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Winter Park-Maitland observer ( 07-04-2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00242

Material Information

Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park FL
Publication Date: 07-04-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates: 28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID: UF00091444:00272

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00242

Material Information

Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park FL
Publication Date: 07-04-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates: 28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID: UF00091444:00272


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WPMOBSERVER.COM Reaching rubber-gloved hands through the arm-sized holes of the thick plastic incuba tor walls, a Winnie Palmer NICU nurse cups the wire-laden crown of newborn baby Kevin Skoogs head with her left hand. Her right places a stethoscope on Kevins peach-fuzz covered back, check ing the rhythm of his teeny-tiny heart. Basking in the warmth of the incubators warm yellow spot light, premature born Kevin nicknamed Peanut by his par ents for his small size uses his his mouth while the nurse works. Between the purple plastic of the shades covering his eyes and thick tube settled in under his nose, the only distinguishable characteristic above Kevins shoulders are wisps of light brown hair sticking out from forehead. Kevin is one of a decreasing number of premature born ba bies needing care from Orlan dos Winnie Palmer Hospital for Women and Babies Neonatal In tensive Care Unit (NICU). From 2011 to 2012, the number of late pre-term babies being born and needing stays in the NICU have dropped by 50 percent. Winnie Palmer doctors credit the drop to hard-stop guidelines restricting early elective deliveries (EED), which has helped moms deliver healthier babies. That means 50 percent less NEW BANK IDEA: LENDING OVER A GLASS OF WINE LIFESTYLES, 7 Winter Parks nail-biter Diamond Dawgs escape defeat, heading into Independence Day games at the ballpark. SPORTS, 6 Its hammertime This 71-year-old lady is a project leader who loves wielding tools for Habitat for Humanity. CENTRAL FLORIDA SENIOR, B2 Stay cool on July 4 Our Calendar has lots of hot outdoor fun, but the cool tip is the Morse Museums free day. CULTURE, B12 COMMUNITY BULLETIN ............ 4 LIFESTYLES .................... 7 CALENDAR .................... 9 OPINIONS .................... 12 CLASSIFIEDS .................. 28 CULTURE .................... B12 Winter Park Recovery CenterExecutive Drug & Alcohol Treatment Protocols Sinclair Method of Alcohol Extinction Suboxone/Subutex For Opioid Abuse Chantix For Smoking CessationPsychiatrist Supervised Dual Diagnosis Evidenced Based Programs2056 Aloma Ave, Suite 100, Winter Park, FL 32792www.WinterParkRecoveryCenter.com 407-629-0413 Winter Parks young athletes lins College development project in Martin Luther King Jr. Park a move that could grow recreation al sports in the city. Rollins College presented the plan last Wednesday before the citys Parks and Recreation Advi sory Board, which approved it on the grounds that both the college relocated to an adjacent property. It could be a great thing, said Parks and Recreation De partment Director John Holland. moting more youth sports, and hopefully it will be a win-win for us, Rollins and the kids. Thats what were all about, Residents would now have a Martin Luther King Jr. Park, giv scheduling youth recreational sports. But before the project moves forward, the city and Rollins Col lege have to negotiate several As Lt. Ralph Palmer walked through the epicenter of Tomoka State Correctional Institution in between barbed wire buf months ago, armed with only his ID badge and embroidered Mai tland Police Department polo, he knew hed made a mistake. I cant imagine what was go ing through the minds of those people who were looking at me, other than that I was going to be their dinner, Palmer said. For the 10 times he visited months, his police-labeled polo never entered the gates with him. I probably still looked like a cop, but I tried not to anyway, he said. A year ago, Police Chief Doug Ball presented Palmer with a old rescue vehicles into a new police mobile command center, lars. found an answer to the chiefs seemingly impossible assign ment in the prison yards of To koma. With the help of PRIDE Prison Rehabilitative Indus es Inc. and $86,000 in seized drug money, Palmer debuted the completed mobile command center last month. Inside and out, inmates took the old truck and tricked it out into a state-of-the-art crimewatch vehicle to serve as a mo bile communication hub for the PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVER Police Chief Doug Ball offered residents a tour of the citys new mobile command center June 24, showing off its high-tech interior. Please see COMMAND on page 2 Inmates, drug money fuel new police unit Prisoners learn skills while building Maitlands mobile command center SARAH WILSON Observer Staff Growing access to rec sports Rollins could make it possible for more kids and adults to play on Winter Park fields TIM FREED Observer Staff Please see RECREATION on page 2 Please see DELIVERY on page 2 Local docs ght to end risky elective deliveries BRITTNI JOHNSON Observer Staff

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Page 2 families leaving their babies in the hospital when they go home, and half as many moms sleep ing in chairs waiting to see their newborns, said registered nurse Lorraine Parker, the administra tor for patient care at the hospital, and one of the people leading the change against unnecessary EEDs at Winnie Palmer. Its the right thing to do for the baby, she said. There are too The guidelines aim to stop the trend of the induction of labor as early as the 37th week of preg nancy 40 weeks being full-term. For the past 20 years, moms and doctors have chosen to induce labor early for the sake of conve nience, because the new grand the mother just cant take the back pain and misery pregnancy can cause, among other reasons. New research shows, though, that waiting until full-term is important to the babys develop ment, and several national health organizations involved in mater nity and delivery, including the March of Dimes and the American Academy of Pediatrics, are calling on hospitals across the country to institute their own EED policies. Vital organs including the brain and lungs are still grow of pregnancy, said Karen Harris, M.D., who is the incoming pro gram services chair for the March of Dimes Florida Chapter, which offers a tool kit to help hospitals start the policy in their own deliv ery rooms. For healthy moms, waiting un til full-term and letting spontane ous, natural delivery happen is the way to go, Harris said. It allows the babys brain to tial, she said. Late pre-term deliveries hold several risks for babies, including asthma, ADD, feeding problems, a longer stay in the hospital and even admittance to the NICU. It also increases the risk of the mother having to have a cesarean section, which is major surgery re quiring a longer hospital stay. At Winnie Palmer, which is the countrys second busiest labor and delivery hospital, when doc tors want to induce their patients at the 37-38 week time period, the mom and baby must meet certain criteria that deem it medically necessary. If mom doesnt want to do an EED but the doctor does, they must discuss it with another physician to get permission. As a result of tightening those guidelines, Winnie Palmer has re duced their EEDs for non-medical reasons to less than seven percent consistently, with a goal of three percent for the future. While many moms deliver just there are some babies who need tors at Winnie Palmer dont want to take for families. Just having a premature baby has a tremendous emotional im pact on families, said Dr. Gregor Winnie Palmer. the families and community to pay for the care of the early ba bies. The recent reduction in Win nie Palmers NICU admittance rate from 2011 to 2012 has saved the community nearly $1 million. Parker and Harris believe end ing EEDs will become the norm for labor delivery hospitals in the tients need to learn more about The key is education, Parker said. Max Your Macs LLCApple Certied Consultants www.maxyourmacs.com iPad, iPhone, Mac, Cloud & More TAKE COMMAND WITH MAX APPLE TIPS Even though you drag items to the Trash Can when you are nished with them doesnt mean they are gone. You still need to empty the Trash Can just like in the real world. Fortunately, its much easier on your Mac! From the Finder Menu Bar, go to Finder > Empty Trash to permanently delete the les in your trash can. is cannot be undone so be sure you really want to delete all the les in your Trash Can before emptying. To minimize the chances of your trash ever being recovered, use the Secure Empty Trash option. is will take longer but the security of your unwanted les will be maximized .TAKE OUT THE TRASH Empty to delete KEEP UP WITH MAITLAND NEWS AND EVENTS!www.IndependenceLane.com Facebook.com/ItsMyMaitland US SAVINGS BONDS OWNERS ALERT!Learn how government changes in the savings bond program could adversely aect you and your investment. Getting the most out of your Savings Bonds THREE DATES THREE LOCATIONS JULY 9 WINTER PARK: Herndon Library 4324 E Colonial Drive, Orlando, FL 32803 Tuesday, July 9, 12:30 pmJULY 11 OVIEDO: IHOP Restaurant 17 Alafaya Woods Blvd., Oviedo, FL 32765 Thursday, July 11, 10 amJULY 16 UCF Area: Alafaya Branch Library 12000 E. Colonial Drive, Orlando, FL 32826 Tuesday, July 16, 2:30 pm Each attendee is eligible to receive a FREE personalized Bond Statement! Please call 407-610-6100 to reserve your seats. Seating is limited.Sponsored by:AMERICAS INCOME PROTECTORS A Division of e AIP Group, LLC police department during ongo ing case investigations. From missing persons to homicides the command center will help the police department improve its onscene services. Palmer designed the truck and made weekly trips to Toko ma prison in Volusia County to oversee PRIDE workers, inmates serving sentences from two years to life. Jeff Bennett, industry man ager for PRIDE at Tokoma, said the program helps rehabilitate in that will serve them when theyre back on the outside, and provides law enforcement divisions na tionwide with low-cost labor in a wide range of industries. When they get out theyre hopefully get jobs and wont end up back in, Bennett said. Its a win-win really. When the vehicle was present ed to the Maitland City Council at their meeting last month, Council members said they were equally as impressed with the outcome as Palmer was when he watched the PRIDE workers in action. rience, Palmer said. Those are people whove made mistakes, and theyre paying for them, but I learned that theyre some very talented people in our prison sys tem. And after sending the truck some tweaks, this week, Palmer said, the Maitland-emblazoned command center is ready to hit the streets. COMMAND | C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE terms, including how the use of public and the schools teams. The issue of funding is also be ing discussed, with the city and the college negotiating who will pay for the majority of the $5 mil lion to $6 million project. Rollins College and City Man ager Randy Knight have also been The material would support rougher sports like lacrosse. A few years ago when we had some lacrosse camps during see the damage, Holland said. Weve learned how to deal with the damage and weve learned how to adjust, so if we got an would be a wonderful thing. Lacrosse teams being able to seven days a week would grow the sport in the Orlando area, Hol land said. If we can have access to a kids. said Parks and Recreation Board Member Joel Roberts. The project will be up for ap proval by the City Commission in August. To learn more about Winnie Palmer Hospital for Women and Babies, visit orlandohealth.com/winniepalmerhospital. To learn about the March of Dimes and what the organization is doing to end early elective deliveries, visit marchofdimes.com To learn more about PRIDE Enterprises and the services it offers inmates and law enforcement, visit pride-enterprises. org RECREATION | New artificial turf would withstand lacrosse and other tough sports C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE DELIVERY | Babies born naturally have much lower need for newborn intensive care C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVER Under the warmth of a lamplight, newborn Kevin Skoog rests in the NICU at Winnie Palmer Hospital, where doctors now avoid elective early births, leading to healthier babies. PHOTO BY TIM FREED THE OBSERVER Current natural grass elds take months to grow back after the brutal lacrosse season.

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Page 3 338 W. MORSE BOULEVARD COMMERCIAL LEASING INFORMATION655 W. MORSE BOULEVARD P.O. Box 350 Winter Park, FL 32790-0350 P: 407.644.3151 www.Sydgan.com Winter Park City Talk BY RANDY KNIGHT CITY MANAGER City Hall closed Please note that Winter Park City Hall will be closed and all Waste Pro services will not be pro vided Thursday, July 4, in obser vance of Independence Day. Reg ular services will resume on the reopen at 8 a.m. on Friday, July 5. The city of Winter Park wishes ev eryone a safe and happy Indepen dence Day. Dont forget: Olde Fashioned 4th of July fun! The city presents the 18th an nual Olde Fashioned 4th of July Celebration on Thursday, July 4, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Central Park. Mayor Ken Bradley will lead a special presentation at 9:15 a.m. from the main stage. The annual celebration will feature live patri otic music performed by the Bach Festival Brass Band and Bach Fes tival Choir, horse-drawn wagon rides, Orlando Cloggers, Rockin Roadster Road Show and much more! Childrens activities will in clude the annual bicycle parade at 9 a.m. (lineup begins at 8:30 a.m.) from City Hall to Central Park, as Free hot dogs, watermelon and water will available for all to en joy, while supplies last. In addition, The Charles Hos mer Morse Museum of American Art will present its Independence Day Open House where admis sion is free to its galleries from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information about our celebration, please call 407599-3463. Law enforcement crack down this holiday weekend Most Americans may not re alize it, but the Fourth of July is one of the deadliest holidays of the year due to alcohol-impaired driving crashes. According to the Administration, 392 people were crashes during the Fourth of July holiday in 2010. Of those fatali ties, 39 percent more than 150 people were in crashes that involved at least one driver or motorcycle operator with a blood alcohol concentration of .08 or higher. The Winter Park Police De partment, along with other law in force conducting saturation pa trols looking for impaired drivers. No warnings. No excuses. Driv ing impaired will get you arrest ed. Not just this holiday, but every day please always remember to drive safely. July 8 City Commission meeting There will be a City Commis sion meeting on Monday, July 8, at 3:30 p.m. in City Hall Commis sion Chambers, located at 401 S. Park Ave. Below are a few topics of interest. Please visit city web site for the most current agenda: Mayors Report Art in Chambers pepper (Bright House Networks) retirement City Managers Report Non-action items Consent Agenda 6/24/13. tracts (for a complete listing, visit cityofwinterpark.org/ccpackets). costs related to the red light cam era hearing program. Public hearings nance annexing the right of way of Aloma Avenue from 2015 Alo ma Ave. east to the city limits and the right of way of Balfour Drive from Amsden Road south to the city limits. nance authorizing the conveyance of the city-owned property at 645 Symonds Ave. in exchange for the property located at 813 W. New England Ave. nance amending Section 1-7 to amend the penalty for violating municipal ordinances to comply with state law. dinance renaming the portion of Loch Lomond Drive between Glenwood Drive and Mizell Av enue as North Edinburgh Drive and renaming that section of Ed inburgh Drive between Mizell Av enue and Dundee Drive as South Edinburgh Drive. Hospital: for the parking garage as ap proved in the Winter Park Memo rial Hospital master plan. sions full agenda on the home page of cityofwinterpark.org un der Whats New > City Commis sion Agenda. Easier green payment options The city of Winter Park is pleased to announce its new elec tronic billing and payment service powered by Payment Service Net work, Inc. (PSN). By implement ing the latest technology, the city will provide several easy payment options for utility customers with no convenience fee. Customers participating in online billing will a link to the PDF of their actual bill when it is ready for viewing. Bills can also now be viewed on line which will save printing and mailing costs. In order to reduce costs and paper usage, utility customers are encouraged to opt out of receiving paper bills and use eBill which is a free service. This new online billing and payment service complements the citys efforts to be environmentally-conscious. If customers prefer paper bills, they can still pay electronically by paying online, via mobile app available mid-July, or by calling rent balances are posted daily so customers can see how much they owe by going online or using the new mobile app. Customers can now review their accounts and pay from the comfort of their homes, 24 hours a day, seven days a week, using one of the following options: 1. Log on to cityofwinterpark. org and click on pay your utility bill button. 2. Download WP BillPay mobile app for Android, Win dows or iPhone app (available in mid-July) 3. Call the toll-free, automated phone service at 1-877-885-7968 (English and Spanish languages) 4. Pay by eCheck, VISA, Mas tercard or Discover (customers can pay immediately, schedule a payment, or set up recurring pay ments) Security of online information is a top concern of the city. One of the reasons PSN was chosen is by the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard, the high est degree of security awarded by the industry. PSN specializes in providing billing, payment and communication services to util ity companies and municipalities. They are a pioneer in the online please call PSNs toll-free help line at 1-866-917-7368. Visit the citys ofcial website at cityofwinterpark.org, like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and watch us on Vimeo.

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Page 4 UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT! 50%offyogurtNO SIZE LIMIT EXPIRES 8-31-13 10 delicious rotating avors Over 40 fresh toppings Great atmosphere Free Wi-Fi HOURS SUNDAY-THURSDAY noon 10 p.m. FRIDAY AND SATURDAY noon 11 p.m.513 Park Ave., Winter Park 321-972-8925 Probate, Wills & Trusts including Elder Law Issues P.A. Practice Areas: Family Law including RemovalAFFORDABLE ADVOCACY WITH A PASSION FOR JUSTICE MENTION THIS AD & RECEIVE A FREE 1-HOUR CONSULTATION, A $100 VALUE!641 W. Fairbanks Avenue, Suite 110 Winter Park, Florida 32789407.622.5020www.LomasLawPA.com Christine Lomas, Esq. Gary Miller, Esq.e hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely on advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you ee wrien information about our qualications and experience. Observer Ad-LomasLaw.indd 1 5/14/13 4:14 PM This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORG @EnzianTheater Florida Film Festival Hit Returns BIG STAR: NOTHING CAN HURT ME Sun 12:30pm Cult Classics THIS IS SPINAL TAP Tue 9:30pm Only $5 Held Over! MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING Fri Sun 3:30, 6:30, 9:30 Mon, Wed, Thurs 6:30, 9:30 Tue 6:30 only Ballet on the Big Screen Bolshoi Ballets ROMEO AND JULIET Sat 11am Business Briefs Community Bulletin Winter Park department nalist The American Academy for Park and Recreation Administration in partner ship with the National Recreation and Park Association, has announced that the Parks & Recreation Department of Winter Park is a nalist for the 2013 National Gold Medal Awards for Excellence in Park and Recreation Management. Child cardiac care The Johns Hopkins Childrens Heart Surgery program at Florida Hospital for Children recently launched to provide comprehensive cardiac surgery care. The program will give Florida children access to a top-notch surgical team and the new est treatment approaches. New Mental Health professionals The Orlando VA Medical Center has hired 35 mental health professionals to improve mental health services for veter ans, service members and their families. Hospice needs volunteers VITAS Innovative Hospice Care of Central Florida needs volunteers who can be friend terminally ill patients provide relief for weary caregivers, accompany their pet on Paw Pals visits, visit with veterans, provide art and music therapy, make bereavement calls, sew Memory Bears or garment bags, knit/crochet af ghans, make crafts, help repair medical equipment and more. Call 407-691-4541 or e-mail central.oridavolunteers@vitas. com for more information. Baylor grads Baylor University grad Emily Ann Fuller has earned a masters degree in taxation. Anna T. Reiman earned a bachelors de gree in business administration. Alexan der Steven Janos graduated from Han kamer School of Business. Villanova grads Wesleigh Donadio from Winter Park earned a Bachelor of Arts degree. Sara Weldon also from Winter Park, earned a bachelors in business administration. Housing for families On May 31, Jason W. Searl of law rm GrayRobinson was among a group of Heart to Heart, a Community Care Home, Inc volunteers and partners as the ribbon on a new housing project for low-income families was cut. The organization pro vides housing and support so women become self-sufcient and are able to live in the community independently with their children. Developing history Terry Mueller, CEO of Winter Park-based website and SEO company, Webtasks, is pleased to announce that Ian Carfag na founder and application developer, has joined Sanford Historic Trust. While working with Sanford Historic Trust, Carfagna will share his talents for web site development and marketing with the organization to improve outreach efforts. Brokering industry NAI Realvest has appointed veteran real estate broker Jason G. Toll to director of its industrial services group. Nonprot gets ofcial Bcenter.com a global stroke resource center serving stroke survivors and their families, has named a medical director, board of directors and advisory coun cil members. The volunteer leadership of the Winter Park based nonprot will drive philanthropic endeavors to sup port the discovery of new and existing treatments options and technologies related to stroke prevention and recov ery. The nonprot was started by former businesswoman Valerie Greene who overcame paralysis and an inability to speak after suffering a stroke at age 31. Shes now an author and motivational speaker. MAITLAND PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVER Fruits hit the market stands at the Maitland Farmers Market June 30. FARMERS MARKET

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Page 5 Although the city of Maitland is a small community that enjoys a relatively low crime rate, we have is much larger than our residen tial population. The city of Mait land is located in the center of the Orlando Metropolitan Statistical area, having a population of more than 2.1 million, and is adjacent to the city of Orlando that has a na tionally recognized violent crime problem. Our city also has several as high risk by the Department of Homeland Security including and the Jewish Federation of Or lando. The Maitland Police Depart ment recently added a state of the art mobile command vehicle spond to any major incident. The worth telling. With the cost of building a mobile command vehi lion dollars, budgeting for such a spending any taxpayer money; in fact, it was paid for completely with money seized from criminal activity and was constructed by prison inmates. The Maitland Police Depart ment partners with federal law enforcement agencies that include the FBI, DEA, IRS and the United States Secret Service. This partner ship not only acts as a force multi hand-and-hand with our federal law enforcement counterparts, it also gives our agency the ability of forfeited money, vehicles and real property seized during longterm criminal investigations. The truck used as the basis for the mobile command vehicle is a 2003 Ford F-450 Super-Duty. The vehicle was originally at the Maitland Fire Department serv truck reached its term in that ca pacity, Police Chief Doug Ball and then Fire Chief Ken Neuhard ap proached the CITY MANAGER police department had a portable ment had a truck that the police needed. Mr. Williams agreed with the two department heads and the rest, as they say, is history. The mobile command vehicle was constructed by PRIDE (Pris on Rehabilitative Industries and is a nationally recognized inmate training company operating ag riculture, sewn products, graph ics, manufacturing and services facilities throughout the state of Florida. PRIDE operates 41 train ing centers providing work and training to inmates in 29 state correctional facilities. PRIDE is tion founded in 1981 by the state propriated funding from govern ment. All programs are operated through sale of goods, with prof its from work programs being re invested to further PRIDEs Mis sion. In this case, the work was completed by inmates at Tomoka State Prison in Volusia County. As a part of the incident com mand structure, a mobile com mand post is a necessity. The tra ditional ways of organizing the command post from the trunk of a patrol car or the hood of a deserves, and should expect, a professional and organized emer gency response. The Maitland Police Department is prepared to handle any critical incident with the highest level of trained and facilitate the needs of the commu nity and the organization. Lt. Ralph Palmer Maitland Police Department WINTER PARK VILLAGE Maitland City Talk BY HOWARD SCHIEFERDECKER MAYOR Maitland Police Department adds mobile command vehicle to its eet PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVER

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Page 6 Daniel Sweets double put the Diamond Dawgs in the lead, and Joshua Glicks wicked sidearm kept things that way as the Daw gs beat the DeLand Suns 3-2 in a tense game June 28. With the help of some headsup play by Michael Danner and aggressive running by Orlando Rivera, the Dawgs came back af ter being tied by the Suns. After their go-ahead run, Glick struck out two in 1.1 innings in a com bined nine-strikeout effort by the Dawgs pitching staff. Winter Park slipped a bit in the past week, but with the win avoid ed being caught up in a three-way tie in the middle of the Florida Collegiate Summer League ladder with the Leesburg Lightning (108) and Sanford River Rats. The River Rats (10-9) have had their ups and downs the last few games, blowing out College Park 15-3 and 7-1 in back to back games, but falling to the Orlando Monarchs 3-1 on June 28. The big blowout game was actually a 4-3 nailbiter until the eighth, when the Rats bats went red hot and scored 11 runs in the Rock Rucker blasted two two-run homers in the game to help give the Rats a boost. Matt Dearden got an unusual save, coming in dur ing the seventh inning to hold on to a one-run lead, only to watch needing a save. He closed it out on the mound with a 2.1 inning, three-strikeout performance. Winter Park (10-8) will try to keep things going after a game at press time. They take on Sanford at 7 p.m. on July 3 at Alfond Stadi um in Winter Park. For some old fashioned ballpark fun on July 4 theyll play the College Park Free dom at 1 p.m. at Bishop Moore High School. Maitland Coin & Currency Showat theMaitland Civic Center 641 South Maitland Avenue, Maitland, FL 32751FREE ADMISSIONShow open to the public Buy Sell AppraisalsFor more information call or visitOrlando Coin Exchange 6301 S. Orange Avenue Orlando, FL 32809www.MaitlandCoinShow.comorlandocoinexchange@gmail.com407-730-3116 SUNDAY, July 7th9:00 AM TO 5:00 PM Free coin for all children 12 and under 7 SUN NEW SPRING MERCHANDISE! Dawgs win nail-biter to keep climbing in league standings ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff SENDING AN ARTIST TO GREECE PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVER Photographer and Observer columnist Josh Garrick, right, stands with editor Isaac Babcock, center, and National Archaeological Museum of Greece in Athens director George Kakavas at a fundraiser June 29 to help send Garricks work to his upcoming exhibition there.

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Page 7 Lifestyles For additional information, call 407-644-8281 or visit experienceparkavenue.com. Thursday, July 11 Sunday, July 14 Enjoy savings up to at your favorite Park Avenue merchants! Presented by: Supported by: Join the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce for its monthly breakfast program Featuring Deanne Gabel General Manager The Alfond Inn at Rollins College Come for a morning of coffee and conversation. Meet and greet with the general manager and senior management at Winter Parks new boutique inn. Learn how the inn will support the Winter Park community, local businesses and student scholarships for years to come. Friday, July 12, 2013 7:45 a.m. Networking/ 8:15 a.m. Program WINTER PARK WELCOME CENTER 151 W. Lyman Avenue, Winter Park, FL 32789 A complimentary continental breakfast will be served. The event is free and open to the public. For more information, call (407) 644-8281 or visit www.winterpark.org. There are no velvet ropes dic tating where to wait in line, no wide counters and glass partitions separating bankers from custom ers, and certainly not any stuffy sitting behind giant walnut desks. When clients walk in, its hard to tell that Seacoast Na deemed fuel cells by its cre ator and the Banks Chief Lending with modern, peppy green chairs and abstract art pops on the walls. Theres a sleek bar that serves cof fee by day and wine by night, en couraging clients to stop by any time. ness owners, and Holland hopes theyll help bankers and clients develop stronger, more collabora tive relationships. with several experienced accel erators who advise clients on the PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVER Accelerate analyst Brian Moseley, left, assists small-business owners such as Jeff Campese, right, with their banking and loan needs at the new Accelerate ofce in Hannibal Square. Please see BANKING on page 11 Speed banking center serves up advice, wine Seacoast National Banks new Accelerate offices aim to speed up the lending process by eliminating hoops BRITTNI LARSON Observer Staff

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Page 8 r rfntbWe offer Full-Day Infant Care and Childcare Year-Round, Preschool Classes, Summer Camp, and much more! rfntbrn n n Orlando resident Augusto Goose Lopez-Torres could still picture the childrens faces from the shanty villages of the Domini can Republic in this head. The memory was still fresh from his mission trip weeks before, where he hoped his work in cleaning up the old childrens school had made a difference. Lopez-Torres had seen a lot of poverty in the villages, but what struck him most were the chil drens feet. Small feet that were worn down by the harsh and rocky terrain, which is often lit tered with cans and broken glass. Any shoes that a child did have were often mismatched and sev eral sizes too big stuffed with As he returned to his job at a packaging company, Lopez-Tor res had no idea that his next busi ness venture would put the needy on a better footing. Last May, Lopez-Torres and co-founder Scott Miller launched Complete the Pair, a business that connects job seekers with poten tial employers through meeting invitations in the form of shoes, which are donated to charity af terwards. The Winter Park-based compa ny is partnered with Soles4Souls, a Nashville-based charity that has donated more than 20 million pairs of shoes in more than 130 countries worldwide. The partnership allows Com plete the Pair to not only help make business connections, but provide shoes to people in need around the world. Because of our meeting, from it, Lopez-Torres said. The process starts when a job seeker buys a pair of shoes from Complete the Pair, and sends one of them to a prospective employ er. Marked with a redeemable on line code, the shoe comes with di rections to check the Complete the Pair website, where the code can be entered to reveal the prospects bio, resume and personalized Once the two meet, they can mail their shoes back to Complete the Pair with pre-paid mailer bags found inside the shoes. The shoes are then sent to Soles4Souls, who distribute them wherever theyre needed. Were thrilled to partner with Complete the Pair, said Buddy Soles4Souls. This partnership will allow us to help even more people regain their dignity and break the cycle of poverty. The idea for Complete the Pair came to Lopez-Torres four years the Dominican Republic. Trying PHOTO BY TIM FREED THE OBSERVER Augusto Goose Lopez-Torres and Scott Miller founded a business the connects job seekers with potential employers through charity. Please see SHOES on page 10 A foot in the door Winter Park business combines networking with charity TIM FREED Observer Staff JULY 4 The Morse Museum will provide free admission to its galleries on Thurs day, July 4, in conjunction with Winter Parks Olde Fashioned 4th of July Cel ebration in Central Park. The museum will be open from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Winter Parks Olde Fashioned 4th of July Celebration from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. includes a bicycle parade, horsedrawn wagon rides, live patriotic music by the Bach Festival Choir and more. JULY 5 Baldwin Park will host its annual In dependence Day Bash on Friday, July 5, along New Broad Street in Village Center beginning at 5:30 p.m. This years event also coincides with the monthly First Friday Festival & Art Stroll. JULY 8 Come out to the Eatonville Branch of Orange County Public Library at 6 p.m. on July 8 for the Teen Talent Show! We are looking for talented and cre ative performers to sing, play music, dance, perform comedy, or anything in between. Sign up today, and bring it on! The event is open to ages 13 to 18. Call 407-835-7323 or go online to ocls.info/srpteens to register for this event or for more event details. Maitland celebrates 128 years in 2013, and the city is proud to honor this history through the Viva Florida 500 event. The city of Maitland the Art & History Museums Maitland, The Maitland Public Library and Per forming Arts of Maitland are establish ing a time capsule celebrating the Maitland, which will be placed with a ceremony and celebration on July 8 at 6:30 p.m. at Maitland City Hall. The time capsule will contain an inventory of objects and electronic and photo graphic samples of everyday Maitland life to provide a snapshot of Maitland today. The celebration is highlighted with patriotic music by Performing Arts of Maitland. If you would like to suggest items for the time capsule, visit itsmymaitland.com to and enter your suggestions into their Time Cap sule Survey before they seal it. JULY 10 Culture Club for children and youth is from 4 to 5 p.m. on July 10 at the Maitland Public Library. Visit mait landpubliclibrary.org for more infor mation. JULY 13 Ever wanted to learn the art of Japa nese paper folding ? An Origami Group meets from 10 a.m. to noon on July 13 at the Maitland Public Library. Visit maitlandpubliclibrary.org for more information. JULY 14 Winter Park Presbyterian Church will present The Calvin Ringers a very talented group of teenage hand bell ringers, in a performance on Sunday, July 14, at 10:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. They have performed at the White House, Disneyland, Epcot, The Crystal Cathedral and at Rockefeller Center. WPPC is located at 400 S. Lakemont Ave. in Winter Park. JULY 15 Meet a Gatorland wrangler at the Eatonville Branch of Orange County Public Library on Monday, July 15, at 11 a.m. Gatorland brings the wild to the library! Get up close and personal with snakes and gators, and learn all about these amazing creatures. Call 407-835-7323 or go online to ocls. info/srpkids to register for this event or for more event details.

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Page 9 Florida Institute of Technology is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award associate, baccalaureate, masters, education specialist and doctoral degrees. Florida Institute of Technology does not discriminate on the basis of race, gender, color, religion, creed, national origin, ancestry, marital status, age, disability, sexual orientation, Vietnam-era veterans status or any other discrimination prohibited by law in the admission of students, administration of its educational policies, scholarship and loan programs, employment policies, and athletic or other university sponsored programs or activities.OC-394-513 WE PREPARE EXCEPTIONAL LEADERS Orlando CONTACT US TODAY www.fit.edu/orlando(407) 629-7132 | orlando@fit.edu*Admittance is contingent upon receipt of ofcial academic records.Considering pursuing a masters degree from Florida Techs Orlando site? Join us for: Information session Meet & greet with faculty/staff Food and drinks Easily apply and enroll* INSTANT DECISION DAY WEDNESDAY, JULY 17 3 P.M.2420 Lakemont Ave., Suite 190 Orlando, FL 32814 Register by July 15 to orlando@t.edu Application Fee Waived! FEATURING ...... AND MUCH MORE! 250 North Orlando Ave. Winter Park, FL 32789407.677.9777 A Premier Flooring Source rfntb rf ntand soreness nb naches THG-13902 Calendar JULY 4 Runners, walkers and tness enthusiasts of all ages can have summertime fun by participating in the Hunter Vision Watermelon 5K on Thursday, July 4, on Park Avenue in downtown Winter Park. The 3.1mile run/walk begins at 7 a.m. Its an All-Americanstyle celebration featuring a shady course, entertain ment, free kids run and watermelon-eating contest. Visit trackshack.com for more information. From Paul Revere silver to Rookwood pottery, from Louis Comfort Tiffany glass to Daniel Chester French sculpture, its all on view for free this Indepen dence Day at The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art. Observing its long-standing tradition for the holiday, the museum will provide free admis sion to its galleries on Thursday, July 4, in conjunc tion with Winter Parks Olde Fashioned 4th of July Celebration in Central Park. The museum will be open from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Winter Parks Olde Fashioned 4th of July Celebra tion from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. includes a bicycle parade, horse-drawn wagon rides, live patriotic music by the Bach Festival Choir and more. Its a throwback hom age to old Americana, all happening conveniently in downtown Winter Park along Park Avenue. Visit cityofwinterpark.org for more information. Its peak boating season in Florida, and the upcoming holiday and the weekend following means the water ways will be jammed with recreational boaters. Save the Manatee Club is handing out free banners that boaters can raise on their boats when theres a manatee nearby, to warn other boaters. Free ban ners, signs, decals and helpful waterway cards can be obtained by contacting Save the Manatee Club via email at jnearing@savethemanatee.org, by regular mail at 500 N. Maitland Ave., Maitland, FL 32751, or by calling toll free at 1-800-432-JOIN (5646). For more information, visit savethemanatee.org JULY 5 The Art & History Museums Maitlands (A&H) popular program Ladies Art Lounge continues with bookmaking fun on Friday, July 5, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. in the A&Hs Germaine Marvel Building, located at 210 W. Packwood Ave. in Maitland. Preregistration is required. A cash wine bar is available, and outside alcohol is not permitted. To register, visit ArtandHistory.org, or call 407-539-2181, ext. 265. Baldwin Park will host its annual Independence Day Bash on Friday, July 5, along New Broad Street in the Village Center beginning at 5:30 p.m. This years event also coincides with the monthly First Friday series, and the two events will be combined to cre ate a large, family friendly festival culminating with a choreographed reworks show over Lake Baldwin in Harbor Park after dark. For more information on the Baldwin Park community or the Baldwin Park Joint Committee, please contact Susan Comisky at 407740-5838 or email susan@baldwinparkpoa.com Bring your eReader and cable for eLab at the Mai tland Public Library from 10 a.m. to noon on Friday, July 5. Visit maitlandpubliclibrary.org for more infor mation.

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Page 10 WELCOMENew M embersMONTHLY CHAMBER NEWS & EVENTSMaitlands Chamber of Commerce Community Luncheon Orlando Jobs/ Your City, Your Jobs Wednesday, July 17, 201311:30am-1:00pm Maitland Civic Center Cost: $15.00 Chamber Members with RSVP by July 15 5:00pm $20.00 Non-Members & Members after deadline Go to website maitlandchamber.com for more info.No July Meeting Success Leads Group: Meets the 1st Thursday each month 11:30am-1pm Coffee Connection with the Maitland Chamber of Commerce Making business connections one cup at a time Meets 2nd Tuesday each month 8-9am July 11: Francescos 400 S. Orlando Ave. Community Partners: Meets the 2nd Thursday each month 11:30am1pm July 24: TBD Wednesday, Women and Wisdom: Meets the 4th Wednesday each month 11:30am-1pm Business After Hours: check our website or call 407-644-0741 for updates. www.maitlandchamber.com Special Guest & Speaker from Roger Lear President Orlando Jobs Save the Date: OCTOBER 21ResMac Mortgage Be Ageless-Rejuvenation & Aesthetic MedicineBUSINESS AFTER HOURSJuly 11: The UPS Store July 23: Elite Financial Partners August 13: Buca di Beppo H O U S E S W A N T E D ! G e t a F R E E N o O b l i g a o n C A S H O e r O n Y o u r H o u s e W i t h i n 2 4 H o u r s (8 5 5 ) 7 5 5 1 8 1 8 w w w C i r c l e 1 8 H o m e s c o m C A S H $ $ $ Q U I C K C L O S E A N Y P R I C E R A N G E A N Y C O N D I T I O N A N Y S I T U A T I O N DR. CHARLES N. MICARELLII cant remember where or when I rst met Dr. Charles N. Micarelli, but aer we met, we became great friends, and he was an important person in my life. Charlie was a Bostonian, and when he learned that I had spent 4 years in Cambridge at Harvard, we were o to the races. He grew even more interested when he found that I was an opera singer who had sung all over Europe, including the Maggio Musicale Fiorentino in Florence, Italy. Charlie was as avidly enamored of music, and particularly of singing, as any non-professional I ever knew. He was locally a star in his own right as Vice President and Dean of the University of Central Florida. He brought me to the attention of Dr. Trevor Colbourn, President of UCF where I was soon oered the position of Distinguished Professor. I taught at UCF for 24 happy years. e other day Charlie Micarelli passed away aer a lengthly illness. Charlies personality and the goodness of his soul made anyone who met him like him immediately, and the sunshine of the human scene here lost much when he le Louis Roney SHOES | Inspired by shoeless children in third-world countries, this entrepreneur has an idea to help them C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 8 to get his foot in the door with a potential job prospect, Lopez-Tor res had heard about the practice of giving an employer a meeting enticer to make a connection, but had never tried it himself. He de cided to try it with a pair of shoes, buying a pair of $60 New Balance sneakers. But before he sent off one of the shoes, Lopez-Torres had a change of heart. He remembered the countless children he saw without shoes, and felt guilty when he re alized that these shoes might go to waste. I was literally wasting a pair of shoes to try and land a meeting, and it wasnt certain I would get this meeting, Lopez-Torres said. At the end of the day, even if I got the meeting, what were they going to do with one shoe? Lopez-Torres never sent the shoe. Instead, he began to draft a business model around the idea of connecting people in the busi ness world while contributing to a greater cause. The employer and prospect could send their shoes off together as a donation, making they conduct business or not. sends a better message and tells way more about an employee than a paper resume ever could, Miller said. There are hundreds of people that apply for that same job, so youve got to stand out, Miller said. Instead of just printing your resume in fancy paper, youve got to deliver, show that you think outside the box, that youve got a big heart and that theres more where that came from if youre hired. Even if the two shoes never come together, 5 percent of every sale goes to Soles4Souls either way, Miller said. The more successful we are, the more successful Soles4Souls is at distributing shoes to people in need, Miller said. Thats an im portant thing that we really want to hammer home in what were doing. The Complete the Pair found ers hope to connect business peo ple who wish to make a bigger difference in world. Its no longer exceptional just to be different, Miller said. Youve got to be different in a way that makes a difference.

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Page 11 It was 2:30 a.m. on a Sunday morning and I was driving as fast as the law and expectant fathers were allowed. My very pregnant wife and I pulled into the emergency room entrance where we were met by an attendant who had a wheelchair and was ready to roll my wife into the building. As we entered the doors I noticed people were everywhere. Some people were in various color uniforms going in different directions, papers were We had no sooner checked in when we were whisked upstairs to a labor room. Now for nine months my wife had the tough job of carrying our child. Like other moms, she had suffered with morning sickness, swelling of ankles, cravings and a spell with self-image problems. Now we were at the end. When the nurse arrived in the labor room she has asked me how far apart the contractions were. Being the nervous father-to-be I hadnt even thought about contractions. I heard a comforting tone from our nurse that told me not to worry. She said that they had a machine that would tell me when the contractions are coming. I nodded and said something to my wife as I started staring at the little numbers as they rose and fell. Each time the numbers were getting higher I would tell her a contraction is coming and I would hold her hand and let her squeeze as hard as she wanted. Now we men cannot possibly imagine how painful contractions really are. I can only relate to the pain, in some small fashion, that I experienced when my wife grabbed my belt buckle and yanked. I did not seem to rate an epidural for that. Our nurse probably has seen that scenario play out hundreds of times. Finally, it was time. We were ushered to a delivery room where nurses prepped my wife with IVs and other medical gizmos. My wife and I had taken Lamaze Training so that I could be there when the baby was born. The contractions were coming faster and faster as I tried to remember the breathing techniques taught to us in Lamaze. Now my Lamaze technique may not have been all that great but I was where I wanted to be; at my wifes side while our baby was being born. Then the doctor came in and that is when the work really started. Epidurals were called for by my wife; more medical stuff was being called for by the doctor and everyone was focused on the health of my wife and baby. Just a short time later our daughter was born. I just stood there. The doctor cut the umbilical cord and laid our daughter on her mothers Now we men are not generally known to cry, well, except when something heavy falls on our hand or foot. But when you witness the miracle of birth, there is a catharsis, a joy, a feeling that must come to the surface. As fathers, the Bible tells us that children are a gift from God. In Psalm 127:3 it says, Children are a heritage from the Lord, offspring a reward from him (NIV). Fathers and Mothers have another responsibility. In Ephesians 6:4 it says, Fathers, do not exasperate your children; instead, bring them up in the training and instruction of the Lord (NIV). So you see, my wife worked to carry our child for nine months but from the delivery on, we both had the responsibility to be a caregiver and train up our daughter in the way of the Lord. I am reminded about one more gift that is important. In John 3:16 it says, For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life (NIV). Dads Heart But when you witness the miracle of birth, there is a catharsis, a joy a feeling that must come to the surface. by John Toomer OurLifeToday OurLifeToday Our Family July 2013 Visit acceleratebusiness.com for more information about the services offered by Seacoast National Banks new Accelerate ofces. The Winter Park ofce is located in Hannibal Square at 444 W. New England Ave., and is one of three locations in Central Florida. such as small business loans and credit lines. An analyzer, or un derwriter a person responsible for approving a loan is also there to talk with the small busi ness owner. What weve done with the fuel cells is put a team of very experienced commercial lenders and underwriters right in front of the customer, so a small business owner or a professional can go in and really get some good advice, Holland said. In a typical bank, the small business owner or pro fessional would never sit face-toface with that level of experience or an underwriter. In a traditional banking situ ation, there are several hoops to jump through, a hierarchy of con sent levels to get a loan approved. The representative at the typical bank cant just say yes or no, but at Accelerate, their analyzer is ex perienced and authorized to make decisions on loans right there, And whether the answer is yes or no, clients have the opportuni ty to talk to the person in charge, and thats what the neo-entrepre neurs, business owners age 30 to 50, are all about, Holland said. Our target is Generation X, that demographic is all about em powerment and engagement, he said. They really expect to be a part of the process. Were not just here to say no, said Brian Moseley, an analyzer at give them reasons why, thats al ways a better way to handle busi ness. Accelerators and analyzers give clients free advice on the next steps to take to eventually get ap proved for a loan or grow their business. And if their expertise cant help, theyll connect the cli ent to someone who can, whether its a human resources consultant or a life coach. So while the atmosphere is very modern and all banking transactions are done through ATM and online, the relationships built between clients and accelera tors feel like old school banking, said client Jeff Campese, who got a credit line through Accelerate for his Orlando marketing com pany Red Rocket Studios. Its a combination of being totally accessible to the decision makers and them knowing me and my business, Campese said. on the business side, that we felt like clients again, rather than that the bank was doing us a favor. I like getting to talk to the person behind the numbers, be hind the business, Moseley said. Customers are looking for much more interaction thats the model thats going to set you apart in this industry. BANKING | Fuel cell eliminates hoops C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 7 Plan your weekend with The Weekender! Visit wpmobserver.com and click "Subscribe to Newsletter" PEAK SEASON PROPOSAL PHOTOS BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVER Popping the question has never been sweeter. Peak Season Pops Owner Jana Rice crafted a one-of-a-kind Ring Pop to help Jake Voll propose to his girlfriend Mary Pat Stewart at the Maitland Farmers Market on June 30. After Voll got down on one knee and presented Stewart the frozen-water popsicle with the ring peeking out its top, she said yes.

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Page 12 Opinions Advances in cancer treat ment are saving lives and cutting health care costs. But because many health insurance plans havent caught up with the times, nearly half of all cancer patients are forced to choose between the treatment that could save their lives or one thats paid for. John Rykert had been battling advanced basal-cell carcinoma for two decades by cutting out the tumors as they appeared. In 2009, after 20 surgeries lasting 10 hours each, Rykerts doctor said that the cancer had spread so far that the only option left would be to carve out half his face. But then Rykert was given Erivedge, then an experimental drug, which shut down the genetic mutation caus ing his skin cancer to spread. Erivedge shrank Rykerts tumors almost immediately and shut down the skin cancer. He suffered some hair loss and muscle cramps, but four years later he is alive. Such stories are increasingly common. As scientists causing genes, they can make pills that go after cancer cells and block mechanisms that pro duce them. These pills are not only less toxic than conventional IV chemotherapy, theyve turned once-incurable cancers such a myeloma, breast cancer and even pancreatic can cer into manageable diseases. But insurance coverage hasnt kept up with medical innovation. Instead, most insurers follow Medicares 40-year-old approach which covers IV treatments generously, capping out-ofpocket costs at about $3,000, but charges the patient up to 50 per cent for oral cancer drugs, even when theyre the only treatment that will work. And targeted cancer pills such as Gleevec, Tykerb (for breast cancer) and Revlimid can cost tens of thousands of dollars a year. Ironically, thats not much more expensive than many IV cancer treatments; the cover age cap isnt even about saving money. Hence, when Robert Adlers multiple myeloma returned after his IV chemotherapy, his doctor recommended the pill Revlimid. While his insurer had paid all but a few hundred dollars of his previous treatment, it saddled him with out-of-pocket costs of $42,000 because Revlimid counts Again, nearly half of all cancer patients are in plans that force them to choose between a treat ment thats paid for and one that could save their lives. Sadly, several stud ies show, 25 percent of their initial prescriptions for cancer pills when the co-pays exceed $500. Even more will stop or interrupt treatment. Neither Medicare or private health insurers are closing the gap be tween coverage and innovation. Instead, a survey of plans con ducted by the Zitter Group found that insurers recognize that oral ments actively encourage patients to use infusible products. This is akin to paying for an iron lung machine but not a polio vaccine. To address this innovation gap, Rep. Brian Higgins (D-Buf falo) has introduced the Cancer Drug Coverage Parity Act, which cancer care. Again, these pills have meant huge progress in the war against cancer. Since targeted cancer therapies were introduced in 1993, the number of cancer survi vors has more than doubled from about 6.8 million to 14 million today. That translates into 43 mil lion added years of life which Columbia University economist Frank Lichtenberg says added $4.2 trillion to our economy. These new treatments are also saving money by reducing the need for hospitalization. If the number of cancer patients hospitalized had remained constant since 1993, wed have spent $1.3 trillion more on cancer care. Meanwhile, the amount we spend on cancer medications (old and new) has remained 5 percent of total U.S. health care spending. Being able to decode our genome to treat cancer is just the start of a total transformation of medicine but most health-care reforms impede such progress. The Cancer Parity Act aligns how we pay for health care with the future of medicine. Robert Goldberg is vice president of the Center for Medicine in the Public Interest. With the weather heating up, its time to start checking out some dog-friendly beaches with your four-legged friend! For most dogs, getting to run around in the sand, dip into the waves, and fetch balls out of the water is the best day ever! Here are some tips to ensure that you and your dog have a fun and safe beach experi ence: First things rst Check with your local beaches before you pack up the dog, since not all beaches allow them. Depending on the time of year, some beaches allow dogs during the off-season, but summer is a different story. Call ahead or visit the beachs website for informa tion. Its also important, if you whether or not they need to be on leash or if they can roam free. Bring a long leash no matter what, but know ahead of time if there will be an area where a leash isnt necessary. If they dont need to have a leash, only let them be without it if you know for an absolute fact that they will respond to your voice commands. Other dogs, people, certain scents, birds, etc., may catch their attention and cause them to tune you out, which could be a recipe for disaster (no one wants a dog (as well as easily frightened children) will be less dog-friendly than others, so be mindful of who your dog might be approaching to avoid any sort of snafu. Never, ever leave your dog unattended. Even the most welltrained dog can get distracted. Pay extra special attention to your surroundings and any po tential situations that may cause your dog to wander or run off. Follow all of the rules set by the beach. You dont want to be the reason that dogs arent allowed at that particular beach anymore. Pro swimmer or doggie swim vest? If you want to bring your dog to the beach, you probably have a good idea that your furry friend time your dog will be swimming, you may want to read up on his breed just to be sure. For exam ple, Shar-Peis tend to be afraid of water. Obviously there are excep if swimming is characteristic of the breed will be a good indica tor of how enthusiastic (or timid) they might be. When you bring the pup to the water, if he isnt diving right in, take it slow. Dont force your dog to go in. He may feel more comfortable if you head vous or unsure, purchasing a dog life vest to bring with you would be a safe bet. Be wary of temperature extremes Depending on where you are in the country, summer at the beach can bring about two extremes: heat from the sun and a cold, cold ocean. Pay attention to how your dog is acting and responding while hes with you throughout the day, since there could be the potential of either heat stroke or hypothermia (if hes been swimming his little heart out). Some signs of heat stroke in a dog include: If you think that your dog has heat stroke while youre at the beach, take the following actions immediately: and apply cool (not cold) water all over their body to gradually lower their temperature. towels to the pets head, neck and chest only. amounts of cool water or lick ice cubes. Some signs of hypothermia in a dog include: If you think that your dog has hypothermia while youre at the beach, take the following actions immediately: and blankets that have been warmed by the sun. bottles and leave them out in the sun as this warm water can be applied to your dog to bring his body temperature back up. stopped shivering and has con tinued lethargy, bring him to the nearest vet. As much as we wish, our dogs cant tell us when theyre in pain and not feeling good. The above lists are certainly not all-inclu sive, so if you notice anything out of the ordinary with your dogs behavior, get him out of the ele ments immediately. A few ways to prevent heat stroke is to bring lots of fresh, cool water that they can drink. A spray bottle with cool water that you can spray him down with will also help in temperature regulation. A bonus of having fresh water with you is that you can also clean the sand and salt water from paws, which can cause irritation and dry out those sensitive pads. Also, since you cant guarantee that you will have access to a shady area, bring an umbrella that he can hang out under. To make sure that hypother mia doesnt strike, bring lots of towels that you can snuggle him in and remove the excess cold salt water. Not only can this warm removing the sand and salt water from his fur so he wont be in danger of shaking off on someone else. The dos and donts of the beach There are hundreds of beaches in the U.S. and Canada that allow dogs, but compared to the num ber of beaches there are, this is a small percentage. Many beaches allowed dogs at one time, but due to careless owners, they had to put a stop to canine patrons. Fol low these rules (in addition to the beachs rules), and youll make sure that you can bring Fido back as many times as he likes. DOG BEACH DONTS: areas on the beach where theyre not allowed. Dunes and grassy areas need to be protected from any sort of environmental dam age that a dog might cause. your site. Not even once. Paying attention and being proactive will go a long way in protecting you and your dog. The last thing you or someone having a run-in with your dog. leash, beach towels, umbrella, fresh water and doggie sunscreen (yes, you can actually get sun screen thats made for dogs). Dont count on the beach sup plying waste bags, so bring your own and be diligent about clean surprise just laying on the beach or buried in the sand. DOG BEACH DOS: vaccinations are current and that hes wearing the proper ID. Keep your vets number on hand just in case something happens. your dog will be sure to ruin both his and your experience. beach trip. A couple hours might be just the right amount of time at the beach, depending on your sign of your dog tiring, pack it up and get back on the road. This is exactly why you are both there: to have fun! friendly beaches. Whether youre going on a trip or a stay-cation, bring your dog this summer will be a great bonding experience for your dog and your family. Get out there and soak up that fresh sea air your pooch will be for ever grateful for all the fun! About TripsWithPets.com TripsWithPets.com is the No. 1 online resource for pet travel. It was named best pet travel site by Consumer Reports! Trip sWithPets.com offers resources to ensure pets are welcome, happy, and safe when traveling. The website features a directory of pet friendly hotels and accom modations across the U.S. and Canada, airline and car rental pet policies, pet-friendly restaurants and beaches, search by route, pet travel tips, pet travel supplies and other pet travel resources. Kim Salerno is the president and founder of TripsWithPets.com. She founded the pet travel site in 2003 and is an expert in the eld of pet travel. Her mission is to ensure that pets are welcome, happy, and safe in their travels. Dog beach outing: tips and dos and donts New cancer cures insurers wont cover KIM SALERNO Guest Writer ROBERT GOLDBERG Guest Writer Nearly half of all cancer patients are in plans that force them to choose between a treatment thats paid for and one that could save their lives.

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Page 13 Chris Jepson Perspectives Louis Roney Play On! As I near age 80 on July 27, I embrace Independence Day with fondness, as shoulderto-shoulder we stand united in freedom. John Adams, our second president, envisioned such patriotic celebrations. On July 2, 1776, he wrote the day be Commemorated as the day of deliverance, by solemn acts of devotion to God almighty. It will be solemnized with pomp and parade, with shows, games, sports, guns, bells, this continent to another, from this time forward forever more. Within days, our Founding Fathers would embark on an effort inspired by our sovereign creator, as our country miraculously defeated the powerful forces of Great Britain. On this Fourth of July, where are we? What about the Patriot Act, which became law during the presidency of George W. Bush, after Sept. 11, 2001? Today, how do we balance the need for national security with sacred privacy rights the heart of the Bill of Rights in the U.S. Consti tution? The Patriot Act drove a stake through the heart of the Bill of Rights. Republicans and Democrats had lined up on both sides of the issue. When they eventually came together, then-Sen. Barack Obama opposed the acts farreaching power. Today, President Obamas position is star tlingly different from his views in the Senate. He not only endorses the original provisions of the Patriot Act, he extends their reach. In fact, some skyrocketed 1,000 percent under Obama. Pundits and commentators from both politi cal parties do not know how to spin this, ex cept to divide our country, even on this special day of patriotism. While our Founding Fathers encouraged spirited debate on all issues, George Washington cautioned against the dangers of in the most solemn manner against the baneful effects of the spirit of party generally. Both political parties acknowledge Washing tons warning today, even as they invoke patrio to protect citizens young and old from the terror that seemingly lurks in every school and at all public gatherings. On this Independence Day, I recall the words one heart, one hand, one nation evermore! Holmes vision can prevail if we set aside partisanship and recognize Gods power to intercede for us, even as his mighty hand did in our countrys infancy. If we are to stand shoulder to shoulder today, as we did in 1776, we must trust God and ignore the endless chatter and one-upsmanship of political parties. Then how sweetly we could sing The Star Spangled Banner, God Bless America, America the Beautiful and This Land is Your Land. Russell Troutman is a lawyer in Winter Park Patriotism, said James Boswell, Samuel Johnsons amanuensis, is the last refuge of a scoundrel. However, I man worth his salt. Human beings may be undeniably beasts at heart. And except for the beasts who gather together to support the com mon good, perhaps we would all kill each other off. The word good is inseparably linked to the preservation of the race and the morality that we higher animals cherish and preserve. I have always been an ardent dog lover, and my experience has made me often trust dogs more than I trust my fellow human beings. Dogs natures make them want to be loved, and they do lots of little things to let you know it. The present condition of American patriotism as referred to by a num ber of the cheap punks who inhabit our television waves these days calls for attention by everyone who, in his or her heart, truly loves this country. I am continually amazed at the anti-American sentiments, either overt or craftily disguised, which raise my hackles. I cannot forget the enormous generosity that our mighty country has showered on others, most of whom have shown little appreciation and seem only too ready to bite the hand that fed them. The other day b.w. read me the follow We are taxed on our bread and wine, in our incomes, on our land and on our property, not only by base creatures who do not deserve the name of men, but for foreign nations, complaisant nations who will bow to us and accept our largesse and promise us to assist in the keeping of the peace these mendicant nations who will destroy us when we show a moment of weakness or our treasury is bare, and surely it is becoming bare! When a government is powerful it is destructive, extravagant and violent; it is a usurer which takes the bread from innocent mouths and deprives honorable men of their substance, for votes with which to perpetuate itself. and statesman Cicero more than 2,000 years ago. (106-43 B.C.) George Santayana wrote: Those who do not read history are doomed to repeat it, i.e. the stupid will go on being stupid! (Today?) My father fought in France in WWI, and when I voluntarily joined the U.S. Navy the day after Pearl Harbor, my fa ther dropped all he was doing and man despite being considerably over aged. Being the son of such a father could I do less than risk my life for my country? My four years as a Navy gunnery against the Germans, and to the South all over and I put my civvies back on, and looked at the red, white, and blue waving above New York skyscrapers, I was glad to have helped to give those On todays radio, an announcer reminds us that there are ever fewer WWII vet erans alive, and I am proud to be one of that generation still cooking! Patriotism seems out of fashion these days. AntiAmericanism is, I hear, being taught to little kids in grammar school, and most university faculties are reputedly so far As for me, I shall continue to cherish patriotism, and am sorry that, at 92, I am now too old and too blind, to be once more of service! About Roney: HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney) Change. It occurred to me about 30 years ago that one of the biggest gifts one generation can give to the next is to let go of the craziness of thy father(s). It is a craziness that is observed and learned at a young age. It is a craziness that warps and shapes young minds, perpetuating irrational tradition, beliefs or practices. In 1975, I was standing in the kitchen with my 61-year-old father who was choking-up while recounting his crazy brother. My father had been raised by a brilliant, driven, martinet of a man. He was tough times seven. And the way Gramps raised my father was the way my father initially thought to raise his son. My father expected my brother (at age 3 or 4) to learn in an unrealistic manner, cre ating all sorts of tensions (and disappoint ments) in his early marriage. My brother, to this day, thanks the stars above for the birth of his (our) sister. She saved my life. Susan diverted dads atten tion, he has observed on many occa sions. Another sister and then me. There is no doubt in my mind that birth order is of incredible importance in how we turn out as adults, and as human beings. But that is grist for another column. My fathers recognition and acknowl edgement of how he attempted to per is applicable to the larger context of how a society lets go of what no longer works or is of dubious value. Were witnessing that right now in the incredible transformation of public opinion regarding homosexual rights. Yet some, mainly older Americans, are aghast that not only is homosexuality publically discussed, but that it is now an acceptable manner of living to the point that samesex couples are legally marrying. Oh my! A brief few decades ago, America was ablaze over civil rights for blacks. A few decades before that, women marched for the right to vote. It wasnt until the 1820s that all white men in America could vote. Each generation confronts change and, ar guably, the pace of change is accelerating. Change is coming fast to America, and Boomers will once again lead the way. Growing up, coming of age in the 1960s was an exhilarating experience. What Boomers deem acceptable becomes the norm. The numbers (votes/leadership) suggest as much. Interesting to me is that change itself is acceptable. Period. Boomers came of age watching black Americans come rightful, legitimate place in the sun. A racist America did not correspond to the mythology of our history and became increasingly unacceptable. Weve miles to go in this regard, but clearly a corner has been turned. our service in an illogical, immoral Asian war and decided that we would rather march in opposition than to our deaths. Boomers need to again speak up as our military/industrial complex wags the tail of our foreign policy. I once argued against a universal mili tary draft but, after the past few decades of American militarism, a draft may be the necessary check we need on American aggression. If only the sons of the poor serve and die, our nationsadly, seem inglyturns a blind eye to our illogical foreign wars. cause they fear what will be lost. Rather, we embrace change and create a better America. The old have no corner on wisdom. Experience illustrates that. Jepson is a 27-year resident of Central Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.US The sins of thy father The freedom of independence Patriotism isnt about the strength of your politics RUSSELL TROUTMAN Guest Writer

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