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Winter Park-Maitland observer ( 08-15-2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00242

Material Information

Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park FL
Publication Date: 08-15-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates: 28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID: UF00091444:00276

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00242

Material Information

Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park FL
Publication Date: 08-15-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates: 28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID: UF00091444:00276


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WPMOBSERVER.COM The city of Maitland is in talks to make its four-legged friends a No. 2 and No. 1 priority. At the Councils Aug. 9 meeting city staff provided ideas to help stop the citys pet waste problem in its Leisure Services Director Chuck Jordan studied the excre ment issue after it was brought up at a previous meeting by a cleaning up after pets could lead to serious potential health risks and lake water quality problems. Aside from the obvious draw back of having waste all over, un treated animal waste often times ends up in lakes and streams Jordan said. Jordan suggested getting the public informed about the issue and its consequences, and to con who do not comply both ideas the city will now consider. by resident Elizabeth SchneiderPeele and echoed by Council woman Linda Frosch was start ing pet waste pick-up education early, targeting school children to pass the information up to their parents, shaming them to do the right thing, much like what happens when kindergarteners school their parents to wear their seatbelts. Frosch said it could be modeled after a D.A.R.E like pro gram pet-waste-appropriate program acronym pending. An ordinance passed by Win ter Parks Planning And Zoning Board last Tuesday would ban fast food restaurants on Park Av enue a response to the uproar from residents and merchants af ter Park Avenue tenants BurgerFi and Firehouse Subs joined the corridor. nitions in the citys zoning regu dining and fast food, making it easier for code enforcement to regulate. A group made up of Winter Park Chamber of Commerce of attorney Frank Hamner drafted and presented the ordinance to voice the demands of local mer chants and property owners along the Avenue. One of the things we heard from the get-go is to keep the ner said. We heard a lot of dif ferent ways to do that, but many of them just seemed simple and gives several criteria for what The use of disposable tableware, payment before food is con sumed, and customers ordering from a wall menu and busing their own tables are just a few of the characteristics. If an incoming restaurant shows two or more of these traits, theyd be turned away. We dont want fast food on Planning Director Jeff Briggs. This is prohibiting it, and its a The team developed the or dinance by communicating with residents, property owners, mer chants and city staff, gathering a consensus that fast food restau rants would threaten the charm and success of the Avenue. It truly comes from a streetlevel view of whats going on in the Avenue, what you want to see for the future of the Avenue and really with a primary goal being to preserve what we have Chamber of Commerce presi dent Patrick Chapin noted that a grandfather clause would ex empt BurgerFi and the incom ing Firehouse Subs from being banned, due to the restaurants already agreeing to a business ing standards set by the city. The stakes in the ground now, and were moving forward Chapin said. Theres expecta tions for Firehouse Subs also; they came in under a guideline letter agreement that they will Winter Park residents came together to support historic preservation last Thursday at the Polasek Museum and Sculpture ing project an effort to move the historic Capen House across Lake Osceola by barge to the grounds of the Winter Park museum. The historic home that faced the wrecking ball last June can be saved if residents raise $650,000 by Nov. 1, giving mov ers the minimum two months they need to relocate the house by the end of the year. Capen House property own ers John and Betsy Pokorny gave the green light on the project after receiving a letter of intent in July from Debbie Komanski, executive director of the Polasek Museum and Sculpture Garden. Were about to embark on the most important three months The money raised for Preser vation Capen would cover the cost of moving the home and installing it on the new property, which is located behind the Po lasek Museum in the sculpture garden. Balloons set at four corners of a clearing near the shore of Lake Osceola marked where the Capen House will be placed. The large back windows and the back porch of the home would have a panoramic view of the museums sculpture garden and Lake Osceola. Co-chairs of the Preserva tion Capen project former Orange-Osceola State Attorney Lawson Lamar and Rollins Col lege President Emeritus Thad deus Seymour addressed the dozens of Winter Park residents who came to show their support PHOTO BY TIM FREED THE OBSERVER BurgerFi and Firehouse can stay if a new ordinance passes halting fast food. Banning fast food Capen preservation gets $100K Pet poo nes in Maitland? Ordinance would codify classiness on Park Avenue and keep BurgerFi Polasek Museum to save Capen House and TIM FREED Observer staff TIM FREED Observer staff SARAH WILSON Observer staff Please see FAST FOOD Page 2 Please see CAPEN Page 2

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Page 2 | Thursday, Aug. 15, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer $104,000 $108,160 $111,405 $115,861 $119,950 $119,950 $124,748 $129,738 $129,738 $134,928 $131,080 $171,819 $183,846 $225,219 $240,985 $89,861 $78,141 $59,882 $75,679 $82,486 $96,532 $99,939 $61,477 $75,896 $85,597 $85,595 $97,069 $84,961 W h i c h l i n e g i v e s y o u t h e b e s t c h a n c e f o r s u cce s s ? I llustr a tion per iod: 1 -1-2000 thr ough 1-1-2012. Each e xample sho wn assumes $100,000 initial pr emium with no withdr a w als M ar ket v alue based on the S&P 500 Index. H i s t o r i c a l perf o r m a n c e o f the S & P 5 0 0 I n d e x s h o u l d not be c onsider ed a r epr esen ta tion of cur r en t or futur e per f or manc e of the I nde x or of an y annuit y H ypothetical inde x annuit y pr oduc t illustr a tion assumes cr editing method of a 6% annual poin t -t o -poin t cap and annual r eset H ypothetical I nc ome R ider V alue assumes a 7% annual r a t e of r etur n f or inc ome pur poses I llustr a tion v alues r epr esen t g r oss r etur ns A ssumed annuit y r a t es and ac tual hist or ical pr ic es of the S&P 500 I nde x w er e used in this purely hypothetical example for the purpose of illustrating comparitive values and to illustrate how the Interest-Crediting Strategy might have guaranteed. Past performance does not guarantee future results. O N E S H OTY o u o n l y h a v e a t r et i r em en t w i ll f a ll6 0% o f A m er i c a n s s h o r t. M ember of(407)-644-6646w w w .aS af eHar b or .c omB ob A dams P r esiden t/CEOA S af eHar bor LL C bob@asaf ehar bor .c om Illustration period: 12-31-1999 though 12-31-2012According to paycheckforlife.com, three out of ve middle-class Americans entering retirement today are projected to outlive their nancial assets. Learn how to protect your retirement account from losses, maintain upside potential and maximize your lifetime income. Call us today for your PERSONALIZED SAFE MONEY REPORT. FAST FOOD | Business owners fear rules could stop them from saving themselves with new food menus C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE CAPEN | Despite a large donation to kick off fundraising, house-floating project still needs nearly $550K C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE establishments include having a host or hostess that greets custom ers, table service and a menu that which ranges from appetizers to entrees to deserts. Restaurants not meeting this egory, which would be limited to only 15 percent of the Avenues storefront space. This captures those entrepre neurial type restaurants that want to come in and dont want to go to full sale table service with table host seating everyone, but want to put out a good quality product on But the ordinance also affects incoming bakeries, coffee shops and candy stores. One amendment introduces a when a coffee shop or bakery their business description, includ ing sandwiches or other items. Local merchants approved it in order to create a sense of fairness due to the higher impact fees that come with owning a restaurant. But language in the ordinance requiring bakeries and coffee shops to submit their menu for approval from code enforcement raised concerns among board and staying competitive. By the time they go through this procedure, their business member Shelia De Ciccio. That Winter Parks Planning And Community Development Direc tor Dori Stone said that while the language seemed constrictive, the ordinance had in fact been ap proved by the Park Avenue Mer chants Association, and that that the merchants desire to remove fast food restaurants from the Av of them was their main priority. Board member Bob Mahn agreed with the ban on fast food and recognized that the changes had been approved by the mer chants and land owners them selves, but showed concern of having such a negative response to the fast food tenants. I dont like that being a kneeMahn said. But if it gives the res taurant owners some comfort in The board voted to approve the ordinance on the grounds that the language concerning menu The ordinance now awaits ap proval from the City Commission, likely coming up within the next few weeks. in front of the future location. That Capen House ranks at the top of our register for impor That house is not good be cause its old, its old because its Komanski said that the reloca tion of the Capen House would not only save a historic home, but give the Polasek Museum additional administrative and program space that it desperately needs. The Polasek Museum had plans to construct a new build ing, but discovered that relocat ing the Capen House would be less than half the cost. The home would be open to the public who visit the museum, no longer a private residence, Komanski said. Were just so happy that we have the ability to accommodate this house and give it brand new Komanski said. that history was on the move in Winter Park. Residents came together 12 years ago to save the historic Casa Feliz, which fell under threat of demolition when new property owners sought to build a large mansion in its place. Casa Feliz executive director role in bringing about awareness of the Capen Houses imminent destruction back in June, and is now spreading the word about the project to save the home. The citys success in protecting Casa Feliz in the past motivates residents to contribute to save the Capen House, Owens said. We have paved the way for Ancestors of the homes origi nal owner, James Capen, had the chance to address the audience at the end of the gathering. I believe that old things are Rolston, who travelled from Kan sas City, Mo., to attend the event. Were going to do everything Melissa Capen Rolstons sister, Ann Capen Hunt, marveled at the citys resolve to save the his toric treasure. This town is remarkable; Im ing from Eads, Tenn. Im com pletely overwhelmed by the spirit of these people and how engaged The sisters are now brain storming more ways to raise money to move the Capen House. The Galloway Foundation of Winter Park started off the do nations with an initial $100,000. Weve gotten off to a good start, but we have 90 days to get The Preservation Capen team reportedly plans on putting the Capen House back on the historic register once it is relocated, said City Manager Randy Knight. This is an investment in the future of our community that we The good news is that this A donation button is now available on the Polasek Muse ums website at polasek.org ARCHIVE PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVER The Capen House still could be demolished if money isnt raised in time to move it. PHOTOS BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVER Woof! Orlando in College Park hosted WoofStock on Sunday, Aug. 11, giving dogs a chance to cool off from the summer heat with offerings of dog washes and frozen pupsicles. Proceeds from the annual fundraising event benet the SPCA of Central Florida.

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Aug. 15, 2013 | Page 3 Community Bulletin Business Briefs Winter Park Cheer Athletics T h e P a r k P i c k U p A f t e r S c h o o l CALL TODAY: 321 972 6945 Study Hall and Quiet Room for Homework time $65 per week include transportation from select Elm. Schools and Middle Schools ) *Ages 5 and up with exercise daily *Girls and Boys welcome *15 years experience in Winter Park Pick up by 6:00pm at WPCA daily! Reserve your spot TODAY! www.wpcheerathletics.com r rfntbWe offer Full-Day Infant Care and Childcare Year-Round, Preschool Classes, Summer Camp, and much more! rfntbrn n n Board of health Our Whole Community (OWC), the local Christian non-prot focused on com munity health initiatives, announces its new leadership team. The new OWC Ex ecutive Board of Directors, whose terms began July 1 and will run until June 30, 2015, includes: President Lavon Williams; Vice-President Cris Parson; Treasurer Jeff George; and Secretary Cathy Semyck. Elected to serve on the Board of Direc tors for terms ending June 30, 2014, are: Rosemary George, Betsy McKeeby, Gigi Erwin, Michelle Hodge, Stephanie Spies, Tom Hackim, Regina Buchanan, Denise Schmalze, Teona Morris, Kimberly Hicks, and Tonja Williams. Champion rock climbers Team Aiguille under the direction of head Coach Eugene Hoberg had four team members that were invited to compete at the SCS 2013 Youth National Champion ships on July 4-7 in Atlanta, Ga. Invitations are based on advancing through a series of local, regional and divisional competi tions in order to earn a spot to compete at the national level. Sport climbing is based on level of difculty and speed climbing on time only. Placers in sport climbing: Ciera Stone, 11, earned sixth place; Stasio Gauza, 14, earned 17th place; Peter Steffy, 15, earned 18th place; and Ian Englehart, 14, earned 36th place. Speed Climbing: Peter Steffey earned fourth place, earning him a spot on the USA climbing team. He will compete at the 2013 World Youth IFSC Championships on Aug. 15-19 in Victoria, British Columbia. Insurance pays you Since Florida has not been directly hit by a catastrophic event in the last several years, the Florida Municipal Insurance Trust is able to return excess premium funds to Floridas municipalities. Begin ning in December, members of the In surance Trust that are renewing property coverage in 2013-2014 will receive a por tion of the $8 million refund. Caring for kids Executive Director for Threshold Center for Autism Jim Dennis announces the hir ing of Dr. Luis F. Barroso, D.O., and Nurse Practitioner Caroline Gertz to the staff of the Benjamin C. Willard Jr. M.D. Memorial Clinic. The clinic offers full medical and dental services for families with special needs children and adults and their fam ily members. Super lawyers Three shareholders with the law rm of Winderweedle, Haines, Ward and Wood man were recently selected as 2013 Florida Super Lawyers. The attorneys named Super Lawyers are: Joseph P. Rusty Carolan III (Banking), J. Jeffrey Deery (General Litigation) and Bradley M. Saxton (Bankruptcy). Owned by Thomson Reuters, Super Lawyers recognizes attor neys who have distinguished themselves in their legal practice. The selection process is multi-phased and rigorous. Peer nominations and evaluations are combined with third-party research and validation of the attorneys professional accomplishments. Leader of the lawyers Associate attorney Melanie Grifn in the litigation department of the law rm of Dean, Mead, Egerton, Bloodworth, Cap ouano & Bozarth, P.A. in Orlando was recently elected to lead The Florida Bar Young Lawyers Division. Grifn assumes the role of president for the 2013-2014 year and has served as a member of the organizations board of governors since 2009. Bowling for literacy Fifth Third Bank (Central Florida) recently participated in the 30th Annual Bowl-AThon fundraiser for Junior Achievement (JA) of Central Florida. During the event, employees from Fifth Third raised more than $10,000 to support JA programs that focus on nancial literacy, workforce readiness, the free enterprise system and entrepreneurship. Heart of Heart of Florida Heart of Florida United Way, Central Floridas most comprehensive health and human services agency, has appointed Danielle Orchard, a Lake Mary resident, as its new senior director of Donor Re lations. In this role, her responsibilities include the overall planning, research, strategic development, evaluation and implementation of comprehensive major gifts, donor relations and the Alexis de Tocqueville Society. New school NAI Realvest recently negotiated a new lease agreement for 14,305 square feet at the Crossroads Business Center, 931 South Semoran Blvd. in Winter Park. The new tenant is Conductive Education Cen ter of Orlando Inc. PHOTOS BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVER Ron Raike pours out craft brews for The Cask & Larder at the annual Taste of the Nation fundraising event held at the World Center Marriott to help end childhood hun ger. Other Central Florida chefs donned pirate garb to doll out their grub, while desserts were served on rotating platforms.

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Page 4 | Thursday, Aug. 15, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Winter Park City Talk BY RANDY KNIGHT CITY MANAGER | Publisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor. Submission does not guarantee publication. Columnists opinions are made independently of the newspaper. All rights reserved. Winter Park/Maitland Observer 2013 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Winter Park/Maitland Observer | 1500 Park Center Drive | Orlando, FL 32835 TCraft@TurnstileMediaGroup.com IBabcock@TurnstileMediaGroup.com SWilson@TurnstileMediaGroup.com TMiller@TurnstileMediaGroup.com Brittni Larson Megan Stokes Tim Freed Allison Olcsvay Kristy Vickery (Orange & Seminole Counties) Legal@FLALegals.com LStern@TurnstileMediaGroup.com LBaez@TurnstileMediaGroup.com Florida Press Association & Winter Park/Maitland/Goldenrod Chambers of Commerce Winter Park/Maitland Observer is published by headquartered in Orlando, Fla., Turnstile Media Group is also the parent of Golfweek, Golfweek Custom Media, TurfNet, Professional Artist, Seminole Voice, Baldwin Park Living and Turn stile Connect. CHAIRMAN: Rance Crain PRESIDENT/CEO: Francis X. Farrell VICE PRESIDENTS: Patti Green & Jeff Babineau Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster There was a City Commission meeting held Aug. 12 in City Hall Commission Chambers. Below are a few highlights of decisions made at the meeting: Mayors Report $25,000 was made by the Winter Park Health Foundation for help ing fund the purchase of the citys new shuttle bus. This shuttle bus will help transport children and ing transportation to and from the Winter Park Community Cen ter. Thank you to the Winter Park Health Foundation for helping keep our residents active and hav ing the ability to participate in the citys programming efforts. for the Code Enforcement Board and Construction Board of Ad justments & Appeals were ap proved. Consent Agenda were approved. contracts were approved (for a complete listing, visit cityofwin rized to execute the power supply and interconnection agreements with the Orlando Utilities Com mission, and to execute agree ments with Florida Power & Light Company. Stone as director of Planning & Community Development was partments have been consolidat Action Items Requiring Dis cussion: Winter Park Register of Historic Places and the National Register of Historic Places was presented. city-owned land (Murrah Civic private parking structure was pulled off the agenda as a result of the City Commission Work shop where a win-win scenario was unable to be agreed upon for the project to move forward. Public Hearings the ordinance repealing obsolete provisions and amending Chap city code to implement Chapter consistent with general law was approved. the ordinance amending Section Costs of Repair; Liens, of Chap ter 2, Administration, repealing the clause declaring that code en forcement liens take priority over other liens was approved. ing the red light camera program were approved. to comply with recent changes to the Internal Revenue Code relat were approved. A full copy of the Aug. 12 City Commission minutes will be available at cityofwinterpark.org the week of Aug. 26, pending ap proval by the City Commission. Register now for the Edu cation Update for the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce and city of Winter Parks Education Update. This event, scheduled for Aug. 22, at munity Center. It will explore From Learn ing to Working: How Winter Park panel discussion moderated by WKMG Local 6 news anchor Lau ren Rowe. Panelists for the break fast event include Dr. Barbara Jenkins, superintendent, Orange County Public Schools; Dr. Da vid S. Richard, dean, Rollins Col lege Hamilton Holt School; Mi Ruths Hospitality Group Inc.; and Dr. Sandra Lyn Jewell, senior director, Winter Park Tech. Attendees are also encouraged to bring supplies to the event for A Gift For Teachings 15th Birth day Back-to-School Drive. Event registration will begin fast and program at 8 a.m. Please make your reservations by Friday, or visiting winterpark.org Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over Over the Labor Day weekend were killed as a result of drunk of all highway fatalities. To prevent additional fatali ties, beginning Aug. 16 through Monday, Sept. 2, the WPPD, along with other law enforcement agen cies, will be conducting check points and roving saturation patrols within Orange County looking for alcohol and drug im paired drivers. If you drive im paired, you will be arrested. The WPPD recommends these simple tips for a safe Labor Day weekend: fore the fun begins. nate a sober driver. taxi, call a sober friend or family member, or use public transport. drunk driver on the road, dont hesitate to contact the police. know someone who is about to drive or ride a motorcycle while impaired, take their keys and help them make other arrangements to get to where they are going safely. For more information, please Walking to school As we welcome back our stu dents to school, please remember to be cautious of back to school bike riders and walkers. Please teach your children basic street pecially while travelling to and from school. We are all visual learners, so remember to be walk ing examples of what a safe pe destrian should do and be while crossing the road. Please be a safe role model for our little ones. at cityofwinterpark.org, like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, New shuttle bus!

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Page 6 | Thursday, Aug. 15, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Maitland City Talk BY HOWARD SCHIEFERDECKER MAYOR FIXED INCOME EXPERTS SINCE 1982 www.Shop4Bonds.com Check out the more than 50,000 bonds on our website at:Email fwright@jwkorth.com for more info.A Service of J W KORTH & COMPANY SIPC* Tax equiv. yield based on FL residency and 35% tax bracket. Subject to prior sale and price change. Maitland Fla LTD Tax General Obligation Bonds (Baa1/BBB)Coupon: 4.40% Maturity: 7/1/2034 Next Call: 1/1/15 @ 100 Sinking Fund: 7/1/31 @ 100 Price: 94.00 Yield to Worst: 4.859% Federal and State Tax Exempt 7.475%*Tax Equivalent Yield Contact Fred Wright at 407-758-7486 617 E Washington Street, Ste 3 Orlando, Florida 32801SHOP4BONDS JWK ORTH / SHOP4BONDS.COM FEATURING ... ... AND MUCH MORE! 250 North Orlando Ave. Winter Park, FL 32789 407.677.9777 A Premier Flooring Source H O U S E S W A N T E D ! G e t a F R E E N o O b l i g a o n C A S H O e r O n Y o u r H o u s e W i t h i n 2 4 H o u r s (8 5 5 ) 7 5 5 1 8 1 8 w w w C i r c l e 1 8 H o m e s c o m C A S H $ $ $ Q U I C K C L O S E A N Y P R I C E R A N G E A N Y C O N D I T I O N A N Y S I T U A T I O N City Council Meeting of Aug. 12 The Maitland City Council met Hall Council Chambers. Below is a synopsis of that meeting. Special Presentations: Mayor Schieferdecker pre to Lauren Brown of Browns New York Deli. Andrea Bailey Cox, director and CEO of Art & History Muse ums Maitland addressed the art currently displayed in the Council Chambers. Old Business: Dick Wells, Community Devel opment Director, provided an up date on the FlexBus project. Public Hearings: There were no scheduled public hearings. Consent Items: The minutes of the July 22, City Council Meeting and the minutes of the July 15 special session min utes were approved. The minutes of the June 20 Planning and Zoning Commis sion were accepted. The Council authorized the city manager to enter into a threeyear agreement with Dr. Todd M. Husty for Medical Direction Ser FY 2016. The Council authorized the city manager to enter into an agreement with Johnson, Mirmi ran and Thompson, for additional survey and re-design of the Lake Decision Items: An ordinance was introduced Shadow, Planned Development Zoning Amendment and Devel opment Plan; and the date for the public hearing was set for Aug. An Ordinance was introduced Homebuilders Association of Metro Orlando, Inc., PD Zoning Amendment; and the date for the public hearing was set for Aug. An Ordinance was introduced New Hope for Kids, PD Zoning Amendment; and the date for the public hearing was set for Aug. An Ordinance was introduced course Parkway South, PD Zon ing Amendment; and the date for the public hearing was set for Discussion Items: Mr. Chuck Jordan, leisure services director, presented the Council with information regard ing pet owner responsibility. manager, provided the Council with a presentation of the millage rate survey. To listen to a recording of the meeting, please check our website at itsmymaitland.com Were keeping Dr. Todd PHOTO COURTESY OF WINTER PARK CHAMBER OF COMMERCE The Winter Park Chamber of Commerce awarded its Youth Leaders Chris Koch from Winter Park High School and Nina Kumar from Hagerty High School. Not pictured are leaders Ben Hursh and Marissa Block.

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Aug. 15, 2013 | Page 7 Lifestyles PROGRAM When companies look to expand and relocate their operations, the state of education in the area is often one of the top priorities. Join the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce and City of Winter Park for a community dialogue that will highlight accomplishments, celebrate collaborations and examine how educators and business leaders are partnering to meet tomorrow's needs. PANEL DISCUSSION ModeratorLauren Rowe, News Anchor Panelists Dr. Barbara Jenkins, Superintendent, Dr. Sandra Lyn Jewell, Senior Director, Pamela Nabors, President & CEO, Michael ODonnell, President & CEO, Dr. David S. Richard, Dean, EVENT DETAILSThursday, August 227:45 a.m. Registration / 8:00 a.m. Breakfast & Program Winter Park Community Center 721 W. New England Avenue, Winter Park, FL 32789 Register by Friday, August 16 $25 Chamber members (in advance) / $30 Non-Members $200 Corporate Table of 8 $30 at the door (space permitting) School Supply Drive Attendees are encouraged to bring a donation for A Gift For Teachings 15th Birthday Back-to-School Drive. Loose leaf paper, #2 pencils, 24-count crayon boxes, 8-count marker packages, Glue sticks and 12-count colored pencil packages. The bandage wrapping 5-yearold Trevor Scheerers right calf at the end of summer camp could have come from any average little boy accident too quick of a turn on his bike, a tumble chas ing his older sister Emily, a close encounter with some basketball blacktop. But the story behind it has followed him for a year and a half of his life. I would say break a leg, but Sandy Bonus, nodding her head toward the boy dressed in the beige Florida panther suit in her Maitland art studio. kered cat hat. Its stage-talk for good luck, but we dont want you to hurt another paw, so well stick with smile as she straightened out his Its minutes before show time days since art camp started, and two weeks and a day since Trevor sat through two hours of surgery removing whats left of a stagefour malignant tumor in his right leg. Each of his 10 fellow campers have similar stories, though the villains come by different names. For Trevor, its Alveolar Rhab domyosarcoma. Trevor calls it a bump in his leg a bump thats and counting, and hundreds of nights in the hospital since a doc tor found it in March of last year. The campers surrounding Trevor are mixed between those battling an illness and their sib lings. But Bonus said she makes it a point not to distinguish between the two during the camp giving the kids an equal shot at specialized attention during their week together. Orlandos BASE Camp an acronym for Believe, Achieve, Support, and Educate returned to Sandy Bonus Fine Arts for its ninth annual art camp Aug. 5, offering a week of escape and refuge from hospital stays for children battling cancer. From the on Monday to the cheers as the curtain falls on Friday, Bonus said its a week of art, life lessons, and world where cancer goes away. When theyre creating theyre They are their health. Every day its an escape, refuge and a Glittered feathers, googly eyes and hand-sewn patches cover kids dressed as peacocks, owls, rats, trees and tortoises ready to take to the handcrafted stage out back of Bonus studio. Artist O.L. Samuels inspired the play set in a Florida orange grove. The animals, different their home safe and to stay alive. Everyone has something to just before the curtain call. This grove isnt just about one, its an ecosystem, its about everyone Its time for you creatures to make everyday your master herbs, to the patchwork fabriccovered stage under an oak tree canopy, the camp concocts a little bit of magic in the middle of Maitland, longtime art camp volunteer Lauren Sealy said. Kids light up when they lot that they want to come back year after year. [Sandy] really But whether the kids return isnt up to the kids sometimes, Bonus said. Treatments take over. The hospital calls. The cancer Escape artists Battling cancer, tiny painters and actors learn to forget their struggles with the help of creativity SARAH WILSON Observer staff PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Players on a stage for a day, kids from BASE Camp escape from worry as they slip into costumes for a play to culminate a week of art and fun at Maitlands Swoope Studios. Owner Sandy Bonus teaches the cancer-ghting kids how to paint and play characters on stage. Please see ESCAPE on page 9

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Page 8 | Thursday, Aug. 15, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Calendar r f r f n f nn t b n t b t n n f f n rfnr KEEP UP WITH MAITLAND NEWS AND EVENTS!www.IndependenceLane.com Facebook.com/ItsMyMaitland AUG. 15 The Winter Park Chamber of Commerces Business After Hours is from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, Aug. 15, at Light Bulbs Unlimited at 1100 W. Fairbanks Ave. in Winter Park. Visit winterpark.org for more information. Celebrate the grand re-opening of Gold enrods re station from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, Aug. 15. The Goldenrod Area Chamber of Commerce has invited local reghters from Station 63, local politi cians and the community to attend this very special occasion. There will be ap petizers and cocktails for all. Door prizes will be given away, and the Goldenrod Museum will be open for tours. There will also be a special display of before and af ter pictures, as well as archived pictures for all to see. This is a free event, so con tact Darlene at the Goldenrod Chamber at 407-677-5980 for your reservations today. Support Our Scholars, a non-prot or ganization that provides college-bound Central Florida women with nancial as sistance, presents Think Big its fall fundraiser featuring renowned pediatric neurosurgeon and New York Times bestselling author Benjamin S. Carson, M.D. The event will take place Thursday, Aug. 15, from 6 to 9 p.m. at the John and Rita Lowndes Shakespeare Theater, located at 812 E. Rollins St., Orlando. AUG. 16 The Art & History Museums Maitland proudly opens two exhibitions highlight ing the city of Eatonville. Images of Ea tonville: Then & Now is held in the A&Hs Maitland Art Center Galleries from Aug. 16 through Sept. 29. The exhibition Found ing of Eatonville is held in the A&Hs Maitland Historical Museum from Aug. 16 through Oct. 6. Sales strategies for growing your busi ness will be the theme of the Small Busi ness Education Series from the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce. Its from 8 to 9:30 a.m. at the Winter Park Welcome Center, located at 151 W. Lyman Ave. Visit winterpark.org for more information. AUG. 17 Join Central Florida Community Arts this Saturday as they present their third an nual Summer Classical Series concert, a performance of Mozarts Requiem. Nearly 100 voices, along with a full chamber orchestra, will perform this nal piece of Mozarts work a powerful musical trea sure that was unnished at the time of his death in 1791. Its at 7 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 17, at Maitland Presbyterian Church. Visit cfcarts.com/mozarts-requiem-2013 for more information. AUG. 18 Learn how to cook Vietnamese food at the Maitland Librarys Ha Roda Vietnam ese Cooking class, featuring appetizers and desserts. Its from 3 to 4:30 p.m. on Sunday, Aug. 18, at the Maitland Public Library. Visit maitlandpl.org for more in formation. A tour and tea at Orlando Museum of Arts A Passion for Collecting event will show you treasures from local collectors on a tour with Jan Clanton, associate curator of adult programs, followed by free tea. Its at 1:30 p.m. on Sunday, Aug. 18, at the Orlando Museum of Art. Visit omart.org for more information. AUG. 21 Florida Hospitals Healthy 100 and Florida Radiology Imaging are offering screen ing mammograms and free bone mineral density tests. Its from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 21, at 2008 N. Golden rod Road. RSVP to 407-303-4437. AUG. 22 Learn about the state of education and jobs in your neck of the woods at the Education Update Breakfasts presenta tion of From Learning to Working: How Winter Park Creates a Strong Workforce. Its from 7:45 to 10:15 a.m. on Aug. 22 at the Winter Park Community Center, 721 W. New England Ave. Its an open house at Maitland Family Care from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Thursday, Aug. 22. If youre looking for comprehen sive care for newborns, this state-of-theart family medicine practice located in the beautiful RDV Sportsplex is the perfect t. Plus, gain info on our new weight loss program. RSVP at 407-200-2759, or visit maitlandfamilycare.com AUG. 24 Join us at the ninth annual Philips Phile Texas Hold em Poker Tournament on Saturday, Aug. 24, at the Orlando Science Center. This premier evening event raises money for the Mustard Seed of Central Florida. For more information, visit Real Radio.fm Celebrate the kickoff of Central Floridas art and cultural season with the 9th An nual Red Chair Affair on Saturday, Aug. 24. Your ticket to sample 2013-2014 sea son highlights, this extraordinary evening is held at the Bob Carr Performing Arts Centre and includes performances from a variety of genres and organizations. Visit redchairproject.com for more information. The art of Ral Coln, who has illustrated more than 30 books for children, is at the Orlando Museum of Art from Aug. 24 to Nov. 3. Visit omart.org for more info. The Working Together Coalition invites the public to attend the Ninth Annual Confer ence at 9 a.m. Aug. 24 at 1400 Gaston Foster Rd. in Orlando. Visit trabajan dojuntosorlando.com for more info. AUG. 15 Destinee Hooker of The U.S. Olympic/ American Womens Indoor Volleyball Team will be hosting Girls Volleyball Camps from Aug. 15-17, from noon to 4 p.m. at Central Florida Sports Complex/Winter Park Volleyball Club. Register at destineehookervbcamp. com/registerhome.html AUG. 17 The Art & History Museums Mait land (A&H) invites you to Family Days at the Museum on Saturday, Aug. 17, beginning at 1 p.m. This month the program takes place in the A&Hs Maitland Art Center, 231 W. Packwood Ave., Maitland. Whats So Cool About School? is the theme for our August event. Visit artandhistory.org for more information. AUG. 18 Its Wiggle and Giggle with Mr. Rich ard at Shaynas Village at the Jewish Community Center in Maitland. Its a free concert for kids! Visit orlandojcc. org for more information.

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Aug. 15, 2013 | Page 9 Brad Cluxton, Winter Park Sales Manager/Commercial Lender Cell: 407-325-9984 7250 Aloma Avenue, 407-679-7000 WHAT DOES A COACH AND A COMMERCIAL LOAN OFFICER HAVE IN COMMON?They both have a strong commitment to helping people attain their highest potential. Brad has been coaching central Floridas youth for decades, but did you know he can also help you reach your business goals with a very competitive commercial loan rate? Let Brad handle your loan from start to nish with exceptional customer service AND a coachs commitment. The opportunity is great and the time is now. ESCAPE | Kids who may have been in a hospital all year jump at the chance to learn at fine arts camp comes back. wishes to rewind the week echo through the art studio as kids shed their costumes, emotions encapsulating everything Bonus hopes the camp can accomplish inspiration, unity and hope. We want the opportunity for the children to feel happy and in our lives, it gives us a way to time ruminating on the mantra, I am health. I am strength. I am Saying that over and over again is so powerful because your say it enough and I believe it really starts to Its the makebelieve that becomes reality for the kids who Back in that orange grove, in the world they created on the stage, the tapedover audio acted out by the little performers cut out just in time to skip over the pan thers only line. A second year performance veteran, Trevor the panther sat patiently on the edge of the stage, pretending to lick his front paws. A quick eye-dart toward Sandy, who mouths words and gestures movements in the wings, was met with a smile, a The play must go on. Bonus said, but he they all This, she said, is reality and the real reason for BASE Camp. Lines get cut short. Bad things happen. What matters, she said, is how you handle the recovery. PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Parents watch as little actors take the stage for a once-a-year camp for kids bat tling cancer. The kids rehearse for a performance all week while learning art too. C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 7

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Page 10 | Thursday, Aug. 15, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer The air conditioning blows gently through Marie Wallers apartment as she relaxes in her cushioned crme chair, basking To her it feels like a lifetime ago that going outside to stay cool was as common during Florida summers as iced tea. I worked in an office with a round fan beside my desk, and many times at noon I would go home just to take a Before air conditioning, Central Florida in the summer was an unbearable place to be. In the daytime, parishioners would diligently fan them selves during a Sunday church service. Taking a lesson from local otters, theyd cool off with an afternoon swim in a nearby lake. Ninety-year-old Waller said the summer heat got so bad that many Floridians, such as herself, would sleep on their screened-in front porch, known as a sleeping porch. As the summer heat subsided near midnight, a hot house would take far longer to cool than the outside air, even if 80 degrees right before the sun rose again. I would sleep on the daybed out there summer sometimes just But one of the good things about growing up here then was every thing wasnt covered with concrete, which cre ates heat, and you didnt have close next-door neighbors. We always had every window in the house open, all night, no one locked doors either; it was a very comfortable time, as far Both 91-year-old Eleanor Fisher and her mother were born in a home with no airconditioning, right in the heart of Orlando. Her grandparents moved down to Orlando in were the stuff of science fiction. rian house was full of open windows and breezeways a bygone feature in many modern homes. In an era where eco-friendly convective cooling has become all the rage among green circles, few remember when it wasnt an efficiencyboosting luxury. Homes would strategically place walls, doors, and windows to let cooler air in and draw hotter air out. Windows of homes from the late 1800s wouldnt just open, theyd raise straight up into the ceiling to create massive wind apertures. And of course screened porches surrounded the perimeter, including the one with the bed. Fisher said one of her favor ite things to do in the summer was to make ice cubes out of orange juice, put them in a glass, sit in front of the fan and eat them with a spoon. She also recalls having large floor and attic fans in homes to keep people cool during these sweltering summers. We had a great big floor fan that sounded as if there were a huge airplane propeller in the She and her family would frequently find refuge from the Survival lessons from before A/C KRISTY VICKERY Observer staff PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVER Temperature regulation used to depend more on location than electricity, with most Florida residents from the 1930s choosing to sleep outside. Please see HEAT on next page

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Aug. 15, 2013 | Page 11 One Senior Place ... See our full Calendar of Events at OneSeniorPlace.com407.949.6733715 Douglas Avenue Altamonte Springs, FL 32714M-F 8:30am 5pmFRI DA Y, AUGU S T 16 Hosted by M O N DA Y, AUGU S T 19 Presented by Exit Real Estate Results T U ESDA Y, AUGU S T 20 & Bryan & Bryan W ED N ESDA Y, AUGU S T 21 T HUR SDA Y, AUGU S T 22 Calendar of Events August 2013 shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM s it time to sell? To register, call (407) 933-1999. Happy summer! Summer is in full swing with daily high tem peratures in the high 90s. Now only plants that can tolerate the summer heat and rains will grow and thrive in the garden. Even though the garden wants to go wild, remove old and dead plants from your garden to keep pest and disease problems down. Here are a few strategies for the summer garden: 1. Grow vegetables 2. Grow cover crops The variety of heat tolerant vegetables is limited, but you can still continue to grow black-eyed peas, collards, rattlesnake pole beans, speckled lima beans, New Zealand spinach, okra, sweet potato, Malabar spinach and yard-long beans. I love cover crops because they are easy and interesting to grow while improving the soil. You can plant cowpeas, sorghum, millet, lablab bean and velvet bean. Sunn hemp is also an excel lent choice because it reduces nematodes too! If you are noticing root swell ing due to nematode damage, an alternate strategy to planting Sunn Hemp is to solarize your soil. Soil solarization is a process where you use the energy from the sun to kill soil pests. To solar ize, clear all vegetation from the garden, loosen the soil and cover for six weeks with clear plas tic. Then, place bricks or other weights on the corners to prevent the plastic from blowing away. The plastic should be removed at the beginning of the fall to prepare for planting. One last option I will propose is simply mulching the garden or wood chip mulch. This will prevent weeds from growing and keep the soil from drying out. In addition, it will add organic mat ter to the soil and keep it alive. Happy gardening! Be sure to save these dates for upcoming OWC Garden events. They are $10 per family to attend. Plant Your Thanksgiving Din ner, Sept. 21 | 9 11 a.m. OWC Garden at Winter Park Presbyterian Church Park (garden is located off of Plant Your Christmas Dinner Oct. 22 | 6 8 p.m. OWC Garden 550 W. Morse Blvd., Winter Park (garden entrance is located Our Whole Community is a 501(c) (3) non-prot Christian organization that brings communities together to establish relationships and share resources resulting in innovative programs that inspire, motivate and educate individuals in their pursuit of optimal health. For more information on Our Whole Community, please visit ourwholecommunity.org. Our Whole Community is pleased to contribute monthly to The Winter Park-Maitland Observer. Email owc_ed@me.com for inquiries about the OWC Gardens. Plots are available for rent seasonally. Growing a successful summer garden TIA MEER Guest writer horrific heat at a beach, lake or the springs. But these werent day trips. They were survival va cations to beat the heat. We spent a month at Daytona Beach or a month out at Winder mere on a chain of nine the swimming was won She said the summers without air conditioning got so bad that Winter Park stores would close up shop because of it. A lot of the shops just closed, because they figured there wasnt any business in the summer Mayflower Retire ment Community resi dent B.J. McKee is also a two-generation Florida native, born on the same lot as her mother. My grandmother came down here as a 15-year-old with her parents, her brother and her sister, from Ma con, Ga., in two covered wag And my father started the first bottled-water The bed outside had the luxury of privacy curtains and screens to keep away the mosquitos, which would wake up just around the time when people were going to sleep. There were roll-down awnings on the screened porch, to keep the wind out room for a bed and a blanket chest, but thats about that was summer sleep Although summer sleeping has changed quite a bit for this gen eration of ladies, they say theyll never forget the time when there was no thermostat to set at a We just tried to deal with the hand we were just didnt know any dif HEAT | Orange juice ice C ONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVER Mayower resident Marie Waller sits cooly in her apartment remembering summer days in Florida before air conditioning.

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Nows your chance to showcase just how beautiful your community really is. Submit your best photo of the area, and your shot could be featured in the 2014 Winter Park-Maitland Observer calendar!Visit WPMObserver.com/Photo for more details and to upload your winning submission. Enter the Winter Park-Maitland Observer Calendar Photo Contest today! CALENDAR PHOTO CONTEST

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Aug. 15, 2013 | Page 13 How Dying Intestate (Without a Will) Affects Your Dependent With Special NeedsThe sad reality is that many of us have not taken the time to execute a will or develop an estate plan. The estates of individuals who die without properly drafted and executed wills, are distributed in accordance with the law of the states in which they reside at death, which spell out steps and procedures in distributing their estates. This can be particularly disastrous for dependents with disabilities who are receiving government benets at the time of their caregivers death. Some of the implications are discussed below. State intestacy laws generally provide that if a decedent is survived by a spouse and dependents, his or her assets will be divided among the surviving spouse and dependents. For example, state law may provide that the surviving spouse receives $50,000 plus one-half of the remaining property, with dependents receiving equal shares of the balance of the property outright. The needs of the family are not considered. If a dependent is a minor, depending on the amount of his or her inheritance, a guardian may have to be appointed by the court to manage the dependents property. Smaller amounts, usually less than $10,000, may be payable to the surviving spouse on behalf of the minor dependent under state Uniform Transfers to Minors Law or other provisions of the state probate code. When the dependent reaches majority age, he or she has the right to demand a full accounting and can even sue if there is evidence of mismanagement of the dependents funds. If the surviving dependent has a disability and cannot make nancial decisions on his or her own behalf, there are other issues. The choice of a guardian for such a dependent has major implications. If the caregiver dies intestate, the court must appoint a guardian to manage the money on behalf of a minor dependent without knowing the caregivers wishes. The court appointed guardian may not have an emotional connection or vested interest in the person with special needs, which may further complicate the situation, causing considerable distress to surviving family members. Many government benets, like SSI, are subject to income limitations; other needs-based benets like Medicaid and food stamps look at assets, as well. If a person with a disability is receiving government benets, and receives more from the deceased caregiver than permitted by program guidelines, benets will stop. The dependent will generally have to reapply and requalify for benets. During the interim, the dependent could be expelled from a residence such as a group home or be removed from a treatment or day habilitation program. Substantial amounts of money and/or property left to a minor or adult with special needs who cannot make nancial decisions for him or herself could be subject to ongoing court scrutiny. Most courts require that the guardian of the estate, even if a caregiver, be bonded and make periodic accountings with respect to minors or anyone with special needs. In addition, the guardian may need prior approval from the court before spending of the dependents money. This could include a purchase of a wheelchair, other durable medical equipment or assistive technology for the dependent with special needs. In the event of remarriage of the surviving parent, the nancial security of the dependent with special needs can be compromised. A spouse is generally entitled to a specic share of his or her deceased spouses estate, regardless of whether there was a valid will or not. If the surviving parent had remarried without a prenuptial agreement and subsequently died, his or her surviving spouse would be entitled to a share (typically a third) of the estate, whether or not his/her will provided for such a share.. The surviving second spouse would generally have no obligation to support dependents from the deceased spouses rst marriage. When a properly drawn up will is not in place, money that could normally benet a dependent with special needs and other surviving dependents may be diminished by unnecessary court costs and lawyer fees. Depending on the value of your estate, a properly drawn up will may also permit you to reduce or avoid state and federal estate taxes. In summation, state intestacy laws seldom provide proper planning for people with special needs. Caregivers of such dependents are encouraged to consult knowledgeable professionals and, at the very least, to execute wills. Due to the complexity of federal and state laws, you may require specially trained professionals to help you plan for the future of your dependent with special needs. Call Special Needs Planner Charles Fisher at 407-393-6693 for a condential consultation. MetLife Center for Special Needs PlanningSM For more information about this and other related topics, visit our organizations web site at www.metlife.com/specialneeds or call 1-877-638-3375.L1111221625[exp0114][All States][DC,PR] MD-INTESTATE Charles FisherFinancial Services Representative Special Needs Planner MetLife of Central Florida 301 E. Pine Street, Suite 800, Orlando, FL 32801 A whole generation of Ameri can girls dreamed of what it would be like to kiss Elvis Presley. Not that many got a chance to see their dreams come true. One ex ception was Sister Dolores Hart. I should let you know that Sister Dolores was not a nun as the time, but actress Dolores Hart. This summer, I had the de lightful experi ence of read ing about her journey from actress to nun in her memoir, The Ear of the Disclaimer: I am not Roman Catholic and I am not sure what to make of the clois tered life. Nevertheless, I found Sister Dolores book compelling, not just as religious autobiogra phy, but as the tale of transforma to no boys at all. Sister Dolores journey was not an easy one. Her strong personality challenged her vow of obedience on more than one occasion. Her friends thought she had lost her mind and tried ev erything possible to return her to doubts, Dolores persevered and eventually became the Prioress of Regina Laudis Monastery in Beth lehem, Conn. Even if one is not particularly religious, Dolores story is fasci nating. Like the stars of today, she was used to being made much of. Landing in the monastery as a novice, she was given the task of digging rocks out of the garden. dont know how much of my hurt came from being treated like a nobody. It would be hard for any Please see ELVIS Page 15 The bigger Elvis A shiny red apple laced with hidden poison put Snow White into a long, deep sleep in the forest. If it werent for the dear dwarfs, the story could have had a bad non-Disney ending and Central Florida might have become a very differ ent place. Dangerous bacteria and toxins, the most common poisons in our food, can hide in all kinds of food, not just apples. Each year, about 1 in 6 people gets ill from contami nated food nearly one in the average family per year. Foodborne illnesses can range from a mild short bout of diarrhea to kidney failure and death. Older and younger, pregnant, and immune-deficient people are the most vulnerable, unable to fight off infections as easily as healthier eaters. If you ingest contaminated food, you might feel nauseated, vomit, have water diarrhea, and fever. You may have stomach pain and cramps. It may hap pen a few hours, days, or weeks after eating the suspect food. Mild symptoms in a healthy person can resolve in a day or so, but contaminated food can severely affect those unable to fight it off, and some of the fortunately rare infections can affect anyone. Seek medical attention if your symptoms are more than mild. Even the most elegant look ing meal can bring microscopic enemies along with dining pleasures. The most common culprits have melodic names that might sound like lovely delicaciessalmonella, escheria vibrio. Improved government oversight of meat production has reduced e. coli infections, but salmonella sends 1 million people to the hospital each year. Listeria and vibrio are relatively rare but can be deadly. Listeria typically comes from unpas teurized dairy foods and deli to the cholera family, can enter the body from contaminated and uncooked seafood, espe cially from warm waters, such as the Gulf Coast. Best defenses Fortunately, most of these are rare. The best defense is to be as healthy as you can be. The secret to avoiding exposure to food poisoning is preparation. Keep food clean, store it at the right temperature, and cook thoroughly. Keep food refrigerated. If packing a lunch that cant be refrigerated, include an ice pack big enough to keep the food cold until eaten. The intense Florida heat makes food a growing haven for microbes. Dont thaw food on the coun ter because the outside layer will get too warm and be a great host to bacteria. Bacteria degrees, easily the temperatures between your refrigerator and your car. Cook food thoroughly, whether on the grill, stove or oven. Thorough cooking can usually kill the culprits. Un cooked chicken and other meat often have some bacteria that can be killed with thorough cooking. Avoid uncooked eggs, including eggs over easy with runny yokes or raw cookie dough. Careful washing of utensils and countertops used to prepare these foods can pre vent contaminating other foods with the poultrys germs. Leftovers can be tricky. It does not have to smell or look bad to be bad. The Center for Science in the Public Interest food out longer than two hours (in Florida, less time, unless you keep your AC in the Artic containers less than 2-inches deep, and use or freeze leftovers before four days (the sooner the Know the quality of the food where you are eating away from home. Food safety and restaurants are regulated differ ently by each state. To find out the inspection status of your favorite Florida eateries, go to click on Food and Lodging Know your food poisoning dangers Dr. Nancy Rudner Lugo Health Action Jim Govatos Reality Lines

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Page 14 | Thursday, Aug. 15, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer at Winter Park Towers Your room is waiting for you if you need Pain and Symptom Management Hospital Follow-up Complex Treatments, or Crisis Care Referrals 866-742-6655#5019096 www.cornerstonehospice.org www.SeriousIllness.org/cornerstoneMedicare, Medicaid, most commercial insurances accepted 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com r fntbt f rtt ftbt bt bnr nr rt b bb f b tb off trtnCoupon redeemable for cash, check or credit card purchases only. Not redeemable for insurance transactions. Excludes custom/special orders & nutritional supplements. May not be combined with any other discounts. Coupon has no cash value. $10.00 OFF Initial Purchase $100 or more CANADIAN MEDS SAVE UP TO 80% on Prescription Drug PricesORDER by phone No Store Visit required Advair Benicar Celebrex Cialis Crestor Cymbalta Flomax Levitra Lexapro Lipitor Nexium Spiriva Viagra Zetia CALL for a FREE Quote! We Ship Anywhere in the U.S.A. Locally owned & operated. 744 South US Hwy 441 Lady Lake, FL 32159(352) 633-3301 Lets face it, relationships can be tough and some even debilitating. Although relationships are a fundamental aspect of the human experience, our dealings others, co-workers and superiors are often riddled with strife and consternation. In fact, research by Cornell University estimates that there will be a whopping one million divorces in the United States ships are far more than a nuisance, as they can cause anxiety, burnout, clinical depres sion and even physical illness. Whats can undermine your professional success and threaten your livelihood at large. The bottom line is this: the right rela tionships can propel you to great heights of achievement; the wrong ones will tether you to mediocrity and mire you in disap pointment. With this in mind, in striving for rewarding connections with others, its essential to evaluate relationships intel ligently: What makes a great relationship? How do you keep a relationship great? What are the warning signs of trouble? While its so very easy to blame the other person in a distressed relationship, its far more effective to consider and assess the situation objectively and build your Relational IQ. What is Relational IQ? Relational IQ is the mindset that helps us to better un derstand and control our personal and professional relationships to maximize happiness and realize life-changing suc cess. Relationships are an art, and most of us lack the skill and mastery to help break or altogether avoid destructive patterns, disrespect, and deception. Far too many people also lack the ability to have productive connections with othersthose that help you achieve goals, sharpen your mind, and generally uplift and enrich your life. There are, in fact, fundamental princi ples for living and interacting with others in the complex and ever-changing dynam ics of todays culture that, if adhered to, can best assure relational success in all aspects of life at home, in social circles, and in business. Choose not to and suffer the consequences. Naysayers might ask, Is it really possible to master relation proactively apply tactical techniques, that is. To help kick-start your Relational IQ so that you can better navigate, and begin to master, your own personal and profession when seeking a meaningful and genuine relationship that will result in a richer, Dont hide: While secret identities might be fun in the movies, a person who harbors secrets, and hides their fears and beliefs from others will never be able to enjoy an authentic relationship. Being real with others and even making yourself vulnerable from time to time can foster tre mendous emotional connections, including all-important trust, and forge unbreakable bonds. Dont tweak the truth. Studies show certainly no way to start an engagement with a new employer. Whether at work or at home, lying even small white lies will do nothing but undermine and compromise any relationship. Even slightly altering the truth is one of the most destructive forces that can perma nently damage a personal or professional relationship. Understand that a relationship is a journey with changes in direction, twists and turns, and roadblocks along the way. Its impera tive to pass through certain experiences from these situations and create a healthy outcome. Resist the desire to take short cuts or race through certain aspects of a relationship. Even if it is painful or boring, embrace it, knowing that it offers a healthy purpose for the big picture of a relation ship. Dont force it. Theres an old R&B lyric Despite the poor grammar, it is quite in sightful in its simplicity. Relationships that create positive synergy through mutual respect and shared values are worth your investment. Dont repeat the past. The past should to keep looking back. While previous events and actions might be a life lesson, the nature of every journey is to move for ward. Dont repeat those actions that did not produce the intended results; instead, focus on new choices that will affect a more desirable outcome. involve give and take, so it is important to recognize when each relationship could use more of a giving spirit. When we think about what we can do for others instead of what they can do for us, we get to the very heart of healthy, successful interactions. In a strong relationship, both people willingly Mastering the art of healthy relationships A list of 10 donts that destroy life-changing connections at home and work, and tips on how you can avoid them all VAN MOODY Guest writer Please see RELATIONSHIPS on next page

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Aug. 15, 2013 | Page 15 1301 W. Maitland Blvd.407-645-3990www.SavannahCourtMaitland.comAssisted Living Facility License No. 8447 Skilled Nursing Facility License No. 1635096Excellence in Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation Fun, Food, and Entertainment! Music by Alex LoweryCool Off at Savannah CourtsBeach PartyWednesday, Aug. 21 2:00 3:30 p.m. Please RSVP 407-645-3990 BeWellWithin UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT! 50%offyogurtNO SIZE LIMIT EXPIRES 8-31-13 10 delicious rotating avors Over 40 fresh toppings Great atmosphere Free Wi-Fi HOURS SUNDAY-THURSDAY noon 10 p.m. FRIDAY AND SATURDAY noon 11 p.m.513 Park Ave., Winter Park 321-972-8925 ELVIS | Actress joined a convent forever one to take, but being someone who had been catered to, fawned over to have to stand in the rain and wait and be given a grubby job that everyone knew full well I didnt want was more than just the indignity which many face ev ery day of their lives. to move from Hollywood to the monastic life, she tried to explain her reasoning to a show business friend: I might have spent years thinking I exist only because I see my picture in the newspaper, because I am Mrs. So-and-So, be cause I have money rather than knowing that I am because I am related in all my experiences with the forces of life by being obedient to the unifying force that unites This brings us to the bigger Hollywood career for her monas tic vocation because of her pas sion for God. As it developed, she found it leading her deeper and deeper into the monastic life. Oth sions of their love for God, but an authentic faith calls forth a similar shapes our whole lives. She played a critical role in making sure the voice of the sis ters as women got heard. She helped establish many business improvements in the monastery. She helped establish a community theatre in her region where mon astery and town combine forces to produce works of art. She is the only Oscar-voting member of the American Academy of Motion Pictures who is also a nun. For more information on Dolo res Hart and her fascinating story, you may pick up a copy of her visit Regina Laudis website at ti Rev. Jim Govatos currently serves as Senior Pastor at Aloma United Method ist Church located in Winter Park. A former atheist, Jim is passionate about helping people understand and expe rience a living faith in Jesus Christ. Please share your thoughts by emailing him at jimg@alomazone.org C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 13 RELATIONSHIPS | C ONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE give far more than they take. Dont stay in an unhealthy re lationship. Unfortunately, some times we make a poor choice and enter into relationships that will never be healthy no matter what actions are taken. Part of Rela tional IQ is knowing when and how to end a toxic relationship. If someone is not able to accept a change in the status or direc tion, is not loyal and stable under pressure or in the face of chal lenge, or had once been depend able but now is unreliable, these are strong clues that the relation ship may not be worth saving. Dont let feelings of misplaced guilt or sympathy get in the way of making good personal choices. Dont lose personal power. There are situations, particu larly in the work environment, where healthy relationships with unhealthy people are necessary. Developing a higher level of Relational IQ will help to identify those unhealthy people and har ness personal power to not let those people hurt, disrespect, or transmit negativity such that you are affected by these attempts. Instead, personal power can be used to turn the tide on those unhealthy people and maintain your resilience and composure to stay the course. Dont forget who and what really matters. The most valuable people in life arent always the most visible. People of true value tion. All too often, those taken for granted or overlooked are veritable lifesavers or ones that silently help us achieve goals, provide encouragement, or offer important insights and connec tions. Dont accept everyone. The people in your life right now are setting the course for next week, month, year and possibly the rest of your life. Accordingly, selection process for friends and others you choose to surround yourself with. Blocking the wrong people from your life is the only way to make room for the right people who help you achieve your dreams, enrich your lives, and create a happy, satisfy ing life experience. Fundamentally, every rela your life. There are no neutral relationships; each one lifts you up or weighs you down. They move you forward or hold you back. They help you or they hurt you. Only by cultivating your Relational IQ knowing which is which and how to turn the tide on those that are negative can you then take the appropriate action. Not to be taken lightly, these actions and decisions can make the difference between a great, happy life or one that is riddled with disappointment, failure and regret. Field expert Van Moody is the author of The People Factor (an upcoming release by publisher Thomas Nelson) and a motivational speaker who advises on matters related to relationships as they pertain to friends, family, signicant others and the workplace. He is a People Scholar who helps others build their Relational IQ to achieve success at home, in their social circles, and in business. He may be reached online at vanmoody.com www.WPMObserver.com www.WPMObserver.com www.WPMObserver.com www.WPMObserver. com www.WPMObserver.com www.WPMObserver.com www.WPMObserver.com www.WPMObserver.com www.WPMObserver.com www.WPMObserver.com www.WPMObserver.com www.WPMObserver.com www.WPMObserver.com www.WPMObserver.com www.WPMObserver.com www. WPMObserver.com www.WPMObserver.com www.WPMObserver.com www.WPMObserver.com www.WPMObserver.com www.WPMObserver.com www.WPMObserver.com www.WPMObserver. com www.WPMObserver.com www.WPMObserver.com www.WPMObserver.com www.WPMObserver.com www.WPMObserver.com www.WPMObserver.com www.WPMObserver.com www.WPMObserver.com www.WPMObserver.com www.WPMObserver.com www.WPMObserver.com www. 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Page 16 | Thursday, Aug. 15, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer ts a great rule for children in libraries, church services and classrooms. Its also a great rule for parents. Yes, parents. One of the most common problems I hear from stressed moms and dads is this: I feel like Im yelling at my kids all the time. As a counselor and a parent, I have laid down the law for myself and my clients: no screaming, no shouting, no angry tirades. In short, no yelling at your kids. Yelling is for dangerous emergencies. At the sound of your raised voice, your little troublemaker or teenager, should stop dead in his or her tracks, stunned to hear that tone and volume coming from your usually calm and dignified mouth. If your child has heard you shouting every day of their short life, it wont mean anything to them as they are running toward a busy street or reaching for the proverbial hot stove. In addition, a child who is regularly exposed to harshness and yelling is more likely to act out and to struggle with problems like anxiety later in life. [footnote this] Its fairly easy to adopt a no yelling rule. Its a lot harder to keep it. We yell because we are frustrated or angry. We yell because our children have inconvenienced and upset us. We dont yell because we really believe its helpful to them. So here are a few tips to help you stop. Be clear. State your expectations for your children calmly and clearly, including any consequences for disobedience. Please put away all the toys on the floor now. If you cant do that, we wont be able to have our snack. No second, third or fourth chances. Giving kids multiple opportunities just teaches them that you dont really mean what you say which ultimately leads to yelling. If they disobey your clear and reasonable request, they should receive a clear and reasonable consequence the first time. Slow down. When you and your kids are overscheduled, it leads to frustration. Children need more time and sometimes more help to accomplish their tasks than adults do. Dont put them on an adult schedule. You will feel less irritated when you have a few extra minutes instead of not quite enough. Take a deep breath Yelling is an angry emotion. Step back and acknowledge that you are mad. Take stock of what is going on in your own heart. Maybe the kids need a time out. No Yelling! G od doesnt yell at us when we sin against Him, and Heaven knows, our disobedience is at least as disrespectful as our kids. Instead, we grieve Him, and He watches with love for our return. He disciplines us, but never in anger because Jesus has already paid the penalty for everything we have done or will do. Yelling comes from anger and says, I will make you pay. Godly discipline comes from love and says, I will make you beautiful. Thats what we really want for our children, isnt it? W hat can you do to stop yelling at your children (or your spouse or your co workers)? the most common circumstances where you find yourself yelling. When, where, who, why? your habits to make yelling less likely under those circumstances? as you resolve to stop yelling. OurLife OurLife August 2013 OurLife by Louise Holzhauer, MA, LHMC www.dearchristiancounselor.com By Leah Nash In 2011, the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce was awarded grant dollars by the Winter Park Health Foundation to promote and implement workplace wellness to organizations primarily in Winter Park. The Chamber developed the Work Well Winter Park program and its mission: To engage and equip local businesses with practical policies which inspire and create a culture of wellness within the work place. And it worked. Over the past two years, the Work Well Winter Park program, with the support of many community partners, has been able to help dozens of compa nies implement fun, easy policies which encourages healthy choices and changes to the workplace. In 2013, Winter Park Chamber of Commerce President/CEO Patrick Chapin, decided to take it one step further. In an effort to make our community the healthi est place to work, Work Well Winter Park began expanding outside of Winter Park boundaries to include all of Central Florida. Work Well Winter Park has been enthusiastically received by Winter Park-based businesses, says Chapin. Weve tive exposure. Were excited to grow the program beyond our immediate commu nity. What does this mean for Work Well Winter Park? Some minor shifts are going to make a big difference. Work Well Winter Park hopes to add at least 30 additional Central Florida companies to its list of participating teams. An invitation-only breakfast is scheduled this month for CEOs, human resource managers and well ness coordinators to learn more about the program. New teams will be formed and will work closely with Work Well Winter Park Manager Leah Nash to implement 3-5 new or additional poli cies in their workplaces. With over 50 potential policies to choose from, the plan for each team goals. The Chamber is also transforming its Work Well Winter Park website (www.work wellwinterpark.org) to include an online toolkit of valuable resources, a timely blog and examples of wellness in action. Work Well Winter Park teams will also be featured in ongoing Chamber communications and social media efforts as a way to demonstrate how Central Florida companies are embracing workplace wellness. Programs vs. Policies. Implementing policies such as Sweet Free Zones, Healthy Meetings and Providing Emergency CPR/AED training will be the focus of Work Well Winter Park. Although programs, such as weight loss challenges are fun, they do not necessarily inspire lasting change. Workplace policies, in conjunction with leadership buy in, are what truly make a difference in the health of employees. The Work Well Winter Park mission is to engage and equip local businesses with practical policies which inspire and create a culture of wellness in the workplace. Work Well Winter Park is spearheaded by the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce and strives to make our community the healthiest place to work. Visit workwell winterpark.org for more information or contact workwell@winterpark.org. WORK WELL Minor Changes, Big Difference

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Aug. 15, 2013 | Page 17 This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH O RLANDO A VE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.E NZIAN.ORG @EnzianTheater Peanut Butter Matinee Family Film Only $5! THE SECRET OF NIMH Sun 12PM Held Over! BLACKFISH Fri Sun 3:45, 6:30, 9:15 Mon Thu 6:30, 9:15 Ballet on the Big Screen Bolshoi Ballets LA BA Y ADERE Sat 11AM Tonight Aug. 15 Third Thursdays Fashion Lounge at Jai Gallery Youll love these free Third Thursday events at Jai Gallery thanks to the warm welcome from Coralie Claeysen-Gleyzon, who makes you feel part of it all while also enjoying the insider feeling of being on the right side of the red velvet rope. This Thursday features TallyReNee giving us express-myself-viafashion attitude. TallyReNees fun designs are a dynamic mix of vibrant colors, polka dots and s pin-up imagery with a contemporary twist. Its all at Jai Gallery in the Exchange Building jaigallery.net Aug. 16 to Oct. 6 A&H Museums Maitland celebrates Eatonville On Aug. 16, the Art & His tory Museums Maitland opens two exhibits featuring the city of Eatonville. Images of Ea presented in the A&Hs Center Galleries from Aug.16 to Sept. 29, while the exhibit Founding A&Hs Historical Museum from Aug. 16 through Oct. 6. Eaton ville is currently celebrating its 125th anniversary as the oldest incorporated African American municipality in the United States. dHistory.org Aug. 16 to Jan. 5 Eugene Savage: The Seminole Paintings many journeys into the Florida Everglades to study the Semi nole Indians. Over two decades, he created an extensive series of paintings of the Seminoles concern for the plight of their na tive culture. Depicting the way in which tourism and land develop ment threatened their traditional way of life, Savages paintings will be exhibited at the Mennello Museum from Aug. 16 through mennellomuseum.com Aug. 17 and 18 A Passion for Collecting at the Orlando Museum of Art The exhibit opening Aug. present decorative works from outstanding private collections in Florida. A Passion for Col pieces including silver, textiles, furniture and ceramics that showcase craftsmanship from China, Japan, Europe and the United States. The collectors were chosen because each has in-depth knowledge and experience with to sharpen their collectors eye as they observe the qualities it takes to form an outstanding collec the new collection with Associate Curator Jan Clanton followed by an invitation for tea (free with Aug. 18 Divas in Concert fundraiser Six of Floridas most cel ebrated divas will sing Broad way and jazz on Aug. 18 in one extraordinary concert to support the Steinway Society of Central include Michelle Amato, Laura Hodos, Jacqueline Jones, Michelle Mailhot, Suzy Park and Carol Stein. The six celebrated perform ers will sing to help raise money to provide complimentary piano lessons for children in need and for the Societys piano bank, which awards pianos to talented youngsters who cannot afford to purchase them. The event begins at 6 p.m. in the Orlando Museum Aug. 19 Rimma and Friends monics Sounds of Summer Se Bergeron-Langlois leading two octets: Mendelssohns Octet in F major. Both are the products of young genius, and both are considered among the greatest of chamber ensemble works for their melodic beauty. This is some beautiful music played by eight very talented performers, and it Aug. 20 Taverna Opa Orlandos Journey & Savor wine dinner If you saw my review of of these pages, youll understand why their special evening on is showing up in this column. This highly recommended Medi terranean restaurant, celebrated for its vibrant atmosphere, will present a wine dinner pairing with a portion of proceeds donat ed to Pet Rescue by Judy. Priced guests can also learn about the ingredients used to create each of bring on that incredible food, start the Greek line dancing, and Orlando on International Drive visit opaorlando.com Aug. 22 From Learning to Working in Winter Park to 10:15 a.m. on Aug. 22, the Win ter Park Chamber of Commerce will explore From Learning sion moderated by WKMGs Lauren Rowe. The session will celebrate accomplishments and collaborations between educators and business leaders. Panelists include: Dr. Barbara Jenkins, Superintendent, Orange County Public Schools; Dr. Sandra Lyn Jewell, Director, Winter Park Tech; Michael ODonnell, CEO, Ruths Hospitality Group; and Dr. David S. Richard, Dean of Hamilton Holt School, Rollins College. The event will serve as a collection point for A Gift for Teachings Back-to-School Drive. winterpark.org Aug. 24 Orlandos Cultural Season begins Its a fundraiser; its an auc tion; its an art show; its a gala kick-off of Orlandos Cultural Season. It is the Annual Red Chair Affair, and it happens Aug. at the Bob Carr PAC. This unique showcase of performing groups and visual artists is your preview ticket to all things cultural in the coming season. Patrons will enjoy performances by Phantasmago ria, Orlando Aerial Arts, Florida Opera Theatre, Orlando Ballet, Orlando Gay Chorus, Orlando Philharmonic and more. Proceeds participation in arts and culture throughout Central Florida. For tickets, visit RedChairProject.com Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906. Josh Garrick Culture worthy of your calendar 37TH Annual Maitland Rotary Art FestivalOctober 4-6, 2013 Around Beautiful Lake Lily in MaitlandFestival Hours: Friday 6 pm 10 pm, Saturday 10 am 10 pm, Sunday 10 am 5 pm ART the STARSUNDER

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Page 18 | Thursday, Aug. 15, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer Opinions During the decade leading up to the birth of my son, I averaged gle day, an amount equal to the Super Big Gulp cup. Forty-four ounces a day, though some days I went with BP or Mobil, anywhere with a soda fountain. Forty-four ounces a day, and that includes those days when I visited res taurants where only Pepsi was served, and sick days when I couldnt leave bed or even swal low. In fact, when factoring in probably low-balling it. Diet Coke was my brand. I was the college instructor who in hand, who built a Diet Coke policy into his syllabus, whose students commented about Diet Coke on my evaluations and on RateMyProfessor. For several years I wrote a blog called The detailed my odd habits, my pref my argument for plastic cups over Styrofoam, my ideal ice-tosoda ratio. I was Diet Coke. The Diet Coke Guy. Sometime in the past two etly reduced its Super Big Gulp happened, I exploded in mock outrage. I threatened protests and boycotts. I threatened to shop exclusively at Circle K. (I didnt care that much, but the outrage was expected of me. Id written thousand-word essays on Styro foam cups, for crying out loud. If anyone should speak out about Days passed, weeks, months, and my average daily consump months of 2012, matching the new Super Big Gulp cup volume. And when the cup size shrank In one of my kitchen cabinets, of old Super Big Gulp cups. One logo, what I call my rare albino perhaps the last original cup I saved before the stores changed myself using this old cup at my about 50 cents per transaction, which is not insubstantial when considering the totality of my know its an older cup, and they give me winks and head-nods, as if Ive bucked the system by not only getting a cheaper drink, but a larger drink. It should make me feel sneaky, smart. Except now whenever I use the last of the soda. Its a strange thing for me to do, to just call it quits and give up on the drink I used to be the kind of guy who Gulp, who would drink warm ing an afternoon at a sports bar watching the NCAA basketball tournament. Im not sure how to process this. Am I happy because Im con suming less Diet Coke? Certainly its wreaking havoc on my body Or am I sad because this feels like a metaphor for aging, like one of those comments that men pounds heavier than in our meta bolically blessed 20s, and slower, and quickly exhausted just from watching our sons spin around like I remember when I could going days without a Diet Coke. So often, we become the brands with which we identify: the bands we follow, the sports teams, the stores at which we shop. Each, we think, is a critical part of our personality, our own brand (making us, really, a col For a decade, I was the Diet Coke Guy: eccentric, mainstream but not obvious, at odds with the my masculinity (how many Dude, why are you drinking Diet Coke? Worried about your Could my fading addiction be child I no longer have the time me? Thats a nice thought. The other day, I ran into an old friend from college. His wife is pregnant, and I warned him about the upcoming may hem that would soon overtake his house. At one point in the conversation, he asked, Are you invisible cup to his lips, the Diet And I was relieved that I could say, Yeah, you know, I do still say it without real passion. Nathan Holic teaches in Univer sity of Central Floridas Department of Writing & Rhetoric. He can be reached at Nathan.Holic@ucf.edu Though gasoline consump tion has declined over the past few decades, drivers are spend ing more than ever to fuel their daily transportation. According to the U.S. Energy Information Association, the average Ameri can household spent $2,912 on percent of their pre-tax income. But with some simple changes to your driving habits, you can save a few miles per gallon and cut your spending at the pump. Dont ignore your indicators. comes on, its usually for good reason. Yet many drivers ignore these warnings and their fuel economy suffers. For example, if your cars oxygen sensor isnt operating effectively, you can lose And one of the most overlooked causes of wasted gas is an impre cise cooling system. Have your auto technician regularly check the cooling system to ensure it isnt running too cold, which can cause the cars computer to demand more fuel than it needs. ciency by as much as 10 percent. However, new cars only require tune-ups every 100,000 miles so many drivers arent changing wait that long to be changed. Check your owners manual service intervals. Make sure your gas and oil are manufacturer-approved. When choosing the right gas and oil for your car, the owners manual should be your guide. Dont opt for oil thats thicker than recommended it can cause your engine to work less The same is true for gas. If your vehicle requires high-octane fuel and you use a less-expensive ver sion, the cars sensors will detect it and youll lose power and fuel economy. Avoid ethanol. The more ethanol in your gas, the less mileage youll get from each tank. Gas stations are required to post that the fuel can contain up to 10% ethanol (but they arent required to post the exact amount gas stations have less ethanol than others. You can try various with the lowest content and high est mileage. Compare your fuel economy with gas from different stations using a calculator, such as the one at fueleconomy.gov. a local station with the lowest amount of ethanol. Pump up the tires. Keep your ing the owners manual, which will include the manufacturers recommended tire pressure. Its a simple step that can improve fuel Dont speed. As much as we complain about gas prices, its re markable how frequently drivers green or pound on the brakes at stop signs. Youll be surprised how much gas you can save by driving at moderate speeds and avoiding quick acceleration. Michael Heyman is an instructor/ technical team leader at the Orlando campus of Universal Technical Institute, the leading provider of post-secondary education for students seeking careers as professional automotive, diesel, collision repair, motorcycle and marine technician. For more information, visit uti.edu When our children head out to play sports this summer, the pressure to win is so intense; a troubling new local survey reveals 59 percent of young athletes say they expect to get hurt as part of the game. Whats even more surprising local kids polled say coaches, teammates and in some cases even their own parents have tried to make them play injured and even suggested they hurt another player. And 69 percent of young athletes who were hurt say they continued to play hurt, and half of them say they hid their injuries so they could play. The just released local survey hurt playing sports. 59 percent say its part of the game and they expect it. someone will hurt them while playing sports. 11 percent say they were offered gifts or money to hurt another player. The survey was commissioned a youth sports league franchise. The local survey also reveals: 81 percent of those who have friends have thought of them as tough, cool, a good player, or even a hero when they played they were called foul names if they sat out while hurt some by their own moms and dads! Other names were given, but were too graphic to print. 29 percent say they are secretly glad when a player on the other team gets hurt. young players to rough-it-up at all cost? priority is the win over safe play. 16 percent of the respondents said they or their teammates tried to hurt another player. When asked who gave them the idea, percent said their mom or dad, and 11 percent said coaches. dents who said someone made them or tried to make them play while hurt, 52 percent said it was was one of their parents. Im concerned about the di Robert Cantu, renowned neuro surgeon, expert on youth sports safety and acclaimed author of the book, Concussion and our Over the past 20 years or so its all become so serious. Fun no longer seems to be the main object. Now it seems to be about grooming your child to be a star Stop caring about the brands that dene us Getting the most from your tank of gas: Top fuel-saving tips for more efcient driving New survey reveals most kids expect to be hurt or asked to hurt someone else in sports NATHAN HOLIC UCF Forum columnist MICHAEL HEYMAN Guest columnist I9 SPORTS ASSOCIATION Guest columnist

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Winter Park / Maitland Observer | Thursday, Aug. 15, 2013 | Page 19 Chris Jepson Perspectives Louis Roney Play On! Opinions This was last week. Ill let you know what By any metric you research, approxi uninsured. That translates into roughly know someone who lacks access to good healthcare. The reason I contacted Congressman Mica was for him to clearly articulate his plan for providing health care for Floridas uninsured. I completely understand when Re must be that they have better ideas on how to provide healthcare for all Ameri cans. John Mica has been in Congress for more than two decades and has wellknows the importance of all Floridians having comprehensive healthcare. Inter esting that the American Public Health Association evaluated Congressman and gave him then an unremarkable 11 percent approval rating. Congressman Mica has repeatedly op posed Obamacare because as a represen tative of the people he has a plan for pro viding good healthcare and coverage for all. Ill share it with you when I receive I know some do. Really. Congressman Mica, perhaps. But we agree, Americas got problems and we all wonder how best to move forward. Were eye-to-eye there. We part over how to get there. Actually, we part over where to go. Heres a vision: We just keep trying to be better. Better, in the context that life is better for more and more of us. Healthier, hap pier, if you will. And, when we dont entirely succeed, keep trying as Americans to keep after it that life be better, for more of us. John Mica has a vision, as well. There without coverage. This is a perfect forum for Congressman Mica to share how he What kind of America do you want? Free. Mobile. Independent. Safe. Creative. Entrepreneurial. Civic-minded citizens. How do you pursue that vision? It starts with so many things, the good mother and father, nutrition, education, medical care. Where do you invest in America? In the health care of our people. Why would we not at least try to get health care to all Americans? Im afraid, yes, I am. Im afraid that Rolling-us! Were being had. Any day now theyre gonna roll out their big ideas and surprise us all with how Republi cans will cover all Americans. Not with a shovel one hopes. Now if your plan requires time to implement, Congressman Mica, give us your timeframe, please. I will give it a fair Having children is an iffy business, a road with lots of curves and bumps. The trouble with children is that they are people and people come in pack ages labeled every way from Jesus Christ to Al Capone. The terrible school crimes we learn who went to school with your kids and mine. The naughtiest kids probably didnt look any different than anyone else until their faces began to appear on police blotters. Have you ever thought of committing a crime? Maybe something a little more colorful than fudging on your income taxes? Can you even imaging taking someone elses property, or his wife, or his life? To almost all of us, big-time crime is commit it, or become victims of it in our lifetimes thank goodness! Being alone and unprotected can make one fearful of all kinds of imaginary crimes. There were many uneasy mo ments when I found myself alone very late at night walking through deserted parts of New York or London. I lived in New York many years where walking was, and still is, the accepted mode of locomotion. Long hauls were subway trips, and if one had plenty of time, a bus was handy. The prices of pub lic transportation, and especially of using taxis, have all risen precipitously in my day subway and bus rides ranged from a nickel to 50 cents. Presently the price is at $2.50! People who say, Whats to be wor have so many uniformed policemen on in how many houses is tucked away a just to shoot quail! Protection of children perhaps is among our most worthy concerns. I re member that the kidnapping of the Lind with small children afraid to leave their folks like Nancy Grace bring us unhappy scenarios nightly. Todays homes are often supplied with fancy protective electronic devices some that even allow parents to watch My parents used to leave me often at age 8 or 9 to look after my two-year younger sister in Forest Hills, our lonely neighborhood in Winter Park. Our com munity was then almost literally crime less but since I had no gun, I could have done little to protect my sister or myself. I guess most of us kids got used to being in the house without our parents when our parents went out with other parents for the evening. Anyhow, nothing untoward ever happened within memory. But I felt better when my uncle gave me a to get into trouble as they grow older. The by himself is a scary occasion. promise not to drive more than 15 mph! I took Jane Gary to a high school dance at the Winter Park Womens Club. Jane kept looking at me as though she were won dering if I did not know how to shift out of second gear. Jane and I laughed about that incident when I returned to Winter Park to live in 1980, when I was 59. a far cry from my youth, when no kid was allowed to drive more than a bicycle to Winter Park High School! Moving Winter Parks most im portant room What an innovative approach to solv ing the Capen House dilemma. But, what will the name of the next house be? And what will the innovative approach be to move that house? And the one after that? And the one after that? Thats the problem with crisis man agement that doesnt include a long-term solution to the root cause of Winter Parks problem. We need a Preservation Foundation of Winter Park, and we need to set aside a room in the Capen House as the tempo rary headquarters of that foundation. Heres why that room would eventually be viewed as Winter Parks most valuable room... Do you know what Palm Beachers rave about? Winter Park. Palm Beachers ity, historic character, and architectural heritage. We actually have deep-pocketed But, its the historic districts, landmark ing, etc., that allows Palm Beachers to attract multimillions for their properties! Winter Park will continue to be targeted by those with deep pockets and unful we have the guts to put real teeth in our preservation rules backed by a preserva tion foundation as the watchdog. Were determined to become like everywhere else. That will really increase your prop erty value, let me tell you. We devalue our town for all citizens when we allow individuals to view historic architecture as dirt, which is real estate parlance for a teardown candidate. Winter Park residents need to protect the crown jewels of the town. Not on a case-by-case basis as with Casa Feliz and the Capen House, but with preservation protection enacted by the Winter Park City Commissioners ahead of time. Not after the fact. The historic designation of a building shouldnt be determined by a bank. Citi zens shouldnt have to cough up $650,000 to move a house that never should have been viewed as a teardown candidate and stripped of its historic designation in the But, if the Capen House ends up new home, please insist on a silver lining. When the two halves of the Capen House are joined together, make one room the temporary headquarters of the Preservation Foundation of Winter Park. That way, the sum of the parts will far exceed the whole. Will Graves, Founder Friends of Winter Park Through the cracks Growing up and other life-learned fallacies Jepson is a 27-year resident of Central Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.US About Roney: HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney) King Features Weekly ServiceAugust 12, 2013 EDITORIAL CARTOON Letters to the editor Send your thoughts (400 words or less) to Managing Editor Isaac Babcock at ibabcock@turnstilemediagroup.com

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Page 32 | Thursday, Aug. 15, 2013 | Winter Park / Maitland Observer ANNOUNCEMENTS CAKE DECORATING & PASTRY CLASSES: Sofelle Confections offers group and cus tomized classes in all areas of pastry, baking and cake decorating! Contact: Lucy sofelleconfections@bellsouth.net or call (407) 579-1962 www.facebook. com/SofelleConfections Hablamos Espa ol! Winter Park Benefit Shop 140 Lyman Ave, Winter Park needs items to sell: clothing, bedding, jewelry, kitchenware and bric-a brac. Also need ing volunteers. Contact Elizabeth Comer 407-647-8276. Open Tues & Fri at 9:30am; Sat 10am-1pm. All proceeds support childrens programs & the Or lando Blind Association. EDUCATION Can You Dig It? Heavy Equipment Operator Training! 3wks Hands On Training School. Back hoes, Bulldozers, Excavators. National Certification. Lifetime Job Placement As stistance. VA Benefits Eligible. 866-3626497. Medical Office Trainees Needed! Become a Certified Medical Office Assis tant! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training at SC gets you job ready! HS Di ploma/GED PC/Internet needed! 1-888374-7294. HELP WANTED Driver Trainees Needed NOW! Become a driver for Werner Enterprises. Earn $800 per week! Local CDL Training. 877-214-3624 CAREGIVER for my 104 Year Mother Winter Park Lovely home Lake Sue. Weekdays 8a4p. Monday-Friday. Must lift/transfer (5#) through the day. Light whole meals. Supplemental tube feeding. Housekeeping/Cleaning. Sedan not SUV take to doctors. Non-smoker. Pet friendly. Quiet house. CNA or comparable. Best Caregiving References. Rosemary Huffman 317 506 4400 after 10am rosemail@comcast.net Now hiring: Class A-CDL Drivers $2500 Sign -On Bonus, Great Pay, Full Benefits, and Achievable Bonuses! Call us now at 1-800-973-9161 or apply at www.heyl. net Personal Care Workers ($10/hr) and Homemakers ($9.50/hr) Pool positions, Mon Fri, Orange and Seminole County areas. PCW requires current CNA or HHA and CPR certifica tions. In person at 5395 L.B. McLeod Road, Orlando 32811, Fax 407-2922773, E-mail HR@seniorsfirstinc.org Closes 8/21/13 DFWP/EOE/AA/E-Verify MISCELLANEOUS ADOPT: A childless couple seeks to adopt. Loving home with tenderness, warmth, happiness. Financial security. Expenses paid. Regis & David (888)986-1520 or text (347)406-1924; www.davidandreg isadopt.com -Adam B. Sklar FL# 0150789 Nurturing, single woman will provide stable home/support of large, extended family. Lets help each other. Financial security. Expenses paid. Deborah, toll-free (855)-779-3699. Sklar Law Firm, LLC FL Bar #0150789 MISCELLANEOUS Airline Careers begin here! Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Finan cial aid for qualified students. Job place ment assistance. Call AIM 866-3143769. PROFESSIONAL SERVICE Cleanerella Maid Services WE CLEAN FOR YOU!! Commercial and Residential servicing. Call Catherine Adam 321-356-8160. cadam1959@ya hoo.com REAL ESTATE: COMMERCIAL AUCTION August 28th Beech Mountain, NC. Commercial Prop erty; 1.68 +/acres. Former: Ski shop; gift shop; (3) apartments; 10,500 +/sqft. Great location. www.RogersAuc tionGroup.com. 800-442-7906. NCAL#685 For LeaseLakemont @ Howell Branch Attractive new building -professional space for lease @ very competitive rates. Schedule a tour today!! Three suites @1,335 sf!. Frank Ricci, 407-947-5074 Fricci@cfl.rr.com OFFICE FOR RENTWINTER PARK Executive office available in prestigious bank building. Approximately 10 x 12 with windows on two sides. Additional space available for assistant, now or lat er, at additional charge. Aloma and Lake mont Avenues. 24-hour access. Mini mum one year term. Broker. $500 per month. Lou Nimkoff, 407-405-3368 office@briofl.com Offices for Rent Winter Park Real Estate Offices for rent (Winter Park/Goldenrod/University). Doc tors office w/5 exam rooms + extra fea tures. Other office units available from 800-3000 SF. New Orleans style bldg; great prices. Call Ann 407-293-1934. an npolasek@cfl.rr.com SANFORD: Free standing retail/office building, 2640 SF, great signage & visibility. Lease for $2800 per month (also for sale). Call John, owner/broker, 407-492-7111 REAL ESTATE: FOR SALE Mobile Homes with acreage. Ready to move in. Seller Financing with approved credit. Lots of room for the price, 3BR/2BA. No renters. 850-3086473. LandHomesExpress.com REAL ESTATE: FOR SALE OWNER MUST SELL! Beautifully wooded homesite located next to crystal clear mountain lake, WISP Ski area and brand new golf Courseonly $79,900. Adjoining lot sold for $249,900. Bank will finance. Call 301-387-8100, x 91 SALES: GARAGE HUGE RUMMAGE SALE! Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd, 331 Lake Ave., Maitland Friday, Oct. 4th & Saturday, Oct. 5th, 8 am to 4 pm From Hwy. 17-92, go west one block on Lake Ave; church is on the right immediately after railroad tracks. Phone: (407) 6445350 Sunday, August 18th: 1913 Waldo Street, Orlando FL 32806 3 BR | 2 BA | 1,428 SF | $259,000 Light and bright home nestled between large, shady oak trees on a quiet street. Tile flooring and volume ceilings through out all living areas, brand new carpet in the bedrooms and nice sized kitchen with island and eat in area! Master bedroom features French doors that lead out to a patio overlooking the spacious, fenced backyard. Great location, just minutes from Downtown Orlando! Hosted by: Jennifer Sloan from 2-4 PM 1099 N. Park Avenue, Winter Park FL 32789 4 BR | 5 BA | 5,706 SF | $2,199,000 Elegant brick home located in the heart of Winter Park! The lovely formal living room features a gas fireplace, dining room has a wonderful view of Park Avenue and leads into the butlers pantry and wine closet. Spacious chefs kitchen opens up to the family room and breakfast nook ~ all with pool views. The large family room displays a fireplace with gorgeous wood floor-to-ceiling mangle and built-in entertainment center. The first floor mas ter suite has French doors leading to the pool, gas fireplace, a luxurious bathroom with spa tub, dual vanities and walk-in travertine shower! Extras include a bonus room, office/den, four car garage, sum mer kitchen, spa and sparkling pool. Hosted: Rhonda Chesmore from 2-5 PM 4141 Gabriella Lane, Winter Park FL 32792 sold by Sherri Dyer 883 Moonluster Drive, Casselberry FL 32707 sold by Jennifer King 559 Park North Court, Winter Park FL 32789 sold by Cyn Watson 2165 Falmouth Road, Maitland FL 32751 sold by Jennifer King 1621 Chippewa Trail, Maitland FL 32751 sold by Padgett McCormick 1320 Golfview Street, Orlando FL 32804 sold by Jennifer Sloan 1600 Green Cricket Court, Apopka FL 32712 sold by Kelly Price & Company 644 Gaines Way, Winter Park FL 32789 sold by Patrick Higgins 140 Cortland Avenue, Winter Park FL 32789 sold by Pamela Ryan 1729 Elizabeths Walk, Winter Park FL 32789 sold by Jennifer Sloan & Jennifer King 217 W. Yale Street, Orlando FL 32804 sold by Padgett McCormick 1014 Dunraven Drive, Winter Park FL 32792 sold by Gwyn Clark 9540 Silver Buttonwood Street, Orlando FL 32832 sold by Gwyn Clark 501 S. Lakemont Avenue, Winter Park FL 32792 sold by Julie Bombardo Jeff and Barbara Friedman, 381 Perth Lane, Winter Park $290,000. 08/06/2013 Jeff and Barbara Friedman, 2927 Montfichet Ln, Winter Park $247,000. 08/07/2013 Kelly Maloney, 2098 Majestic Woods, Apoka $245,000. 08/02/2013 Patty Munsey, 4308 Corrine Dr, Orlando $271,000. 08/06/2013 Cathy Richey, 1898 Turnberry Ter, Orlando $320,000. 08/09/2013 Elizabeth Manno 1659 Hanks Ave, Orlando $285,000.08/12/2013 Patty Munsey, 4067 Tenita Dr, Winter Park $275,000. 08/12/12013 SUNDAY 12-3 NEW LISTING! CHARMING WINTER PARK BUNGALOW 1481 Harmon Avenue, Winter Park. 3BD/2BA, 1,705SF. Charming 1926 bun galow features 3BD/2BA main house and 1BD/1BA detached guest suite/art ist studio. Quaint brick front sidewalk leads you to cute front porch! Freshly painted inside and out, this home boasts hardwood floors, French doors, adorable kitchen, upstairs utility, remodeled bath room with Jacuzzi tub and relaxing back patio/courtyard. $299,000 SUNDAY 1-4 NEW PRICE! GREAT OPPORTUNITY TO LIVE IN DOWN TOWN WINTER PARK 557 Osceola Avenue, Winter Park. 5BD/4.5BA, 2,911SF. Walk to Park Av enue and walk to Rollins College! Home on the Winter Park Historic Register. Dutch colonial home with all systems updated. Attached two car garage, hard wood floors, wood burning fireplace and a basement. Eat-in space in kitchen. $649,000 SATURDAY & SUNDAY 1-4 NEW LISTING! BEAUTIFUL HOME IN DESIRABLE NEIGH BORHOOD 1811 Winchester Drive, Winter Park. 4BD/2.5BA. 2,733SF., Quiet neighbor hood with wide, tree-lined streets. Home features large, bright living spaces, hard wood floors, wood burning brick fire places, and large eat-in kitchen. Built ins, vaulted ceilings, lush landscaping, and bonus tree fort. Plenty of room for pool or expansion! $579,000 WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com Order your classified ad online! At WPMObserver.com you can create, customize and pay for your ad in one convenient place! OBSERVER Just Sold Homes OBSERVER Open Houses The Marketplace MindGymAugust 12, 2013 MindGymAugust 12, 2013 MindGym August 12, 2013