a few highlights of decisions made at the meeting: Mayors Report A presentation was made by to Wanda Salerno as the recipient of the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce Lifetime Achievement Award. Consent Agenda The minutes of 8/12/13 were approved. The purchase order for Techni cal Solutions to perform work for the Capital Improvement Project Alum Station Upgrades was ap proved. The budget adjustment to fund payments to Waste Pro and ADPI (third-party billing agent for ambulance transport services) through the remainder of the cur The annual review of the citys Debt Management Policy was ap proved. Forfeiture Funds for the purchase and installation of the AeroClave units was approved. Action Items Requiring Dis cussion As part of the budget discus sion, $250,000 was approved to be included in the Fiscal Year 2014 proposed budget to address Cat and Category 1 Tree Pruning. Public hearings dinances were approved. The resolution designating 940 Old England Ave. as a historic re source in the Winter Park Register nance revising the permitted and conditional uses regulations for restaurants and other food service taurants, was approved. A full copy of the Aug. 26 City Commission minutes will be available at cityofwinterpark.org the week of Sept. 9, pending ap proval by the City Commission. Labor Day holiday servance of Labor Day on Mon day, Sept. 2. This is also a Waste Pro holiday. If your household garbage, recycling or yard waste service falls on Labor Day, your items will be picked up on the day. Household hazardous waste disposal day The city of Winter Park, in partnership with Waste Pro for household hazardous waste and A1 Assets Inc. for e-waste, will be offering waste disposal for all city residents Saturday, Aug. 31, from 8 a.m. to noon at the Public Works ell Branch Road, directly behind Fire Station 64. The following items will be ac cepted: paint is not hazardous waste and can go in trash) dry) lar alkaline batteries go in trash) sions, VCRs, DVD players, FAX machines, CD players and ste reos) Drugs and prescription medi cations Please take to the citys Pre scription Reclamation Station in the lobby of the Public Safety Fa cility located at 500 N. Virginia Ave., between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. a quick & safe drop-off: Please bring your proof of city residency drivers license or util ity bill statement. Keep all hazardous waste ma terials in their original containers with its original labeling. Un known items will not be accepted. Items will only be accepted on Saturday, Aug. 31, from 8 a.m. to noon. Items delivered before or after this time will not be accept ed. This drop off is for residential use only. No contractors please. Thank you for helping keep the city green and properly dispos ing of your household hazardous waste materials the earth-friendly way. For additional information, please call 407-599-3364 or visit cityofwinterpark.org/sustainabil ity CoffeeTalk featuring Commissioner Steve Leary If you have a latt beans to grind or you simply want to espresso your thoughts, Cof feeTalk may be the cup for you. Please join an informal conver sation with Commissioner Steve Leary on Thursday, Sept. 12, from 8 to 9 a.m. at the Winter Park Wel come Center located at 151 W. Ly man Ave. CoffeeTalk gives the communi ty an opportunity to sit down and talk with the Commissioner over a cup of coffee and chat about any city issues that are of interest to them. Special thanks to Palma nos Cafe, Coffee & Wine Bar for donating the coffee for this spe cial series. For more information, please call 407-599-3428. at cityofwinterpark.org, like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and watch us on Vimeo. Its disposal day Contact Ashley Hamm with Primepay Payroll Services for your payroll and tax ling needs. We are a privately held company that has been around for over 28 years. Located in Tampa Florida our small business pricing is sure to beat the competition. In addition to payroll and tax ling Primepay offers: We also offer special pricing for those that Contact me for more information. 407-404-0111ahamm@primepay.com Winter Park City Talk BY RANDY KNIGHT CITY MANAGER PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVER Dozens of guns turned up at the Kicks for Guns event in Winter Park on Aug. 22

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Cornerstone Hospice patient receives elusive college diploma at Winter Park Towers unit.by Manny P. Hernandez Due to hardships of his working life, no matter how hard he tried, a college diploma always eluded Kenneth Coleman. one of eleven children. Kenneth held a number of jobs while helping his mother, but always pursuing his lifes ambition of achieving his college degree.He attended what is now Valencia Community College earning an associate in arts degree there, later obtaining a transfer to Florida A&M University. While holding down two, sometimes three jobs while helping to care for his mother, he returned to Orlando, most recently working in deliveries for UPS. Older brother William Humphrey of Cocoa recalls his brothers passion for painting as well as playing the bass guitar for 37 years. He also restored motorcycles as well as his 1970 Chevy Camaro and other vintage automobiles, but while tending to the necessities of life, never took his eye off his education. He was always interested in medicine, he really wanted to be a physician recalls his older brother. Following his dream, Ken eventually enrolled at the University of South Florida in Tampa in biomedical research, but he was forced to drop out in the fall of 2010 as he had been diagnosed with cancer. But Sandra Cole man, his younger sister in Orlando, said that no matter how many obstacles he faced, he always wanted to pursue his studies, he was married to his books. Not expecting great results in the little time her patient had left, Ken Colemans social worker at Cor nerstone Hospice, Rasheeda Moorer, contacted USF about her patients degree, and through the joint efforts of Dr. Janet Moore (no relation), dean of student affairs and Danielle McDon ald, associate dean of student affairs, things went forward over the course of a weekend and Colemans academic record showed he had indeed earned enough credits for a bachelors degree in general studies from USF. In the presence of many members of the Coleman family, in the presence of Corner stone Hospice President and CEO Chuck Lee, regional team manager Ann Harr, executive director Cindi Harris-Panning and other Hos pice personnel in attendance, Dr. Janet Moore presented Ken Coleman with the elusive col lege diploma he had so diligently pursued. Ken Coleman, in the name of the trustees of the University of South Florida, I bestow upon you this degree that you have earned, said Dr. Janet Moore of USF, as a tear rolled down the graduates cheek. Cornerstone Hospice and Palliative since 1984, provides comfort and care to Cen tral Florida families experiencing life-limiting illnesses. Over 5,000 people in Lake, Sumter, Orange, Osceola, Polk, Hardee and Highlands each year. Enhanced patient and family care is made possible through the generous support of individuals and groups. For more information, to donate, or to volunteer, call 888-728-6234 or visit www.cornerstonehospice.org Nursing staff at the Cornerstone Hospice unit at Winter Park Towers congratulate units patient Kenneth Coleman as he proudly showcases his degree conferred upon him by University of South Florida. Left to right: Brian James, Cornerstone Hospice patient care regional team manager. Kenneth Coleman, a patient at Cornerstone Hospices Winter Park Towers unit, proudly showcases his degree conferred upon him Dr. Janet Moore, USF dean of student affairs; Danielle McDonald, associate dean of student affairs, USF; Cindi Harris-Panning, Cornerstone Hospice executive director for Orange and Osceola; Rasheeda Moorer, Hospice social worker. While holding the diploma just awarded him by Cornerstone Hospice patient Kenneth Chuck Lee: This diploma means to me more than youll ever know This is what I struggled for during many, many years. The USF diploma presentation took place at the Cornerstone Hospice

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Page 6 | Thursday, Aug. 29, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer By now we all know that hur ricane season started June 1, and youve probably been bombarded with all types of information from news organizations, emergency management agencies and other groups. Keeping that in mind, this ar ticle is intended to provide some insight into how your local mu nicipal emergency management functions, what plans are in place, an individuals roll during emer gencies, and how an individual or company can create their own emergency plan. Emergency planning and re sponse is not the sole realm of the federal government or even the state government. More ef to emergencies achieved, at the level of local government than at any other agencies. Locally is where the disaster or emergency becomes personal. The city of Maitland has devel oped a Comprehensive Emergen cy Management Plan (CEMP) in preparation to address emergen cies in a prudent and calm manner. The plan consists of procedures for all city departments to follow during a disaster or emergency in ness and decision making phases of operation known as EMCONS, Emergency Conditions, have been established as guidelines for deal ing with disaster or emergency situations. At the time of a looming emer gency, such as an approaching hurricane, EMCONS are declared and actions are activated based upon a timeline of the storms ar rival in our area. Employees, man informed of the impending storm and preparations are implement ed to protect our citizens and city assets. Additionally, emergency and our Emergency Operations Center is opened and staffed. After the passage of the storm, recovery efforts begin with the clearing of roadways, checking on the welfare of citizens and em ployees, damage assessment and repair efforts. While government can address issues in the community at large, vices to each individual, family, or business within a municipal ity, county or state. Therefore, in order to help ensure the safety of families, homes and/or business es, it is necessary to undertake di saster planning and preparations on an individual scale. Developing a personal or busi ness disaster plan has become easier in recent years with the ad vent of the Internet. A web search involving disaster planning pro vides a number of resources such as: www.fema.gov The Federal Emergency Management Agency website with information deal ing with both family and business emergency planning. www.ready.gov/are-youready-guide This site provides a very useful resource available to both families and businesses. Management website In addition to web resources, many books can be obtained and consulted for planning, such as the Standard on Disaster/Emer gency Management and Business Continuity Programs, NFPA 1600 available for purchase through the National Fire Protection As sociation website at nfpa.org, and other titles may be found through Amazon.com or Barnes and No bles. A copy of the information con tained in this article will be made available to our citizens and busi sented for pick up at Maitland website. We encourage each family and business to plan and prepare for emergencies both large and small. Contingencies should be in place to provide for the safety and health of individuals and busi nesses. Your Maitland Fire Rescue Department realizes such plan and stands ready to provide guid ance and assistance as needed at 407-539-6226. Written by Dennis Marshall, CET, FCO, Fire Marshal for the Maitland Fire Rescue Department Planning for emergencies Maitland City Talk BY HOWARD SCHIEFERDECKER MAYOR T his summer I read a biography with my children about the great composer and musician Johann Sebastian Bach. Something interesting to me was that Bach grew up in a musical family. For almost 200 hundred years, his ancestors had been passing on their love for music to the next genera t i o n o f t h e f a m i l y In h i s o w n h o m e B a c h s f a t h e r taught him how to play the violin and played the organ at the village church, and every year all the Bach family would gather for days of playing instruments and merry singing. After the death of his father, Bach attended a school where he was surrounded by music teachers and opportunities to play under the advisement of his teachers. It was no surprise that Bach learned how to play many instruments and compose music. In the world of education lingo, Bachs journey to fame was really a simple formula of direct instruction. Now that the new school year is in full swirl, you may be thinking about how to help your son or daughter be successful learning new subjects. One way you can help is to understand how many teachers design their lessons. All teachers want students to move to an application phase like Bach eventually did with his learning, but until a student can apply the knowledge, he generally has to progress through a period of direct instruction. Direct instruction has three main components: modeling, guided practice, and independent practice. MODELING Teachers spend time in this stage immersing students in the content. They show, demonstrate, and model what is to be learned. Students are generally observers in the modeling stage trying to absorb the new content. GUIDED PRACTICE As teachers finish modeling, they provide students with opportunities to practice the content with assistance. Teachers oversee the new learning, offering the most assistance in the beginning and gradually releasing more responsibility to the student, yet always under a watchful eye so quick feed back can be given to right wrong steps. INDEPENDENT PRACTICE Guided practice naturally leads to the student working on the skill independently, without teacher input during the practice. However, when the practice is complete, teachers should be timely in giving feedback. The evaluation lets students know what still needs to be learned, and lets the teahers know what needs to be retaught. HELPING YOUR TEEN If your teenager seems to be struggling with learning, take some time to talk with him or her about the steps of direct instruction as a way to show how teachers often design lessons. Maybe use the analogy of how you learned to derive a car to illustrate the three main steps of direct instruction. For example, everyone sees driving modeled for many years. Then, when its time to begin learning how to drive, we are all shown what to do and take the wheel under the watchful eye of a teacher usually in a drivers education course. Only after much guided practice do we get to drive solo.. A s far as school is concerned, ask what the teacher did to model, show, or demonstrate the new knowledge to be learned. Then ask your teen to identify the time the teacher gave assignments with his or her full assistance available. Finally, determine what work students were expected to do independently. As you rehearse the learning environment with your son or daughter, you may find he or she needs to be shown a few more times how something is done. Or you may find that he or she has an idea of how to do something but just needs more support from a more knowledgeable person. In either case, you may need to contact the teacher to ask for assistance and to give him or her the heads up as to where learning seems to be breaking down for your son or daughter. Finally, remember that learning is particular to each individual; each person is unique when it comes to the amount of direct instruction needed. So if your child is discouraged, assure him or her that everyone learns at a different pace and some of that will depend on natural gifting, cognitive functioning, and background knowledge. And let him or her know that independent practice really gets easier after enough modeling and guided practice have been done. Y ou may not end up wit a Bach on your hands, but you should end up with another driver in the world. Helping Your Child Learn New Subjects By Hope Akins Hope earned a Backelors Degree in Specific Learning Disabilities and Master of Education at UCF. She taught at Oak Ridge High School, Lakeview Middle, and Neptune Middle. Also taught as an adjunct professor at UCF. OurLife Education OurLife August 2013 OurLife

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Aug. 29, 2013 | Page 7 Lifestyles Maitland Coin & Currency Showat theMaitland Civic Center 641 South Maitland Avenue, Maitland, FL 32751FREE ADMISSIONShow open to the public Buy Sell AppraisalsFor more information call or visitOrlando Coin Exchange 6301 S. Orange Avenue Orlando, FL 32809www.MaitlandCoinShow.comorlandocoinexchange@gmail.com407-730-3116 SUNDAY, Sept. 1st9:00 AM TO 5:00 PM Free coin for all children 12 and under 1 SUN A bit of Central Floridas famous magic has created our tons Kitchen, and its named legendary 8th President of Rol lins College. Open for less than two weeks and located inside the aesthetically beautiful new Alfond Inn, the magic comes to us from the talented hands, heart, and mind of Chef Christopher Windus. A native of Winter Park, Chef Chris returns to us from his Englishs bluezoo at Disneys with multiple invitations to the that the foodies who used to drive to Disney in order to freshness of Chef Chris imagina tive menus may now enjoy his creativity here in Winter Park. advocate local ingredients in the creation of his menus, Chef Chris incorporates the freshest of Floridas agriculture, beef and gulf seafood into his creations. The Alfond Inn is such a beau tiful and welcoming property that it is no surprise that the walk to the restaurant included hugs and hellos from many of Winter Parks cognoscenti. It is read ily apparent that the restaurant and adjoining bar earned their place as serious Winter Park gathering spots from the day they opened. Not wanting to miss any of Chef Chris creativity, we began in the bar, which has its own tapas-style menu, and a host of names. We began with the Sara sota smoked sturgeon on toast. With just enough of that rich was enhanced with a home-made garlic aioli. Big smiles the eve ning was off to a great start. And there was no way I was going to resist the blue cheese stuffed dates (wrapped in prosciutto). Ive already convinced myself that those gorgeous morsels are good for me, and I dont even need to know what Chef Chris does to the dates to make them melt in your mouth. Two winners and we had yet to make it to the restaurant In the restaurant our appetiz ers turned out to be a testament to the greatness of bacon. My ri sotto of the day featured scallops, bacon and a new favorite veg etable called the zipper pea. The bacon added its buttery richness to the sophisticated chewiness of the rice. Arriving at the perfect consistency of the rice in risotto is an art form, and this was timed to perfection. The second appetizer little chunks of bacon, caramel ized onions and an amazing creamy-dressed spinach. Please note I love oysters, but it was the infused spinach that had me ing in love with spinach! Our sensible entrees posed the I ordered the grouper, which was made special by an olive glaze that gives this naturally moist and tasty crust that fully with my fork. This was served on polenta as tasty as the that added nutty taste. The second entre, listed simply as Grilled Chicken Breast, was an edu cation in what chick en can be. The sliced medallions of chicken were tasty, moist and tender and served over an ancient grain called farro. While farro may not be well known today, it fueled the power of Roman legions for centuries. The chicken and grain is topped with a delicious mushroom ragout that serves as a kind of thick gravy giving a whole new meaning to, It tastes like chicken. Considering all that food, we purposely saved room for des serts because we knew ahead of time that a second chef Chef Edward had joined the team Edwards reputation for desserts is legendary, and we took our hand-made desserts. Each was highlights. The butterscotch pudding laced with 12-yearHamiltons Kitchen thrives on creativity JOSH GARRICK Observer Staff Please see FOOD on page 8 PHOTOS BY ALLISON OLCSVAY THE OBSERVER An exotic array of dishes at the Alfond Inn comes courtesy of former Disney chef Christopher WIndus. From the Corner Table

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Page 8 | Thursday, Aug. 29, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer AUG. 29 A Winter Park Playhouse favorite, Nata lie Cordone is back for her fourth caba ret performance on Aug. 29 at 7:30 p.m. This new show, called My Favorite Themes, features popular songs from TV, lm and Broadway. It will be a night lled with a wide variety of music, including a few unexpected surprises. Visit us online at winterparkplayhouse.org for more in formation. AUG. 30 The Park Avenue Merchants Asso ciation will meet at 8:30 a.m. on Friday, Aug. 30, to discuss upcoming events, city updates and to learn about the new City Guide published by Travelhost. Its all at the Winter Park Welcome Center. Visit winterpark.org for more information. AUG. 31 The city of Winter Park is offering a haz ardous waste disposal day from 8 a.m. to noon on Saturday, Aug. 31, at the Pub lic Works Compound. Get rid of chemicals, containers and more in an environmental ly healthy way. Visit cityofwinterpark.org for more information. SEPT. 4 Learn about cool season vegetable gardening from host Ed Thralls from the Orange County Extension Ofce for free! Its from 10 to 11:30 a.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 4, at the Maitland Community Park Meeting Room. Its limited to the rst 35 who sign up. To register, call the park of ce at 407-539-0042. SEPT. 5 Do you love playing cribbage? Have a great time and meet new friends at the Greater Orlando Cribbage Club at 6:45 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 5, at the Elks Lodge at 4755 Howell Branch Road in Winter Park. For more information, contact Dave at 407-695-1902. SEPT. 6 The Art & History Museums Maitland (A&H) continues its popular program La dies Art Lounge on Friday, Sept. 6, at 5:30 p.m. in the A&Hs Germaine Marvel Building, 210 W. Packwood Ave. Ladies Art Lounge is designed for women who want an evening out with friends where they can talk, have a glass of wine, and learn something new in a casual and fun atmosphere. The program is held on the rst Friday of every month from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Each event features one of the A&Hs talented faculty members leading a program designed for all skill levels to enjoy. AUG. 31 Florida Museum of Natural History visi tors can discover the states famous deep surng culture in the new exhibit Surf ing Florida, opening Aug. 31. Developed by Florida Atlantic University, the exhibit documents the states surng history through vintage photographs and inter pretive graphics as well as videos and oral histories from well-known Florida surfers. Visit mnh.u.edu of call 352846-2000 for more information. SEPT. 7 Its a Dinky Dock Landscaping Party! Come help beautify Winter Parks Dinky Dock Park from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Sat urday, Sept. 7. Visit cityofwinterpark.org for more information. ONGOING The preschool stories series continues from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Tuesdays at the Maitland Public Library. Babytime is from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. every Thursday. WELCOMENew M embersMONTHLY CHAMBER NEWS & EVENTSSeptember 5: Buca di Beppo, 1351 S. Orlando Avenue, Maitland Success Leads Group: Meets the 1st Thursday each month 11:30am-1pm September 10: Sams Club, 355 Semoran Blvd., Fern Park Coffee Connection with the Maitland Chamber of Commerce Making business connections one cup at a time Meets 2nd Tuesday each month 8-9am September 12: Francescos, 400 S. Orlando Avenue, Maitland Community Partners: Meets the 2nd Thursday each month 11:30am1pm September 18: Maitland Civic Center, 641 S. Maitland Avenue Monthly Community Luncheon: 11:30am 1pm Reservations Required 407-644-0741 Featuring: Brighthouse Networks (Speaker: Craig Carter) Modern technology working for you September 28: Wednesday, Women and Wisdom: Meets the 4th Wednesday each month 11:30am-1pm Business After Hours: check our website or call 407-644-0741 for updates. www.maitlandchamber.com Save the Date: OCTOBER 21AmeriLife & Health Services of Florida 4U-Insurance, Maitland Hampton Inn and Suites, Altamonte Springs Maitland Family Care SoNapa GrilleTHE TASTE OF MAITLANDOCTOBER 21, 2013 of their specialities the evening to ensure your spot! T he Maitland Chamber of Commerce welcomes new Board MembersAnother Special Announcement:September 3rd: Project Walk 330 Harbour Isle Way, Ste. 1090, Longwood, FL cord injury recovery facility. Facility tours, refreshments and door prizes.Carol Spears, Savannah Court & Jeff Aames, J & J Creations old Scotch preceded the Killer Chocolate Cake enhanced with gold shavings. The white choco late cheesecake is wonderfully light in part because it is made from egg whites. My favorite is the fruit cobbler, which changes by fruits in season, and is topped with homemade vanilla ice cream. Finally there are assorted sorbets blood orange; honeybell and champagne; and watermel on. These too will change with the seasons. Dinners can be memorable for a number of reasons, and we tribute to Chef Chris that this new restaurant in a new venue in every way. And there is one more reason we may all feel good about nancial challenges facing colleges throughout the country are being addressed in a new and innova tive way by Rollins College. The Alfond Inn is owned by Rollins College and was built with a multi-million-dollar grant from The new Inn not only meets our communitys need for lodging and conference space, but it will also provide full scholarships for Rollins top students. Fine dining that helps send the best and the brightest to college is a concept that can suit every taste. iltons Kitchen and Chef Chris to Winter Park. Were so glad youve come home. FOOD | Dessert infused with Scotch, and chocolate cake covered in gold shavings C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 7 PHOTO BY ALLISON OLCSVAY THE OBSERVER Artistic ourishes excite the eye as well as the palate at the newly opened Hamiltons. Calendar

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Nows your chance to showcase just how beautiful your community really is. Submit your best photo of the area, and your shot could be featured in the 2014 Winter Park-Maitland Observer calendar!Visit WPMObserver.com/Photo for more details and to upload your winning submission. Enter the Winter ParkMaitla nd Observer Calendar Photo Contest today! CALENDAR PHOTO CONTEST

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Page 10 | Thursday, Aug. 29, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer September 12 | 5 8 p.m. | Park AvenueExperience the charm of Park Avenue on a fun fall evening Winter Park Sip & Stroll$25 | www.ExperienceParkAvenue.com | 407-644-8281and enjoy wine samples and hors doeuvres at more than 25 local merchants along the way. Avenue Fashion Week (PAFW) Emerging Designer Contest, the process of picking a winner is getting a lot more action-packed and public. the Emerging Designer Contest? tor of the contest. I had to have a fashion show for the top 10; I couldnt just quietly choose them. The PAFW Emerging Designer Contest has accepted 20 ap plications from up-and-coming designers. What theyre after is the big win, which allows them to show their collection on the night of the PAFW Runway Show, professional photos of their clothes coming down the runway and the opportunity to have their line featured in a Park Avenue boutique with a trunk show. Theyve submitted sketches and photos of their work, and the top 10 will be able to show some of their designs in-person in the hopes of moving on to the this year, the judging to get to top three was done in private, with judges gathering in a room inspecting applications and gar ments. But there wasnt enough anticipation or community involvement leading up to the winner being chosen, Broadwell ment. Broadwell will be hosting an Emerging Designer Fashion on Shine in Orlando, where shell emcee while the top 10 design ers have models strut three of their looks down the runway. Shell give information about the chosen, and theyll be inter viewed by the judges. A Peo ples Choice award will be given to the audience favorite, and the designers will be available after the show to talk to the crowd. So people can get involved all the way to the runway, said PAFW. Broadwell hopes it can inspire the audience to try a new de signer or look, too. To help women be fearless, she said. To go to a fashion show, its an adventure. Karen Cleary, a celebrity makeup artist, judge and the assistant director for the contest, said shes looking for versatility in her winner. She loves seeing creative and sometimes a little over-the-top couture clothing from designers, but along with that she wants to see items a Winter Park woman could picture herself wearing, or that Tuni would proudly display in Fashion Idol BRITTNI LARSON The Observer Presented by: Supported by: Featuring: David Richard, PhD Come for a morning of coffee and conversation. Meet and greet with the new dean. Learn more about adult education and lifelong learning programs available through the college. Friday, September 13, 2013 7:45 a.m. Networking/ 8:15 a.m. Program WINTER PARK WELCOME CENTER 151 W. Lyman Avenue, Winter Park, FL 32789 A complimentary continental breakfast will be served. The event is free and open to the public. For more information, call (407) 644-8281 or visit www.winterpark.org. ARCHIVE PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Bizarre fashion was the result of a challenge last year to create outts out of construction materials, including fencing and duct tape. Please see FASHION on page 11

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Aug. 29, 2013 | Page 11 In our business, weve noticed that most people think aqua ther programs are only for dogs who have some sort of problem, such as arthritis, dysplasias, weight issues, or other joint or spinal problems. That cant be further from the truth. Just like humans, dogs need get. A walk or backyard play time is generally not enough. To preserve health, dogs need a high such as a good run, weight training to keep their muscles strong, appropriate stretching to that provide mental stimula tion. Cardiovascular or aerobic overall physical health, but it as well. Because of the endor phins and serotonin released, this dog and elevate and stabilize his mood. Statistics show that most dogs dont get enough aerobic in the rising obesity rate in dogs, now estimated at 54 percent. You can make sure your dog going for a jog or bike ride with him if hes able and its not too hot. Interval training, where you run with your dog for a short period of time, then walk, and repeat is a great way to build cardiovascular and respiratory endurance, again if your dog is such as sit to stand, down to stand or play bows are good strength and provide mental stimulation. Swimming or aqua therapy where all four limbs are moving is, in my opinion, the dogs. Its a full body workout that improves cardiovascular health, builds muscle mass, and helps with weight loss. Its ideal for dogs that cant easily do land weight bearing. Instead of waiting until your dog has a problem, why not still healthy? Youll be richly rewarded by keeping your loving companion healthier and happier for a longer period of time. Sherri Cappabianca, an expert in the eld of canine health and tness, is the author of two books on canine health, and is the co-owner of Rockys Retreat Canine Health & Fitness Center and Barking Dog Fitness, both located in Orlando. For more information, visit rockysretreat.com or barkingdogtness.com Sherri Cappabianca The Wet Nose Report Exercise and your dog Socially behaving canines are welcome! Special drawing for people wearing their team spirit! Last month I wrote about the end of summer and return of the school year. Im glad to report that as of this week all of our local schools, colleges and universities are now in session. Now that the students have all returned to their schoolwork, its time to get back to business at the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce. In Winter Park, the Chamber is known for as much community as it is commerce, but its proud to report some recent business news, including the opening of the highly anticipated opening of The Alfond Inn. The 112-room Preferred Boutique Hotel features ample meeting space, a fabulous restaurant and a bar, sure to be the favorite watering hole of many who remember The Langford Hotel. Be among the rst to enjoy the hospitality of the Inn at the Chambers September Business After Hours event on Thursday, Sept. 19. As with many events, network ing will not be in short supply, nor will hors doeuvres and drinks. However, this event does require an RSVP. The cost to attend is $5 for members and $15 for non-members. Reservations can be made at winterpark.org or tickets can be purchased at the Winter Park Welcome Center by Sept. 13. Learning opportunities abound Business profession als can also head back to the classroom this fall with several educational opportunities at the Winter Park Cham ber of Commerce. On Sept. 12, Winter Park Executive Women will meet for their monthly networking luncheon and hear from Mary Gardner from MG Inspired! on the art of public speaking. Never fear, glossophobics! Ms. Gardner will provide simple techniques and exercises to help you build your condence and engage audiences in any scenario. That same week, on Friday, Sept. 16, business professionals can explore em ployee relations at the Small Business Education Series. Carol Anderson, prin cipal at Anderson Performance Partners, will share insights on managing people. Attendees will walk away with tips on identifying opportunities for performance improvements, how to deal with difcult employees and implementing team development techniques. Details on both events can be found at winterpark.org under the Programs and Events tab. All work and no play Enough about the serious topics, lets move on to the social events. The Winter Park Chamber of Commerce and Park Avenue Merchants Association will host their nal Sip & Stroll event on Thursday, Sept. 12. The fun, fall evening is an ideal opportunity to experience the charm of Park Avenue and discover many of the local merchants that make our downtown so vibrant. More than 25 shops and restaurants will say open late for attendees to stop by for wine and appetizer pairings and to see whats in store this fall season. This event attracts 400 guests to downtown and is ex tremely popular advance reservations are strongly encouraged. Details and tickets are available at experienceparka venue.com Erika Spence is the senior director of marketing and communications at the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce. Erika Spence Business in the Park Career-boosting classes on the Avenue its store window. The point of the show is to give an aspiring designer a break into the fashion market, a way to someday make money from their passion. Every designer has that creative eye, but it takes real skill to make something wearable, Cleary said. Once the designers have passed the quality, creative and fashion show tests, three go on to the Project Runway style part of the competition make an rials in a limited amount of time. Last year designers had to take construction materials to create a beautiful look. Winner Melissa Vivo made a bikini bottom from a derneath a dress made from the material you use to stop weeds from growing up into your lawn. She took giant light bulbs meant for streetlamps, smashed them to bits, and used neon highlighters to accent the luminescent glass for a necklace. And it was tough, but her dress did its job weed ing out the other competition. I feel like it really pulls out the true creativity in the person, Vivo said. Thats really where the talent shows up, what sepa rates the true artists. And as far as the competi tions goal of giving a new de gotten from winning last year. Shes had photo spreads in maga zines as far away as California. Photographers were lining up to shoot her work, and she got a job styling photo shoots with Mela nie Pace, a local wardrobe stylist and former Emerging Designer judge. the opportunity to be involved what they truly love, like shes been able to since winning. Shes herself when shes designing the pression of who I am. ARCHIVE PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER A new theme will challenge designers this year after the eld of candidates is cut in half. FASHION | Emerging designer contest was so successful that organizers doubled its size for this year C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 10 More than 25 shops and restaurants will say open late for attendees to stop by for wine and appetizer pairings.

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Page 12 | Thursday, Aug. 29, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Congratulations Local artist Rebecca Rose wins national grant lations to Central Florida artist Rebecca Rose, recently named elry. Rebecca will receive $5,000 in cash and $1,000 in jewelry supplies in addition to other prizes. Upon hearing the news, pieces, from dreams into reali ties, Rebecca said. Only recently, Rebecca launched her line called Sculpturings. Each ring is a large statement piece that can be worn as jewelry or displayed as art some as unique pieces, and some as limited editions, and each one more amazing than the last. Visit rebeccarose.bigcartel.com Aug. 29 to Sep. 22 Cortez Method world premiere at Orlando Shakes The Cortez Method is a darkly comic drama that ques tions what happens when bad decisions are made for the right reasons. Sara and Bill are eagerly awaiting the arrival of their new from Bills brother Walter upsets their hopeful future by shedding light on the troubled founda tion of their past. Rob Keefes premiere at the Orlando Shake speare Theater forces audiences tion drugs, home improvement, and the dysfunctional family in this rollercoaster ride around the American Dream. Call 407-4471700 or visit orlandoshakes.org Aug. 31 The voice of Sisaundra Orlandos singing diva Si saundra Lewis was the voice of Cirque du Soleils La Nouba for 10 years, performed world wide tours with Celine Dion, is an Oscar nominee, co-wrote two No. 1 Billboard hits, and has ap peared on The Tonight Show and Oprah. I promise youll fall in love with Sisaundra (and the voice) as she tells of growing up in a citrus grove and moving on to fame and glamour. Shell per form Aug. 31 with special guests in a show called Bold & Daring at the Garden Theatre in Winter Garden. Call 407-877-4736. The month of September Orlandos Magical Dining Month Foodies Start your tastebuds! You wont want to miss a day in September when Or landos top restaurants offer $33 Josh Garrick Culture worthy of your calendar r f r f n f nn t b n t b t n n f f n rfnr Please see CULTURE on next page This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORG @EnzianTheater Wednesday Night Pitcher Show Free on the Lawn! KINGPIN Wed 8PM or Sunset Held Over! BLACKFISH Fri Sun 4:00, 6:30, 9:00 Mon-Thu 6:30, 9:00 Opera on the Big Screen Teatro alla Scalas CAVALLERIA RUSTICANA & PAGLIACCI Sat 11AM Disney241897disneyonice.com #D isne yOnI ce SAVE $4 on Tickets!*Use offer code: SAVEDOI3 Easy Ways to Redeem Your Savings: 1. Bring this ad to Amway Center Box Office 2. Call at 1-800-745-3000 3. Log on to Ticketmaster.com Appearing: SEPT. 13 15 Tickets Start at $16! Additional fees may apply. GOOD ONLYSat. SEPT. 14 11:00 AM & 7:00 PM Sun. SEPT. 15 5:00 PM*Excludes Opening Night performance, Rinkside and VIP seats. Not valid day of show. No double discounts. Presented locally by DISCOVER THE EVERGLADES THROUGH ART THE CORTEZ METHOD

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Aug. 29, 2013 | Page 13 KEEP UP WITH MAITLAND NEWS AND EVENTS!www.IndependenceLane.com Facebook.com/ItsMyMaitland H O U S E S W A N T E D ! G e t a F R E E N o O b l i g a o n C A S H O e r O n Y o u r H o u s e W i t h i n 2 4 H o u r s (8 5 5 ) 7 5 5 1 8 1 8 w w w C i r c l e 1 8 H o m e s c o m C A S H $ $ $ Q U I C K C L O S E A N Y P R I C E R A N G E A N Y C O N D I T I O N A N Y S I T U A T I O N Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above. You are always welcome! A Senior Living Community where Hospitality is a Way of Life.Excellence in Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation e quality of care is outstanding. Our mother has made so many friends here. And she especially loves the hair salon! Peggy, her daughter Merrel & son Dwight three-course dinners throughout the month of September during Visit Orlandos Magical Dining Month. Yes you read it correctly three-course meals for $33. This ultimate foodie event features more than 60 restaurants offer ing the special price meal with $1 from each meal donated to Ron of Central Florida. Find a full list of restaurants at OrlandoMagi calDining.com Sept. 5 to Oct. 6 Ivy + Bean the Musical for young people The Orlando Repertory The ater (the Rep) continues its series of musicals (with a message for young people) with Ivy + Bean the Musical. Can two second graders, who are very different, become inseparable friends? Both are sure they have nothing in common and will not like each other, but they soon discover that true friendship comes from the heart and not appearances. Meet quiet Ivy (with her amazing ideas) and outgoing Bean, (who puts those ideas into ac tion). Call 407-896-7365 or visit orlandorep.com Sept. 6 to 16 Breakthrough Theatre presents The Gingerbread Lady Simons The Gingerbread Lady. Neil Simons comedies, this 1970 work is a drama about alcohol ism. In the play, performer Evy Mearas career, marriage, and health have all been destroyed by alcohol, and she returns home following a 10-week stay marred by friends with emotional problems of their own includ ing her teenage daughter and be surprised when this Neil Simon tragi-comedy ends up more tragic than comic. Call 407-920-4034. Sept. 6 Visit the Everglades at The Mennello Museum The Mennello Museum will be alive with the sounds, images and colors of the Everglades on Sept. 6 as the public is invited to the opening reception of the new Discover the Everglades Through Art! series. The opening includes Seminole Paintings. In 1935 American artist Eugene Savage began a two-decades-long series of paintings of Floridas Seminole deep concern for the plight of their native culture. The paint Jan. 5. Call 407-246-4278 or visit mennellomuseum.com Eugene Savage (American, 1883-1978), Scherzo, 1953 Earl Cunningham (American, 1893-1977), The Everglades, c. 1960 Sept. 7 Lace Up for the Greater Orlando Heart Walk Looking to raise funds while increasing awareness of heart Association is looking for 18,000 walkers to participate in the Sept. 7 at 7 a.m., the walkers will start at the UCF Memory Mall with a fundraising goal of $1.5 million, making it the largest oneday fundraiser in Central Florida. thropy, the annual Walk brings together corporate sponsors, walk teams, individuals, and heart disease survivors to raise funds to combat heart disease and stroke, the No. 1 and No. 4 leading killers of American men and women. Visit greaterorlando heartwalk.org CULTURE | Your kids will love the stage musical tale of the friendship of quiet Ivy and outgoing Bean C ONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE SISAUNDRA IVY AND BEAN THE SEMINOLE PAINTINGS

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Page 14 | Thursday, Aug. 29, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Opinions Chris Jepson Perspectives hills. Ive a theory that if you live where the horizon is distant, your life view is one of wonder as to what lies just beyond. River. But if what most people associate as Iowa is its rolling hills, well Iowa then really starts at my hometown. For tens upon tens of thousands of years the winds blew across the North American continent carrying loess soil, dirt that was deposited in huge bluffs beginning in western Iowa. These bluffs can be 200 feet above the Missouri River. unobstructed views for miles and miles into South Dakota and Nebraska. One particular avenue, 18th Street, crested near, appropriately enough, Sum mit Street. Gazing west from the top of nearby Gilman Terrace you looked down ly remember once pausing on my bicycle with several friends and someone pointing downward and casually noting that (down there) negroes lived. You might as well have said Martians resided there as little There were, maybe, 50 black families in week) the Des Moines Register newspaper ably it was the most enriching job in my life. I loved the Iowa mornings and my Boulevard and moved into a modest north side home on the farthest reach of my pa per route: Terrace Place. They subscribed to the paper and I started collecting from them once a week. I recollect some initial trepidation over family. But over a couple of months any reservations that I might have had about black family life were dispelled by my interactions with this household. I have no idea, cannot remember, what the young father did, but he had a professional demeanor, was easily conversational and was always wearing a tie. The food invari ably smelled good, tastier, I suspected, that evening. Regarding my subscriber, I cannot say I ever became unaware of his blackness but his money sure spent green. I became friends and for the life of me I cannot recall how this friendship developed with a black lad my senior Phil Fields. I remember him as easy going, mellow talking and non-confrontational. Phil was smooth. Fields was the antithesis of the black men I would soon encounter and befriend college. Oh, they were smooth, but the days of non-confrontation were over, and The best man at my wedding in 1969 gentlest soul I ever encountered. And he couldnt dance. offered horizons that were boundless yet, ultimately, inclusive. It will be forever my city upon a hill. The City Upon A Hill Jepson is a 27-year resident of Central Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.US Louis Roney Play On! In the Yankee dugout, someone would ask catcher Yogi Berra, What time is it? Yogi would answer, You mean now? Yogi became famous for his imaginative use of the English language. When I came back to my hometown of Winter Park, b.w. and I decided that it would be nice to have some world-class music in the Bob Carr. For 17 years we brought great symphony orchestras and soloists to usually full houses. At age 80, I retired. My b.w. and I had just brought the Montreal Symphony Orchestra to the Bob Carr for a concert. Afterwards, in a private dining room in a restaurant, conductor Charles Dutoit asked me across the table, Tell me, Louis, what is that Ravels La Valse all about? I said, If you dont know after your fabulous performance a few minutes ago, only Ravel knows, and unfortunately hes out of reach! track beaten to their doors, or leading to the doors of others who need them. You dont have to be an Adonis to be popular: Your looking like Tyrone Power or Clark Gable means nothing to a gal whose front door lock is kaput, or whose kitchen sink is stopped up. Better to be clever about how things work and be full of Boy Scout helpfulness. That smile of thanks on the lips of a pretty girl is often easier to get with a screwdriver than with two tickets to Atlantic City. Things that dont work right can arouse compete with. There is something in the human brain that needs the assurance that fundamental things are going well, and things come to a standstill if that state of equilibrium isnt there. We want things around us to be in order. There is a certain romance in being among things that are all working as they at any given time is trying to keep things from becoming fouled up and the other half is trying to get everything back in order. As the eminent American philosopher Woody Allen once observed, Showing up is 80 percent of life. Anyone who has a home, and tries to keep it up in todays insecure job-market knows that getting someone to show up as promised and do work at your place is an iffy proposition. who were friends in our teens are still see ing each other sometimes at class reunions. Jay tells me he still keeps busy by work ing his herd! Parkers to do so or not. I see that two all. The antiquity of a college that started in 1636, not long after the Pilgrims had landed, rubs off on one whose early life was in Florida where, though the Span iards were in St. Augustine in the 1500s, they didnt leave much of a cultural calling card. Someone historic wrote that nothing good ever comes from a warm climate, mates of 1938 and I but send us up North in the ice and snow, and something good may happen after all! A smatter of chatter About Roney: HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney) King Features Weekly ServiceAugust 26, 2013 EDITORIAL CARTOONS

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Aug. 29, 2013 | Page 15 Do you picture yourself owning a new home, starting a business, funding a col lege education for your children or achiev but achieving those dreams sometimes seems like an insurmountable challenge. Many people dont even know where to begin. The key to achieving any goal is plan ning. When the dreams involve your planning is a process that can help you reach your goals by evaluating your whole process outlines strategies that are tailored to your individual needs and available resources. Just as champion athletes train and pre pare based on the best available training methods and techniques, a comprehensive nancial plan in place, you are better able to focus on your goals and understand what it will take to achieve them. step process: 1. Develop a clear picture of your current situation. This includes reviewing and liabilities, your insurance coverage, your estate plan. 2. Establish and prioritize your for achieving each goal. 3. Decide strategies. This is your game plan. Your strategies will address 4. Implement tactics. This is the blocking and tackling, the nuts and bolts of 5. Monitor your plan. You dont just implement a plan and forget it. This step includes making adjustments as your goals, time frames and circumstances change. You should review your plan at least once a year, and certainly when major life events occur such as marriages, divorces, job change, retirement, college If you can develop a relationship with a son will work hard to give you objective information and make the process as easy as possible for you. make recommendations. You make the and privacy are No. 1 priorities with any competent professional. Your advisor will then make recom mendations based on your needs, values, goals and time frames. You decide which recommendations to follow. Then work with your advisor to implement them. With these relatively simple steps in to be. Ray White Jr. is a senior vice president of PNC Wealth Management and leads those efforts for Central Florida. He can be reached at raymond. white@pnc.com I was a child in Beirut, Lebanon, when my American teacher told me the story of George Washington and the cherry tree. She also told me about Abraham Lincoln who freed the slaves. I never forgot these stories and and the feeling that I had kindred spirits across the ocean. Many years later, I became a citizen and held my head high as an American. I believed in this countrys constitutional and ethical values and most of all, in its justice. Then 9/11 happened and our world changed forever. I was supposed to meet that afternoon; instead we met a few days later at the Islamic Center of Washington when he spoke to the nation in support of American Muslims. At the time, we Muslims werent as concerned about the blowback as we were about U.S. security and the victims of 9/11. And then came the aftershock: wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, more bloodshed, and foreign detainees. The prison at Guanta namo Bay opened. Stories about incredible acts of torture while interrogating detainees trickled in. Initially, American Muslims refused to believe. Not this country, not our president. But facts are stubborn, and we had to yield to them. It didnt have to be this way. Torture is il legal and immoral, and there is no persua sive evidence that its use against suspected terrorists produced actionable intelligence or helped save lives. The conventional interrogation techniques America has used throughout its history are effective. There no matter how heinous the crimes commit ted on 9/11. That decision cost this country dearly. The United States can regain its moral stature in the global Muslim community but will never do so if it refuses to confront abuses of the past. Like George Washing ton, America needs to readily admit the truth painful as it may be. More than 10 years after 9/11, the claim to protect national security is unfounded. President Obama must direct agencies to declassify evidence of abusive practices with redactions only where needed to matic agreements. The best place to start would be with the information underlying the recently completed but still secret Senate Select Committee on Intelligence report on the CIAs interrogation program. Accord ing to senators familiar with it, the report based on more than 6 million pages of that torture saved lives. Allowing the public to see and evaluate all the facts for itself is never again commit torture in the name of freedom. But simply declassifying information is in the Muslim community. The notorious Guantanamo prison a symbol of U.S. torture and abuse post 9/11 must also remain at Guantanamo, even though the U.S. government has already cleared 86 for of these individuals under deteriorating conditions led to a massive hunger strike; at one point, more than 40 detainees were being force-fed through a painful and de grading procedure that violates established principles of medical ethics. In recent years, nearly as many detainees have died in custody as have been released; a trend that could worsen if the hunger strike continues. During his counterterrorism speech in May, President Obama asked us to Imag ine a future 10 years from now or 20 years from now when the United States of America is still holding people who have been charged with no crime on a piece of land that is not part of our country . Is that something our founders foresaw? Is that the America we want to leave our children? The answer to both questions is a resounding no. If the president wants authority to immediately begin transferring prisoners out of Guantanamo, and he must use it. Taking these steps will go a long way to ward repairing the damage done after 9/11 and restoring respect for our country in the Muslim world. If America rededicates itself to its traditional values, the values I learned as a little girl in Beirut, its light can shine brightly once again. Azizah Y. al-Hibri is a professor emerita at the University of Richmond, and the founder and chairwoman of Muslim Women Lawyers for Human Rights. She is a member of The Constitution Projects Task Force for Detainee Treatment. Fifty years ago Martin Luther King Jr. asked to wake up to a dream of an equal America. But he wasnt asking for it merely on racial terms. As a quarter of a million protestors marched toward the steps of the nations Capitol a few days before Labor Day, the rallying cry didnt start with equality. It began with jobs. the economys going these days, four years ica, and youll likely catch them between sips of champagne. JP Morgan Chase and Co., who you may know for helping cause the destruction of the U.S. economy in 2007, reported a 53 percent quarterly jump in But that wild run up the jagged moun tain nicknamed Dow Jones, like an eco nomic Everest, hasnt been a trip for all of us. For some, that peak is the highest high theyve even seen, cresting 15,600 in August. But most of us have been the sherpas to the few high-climbing million aires whove ascended to the summit on our backs, left us behind, and tasked us with saving the lucky few if they fall off the mountain. The march toward economic equality, on the 50th anniversary of the most iconic civil rights speech in American history, has taken far fewer steps upward than King dreamed. Take a look at a median household major symptom. In 2008, just as the world economy fell off a cliff, the median house hold income of Americans reached above since, with the most recent quarterly report showing consumer spending power at 7.2 percent below the CPI. In laymans terms, life has gotten more paycheck has lagged devastatingly behind, even as the economy has allegedly reached new heights. And thats not because were slower, la zier or less productive. Take a look at gross domestic product (GDP), a key measure of our total economic output as a country; its soared. In just the last three years the real GDP has leapt from 14 trillion to nearly 16 trillion almost as rapidly as the U.S. GDP grew during the previous 10 years com bined. And weve done it under unfathomable pressure, as the economy shed jobs for 25 in 2010. And as many have come to know in their own working lives, many of the jobs that remained were now carrying ad ditional duties for the same pay to make up for laid off coworkers. Still, we became more productive, making more money per stayed at the top of companies, rather than that growth trickling down into employees paychecks. The evidence is clear in that regard, have returned to record levels. But take a look at employment and its as if the recession never left. The most recent quarter the Bureau of Labor Statis tics (BLS) reported that only 47 percent of American adults older than age 16 who werent institutionalized had a full time job. That number was higher than 52 percent before the recession, and as high as 54 percent in 2000. But unemployment overall has fallen in the last three years. So whats the employ ment issue? A part-time recovery, which has added far fewer full-time jobs than part-time ones. The BLS estimates 8 million working Americans are working part time because they have to, not because they ingly faced with a job market that only wants them on a part time basis. And those hourly jobs are far more likely to pay at or near minimum wage. A frequent point of contention made by against the argument for raising the minimum wage is that so few workers in America actually work for the federal minimum wage (some estimates ranging as low as 2.9 percent) that it wouldnt make much difference to raise it. Try telling that the millions of workers making a few cents more than that, still 30-50 percent less than a living wage. But its not just part-timers and lowwage workers suffering. Remember JP Morgan Chase? Their CEO Jamie Dimon made $18.7 million last year, a cut from $23 million in 2011. Based on a 40-hour week (which adherents to the idea that America believe is a serious underestimate of his working hours), Dimons wage plunged to only $8,990 per hour, causing him to be per day of labor. But if you count only his salary and not associated compensation, he was only paid $721 per hour far more But apparently hes not sweating his chances of having to go on public assis tance anytime soon not like the billions bailout funds during the recession. A quarter showed JP Morgan Chase paid which pushes for cuts in Social Security and Medicare. So as thousands more march on Wash ington this week in honor of Kings dream of a more equal America, keep in mind that their march isnt just symbolic. Its been a long journey for worker equality, and the climb is getting steeper to the top. A nancial game plan: Road to a more condent future Torture admission would help restore U.S. standing in world Martin Luther Kings dream meets a steepening mountain RAY WHITE PNC Wealth Management AZIZAH Y. AL-HIBRI Guest columnist Our Observation

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Page 28 | Thursday, Aug. 29, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer OBSERVER Just Sold Homes ANNOUNCEMENTS Adoption=Love. Nurturing, single woman will provide stable home/support of large, extended family. Lets help each other. Financial security. Expenses paid. Deborah, tollfree (855)-779-3699. Sklar Law Firm, LLC FL Bar #0150789 ANNOUNCEMENTS CAKE DECORATING & PASTRY CLASSES: Sofelle Confections offers group and customized classes in all areas of pas try, baking and cake decorating! Contact: Lucy sofelleconfections@bellsouth.net or call (407) 579-1962 www.facebook. com/SofelleConfections Hablamos Es paol! Winter Park Benefit Shop 140 Lyman Ave, Winter Park needs items to sell: clothing, bedding, jew elry, kitchenware and bric-a brac. Also needing volunteers. Contact Elizabeth Comer 407-647-8276. Open Tues & Fri at 9:30am; Sat 10am-1pm. All proceeds support childrens programs & the Or lando Blind Association. EDUCATION Medical Office Trainees Needed! Become a Medical Office Assistant! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training at SC gets you job ready! HS Diploma/GED PC/Internet needed! 1-888-374-7294. HELP WANTED AVON Representatives needed in your area! Just $10 starts your business! Easy, Fun and Flexible! Works great with any schedule. Your Time Your Terms Your Money! Call Anita,ISR 1-877-871-4275 or email aaa4avon@yahoo.com. Online appointments also available at start. youravon.com Enter Reference Code aalbaghli HELP WANTED Business Opportunity for the right person: I am looking for 1 HIGHLY motivated sales professional with strong closing skills to sell placemat advertising in the Orlando and Central Florida marketplace. The ideal candidate must be a self starter with experience in B2B sales. You will be making sales calls (both cold calls and by appointments set by you). You have the ability to circumvent the various gate keepers that usually surround the deci sion-makers in prospect companies, and gain access to targeted person. There are 12 full color ads per mat, How many placemats can you close per week.? I design all ads and print the placemats. This is a business partnership, we split ALL profits. The only cost to you is your time. Interested? Send your resume or questions. to lari@larithaw.com CAREGIVER for my 104 Year Mother, Winter Park Lovely home Lake Sue. Hours to be ar ranged weekdays 8am-4pm; weekends 8am-10pm. Must lift/transfer (5#) through the day. Light whole meals. Supplemental tube feeding. Housekeep ing/Cleaning. Sedan not SUV take to doctors. Non-smoker. Pet friendly. Quiet house. CNA or comparable. Best Care giving References. 317-506-4400 after 10am. rosemail@comcast.net Driver Trainees Needed NOW! Become a driver for Werner Enterprises. Earn $800 per week! Local CDL Training. 877-214-3624 HELP WANTED Drivers-HIRING EXPERIENCED/ INEXPERIENCED TANKER DRIVERS! Earn up to $.51 per MILE! New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 Year OTR Exp. Req. Tanker Training Available. Call Today: 877-8826537. www.OakleyTransport.com MISCELLANEOUS ADOPT: A childless couple seeks to adopt. Loving home with tenderness, warmth, happiness. Financial security. Expenses paid. Regis & David (888)986-1520 or text (347)406-1924; www.davidan dregisadopt.com -Adam B. Sklar FL# 0150789 Airline Careers begin here! Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Fi nancial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866314-3769. PROFESSIONAL SERVICE Cleanerella Maid Services WE CLEAN FOR YOU!! Commercial and Residential servicing. Call Catherine Adam 321-356-8160. cadam1959@ yahoo.com REAL ESTATE: COMMERCIAL OFFICE FOR RENTWINTER PARK Executive office available in prestigious bank building. Approximately 10 x 12 with windows on two sides. Additional space available for assistant, now or later, at additional charge. Aloma and Lakemont Avenues. 24-hour access. Minimum one year term. Broker. $500 per month. Lou Nimkoff 407-405-3368 office@briofl.com Offices for Rent Winter Park Real Estate Offices for rent (Winter Park/Goldenrod/University). Doc tors office w/5 exam rooms + extra fea tures. Other office units available from 800-3000 SF. New Orleans style bldg; great prices. Call Ann 407-293-1934. annpolasek@cfl.rr.com REAL ESTATE: COMMERCIAL SANFORD: Free standing retail/office building, 2640 SF, great signage & visibility. Lease for $2800 per month (also for sale). Call John, owner/broker, 407-492-7111 REAL ESTATE: FOR SALE HUNTERS PARADISE WITH POND $3375 PER ACRE! 45 minutes from Nashville. Tracts from 41 to 560 acres with timber, food plots, and views. Call 931-629-0595 Mobile Homes with acreage. Ready to move in. Seller Financing with approved credit.Lots of room for the price, 3Br 2Ba. No renters. 850-3086473 LandHomesExpress.com SALES: GARAGE HUGE RUMMAGE SALE! Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd, 331 Lake Ave., Maitland Friday, Oct. 4th & Saturday, Oct. 5th, 8 am to 4 pm From Hwy. 17-92, go west one block on Lake Ave; church is on the right immediately after railroad tracks. Phone: (407) 6445350 SUNDAY 12-3 NEW LISTING IN WINTER PARK PINES 520 Cornwall Road, Winter Park. 3BD/2BA, 1,498SF. Pristine single owner home with beautifully manicured lawn, amazing oak tree and pavered drive. Fenced backyard, screened pool and pa tio. Updated kitchen and brand new AC. Two car garage with large utility room and workshop. A rated schools within walking distance as well as Cady Way pool and trail. $248,400 SUNDAY 1-4 POOL HOME IN GREAT LOCATION 519 Worthington Drive, Winter Park. 4BD/2.5BA, 2,285SF. One story split plan home offers natural hardwood floors and newly renovated master suite with ample closet space. Extra large great room with fireplace and bookcase. French doors open to Florida room for views of lush backyard and pool. Circular driveway and tandem two car garage. $460,000 1935 GAMBLE ROGERS HOME IN PRIME LOCATION 851 Georgia Avenue, Winter Park. 4BD/3.5BA, 4,314SF. Olde World with a European flair, this home features a living room with fireplace and a wall of French doors leading to brick patio. Florida room has views of grounds and pool. Spacious master has French doors and large mas ter bath with marble floors and walls. Detached 1BR apartment. $2,250,000 2804 Oakville Place, Oviedo FL 32765 sold by Audra Wilks 7855 Copperfield Court, Orlando FL 32825 sold by Heidi HudaKoz 2008 Vivada Street, Orlando FL 32803 sold by Jennifer Sloan 410 Terravista Place, Oviedo FL 32765 sold by Jennifer Sloan 430 Terravista Place, Oviedo FL 32765 sold by Jennifer Sloan OBSERVER Open Houses MindGym August 26, 2013 THE MARKE T PLACE 1-866-742-1373Get your business noticedOne Call One Order 100+ Newspapers Call us today to reach a statewide audience! www.AdNetworksFlorida.com WinTheFightAgainstCancerNATURALLY.orgA non-prot organization providing the public with FREE information, Amazon anti-cancer books and more!Visit our site today to see how we can make a difference in your life! MindGym August 26, 2013 200 Carolina Avenue Unit 404, Win ter Park FL 32789 sold by Dee Morgan 3056 Temple Trail, Winter Park FL 32789 sold by Padgett McCormick 441 E. Kings Way, Winter Park FL 32789 sold by Kelly L. Price & Rhonda Chesmore 311 Walton Heath Drive, Orlando FL 32828 sold by Sherri Dyer 1347 Chapman Circle, Winter Park FL 32789 sold by Kelly L. Price 1271 Palmer Avenue, Winter Park FL 32789 sold by Patrick Higgins & Pamela Ryan 7861 Copperfield Court, Orlando FL 32825 sold by Heidi HudaKoz 509 Florida Street, Orlando FL 32806 sold by Kelly L. Price 1806 Laurelton Hall Lane, Winter Park FL 32789 sold by Jennifer King The Nancy Bagby Team 643 Carvell Dr, Winter Park $162,000. 08/19/2013 The Nancy Bagby Team 900 N Park Ave, Winter Park $2,000,000. 08/21/2013 Jeff Hall 3842 N. Lake Orlando Pkwy, Orlando $202,500. 08/20/2013 The Nancy Bagby Team 660 Osceola Ave #103, Winter Park $1,175,000. 08/20/2013 The Nancy Bagby Team 200 S. In terlachen Ave #400, Winter Park $1,190,000. 08/22/2013 Michelle Sanderson 4269 S. Semoran Blvd, Orlando $51,000. 08/23/2013 Meg Dolan 3218 Holliday Ave, Apop ka $480,000. 08/23/2013 Elizabeth Manno 4240 Shorecrest Dr, Orlando $229,900. 08/23/2013 Kelly Maloney 3879 Brantley Place Cir, Apopka $356,500. 08/23/2013 Jeffrey and Barbara Friedman 13315 Phoenix Dr, Orlando $231,300. 08/23/2013 Catherine DAmico/ Catherine DAmico 535 N Interlachen Ave, #202, Winter Park $192,000. 08/26/2013 Bill Adams 1150 Carmel Cir #501, Casselberry $109,000. 08/23/2013 Meg Dolan 1953 Summerfield Road, Winter Park $265,000. 08/26/2013