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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00242
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park FL
Publication Date: 03-28-2013
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates: 28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID: UF00091444:00258


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WPMOBSERVER.COM COPS TEACHING CLASSLIFESTYLES, 11Hopping good fun Looking for a way to spend Easter weekend outside? Look no farther than Central Park. CALENDAR, 8Making music againThis teenager saw broken instruments and found a way to get kids playing again. LIFESTYLES, 9Review: Pannullos Twenty years after opening, is Park Avenues family-style Italian mainstay still good? CORNER TABLE, 13COMMUNITY BULLETIN ........... 4 CALENDAR ................... 8 LIFESTYLES ................... 9 CULTURE .................... 17 OPINIONS ................... 18 CLASSIFIEDS ................. 20 CALL US TODAY FOR A COPY OF Your Guide to Social Security Bob@aSafeHarbor.com | ASafeHarbor.com(407) 644-6646 Learn more visit www.ss.vip2site.com When faced with stormy nancial waters, seek... Call us today for your Complimentary Custom Annuity Review!407-644-6646 or visit www.asafeharbor.com for your complimentary brochure. Winter Park Recovery CenterExecutive Drug & Alcohol Treatment Services Suboxone Maintenance For Opioid Abuse Sinclair Method for Alcohol Extinction Hypnotherapy/Acupuncture/MassageMedically Managed Dual Diagnosis Evidenced Based Protocols2056 Aloma Ave, Suite 100, Winter Park, FL 32792www.WinterParkRecoveryCenter.com 407-629-0413 Winter Parks City Commis sion approved three projects by developer Dan Bellows in one night Monday. A 206-unit apartment building near the Winter Park Village had upset nearby residents. The projbox to clean stormwater drain ing into a nearby lake and will replace the removed tree canopy. Im really appreciative the applicant is working to get the (electrical) lines underground, Commissioner Tom McMacken said. The Commission also ap proved a zoning change to properties near the intersection of Ly man and New York avenues from The Ravaudage development was granted a commercial devel opment district that would give it eminent domain powers, though only over members of the CDD. The latter two projects will require a second reading to be enacted. After more than 10 years of planning and just less than 10 months before its demonstration phase is set to kick off, LYNX announced last week that its pulling out of overseeing opera tion of the intelligent transport system FlexBus, leaving its four committed participant cities questioning the systems future. A month after an update to the city of Maitland revealed that everything for FlexBus, an on-demand bus system, was running on schedule to launch they were shocked and disap longer planned to help oversee the project as of last week. In a letter dated March 18, LYNX director of engineering David Healey stated LYNX is not in the position to implement the operations of FlexBus service at this time. He said the four participating cities Maitland, Altamonte Springs, Longwood and Casselberry can operate the system themselves, or seek an outside operator to apply for funding grants to run the system for them. That wasnt really the intent (of the deal), because were not PHOTO COURTESY OF LYNXLYNX designed technologies for FlexBus, but backed out suddenly from a plan to oper ate the system, announced in a letter sent to the city of Mailtand on March 18. Please see FLEXBUS on page 2LYNX leaves FlexBus stalledLYNX pulls out of overseeing the operation of FlexBus, leaving four participating cities questioning the systems futureSARAH WILSON Observer StaffCommission OKs three projectsISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff The mayor or fellow alreadyelected Council members publicly endorsing candidates for other seats on the dais shouldnt land them in trouble in Maitland, say political science experts from UCF and Rollins College. Theres a big gray area be tween whats ethically and le gally OK and whats tradition ally accepted as political culture, said UCF political science professor Aubrey Jewett. Maitland Mayor Howard Schieferdecker had drawn criticism from fellow Council mem ber Bev Reponen when she saw him actively campaigning for candidates in the March 12 Council election. Openly cam paigning for candidates while in become a rarity in the Maitland, and had led to a public resignation in Winter Park. But aside from upsetting gen erally accepted social mores, its age by campaigning as a private citizen, Jewett said, even if you wield the personal credibility of being mayor. So leading up the March election in Maitland, as long as Council members werent utilizing resources gained through citizen money and did so in an non-corrupt or threatening man ner, Jewett said theres nothing illegal or unethical about the mayor and Council members hitting the streets campaign signs in hand.PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVERMaitland Mayor Howard Schieferdecker drew some ack for campaigning openly for candidates in the March 12 city council election, but he did not violate election laws. Please see ENDORSEMENTS on page 2Election ethics: were they breached?Experts say endorsements from fellow Council members may anger some, but arent unethicalSARAH WILSON Observer Staff

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Page 2 (407) 514-0087 3.05% Certain restrictions apply.Rates may vary depending on deposit amount. We broker CDs for FDIC insured banks. Promotional incentive may be included to obtain yield.www.oldharborf inancial.com Old Harbor FINANCIAL12 Month CDAlso oer IRA Specials & free 401k ReviewsAPYHigher Rates for Longer Term in the business of operating a bus system, said Maitland City Man ager Jim Williams. Williams, and Maitlands federal lobbyist Louis Rotundo, said thered been no warning that this was coming until it hit their desks last Friday. To say this letter is a surprise would be sort of an understate ment, Rotundo said. To see this letter show up at the end of this process is, I think, disappoint ing to say the least. Members of Maitlands City Council sounded off at Mondays meeting, questioning how the system deemed by Council members a necessity for the success of SunRail can proceed. Looking back at a Memoran dum of Understanding (MOU) from the agreement between the four cities and Lynx, Maitland Community Development Director Dick Wells said there are enough implied wordings of LYNXs involvement through im plementation of FlexBus that war rant the citys surprise following last weeks letter. This to me is an outrage, Maitland Mayor Howard Schieferdecker said. This is some thing weve been trying to do for a long time thats very important for SunRail, for our SunRail and also for the other cities, and now were really in a bind. Now youre creating this Sun Rail project and youre killing it before its even getting started, Councilwoman Linda Frosch said. This has a severe domino effect on a lot of businesses and a lot of residents. Schieferdecker said LYNX par ticipation was key to the process of getting federal grant funding for the system as a public entity. Without LYNX, Rotundo said, it might be impossible for the cities to get the grant money from the government theyd planned to use to operate the system. Council members, with the support of Rotundo, are reaching advice on answering the inevi table question of, What now? Meanwhile, spokesperson for LYNX Matthew Friedman said its business as usual for LYNX. Our job was to develop the concept and its the partners job to come up with the operations dollars, Friedman said, adding that LYNX has not strayed from its initial path with the project of committing to develop the tech nology never agreeing to oper ate the buses. Rotundo said the city will work to see if LYNX will recon sider continuing with the project through the trial phase, or look into other options for funding and operation. Its rather disappointing that weve stepped up as four cities and said, Well help, well do our part, well do it with our money, and one of the agencies thats sup posed to be facilitating the suc cess of SunRail seems to be on a different mission, Rotundo said. Thats not very helpful to the re gion. Its interesting to me that the tradition has been not to be in volved, Jewett said. In many areas of Florida and certain areas around the country, its just not really become an issue. The blurry line between cam paigning as a private citizen when youre a face-recognizable elected professor Rick Foglesong said, is made clear by how its presented. Its not appropriate for an the resources of his or her elected anther person But it is permis sible that someone would use their name or position to cam paign for themselves or someone else, Foglesong said. According to rulings by the Florida Commission on Ethics, theres another line drawn be time and resources such as city stationery or business cards and on-the-job hours and using pri vately sourced resource knockoffs situation using publicly fund ed resources to campaign being unethical, and the second using acquired means is permissible. ing out pizza at polling stations, shaking hands while going doorto-door on the street, and send ing out endorsement emails from private accounts as long as its being done without corrupt in tentions, coercive actions or cityfunded resources, or on city-time Foglesong said, can be perfectly if theyre against tradition. Thats something that could come back and hurt someone politically if its contrary to the common practice, but that doesnt make it unethical or unlawful ei ther, he said.FLEXBUS | City officials now wondering about their next step after sudden removal of LYNX bus support CONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGEENDORSEMENTS | Political expert: Schieferdecker in the clear if he didnt use mayorship threateningly CONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE Its not appropriate for an elected office holder to use any of the resources of his or her elected office to campaign for himself or another person But it is permissible that someone would use their name or position to campaign for themselves or someone else, Rollins political science professor Rick Foglesong

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#2Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Get screened today.Each year more than 150,000 people are diagnosed with colorectal cancer. As a part of Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month, Florida Hospital is urging you to put a stop to this preventable disease before it starts. Because colon cancer can develop with no signs or symptoms, a regular colonoscopy is the recommended method to finding pre-cancerous polyps. If you are at least 50 years of age or have a family history of colorectal cancer, get screened today. Call (407) 303-1700 or visit ScheduleYourScreening.com to schedule a colonoscopy today.WPMH-13-11853 WPMH-13-11853 Colorectal Ad WP Observer March.indd 1 3/8/13 10:10 AM

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Page 4 DONT MISS OUTon the2013 Summer Fun & Entertainment Guide! The Summer Fun & Entertainment Guide will be printed and inserted into the Winter Park-Maitland Observer on April 11, and the Seminole Voice on April 12. is comprehensive directory will not only serve as an invaluable resource, but will allow you to showcase your business or service directly to local contacts. Parents will be looking at a variety of activities for their children in addition to preparing them for a new school year.Call and reserve your space today!Linda Stern / 407-376-2434 / LStern@turnstilemediagroup.com Business Briefs Community Bulletin Endangered Species DayParents, teachers and scout leaders tell your kids to start the drawing engines and participate in the annual Endangered Species Day Youth Art Contest, an integral part of the eighth annual national Endangered Species Day, celebrated on May 17. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and numerous conservation organizations will observe Endangered Species Day to recognize conservation efforts under way across the nation aimed at helping Americas imperiled species. This year also commemorates the 40th anniversary of the Endangered Species Act.Volunteers neededVITAS Innovative Hospice Care of Central Florida needs volunteers in the Winter Park/Maitland area who can befriend terminally ill patients, provide relief for weary caregivers, accompany their pet on Paw Pals visits, visit with veterans, provide art and music therapy, make bereavement calls, sew Memory Bears or garment bags, knit/crochet afghans, make crafts, help repair medical equip ment, or help with administrative work. Call 407-691-4541 or email central.ori davolunteers@vitas.com if you would like to nd out more information.Award-winning producerThe Florida Historical Society has awarded the 2013 David C. Brotemarkle Award to Dr. Maurice OSullivan Kenneth Curry Professor of Literature at Rol lins College, and Mr. Bill Dudley, award winning Florida technical director. Dr. OSullivan was executive producer of the project, which was lmed and edited by Mr. Dudley. Named after the rst English poem about Floridathe 1564 Have You Not Hard of Florydathe lm includes almost 30 important poets from Tallahas see to Miami reading their work as well as classic works from the states past.Top scholarsThe following students from your area were named to the Deans List at Mercer University for the fall 2012 semester: Kathryn Dunnam of Maitland, a senior, was named to the Deans List of the Col lege of Liberal Arts. Lauren Gassie of Winter Park, a sopho more, was named to the Deans List of the Eugene W. Stetson School of Business and Economics. Bryan Danley, of Maitland, a senior, was named to the Presidents List and Deans List of the school of engineering for the fall 2012 semester. Princeton senior Jake Nebel, from Winter Park, has been named a winner of the Universitys 2012 Moses Taylor Pyne Honor Prize, the highest general distinc tion conferred on an undergraduate.Honoring Kevin GrayThe Annie Russell Theatre and Depart ment of Theatre and Dance at Rollins Col lege presented a special service March 16 honoring Kevin Gray and his contribu tions to Rollins College during his tenure. Kevin Gray, a visiting artist professor at Rollins from 2009-2011, passed away unexpectedly on Feb. 11 in Connecticut, where he was currently an associate pro fessor of theatre for the Hartt School. Orlando Health has named Horace Wayne Easterling director of diver sity and minority business development. In this role, Wayne will provide corporate leadership in developing, implementing and evaluating Orlando Healths diversity and inclusion strategy to support the or ganization across multiple departments including human resources, business de velopment, and materials management. Royal Oak Homes, based in Orlandos Baldwin Park, recently promoted Colby Franks to executive vice president. Franks is a graduate of the University of Florida and has more than 18 years of experience in the homebuilding industry. He joined Royal Oak Homes in December 2010 as vice president of construction. Rollins College recently named Shelley Wilson Gentile director of the Ofce of Multicultural Affairs (OMA). In her new role, Gentile will focus on establishing OMA and Chase Hall as a welcoming lo cation for all, as well as a home base for those with an afnity towards any or all of OMAs organizations and programs. Rollins College and The Olympia Com panies announced the appointment of Deanne Gabel as general manager of The Alfond Inn, opening in Winter Park in August 2013. Gabel was a senior vice president with Wyndham Worldwides Hospitality Division. Winter Park-based pawn chain La Familia Pawn & Jewelry recently hired pawn industry veteran Rosa Wedge as director of operations for the companys Puerto Rican stores. Wedges hire is part of the companys ongoing effort to provide in creased support for the Puerto Rican mar ket, into which the company continues to rapidly expand due to demand. Cuhaci & Peterson Architects Engineers Planners, based in Orlandos Baldwin Park, recently completed the design of three residential handicap ramps for the Center for Independent Living. First Green Bank, with headquarters in Mount Dora and branches in downtown Orlando, Clermont and Ormond Beach, recently appointed the Orlando architectural rm of VOA Associates to draw up building and site plans for a Winter Park branch. ( Kenneth LaRoe, chairman and chief executive ofcer at First Green Bank, said the Winter Park branch will open by the end of the third quarter of this year. Charles H. Egerton one of the founding shareholders of the law rm of Dean, Mead, Egerton, Bloodworth, Capouano & Bozarth, P.A. in Orlando, was recently ap pointed to the American Tax Policy Insti tutes (ATPI) Board of Trustees. Trinity Prep athletes go to college Members of Trinity Preps Class of 2013 gathered on National Signing Day to sign letters of intent to continue their athletic careers in college. Jack OConnor of Winter Park committed to Swarthmore College for swimming; Madeleine Loftus of Winter Park committed to Centre College for soccer; Rick Hord of Kissimmee committed to Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute for baseball; and Daniel Salas of Winter Park committed to Dartmouth College for cross country and track. Three other seniors signed letters of intent in November. Kyle Cavanaugh of Winter Park committed to North Carolina State for baseball; Eliot Shapleigh of Oviedo committed to Stetson University for baseball; and Felicia Coleman of Winter Springs committed to the University of Nebraska at Omaha.

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Page 5 Winter Park City TalkBY RANDY KNIGHT CITY MANAGER March 25 City Commission meeting There was a City Commission meeting held March 25 in City Hall Commission Chambers. Be low are a few highlights from that meeting:Mayors Report acknowledge Friends of Fleet Pee ples Park volunteer efforts, Victim Service Center of Central Florida Inc., Edwin Ford Day, Purchasing Month and Water Conservation Month. made to the Hannibal Square Community Land Trust Inc.City Attorneys Report regarding property at 1849 Aza lea Ave. were resolved with lien reduction to facilitate a sale agreement.Non-action item nancial Report for the year ended Sept. 30, 2012, was presented. Consent Agenda approved. tracts were approved (for a full listing, please visit cityofwinter park.org under Whats New > City Commission Agenda). eral Lobbying Services to Alcalde & Fay Government and Public Af fairs Consultants was tabled until April 8.Action items requiring discussion sented.Public hearings Town Center Development, LLC: proval to construct a four-story, 206-unit residential project and a parking garage of approximately 300 spaces at 940 W. Canton Ave. was approved. tion: nance to change the Future Land Use designation of Single Family Residential and Institutional properties at 216, 226 and 234 W. Lyman Ave. was approved. velopment District (CDD): nance granting petition of Benja min Partners, Ltd.; establishing and naming the Ravaudage Com munity Development District pursuant to Chapter 190, Florida Statutes; describing and provid ing the external boundaries, the functions and powers of the Dis serve as the initial members of the Districts Board of Supervisors Non-action item ment was discussed. A full copy of the March 25 City Commission minutes will be available at cityofwinterpark.org the week of April 8, pending ap proval by City Commission.Popcorn Flicks in the ParkJoin us for Popcorn Flicks in the Park featuring The Dirty Dozen Thursday, March 28, at 8 p.m. in Central Park. The Popcorn Flicks series is presented by Ruths Hospitality Group and Winter Park CRA, and produced by Enzian Theater. This event was rescheduled from March 14 due to the 54th Winter Park Sidewalk Art Festival. We encourage you to gather your family and friends and bring a blanket, a picnic or snacks. Free popcorn will be available for everyone! 59th annual Easter Egg HuntThe city of Winter Park is proud to announce their 59th an nual Easter Egg Hunt will be held Saturday, March 30, in beautiful Central Park West Meadow located in downtown Winter Park. The hunt will begin promptly ing signal. Children with special needs are also encouraged to join in the fun. More than 10,000 stuffed eggs will be placed throughout Central Park West Meadow. As always, children who come up empty handed will still be able to enjoy special treats at the designated area. For more information re garding Winter Parks oldest com munity event, please call 407-5993275.KWPB accepting applications for grant programsKeep Winter Park Beautiful (KWPB) is currently accepting grant applications for community garden and pocket park restora tion projects. Applications for up to $3,000 in funding will be ac cepted from neighborhood and community-based groups for funds to support improvements to mini parks, medians, rights of way or any city-owned green area that is fully accessible to guidelines and application forms cial website at cityofwinterpark. applications must be received by Monday, April 1, at 5 p.m. The mission of KWPB is to im prove the quality and aesthetics of our environment in order to cre ate a healthier and more beautiful place to live, work and play. The purpose of the Community Gar den and Pocket Park Restoration Project is to support neighbor hoods in their efforts to beautify and improve the community, and take ownership of public spaces. In addition to calling for com munity garden and pocket park grant applications, KWPB is also calling for local schools to submit Green Schools Grant applications that share how they are working to keep their school environment beautiful. Up to $1,800 will be al located to local schools in recog nition of these efforts. Mayor Ken Bradley will recognize selected schools at the Earth Day in the Park & Arbor Day Tree Give away celebration Saturday, April 20, at 10:30 a.m. from the main stage in Central Park. Grant appli cations for local schools must also be received by Monday, April 1, at 5 p.m. For more information regard ing KWPB grant programs and to obtain an application, please email kwpb@cityofwinterpark. org or call 407-599-3364.Visit the citys ofcial website at cityofwinterpark.org, like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and watch us on Vimeo.

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Page 6 City Council Meeting of March 25, 2013The Maitland City Council met on March 25 at 6:30 p.m. in the City Hall Council Chambers. Below is a synopsis of that meeting. Special Presentation: Arborist Brian Dierks presented a Power Point presentation show ing projects undertaken by the Interim Improvement Committee.Public Hearing: tition No. 2012-02 Maitland Con course North) to approve the pro posed CDP Text Amendment and Map Amendment as approved for transmittal by the City Council to the Department of Economic Op portunity (DEO) at their meeting of Jan. 28, 2013, and authorized city staff to transmit the adopted ordinance and amendment pack age to DEO. The application for amendment to the 2030 Comprehensive Development Plan (2030 CDP) was submitted by the prop erty owner, BPL Maitland Con course North, LLC. The property is generally located on the north side of Maitland Boulevard, east of Interstate 4 and west of Mait land Avenue, between Concourse Parkway and Lake Faith Villas. Consent Items: Council meeting and the March 4, as presented. Meeting Minutes of the city of Maitland Canvassing Board March 12, 2013 & March 14, 2013 were approved as presented. park-operating schedule. ager to renew a facility use agree ment renewal for the Cottage at Lake Lily facility with the Mait land Art & History Association for a period of 24 months. of HUD grant funds to purchase upgrade goods and services for Covered Bridge Park and Jim Houser Azalea Garden. Improve ments will include upgrades to the pathways at both locations with permeable pathway surfac ing, installation of a small parking area at Azalea Park, provide a small picnic area in the north east corner of the garden, install benches, tables and a small pavil ion in the Covered Bridge Park. Paved (permeable pathways) will also be installed in the Covered Bridge Park to facilitate easier walking and use of the property. amount of $850 to the Internation al Society of Arboriculture. 25 percent cancellation penalty for a September fundraising event for the blind that was cancelled due to unforeseen circumstances.Decision Items: Councilman Valdes to establish guidelines for promoting Maitland through the city web site. and submission of a Preliminary Site Information Questionnaire to the Florida Department of State as a preliminary evaluation of the library structure and property as potential Historic Place. Approval by the State of Florida Bureau of Historic Preservation is a prereq uisite in the Bureaus determination before applying with the US Department of the Interior to be listed on the National Register of Historic Places. To listen to a recording of the meeting, please check our website at itsmymaitland.com One Senior Place ... See our full Calendar of Events at OneSeniorPlace.com407.949.6733715 Douglas Avenue Altamonte Springs, FL 32714M-F 8:30am 5pmMONDAY, APRIL 1 Every Monday 10am 1pm Senior Club (sponsored by Family Physicians Group) Every Monday, 10am 12noon April 1 Bingo April 8 Computer Club April 15 Movie Day April 22 Alcohol Abuse Seminar April 29 Casino Day The Real Estate Specialists are IN 10am 1pm (also Mon, April 8, 15, 22, 29) Presented by Exit Real Estate Results TUESDAY, APRIL 2 Medicare Educational Workshop 10:30am 12noon Presented by Medicare Plan Options RSVP 407-949-6723 WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3 BOOB Girls Burned Out Old Broads Guest Author Joy Jackson 2pm 4pm Presented by Senior Partner Care Services RSVP 407-949-6733 Why do hearing aids cost so much? 3pm 4:30pm (also April 10, 17, 24) Presented by Harmony Hearing Centers of America RSVP 407-545-4098 THURSDAY, APRIL 4 The Real Estate Specialists are IN 9am 12noon (also April 11, 18, 25) Presented by Exit Real Estate Results Zumba Gold Exercise Class 11:30am 12:30pm By Orlando Family Physicians FRIDAY APRIL 5 Speaker Series: Live Healthy & Be Happy! 10:30am 12noon By LTC Advisors RSVP 407-949-6722 Womens Inspirational Hour 12noon 1pm Hosted by Cindy Price RSVP 407-949-6732 Memory Screenings 2pm 4pm Hosted by Arden Courts Memory Care Community By appointment only 407-949673311:30am 12:30pm By Orlando Family PhysiciansCalendar of Events April 2013 Make a Difference ... Volunteer! rfntbb tb rfntb1-800-96-ELDERffSHINE provides free and unbiased Medicare counseling and information.nnnn nnfn nnbbbbf nnnn nn nnnnnn nnnnfn nnnnnf Its TAX time. Appointments Available 7 Days a Week!Tax Form Processing LLC4070 Aloma Ave., Suite 1010 Winter Park, FL 32792Tel: (407) 657-6336www.TaxFormProcessing.com Proudly Serving the Orlando Area for 18 years! Scan QR Code 40$00OffTax PreparationMust present this coupon at time service is provided. Offer valid for one-time use. Cannot be combined with any other offer. Expires April 15, 2013Code: WPMO13 Maitland City TalkBY HOWARD SCHIEFERDECKER MAYOR Concourse North change approved

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Page 7 A bad start to conference play got worse for the Rollins Tars as they fell 16-4 in a blowout on the baseball diamond at the hands of the No. 3 Tampa Spartans (24-4, 7-2) March 24. The loss handed the Tars (14-12, 1-5) their second straight blowout loss in Sunshine State Conference play, and their The Tars couldnt seem to stop the Spartans red-hot bats, as they lit up Rollins pitching for a combined 37 runs in the three-game series. Meanwhile the Tars strug gled at the plate, only generating 8 total runs in response. But even that series may not score a blip in the annals of Rol lins history compared to the 38-4 dismantling they suffered at the hands of Lynn University (20-9, 5-1) in just one game on March 15. In possibly the most lopsided comeback suffered in team his tory, the Tars led the game 3-0 before the bottom of the second when the Fighting Knights scored seven runs to retake the lead be fore lighting up the scoreboard like it was a basketball game. The landslide loss resembled more of a comedy of errors as the Tars allowed 38 runs on 29 hits, with Tars pitching causing more hit batsmen than the Tars had runs. In four of the wilder innings in the game starter Brett Mueller and reliever Brett Flutie combined to give up 16 runs, but only four of them were scored as earned runs. Meanwhile of the 15 Fighting Knights players to step into the batters box, only one emerged from the game without an RBI under his belt. Four of Lynns hitters each had as many or more RBI than all of Rollins combined. The Tars bounced back the next day, edging Lynn 2-1. Theyll be looking to bounce back in a bigger way in confer ence play after a short stop at Fla gler Tuesday at press time. Theyll return home to face Eckerd for a three-game series starting at 6 p.m. Thursday before pulling a doubleheader at 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. on Friday. With a trio of wins the Tars could be within a game of breaking even in conference play. Knights The Knights had no trouble handling UAB (9-14, 0-3) until series, when they fought their way through a 10-10 stalemate to emerge the winners in a 12-10, 10-inning victory March 24. That win capped off a threegame sweep for the Knights (17-9, 3-0) to start Conference USA play with a bang. The win was the Knights second straight comeback victory, engineered by freshman Bo Deck ers two-run single, followed by a solo shot JoMarcos Woods sent soaring into the afternoon sky and save, Tyler Martin only needed one inning to close it out. The Knights come home this weekend for three games, start ing with a 6:30 p.m. showdown Thursday against Southern Miss (9-14, 1-2), followed by a 6:30 p.m. game Friday and a 12:30 p.m. game Saturday. Golf Classic Presented by Friday, April 19, 2013 Dubsdread Golf Course A fun afternoon of golf, food, friends and charity! Proceeds benefit BETA Center and Leadership Winter Park Scholarship Fund. Golf Registration Deadline April 5 $400 per foursome / $100 per individual Includes box lunch, beverages, snacks, happy hour social, goodie bag and cart and greens fees. Helicopter Ball Drop Contest $500 Prize! $10 per entry or 3/$20 A helicopter will drop golf balls over one hole and the first ball in the hole (or closest to the pin) wins the cash! Entry open to the public. Must not be present to win. Register online at www.winterpark.org or call (407) 644-8281 Private Tutoringwww.harvardcrimsontesting.com 800-246-0972 EmployFlorida.com1-866-352-2345 Employ Florida is an equal opportunity program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. The Employ Florida telephone number may be reached by persons using TTY/TTD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711. Disponible en Espanol. JOB RESOURCES at EmployFlorida.com helped me nd a new job I enjoy earning higher pay than I did before I was laid off. You too can discover REAL RESULTS with Employ Florida. HIRED. RANDAL HARDBOWER Industrial Electrician Green Circle Bio Energy Inc. Friday, April 12 Saturday, April 13 Sunday, April 14 Lake Lily Park If youre on Medicare with diabetes, you could qualify for a new meter! Youll receive the latest blood glucose technology delivered right to your door. Diabetes Care Club provides diabetes testing supplies to thousands of satised customers across the United States. We work with your doctor to obtain a prescription and will remind you when it is time to reorder. And delivery is free! Call now to see if you qualify! 1.800.531.2319 Rollins suffers huge losses; Knights come back twiceISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff Plan your weekend withThe Weekender!Visit wpmobserver.com and click "Subscribe to Newsletter"

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Page 8 MARCH 28 Popcorn Flicks in Central Park, which takes place at 251 S. Park Ave., fea tures the classic war film The Dirty Dozen Thursday, March 28, at 8 p.m. at the Central Park Main Stage in Winter Park. Call 407-629-0054 for more in formation on this event. Kate Zaloumes, with pianist Christopher Leavy, returns to the Winter Park Playhouse Spotlight Cabaret Series with her cabaret, Hit Me With A Hot Note Wednesday, March 27, and Thursday, March 28, at 7:30 p.m. at The Winter Park Playhouse, located at 711 Orange Ave., Suite C. Tickets cost $20 and in clude a drink from the bar. When sold out, standing room tickets are $10, and no drink is included. Hit Me With A Hot Note will feature a compilation of songs from jazz standards to Broadway. Advance reservations are strongly recommended, as seating is limited to 50. Call the box office at 407-645-0145 or visit winterparkplayhouse.org for more information. Artist Doug Rhodehamel will present The Live Creation of Doug Rhodehamels 50,000th Paper Bag Mushroom Thursday, March 28, from 7 to 11 p.m. at The Venue, located at 511 Virginia Drive in Orlando. Call 407-412-6895 for more information on this event. Armand Marchesano and his orches tra will be at the Beardall Senior Center, located at 800 Delaney Ave. in Orlando, Thursday, March 28, and Saturday, April 13, from 7:30 to 10 p.m. Attendees can dance to Waltzes and more. The cost, which includes coffee and snacks sup plied by Beardall, is $4 per person. The April 13 dance is a covered-dish party, so attendees should bring a covered dish to share. Call 402-246-2637 for more information on these events.MARCH 29Creative Sanford presents The Lords Supper on Good Friday, March 29, at 7 p.m., and Saturday, March 30, at 5:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. at The Princess Theatre, located at 115 W. First St. in Sanford. Reserved seating will cost $5 prior to the show. An open seating love donation will cost $5 at the door. Seating is limited, so call 407-314-6750 for ticket information. MARCH 30The Central Florida Chapter of the American Hibiscus Society will present its annual Hibiscus Show Saturday, March 30, in the building at the rear of Mead Garden in Winter Park. The com munity will have the chance to see the entered blooms, some available from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., and the top winning blooms from 1 to 3 p.m. Call 407-8773495 or email Mnixonhibiscus@gmail. com for more information. Garden volunteer Janet Mercer will teach Hypertufa Techniques on Satur day, March 30, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Albin Polasek Museum & Sculp ture Gardens, located at 633 Osceola Ave. in Winter Park. Hypertufa, a man made rock created from various ma terials bonded together with Portland cement, is popular for making garden ornaments, pots and lanterns, as it is lighter than concrete and terracotta and much easier to move around. The museum will provide all necessary materials, and guests can take home fin ished products. Attendees can bring a small container to be used for a mold. Other molds will be provided. The cost is $55 for Museum members and $60 for non-members. Enrollment is limited to 15 people. Visit polasek.org or call 407-647-6294 to register for this event. APRIL 12013 UCF Student Research Week will be Monday, April 1, through Thursday, April 4, in the Pegasus Ballroom at the University of Central Florida, located at 4000 Central Florida Blvd. in Orlando. Those in the Central Florida community who are interested can learn about cutting-edge student research, develop research skills, meet with researchers and plan for the future. Visit researchweek.ucf.edu for more information. APRIL 2Jeret Daniels, a University of Florida Entomologist, will present Enhancing Habitat for Butterflies and other Native Insect Pollinators to the Tar flower Chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society Tuesday, April 2, at Harry P. Leu Gardens, located at 1920 N. For est Ave. in Orlando. The program is free and open to the public. Attendees are encouraged to come early, enjoy re freshments and to talk with other native plant enthusiasts. Call 407-647-5233 for more information on this event.APRIL 4As part of its First Thursdays monthly event, the Orlando Museum of Art, lo cated at 2416 N. Mills Ave., will feature For the Birds, Thursday, April 4, from 6 to 9 p.m. Attendees can do the fol lowing: listen to Please Respect Our Decadence; enjoy food; watch pre sentations by various artists; and learn how to do certain projects. Handcrafted beers, wine, soft drinks and water will be available for purchase throughout the evening. Admission to First Thurs days, which includes admission to the OMAs featured exhibition Contempo rary Glass Sculpture: Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of Studio Glass, is $10 for non-members and free for OMA members. Parking is free at Orlando Loch Haven Park, and overflow parking is available at the Orlando Science Cen ter parking garage. Call 407-896-4231, extension 260, or visit OMArt.org for more information on this event.APRIL 5Jeffrey Hatchers new mystery, Sher lock Holmes and the Adventure of the Suicide Club, directed by Tom Larkin and presented by Theatre Down town, will be featured Saturday, April 5 through April 27. Performances are Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m. There will be Sunday matinees April 14 and April 21 at 2:30 p.m. Tick ets are $20 for the public and $16 for seniors and students. Call 407-8410083 for more information on the per formances. Visit www.wpmobserver.com/ events/search for more details. Send submissions to ibabcock@ turnstilemediagroup.com 58th ANNUAL SPRING ORCHID SHOWThe Orchid Market Central Florida Orchid Society Maitland Civic Center 641 South Maitland Ave., Maitland, FL 32751 Apr 6 & Apr 7, 2012 9am to 5pm each day Exhibits, Sales, Lectures, Door Prizes, Etc. Admission $5 at door (Bring ad-save $2) FUNDRAISER Fish Fry For the Church of the Good Shepherd Outreach Ministry DATE:Friday, April 5, 2013WHERE: Church of the Good Shepherd 331 Lake Avenue, Maitland Florida, 32751 407 644 5350 TIME: 5:00 pm to 7:00 pm PLACE: Parish Hall (follow signs for addl parking) Calendar

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Page 9 Lifestyles Sunday, April 14, 2013 1 5 p.m. Winter Park Civic Center 1050 Morse Blvd. Winter Park, FL 32789Tickets $5 ADVANCE Or$7 DOOR $5 SENIORS (AT DOOR) (Children Under 3 FREE) JOIN US FOR: Ice Cream Floats, Create A Sundae, Celebrity Servers, Face Painting, Cake Walk, Games, Silent Auction, Door Prizes, Special Guests and more! FEATURING: Blue Bell Ice Cream, Jeremiahs Italian Ice, Peak Season Pops, and Private Island Ice Cream frozen on site using liquid nitrogen! MICHAEL MOYER, MD, PA 407 671 7141 3592 Aloma Ave, Suite 5 Winter Park Commerce Center Winter Park, FL 32792 Attention Deficit Disorder Migraine Headache Anxiety/Depression Muscle Spasm Insomnia Arthritis Hypertension Diabetes Asthma Allergies Weight Management Adult Physicals School / Sport Physicals Medical Disability Physicals Michael Moyer, MD, PA During one of Erica Chem tobs many visits to Muni Strings with walls covered in smooth, cherry wood violins and per fect, distinguished cellos she noticed a few instruments lying there, broken. She learned that they were from schools, and that owner Daniel Muni was donating his time to repair them because the schools couldnt afford to. Her own school, Trinity Preparatory School in Winter Park, had the same problem. Then she wondered: If her own private school, with all its resources, had this problem, what must it be like for all the public schools out there? There are often instruments that go unused because of lack very tragic because music is such a gift. Erica couldnt imagine that, either. Her life has been music she has played the violin since she was 3 years old, spends summers at music camp and has played at Carnegie Hall. Being a violinist is integral to her whole identity, her mom Candace Chemtob said. Its so much a part of her life. way to help bring music to more children who wanted it. String TogetherSo Erica started String Togeth to repair string instruments for schools in Central Florida, which Muni Strings does for her at a very low cost to keep it free for the Trinity Prep junior started when she was in ninth grade, also supports her music enrichment program at Jones High School in Orlando, where she teaches violin classes for an hour almost every Friday afternoon and pays for the teacher to attend. She was recently named a distinguished Community Awards, a national contest for community service, for her work with String Together. Erica has raised more than PHOTO BY BRITTNI JOHNSON THE OBSERVERErica Chemtob saw a pile of broken instruments and made a solution with her String Together charity that helps kids be able to play. Please see STRING on page 12Reviving the musicErica Chemtob started String Together, a nonprofit that gets broken string instruments repaired and supports her music enrichment program BRITTNI JOHNSON Observer Staff For more information about the Prudential Spirit of Community Awards, visit spirit.prudential.com

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Page 10 A BENEFIT FOR THE SEB AS TI A N HAUL F UND HELPING GREYHOUND S RE A CH THEIR NEW F A MILIE S. Tenth AnnualDOGGIEart festivalPoster art by Jason Sipple Sunday, April 7thNorth Park Avenue in Winter ParkFEATURING PET RELATED ARTISTS, VENDORS AND ADOPTION ORGANIZATIONS PRESENTED BY:SPONSORS : MARCH 29Easter Weekend Open House at the Morse Museum, located at 445 N. Park Ave. in Winter Park, will be Fri day, March 29, from 9:30 a.m.-8 p.m., Saturday, March 30, from 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. and Sunday, March 31, from 1-4 p.m. The open house is free. Call 407645-5311 for more information on this event. MARCH 30 The 59th annual Winter Park Easter Egg Hunt starts at 9:30 a.m. Satur day, March 30, in the Central Park West Meadow in downtown Winter Park. The event draws hundreds of kids every year for a traditional egg hunt in the grass. Visit cityofwinter park.org or call 407-599-3463 for more information. Join the Muscular Dystrophy Association and your friends and neighbors at the 2013 Central Florida Muscle Walk from 7:30 a.m. to noon March 30 at Lake Lily Park in Maitland. The walk starts at 9 a.m., and registration is available on site or you can nd more information at musclewalkmda. org/orlando2013 or by calling 407562-2035. APRIL 3The Valencia College Theater will present the rst staging of playwright Jack McGraths original play, Eros in Veracruz. Showtimes are Wednes day, April 3, through Saturday, April 6, at 7:30 p.m. There will also be a matinee performance on Sunday, April 7, at 2 p.m. The April 5 performance will be followed by a question-andanswer session with the playwright and the actors. Seating is limited in the Black Box Theater, located at 701 N. Econlockhatchee Trail in Orlando, so theater managers suggest that attendees arrive 30 minutes before the curtain time. Visit valenciacollege.edu/arts or call 407-582-2900 to purchase tickets. To receive a $2 discount on each ticket purchase, use the code VALENCIAWEB.APRIL 5Internationally famous astrologer Os taro will be featured in The Wonder ful World of Ostaro Friday, April 5, at 8 p.m. at Orlandos Plaza Live Theater, located at 425 N. Bumby Ave. in Or lando. This event marks the renowned psychics rst visit to Central Florida, where he and his co-stars will amaze and amuse audience members with an evening of Ostaros trademark blend of comedy and psychic predictions. The show, sure to delight the whole family, promises an entertain ing evening of fun and fantasy, a com bination of contemporary comedy and ancient mysteries. Visit plazaliveor lando.com for more information.APRIL 8 The Maitland Art Center, located at 231 W. Packwood Ave., will begin its spring season of classes the week of April 8. Programs for adults include drawing, painting, jewelry, sculpture, pottery, stained glass, multi-media and photography. Childrens programs include pottery, drawing, painting, and the exploration of artistic elements. The center also offers programs for scouting troops and homeschool groups, such as Hats, Teas & History, Carpentry Crew, legacy arts and a variety of art and history workshops. Visit artandhistory.org for information. ONGOING The Maitland Public Library has brought back LEGOS Engineers, which will be from 4 to 5 p.m. every Monday through August 5. There will be rst-level and second-level classes for grades 3 and up.

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Page 11 Just before 11:30 a.m. on Thurs days, theres a changing of the classroom at Carillon Elementary in Oviedo. Mrs. Miles moves out for a planning period, and Deputy Adam Brewster moves in. Forgoing this weeks P.E. class, owl-embellished workbooks ready for a different kind of les son from the uniformed man in charge. In schools in Orange ing up security in the wake of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting. In Seminole County, theyre also teachers. Todays lesson is about re sisting gangs, Brewster says to the room of 10-year-olds. But be fore the new lesson can begin, he asks them to recap what theyve already learned in his previous weeks workshops. What does Otis the name of the owl on each of the students Focus on Safety program packet stand for? Hands shoot up as a chorus of voices rings out: Obey Teachers In Schools, they say. What are the gateway drugs? Each hand has a different answer, from marijuana to inhalants to al cohol. Inside drugs? Crystal meth and cocaine, the kids say. Knowing these answers, Brew ster said, provides students with poor decisions in the future, and building positive relationships with law enforcement in the pres ent. Its like D.A.R.E., but a customizable version covering issues from bullying to cyber-safety with focus shifting based on the needs of the students in each session. The kids know whats right and wrong, they really do, so youre just giving them that push that theyre doing the right thing and hopefully that leads them down the right path when they get older, Brewster said. Seminole County Public Schools (SCPS) approved fund ing in February to help make that path a little smoother, voting to expand the 10-week Focus on Safety program being prototyped at Carillon to all 22 of the districts T H A N K Y O U T H A N K Y O U T H A N K Y O U The businesses, organizations and individuals below have chosen to support your local Chamber of Commerce again in 2013 by renewing their membership. Please join us in thanking them for their investment in our community the next time you shop, dine, or call on their place of business. For more information about the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce, our members, or upcoming events, visit us at the Winter Park Welcome Center, call (407) 644-8281 or log on to www.winterpark.org. A N N U A L S U P P O R T E R S Avanti Wealth Management BAGS Barefoot Wine Blue Door Denim Shoppe Ceramic Matrix Claret Cosmetics Current Tim Davenport Florida's Finest Linen Service Moss, Krusick and Associates Orlando City Soccer Club Joseph Regner Rose Properties, Inc. Sassafras Sweet Shoppe Seaside National Bank & Trust Shipyard Brew Pub Sysco Central Florida Vascular Vein Centers Robert E. Wilson Winter Park Fish Co. Womans Club of Winter Park 5 + Y E A R S Dean Cannon Dorothea M. Fox, CPA Florida Institute of Technology Johnny Mag Sax Music Services Betty Jo MacKenzie, Accountant & Tax Specialist Mattamy Homes Palmano's Cafe & Wine Bar See, Inc. The Bistro on Park Avenue The Westchester Assisted Living Residences UpTown Dog 1 0 + Y E A R S 310 Park South Chez Vincent, Inc. Consumer Debt Counselors Dexters of Winter Park Elizabeth Morse Genius Foundation Friends of Fleet Peeples Park, Inc. M&I Bank Mark Lang & Associates Pinnacle Awards & Promotions The Jander Group, Inc. 1 5 + Y E A R S John Craig Clothier Partridge Tree Gift Shop Seawright & Associates, Inc. Siegel's Winter Park Allen Trovillion 2 0 + Y E A R S Boy Scouts of America Central Florida Council DownEast Orvis 2 5 + Y E A R S Trinity Preparatory School Winter Park High School 3 0 + Y E A R S Fannie Hillman & Associates 5 0 + Y E A R S Palmer Electric Company Chamber Trustees Park Avenue Merchants Association members Presented by: Wednesday, April 17 5:00 8:00 p.m. Winter Park Farmers Market 200 W. New England Avenue Tickets: $40 WPCC Members (in advance) $45 Non-Members & Everyone at the Door $350 Ten Ticket Pack ($50 savings!) Order at www.winterpark.org 28th Annual PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVERDeputy Adam Brewster teaches class as part of a pilot program that helps kids identify and avoid gangs and drugs, while increasing police the presence at elementary schools. Please see SCHOOLS on page 12Focused on safety in schoolsSCPS approves funding to expand program where cops teach in classrooms, while Orange County adds officers to schools in wake of Sandy HookSARAH WILSON Observer Staff

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Page 12 Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above. You are always welcome! A Senior Living Community where Hospitality is a Way of Life.Excellence in Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation e quality of care is outstanding. Our mother has made so many friends here. And she especially loves the hair salon! Peggy, her daughter Merrel & son Dwight Need To Sell Your House? (855) 755-1818 Just Want Out Behind on Payments Job Transfer or Loss Tired of Being a Landlord Need Repairs Facing Foreclosure Vacant / Abandoned www.Circle18Homes.com CASH $$$ QUICK CLOSE ANY PRICE RANGE ANY CONDITION ANY SITUATION George Carroll, M.D., has over 20 years experience in sexual medicine, and is actively involved in the following: Even if Viagra, Cialis or Levitra have not worked for you, the vast majority of diabetic men can resume a normal sex life. OrlandoSexualMedicine.com KEEP UP WITH MAITLAND NEWS AND EVENTS!www.IndependenceLane.com Facebook.com/ItsMyMaitland CONTINUED FROM PAGE 9STRING | Teen charity founder also teaches music at Jones$4,000 for String Together, and has repaired more than a dozen instruments and donated four instruments and many accessories. Shes received heartwarming let ters from the schools she helped, saying that without her, a student wouldnt have been able to play in a special concert coming up, or at all. At many schools, funds are used to buy the students the instruments because they cant, but there are no funds to ever keep them up or repair them, Muni said. Some children are playing on steel violin and cello strings from the 1990s, which can be pretty painful if theyre breaking. But they do it because they love music. Kids want to play instruments, but they dont have the re sources, Erica said. They want to learn. For Muni, this is personal, too. When he was learning to play vio lin at age 10, his instrument wasnt set up correctly, and he nearly quit from all the problems it gave him. A simple switch with his teacher and he was playing like nothing could hold him back. He knows the importance of a good instru ment, and without that moment his life wouldve been totally different. Thats why its essential to him to give back, regardless of the cost. Were into helping out people and bridging the gap between de sire and means, Muni said. Jones programWhile Erica loves working with Muni and hearing about how the new instruments make music programs better, what she loves most about String Together is her music enrichment program at Jones High School. She works on the students scales and mu sic from their class and a little on technique about once a week. I want to share with people who havent been able to get the experiences that Ive gotten, Er ica said. Im always the student, so its fun to be able to share what you know with the students. And Erica has learned a lot from interacting with the Jones students. She discovered that re gardless of life experience, music still feels the same. Music really transcends peoples culture, peoples back ground, Candace said. Theyre eager to learn, but its not always easy for every student to come. Sometimes the whole class of 10 to 12 will show up, sometimes its just three or four. But theres a certain three or four who always come, because they cant wait to take advantage of the love for music. Theres power behind the mu sic, Erica said. Theyre just start ing to learn that maybe music has something behind it other than the notes that you play. PHOTO BY BRITTNI JOHNSON THE OBSERVERelementary schools. The move came a few weeks after Orange County began in schools in unincorporated areas, and $3 million. The Seminole County program will bring 10 deputies on full-time spilt between the schools one deputy assigned to two or three schools to increase education and safety on Seminole campuses, said Seminole County Sheriff OfCanaday. The $700,000 cost will be spilt between SCPS and SCSO. Well have Focus, but obvi ously everyone is concerned with safety after Sandy Hook, so then weve got extra security here on campus as well, so its two fold, Canaday said. The move to put more cops on campus following the Sandy Hook Elementary shooting in December has spread across the country to Central Florida. Maitland, perhaps fearing a copycat elementary schools temporarily, but the city couldnt afford it for long. The stopgap, in Maitland and Winter Park, has been to beef up patrols moving between elementary schools rather than paying Middle and high schools already school. Principal AnaLynn Jones at Carillon said having the Focus program and Deputy Brewster involved on campus gives her school the best of both worlds: increased police presence, and an added educational element. I think its an appropriate use of our resources; were using the Sheriffs department and we have the presence on campus, but theyre also educating our chil dren and I think thats a really important piece to it, she said. Theyre not just standing at the front door guarding our school, but theyre actually involved in our school and get to know the families and the kids. And I think thats a much better relationship than just having someone sit in your parking lot. Brewster said the mix of the ded in the schools serving a dual purpose is what he feels will make Focus continually successful as it expands to the other schools next fall. Were trying to make a vested interest in the school itself. The school is a community within a community, and showing your presence there, the kids really respond to you, he said. If were going to be here we need to be productive, proactive and productive. We need to make sure that were doing some type of prevention with them cause any little bit helps. A quiz after this weeks les son, and the kids at Carillon name off the three major functions of gangs, and offer suggestions on how they and their classmates can avoid getting involved. Those who do, Are not mak ing good choices because they didnt sit through Mr. Brewsters Focus class, Brewster adds with a smile, garnering nods and gig gles from his crowd. room come 12:05 p.m. from the sign on her door: Youll never regret doing the right thing.SCHOOLS | 60 more schools get cops CONTINUED FROM PAGE 11

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Page 13 of the month and better to be the choice of the year, but it places a business in a whole other category to celebrate 20 years of being a popular restaurant especially along Park Avenue in Winter Park. That is exactly what is happening for the totally friendly bring-thefamily Pannullos Italian Restaurant where owners Richard Pannullo and Michael Schwartz are celebrating 20 years of restaurant success in the same location. And the real winners are those of us who know this restaurant for its mouth-watering, classic Italian dishes, abundant portions and affordable prices. It was a real joy to join Richard, Michael, Mayor Ken Bradley and a host of their friends and family for their 20-year celebration dinner on March 20 complete with engraved, commemorative bottles of red wine. But since there are folks who have not yet experienced the all-around goodness that is Pannullos, lets talk about the food. Beginning with a gourmands feast of appetizers (in portions that would be suitable as entre portions in a lesser establishment), we began with the Salmon Bruschetta. Now it can be said that every Italian restaurant in a four-state radius is proud of their special blend of tomatoes, garlic, and basil, but the addition of fresh grilled salmon makes all the difference. Chances are your doctor wants you eating salmon at least once a week (and I love salmon), but this particular mix unique to Pannullos is a brilliant combination of taste treats that comes highly recommended. Seafood lover that I am, my dining partner and I also tried the mussels offered in ones choice of marinara or white wine sauce (we tried both) and I can happily recommend both. The marinara sauce is special with fresh chunks of tomato, while the garlicy white wine sauce wins with that wonderful option of dipping your bread in the sauce once the mussels are a tasty memory. I always try the meatballs when I go Italian because who doesnt love meatballs? Especially when they are described as the way Grandma made them. Grandma would be proud. Affordably priced, these meatballs are superb. And gestion we tried an appetizer portion (also offered as an entre portion) of the Ravioli Terracina, which turned out to be my OMG experience of the evening. This dish is the ultimate comfort food served in a mushroom, spinach and parmesan cream sauce. And remember, we ordered the appe tizer portion, which was so plentiful I could only imagine what the entre portion would be. Moving on to the entrees, I hasten to remind you the Ravioli Terracina can be ordered as an entre (come with a big appetite), and it comes highly recommend ed. We also tried the eggplant parmigiana, which led to two beautifully cooked in thick slices, which allows one to actually taste the vegetable part of this offering, and second, that each of these comes with a side order of pasta, which is cooked to al dente perfection. Ive concluded the al dente thing is unique to Italian chefs who must have a sixth sense about timing their pasta. We also tried the Chicken Marsala, which according to our server is a house spe cialty. When you taste it you will understand why. Not only is the chicken breast juicy and tender (an art in itself), but Pannullos is rfntrbrbbr fntb tr r rfrfnf tfb rfrfnf tfb rfbrftbrbfrftbrb bbbfbfbrbf fbfbbbbb brfbffftb rfntb ftb nt rfn t b From the Corner TablePHOTO BY JOSH GARRICK THE OBSERVERJosh Garrick with Pannullos owners Richard Pannullo, left, and Michael Schwartz as the duo celebrated 20 years of family-style Italian food on Park Avenue in Winter Park. The pair pride themselves on at least one of them being at the restaurant seven days a week. Please see TABLE on page 14Review: Pannullos Italian Restaurant on ParkJOSH GARRICK Observer Staff Pannullos is open seven days a week at 216 S. Park Avenue in Winter Park. Call 407629-7270 or visit pannullos.com

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Page 14 Florida Institute of Technology is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award associate, baccalaureate, masters, education specialist and doctoral degrees. Florida Institute of Technology does not discriminate on the basis of race, gender, color, religion, creed, national origin, ancestry, marital status, age, disability, sexual orientation, Vietnam-era veterans status or any other discrimination prohibited by law in the admission of students, administration of its educational policies, scholarship and loan programs, employment policies, and athletic or other university sponsored programs or activities.OC-144-213 WE PREPARE EXCEPTIONAL LEADERS Orlando CONTACT US TODAY www.fit.edu/orlando(407) 629-7132 | orlando@fit.edu*Admittance is contingent upon receipt of ofcial academic records.Considering pursuing a masters degree from Florida Techs Orlando site? Join us for: Information session Meet & greet with faculty/staff Food and drinks Easily apply and enroll* INSTANT DECISION DAY TUESDAY, APRIL 2 3 P.M.2420 Lakemont Ave., Suite 190 Orlando, FL 32814 Register by March 26 to orlando@t.edu Application Fee Waived! Ive tasted. It takes the right wine, said the chef when I inquired about his secret. Without actually saving room for dessert, we had to try the made-on-premises Cannoli fabulous and the Tiramisu even more fabulous, and Ive gotta say, Save room. When I asked owner/manager Michael Schwartz about his secret for their longstanding success, we talked about the fact that there is an owner/manager on-site for every shift and Pannullos is open seven days a week. We also talked about the restaurants true family style, which Richard and Michael like to extend to their customers and to their employees as well. No doubt one of the most telling traits of a successful restaurant is happy servers. Finally, however, Michael talked about what the restaurant is not. It is not a bar. It is a family restaurant and that is truly special as witnessed by the extended, three-generation family dining at the table next to us. Speaking in Italian, this family had somehow found the right place for them to feel at home, and that is a better indicator of how good this restaurant is far beyond my words of praise. And if youve read this far in celebration of their 20 years of happily and successfully serving families on Park Avenue Richard and Michael would like to offer a buy-one-get-one free entre (max value $15) when you present this review to your waiter. (Theyll even accept a Xerox copy of the offer), but you must have a copy of this paragraph to receive your free entre, and dont forget to tell them, Josh sent me. I love the food and the atmosphere of this family restaurant, and Im happy to send you.TABLE | The place where real Italian families eat CONTINUED FROM PAGE 13We also talked about the restaurants true family style, which Richard and Michael like to extend to their customers and to their employees as well. No doubt one of the most telling traits of a successful restaurant is happy servers. WPMOBSERVER.COM

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Page 15 T h e m o s t f u n s t o r e o n P a r k A v e n u e Marilyn Monroe Jackie Kennedy Vivien Leigh Lana Turner Bette Davis Natalie Wood Humphrey Bogart Clark Gable Angelina Jewel Eva K ate Pippa Julia Katy Hei d i Reese Taylor Halle Elvis Edward & Bella Jennifer Kim This is the store where Winter Park ladies buy their travel jewelry! 216 B N. Park Avenue Winter Park, FL 32789 w or ldfamousjewelry.com 407960 -3950 (near Paris Bistro) Hours of operation: Monday Saturday 10 AM 6 PM Sunday Noon 5 PM TM Celebrating our 10 th Anniversary $104,000 $108,160 $111,405 $115,861 $119,950 $119,950 $124,748 $129,738 $129,738 $134,928 $131,080 $171,819 $183,846 $225,219 $240,985 $89,861 $78,141 $59,882 $75,679 $82,486 $96,532 $99,939 $61,477 $75,896 $85,597 $85,595 $97,069 $84,961 Which line gives you the best chance for su ccess? Illustration period: 1 -1-2000 through 1-1-2012. Each example shown assumes $100,000 initial premium with no withdrawals. Market value based on the S&P 500 Index. Historical performance o f the S&P 500 Index should not be considered a representation of current or future performance of the Index or of any annuity. Hypothetical index annuity product illustration assumes crediting method of a 6% annual point-to-point cap and annual reset. Hypothetical Income Rider Value assumes a 7% annual rate of return for income purposes. Illustration values represent gross returns. Assumed annuity rates and actual historical prices of the S&P 500 Index were used in this purely hypothetical example for the purpose of illustrating comparitive values and to illustrate how the Interest-Crediting Strategy might have guaranteed. Past performance does not guarantee future results. ONE SHOTYou only have at retirement will fall60% of Americans short. Member of(407)-644-6646www.aSafeHarbor.comBob Adams President/CEOA SafeHarbor, LLC bob@asafeharbor.com Illustration period: 12-31-1999 though 12-31-2012According to paycheckforlife.com, three out of ve middle-class Americans entering retirement today are projected to outlive their nancial assets. Learn how to protect your retirement account from losses, maintain upside potential and maximize your lifetime income. Call us today for your PERSONALIZED SAFE MONEY REPORT. HANNIBAL WINE PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERFood, wine, fun and music by The Redcoats kicked off the Winter Park Sidewalk Art Festival with a bang at the Hannibal Square Wine Tasting March 14. WP ART FEST PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERHundreds of thousands of visitors packed Park Avenue and Central Park in Winter Park for the Winter Park Sidewalk Art Festival March 15-17.

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Page 16 Welcome to our 2013 Board of DirectorsWELCOMENew M embersMONTHLY CHAMBER NEWS & EVENTSPresident ........... Lynn Threlkeld Past President ........... Ed Doyle President Elect ..... George Williston Vice President .... Anita Blackwelder Treasurer ............. Laura Wood Corporate Secretary .... Steve ClintonBrightway Insurance Competitor Gym Cornerstone Hospice The Country Club at Deer Run Browns NY Deli Clayton & McCulloh, PA Dunkin Donuts Integrity Home Loan of Central Florida La Amistad Behavioral Health Services Renee Stein Charlan Thompson Insurance Group of FL Chick-l-A (Maitland) April 4th @ Bahama Breeze in Altamonte Springs: Success Leads Group: Meets the 1st Thursday each month 11:30am 1pm April 9th & 23rd: Coffee Time at the Chamber: 2nd & 4th Tuesday 8am 9am. Enjoy coffee, donuts and networking April 11th @ Francescos, 400 S. Orlando Avenue Maitland: Community Partners: Meets the 2nd Thursday each month 11:30am 1pm. April 12th -14th: 25th Annual Festival of the Arts, presented by the Maitland Area Chamber of Commerce April 17th: Maitland Chamber Community Luncheon: 3rd Wednesday 11:30am 1pm. April 24th: Wednesday, Women and Wisdom: Meets the 4th Wednesday each month 11:30am 1pm Business After Hours: check our website or call 407-644-0741 for updates. April 23rd: 5:30-7:00pm @ PNC Bank, 238 S. Orlando Ave., Maitland Denise Beumer Keith Carrington Kathleen Lapp Catherine Messina Michael Von Berg Jonnie Mae Warner DIRECTORS www.maitlandchamber.com ART AND MYTH PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERThe Observers Josh Garrick, above, performs at Myths and Muses, part of the gallery opening for Barbara Sorensen at Orlandos Jai Gallery March 22. Jill Lockhart, right, plays Pandora. Mila Makarova, below, as Greek Goddess Hera. AMANDA BEARSEPHOTOS BY REBECCA MALES THE OBSERVERWinter Park graduate, actress and director Amanda Bearse of Married ...With Children fame spoke at the Winter Park Welcome Center March 19, part of the Growing Up Wildcat exhibit at the Winter Park History Museum.

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Page 17 Now through April 28 Titus Andronicus at Orlando Shakes Those Elizabethans were a bloody bunch as witnessed by the popularity of Shakespeares bloodiest blockbuster. Vengeance and madness are the themes of Titus Andronicus with each barbarous act escalating the plot to brutal acts of retaliation. Titus Andronicus was the most popular of Shakespeares plays during his lifetime and what does that say about this human race? Its showing through April 28 at the Shakespeare Festival. Call 407-447-1700 or visit orlandoshakes.org March 29 to April 15 Jesus Christ breaks through as Superstar!The Breakthrough Theatre of Winter Park will present the Andrew Lloyd Webber/Tim Rice rock opera Jesus Christ Super star from March 29 to April 15. Based on the Gospel accounts of the last weeks of Jesus life, Superstar opened on Broadway in 1971. Directed by Artistic Di rector Wade Hair (who will also play the role of Herod), Jesus will be played by Tony Flaherty. The Breakthrough Theatre is at 419A W. Fairbanks Ave. in Winter Park Call 407-920-4034. March 30 Cirque de la Symphonie The forward-thinking Orlando Philharmonic shows us how Cirque can meet Symphony in a thrilling program featuring music by Bizet, Saint-Sans, and Tchaikovsky. In this program, acrobats and contortionists perform amazing feats and aerialists soar overhead as the Philharmonic performs. For tickets to these unique performances on March 30 at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m., visit orlandophil.org or call 407-7771700. April 5 and 7 The Orlando Philharmonic presents Madama Buttery A wise man once said that all opera is about love and death, and no opera is more touching on both subjects as Puccinis lando Philharmonic, continuing to distinguish itself in beautifully staged operas (with the Orchestra on-stage), will present Mika the beautiful young geisha who Call 407-770-0071 or visit orlandophil.org April 5 to 7 Casa Feliz hosts Colloquium on Historic PreservationFamed architecture critic Paul Goldberger will deliver the key note address as Casa Feliz hosts the seventh annual James Gamble Rogers II Colloquium on Historic Preservation. Open to the public, the Colloquium includes a bus tour of important Winter Park homes including The Tappan House, The Nelson House, and The Edwards House. Call 407628-8196 or visit casafeliz.usApril 6 pARTicipation Fundraiser for A&Hs Maitland Art Center The fundraiser pARTicipation was voted Best Arts Event in The DailyCitys Best of Orlando, and the newest version will be held on April 6 at Art & History Museums Maitland. The Art Centers campus comes to life in this interactive event showcasing visual artists, food, and mysteriously engaging perfor mances. The dining experience happens at artist-created tables, followed by bidding on art, a text message scavenger hunt, creation stations and more. Call 407-5392181 or visit artandhistory.orgApril 6 Fernando Varela in benet for Gay Games 2018Orlandos homegrown super-talent Fernando Varela has performed in 26 countries. From opera to pop to Broadway, his diverse vocal talent will perform in support of Orlandos bid to host the Gay Games 2018 at 8 p.m. on April 6. Varela says, I am a big fan of the games coming to Orlando, and my wife Susan and I are very supportive of the GLBT community. Staging an event like this in our hometown sends a message to the world that Orlando is ready and willing to be known as an embracing place of diversity and hospitality for all. For tickets, visit ticketweb. com or orlando2018.com April 7 Gold medal fundraiser to benet Piano Competition Yekwon Sunwoo, gold medalist in the 1st Florida International Piano Competition, will be the featured performer on April 7 Competition. Beginning with a cocktail reception and silent aucat the Grand Bohemian. After dinner, the ballroom becomes a private salon as pianist Yekwon Sunwoo offers Bach, Schumann, Scriabin and Schubert on the handcrafted Bsendorfer grand piano. VIP guests will then enjoy a private post-concert reception with the artist. For more informa tion on this Orlando event, visit FloridaPiano.org or call 407-6452525.Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906. Wednesday, April 17, 2013 5-8 p.m. Winter Park Farmers MarketFeaturing 40 local restaurants and caterers, unlimited food and beverage samples and live entertainment in downtown Winter Park. Tickets: $40 WPCC Members (in advance) $45 Non-members & at the door. Tickets and information at www.winterpark.org or call 407-644-8281. Presented by 28th Annual Use the small-space stacked logo ONLY when it is less than 1 inch widePRIMARY SMALL-SPACE Josh Garrick Culture worthy of your calendar This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORG @EnzianTheater Garett Hedlund, Kristen Stewart, and Sam Riley One Week Only! ON THE ROAD Fri & Sun 3:15, 6:30, 9:45 Sat 3:00, 6:30, 9:45 Mon Thurs 6:30, 9:45 Wednesday Night Pitcher Show FLASH GORDON 8pm Free on the Eden Bar Lawn! Tickets Now On Sale for the2013 Florida Film Festival Open Your EyesApril 5-14 Tickets start at $9!

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Page 18 Opinions As we celebrate the 50th an niversary of UCF this year, we of an upper-level education is the opportunity to pursue and obtain insight and knowledge over blindness and ignorance. We live in a time in which faith in religion is believed by many to provide the best solutions to our most profound and unknowable questions. To others, the discipline of mathematics and are considered to be the best rational means for navigating human dilemmas. While these age-old debates between the sacred and secular continue, we must be cautious to not overlook the subtle changes that have taken place in the means and manners for pursu ing truth that are offered to us outside the academic world. More and more, we are being inundated in media and politics with pseudoscience presented as real science in the form of reality shows on many 24-hour cableprograming cycles. The airwaves obscure Egyptology, extrater restrial ancestors, and humananimal creatures in the woods. We consume books listed in the tion categories on The New York Times Best Seller lists that are We populate theaters that offer us outlandish and silly, but frighteningly popular realitybased movies of modern-day vampires, werewolves and ghosts, which appear to be replacing a formerly legitimate primer for future scientists and innovative thinkers. Worse yet is the popular plethora of television documen taries about paranormal activity equipped with high-tech sensors prominently depicted as measures of reliable truth. the traditional visual arts, a similar phenomenon has occurred as fashionable art is becoming more popular than the more thoughtprovoking art. But because the less relevant to the lives of many in our contemporary culture, I think the issue unfortunately goes less noticed and may be considered unequal to the issues confronting science, especially as pseudoscience attempts to usurp and misconstrue the language and methodologies of real science. To those who are uninformed and not exposed to tunities for education in the arts, the visual arts are often relegated to the same realms as pseudosci ence. Leonardo da Vinci has always been celebrated as both an artist and a scientist for his beautiful and meticulous renderings of the observable world, while also of fering us his visions of futuristic recently popular contemporary artist, created complex interlocking geometric forms that can be or both simultaneously, depending on how you look at them. Da Vinci and Escher are well known examples of artists/scientists. Long ago, Paul Czanne, the indisputable father of modern art, was considered radical for simply eliminating directional light and shadow in his paintings. By doing this, his forms began to exist in a universal ment in time. Light, therefore, became integral to color a static and timeless light. He also challenged ideas about space by suggesting that space is not empty. By interlocking and converging broad planes of space with broad planes of mass in his landscapes, Czanne made paintings in which space is affected by objects, and objects are affected by space. Czannes paintings demon strated new conceptions of space, time and light that were being elaborated at the time by the physicists who were challenging assumptions in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. To some of us working as research educators with students to reconnect the arts and sciences, this comparison between modern art and modern physics is funda mental. UCF physics major Christo pher Frye and art student Mary Joy Torrecampo are both inter ested in relationships between science and art, and are currently collaborating on an undergraduate interdisciplinary research project. Based on Fryes explanations to Torrecampo about the geometry of our universe, her challenge is to recreate those explanations in a painting. Frye said: Did you ever play an arcade game as a kid, where if you leave the right side of the screen then you return on the left? In such a universe, space is wrapped up like a cylinder or a torus [a doughnut-shaped surface] so that if you keep going in one direction, you will always return to where you began. Phys icists believe that our universe might be wrapped up like a cylinder or a torus, and the theory of relativity tells us what life should be like in such a universe. His explanation goes on, and it will be a challenge for Tor his ideas in a creative way that is relevant to both her interests and skills as an artist. In the future, Frye will con tinue to pursue advanced physics, but in a world that values pop-science over real science his obscure. I hope Torrecampos imagery, however, might compel people to become excited about Fryes complex theoretical ideas. On the other hand, without Fryes subject matter, Torrecampos abstract paintings may seem incomprehensible and irrelevant to a public that often cares little about the seemingly radical imagery of contemporary art. I hope that more students like them will be encouraged to collaborate for the sake of achieving and obtaining a more expansive, interdisciplinary opportunity for seeking truth and knowledge.UCF Forum columnist Carla Poindexter is an associate professor of ne art at the University of Central Florida and can be reached at Carla.Poindexter@ucf.eduTornadoes can strike any day or night throughout the year. However, tornadoes are more common from March through June, particularly for states in the Southeast, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Although there is little you can do to prepare your home dur ing an EF-2 or stronger tornado, options for improving structural performance do exist and can produce effective results during a weaker tornado. Combined with the use of a safe room and wide spread use of effective strapping, which might increase the cost of a wood frame house by two percent, can create houses that all kinds of severe wind events, according to the Insurance Institute for Business & Home Safety (IBHS). Find out additional ways you can reduce your tornado risks before, during and after a storm by visiting IBHS tornado resources page at DisasterSafety. org. Meanwhile, as you prepare for a possible tornado, know the truth about the following com mon misconceptions regarding tornadoes. Common tornado myths: rivers. Although some landforms tornadoes, rivers do not have any clear effect on them. The great tristate tornado of 1925 crossed both the Mississippi and the Wabash rivers. your house to equalize pressure. Do not do this. Your house will not explode due to a tornado passing over it and taking time to open windows merely reduces your ability to seek safe shelter in time. In fact, once an opening is created, air rushes inside a structure and pressurizes it internal pressures build up and put pressure on ceilings and the roof, which is also getting uplift pressures from external wind forces. This can lead to the entire structure collapsing. corner of the building for safety. The safest place in a building is in a small, reinforced room (such as a bathroom or closet) near the center of the building, on the ground). Even safer is a tornado safe room. Sometimes, the damage path of a tornado will result in demolition of several buildings, followed by several lightly damaged, followed by several more demolished. This gives the impression that the tornado skipped over the less-damaged structures. There are several explanations for this. One is that the surviving buildings were better construct ed. Also there is a possibility that the orientation of the buildings resulted in varying degrees of vulnerability. (Source: National Weather Service) IBHS is a leading national expert on preparing for, and repairing and rebuilding struc tures after a catastrophe to make them more disaster-resistant. To arrange an interview with IBHS, contact Joseph King at 813-6751045 or 813-442-2845, jking@ibhs. org or via direct message on Twitter @jsalking. Visit DisasterSafety.org for more information about how to make your buildings more resistant to a variety of disasters, big and small. Follow IBHS on Twitter at @DisasterSafety and on Facebook. If you have recently started a new job, it turns out youre not alone. A Bureau of Labor Statistics report stated that in 2012 the median number of years that wage and salary employees worked in their current job was 4.6 years. estimate that an individual might change jobs at least six times in a lifetime, which may mean an individual likely has multiple 401(k) retirement plans. In the haze of starting a new job, keep and retirement plans could get confusing or overwhelming but its important not to lose sight on your house cleaning may involve consolidating several 401 (k)s. tiple 401 (k) plans, here are some points to consider: Leaving the J-O-B? If you leave your job (voluntarily or involuntarily), youll be entitled to a distribution of your vested balance. Its important for you to understand how your particular plans vesting schedule works because youll forfeit any employer contributions that havent vested by the time you leave your job. If youre on the cusp of vesting, it may make sense to wait before leaving if you have that luxury. Dont spend it, roll with it! If you take a distribution youll be taxed at ordinary income tax rates on the entire amount of your account except for any aftertax or Roth 401(k) contributions. Which to choose: 401(k) or IRA? Presuming both options are available to you there is no right or wrong answer to this question, and there are strong arguments for both options. A professional adviser can assist you because the decision you make may have now and in the future. Reasons to roll over to an IRA: You typically have more investment choices with an IRA than with an employers 401(k) plan, as you may freely allocate your IRA dollars among different options and you may have more distribution options depend on the terms of that particular plan. However, with an IRA, the timing and amount of distributions is generally at your discretion. You may also roll over your 401(k) plan distribution to a Roth IRA. Youll have to pay taxes on the amount you roll over (minus any after-tax contributions youve tions from the Roth IRA in the future will be tax-free. Reasons to roll over to your new employers 401(k) plan: A rollover to your new employers 401(k) plan may provide greater creditor protection than a rollover to an IRA. Your creditors (with certain exceptions) cannot attach your plans funds to satisfy any of your debts and obligations, regardless of whether youve declared bankruptcy. If your distribution includes Roth 401(k) contributions and earnings, you can roll those amounts over to either a Roth IRA or your new employers Roth 401(k) plan (if it accepts rollovers). Armed with these helpful changing jobs knowing this career move will let you retire with more money in the bank! Ray White is a senior vice president of PNC Wealth Management and leads those efforts for Central Florida. PNC Wealth Management has been in Florida for more than 25 years, serving individuals with $1 million or more in investable assets. He can be reached at raymond.white@pnc.comChanging jobs? Take your 401(k) and roll with it! RAY WHITE Guest WriterBusting storm myths as tornado season beginsScience and arts answers in search for truthCARLA POINDEXTER Guest Writer

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Page 19 Chris Jepson PerspectivesLouis Roney Play On!Some life. Bittersweetlongs to well, the bitter, who are will ing to settle for attitudes that produce nothing good for either the sender or the receiver. Bitterness is one of the most unattractive of all human conditions. In my 33 years of marriage to b.w., I recall not a moment of bitterness. I have, howme often in rudeness and bitterness the fact of which leaves me only shaking my When she is talking with me, I often get the feeling that, for no particular reason, she just doesnt like me. My belief is that controller and that she has never yet discovered a way to control me! I have never tried to control other people, but am still trying to control myself without noticeable success. Her coolness is a pe culiar condition, as slightly more than 54 percent of the people I know seem to tolerate me quite well. This relative of mine is one of those people who automatically takes the opposing point of view of anything I say to her. If I point out what a beautiful clear day it is, she may say, No, youre wrong. There is a little cloud over there beyond that tree. Although I love my relative, I would surely never want to be married to a woman like her that would be really bitter! strangers to be friendly and nice unless they later gave me good reason to change my opinion. In that case I walked away and forgot them, the way one forgets an orange thats too sour to eat. In those days, we were not taught to be wary of grown-ups we didnt know. Today, that is neither a popular nor perhaps a safe idea. block of the human race from the begin ning of recorded history. The father, mother and the child are the trinity of human progressthat triangle which guarantees the future and memorializes the past. And so it is that we see with dismay, clear signs of weakening of the structure of the human family in todays world. Todays family can consist of a mother and fathereach in different daytime jobsa son away at college, a daughter studying in a distant city, and a third child still in a local public school. When I went to high school I either walked or rode a bike everywhereto day kids always seem to have an auto mobile available. On dates we used to go to a movie, and afterwards have a root beer at the drug store counter! It may be that todays family only a few times a year sits down for dinner at the home table, and that most communication is via phone or email. Certainly the closeness of families of several generations ago is being challenged, even jeopardized. ful nation, is committing suicide by opposing the word work. French workers work 35 hours a week and get no over per yearsometimes up to eight. They retire from their jobs at 59 or 60. Pensions must be paid longer now. With all this folderol, France still has 10 percent un employed. You cant sell what you dont produce, and if youre not working, youre not producing. Napoleon made France a tough country to compete with. Now theyre a pushover.About Roney: HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney)Life begins at conception but ends at birth. Some life. I do not have any qualms agreeing with the pro-life position that life begins at conception. It would be disingenuous to argue otherwise. But I would ask: Is that life, say, six years later is one of tor ment, abuse and neglect? If life is sacred as pro-life advocates contend, why are the lives of Americas impoverished children, for example, somehow of lesser importance (less sacred)? Life the size of a pencil-point has pro-life advocates in tears of reverence, yet Americas impoverished, mentally ill, homeless veterans, etc. are too often marginalized, dismissed or neglected. Requiring a life requires responsibility. To say that all life is sacred as pro-life advocates maintain is belied by the reality that some life (to them) is more revered (see Pencil-Point Life). This issue pivots for me on female rights. Ive acknowledged that I subscribe to the fact that human life begins at conception. What then? Pro-life advocates would strip women of autonomy . for all the years they are fertile. Regardless of that individual womans rights, her uterus would be subject to government authority and regulation. The irony is frequently noted that the government an obstacle to freedom, yet thinks stripping Americas women of their autonomy perfectly acceptable. Do they not comprehend the inherent contra diction of their position? One of the most revolutionary achievements of the 20th century was the development of safe, accessible and affordable birth control for women. No longer would women have to relentlessly bear child, after child, after child. This one ad vance changed the course of our species. Birth control (and accompanying female education/empowerment) offers human ity our best (safest) prospect for getting Earths population to a sustainable level but thats a different issue. I am of a mixed-mind as to under standing why any Westerner (historical Western European culture) would resist the trajectory of our citizens toward individual autonomy and freedom. For all. Is it mere coincidence that the preponder ance (leadership/spokespersons) of those in the pro-life movement are noisy males, authoritatively advocating for the management of a womans body? And what does it say about the women of the pro-life movement? This boggles my mind. How can it be that any woman knowledgeable of the undeniable 10,000-year history of male oppression of women would advocate the renewed oppression of their sex? (Oh, that boot istic? The predominantly male legislators of Arkansas and North Dakota rush to to ultimately outlaw abortion (and certain forms of birth control). Rather than marginalizing Americas women by restricting their autonomy and freedom, I advocate we respect every womans right to manage her own life in accord with her wishes and plans. Not every session of coitus plans for a concep tion. Let the individual woman privately decide for herself what happens next. To interject the state in such matters is an historical step backward for women. These last few words are for young women: If you do not speak up, what you take for granted your right to man age your own body will be stripped from you (and any daughters you may someday choose to conceive). Call Planned Parenthood of Greater Orlando at 407-246-1788. Get involved. Volunteer. Your freedom may very well depend on it. And it doesnt get any more personal than that. Jepson is a 24-year resident of Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.USEDITORIAL CARTOONS King Features Weekly ServiceMarch 25, 2013 King Features Weekly ServiceMarch 25, 2013 King Features Weekly ServiceMarch 25, 2013

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Page 20 Downtown Maitland Office for RentFully Renovated, 760 sq ft.; mini kitchen ette; private bath; 2 blocks from new City Hall. Parking front, rear & street. Ideal for attorney or other professional. $1,100 per month. 407-831-6622. Offices for RentWinter Park Real Estate Offices for rent (Winter Park/Goldenrod/University). Doc tors office w/5 exam rooms + extra features. Other office units available from 800-3000 SF. Nice bldg.; great prices. Call Ann 407-293-1934. annpolasek@ cfl.rr.com REAL ESTATE: COMMERCIAL BANK-REPOSSESSION Smith Lake, AlabamaPrime dockable Homesite $49,900. Bank loss of $120K per lot. Level to water, no stairs. Build at waters edge. NEW TO MARKET. Roads and utilities in place. Available April 20th. Make early appt. Once in a lifetime opportunity. 877-4486816. REAL ESTATE: FOR SALE Mobile Homes with land.Ready to move in. Owner Financing with approved credit. Lots of room for the price, 3BR, 2BA. No renters. 850-3086473. LandHomesExpress.com Buy 1-3BR Homes from $1,000/mo!PreForeclosured and Rent2OWN Homes! Bad Credit OK! Only 500 Credit Score Min! To learn more and access local listings call 1-866-955-0621. REAL ESTATE: FOR RENT LEATHER LIVING ROOM SETIn Original Plastic, Never Used, orig $3,000, sacrifice $975. CHERRY BEDROOM SET, Solid Wood, new in factory boxes-$895. Can deliver. Call Bill 813298-0221. Would you like help in selling your Antiques and Collectables?Thousands of potential buyers. Tired walls.com Mr. Fleming Florida State License #OR1502/AU4441. All Calls Confi dential. 407-489-3351. MERCHANDISE Airline Careers Become an Aviation Maintenance TechFAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance. 866-314-3769 MEDICAL CAREERS begin hereTrain ONLINE for Allied Health and Medi cal Management. Job placement assis tance. Computer available. Financial aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 888203-3179. www.CenturaOnline.com AIRLINES ARE HIRINGTrain for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified. Housing available. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866314-3769. Mausoleum Companion Site for saleLocated in Glen Haven Memorial Park, 2300 Temple Drive, Winter Park. $6500 for both together (regular pricing over $11,000). Call 352-430-1851 or 352816-1066. MISCELLANEOUS MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED!Train to become a Medical Office Assis tant. NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training gets you Job ready ASAP. HS Di ploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! 888926-7884. ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home*Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Financial aid if qualified. SCHEV autho rized. Call www.CenturaOnline.com 800443-5186. COMPUTER TECHNICIANS TRAINING!Train for PC Technical Careers at sctrain. edu. No computer experience needed! Job placement assistance. HS Diploma/ GED a MUST! Start Immediately! 1-888872-4677. EDUCATION Caregiver Available to Elderly or Infirm61 year old lady, w/LPN experience,seeking live in arrangement, as evening/ overnight caregiver for el derly/infirm person. Must be close prox imity to old Winter Park. No heavy lifting. Non smoker/drinker, WVA farm girl;love to cook. Hourly pay/arrangements nego tiable. samclickx@yahoo.com 407-7826666 PROFESSIONAL SERVICE Winter Park Benefit Shop140 Lyman Ave, Winter Park needs items to sell: clothing, bedding, jewelry, kitchenware and bric-a brac. Also need ing volunteers. Contact Elizabeth Comer 407-647-8276. Open Tues & Fri at 9:30am; Sat 10am-1pm. All proceeds support childrens programs & the Or lando Blind Association. ANNOUNCEMENTS Transfer Drivers: Need 20 Contract DriversCDL A or B to relocate vehicles to and from various locations throughout US No forced dispatch: 800-501-3783. www.mamotransportation.com. Driver Trainees Needed NOW!Become a driver for Werner Enterprises. Earn $800 per week! Local CDL Training. 877-214-3624 Driver-Qualify for any portion of $.03/milequarterly bonus: $.01 Safety, $.01 Pro duction, $.01 MPG. Two raises in first year. 3 months recent experience. 800414-9569 www.driveknight.com HELP WANTED The Marketplace Nancy Babgy Team 818 Alameda Street, Orlando $715,000 Kelly Maloney 2383 Parkside Glen, Apopka $269,000 Cathy Richey 223 E Canton Ave #223, Winter Park $275,000 Maria Van Warner 219 Genius Drive, Winter Park $1,700,000 Jerry Oller 416 Balmoral Road, Winter Park $400,000 OBSERVERJust Sold Homes1380 Viburnum Lane, Winter Park, FL 32792 sold by Cindy Watson & Kelly L. Price 151 E. Washington Street #317, Orlando, FL 32801 sold by Jim & Melody Mitchell 1177 N. Park Avenue, Winter Park FL 32789 sold by Patrick Higgins 1336 Sunset Drive, Winter Park FL 32789 sold by Kelly L. Price 1240 N. Park Pointe Lane, Winter Park, FL 32789 sold by Sherri Dyer 4940 Tangerine Avenue, Winter Park, FL 32792 sold by Julie Bombardo & Dee Morgan 61 Interlaken Road, Orlando FL 32804 sold by Padgett McCormick Its FREE to place estate sales, garage sales and yard sales on this page! Visit WPMObserver .com and click Create Your Classified MindGymMarch 25, 2013 MindGymMarch 25, 2013 SATURDAY 1-4 NEW LISTING!TRADITIONAL HOME IN WINGFIELD RESERVE2159 Deer Hollow Circle, Longwood. 4BD/3BA. 3,100SF. Enjoy the Seminole County Lifestyle in this beautifully cared for home. Warm colors, extensive crown molding, newly re-done hard wood floors and incredible media room are just a few of the features in this Family Home. Relax in your tropical screened pool and lanai. Enjoy coming home to this beauty. This one will not last! $599,900 OBSERVEROpen Houses Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. SCHEV authorized.MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERECall 888-203-3179www.CenturaOnline.com 866-314-3769AIRLINES ARE HIRING Colon cancer is the 2ndleading cause of cancer deaths in Florida. 7 out of 10cancer deaths can be prevented through screening and lifestyle changes. Colon cancer starts without symptoms so choose prevention and get screened.If youre 50or older, ask your doctor which colon cancer screening test is right for you. Colon Cancer Screening Saves LivescoloncancerFL.org rffntb

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WPMOBSERVER.COM COPS TEACHING CLASS LIFESTYLES, 11 Hopping good fun Looking for a way to spend Easter weekend outside? Look no farther than Central Park. CALENDAR, 8 Making music again This teenager saw broken instruments and found a way to get kids playing again. LIFESTYLES, 9 Review: Pannullos Twenty years after opening, is Park Avenues family-style Italian mainstay still good? CORNER TABLE, 13 COMMUNITY BULLETIN ............ 4 CALENDAR .................... 8 LIFESTYLES .................... 9 CULTURE ..................... 17 OPINIONS .................... 18 CLASSIFIEDS .................. 20 CALL US TODAY FOR A COPY OF Your Guide to Social Security Bob@aSafeHarbor.com | ASafeHarbor.com(407) 644-6646 Learn more visit www.ss.vip2site.com When faced with stormy nancial waters, seek... Call us today for your Complimentary Custom Annuity Review!407-644-6646 or visit www.asafeharbor.com for your complimentary brochure. Winter Park Recovery CenterExecutive Drug & Alcohol Treatment Services Suboxone Maintenance For Opioid Abuse Sinclair Method for Alcohol Extinction Hypnotherapy/Acupuncture/MassageMedically Managed Dual Diagnosis Evidenced Based Protocols2056 Aloma Ave, Suite 100, Winter Park, FL 32792www.WinterParkRecoveryCenter.com 407-629-0413 Winter Parks City Commis sion approved three projects by developer Dan Bellows in one night Monday. A 206-unit apartment building near the Winter Park Village had upset nearby residents. The proj box to clean stormwater drain ing into a nearby lake and will replace the removed tree canopy. Im really appreciative the applicant is working to get the (electrical) lines underground, Commissioner Tom McMacken said. The Commission also ap proved a zoning change to prop erties near the intersection of Ly man and New York avenues from The Ravaudage development was granted a commercial devel opment district that would give it eminent domain powers, though only over members of the CDD. The latter two projects will require a second reading to be enacted. After more than 10 years of planning and just less than 10 months before its demonstration phase is set to kick off, LYNX announced last week that its pulling out of overseeing opera tion of the intelligent transport system FlexBus, leaving its four committed participant cities questioning the systems future. A month after an update to the city of Maitland revealed that everything for FlexBus, an on-demand bus system, was running on schedule to launch they were shocked and disap longer planned to help oversee the project as of last week. In a letter dated March 18, LYNX director of engineering David Healey stated LYNX is not in the position to implement the operations of FlexBus service at this time. He said the four participating cities Maitland, Altamonte Springs, Longwood and Casselberry can operate the system themselves, or seek an outside operator to apply for funding grants to run the system for them. That wasnt really the intent (of the deal), because were not PHOTO COURTESY OF LYNX LYNX designed technologies for FlexBus, but backed out suddenly from a plan to oper ate the system, announced in a letter sent to the city of Mailtand on March 18. Please see FLEXBUS on page 2 LYNX leaves FlexBus stalled LYNX pulls out of overseeing the operation of FlexBus, leaving four participating cities questioning the systems future SARAH WILSON Observer Staff Commission OKs three projects ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff The mayor or fellow alreadyelected Council members pub licly endorsing candidates for other seats on the dais shouldnt land them in trouble in Maitland, say political science experts from UCF and Rollins College. Theres a big gray area be tween whats ethically and le gally OK and whats tradition ally accepted as political culture, said UCF political science pro fessor Aubrey Jewett. Maitland Mayor Howard Schieferdecker had drawn criti cism from fellow Council mem ber Bev Reponen when she saw him actively campaigning for candidates in the March 12 Council election. Openly cam paigning for candidates while in become a rarity in the Maitland, and had led to a public resigna tion in Winter Park. But aside from upsetting gen erally accepted social mores, its age by campaigning as a private citizen, Jewett said, even if you wield the personal credibility of being mayor. So leading up the March election in Maitland, as long as Council members werent uti lizing resources gained through citizen money and did so in an non-corrupt or threatening man ner, Jewett said theres nothing illegal or unethical about the mayor and Council members hitting the streets campaign signs in hand. PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVER Maitland Mayor Howard Schieferdecker drew some ack for campaigning openly for candidates in the March 12 city council election, but he did not violate election laws. Please see ENDORSEMENTS on page 2 Election ethics: were they breached? Experts say endorsements from fellow Council members may anger some, but arent unethical SARAH WILSON Observer Staff

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Page 2 (407) 514-0087 3.05% Certain restrictions apply. Rates may vary depending on deposit amount. We broker CDs for FDIC insured banks. Promotional incentive may be included to obtain yield.w w w .oldhar bor f inancial .c om Old Harbor FINANCIAL12 Mon t h CDAlso oer IRA Specials & free 401k ReviewsAPYHigher Rates for Longer Term in the business of operating a bus system, said Maitland City Man ager Jim Williams. Williams, and Maitlands fed eral lobbyist Louis Rotundo, said thered been no warning that this was coming until it hit their desks last Friday. To say this letter is a surprise would be sort of an understate ment, Rotundo said. To see this letter show up at the end of this process is, I think, disappoint ing to say the least. Members of Maitlands City Council sounded off at Mondays meeting, questioning how the sys tem deemed by Council mem bers a necessity for the success of SunRail can proceed. Looking back at a Memoran dum of Understanding (MOU) from the agreement between the four cities and Lynx, Maitland Community Development Di rector Dick Wells said there are enough implied wordings of LYNXs involvement through im plementation of FlexBus that war rant the citys surprise following last weeks letter. This to me is an outrage, Maitland Mayor Howard Schief erdecker said. This is some thing weve been trying to do for a long time thats very important for SunRail, for our SunRail and also for the other cities, and now were really in a bind. Now youre creating this Sun Rail project and youre killing it before its even getting started, Councilwoman Linda Frosch said. This has a severe domino effect on a lot of businesses and a lot of residents. Schieferdecker said LYNX par ticipation was key to the process of getting federal grant funding for the system as a public entity. Without LYNX, Rotundo said, it might be impossible for the cities to get the grant money from the government theyd planned to use to operate the system. Council members, with the support of Rotundo, are reaching advice on answering the inevi table question of, What now? Meanwhile, spokesperson for LYNX Matthew Friedman said its business as usual for LYNX. Our job was to develop the concept and its the partners job to come up with the operations dollars, Friedman said, adding that LYNX has not strayed from its initial path with the project of committing to develop the tech nology never agreeing to oper ate the buses. Rotundo said the city will work to see if LYNX will recon sider continuing with the project through the trial phase, or look into other options for funding and operation. Its rather disappointing that weve stepped up as four cities and said, Well help, well do our part, well do it with our money, and one of the agencies thats sup posed to be facilitating the suc cess of SunRail seems to be on a different mission, Rotundo said. Thats not very helpful to the re gion. Its interesting to me that the tradition has been not to be in volved, Jewett said. In many areas of Florida and certain areas around the country, its just not re ally become an issue. The blurry line between cam paigning as a private citizen when youre a face-recognizable elected professor Rick Foglesong said, is made clear by how its presented. Its not appropriate for an the resources of his or her elected anther person But it is permis sible that someone would use their name or position to cam paign for themselves or someone else, Foglesong said. According to rulings by the Florida Commission on Ethics, theres another line drawn be time and resources such as city stationery or business cards and on-the-job hours and using pri vately sourced resource knockoffs situation using publicly fund ed resources to campaign being unethical, and the second using acquired means is permissible. ing out pizza at polling stations, shaking hands while going doorto-door on the street, and send ing out endorsement emails from private accounts as long as its being done without corrupt in tentions, coercive actions or cityfunded resources, or on city-time Foglesong said, can be perfectly if theyre against tradition. Thats something that could come back and hurt someone politically if its contrary to the common practice, but that doesnt make it unethical or unlawful ei ther, he said. FLEXBUS | City officials now wondering about their next step after sudden removal of LYNX bus support C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE ENDORSEMENTS | Political expert: Schieferdecker in the clear if he didnt use mayorship threateningly C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE Its not appropriate for an elected office holder to use any of the resources of his or her elected office to campaign for himself or another person But it is permissible that someone would use their name or position to campaign for themselves or someone else, Rollins political science professor Rick Foglesong

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#2Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Get screened today.Each year more than 150,000 people are diagnosed with colorectal cancer. As a part of Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month, Florida Hospital is urging you to put a stop to this preventable disease before it starts. Because colon cancer can develop with no signs or symptoms, a regular colonoscopy is the recommended method to finding pre-cancerous polyps. If you are at least 50 years of age or have a family history of colorectal cancer, get screened today. Call (407) 303-1700 or visit ScheduleYourScreening.com to schedule a colonoscopy today.WPMH-13-11853 WPMH-13-11853 Colorectal Ad WP Observer March.indd 1 3/8/13 10:10 AM

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Page 4 DONT MISS OUTon the2013 Summer Fun & Entertainment Guide! The Summer Fun & Entertainment Guide will be printed and inserted into the Winter Park-Maitland Observer on April 11, and the Seminole Voice on April 12. is comprehensive directory will not only serve as an invaluable resource, but will allow you to showcase your business or service directly to local contacts. Parents will be looking at a variety of activities for their children in addition to preparing them for a new school year.Call and reserve your space today!Linda Stern / 407-376-2434 / LStern@turnstilemediagroup.com Business Briefs Community Bulletin Endangered Species Day Parents, teachers and scout leaders tell your kids to start the drawing engines and participate in the annual Endangered Species Day Youth Art Contest an in tegral part of the eighth annual national Endangered Species Day, celebrated on May 17. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and numerous conservation organizations will observe Endangered Species Day to recognize conservation efforts under way across the nation aimed at helping Americas imperiled species. This year also commemorates the 40th anniversary of the Endangered Species Act. Volunteers needed VITAS Innovative Hospice Care of Central Florida needs volunteers in the Winter Park/Maitland area who can befriend terminally ill patients, provide relief for weary caregivers, accompany their pet on Paw Pals visits, visit with veterans, provide art and music therapy, make bereavement calls, sew Memory Bears or garment bags, knit/crochet afghans, make crafts, help repair medical equip ment, or help with administrative work. Call 407-691-4541 or email central.ori davolunteers@vitas.com if you would like to nd out more information. Award-winning producer The Florida Historical Society has award ed the 2013 David C. Brotemarkle Award to Dr. Maurice OSullivan Ken neth Curry Professor of Literature at Rol lins College, and Mr. Bill Dudley, award winning Florida technical director. Dr. OSullivan was executive producer of the project, which was lmed and edited by Mr. Dudley. Named after the rst English poem about Floridathe 1564 Have You Not Hard of Florydathe lm includes almost 30 important poets from Tallahas see to Miami reading their work as well as classic works from the states past. Top scholars The following students from your area were named to the Deans List at Mercer University for the fall 2012 semester: Kathryn Dunnam of Maitland, a senior, was named to the Deans List of the Col lege of Liberal Arts. Lauren Gassie of Winter Park, a sopho more, was named to the Deans List of the Eugene W. Stetson School of Business and Economics. Bryan Danley of Maitland, a senior, was named to the Presidents List and Deans List of the school of engineering for the fall 2012 semester. Princeton senior Jake Nebel from Win ter Park, has been named a winner of the Universitys 2012 Moses Taylor Pyne Honor Prize, the highest general distinc tion conferred on an undergraduate. Honoring Kevin Gray The Annie Russell Theatre and Depart ment of Theatre and Dance at Rollins Col lege presented a special service March 16 honoring Kevin Gray and his contribu tions to Rollins College during his tenure. Kevin Gray, a visiting artist professor at Rollins from 2009-2011, passed away unexpectedly on Feb. 11 in Connecticut, where he was currently an associate pro fessor of theatre for the Hartt School. Orlando Health has named Horace Wayne Easterling director of diver sity and minority business development. In this role, Wayne will provide corporate leadership in developing, implementing and evaluating Orlando Healths diversity and inclusion strategy to support the or ganization across multiple departments including human resources, business de velopment, and materials management. Royal Oak Homes, based in Orlandos Baldwin Park, recently promoted Colby Franks to executive vice president. Franks is a graduate of the University of Florida and has more than 18 years of experience in the homebuilding industry. He joined Royal Oak Homes in December 2010 as vice president of construction. Rollins College recently named Shelley Wilson Gentile director of the Ofce of Multicultural Affairs (OMA). In her new role, Gentile will focus on establishing OMA and Chase Hall as a welcoming lo cation for all, as well as a home base for those with an afnity towards any or all of OMAs organizations and programs. Rollins College and The Olympia Com panies announced the appointment of Deanne Gabel as general manager of The Alfond Inn, opening in Winter Park in August 2013. Gabel was a senior vice president with Wyndham Worldwides Hospitality Division. Winter Park-based pawn chain La Familia Pawn & Jewelry recently hired pawn in dustry veteran Rosa Wedge as director of operations for the companys Puerto Rican stores. Wedges hire is part of the companys ongoing effort to provide in creased support for the Puerto Rican mar ket, into which the company continues to rapidly expand due to demand. Cuhaci & Peterson Architects Engi neers Planners based in Orlandos Bald win Park, recently completed the design of three residential handicap ramps for the Center for Independent Living. First Green Bank with headquarters in Mount Dora and branches in downtown Orlando, Clermont and Ormond Beach, recently appointed the Orlando architec tural rm of VOA Associates to draw up building and site plans for a Winter Park branch. Kenneth LaRoe, chairman and chief executive ofcer at First Green Bank, said the Winter Park branch will open by the end of the third quarter of this year. Charles H. Egerton one of the found ing shareholders of the law rm of Dean, Mead, Egerton, Bloodworth, Capouano & Bozarth, P.A. in Orlando, was recently ap pointed to the American Tax Policy Insti tutes (ATPI) Board of Trustees. Trinity Prep athletes go to college Members of Trinity Preps Class of 2013 gathered on National Signing Day to sign letters of intent to continue their athletic careers in college. Jack OConnor of Winter Park committed to Swarthmore College for swimming; Madeleine Loftus of Winter Park committed to Centre College for soccer; Rick Hord of Kissimmee committed to Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute for baseball; and Daniel Salas of Winter Park committed to Dartmouth College for cross country and track. Three other seniors signed letters of intent in November. Kyle Cavanaugh of Winter Park committed to North Carolina State for baseball; Eliot Shapleigh of Oviedo committed to Stetson University for baseball; and Felicia Coleman of Winter Springs committed to the University of Nebraska at Omaha.

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Page 5 Winter Park City Talk BY RANDY KNIGHT CITY MANAGER March 25 City Commission meeting There was a City Commission meeting held March 25 in City Hall Commission Chambers. Be low are a few highlights from that meeting: Mayors Report acknowledge Friends of Fleet Pee ples Park volunteer efforts, Victim Service Center of Central Florida Inc., Edwin Ford Day, Purchasing Month and Water Conservation Month. made to the Hannibal Square Community Land Trust Inc. City Attorneys Report regarding property at 1849 Aza lea Ave. were resolved with lien reduction to facilitate a sale agree ment. Non-action item nancial Report for the year ended Sept. 30, 2012, was presented. Consent Agenda approved. tracts were approved (for a full listing, please visit cityofwinter park.org under Whats New > City Commission Agenda). eral Lobbying Services to Alcalde & Fay Government and Public Af fairs Consultants was tabled until April 8. Action items requiring discussion sented. Public hearings Town Center Development, LLC: proval to construct a four-story, 206-unit residential project and a parking garage of approximately 300 spaces at 940 W. Canton Ave. was approved. tion: nance to change the Future Land Use designation of Single Fam ily Residential and Institutional properties at 216, 226 and 234 W. Lyman Ave. was approved. velopment District (CDD): nance granting petition of Benja min Partners, Ltd.; establishing and naming the Ravaudage Com munity Development District pursuant to Chapter 190, Florida Statutes; describing and provid ing the external boundaries, the functions and powers of the Dis serve as the initial members of the Districts Board of Supervisors Non-action item ment was discussed. A full copy of the March 25 City Commission minutes will be available at cityofwinterpark.org the week of April 8, pending ap proval by City Commission. Popcorn Flicks in the Park Join us for Popcorn Flicks in the Park featuring The Dirty Dozen Thursday, March 28, at 8 p.m. in Central Park. The Pop corn Flicks series is presented by Ruths Hospitality Group and Winter Park CRA, and produced by Enzian Theater. This event was rescheduled from March 14 due to the 54th Winter Park Sidewalk Art Festival. We encourage you to gather your family and friends and bring a blanket, a picnic or snacks. Free popcorn will be avail able for everyone! 59th annual Easter Egg Hunt The city of Winter Park is proud to announce their 59th an nual Easter Egg Hunt will be held Saturday, March 30, in beautiful Central Park West Meadow lo cated in downtown Winter Park. The hunt will begin promptly ing signal. Children with special needs are also encouraged to join in the fun. More than 10,000 stuffed eggs will be placed throughout Central Park West Meadow. As always, children who come up empty handed will still be able to enjoy special treats at the designated area. For more information re garding Winter Parks oldest com munity event, please call 407-5993275. KWPB accepting applications for grant programs Keep Winter Park Beautiful (KWPB) is currently accepting grant applications for community garden and pocket park restora tion projects. Applications for up to $3,000 in funding will be ac cepted from neighborhood and community-based groups for funds to support improvements to mini parks, medians, rights of way or any city-owned green area that is fully accessible to guidelines and application forms cial website at cityofwinterpark. applications must be received by Monday, April 1, at 5 p.m. The mission of KWPB is to im prove the quality and aesthetics of our environment in order to cre ate a healthier and more beautiful place to live, work and play. The purpose of the Community Gar den and Pocket Park Restoration Project is to support neighbor hoods in their efforts to beautify and improve the community, and take ownership of public spaces. In addition to calling for com munity garden and pocket park grant applications, KWPB is also calling for local schools to submit Green Schools Grant applications that share how they are working to keep their school environment beautiful. Up to $1,800 will be al located to local schools in recog nition of these efforts. Mayor Ken Bradley will recognize selected schools at the Earth Day in the Park & Arbor Day Tree Give away celebration Saturday, April 20, at 10:30 a.m. from the main stage in Central Park. Grant appli cations for local schools must also be received by Monday, April 1, at 5 p.m. For more information regard ing KWPB grant programs and to obtain an application, please email kwpb@cityofwinterpark. org or call 407-599-3364. Visit the citys ofcial website at cityofwinterpark.org, like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and watch us on Vimeo.

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Page 6 City Council Meeting of March 25, 2013 The Maitland City Council met on March 25 at 6:30 p.m. in the City Hall Council Chambers. Be low is a synopsis of that meeting. Special Presentation: Arborist Brian Dierks presented a Power Point presentation show ing projects undertaken by the Interim Improvement Committee. Public Hearing: tition No. 2012-02 Maitland Con course North) to approve the pro posed CDP Text Amendment and Map Amendment as approved for transmittal by the City Council to the Department of Economic Op portunity (DEO) at their meeting of Jan. 28, 2013, and authorized city staff to transmit the adopted ordinance and amendment pack age to DEO. The application for amendment to the 2030 Compre hensive Development Plan (2030 CDP) was submitted by the prop erty owner, BPL Maitland Con course North, LLC. The property is generally located on the north side of Maitland Boulevard, east of Interstate 4 and west of Mait land Avenue, between Concourse Parkway and Lake Faith Villas. Consent Items: Council meeting and the March 4, as presented. Meeting Minutes of the city of Maitland Canvassing Board March 12, 2013 & March 14, 2013 were approved as presented. park-operating schedule. ager to renew a facility use agree ment renewal for the Cottage at Lake Lily facility with the Mait land Art & History Association for a period of 24 months. of HUD grant funds to purchase upgrade goods and services for Covered Bridge Park and Jim Houser Azalea Garden. Improve ments will include upgrades to the pathways at both locations with permeable pathway surfac ing, installation of a small park ing area at Azalea Park, provide a small picnic area in the north east corner of the garden, install benches, tables and a small pavil ion in the Covered Bridge Park. Paved (permeable pathways) will also be installed in the Covered Bridge Park to facilitate easier walking and use of the property. amount of $850 to the Internation al Society of Arboriculture. 25 percent cancellation penalty for a September fundraising event for the blind that was cancelled due to unforeseen circumstances. Decision Items: Councilman Valdes to establish guidelines for promoting Mait land through the city web site. and submission of a Preliminary Site Information Questionnaire to the Florida Department of State as a preliminary evaluation of the library structure and property as potential Historic Place. Approval by the State of Florida Bureau of Historic Preservation is a prereq uisite in the Bureaus determina tion before applying with the US Department of the Interior to be listed on the National Register of Historic Places. To listen to a recording of the meeting, please check our website at itsmymaitland.com One Senior Place ... See our full Calendar of Events at OneSeniorPlace.com407.949.6733715 Douglas Avenue Altamonte Springs, FL 32714M-F 8:30am 5pmM O N DA Y, A P RI L 1 Every Monday 10am 1pm Senior Club (sponsored by Family Physicians Group) Every Monday, 10am 12noon April 1 Bingo April 8 Computer Club April 15 Movie Day April 22 Alcohol Abuse Seminar April 29 Casino Day The Real Estate Specialists are IN 10am 1pm (also Mon, April 8, 15, 22, 29) Presented by Exit Real Estate Results TU ESDA Y, A P RI L 2 Medicare Educational Workshop 10:30am 12noon Presented by Medicare Plan Options RSVP 407-949-6723 W ED N ESDA Y, A P RI L 3 BOOB Girls Burned Out Old Broads Guest Author Joy Jackson 2pm 4pm Presented by Senior Partner Care Services RSVP 407-949-6733 Why do hearing aids cost so much? 3pm 4:30pm (also April 10, 17, 24) Presented by Harmony Hearing Centers of America RSVP 407-545-4098 THUR SDA Y, A P RI L 4 The Real Estate Specialists are IN 9am 12noon (also April 11, 18, 25) Presented by Exit Real Estate Results Zumba Gold Exercise Class 11:30am 12:30pm By Orlando Family Physicians FRI DA Y A P RI L 5 Speaker Series: Live Healthy & Be Happy! 10:30am 12noon By LTC Advisors RSVP 407-949-6722 Womens Inspirational Hour 12noon 1pm Hosted by Cindy Price RSVP 407-949-6732 Memory Screenings 2pm 4pm Hosted by Arden Courts Memory Care Community By appointment only 407-949673311:30am 12:30pm By Orlando Family PhysiciansCalendar of Events April 2013 Make a Difference ... Volunteer! rfntbb tb rfntb1-800-96-ELDERffSHINE provides free and unbiased Medicare counseling and information.nnnn nnfn nnbbbbf nnnn nn nnnnnn nnnnfn nnnnnf Its TAX time. Appointments Available 7 Days a Week!Tax Form Processing LLC4070 Aloma Ave., Suite 1010 Winter Park, FL 32792Tel: (407) 657-6336www.TaxFormProcessing.com Proudly Serving the Orlando Area for 18 years! Scan QR Code 40$ 00OffTax PreparationMust present this coupon at time service is provided. Offer valid for one-time use. Cannot be combined with any other offer. Expires April 15, 2013Code: WPMO13 Maitland City Talk BY HOWARD SCHIEFERDECKER MAYOR Concourse North change approved

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Page 7 A bad start to conference play got worse for the Rollins Tars as they fell 16-4 in a blowout on the baseball diamond at the hands of the No. 3 Tampa Spartans (24-4, 7-2) March 24. The loss handed the Tars (14-12, 1-5) their second straight blowout loss in Sunshine State Conference play, and their The Tars couldnt seem to stop the Spartans red-hot bats, as they lit up Rollins pitching for a com bined 37 runs in the three-game series. Meanwhile the Tars strug gled at the plate, only generating 8 total runs in response. But even that series may not score a blip in the annals of Rol lins history compared to the 38-4 dismantling they suffered at the hands of Lynn University (20-9, 5-1) in just one game on March 15. In possibly the most lopsided comeback suffered in team his tory, the Tars led the game 3-0 before the bottom of the second when the Fighting Knights scored seven runs to retake the lead be fore lighting up the scoreboard like it was a basketball game. The landslide loss resembled more of a comedy of errors as the Tars allowed 38 runs on 29 hits, with Tars pitching causing more hit batsmen than the Tars had runs. In four of the wilder innings in the game starter Brett Mueller and reliever Brett Flutie combined to give up 16 runs, but only four of them were scored as earned runs. Meanwhile of the 15 Fight ing Knights players to step into the batters box, only one emerged from the game without an RBI un der his belt. Four of Lynns hitters each had as many or more RBI than all of Rollins combined. The Tars bounced back the next day, edging Lynn 2-1. Theyll be looking to bounce back in a bigger way in confer ence play after a short stop at Fla gler Tuesday at press time. Theyll return home to face Eckerd for a three-game series starting at 6 p.m. Thursday before pulling a doubleheader at 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. on Friday. With a trio of wins the Tars could be within a game of breaking even in conference play. Knights The Knights had no trouble handling UAB (9-14, 0-3) until series, when they fought their way through a 10-10 stalemate to emerge the winners in a 12-10, 10-inning victory March 24. That win capped off a threegame sweep for the Knights (17-9, 3-0) to start Conference USA play with a bang. The win was the Knights sec ond straight comeback victory, engineered by freshman Bo Deck ers two-run single, followed by a solo shot JoMarcos Woods sent soaring into the afternoon sky and save, Tyler Martin only needed one inning to close it out. The Knights come home this weekend for three games, start ing with a 6:30 p.m. showdown Thursday against Southern Miss (9-14, 1-2), followed by a 6:30 p.m. game Friday and a 12:30 p.m. game Saturday. Golf Classic Presented by Friday, April 19, 2013 Dubsdread Golf Course A fun afternoon of golf, food, friends and charity! Proceeds benefit BETA Center and Leadership Winter Park Scholarship Fund. Golf Registration Deadline April 5 $400 per foursome / $100 per individual Includes box lunch, beverages, snacks, happy hour social, goodie bag and cart and greens fees. Helicopter Ball Drop Contest $500 Prize! $10 per entry or 3/$20 A helicopter will drop golf balls over one hole and the first ball in the hole (or closest to the pin) wins the cash! Entry open to the public. Must not be present to win. Register online at www.winterpark.org or call (407) 644-8281 Private Tutoringwww.harvardcrimsontesting.com 800-246-0972 EmployFlorida.com1-866-352-2345 Employ Florida is an equal opportunity program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. The Employ Florida telephone number may be reached by persons using TTY/TTD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711. Disponible en Espanol. JOB RESOURCES at EmployFlorida.com helped me nd a new job I enjoy earning higher pay than I did before I was laid off. You too can discover REAL RESULTS with Employ Florida. HIRED. RANDAL HARDBOWER Industrial Electrician Green Circle Bio Energy Inc. Friday, April 12 Saturday, April 13 Sunday, April 14 Lake Lily Park If youre on Medicare with diabetes, you could qualify for a new meter! Youll receive the latest blood glucose technology delivered right to your door. Diabetes Care Club provides diabetes testing supplies to thousands of satised customers across the United States. We work with your doctor to obtain a prescription and will remind you when it is time to reorder. And delivery is free! Call now to see if you qualify! 1.800.531.2319 Rollins suffers huge losses; Knights come back twice ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff Plan your weekend with The Weekender! Visit wpmobserver.com and click "Subscribe to Newsletter"

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Page 8 MARCH 28 Popcorn Flicks in Central Park, which takes place at 251 S. Park Ave., fea tures the classic war film The Dirty Dozen Thursday, March 28, at 8 p.m. at the Central Park Main Stage in Winter Park. Call 407-629-0054 for more in formation on this event. Kate Zaloumes, with pianist Christo pher Leavy, returns to the Winter Park Playhouse Spotlight Cabaret Series with her cabaret, Hit Me With A Hot Note Wednesday, March 27, and Thursday, March 28, at 7:30 p.m. at The Winter Park Playhouse, located at 711 Orange Ave., Suite C. Tickets cost $20 and in clude a drink from the bar. When sold out, standing room tickets are $10, and no drink is included. Hit Me With A Hot Note will feature a compilation of songs from jazz standards to Broadway. Advance reservations are strongly rec ommended, as seating is limited to 50. Call the box office at 407-645-0145 or visit winterparkplayhouse.org for more information. Artist Doug Rhodehamel will present The Live Creation of Doug Rhodehamels 50,000th Paper Bag Mushroom Thurs day, March 28, from 7 to 11 p.m. at The Venue, located at 511 Virginia Drive in Orlando. Call 407-412-6895 for more information on this event. Armand Marchesano and his orches tra will be at the Beardall Senior Center, located at 800 Delaney Ave. in Orlando, Thursday, March 28, and Saturday, April 13, from 7:30 to 10 p.m. Attendees can dance to Waltzes and more. The cost, which includes coffee and snacks sup plied by Beardall, is $4 per person. The April 13 dance is a covered-dish party, so attendees should bring a covered dish to share. Call 402-246-2637 for more information on these events. MARCH 29 Creative Sanford presents The Lords Supper on Good Friday, March 29, at 7 p.m., and Saturday, March 30, at 5:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. at The Princess Theatre, located at 115 W. First St. in Sanford. Reserved seating will cost $5 prior to the show. An open seating love donation will cost $5 at the door. Seat ing is limited, so call 407-314-6750 for ticket information. MARCH 30 The Central Florida Chapter of the American Hibiscus Society will present its annual Hibiscus Show Saturday, March 30, in the building at the rear of Mead Garden in Winter Park. The com munity will have the chance to see the entered blooms, some available from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., and the top winning blooms from 1 to 3 p.m. Call 407-8773495 or email Mnixonhibiscus@gmail. com for more information. Garden volunteer Janet Mercer will teach Hypertufa Techniques on Satur day, March 30, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Albin Polasek Museum & Sculp ture Gardens, located at 633 Osceola Ave. in Winter Park. Hypertufa, a man made rock created from various ma terials bonded together with Portland cement, is popular for making garden ornaments, pots and lanterns, as it is lighter than concrete and terracotta and much easier to move around. The museum will provide all necessary ma terials, and guests can take home fin ished products. Attendees can bring a small container to be used for a mold. Other molds will be provided. The cost is $55 for Museum members and $60 for non-members. Enrollment is limited to 15 people. Visit polasek.org or call 407-647-6294 to register for this event. APRIL 1 2013 UCF Student Research Week will be Monday, April 1, through Thursday, April 4, in the Pegasus Ballroom at the University of Central Florida, located at 4000 Central Florida Blvd. in Orlando. Those in the Central Florida commu nity who are interested can learn about cutting-edge student research, develop research skills, meet with researchers and plan for the future. Visit research week.ucf.edu for more information. APRIL 2 Jeret Daniels, a University of Florida Entomologist, will present Enhanc ing Habitat for Butterflies and other Native Insect Pollinators to the Tar flower Chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society Tuesday, April 2, at Harry P. Leu Gardens, located at 1920 N. For est Ave. in Orlando. The program is free and open to the public. Attendees are encouraged to come early, enjoy re freshments and to talk with other native plant enthusiasts. Call 407-647-5233 for more information on this event. APRIL 4 As part of its First Thursdays monthly event, the Orlando Museum of Art, lo cated at 2416 N. Mills Ave., will feature For the Birds, Thursday, April 4, from 6 to 9 p.m. Attendees can do the fol lowing: listen to Please Respect Our Decadence; enjoy food; watch pre sentations by various artists; and learn how to do certain projects. Handcrafted beers, wine, soft drinks and water will be available for purchase throughout the evening. Admission to First Thurs days, which includes admission to the OMAs featured exhibition Contempo rary Glass Sculpture: Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of Studio Glass, is $10 for non-members and free for OMA members. Parking is free at Orlando Loch Haven Park, and overflow parking is available at the Orlando Science Cen ter parking garage. Call 407-896-4231, extension 260, or visit OMArt.org for more information on this event. APRIL 5 Jeffrey Hatchers new mystery, Sher lock Holmes and the Adventure of the Suicide Club, directed by Tom Larkin and presented by Theatre Down town, will be featured Saturday, April 5 through April 27. Performances are Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m. There will be Sunday matinees April 14 and April 21 at 2:30 p.m. Tick ets are $20 for the public and $16 for seniors and students. Call 407-8410083 for more information on the per formances. Visit www.wpmobserver.com/ events/search for more details. Send submissions to ibabcock@ turnstilemediagroup.com 58th ANNUAL SPRING ORCHID SHOWThe Orchid Market Central Florida Orchid Society Maitland Civic Center 641 South Maitland Ave., Maitland, FL 32751 Apr 6 & Apr 7, 2012 9am to 5pm each day Exhibits, Sales, Lectures, Door Prizes, Etc. Admission $5 at door (Bring ad-save $2) FUNDRAISER Fish Fry For the Church of the Good Shepherd Outreach Ministry DATE :Friday, April 5, 2013WHERE : Church of the Good Shepherd 331 Lake Avenue, Maitland Florida, 32751 407 644 5350 TIME : 5:00 pm to 7:00 pm PLACE: Parish Hall (follow signs for addl parking) Calendar

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Page 9 Lifestyles Sunday, April 14, 2013 1 5 p.m. Winter Park Civic Center 1050 Morse Blvd. Winter Park, FL 32789Tickets $5 ADVANCE Or$7 DOOR $5 SENIORS (AT DOOR) (Children Under 3 FREE) JOIN US FOR: Ice Cream Floats, Create A Sundae, Celebrity Servers, Face Painting, Cake Walk, Games, Silent Auction, Door Prizes, Special Guests and more! FEATURING: Blue Bell Ice Cream, Jeremiahs Italian Ice, Peak Season Pops, and Private Island Ice Cream frozen on site using liquid nitrogen! MICHAEL MOYER, MD, PA 407 671 7141 3592 Aloma Ave, Suite 5 Winter Park Commerce Center Winter Park, FL 32792 Attention Deficit Disorder Migraine Headache Anxiety/Depression Muscle Spasm Insomnia Arthritis Hypertension Diabetes Asthma Allergies Weight Management Adult Physicals School / Sport Physicals Medical Disability Physicals Michael Moyer, MD, PA During one of Erica Chem tobs many visits to Muni Strings with walls covered in smooth, cherry wood violins and per fect, distinguished cellos she noticed a few instruments lying there, broken. She learned that they were from schools, and that owner Daniel Muni was donating his time to repair them because the schools couldnt afford to. Her own school, Trinity Preparatory School in Winter Park, had the same problem. Then she won dered: If her own private school, with all its resources, had this problem, what must it be like for all the public schools out there? There are often instruments that go unused because of lack very tragic because music is such a gift. Erica couldnt imagine that, either. Her life has been music she has played the violin since she was 3 years old, spends summers at music camp and has played at Carnegie Hall. Being a violinist is integral to her whole identity, her mom Candace Chemtob said. Its so much a part of her life. way to help bring music to more children who wanted it. String Together So Erica started String Togeth to repair string instruments for schools in Central Florida, which Muni Strings does for her at a very low cost to keep it free for the Trinity Prep junior started when she was in ninth grade, also supports her music enrichment program at Jones High School in Orlando, where she teaches violin classes for an hour almost every Friday afternoon and pays for the teacher to attend. She was recently named a distinguished Community Awards, a national contest for community service, for her work with String Together. Erica has raised more than PHOTO BY BRITTNI JOHNSON THE OBSERVER Erica Chemtob saw a pile of broken instruments and made a solution with her String Together charity that helps kids be able to play. Please see STRING on page 12 Reviving the music Erica Chemtob started String Together, a nonprofit that gets broken string instruments repaired and supports her music enrichment program BRITTNI JOHNSON Observer Staff For more information about the Prudential Spirit of Community Awards, visit spirit.prudential.com

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Page 10 A BENEFIT FOR THE SEB AS TI A N HAUL F UND HELPING GREYHOUND S RE A CH THEIR NEW F A MILIE S Tenth AnnualDOGGIEart festivalPoster art by Jason Sipple Sunday, April 7thNorth P ark Avenue in Winter P arkFEATURING PET R ELATED ARTISTS, VENDORS AND ADO PTION ORGANIZATIONS PRESENTED BY:S PONSORS : MARCH 29 Easter Weekend Open House at the Morse Museum, located at 445 N. Park Ave. in Winter Park, will be Fri day, March 29, from 9:30 a.m.-8 p.m., Saturday, March 30, from 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. and Sunday, March 31, from 1-4 p.m. The open house is free. Call 407645-5311 for more information on this event. MARCH 30 The 59th annual Winter Park Easter Egg Hun t starts at 9:30 a.m. Satur day, March 30, in the Central Park West Meadow in downtown Winter Park. The event draws hundreds of kids every year for a traditional egg hunt in the grass. Visit cityofwinter park.org or call 407-599-3463 for more information. Join the Muscular Dystrophy Associa tion and your friends and neighbors at the 2013 Central Florida Muscle Walk from 7:30 a.m. to noon March 30 at Lake Lily Park in Maitland. The walk starts at 9 a.m., and registration is available on site or you can nd more information at musclewalkmda. org/orlando2013 or by calling 407562-2035. APRIL 3 The Valencia College Theater will present the rst staging of playwright Jack McGraths original play, Eros in Veracruz. Showtimes are Wednes day, April 3, through Saturday, April 6, at 7:30 p.m. There will also be a matinee performance on Sunday, April 7, at 2 p.m. The April 5 performance will be followed by a question-andanswer session with the playwright and the actors. Seating is limited in the Black Box Theater, located at 701 N. Econlockhatchee Trail in Orlando, so theater managers suggest that attendees arrive 30 minutes before the curtain time. Visit valenciacol lege.edu/arts or call 407-582-2900 to purchase tickets. To receive a $2 discount on each ticket purchase, use the code VALENCIAWEB. APRIL 5 Internationally famous astrologer Os taro will be featured in The Wonder ful World of Ostaro Friday, April 5, at 8 p.m. at Orlandos Plaza Live Theater, located at 425 N. Bumby Ave. in Or lando. This event marks the renowned psychics rst visit to Central Florida, where he and his co-stars will amaze and amuse audience members with an evening of Ostaros trademark blend of comedy and psychic predic tions. The show, sure to delight the whole family, promises an entertain ing evening of fun and fantasy, a com bination of contemporary comedy and ancient mysteries. Visit plazaliveor lando.com for more information. APRIL 8 The Maitland Art Center, located at 231 W. Packwood Ave., will begin its spring season of classes the week of April 8. Programs for adults include drawing, painting, jewelry, sculpture, pottery, stained glass, multi-media and photography. Childrens programs include pottery, drawing, painting, and the exploration of artistic elements. The center also offers programs for scouting troops and homeschool groups, such as Hats, Teas & History, Carpentry Crew, legacy arts and a variety of art and history workshops. Visit artandhistory.org for information. ONGOING The Maitland Public Library has brought back LEGOS Engineers, which will be from 4 to 5 p.m. every Monday through August 5. There will be rst-level and second-level class es for grades 3 and up.

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Page 11 Just before 11:30 a.m. on Thurs days, theres a changing of the classroom at Carillon Elementary in Oviedo. Mrs. Miles moves out for a planning period, and Deputy Adam Brewster moves in. Forgoing this weeks P.E. class, owl-embellished workbooks ready for a different kind of les son from the uniformed man in charge. In schools in Orange ing up security in the wake of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting. In Seminole County, theyre also teachers. Todays lesson is about re sisting gangs, Brewster says to the room of 10-year-olds. But be fore the new lesson can begin, he asks them to recap what theyve already learned in his previous weeks workshops. What does Otis the name of the owl on each of the students Focus on Safety program packet stand for? Hands shoot up as a chorus of voices rings out: Obey Teachers In Schools, they say. What are the gateway drugs? Each hand has a different answer, from marijuana to inhalants to al cohol. Inside drugs? Crystal meth and cocaine, the kids say. Knowing these answers, Brew ster said, provides students with poor decisions in the future, and building positive relationships with law enforcement in the pres ent. Its like D.A.R.E., but a cus tomizable version covering issues from bullying to cyber-safety with focus shifting based on the needs of the students in each session. The kids know whats right and wrong, they really do, so youre just giving them that push that theyre doing the right thing and hopefully that leads them down the right path when they get older, Brewster said. Seminole County Public Schools (SCPS) approved fund ing in February to help make that path a little smoother, voting to expand the 10-week Focus on Safety program being prototyped at Carillon to all 22 of the districts T H A N K Y O U T H A N K Y O U T H A N K Y O U The businesses, organizations and individuals below have chosen to support your local Chamber of Commerce again in 2013 by renewing their membership. Please join us in thanking them for their investment in our community the next time you shop, dine, or call on their place of business. For more information about the Winter Park Chambe r of Commerce, our members, or upcoming events, visit us at the Winter Park Welcome Center, cal l (407) 644-8281 or log on to www.winterpark.org. A N N U A L S U P P O R T E R S Avanti Wealth Management BAGS Barefoot Wine Blue Door Denim Shoppe Ceramic Matrix Claret Cosmetics Current Tim Davenport Florida's Finest Linen Service Moss, Krusick and Associates Orlando City Soccer Club Joseph Regner Rose Properties, Inc. Sassafras Sweet Shoppe Seaside National Bank & Trust Shipyard Brew Pub Sysco Central Florida Vascular Vein Centers Robert E. Wilson Winter Park Fish Co. Womans Club of Winter Park 5 + Y E A R S Dean Cannon Dorothea M. Fox, CPA Florida Institute of Technology Johnny Mag Sax Music Services Betty Jo MacKenzie, Accountant & Tax Specialist Mattamy Homes Palmano's Cafe & Wine Bar See, Inc. The Bistro on Park Avenue The Westchester Assisted Living Residences UpTown Dog 1 0 + Y E A R S 310 Park South Chez Vincent, Inc. Consumer Debt Counselors Dexters of Winter Park Elizabeth Morse Genius Foundation Friends of Fleet Peeples Park, Inc. M&I Bank Mark Lang & Associates Pinnacle Awards & Promotions The Jander Group, Inc. 1 5 + Y E A R S John Craig Clothier Partridge Tree Gift Shop Seawright & Associates, Inc. Siegel's Winter Park Allen Trovillion 2 0 + Y E A R S Boy Scouts of America Central Florida Council DownEast Orvis 2 5 + Y E A R S Trinity Preparatory School Winter Park High School 3 0 + Y E A R S Fannie Hillman & Associates 5 0 + Y E A R S Palmer Electric Company Chamber Trustees Park Avenue Merchants Association members Presented by: Wednesday, April 17 5:00 8:00 p.m. Winter Park Farmers Market 200 W. New England Avenue Tickets: $40 WPCC Members (in advance) $45 Non-Members & Everyone at the Door $350 Ten Ticket Pack ($50 savings!) Order at www.winterpark.org 28th Annual PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVER Deputy Adam Brewster teaches class as part of a pilot program that helps kids identify and avoid gangs and drugs, while increasing police the presence at elementary schools. Please see SCHOOLS on page 12 Focused on safety in schools SCPS approves funding to expand program where cops teach in classrooms, while Orange County adds officers to schools in wake of Sandy Hook SARAH WILSON Observer Staff

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Page 12 Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above. You are always welcome! A Senior Living Community where Hospitality is a Way of Life.Excellence in Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation e quality of care is outstanding. Our mother has made so many friends here. And she especially loves the hair salon! Peggy, her daughter Merrel & son Dwight N e e d T o S e l l Y o u r H o u s e ? (8 5 5 ) 7 5 5 1 8 1 8 J u s t W a n t O u t B e h i n d o n P a y m e n t s J o b T r a n s f e r o r L o s s T i r e d o f B e i n g a L a n d l o r d N e e d R e p a i r s F a c i n g F o r e c l o s u r e V a c a n t / A b a n d o n e d w w w C i r c l e 1 8 H o m e s c o m C A S H $ $ $ Q U I C K C L O S E A N Y P R I C E R A N G E A N Y C O N D I T I O N A N Y S I T U A T I O N George Carroll, M.D., has over 20 years experience in sexual medicine, and is actively involved in the following: Even if Viagra, Cialis or Levitra have not worked for you, the vast majority of diabetic men can resume a normal sex life. OrlandoSexualMedicine.com KEEP UP WITH MAITLAND NEWS AND EVENTS!www.IndependenceLane.com Facebook.com/ItsMyMaitland C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 9 STRING | Teen charity founder also teaches music at Jones $4,000 for String Together, and has repaired more than a dozen instruments and donated four in struments and many accessories. Shes received heartwarming let ters from the schools she helped, saying that without her, a student wouldnt have been able to play in a special concert coming up, or at all. At many schools, funds are used to buy the students the in struments because they cant, but there are no funds to ever keep them up or repair them, Muni said. Some children are playing on steel violin and cello strings from the 1990s, which can be pretty painful if theyre breaking. But they do it because they love music. Kids want to play instru ments, but they dont have the re sources, Erica said. They want to learn. For Muni, this is personal, too. When he was learning to play vio lin at age 10, his instrument wasnt set up correctly, and he nearly quit from all the problems it gave him. A simple switch with his teacher and he was playing like nothing could hold him back. He knows the importance of a good instru ment, and without that moment his life wouldve been totally dif ferent. Thats why its essential to him to give back, regardless of the cost. Were into helping out people and bridging the gap between de sire and means, Muni said. Jones program While Erica loves working with Muni and hearing about how the new instruments make music programs better, what she loves most about String Together is her music enrichment program at Jones High School. She works on the students scales and mu sic from their class and a little on technique about once a week. I want to share with people who havent been able to get the experiences that Ive gotten, Er ica said. Im always the student, so its fun to be able to share what you know with the students. And Erica has learned a lot from interacting with the Jones students. She discovered that re gardless of life experience, music still feels the same. Music really transcends peoples culture, peoples back ground, Candace said. Theyre eager to learn, but its not always easy for every student to come. Sometimes the whole class of 10 to 12 will show up, sometimes its just three or four. But theres a certain three or four who always come, because they cant wait to take advantage of the love for music. Theres power behind the mu sic, Erica said. Theyre just start ing to learn that maybe music has something behind it other than the notes that you play. PHOTO BY BRITTNI JOHNSON THE OBSERVER elementary schools. The move came a few weeks after Orange County began in schools in unincorporated areas, and $3 million. The Seminole County program will bring 10 deputies on full-time spilt between the schools one deputy assigned to two or three schools to increase education and safety on Seminole campuses, said Seminole County Sheriff Of Canaday. The $700,000 cost will be spilt between SCPS and SCSO. Well have Focus, but obvi ously everyone is concerned with safety after Sandy Hook, so then weve got extra security here on campus as well, so its two fold, Canaday said. The move to put more cops on campus following the Sandy Hook Elementary shooting in December has spread across the country to Central Florida. Mai tland, perhaps fearing a copycat elementary schools temporarily, but the city couldnt afford it for long. The stopgap, in Maitland and Winter Park, has been to beef up patrols moving between elemen tary schools rather than paying Middle and high schools already school. Principal AnaLynn Jones at Carillon said having the Focus program and Deputy Brewster involved on campus gives her school the best of both worlds: increased police presence, and an added educational element. I think its an appropriate use of our resources; were using the Sheriffs department and we have the presence on campus, but theyre also educating our chil dren and I think thats a really important piece to it, she said. Theyre not just standing at the front door guarding our school, but theyre actually involved in our school and get to know the families and the kids. And I think thats a much better relationship than just having someone sit in your parking lot. Brewster said the mix of the ded in the schools serving a dual purpose is what he feels will make Focus continually successful as it expands to the other schools next fall. Were trying to make a vested interest in the school itself. The school is a community within a community, and showing your presence there, the kids really respond to you, he said. If were going to be here we need to be productive, proactive and productive. We need to make sure that were doing some type of prevention with them cause any little bit helps. A quiz after this weeks les son, and the kids at Carillon name off the three major functions of gangs, and offer suggestions on how they and their classmates can avoid getting involved. Those who do, Are not mak ing good choices because they didnt sit through Mr. Brewsters Focus class, Brewster adds with a smile, garnering nods and gig gles from his crowd. room come 12:05 p.m. from the sign on her door: Youll never regret doing the right thing. SCHOOLS | 60 more schools get cops C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 11

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Page 13 of the month and better to be the choice of the year, but it places a business in a whole other category to celebrate 20 years of being a popular restaurant especially along Park Avenue in Winter Park. That is exactly what is happening for the to tally friendly bring-thefamily Pan nullos Italian Restaurant where owners Richard Pan nullo and Michael Schwartz are celebrating 20 years of restaurant success in the same location. And the real winners are those of us who know this restaurant for its mouth-watering, classic Italian dishes, abundant portions and affordable prices. It was a real joy to join Richard, Michael, Mayor Ken Bradley and a host of their friends and family for their 20-year celebration dinner on March 20 complete with en graved, commemorative bottles of red wine. But since there are folks who have not yet experienced the all-around goodness that is Pan nullos, lets talk about the food. Beginning with a gourmands feast of appetizers (in portions that would be suitable as entre portions in a lesser establish ment), we began with the Salmon Bruschetta. Now it can be said that every Italian restaurant in a four-state radius is proud of their special blend of tomatoes, garlic, and basil, but the addition of fresh grilled salmon makes all the difference. Chances are your doctor wants you eating salmon at least once a week (and I love salmon), but this particular mix unique to Pannullos is a bril liant combination of taste treats that comes highly recommended. Seafood lover that I am, my dining partner and I also tried the mussels offered in ones choice of marinara or white wine sauce (we tried both) and I can happily recommend both. The marinara sauce is special with fresh chunks of tomato, while the garlicy white wine sauce wins with that wonderful option of dipping your bread in the sauce once the mussels are a tasty memory. I always try the meatballs when I go Italian because who doesnt love meatballs? Especially when they are de scribed as the way Grandma made them. Grandma would be proud. Affordably priced, these meatballs are superb. And gestion we tried an appetizer portion (also offered as an entre portion) of the Ravioli Terracina, which turned out to be my OMG experience of the evening. This dish is the ultimate comfort food served in a mushroom, spinach and parmesan cream sauce. And remember, we ordered the appe tizer portion, which was so plen tiful I could only imagine what the entre portion would be. Moving on to the entrees, I hasten to remind you the Ravioli Terracina can be ordered as an entre (come with a big appetite), and it comes highly recommend ed. We also tried the eggplant parmigiana, which led to two beautifully cooked in thick slices, which allows one to actually taste the vegetable part of this offering, and second, that each of these comes with a side order of pasta, which is cooked to al dente perfection. Ive concluded the al dente thing is unique to Italian chefs who must have a sixth sense about timing their pasta. We also tried the Chicken Marsala, which according to our server is a house spe cialty. When you taste it you will understand why. Not only is the chicken breast juicy and tender (an art in itself), but Pannullos is rfntrbrbbr fntb tr r rfrfnf tfb rfrfnf tfb rfbrftbrbfrftbrb bbbfbfbrbf fbfbbbbb brfbffftb rfntb ftb nt rfn t b From the Corner Table PHOTO BY JOSH GARRICK THE OBSERVER Josh Garrick with Pannullos owners Richard Pannullo, left, and Michael Schwartz as the duo celebrated 20 years of family-style Italian food on Park Avenue in Winter Park. The pair pride themselves on at least one of them being at the restaurant seven days a week. Please see TABLE on page 14 Review: Pannullos Italian Restaurant on Park JOSH GARRICK Observer Staff Pannullos is open seven days a week at 216 S. Park Avenue in Winter Park. Call 407629-7270 or visit pannullos.com

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Page 14 Florida Institute of Technology is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award associate, baccalaureate, masters, education specialist and doctoral degrees. Florida Institute of Technology does not discriminate on the basis of race, gender, color, religion, creed, national origin, ancestry, marital status, age, disability, sexual orientation, Vietnam-era veterans status or any other discrimination prohibited by law in the admission of students, administration of its educational policies, scholarship and loan programs, employment policies, and athletic or other university sponsored programs or activities.OC-144-213 WE PREPARE EXCEPTIONAL LEADERS Orlando CONTACT US TODAY www.fit.edu/orlando(407) 629-7132 | orlando@fit.edu*Admittance is contingent upon receipt of ofcial academic records.Considering pursuing a masters degree from Florida Techs Orlando site? Join us for: Information session Meet & greet with faculty/staff Food and drinks Easily apply and enroll* INSTANT DECISION DAY TUESDAY, APRIL 2 3 P.M.2420 Lakemont Ave., Suite 190 Orlando, FL 32814 Register by March 26 to orlando@t.edu Application Fee Waived! Ive tasted. It takes the right wine, said the chef when I inquired about his secret. Without actually saving room for des sert, we had to try the made-on-premises Cannoli fabulous and the Tiramisu even more fabulous, and Ive gotta say, Save room. When I asked owner/manager Michael Schwartz about his secret for their longstanding success, we talked about the fact that there is an owner/manager on-site for every shift and Pannullos is open seven days a week. We also talked about the restaurants true family style, which Richard and Michael like to extend to their customers and to their employees as well. No doubt one of the most telling traits of a successful restaurant is happy servers. Finally, however, Michael talked about what the restaurant is not. It is not a bar. It is a family restaurant and that is truly special as witnessed by the extended, three-generation family dining at the table next to us. Speaking in Italian, this family had somehow found the right place for them to feel at home, and that is a better indicator of how good this restaurant is far beyond my words of praise. And if youve read this far in celebra tion of their 20 years of happily and suc cessfully serving families on Park Avenue Richard and Michael would like to offer a buy-one-get-one free entre (max value $15) when you present this review to your waiter. (Theyll even accept a Xerox copy of the offer), but you must have a copy of this paragraph to receive your free entre, and dont forget to tell them, Josh sent me. I love the food and the atmosphere of this family restaurant, and Im happy to send you. TABLE | The place where real Italian families eat C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 13 We also talked about the restaurants true family style, which Richard and Michael like to extend to their customers and to their employees as well. No doubt one of the most telling traits of a successful restaurant is happy servers. WPMOBSERVER.COM

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Page 15 T h e m o s t f u n s t o r e o n P a r k A v e n u e Marilyn Monroe Jackie Kennedy Vivien Leigh Lana Turner Bette Davis Natalie Wood Humphrey Bogart Clark Gable Angelina Jewel Eva K ate Pippa Julia Katy Hei d i Reese Taylor Halle Elvis Edward & Bella Jennifer Kim This is the store where Winter Park ladies buy their travel jewelry! 216 B N. Park Avenue Winter Park, FL 32789 w or ldfamousjewelry .com 407960 3950 (near Paris Bistro) Hours of operation: Monday S aturday 10 AM 6 PM Sunday Noon 5 PM TM Celebrating our 10 th Anniversary $104,000 $108,160 $111,405 $115,861 $119,950 $119,950 $124,748 $129,738 $129,738 $134,928 $131,080 $171,819 $183,846 $225,219 $240,985 $89,861 $78,141 $59,882 $75,679 $82,486 $96,532 $99,939 $61,477 $75,896 $85,597 $85,595 $97,069 $84,961 W h i c h l i n e g i v e s y o u t h e b e s t c h a n c e f o r s u cce s s ? I llustr a tion per iod: 1 -1-2000 thr ough 1-1-2012. Each e xample sho wn assumes $100,000 initial pr emium with no withdr a w als M ar ket v alue based on the S&P 500 Index. H i s t o r i c a l perf o r m a n c e o f the S & P 5 0 0 I n d e x s h o u l d not be c onsider ed a r epr esen ta tion of cur r en t or futur e per f or manc e of the I nde x or of an y annuit y H ypothetical inde x annuit y pr oduc t illustr a tion assumes cr editing method of a 6% annual poin t -t o -poin t cap and annual r eset H ypothetical I nc ome R ider V alue assumes a 7% annual r a t e of r etur n f or inc ome pur poses I llustr a tion v alues r epr esen t g r oss r etur ns A ssumed annuit y r a t es and ac tual hist or ical pr ic es of the S&P 500 I nde x w er e used in this purely hypothetical example for the purpose of illustrating comparitive values and to illustrate how the Interest-Crediting Strategy might have guaranteed. Past performance does not guarantee future results. O N E S H OTY o u o n l y h a v e a t r et i r em en t w i ll f a ll6 0% o f A m er i c a n s s h o r t. M ember of(407)-644-6646w w w .aS af eHar b or .c omB ob A dams P r esiden t/CEOA S af eHar bor LL C bob@asaf ehar bor .c om Illustration period: 12-31-1999 though 12-31-2012According to paycheckforlife.com, three out of ve middle-class Americans entering retirement today are projected to outlive their nancial assets. Learn how to protect your retirement account from losses, maintain upside potential and maximize your lifetime income. Call us today for your PERSONALIZED SAFE MONEY REPORT. HANNIBAL WINE PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Food, wine, fun and music by The Redcoats kicked off the Winter Park Sidewalk Art Festival with a bang at the Hannibal Square Wine Tasting March 14. WP ART FEST PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Hundreds of thousands of visitors packed Park Avenue and Central Park in Winter Park for the Winter Park Sidewalk Art Festival March 15-17.

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Page 16 Welcome to our 2013 Board of DirectorsWELCOMENew M embersMONTHLY CHAMBER NEWS & EVENTSPresident ........... Lynn Threlkeld Past President ........... Ed Doyle President Elect ..... George Williston Vice President .... Anita Blackwelder Treasurer ............. Laura Wood Corporate Secretary .... Steve ClintonBrightway Insurance Competitor Gym Cornerstone Hospice The Country Club at Deer Run Browns NY Deli Clayton & McCulloh, PA Dunkin Donuts Integrity Home Loan of Central Florida La Amistad Behavioral Health Services Renee Stein Charlan Thompson Insurance Group of FL Chick-l-A (Maitland) April 4th @ Bahama Breeze in Altamonte Springs: Success Leads Group: Meets the 1st Thursday each month 11:30am 1pm April 9th & 23rd: Coffee Time at the Chamber: 2nd & 4th Tuesday 8am 9am. Enjoy coffee, donuts and networking April 11th @ Francescos, 400 S. Orlando Avenue Maitland: Community Partners: Meets the 2nd Thursday each month 11:30am 1pm. April 12th -14th: 25th Annual Festival of the Arts, presented by the Maitland Area Chamber of Commerce April 17th: Maitland Chamber Community Luncheon: 3rd Wednesday 11:30am 1pm. April 24th: Wednesday, Women and Wisdom: Meets the 4th Wednesday each month 11:30am 1pm Business After Hours: check our website or call 407-644-0741 for updates. April 23rd: 5:30-7:00pm @ PNC Bank, 238 S. Orlando Ave., Maitland Denise Beumer Keith Carrington Kathleen Lapp Catherine Messina Michael Von Berg Jonnie Mae Warner DIRECTORS www.maitlandchamber.com ART AND MYTH PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER The Observers Josh Garrick, above, performs at Myths and Muses, part of the gallery opening for Barbara Sorensen at Orlandos Jai Gallery March 22. Jill Lockhart, right, plays Pandora. Mila Makarova, below, as Greek Goddess Hera. AMANDA BEARSE PHOTOS BY REBECCA MALES THE OBSERVER Winter Park graduate, actress and director Amanda Bearse of Married ...With Children fame spoke at the Winter Park Welcome Center March 19, part of the Growing Up Wildcat exhibit at the Winter Park History Museum.

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Page 17 Now through April 28 Titus Andronicus at Orlando Shakes Those Elizabethans were a bloody bunch as witnessed by the popularity of Shakespeares bloodiest blockbuster. Vengeance and madness are the themes of Titus Andronicus with each barbarous act escalating the plot to brutal acts of retaliation. Titus Andronicus was the most popular of Shakespeares plays during his lifetime and what does that say about this human race? Its showing through April 28 at the Shakespeare Festival. Call 407-447-1700 or visit orland oshakes.org March 29 to April 15 Jesus Christ breaks through as Superstar! The Breakthrough Theatre of Winter Park will present the Andrew Lloyd Webber/Tim Rice rock opera Jesus Christ Super star from March 29 to April 15. Based on the Gospel accounts of the last weeks of Jesus life, Superstar opened on Broadway in 1971. Directed by Artistic Di rector Wade Hair (who will also play the role of Herod), Jesus will be played by Tony Flaherty. The Breakthrough Theatre is at 419A W. Fairbanks Ave. in Winter Park Call 407-920-4034. March 30 Cirque de la Symphonie The forward-thinking Orlando Philharmonic shows us how Cirque can meet Symphony in a thrilling program featuring music by Bizet, Saint-Sans, and Tchaikovsky. In this program, ac robats and contortionists perform amazing feats and aerialists soar overhead as the Philharmonic performs. For tickets to these unique performances on March 30 at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m., visit orlandophil.org or call 407-7771700. April 5 and 7 The Orlando Philharmonic presents Madama Buttery A wise man once said that all opera is about love and death, and no opera is more touching on both subjects as Puccinis lando Philharmonic, continuing to distinguish itself in beautifully staged operas (with the Orches tra on-stage), will present Mika the beautiful young geisha who Call 407-770-0071 or visit orland ophil.org April 5 to 7 Casa Feliz hosts Colloquium on Historic Preservation Famed architecture critic Paul Goldberger will deliver the key note address as Casa Feliz hosts the seventh annual James Gamble Rogers II Colloquium on Historic Preservation. Open to the public, the Colloquium includes a bus tour of important Winter Park homes including The Tappan House, The Nelson House, and The Edwards House. Call 407628-8196 or visit casafeliz.us April 6 pARTicipation Fundraiser for A&Hs Maitland Art Center The fundraiser pARTici pation was voted Best Arts Event in The DailyCitys Best of Orlando, and the newest version will be held on April 6 at Art & History Museums Maitland. The Art Centers campus comes to life in this interactive event show casing visual artists, food, and mysteriously engaging perfor mances. The dining experience happens at artist-created tables, followed by bidding on art, a text message scavenger hunt, creation stations and more. Call 407-5392181 or visit artandhistory.org April 6 Fernando Varela in benet for Gay Games 2018 Orlandos homegrown super-talent Fernando Varela has performed in 26 countries. From opera to pop to Broadway, his diverse vocal talent will perform in support of Orlandos bid to host the Gay Games 2018 at 8 p.m. on April 6. Varela says, I am a big fan of the games coming to Orlando, and my wife Susan and I are very supportive of the GLBT community. Staging an event like this in our hometown sends a message to the world that Orlando is ready and willing to be known as an embracing place of diversity and hospitality for all. For tickets, visit ticketweb. com or orlando2018.com April 7 Gold medal fundraiser to benet Piano Competition Yekwon Sunwoo, gold medal ist in the 1st Florida International Piano Competition, will be the featured performer on April 7 Competition. Beginning with a cocktail reception and silent auc at the Grand Bohemian. After dinner, the ballroom becomes a private salon as pianist Yekwon Sunwoo offers Bach, Schumann, Scriabin and Schubert on the handcrafted Bsendorfer grand piano. VIP guests will then enjoy a private post-concert reception with the artist. For more informa tion on this Orlando event, visit FloridaPiano.org or call 407-6452525. Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906. Wednesday, April 17, 2013 5-8 p.m. Winter Park Farmers MarketFeaturing 40 local restaurants and caterers, unlimited food and beverage samples and live entertainment in downtown Winter Park. Tickets: $40 WPCC Members (in advance) $45 Non-members & at the door. Tickets and information at www.winterpark.org or call 407-644-8281. Presented by 28th Annual Use the small-space stacked logo ONL Y when it is less than 1 inch widePRIMARY SMALL-SPACE Josh Garrick Culture worthy of your calendar This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORG @EnzianTheater Garett Hedlund, Kristen Stewart, and Sam Riley One Week Only! ON THE ROAD Fri & Sun 3:15, 6:30, 9:45 Sat 3:00, 6:30, 9:45 Mon Thurs 6:30, 9:45 Wednesday Night Pitcher Show FLASH GORDON 8pm Free on the Eden Bar Lawn! Tickets Now On Sale for the2013 Florida Film Festival Open Your EyesApril 5-14 Tickets start at $9!

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Page 18 Opinions As we celebrate the 50th an niversary of UCF this year, we of an upper-level education is the opportunity to pursue and obtain insight and knowledge over blindness and ignorance. We live in a time in which faith in religion is believed by many to provide the best solu tions to our most profound and unknowable questions. To others, the discipline of mathematics and are considered to be the best rational means for navigating hu man dilemmas. While these age-old debates between the sacred and secular continue, we must be cautious to not overlook the subtle changes that have taken place in the means and manners for pursu ing truth that are offered to us outside the academic world. More and more, we are being inundated in media and politics with pseudoscience presented as real science in the form of reality shows on many 24-hour cableprograming cycles. The airwaves obscure Egyptology, extrater restrial ancestors, and humananimal creatures in the woods. We consume books listed in the tion categories on The New York Times Best Seller lists that are We populate theaters that offer us outlandish and silly, but frighteningly popular realitybased movies of modern-day vampires, werewolves and ghosts, which appear to be replacing a formerly legitimate primer for future scientists and innovative thinkers. Worse yet is the popular plethora of television documen taries about paranormal activity equipped with high-tech sensors prominently depicted as mea sures of reliable truth. the traditional visual arts, a simi lar phenomenon has occurred as fashionable art is becoming more popular than the more thoughtprovoking art. But because the less relevant to the lives of many in our contemporary culture, I think the issue unfortunately goes less noticed and may be considered unequal to the issues confronting science, especially as pseudoscience attempts to usurp and misconstrue the language and methodologies of real science. To those who are uninformed and not exposed to tunities for education in the arts, the visual arts are often relegated to the same realms as pseudosci ence. Leonardo da Vinci has always been celebrated as both an artist and a scientist for his beautiful and meticulous renderings of the observable world, while also of fering us his visions of futuristic recently popular contemporary artist, created complex interlock ing geometric forms that can be or both simultaneously, depend ing on how you look at them. Da Vinci and Escher are well known examples of artists/scientists. Long ago, Paul Czanne, the indisputable father of modern art, was considered radical for simply eliminating directional light and shadow in his paint ings. By doing this, his forms began to exist in a universal ment in time. Light, therefore, became integral to color a static and timeless light. He also challenged ideas about space by suggesting that space is not empty. By interlock ing and converging broad planes of space with broad planes of mass in his landscapes, Czanne made paintings in which space is affected by objects, and objects are affected by space. Czannes paintings demon strated new conceptions of space, time and light that were being elaborated at the time by the physicists who were challenging assumptions in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. To some of us working as research educators with students to reconnect the arts and sciences, this comparison between modern art and modern physics is funda mental. UCF physics major Christo pher Frye and art student Mary Joy Torrecampo are both inter ested in relationships between science and art, and are currently collaborating on an undergradu ate interdisciplinary research project. Based on Fryes explanations to Torrecampo about the geome try of our universe, her challenge is to recreate those explanations in a painting. Frye said: Did you ever play an arcade game as a kid, where if you leave the right side of the screen then you return on the left? In such a universe, space is wrapped up like a cylinder or a torus [a doughnut-shaped surface] so that if you keep going in one direction, you will always return to where you began. Phys icists believe that our universe might be wrapped up like a cyl inder or a torus, and the theory of relativity tells us what life should be like in such a universe. His explanation goes on, and it will be a challenge for Tor his ideas in a creative way that is relevant to both her interests and skills as an artist. In the future, Frye will con tinue to pursue advanced phys ics, but in a world that values pop-science over real science his obscure. I hope Torrecampos imagery, however, might compel people to become excited about Fryes complex theoretical ideas. On the other hand, without Fryes subject matter, Torrecam pos abstract paintings may seem incomprehensible and irrelevant to a public that often cares little about the seemingly radical im agery of contemporary art. I hope that more students like them will be encouraged to col laborate for the sake of achieving and obtaining a more expansive, interdisciplinary opportunity for seeking truth and knowledge. UCF Forum columnist Carla Poindexter is an associate professor of ne art at the University of Central Florida and can be reached at Carla.Poindexter@ucf.edu Tornadoes can strike any day or night throughout the year. However, tornadoes are more common from March through June, particularly for states in the Southeast, according to the Na tional Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Although there is little you can do to prepare your home dur ing an EF-2 or stronger tornado, options for improving structural performance do exist and can produce effective results during a weaker tornado. Combined with the use of a safe room and wide spread use of effective strapping, which might increase the cost of a wood frame house by two percent, can create houses that all kinds of severe wind events, according to the Insurance Insti tute for Business & Home Safety (IBHS). Find out additional ways you can reduce your tornado risks before, during and after a storm by visiting IBHS tornado resources page at DisasterSafety. org. Meanwhile, as you prepare for a possible tornado, know the truth about the following com mon misconceptions regarding tornadoes. Common tornado myths: rivers. Although some landforms tornadoes, rivers do not have any clear effect on them. The great tristate tornado of 1925 crossed both the Mississippi and the Wabash rivers. your house to equalize pressure. Do not do this. Your house will not explode due to a tornado passing over it and taking time to open windows merely reduces your ability to seek safe shelter in time. In fact, once an open ing is created, air rushes inside a structure and pressurizes it internal pressures build up and put pressure on ceilings and the roof, which is also getting uplift pressures from external wind forces. This can lead to the entire structure collapsing. corner of the building for safety. The safest place in a building is in a small, reinforced room (such as a bathroom or closet) near the center of the building, on the ground). Even safer is a tornado safe room. Sometimes, the damage path of a tornado will result in demolition of several buildings, followed by several lightly damaged, fol lowed by several more demol ished. This gives the impression that the tornado skipped over the less-damaged structures. There are several explanations for this. One is that the surviving buildings were better construct ed. Also there is a possibility that the orientation of the buildings resulted in varying degrees of vulnerability. (Source: National Weather Service) IBHS is a leading national expert on preparing for, and repairing and rebuilding struc tures after a catastrophe to make them more disaster-resistant. To arrange an interview with IBHS, contact Joseph King at 813-6751045 or 813-442-2845, jking@ibhs. org or via direct message on Twit ter @jsalking. Visit DisasterSafety.org for more information about how to make your buildings more resistant to a variety of disasters, big and small. Follow IBHS on Twitter at @DisasterSafety and on Facebook. If you have recently started a new job, it turns out youre not alone. A Bureau of Labor Statistics report stated that in 2012 the median number of years that wage and salary employees worked in their current job was 4.6 years. estimate that an individual might change jobs at least six times in a lifetime, which may mean an individual likely has multiple 401(k) retirement plans. In the haze of starting a new job, keep and retirement plans could get confusing or overwhelming but its important not to lose sight on your house cleaning may involve consolidating several 401 (k)s. tiple 401 (k) plans, here are some points to consider: Leaving the J-O-B? If you leave your job (voluntarily or involuntarily), youll be entitled to a distribution of your vested balance. Its important for you to understand how your particular plans vesting schedule works be cause youll forfeit any employer contributions that havent vested by the time you leave your job. If youre on the cusp of vesting, it may make sense to wait before leaving if you have that luxury. Dont spend it, roll with it! If you take a distribution youll be taxed at ordinary income tax rates on the entire amount of your account except for any aftertax or Roth 401(k) contributions. Which to choose: 401(k) or IRA? Presuming both options are available to you there is no right or wrong answer to this question, and there are strong arguments for both options. A professional adviser can assist you because the decision you make may have now and in the future. Reasons to roll over to an IRA: You typically have more investment choices with an IRA than with an employers 401(k) plan, as you may freely allocate your IRA dollars among different options and you may have more distribution options depend on the terms of that particular plan. However, with an IRA, the tim ing and amount of distributions is generally at your discretion. You may also roll over your 401(k) plan distribution to a Roth IRA. Youll have to pay taxes on the amount you roll over (minus any after-tax contributions youve tions from the Roth IRA in the future will be tax-free. Reasons to roll over to your new employers 401(k) plan: A rollover to your new employers 401(k) plan may provide greater creditor protection than a rollover to an IRA. Your creditors (with certain exceptions) cannot attach your plans funds to satisfy any of your debts and obligations, regardless of whether youve declared bankruptcy. If your distribution includes Roth 401(k) contributions and earnings, you can roll those amounts over to either a Roth IRA or your new employers Roth 401(k) plan (if it accepts rollovers). Armed with these helpful changing jobs knowing this ca reer move will let you retire with more money in the bank! Ray White is a senior vice president of PNC Wealth Management and leads those efforts for Central Florida. PNC Wealth Management has been in Florida for more than 25 years, serving individuals with $1 million or more in investable assets. He can be reached at raymond.white@pnc.com Changing jobs? Take your 401(k) and roll with it! RAY WHITE Guest Writer Busting storm myths as tornado season begins Science and arts answers in search for truth CARLA POINDEXTER Guest Writer

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Page 19 Chris Jepson Perspectives Louis Roney Play On! Some life. Bittersweet longs to well, the bitter, who are will ing to settle for attitudes that produce nothing good for either the sender or the receiver. Bitterness is one of the most unattractive of all human conditions. In my 33 years of marriage to b.w., I recall not a moment of bitterness. I have, how me often in rudeness and bitterness the fact of which leaves me only shaking my When she is talking with me, I often get the feeling that, for no particular reason, she just doesnt like me. My belief is that controller and that she has never yet discovered a way to control me! I have never tried to control other people, but am still trying to control myself without noticeable success. Her coolness is a pe culiar condition, as slightly more than 54 percent of the people I know seem to tol erate me quite well. This relative of mine is one of those people who automati cally takes the opposing point of view of anything I say to her. If I point out what a beautiful clear day it is, she may say, No, youre wrong. There is a little cloud over there beyond that tree. Although I love my relative, I would surely never want to be married to a woman like her that would be really bitter! strangers to be friendly and nice unless they later gave me good reason to change my opinion. In that case I walked away and forgot them, the way one forgets an orange thats too sour to eat. In those days, we were not taught to be wary of grown-ups we didnt know. Today, that is neither a popular nor perhaps a safe idea. block of the human race from the begin ning of recorded history. The father, mother and the child are the trinity of human progressthat triangle which guarantees the future and memorializes the past. And so it is that we see with dismay, clear signs of weakening of the structure of the human family in todays world. Todays family can consist of a mother and fathereach in different daytime jobsa son away at college, a daughter studying in a distant city, and a third child still in a local public school. When I went to high school I either walked or rode a bike everywhereto day kids always seem to have an auto mobile available. On dates we used to go to a movie, and afterwards have a root beer at the drug store counter! It may be that todays family only a few times a year sits down for dinner at the home ta ble, and that most communication is via phone or email. Certainly the closeness of families of several generations ago is being challenged, even jeopardized. ful nation, is committing suicide by op posing the word work. French workers work 35 hours a week and get no over per yearsometimes up to eight. They retire from their jobs at 59 or 60. Pensions must be paid longer now. With all this folderol, France still has 10 percent un employed. You cant sell what you dont produce, and if youre not working, youre not producing. Napoleon made France a tough country to compete with. Now theyre a pushover. About Roney: HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney) Life begins at conception but ends at birth. Some life. I do not have any qualms agreeing with the pro-life position that life begins at conception. It would be disingenuous to argue otherwise. But I would ask: Is that life, say, six years later is one of tor ment, abuse and neglect? If life is sacred as pro-life advocates contend, why are the lives of Americas impoverished children, for example, somehow of lesser importance (less sacred)? Life the size of a pencil-point has pro-life advocates in tears of reverence, yet Americas impov erished, mentally ill, homeless veterans, etc. are too often marginalized, dismissed or neglected. Requiring a life requires responsibility. To say that all life is sacred as pro-life advocates maintain is belied by the reality that some life (to them) is more revered (see Pencil-Point Life). This issue pivots for me on female rights. Ive acknowledged that I sub scribe to the fact that human life begins at conception. What then? Pro-life advocates would strip women of autonomy . for all the years they are fertile. Regardless of that individual womans rights, her uterus would be subject to government authority and regulation. The irony is frequently noted that the government an obstacle to freedom, yet thinks stripping Americas women of their autonomy perfectly acceptable. Do they not comprehend the inherent contra diction of their position? One of the most revolutionary achieve ments of the 20th century was the devel opment of safe, accessible and affordable birth control for women. No longer would women have to relentlessly bear child, after child, after child. This one ad vance changed the course of our species. Birth control (and accompanying female education/empowerment) offers human ity our best (safest) prospect for getting Earths population to a sustainable level but thats a different issue. I am of a mixed-mind as to under standing why any Westerner (historical Western European culture) would resist the trajectory of our citizens toward in dividual autonomy and freedom. For all. Is it mere coincidence that the preponder ance (leadership/spokespersons) of those in the pro-life movement are noisy males, authoritatively advocating for the man agement of a womans body? And what does it say about the women of the pro-life movement? This boggles my mind. How can it be that any woman knowledgeable of the undeniable 10,000-year history of male oppression of women would advocate the renewed oppression of their sex? (Oh, that boot istic? The predominantly male legislators of Arkansas and North Dakota rush to to ultimately outlaw abortion (and certain forms of birth control). Rather than marginalizing Americas women by restricting their autonomy and freedom, I advocate we respect every womans right to manage her own life in accord with her wishes and plans. Not every session of coitus plans for a concep tion. Let the individual woman privately decide for herself what happens next. To interject the state in such matters is an historical step backward for women. These last few words are for young women: If you do not speak up, what you take for granted your right to man age your own body will be stripped from you (and any daughters you may someday choose to conceive). Call Planned Parenthood of Greater Orlando at 407-246-1788. Get involved. Volunteer. Your freedom may very well depend on it. And it doesnt get any more personal than that. Jepson is a 24-year resident of Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.US EDITORIAL CARTOONS King Features Weekly ServiceMarch 25, 2013 King Features Weekly ServiceMarch 25, 2013 King Features Weekly ServiceMarch 25, 2013

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Page 20 Downtown Maitland Office for Rent Fully Renovated, 760 sq ft.; mini kitchen ette; private bath; 2 blocks from new City Hall. Parking front, rear & street. Ideal for attorney or other professional. $1,100 per month. 407-831-6622. Offices for Rent Winter Park Real Estate Offices for rent (Winter Park/Goldenrod/University). Doc tors office w/5 exam rooms + extra fea tures. Other office units available from 800-3000 SF. Nice bldg.; great prices. Call Ann 407-293-1934. annpolasek@ cfl.rr.com REAL ESTATE: COMMERCIAL BANK-REPOSSESSION Smith Lake, Alabama Prime dockable Homesite $49,900. Bank loss of $120K per lot. Level to water, no stairs. Build at waters edge. NEW TO MARKET. Roads and utilities in place. Available April 20th. Make early appt. Once in a lifetime opportunity. 877-4486816. REAL ESTATE: FOR SALE Mobile Homes with land. Ready to move in. Owner Financing with approved credit. Lots of room for the price, 3BR, 2BA. No renters. 850-3086473. LandHomesExpress.com Buy 1-3BR Homes from $1,000/mo! PreForeclosured and Rent2OWN Homes! Bad Credit OK! Only 500 Credit Score Min! To learn more and access local list ings call 1-866-955-0621. REAL ESTATE: FOR RENT LEATHER LIVING ROOM SET In Original Plastic, Never Used, orig $3,000, sacrifice $975. CHERRY BED ROOM SET, Solid Wood, new in factory boxes-$895. Can deliver. Call Bill 813298-0221. Would you like help in selling your Antiques and Collectables? Thousands of potential buyers. Tired walls.com Mr. Fleming Florida State Li cense #OR1502/AU4441. All Calls Confi dential. 407-489-3351. MERCHANDISE Airline Careers Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified Housing available. Job place ment assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance. 866-314-3769 MEDICAL CAREERS begin here Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medi cal Management. Job placement assis tance. Computer available. Financial aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 888203-3179. www.CenturaOnline.com AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified. Housing available. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866314-3769. Mausoleum Companion Site for sale Located in Glen Haven Memorial Park, 2300 Temple Drive, Winter Park. $6500 for both together (regular pricing over $11,000). Call 352-430-1851 or 352816-1066. MISCELLANEOUS MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED! Train to become a Medical Office Assis tant. NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training gets you Job ready ASAP. HS Di ploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! 888926-7884. ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Financial aid if qualified. SCHEV autho rized. Call www.CenturaOnline.com 800443-5186. COMPUTER TECHNICIANS TRAINING! Train for PC Technical Careers at sctrain. edu. No computer experience needed! Job placement assistance. HS Diploma/ GED a MUST! Start Immediately! 1-888872-4677. EDUCATION Caregiver Available to Elderly or Infirm 61 year old lady, w/LPN experience,seeking live in arrangement, as evening/ overnight caregiver for el derly/infirm person. Must be close prox imity to old Winter Park. No heavy lifting. Non smoker/drinker, WVA farm girl;love to cook. Hourly pay/arrangements nego tiable. samclickx@yahoo.com 407-7826666 PROFESSIONAL SERVICE Winter Park Benefit Shop 140 Lyman Ave, Winter Park needs items to sell: clothing, bedding, jewelry, kitchenware and bric-a brac. Also need ing volunteers. Contact Elizabeth Comer 407-647-8276. Open Tues & Fri at 9:30am; Sat 10am-1pm. All proceeds support childrens programs & the Or lando Blind Association. ANNOUNCEMENTS Transfer Drivers: Need 20 Contract Drivers CDL A or B to relocate vehicles to and from various locations throughout US No forced dispatch: 800-501-3783. www.mamotransportation.com. Driver Trainees Needed NOW! Become a driver for Werner Enterprises. Earn $800 per week! Local CDL Training. 877-214-3624 Driver-Qualify for any portion of $.03/mile quarterly bonus: $.01 Safety, $.01 Pro duction, $.01 MPG. Two raises in first year. 3 months recent experience. 800414-9569 www.driveknight.com HELP WANTED The Marketplace Nancy Babgy Team 818 Alameda Street, Orlando $715,000 Kelly Maloney 2383 Parkside Glen, Apopka $269,000 Cathy Richey 223 E Canton Ave #223, Winter Park $275,000 Maria Van Warner 219 Genius Drive, Winter Park $1,700,000 Jerry Oller 416 Balmoral Road, Winter Park $400,000 OBSERVER Just Sold Homes 1380 Viburnum Lane, Winter Park, FL 32792 sold by Cindy Watson & Kelly L. Price 151 E. Washington Street #317, Orlando, FL 32801 sold by Jim & Melody Mitchell 1177 N. Park Avenue, Winter Park FL 32789 sold by Patrick Higgins 1336 Sunset Drive, Winter Park FL 32789 sold by Kelly L. Price 1240 N. Park Pointe Lane, Winter Park, FL 32789 sold by Sherri Dyer 4940 Tangerine Avenue, Winter Park, FL 32792 sold by Julie Bombardo & Dee Morgan 61 Interlaken Road, Orlando FL 32804 sold by Padgett McCormick Its FREE to place estate sales, garage sales and yard sales on this page! Visit WPMObserver .com and click Create Your Classified MindGymMarch 25, 2013 MindGymMarch 25, 2013 SATURDAY 1-4 NEW LISTING! TRADITIONAL HOME IN WINGFIELD RESERVE 2159 Deer Hollow Circle, Longwood. 4BD/3BA. 3,100SF. Enjoy the Seminole County Lifestyle in this beautifully cared for home. Warm colors, extensive crown molding, newly re-done hard wood floors and incredible media room are just a few of the features in this Family Home. Relax in your tropical screened pool and lanai. Enjoy coming home to this beauty. This one will not last! $599,900 OBSERVER Open Houses Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. SCHEV authorized.MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERECall 888-203-3179www.CenturaOnline.com 866-314-3769AIRLINES ARE HIRING Colon cancer is the 2ndleading cause of cancer deaths in Florida. 7 out of 10cancer deaths can be prevented through screening and lifestyle changes. Colon cancer starts without symptoms so choose prevention and get screened.If youre 50or older, ask your doctor which colon cancer screening test is right for you. Colon Cancer Screening Saves LivescoloncancerFL.org rffntb

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