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Winter Park-Maitland observer
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00242
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park FL
Publication Date: 02-21-2013
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates: 28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID: UF00091444:00253

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WPMOBSERVER.COM PAID TO LOSE WEIGHT? HEALTHY LIVING, 10 College Parks Cheers A revitalization turned the Tap Room at Dubsdread into a classy restaurant and event center. LIFESTYLES, 8 Building during a rampage Volunteers plan to construct ramps for the disabled in one speedy weekend of kindness. LIFESTYLES, 9 Eagles nearing state title Edgewater has two basketball teams with an honest shot at the championship. SPORTS, 4 COMMUNITY BULLETIN ............ 4 CALENDAR .................... 7 LIFESTYLES .................... 8 HEALTHY LIVING ................ 10 OPINIONS .................... 14 CLASSIFIEDS .................. 16 CULTURE ..................... 28 CALL US TODAY FOR A COPY OF Your Guide to Social Security Bob@aSafeHarbor.com | ASafeHarbor.com(407) 644-6646 Learn more visit www.ss.vip2site.com When faced with stormy nancial waters, seek... Call us today for your Complimentary Custom Annuity Review!407-644-6646 or visit www.asafeharbor.com for your complimentary brochure. Winter Park Recovery CenterExecutive Drug & Alcohol Treatment Services Suboxone Maintenance For Opioid Abuse Sinclair Method for Alcohol ExtinctionMedically Managed Dual Diagnosis Evidenced Based Protocols2056 Aloma Ave, Suite 100, Winter Park, FL 32792 www.WinterParkRecoveryCenter.com 407-629-0413 Ravaudage developer Dan Bellows is ready to play ball in Winter Park, a new 5,000-seat mi nor league baseball stadium be ing the newest project in talks as the focal point of his 50-acre re development project at Lee Road and U.S. Highway 17-92. Bellows is in talks with Roll ins College to build the estimat ed $11 million stadium amid the other mass in-the-works mixed residential and retail develop audage revamp 15 years in the making. What is just so amazing is ment, the retail, the residential its literally the synergy of all of it built off of and around the base ball stadium, Bellows said. While still in the drafting stages, Mike Miller, development director for Rollins College, said that between Rollins, the city of Winter Park, a yet-to-be-named minor league baseball team and Bellows hes hopeful that they can work out an agreement for the stadiums construction to start early next year. Current talks have it encompassing six and a half acres in the center of Ravaudage, with new-urban de sign incorporating nearby retail and residential projects in har mony with the stadium. Weve been talking about it a long time, over a year, Miller said of the colleges plan to build a new stadium in Winter Park with hopes of the Rollins base ball team playing in it half the year, a minor league team utiliz ing it the other half, and the city using it for community events when its available. The whole intention has been to bring in the baseball team and make it more than a Rollins College thing, but a whole community thing. Miller said whether plans at Ravaudage work or not, Rollins plans to fund the stadium project somewhere in the city as soon as the deal is right. While the stadium idea is still PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVER A brick walkway will soon beckon visitors to Ravaudages rst tenant, a Millers Winter Park Ale House set to open in two weeks. The massive mixed-use construction project is now the center of rumors that a baseball stadium could be constructed there. Please see RAVAUDAGE on page 4 Ravaudage wants to play ball Ravaudage and Alfond Inn take shape, while Bellows and Rollins talk about luring a baseball team SARAH WILSON Observer Staff Big names rally to save the Wekiva River Green sludge mars the for mer white sandy bottom of the Wekiva River, strings of it wav ing in the current and blocking the sunlight that once glittered off the waters ripples. Some of catching in piles along the bridge where people gather to look for its harder to see them now. What was once a crystal clear, swimming hole paradise, local leaders and environmentalists say, is becoming spoiled. On Saturday, Feb. 16, more than 1,000 nature lovers showed its springs at the Speak Up Weki va Rally at Wekiwa Springs State Park. If we dont do something soon, we may pass the point of no return, said Jimmy Orth, ex ecutive director for the St. Johns Riverkeeper group. Its urgent that we react. What theyre reacting to is a problem years in the making, Orth said. The Wekiva River and the springs that feed it have been declining in water quality and PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVER Former U.S. Sen. Bob Graham asked for a cleanup of the Wekiva River, which has seen algal blooms and sludge from pesticides and fertilizers that have crept into the water. Please see WEKIVA on page 2 Nature lovers have been working to garner public and government attention to help save a declining Wekiva River and spring water supply BRITTNI JOHNSON Observer Staff

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Page 2 (407) 514-0087 3.05% Certain restrictions apply. Rates may vary depending on deposit amount. We broker CDs for FDIC insured banks. Promotional incentive may be included to obtain yield.w w w .oldhar bor f inancial .c om Old Harbor FINANCIAL12 Mon t h CDAlso oer IRA Specials & free 401k ReviewsAPYHigher Rates for Longer Term Fre dlund Fine Arts Works by: Peter Pettigrew Henry Peter Henry VonGend Craig Bone Frank Ferranti Kim Robertson Thomas Brooks Kent Ullberg Robert Deurloo Patricia Chute and othersTo create room for new inventory for 2013 were 1143 Orange Ave. Winter Park 407-622-0102 fredlundgallery.comWinter Clearance 25% to 50% all artwork! Sale Sale Sale Sale Maitland residents upset over the idea of development in Mait land Concourse North are taking their concerns to the top, chal lenging changes to the lands pro posed Comprehensive Develop ment Plan to decision makers in Tallahassee. Angry over the Maitland City Councils unanimous decision last month to seek state approval of changing the land use develop ment designation from residential signed an administrative action to stall the process. Mo Shams, Druid Isles resi the complaint in Tallahassee, said he and his neighbors are try ing to close the door on putting commercial development in their neighborhood before the Council can open it despite their opposi tion. Once you open the door for these things you cant close it. Shams said. It just doesnt close anymore. The city argues the exact oppo site, Mayor Howard Schieferdeck er saying that by not allowing the door to possible development to open, the city is denying itself the right to decide whether it in fact wants the 56-acre area between lakes Charity, Hope and Faith east of Interstate 4 and west of Mait land Avenue to be developed or not. I am not for the project, I dont even know what the project is yet, Schieferdecker said. I just hope well have an opportu nity to look at it. Design plans have yet to be laid for the area, and wont be drafted or proposed until after the Comprehensive Development Plan is altered if given approval by the state, he said. By offering the challenge to Tallahassee, Shams hopes the state will reconsider the citys pro posed change to allow Maitland to permit this land, owned by the Battaglia Group, to be open for commercial use, including stores of up to 65,000 square feet in size. The potential development, Shams said, will negatively im pact his and his neighbors prop erty values as well as put the area The issue is tentatively sched uled to be back before Council, with feedback from the state, on March 25, but the mayor said the process may be slowed by the Feb. We dont know what to ex pect now, Scheiferdecker said. Battle continues over Battaglia development SARAH WILSON Observer Staff fertilizers put on lawns and land used for agriculture, and sew age, that have seeped into the springs. The nitrates create an environment ripe for lots of algae and plants to grow, those plants Wekiva is what happens, he ex plained, degrading the quality Of the eight springs that feed the Wekiva River, four are im paired, including the two largest, said Robert Williams, a member of the counsel for the Center for Earth Jurisprudences Springs the level which there would be spring. The Water Management Dis trict (WMD) is required by law to develop a plan if the levels are be low the minimum or are projected to be in the next 20 years. Williams reached out to the WMD last problem, only to be told theyre studying it. But study after study has been done, all revealing the same information, and no action has been taken to save the river. Theyve known about the damage for a long time, Williams said. Were trying to get them to follow the law, Williams said. We risk losing something that is really irreplaceable. Before the rally, that was some thing that Williams didnt see happening. But the Friday before, the DEP released its Basin Man agement Action Plan to help river. Its a start, he said. Orlando Democrats Rep. Lin da Stewart and Sen. Darren Soto drafted a bill together to protect the springs as well. Those that or ganized the rally the League of Women Voters of Orange County, Friends of the Wekiva River, St. Johns Riverkeeper and Florida Conservation Coalition are slowly reaching some of their goals to bring political attention to the cause. But its more than just getting the river and springs back to spar kling, their health is a window into our own aquifers health, in the springs may indicate a de clining water level in the aquifer, which supplies 90 percent of Flor idas population with drinking water. Unregulated development and giving permits to businesses and farms to use the water, which is part of the springs problems, could be draining the aquifer too, he said. Were pumping water out of the ground at an unsustainable rate, Orth said. There needs to be a focus on a plan, and the public needs to elect environment, and keep them ac countable, Orth said. It is no longer acceptable to eliminate regulation for the sake of economic development, said Seminole County Commissioner Lee Constantine. And really, Floridas unique and beautiful landscapes are what feed the economy, said Bill Belleville, a local environmental maker. The beaches, the one-of-akind springs and the outdoors are what bring people to visit and live in Florida, not its subdivisions and strip malls. And Belleville has made a career out of exploring of the Earth that are nearly un touched by people and time. The springs are some of those he loves most. You can feel like youre sev eral hundred years back in time, Belleville said. Youre having a very essential experience with na ture. visit to Silver Springs in Ocala at 13, before Disney took over Cen tral Florida, and being so amazed with what he saw. No place could compare, and he knew hed be back. I thought it was the most wonderful place I had ever been, Williams said. And thats whats at the heart of those trying to save the springs. Theres nothing like them in the world, and weve got them right here in Central Florida. Theyre a treasure worth saving, said Bob Graham, former Florida governor and U.S. senator. He couldnt help but stop to marvel at the Wekivas beauty as he was driving into the park with his wife on the way to speak at the rally. I feel a spiritual uplift when Im at a place like this, Graham said. I am not for the project, I dont even know what the project is yet. I just hope well have an opportunity to look at it. Mayor Schieferdecker WEKIVA | After years of lip service, organizers say theyve seen tangible moves toward rivers cleanup C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE To learn more about what you can do to help, and to donate to the cause, visit Friends of the Wekiva River at friendsofwekiva.org or email speakupwekiva@gmail.com PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVER Swimmers enjoy the springs at Wekiwa Springs State Park, the site of a rally by activists to try to save it from further damage.

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Page 4 A fatal blow was dealt to the Winter Park Wildcats Feb. 14 at the hands of Treasure Coast High School in a 52-46 loss in the re The Wildcats (17-11) had el bowed their way into the boys Class 8A regional ladder with trict, falling only to University. But Treasure Coast (19-5) had just come off a district championship with momentum on its side. The game didnt get out of hand for most of its duration for the Wildcats, who watched the scoring gap slowly grow over three quarters to as wide as dou ble digits before they began to mount a comeback, but the surge would be too little, too late. With Treasure Coast shooting 53 percent overall, the Wildcats struggled to keep up. Edgewater The Eagles were on a roll head ing into a showdown against Her itage at press time, after trounc ing Palm Bays Bayside 76-49 in With a win, the Eagles (23-4) will face the winner of a matchup be tween Leesburg and Gainesville at 7 p.m. Feb. 23, with the location TBA. Meanwhile the girls team has been destroying every team its faced on a steady march to the ami Norland at the Lakeland took down Melbourne 64-16 in ville 78-62 for the regional cham pionship. Wildcats fall, Eagles still ghting ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff in the works, Bellows said theres more to come soon as Ravaud Winter Park Ale House plans to open its doors within the next two weeks, and deals for mixed use residential and retail build ings and townhome sites are begin signed with more con struction starting in the coming months. Its incredible how the land scape (on Lee Road and 17-92) is going to change and how nice its going to be, he said. Youre re ally going to feel like youre en tering a nice place coming into Winter Park. Alfond Inn taking shape and names Since breaking ground in No vember 2011, construction of the Alfond Inn at Rollins College has continued on schedule at the corner of Interlachen and New England avenues in downtown Winter Park. Everything is going as good as we had hoped, Rollins Col lege Vice President of Finance, Jeff Eisenbarth, said. Weve seen lots of interest and excite ment around the opening. With major construction still underway, and its targeted midAugust opening still nearly six months away, Eisenbarth said 14 events and 847 room nights have already been booked in the 112room hotel. Eisenbarth said Winter Park residents can expect construc tion to continue up until July 1, when all the accoutrements for the Alfond will begin to move in, in preparation for opening as the fall term begins at Rollins. RAVAUDAGE | Rollins Alfond Inn already booked 847 room nights, opens August C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVER The Alfond Inn rises above its concept drawing along New England Avenue in Winter Park. Business Briefs Community Bulletin Fake collections agents sought The Department of Business and Profes sional Regulation (DBPR) recently issued a consumer advisory after learning that i ndividuals posing as Department em ployees are allegedly targeting victims of timeshare scams. The callers are asking victims for cash to pursue refunds for the money they lost. If a person calling claims to be a telemarketer, consumers may report the call to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services at 1-800-HELP-FLA (1-800-435-7352) or at freshfromorida.com SSCs big grant Seminole State College of Florida has re ceived a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant totaling almost $900,000 to be paid over the next three years to prepare students for high-earning careers in engineering, architecture and construc tion. The Advanced Technological Educa tion (ATE) grant is the largest NSF grant in the colleges nearly 50-year history. The goal of the grant is to create interest in careers related to STEM (science, tech nology, engineering and math) and also to provide assistance to help students succeed, says Michael Staley, dean of the School of Engineering, Design and Con struction for Seminole State. Dual degrees at Rollins In order to prepare its students for the challenges in todays global economy, Rollins College recently announced the creation of the Dual Degree Program (DDP), a four-year program that partners with one of the leading business schools in Germany. The program is currently ac cepting a limited number of applications and will launch in fall 2013. Tiny dancer Selected from a pool of 53 quali fying applicants, 6-year-old Faryn Hughley has been awarded a full scholar ship to study for one year at The Center for Contemporary Dance. Valued at more than $4,000, the scholarship covers the cost of Hughleys attendance in unlimited dance classes and participation in two annual student concerts. KaBooming Fleet Peeples Volunteers are needed to help build a playground in Fleet Peeples Park starting at 6:30 a.m. on March 2 until the build is completed that day. Contact Charles Names at cnamey@aol.com or 407383-4566 or contact Brenda Moody at Bmoody@cityofwinterpark.org or 407599-3525. New affordable insurance The Florida Department of Health in Or ange County announces an affordable insurance option to help children of families without health insurance. Florida KidCare is Floridas child health insurance program for kids through age 18 who do not have insurance. For more information call toll-free 1-888-540-5437 (KIDS) or visit the Florida KidCare website at ori dakidcare.org M/I Homes has acquired a 10-acre site overlooking Bear Lake on Bear Lake Road off Maitland Boulevard for development of a luxury residential community. David Byrnes, president of M/I Homes in Florida, said the Enclave at Bear Lake will include 35 luxury homes that range in size from 1,800 square feet of living space to 3,400 square feet. Byrnes said singlefamily homes at The Enclave at Bear Lake will be priced from $225,990. Site devel opment will start in March, Byrnes said, and M/I Homes will start construction of model homes in October. Craig A. Minegar, a shareholder with the law rm of Winderweedle, Haines, Ward & Woodman, P.A., recently received his re newal as a Florida Bar Board Certied Real Estate Attorney To be recertied, attorneys must meet stringent require ments similar to those for initial certica tion, including mandatory continuing edu cation and a peer review assessment of competence in the area of real estate law, character, ethics and professionalism. Mercantile Capital Corporation has an nounced that 2012 was a record year for the nearly 10-year-old company, which specializes in providing commercial prop erty nancing for small business owners via the U.S. Small Business Administra tion 504 loan program. Christopher Hurn, CEO of Mercantile Capital Corporation, said the company nished the year having closed loans on more than $424.2 million in total project costs. This record loan vol ume is an increase of 143 percent from Mercantiles 2011 loan volume of $174.4 million, which was the previous record for the commercial lender. Dunkin Donuts joined the Maitland community in January, adding to its rep ertoire of providing Central Florida with an everyday stop for coffee and baked goods. Hughley

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Page 5 D ear residents, The general elec tion scheduled for March 12 will pro vide an opportunity for you to vote for candidates running for City Council. Also appearing on the March ballot will be a series of Charter Amendments that are proposed for approval or disap proval by voters. In an effort to provide as much information as possible for this upcoming election, we have worked with the Charter Review Commission and the Maitland Public Library to schedule a Charter Amendment Educational Workshop that is open to all resi dents. The workshop will be held on the Maitland Public Library locat ed at 501 S. Maitland Ave. Please make plans to attend. All residents are invited to visit itsmymaitland.com to view the Charter Commission Report and a Charter Amendments outline under the Community Events list ing on the homepage. If you have questions or need more information, please plan on attending the workshop. Cordially, Howard A. Schieferdecker, Mayor City of Maitland City Council Agenda of Feb. 25 City Council meets the second and fourth Monday of the month scheduled for Feb. 25 in the Coun cil Chambers, 1776 Independence Lane. Below is the agenda for that meeting. Special Presentation: Wood Consent Agenda: February 11 ny Inc. Sidewalk Replacement Automotive Network provements U.S. Highway 17-92 at Horatio Avenue CCEI Decision Items: Member/Canvassing Board Rotundo Lobbying & Consult ing Services For updates, please check our website at itsmymaitland.com Its TAX time. Appointments Available 7 Days a Week!Tax Form Processing LLC4070 Aloma Ave., Suite 1010 Winter Park, FL 32792Tel: (407) 657-6336www.TaxFormProcessing.com Proudly Serving the Orlando Area for 18 years! Scan QR Code 40$ 00OffTax PreparationMust present this coupon at time service is provided. Offer valid for one-time use. Cannot be combined with any other offer. Expires April 15, 2013Code: WPMO13 KEEP UP WITH MAITLAND NEWS AND EVENTS!www.IndependenceLane.com Facebook.com/ItsMyMaitland Maitland City Talk BY HOWARD SCHIEFERDECKER MAYOR Invitation to workshop

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Page 6 City Commission meeting There will be a City Commis sion meeting Monday, Feb. 25, at sion Chambers located at 401 S. Park Ave. Below are a few topics Mayors Report Eagle Scouts Non-action items ber 2012 Consent Agenda 2/11/13. and contracts (for a full listing, please visit cityofwinterpark.org under Whats New > City Com mission Agenda) Action Items Requiring Discussion Commission meeting scheduled for Monday, May 27, due to the Memorial Day Holiday Public Hearings construct approximately 35,500 square feet of retail, restaurant properties at 111 and 131 N. Or lando Ave. to construct a tennis court on the property at 1551 Via Tuscany. nance to vacate and abandon the utility easement at 1141 Via Capri. nance to amend the Compre hensive Plan Future Land Use map to change the existing Future Land Use designations of Single Family Residential and Institu the properties at 216, 226 and 234 W. Lyman Ave., and to Medium Density Residential Future Land Use on the property at 250 W. Ly man Ave. ing Map to change the existing Single Family District and Public, trict zoning on the properties at 216, 226 and 234 W. Lyman Ave., and to Medium Density MultiFamily Residential District zoning on the property at 250 W. Lyman Ave. (To be held after 5 p.m.) capital improvements to under ground electric/CATV (BHN) facilities along Via Salerno/Via Capri sions full agenda on the home page of cityofwinterpark.org un der Whats New > City Commis sion Agenda. City blood drive On Monday, Feb. 25, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Florida Blood Cen ters will be in front of Winter Park City Hall located at 401 S. Park Ave., for a blood drive. A critical number of voluntary donations are required every day to meet the need for blood. We appreci ate your lifesaving efforts. To do nate blood, you must be at least 16 years old, weigh 110 pounds, and be in good health. All donors must bring photo ID. For more information, please call 407-599org Provide input on citys downtown parking mobility plan As in any vibrant downtown, the ability to provide adequate parking is always important. This ter Park with the thousands of residents, shoppers, visitors, din ers and event goers that enjoy its downtown every year. Based on the growth in the downtown and the opening of the citys SunRail stop in 2014, the city has identi ment a downtown Parking Mobil ity Plan. You can help the city of Winter Park develop effective parking strategies to accommodate the de mand for downtown parking by participating in the citys Down town Parking Survey at cityof winterpark.org/ParkingSurveys between now and Friday, March 8. Upon accessing the link, you will be able to select a survey from one of these four categories that best describes your role in down 1. Employee 2. Business owner 3. Resident 4. Visitor Participation will help the city maximize parking opportuni ties that can enhance the overall downtown experience. Thank you for participating in the parking survey and providing valuable feedback. St. Patricks Day Parade The city of Winter Park and the St. Patricks Day Parade Commit tee are proud to present the 34th annual Winter Park St. Patricks Day Parade on Sunday, March 3, at 2 p.m. in downtown Win ter Park. Gather your family and friends and wear some green to enjoy the only St. Patricks Day parade in Central Florida. The pa rade will begin at the Winter Park Country Club and continue south down Park Avenue to Lyman Avenue. More than 75 units will participate. The celebration will also feature Irish music and stepdancing at the main stage in Cen tral Park with demonstrations by the Tir Na Greine School of Irish Dance and the Watters School of Irish Dance. Irish music will be provided by the Tommy Doyle Band. This is one event you wont want to miss! St. Patricks Day began as an annual feast day to celebrate St. Patrick, the most commonly rec ognized patron saint of Ireland. The Irish have observed this day as a religious holiday for more than a thousand years, and it is currently recognized by people of many other ethnicities. The day is widely celebrated by wearing green clothing and items such as shamrocks. According to Irish tradition, those who do not wear green on St. Patricks Day face the risk of being affectionately pinched. This celebration is made pos sible by the generous support of event sponsors including the city of Winter Parks Community Re development Agency, Fiddlers Green Irish Pub and Eatery, the Irish American Cultural Society of Central Florida, and Florida Dis tributors Company. For more information regard ing the 34th annual St. Patricks Day Parade, please call 407-2220648. Visit the citys ofcial website at cityofwinterpark.org, like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter and watch us on Vimeo. FEATURING ...... AND MUCH MORE! A Premier Flooring Source (877) 302-6713www.fortiscollege.edu 1573 W. Fairbanks Ave. Winter Park, FL For consumer information visit www.fortis.edu Prepare to become aCAREER OPPORTUNITIES Winter Park City Talk BY RANDY KNIGHT CITY MANAGER

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Page 7 FEB. 21 African-Puerto Rican author Mayra San tos-Febres and Cuban-American poet Ricardo Pau-Llosa will speak on Feb. 21 at the Annie Russell Theatre, located at 1000 Holt Ave. in Winter Park. Pau-Llosas master class will be at 2 p.m. in the Wool son House, followed by Santos-Febres master class at 4 p.m. in the Woolson House. Call 407-646-2000 or visit Rollins. edu for more information on these events. The Holocaust Center, located at 851 N. Maitland Ave., announced that its Febru ary Education Forum will feature a pre sentation by local writer Greg Dawson on Thursday, Feb. 21, at 6 p.m. Dawson will discuss his latest book, Judgment Before Nuremberg. Reservations are suggested, but are not required for this event. Call 407-628-0555 or visit holo caustedu.org for more information on this event. FEB. 24 Peter Thatcher, who has been playing the guitar for almost 60 years, will perform at Casa Feliz located at 656 N. Park Ave. in Winter Park, on Sunday, Feb. 24, from noon to 3 p.m. Call 407-628-8196 or visit casafeliz.us/ for more information. Scholar Barrymore Laurence Scherer, a Thomas P. Johnson Distinguished Visiting Scholar, will lead a discussion at Tea and Talk about the upcoming concert, Titans in C, which features works by Beethoven, Haydn and Mozart, on Sunday, Feb. 24, at 4 p.m. at the Casa Feliz Historic Home Museum, located at 656 N. Park Ave. in Winter Park. The event is free. Doors open at 4 p.m., and the program begins at 4:30 p.m. Call 407-628-8196 or visit casafeliz. us/ for more information on this event. The Orlando Museum of Art, located at 2416 N. Mills Ave., will host the Glass Collectors Forum on Sunday, Feb. 24, at 1:30 p.m. as part of the Contempo rary Glass Sculpture: Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of Studio Glass exhibition. Guests will have the opportunity to discuss Studio Glass with noted glass collectors and hear about their experiences collect ing it. Four Florida collectors composed of Arnold Bierman, Norma Roth, Gary So rensen, and Chuck Steinmetz will attend the Glass Collectors Forum for a round table discussion. A complimentary docent tour of the Contemporary Glass Sculpture exhibition will be before the discussion at 12:30 p.m. The event is free with paid gallery admission. This program requires advance registration. Call 407-896-4231, extension 262, or visit omart.org for more information on this event. Music Theater Bavaria, Central Floridas unique nonprot arts education organiza tion that helps college-age opera and mu sical theater students work toward career success, is hosting a Sound of Music movie sing-along at the Enzian located at 1300 S. Orlando Ave. in Maitland, on Sunday, Feb. 24, at 11 a.m., to benet the Music Theater Bavaria Scholarship Fund. There is no charge for admission, with a suggested minimum donation of $10 per person. Proceeds will fund need-based scholarships for MTBs intensive training and performance summer program in Germany this July. Visit musictheaterba varia.org for more information about the organization and its program. FEB. 25 Winter Park City Hall, located at 401 S. Park Ave., will host the Winter Park City Blood Drive on Monday, Feb. 25, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. The annual Shakespeare Competition sponsored by The English Speaking Union of Central Florida will be held at The Uni versity Club of Winter Park on Feb. 25 at 4 p.m. Students from Seminole, Orange and Osceola counties in grades 9 to 12 will memorize a Shakespearean sonnet and a 20-line passage from one of his plays. The winner receives an all-expenses paid trip to New York to compete in the National E-SU Shakespeare Competition. The rst place winner in New York wins a scholarship to study at the British Ameri can Drama Academy the following sum mer. Contact Nick Leo at 407-365-4051 or nleo@bellsouth.net for information. FEB. 26 The Winter Park Chamber of Commerce hosts an Economic Update Breakfast on Feb. 26 at 7:45 a.m., with the program beginning at 8:15 a.m. at the Rachel D. Murrah Civic Center, located at 1050 W. Morse Blvd. in Winter Park. Featured pan elists are Harry Collison, co-founder and president, The Real Estate Consortium Inc.; Al Latimer, senior vice president strategic partnerships, Enterprise Florida; and Bill Seyfried, professor of economics, Rollins MBA. For more information, visit winterpark.org FEB. 27 The Maitland Chamber of Commerce presents the Maitland Chamber Com munity Luncheon on Wednesday, Feb. 27, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Mai tland Civic Center, located at 641 S. Mai tland Ave. Mayor Howard Schieferdecker will give the State of Maitland update. Reservations, which are a must, cost $15. Call 407-644-0741 for more information on this event. MARCH 2 UCPs 20th Anniversary Gala presented by Republic National Distributing Com pany, will take place Saturday, March 2, from 5:30 to 10 p.m. at the Buena Vista Palace Hotel & Spa, located at 1900 E. Buena Vista Drive in Lake Buena Vista. The gala, which benets UCP support, education and therapy programs, gener ates valuable dollars that help thousands of children each year. Call 407-856-4827 or visit ucpc.org for more information on the gala. Visit www.wpmobserver.com/ events/search for more details. Send submissions to ibabcock@ turnstilemediagroup.com Find I LUV Winter Park merchandise and local art at ILUVParkAvenue.com407-539-3977 Calendar 866-314-3769AIRLINES ARE HIRING r r f n t b t t r b t t r n n t t r b t t t r r fffnttb b t t r t r t t n t t r b r b t b b r t r t r b b Private Tutoringwww.harvardcrimsontesting.com 917-637-0438 FEB. 27: Reading Lolita The Winter Park Institute at Rollins College will host Dr. Azar Nasi, author of Reading Lolita in Tehran, on Feb. 27 at 7:30 p.m. in the Tiedtke Concert Hall, Keene Music Building, at Rollins College, which is located at 1000 Holt Ave. in Winter Park. Nasi will discuss the relationship between politics, culture and human rights in Iran. She will also emphasize the rights of women and girls and the role they play in the process of change for pluralism and an open society. Nasi will participate in a book signing immediately following the discussion. This event is free. No tickets are required and free parking is available in the SunTrust parking garage at 166 E. Lyman Ave. Call 407-646-2233 for more information. FEB. 21: Winter Park Sip & Stroll The Winter Park Chamber of Commerce and Park Avenue Merchants will host its rst Winter Park Sip & Stroll for 2013 on Thursday, Feb. 21, from 5 to 8:30 p.m. Attendees will en joy appetizer and beverage samples at more than 25 local merchants. Tickets will not be mailed, but conrmations will be emailed for registrations submitted through PayPal. Only 300 tickets will be sold. Check-in will be at Luxury Trips, located at 190 E. Morse Blvd. in Winter Park, beginning at 5 p.m., and attendees will receive their wine glass and lan yard at check-in. Guests must check in by 7 p.m. Attendees must be 21 or older. The event will be held in rain or shine. Call 407-644-8281 or visit winterpark.org for more information on this event.

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Page 8 Lifestyles Its minutes before 4 p.m. on a Monday afternoon as Steve Biss inger sits on an end-cap barstool swirling the last sip of red wine in his glass. Closest to the entrance and far thest from the kitchen, hes got a of the familiar faces walking in out replaced by those coming for dinner. His is well-sought-after real estate in the trajectory of the Tap Rooms wood-paneled dining room. A VO Canadian whiskey and water replaces his empty glass before he even has to ask, after sitting in this chair three days a week for the past six years, They know what I like, he says, send ing a smile and nod toward the bartender. A man with white wine in hand lingers behind Bissinger as the amber liquid in his own glass lowers. See the guy behind me? This is his seat, he says motion ing toward the man behind him. Once dinner rolls around, he knows I know its his seat, and he knows Ill give it to him. Its a synchronized regular changing of the guard that comes with the routine of a place, he says, where the crowds nearly always the same, and everyone knows your name. Everyone comes here because its the place to come, he says. Its a lot like Cheers. Every body knows your name. The name most commonly bantered about the dimly lit din ing room is that of the man whos taken up shop in the back corner booth during the lull between lunch and dinner service. Laptop open, and papers scattered about, owner Steve Gunter is rarely more than earshot away from the cus College Park restaurant all day. The guy really knows how to do business, Bissinger says of Gunter, Hes always around, and he knows everybody Hes done up the place really, really well. Its praise, Gunter said, thats always nice to hear, but that hes quick to divert to others on his staff. Its only with the help of his staff, he said, that hes been able to turn The Tap Rooms struggling golf-side bar space into an awardwinning restaurant and events venue since taking it over in the early 2000s. other owners in had tired, and failed to do in the decade prior, and in the process became Mr. College Park, said College Park Partnership Director Andrea Kud lacz. He knows everybody, and ev erybody knows Steve, she said. Getting there, Gunter said, re quired throwing everything hed thought hed known about run ning a restaurant, throwing it out the window, and starting from scratch, the key variables in that formula being his mangers Bar bara Teal and Cathie Ashby. I assure you without both of those women I would have been a colossal failure, he said with a laugh. Far from a failure, since Gunter took ownership of the Tap Room the restaurant has won six Orlan do Sentinel Foodie Awards and was named as the winner of the Best of in Orlando Magazine three times. Im just lucky to get to come to work here everyday, Gunter said, motioning to the expansive oak tree-lined golf green border ing the outdoor dining area. College Park is a great community that were proud to be a part of. N e e d T o S e l l Y o u r H o u s e ? (8 5 5 ) 7 5 5 1 8 1 8 J u s t W a n t O u t B e h i n d o n P a y m e n t s J o b T r a n s f e r o r L o s s T i r e d o f B e i n g a L a n d l o r d N e e d R e p a i r s F a c i n g F o r e c l o s u r e V a c a n t / A b a n d o n e d w w w C i r c l e 1 8 H o m e s c o m C A S H $ $ $ Q U I C K C L O S E A N Y P R I C E R A N G E A N Y C O N D I T I O N A N Y S I T U A T I O N Rick Lee, President and Chief Cluxton Joins Citizens Bank of Florida, Winter Park Member FDIC TAPPING into COLLEGE PARK In 10 years, the Tap Room at Dubsdread went from troubled bar to thriving restaurant and event space SARAH WILSON Observer Staff PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVER Steve Gunter, owner of the Tap Room at Dubsdread and Carol Hollday, restaurant general manager, hold tuna sashimi and tenderloin steak atbread. The Tap Room at Dubsdread is located at 549 W. Par St. in College Park. For more information, visit taproomatdubsdread.com

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Page 9 friday featuring heartsofgoldconcert.com hard rock live at universal citywalk march 1 h ear ts go benefitting coalition for the homeless of central florida ld of 2 0 t h A n n i v e r s a r y SPONSORS: r rfntbWe offer Full-Day Infant Care and Childcare Year-Round, Preschool Classes, Summer Camp, and much more! rfntbrn n n Most of us take for granted the ability to come and go freely from our homes. But its not so simple for Central Floridians with dis abilities who struggle to navigate the steps at their front doors of ten dragging their wheelchairs behind them or relying on a loved one to carry them. In emergency situations, the task becomes even more challenging. While a ramp offers an accessible solution, many in need cant afford to mod ify their homes. Thats why the Center for Inde pendent Living in Central Florida is seeking donations for our sev enth annual RAMPAGE event. On Feb. 23, our volunteers will fan out across the region on a oneday push to construct permanent ramps free of charge to recipients, making a long-term difference in their safety and quality of life. mix of people including seniors, military veterans and children, like 12-year-old Antonio, who has cerebral palsy and was overjoyed last year to cruise down his new ramp all by himself. When people who have dreamed of indepen gift that makes it possible, the ex pressions on their faces are unfor gettable. Each year, Central Florida ral lies behind RAMPAGE, and 2013 is no different. Were honored to partner with a number of volun teer and sponsor groups, includ ing the Home Depot Foundation, Publix Super Markets Charities, CNLBank, Cuhaci & Peterson, and Master Custom Builders Council, among others. However, building ramps properly requires in urgent need of donations to cover the cost of materials to sup port our ongoing ramp-building efforts. A gift of $100 allows us to purchase 30 bags of concrete mix, 1,720 deck screws or eight wood posts. With your support, we can also provide other avenues for clients to reach their goals whether its ing affordable housing or coping with their challenges through mental health counseling. Your gifts to RAMPAGE allow us to empower people with these vital services year round. Donations of any amount are tremendously appreciated, because building pathways to independence takes a community. Elizabeth Howe is the executive director of the Center for Independent Living in Central Florida. To donate or learn more, contact Allison Gould at 407-623-1070, extension 124, or agould@cilorlando.org Building ramps to independence Volunteers will modify homes with ramps at the Center for Independent Livings RAMPAGE on Feb. 23 ELIZABETH HOWE Guest Writer PHOTO COURTESY OF CENTER FOR INDEPENDENT LIVING CNL Bank employees, above, with the Center for Independent Living, helped build a ramp for a senior veteran at a past RAMPAGE event. FEB. 22 The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art, located at 445 N. Park Ave. in Winter Park, presents Alaska-Yukon-Pacic Exposition: Seattles Forgotten Worlds Fair on Friday, Feb. 22, at noon. Admis sion is $5 for adults, $4 for seniors, $1 for students, and free for those younger than 12. Call 407-645-5311 or visit morsemuseum.org for more information on this event. FEB. 23 The Great Duck Derby is returning to Mead Botanical Garden, located at 1500 S. Denning Drive in Winter Park, on Saturday, Feb. 23. Gates will open at 9:15 a.m. The event will begin in the little amphitheatre at 10 a.m. with the Peabody Hotel Duck March and then conclude at 2 p.m. In addition to duck races, there will be other activities, including hay rides, face painting, a bounce house and much more. To enter the duck races, adopt a little yellow rubber racing duck for $5. Proceeds sup port the youth educational program ming at Mead Garden. Prizes will be awarded to winners and runners-up of the races. Parking and activities, excluding the Duck Races, are free. Food and drinks will be available on site for purchase. Call 407-599-2800 or visit meadgarden.org for more in formation on this event and Mead Garden. UCF will host a Activities Day at the Creative School for Children, located in Building 24 at 4000 Cen tral Florida Blvd., from 9 to 11 a.m. on Saturday, Feb. 23, to celebrate the universitys 50 years. Fifty activities will be done one at a time throughout the morning, including cooking and science activities, obstacle courses, and arts and crafts. The event is free and open to the public. The Creative School also is seeking volunteers for the event. To volunteer, call 407823-2726. To learn more about the school, visit csc.ucf.edu. MARCH 2 The sixth annual Junior League of Greater Orlandos Kids in the Kitch en Fit-n-Fun Fest will take place on Saturday, March 2, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at South Central Park in Winter Park. The free event will feature over 40 exhibitors, free giveaways, music, games, an obstacle course, bounce houses, face painting, healthy snack suggestions and much more. There also will be 25 health related vendors at the event. Call 407-422-5918 or visit jlgo.org for more information on this event. MARCH 3 The city of Winter Park and the St. Patricks Day Parade Committee present the 34th annual Winter Park St. Patricks Day Parade on Sunday, March 3, at 2 p.m. in downtown Win ter Park. Attendees are encouraged to bring family and friends, and to wear green to the event. Visit cityof winterpark.org for more information on this event. ONGOING The Voyages of Doctor Dolittle will be playing through Feb. 24 at the Orlando Repertory Theatre. The pro duction is perfect for all ages and will be performed in the style of Disneys The Lion King or Animal Kingdoms Finding Nemo: The Musical, with all of Dr. Dolittles animal friends portrayed by live actors with pup pets. Visit Orlandorep.com for more information. Send submissions to ibabcock@ turnstilemediagroup.com

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Page 10 New trend: paying workers to be healthy PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVER Kelly Lange, left, brought tness to her ofce with the help of instructor Jon Bergeron. More employers are offering incentives to employees to stay t, with some even paying them. Its estimated that obesityrelated health problems cost em ployers in the U.S. $73.1 billion a year. The Duke University study found that not only does it cost employers tons of cash for health costs in general, obesity-caused absenteeism and decreases in productivity encompass about half that number at $36.4 billion. that a few companies are trying to combat by implementing their own healthy initiatives. Some companies are paying lenges, run miles and eat their vegetables. Others are offering spa gift cards and paid days off, Jon Bergeron, a Winter Springs resident, owns Underground Fit on-site exercise classes and em ployee incentive plans that adapt Please see FITNESS on page 11 Corporate wellness is catching on, with some companies paying and rewarding employees to get healthy BRITTNI JOHNSON Observer Staff

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Page 11 started his company because of his pas sion for living a healthy lifestyle and shar ing that with others, and because he saw an opportunity when he learned about the costs for employers associated with obesity. Thinking about those billions of dollars struck him. It boggles my mind sometimes, Bergeron said. gram can save employers about $6 per em ployee in medical costs and absenteeism for every dollar invested, but that return on investment takes time up to three years. Corporate wellness is extremely new, but its catching on with compa nies focused on keeping their employees healthy and happy, rather than the end insurance sav ings. Bergeron consults with companies to decide on what classes theyd like and heads there at any time of day, after work, during the lunch hour or for a quick break during the day, to give personalized classes. Hell also work with the company to help plan a way to get employees excited lenges and incentives to get them to partici company through increased productivity. A healthy employee is a more pro ductive employee, Bergeron said. Your awareness is heightened and your brain activity is actually higher after you work out. Workscapes in downtown Orlando is one of his clients, and has worked with him ager who has worked with him to develop their plan, said shes felt that little rush of energy and focus after workouts. Theyll room, run up and down their stairs and host Zumba and yoga classes. Theyve also developed an incentive program that pays employees in points re deemable for vacation time or spa trips. Lange said not only has Bergerons program helped people at work, but its also given them the motivation to keep up their healthy routine at home. It has an impact when you are focused side of work, she said. PCE, an investmentPark, has developed its own healthy employee program, and has seen the same results. Their employees have de veloped friendships lenges theyve given them. Their focus is to create an exciting, supportive and happy environment for their employees, rather nies demonstrating that they value a work and life balance has become a way to draw prospective employees, and health pro grams do that, Bergeron said. It builds camaraderie among our group, said Luisa Shellhorn, who co-creat ed the program and is marketing coordina tor for PCE. Theyve even seen side bets going on to lose weight, and in their competi goes a long way when it comes to getting around Park Avenue, said Deborah Dom roski, co-creator of their program. Like minds usually come together to motivate each other, said Domroski, hu At PCE, employees have the opportu health goals. They are on a point system, with walking a mile earning a point, for example, and every point they get is worth 10 cents. Domroski said they estimate that it would be easy for employees to make about $200 to $300 a year, and they can of the program will culminate in the whole company running a 5k together. They think their program will stick because of how their co-workers will feel by participating. You just feel much better when you live a healthy lifestyle, Shellhorn said. 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com r fntbt f rtt ftbt bt bnr nr rt b bb f b tb off trtnCoupon redeemable for cash, check or credit card purchases only. Not redeemable for insurance transactions. Excludes custom/special orders & nutritional supplements. May not be combined with any other dis counts. Coupon has no cash value. at Winter Park Towers Your room is waiting for you if you need Pain and Symptom Management Hospital Follow-up Complex Treatments, or Crisis Care Referrals 866-742-6655#5019096 www.cornerstonehospice.org www.SeriousIllness.org/cornerstoneMedicare, Medicaid, most commercial insurances accepted February is all about heart health. Did you know that according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women? That is why being proactive about the health of your heart is vital. On Wednesday, Feb. 13, Work Well Winter Park and Winter Park Memorial Hospital hosted Cardiologist Anil Kumar, MD, and Edwin Cabrera, Florida Hospi tals executive chef, to participate in the Health Education Series. During the lunch and learn, Dr. Kumar shared these helpful tips to take preventative measures against heart disease: Be active Diabetes, obesity and physi cal inactivity are a few factors that can put you at a higher risk for heart disease. Reduce your risk by being active. If you with as little as two hours a week of brisk walking you can reduce your risk of major Eat healthy Lowering your choles terol and blood pressure reduces your risk of heart disease. Try eating more grains, fruits, vegetables and nuts. Eating healthy prevent heart disease, limit your sugar in take, cut down on sweets and lower your sodium intake. Know the warning signs Making sure you know the warning signs and symp toms of a heart attack is key. Heart attacks have several major warning signs such as chest pain or discomfort, shortness of Get heart healthy in February Please see HEART on page 12 For more information about Underground Fitness and how they can help your employees get t, visit undergroundtness.us or call Jon Bergeron at 407-463-6940. FITNESS | Employers finding they improved output, reduced healthcare costs C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 10 A healthy employee is a more productive employee. Your awareness is heightened and your brain activity is actually higher after you work out.

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Page 12 Y es you should move now. No, you shouldnt wait. And heres why.Good Samaritan Society Kissimmee is proud to sponsor this no-nonsense, straightforward seminar for seniors, developed by Rick Hunsicker, a nationally known expert in senior living for more than 25 years. Rick covers the issues of lifestyle, health, tness, security and socialization, and ends with a strong message about the nancial issues of owning an older, paid-off home. You may be on the fence, or you may have received conicting advice from friends, family or others. Either way, this is the one seminar you shouldnt miss. Youll come away with the tools you need to take the rst steps toward a satisfying retirement. Delicious desserts and coffee will be served, and three great door prizes await the lucky recipients! Following Ricks presentation, well welcome your questions, and youll have a chance to see and hear the latest from the directors of Good Samaritan Society Kissimmee Village.What Seniors Need to Know Today Seminar Good Samaritan Society Community Center Kissimmee, FL Rick Hunsicker is a leading speaker who tours the country presenting his popular What Seniors Need to Know Today seminar. Rick grew a very successful El Paso real estate practice, starting in 1977. Then, recognizing a need to help seniors move from older homes, Rick founded The Retirement Housing Transition Program for Equitable Relocation, a program that grew to include multiple senior living community clients. After having been recruited for national sales positions by two respected developers of senior living communities, Rick founded Hunsicker Consulting in 2007 to continue providing sales, marketing and customer service support for the senior living profession. Numerous communities across the country have utilized his wealth of experience and strong capabilities, and thousands have attended his timely and informative seminars. One Senior Place ... See our full Calendar of Events at OneSeniorPlace.com407.949.6733715 Douglas Avenue Altamonte Springs, FL 32714M-F 8:30am 5pmFriday, February 22 Fiscal Cliff The New Tax Act 9am 10am Presented by Price Financial Services RSVP 407-339-4500 Fitness Club 11:30am 12:30pm By Arden Courts Memory Care Community RSVP 407-949-6733 Caregiver Workshop 2:30pm 4pm Presented by ADRC RSVP 407-843-1910 Monday, February 25 Senior Club sponsored by Family Physicians Group 10am 1pm Feb 11: Computer Club Feb 18: Movie Day Feb 25: Casino Day Tuesday, February 26th Estate Planning Workshop 9:30am 11:30am Presented by The Law Ofces of Hoyt & Bryan RSVP 407-977-8080 Elder Law Workshop 2pm 4pm Presented by The Law Ofces of Hoyt & Bryan RSVP 407-977-8080 Wednesday, February 27 Why do hearing aids cost so much? 3pm 4:30pm Presented by Harmony Hearing Centers of America RSVP 407-545-4098 Thursday, February 28 Medicare Educational Workshop 3pm 4:30pm Presented by Medicare Plan Options RSVP 407-949-6723 The Real Estate Specialists are IN 9am 3pm Presented by Exit Real Estate ResultsCalendar of Events February 2013 breath, nausea or upper body pain or discomfort. Edwin Cabrera, Florida Hospitals executive chef, performed a cooking demonstration of a heart healthy meal for the group. Chef Edwin explained that it is the small steps that can make the biggest impact. For instance, instead of using vegetable oil, use a small amount of olive oil. He also emphasized that it is important to train your taste buds to appreciate healthy foods and to not be afraid of trying foods as an adult that you may have disliked as a child. For healthy recipes to get you started, visit Healthy100.org Start taking healthy steps today to have a healthier heart for tomorrow. Winter Park Memorial Hospital is part of the Florida Hospital system, one of the nations lead ing centers for cardiac care. Florida Hospital treats more heart patients than any other hospital in the nation, and performs more open-heart surgeries than any other hospital in Florida. For more infor mation, visit WinterParkHospital.com or to sched ule an appointment call 407-303-DOCS (3627). HEART | Try new foods C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 11 PHOTO COURTESY OF WINTER PARK MEMORIAL HOSPITAL Cardiologist Dr. Anil Kumar talks heart health during a presentation courtesy of Work Well Winter Park and Winter Park Memorial Hospital. He outlined a series of easy tips to improve heart health by integrating them into daily routines.

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Page 13 It being that time of year (Val entines Day, give or take a week), I couldnt resist addressing the subject of love. To get a better understanding of the current love environment, I trolled some of the more popular advice for the lovelorn. I thought I had seen it all, but I was blown away. Blame my naivet, but I was raised on Dear Abby, where people mostly wanted advice on how to get along with their in-laws and how to communicate with their children. The raciest it ever got might involve a husbands wonderings about appropriate nightwear, or a wifes fears that her husband might be ogling the next-door neighbor. Contemporary advice columns seem to focus more on sexual technique (a wide range of it) and how many partners one must have before its considered cheat ing. And then there is the sheer volume of requests. Dont people have anyone to talk with about their problems? And what makes the advice columnists so expert, save for their ability to respond in clever and titillating ways? As I sorted through the col umns, though, I was struck by a persistent longing for people through their romantic encoun ters. It was never really about the technique, or the numbers, but a called love: to who would cherish, comfort and respect a person. And those seemed to be in short supply. Might I be so bold as to suggest that the lack of suitable partners has a lot to do with how we view love in general? Right now, our society seems to treat love like a lottery rather than an investment. We play right person who will make us happy. That is the stuff romantic comedies are made of. However, in real life, love is much more like an investment: it rather than an occasional splurge. Real love requires an investment of forgiveness, helpfulness (like getting up when the baby is crying), understanding, compas sion and trust. None of these are cheap, but the ROI (return on investment) can be amazing! In my church we are blessed with several couples who have enjoyed more than 60 years of marriage. As I look at them, I see incredible returns on their investments. I see the comfort ableness of a life built together. I see them bearing with one anothers quirks in order to provide each other with a space to be who they are. I see them holding hands with great tenderness. I see them wiping each others brows when that sickness part of the in sick ness and in health rolls around. Thats something day traders in love never get to experience. Like all investments, values couples go through times when they think they will go bankrupt. One person is investing and investing without much seeming return. And yet when they hang on through the bear markets of love, they see their investments multiply. The secret is to patiently wait for the turnaround, while What happens when you run out of stuff to invest? What if your emotional energy and hope are all dried up? A long time ago, Jesus told some of his friends: Love one another as I have loved you (John 13:34). I used to think that Jesus was just telling them to imitate Him: try harder. But I think this truth goes much deeper. I think Jesus is not only giving direction but power here. He understood that people would never be able to love oth ers the way He did unless they knew His love. I have discovered that when I have nothing left, Jesus does. You simply need to know how to access that love. The sad thing about many of those advice columns is that they keep giving the same advice over and over again. Is anyone listening? If technique could do it, wed have a lot more happy people running around than we currently do. Something to think about Rev. Jim Govatos currently serves as Senior Pastor at Aloma United Methodist Church located in Winter Park. A former atheist, Jim is passionate about helping people understand and experience a living faith in Jesus Christ. Please share your thoughts by emailing him at jimg@ alomazone.org Savannah Court and CoeExcellence in Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation 1301 W. Maitland Blvd. Maitland, FL 32751407-645-3990www.SavannahCourtMaitland.comAssisted Living Facility License No. 8447 Skilled Nursing Facility License No. 1635096 At Savannah, it feels just like home. Its safe, convenient and the food is excellent. And of course, my mom is a huge fan of Bingo! Ernestine & her daughter PatriciaAssisted Living Rehabilitation and Skilled Nursing Care Variety of Apartment Suite Selections, some with Lake Views Restaurant Style Dining Laundry, Housekeeping, Maintenance Services Transportation to Outings and Medical Appointments Beautifully Landscaped Courtyard Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above. You are always welcome! A Senior Living Community where Hospitality is a Way of Life. Its not just about getting you back on your feet. Its about getting you back to your life. HCR Healthcare, LLC Rehabilitation and Skilled Nursing George Carroll, M.D., has over 20 years experience in sexual medicine, and is actively involved in the following: Most men can resume a normal sex life without surgery. 407-894-9959 OrlandoSexualMedicine.com Mark your calendar and join us for the inaugural Our Whole Community Healthy Living Expo! Its on March 9 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Winter Park Community Center, providing a great time for family to learn and have fun! This free Expo is being brought to you by Our Whole Community, a Christian organi zation that brings communities together resulting in innovative programs that inspire, motivate and educate individuals in their pursuit of optimal health and wellness. A healthy person has a well-functioning body, an active mind and a loving spirit. When all of these components are in harmony, quality of life is greatly improved. Our mission is to educate our community to live the healthi est life possible, partnering with Winter Park, University of Cen tral Florida College of Nursing and the Florida Hospital Center for Family Medicine to provide free health assessments and education at the Expo! We are providing free health screenings for: cholesterol, blood pressure, diabetes and cancer risks. Your time at the Expo can be spent with a team of profession als who want you to enjoy superi or physical, mental and spiritual health. You will have access to a wealth of information on health and wellness from our team of physicians, nurses, pharmacists and wellness coaches. In addi tion, your family can participate in fun activities such as yoga, healthy cooking demonstrations and participating in discussions on healthy living, disease control and weight management. You are sure to return home richer in the knowledge of good health, nutrition and longevity than you dreamed possible. We have an awesome day planned for you you dont want to miss it. Did I mention that we have free gifts too? We look forward to seeing you and your family at the OWC Healthy Living Expo! Teona Morris is a certied health and wellness coach. Growing wealth in the bank of love Jim Govatos Reality Lines Right now, our society seems to treat love like a lottery rather than an investment. Healthy Living Expo TEONA MORRIS Guest Writer

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Page 14 Opinions F ew widespread, com monly planned and at tended events engender the spectrum of possibilities of the modern day wedding. There are endless shows and movies devoted to such, portraying dif bonding-rituals of Bridesmaids, the forgetful antics of bachelor parties followed by hangover recuperation. Weddings are memorable events. Many people have at one time or another become part of a wedding party, ring bearer in my of honor, for others. Some have even more hands on experience. Several years ago I noticed The Winter Park Wedding Chapel on Facebook, but only recently learned its story, and the story of the couple behind it. Transplanted Brits Suzanne and Steven Graffham met in Orlando working for a tour com ago, as they welcomed daughter Sienna into the world requiring nursery, and a search for space led to its creation. Once a Meth odist church, after theyd moved in, a friend stated the obvious. We came in and we had it as a studio and then the back we started out renting it out to other photographers as well, explained Suzanne. Then one of our close friends came up and said, okay, youve got a chapel, youre a photographer, and my history was I had coordinated weddings at Cypress Grove. And he was like, Hello, duh, why dont you do weddings? We got one of the biggest tour operators, Virgin Holidays because of our connections, we got the manager up here and said, okay, this is what wed like to do. They signed up with us straight away, so they were the I was shopping at Michaels for wedding chapel yet; we were just faking it. They were like yeah, if you change this, do that, well sign up. So, we got in the brochure and we started doing weddings just with them. Then we marketed it locally. Year one they had 20 weddings, 60 the second year, 82 in the third and last year they had 102. The day we met last week shed already had two that morning. Many couples have returned to visit since, stopped in to say hi. As with most small busi nesses, customer requests have led to change. Ive had a couple, they booked from New York, but they came here from China. They had both sets of parents who the six of them. They booked a package with me and it was the They called from New York and said do you do packages? And I didnt, but I said yes and threw one together. The package in cluded horse and carriage, special champagne and more. I ask about most memorable weddings and she recalls one in which the bride wore a red dress, and all the guests were dressed up as characters, mostly Disney characters. The bridesmaids were like sexy Sleeping Beauties. One of the guests, the videographer, was Pinocchio. But the most memorable for other reasons was weddings. I didnt have a carpet here, I had a paper runner Id bought from Michaels and I had it down before people started arrive were these two young girls and this woman, and I couldnt woman to the bride and groom because she was kind of mess ing up the runner. It was almost ripped by the time they were coming in. Anyway, afterwards, I found out she was the ex of the groom. And her parents showed up at the reception at Park Plaza Gardens. Suzanne and Steven were married in Orlando around Little Lake Bryan near Disney. But the proposals yes, plural took place in Hawaii. There for work, Steve invited Suzanne to join him, and had her picked up at the airport in a limo to start a tour of the islands. First one was the big island and we went hiking on the lava, all the way down to this black beach, he said. And we were miles from the car, so I had the ring in my pocket and this is what I planned, this was it, on this black beach. I got down on one knee, took the ring out and she shouted out Noooooooooooo! So, for a mo ment I thought, What? But she said I was going to propose to you on this trip but youve beaten me to it. And it was a leap year, and apparently thats the thing, on a leap year, the girls can ask the men. Not one to miss an opportu nity, Suzanne retaliated days later with her own proposal while snorkeling. I said, you go in photos of you. And then I put the ring box in between, she starts laughing, looks at me, in my bikini top. She made the pro posal in the water, literally got the ring out of the box and put which could have been disastrous because if I dropped it, it was thousands of feet down. Chapel operations are becom ing a family operation as Sienna, chapel, gets more involved. She helped pass out candy at last years Christmas parade, and had ideas on how to improve for the next year afterward. She helps me from time to time and then, when Im on the phone, explaining things to brides, she pipes up in the back of the car and yells, Mommy, I help change ribbons out, says Suzanne. Adds Steven, There was one day Suzanne was talking to a bride and she was referring to it as my chapel, she said my chapel, and Sienna was in the background saying Its not your chapel, its our chapel. Clyde Moore operates local sites ILUVWinterPark.com and ILUVParkAve. com, and aims to help local businesses promote themselves for free and help save them money, having some fun along the way. Email him at iluvwinterpark@ earthlink.net or write to ILuv Winter Park on Facebook or Twitter. Check out his column on WPMObserver.com by navigating to Columnists > Clyde Moore Unsurprisingly, given its historical tradition of exceptionalism, the United States, in contrast to other advanced de mocracies such as Canada and Australia, takes a restrictive approach to attracting foreign talent. Like green cards awarded on the basis of employment, H-1B visas (temporary work visas for high-skilled positions) are subject to stringent quotas. As a result of this rigid U.S. policy, our economy forgoes the positive effects of skilled immigration on entrepreneurship and employment creation. But, in the case of high-skill immigrants, the relationship between liberalization of immigration poli cies and job creation is robustly positive. The National Foundation for American Policy found that for every H-1B position requested, U.S. technology companies following year. For technology compa nies with fewer than 5,000 employees, each H-1B position was associated with increased employment of 7.5 workers. In soft has found that for every H-1B hire we make, we add on average four additional employees to support them in various capacities. And in 2011, the American Enterprise Institute found no evidence that foreign workers hurt U.S. employment; on the contrary, analysis showed that for every 100 H-1B workers added, an addi tional 183 jobs were created for American workers. These studies suggest that the foreignskilled labor force, rather than taking jobs from Americans, creates new job oppor tunities for U.S. workers. Substitution is unlikely since foreign skilled workers are paid equal to Americans in the same jobs. Nothing is simple when it comes to the issue of high-skilled immigration, though. From a global perspective that extends beyond U.S. interests, there is a moral dilemma: vast areas of the global south, already depleted of valuable resources by the north, are undergoing human capital their already disadvantaged position in the world. The brain drain harms native popu lations, which are deprived of necessary services when doctors, nurses, teachers, engineers and scientists leave their coun tries of origin. The dilemma is exacerbated when the question of individual freedom of choice is set beside that of the common good of poor countries. Most of the skilled workers who emigrate do so eagerly, to improve their personal and family pros pects. Their home countries dont always offer the infrastructure to do research and work they are passionate about. Should we impartial spectators concerned with global justice oppose policies that attract foreign talent to the developed world? Should we plug the brain drain? The answer to this question has to be no, even though there is something ethical ly dubious about robbing poor nations of an opportunity to grow by enticing their brightest and most productive citizens to leave. We may hesitate to restrict emigra tion because we value individual au tonomy and do not want to live in a world where national governments hinder the free movement of persons. But a persons right to emigrate does not necessarily entail an obligation on any one state to receive that person. The reason a right to emigrate might entail obligations on the ible immigration rules is that, in a world of sovereign states where no corner of the earth remains outside of some countrys (formal) dominion, the freedom to move is contingent on the (arbitrary) willing ness of receiver countries to maintain open borders to the extent that doing so does not hinder their survival. So if rigid limits to immigration are in tension with individual freedom, why not compensate underdeveloped countries for depriving them of their human capital? This idea is philosophically coherent. After all, the rich northern nations should be held accountable for exacerbating the plight of the resource-poor global south by enacting immigration policies that attract foreign talent. So how should they be compensated? Although the question is complex, a few quick answers come to transfer initiatives, partial debt forgive transfers. Compensation is founded on sound principles of justice and does not offend equally important principles of individual freedom (of movement) across nations and continents. Julia Maskivker is an assistant professor in the Political Science department at Rollins College in Winter Park. Clyde Moore I LUV Winter Park Goin to the chapel We highlight local businesses that are utilizing and selling items made by other locals. Send submissions to iluvwinterpark@earthlink.net Local Luvn Local Janes Short & Sweet Janes Short & Sweet shortbread cookies are made in College Park and sold at Sassafras Sweet Shoppe in Winter Park. Janes shortbreads were voted Best Cookie in Central Florida by the readers of Edible Orlando, and named Best Shortbread at the Central Florida Scottish Highland Games. In all, Jane is creating new avors all the time, with a select group available at any one time. PHOTO BY CLYDE MOORE THE OBSERVER Suzanne and Steven Graffham built a wedding chapel from an old church, right in the middle of downtown Winter Park. They say business has quintupled in four years. The other immigration debate: the brain drain JULIA MASKIVKER Guest Writer

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Page 15 Chris Jepson Perspectives create God? There are scientists among us who believe that the universe began with something called a singularity, a speck Nothing was everything, that is. And everything that ever was, or shall be, was buy this idea, although I would ask you not to expect me to explain it. Some people might consider this sin gularity to be God. Thats OK with me since without it, there would be no cre ation of anything. The Earth is but a speck in the universe, and speck. It is not given nite, for we are stuck with small minds that can never escape their Even Einstein admit ted his fatal limita tions when asked if he believed in God, he could only answer, Well, I didnt make myself. Scientists argue as to whether the universe, far enough out, comes to an end. The more we perfect our nating from the dark void. Light travels at 186,000 miles a second. We know that the light we perceive as being far out in the universe started to travel to us billions of years ago, from sources that may no longer even exist. Things are certainly not located where our human eyes perceive them. We peculiar creatures have come to realize that we shall never understand the exact nature of God. Karl Marx called religion the opiate of the masses. An old folk song goes, I wonder as I wander out under the sky. If faith does it for you, dont knock it, but go on applying loveable human qualities to the creator and enjoy your life while doing so. Oth erwise wander on wondering like the rest of us wonder why we elected Obama once, and were slightly astounded when he got a second nod. As his second term pro gresses, dont be surprised if his familiar ity breeds contempt and his popularity wanes. Yogi Berra cemented his niche in history by saying such things as when being asked, What time is it? he answered, You mean now? Great philosophers have perennially pondered the use of the word now, which is no longer now once you have uttered it. Its done. Its over. It becomes then the moment you say it. In the days before I decided to see what was north of the St. Johns River, I was one of the obedient cap tives in Winter Park public schools. There was, I had heard, lots of stuff going on up north and across the big ocean from New Smyrna. One thing I found out for sure is that human curios ity grows from experience to experience every one opening a door to myriad others. There is no now where one can stop and rest on his laurels. Incidentally, laurels are things I have never been able to locate to rest on. And is the future ahead or up or down? I just hope I have one at all, wherever it is! be suing me today if I had decided to become a plumber? Many a guy is now being sued by the woman he married just because he pledged to make a husband out of himself! About Roney: HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney) cent cigar. Thomas Marshall, former vice president of the United States The cigar quote is attributed to Wood row Wilsons two-term vice president, Thomas Marshall. Presiding over the Senate and after listening to an intermi nable senatorial speech on what America needs, Marshall allegedly leaned over to a colleague and offered his pithy assess ment of what the country required. And, of course, Marshall is remembered today. A footnote. What do you think America needs today? Seriously, if you could wave a magic wand, what would you imple ment/initiate that would make America a better place? I think the nation is half-measuring itself to the dustbin of history. We seem incapable of achieving two important tasks: 1) Determining (as a society) im portant national priorities, and 2) Agree ing (a consensus) on how to achieve/ pursue them. I am sadly disheartened regarding the course of America. Is there one particular example that an illustration or two. Send me your ex amples, but I insist they be unambiguous as to how they clearly demonstrate the nations descent to mediocrity. acts of self-interest (recall Alaskas bridge to nowhere), which was merely legisla tive pork run-amuck. It is a timeless practice, based on greed and power. No, I want clear-cut examples of systemic Among the many examples that im mediately come to mind, Ive one that clearly captures the challenge confront ing the United States. In the summer of 2012, the Texas Republican Party agreed to the following provision in its party platform: Knowledge-Based Education We oppose the teaching of Higher Order tion), critical thinking skills which the purpose of challenging the students authority. To go on record, publicly no less, that as Republicans you oppose teach ing our children critical thinking skills is a staggering indictment of the nation as a whole. Why oppose critical thinking? beliefs? What? Critical thinking might For shame, that we ever change our thinking or horrors our behavior! My goodness, Jepson, Im not sending my kid to school so she learns to think for herself! Sacre bleu! What does it say, that the governing political party in the second largest state in the United States goes on public record opposing higher order thinking skills, critical thinking, because bottom line authority may be challenged? This is at the crux of much of human history. Time and time again, author ity opposed change because change is threatening. To power. To privilege. To wealth. To what is known. To the status quo. To the sacred unchallengeable verities. Fortunately, for humanity, such rear guard reactionary actions never succeed in the long run. Change is as predictable as each new day. Mercifully so. No na tion, no people remain in power forever. We like to think we Americans are differ ent in that regard, that history is irrel evant, that we will be on top forever. To oppose the teaching of critical thinking facilitates Americas decline, and is emblematic of us today as a culture. Someday future Americans will sadly ask, What were those people thinking? The answer: we werent. Nay, Republicans are actually on record opposing it. Jepson is a 24-year resident of Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.US What does this country need? Wondering as were wandering Louis Roney Play On! JASON KENDALL Guest Writer It might not be front-page news, but toll lanes on Interstate 4 are quickly and quietly becom ing an expensive reality. Tallahassee has approved nearly a billon dollars in funding these Lexus lanes and needs another billion from private investors. The new project, estimated to take seven years, includes 56 new bridges, along with many replacement bridges and the reconstruction of 15 major inter changes. The I-4 project comes on the heels of SunRail, the construction of which has begun and will be paid for by fares and increased property taxes. The new I-4 construction will undoubtedly create massive congestion for drivers and will only cost taxpayers more money. The estimated cost of a one-way cruise in the private Lexus lane from 434 to downtown will be about $7.70, while the return trip will cost about $5. To most, the fare is lunch and a coffee; for a few, this is spare change. How can legislators now justify this project after invest ing billions of our dollars into SunRail? SunRail was sold as a in the world would we build new toll lanes on I-4? Logic dictates that by creating private toll lanes on I-4, drivers who might pay for a SunRail ticket will now have the option to pay the toll instead, thus only helping to reduce SunRail rider ship. I can only assume I-4 toll supporters feel the need to force drivers onto SunRail by making the morning commute as misera ble as possible. However, the role of government is to help facilitate solutions to problems not to change the behavior of people or, its master plan. Also, where did the billion tax dollars come from? Could this money not be better spent in our communities or schools? Or is this money being spent because unemployment for road builders hovers around 20 percent? Gov. Rick Scott just sent $2 billion back to Washington for the high-speed rail project due to the costs. Now, magically, there is a billion dollars for a toll road. Thanks, but no thanks Im not buying. Why is this important to resi dents of east Seminole County? Simple, I live in Altamonte Springs west of I-4 and, like many other residents in my area, I will hardly ever pass over I-4 to ride the SunRail. Yet I, along with other taxpayers, will be paying for the maintenance and costs of SunRail for many years to come via property taxes. Accordingly, east Seminole County residents who will either take SunRail or drive on the 417 to get to downtown will now be paying for the I-4 toll road although they may never use it. There are other options, though. We could, at no cost, make the inside lanes of I-4, riders-or-more carpool lane. I say if legislators want their $2 billion prove that SunRail is going to be spending our money. Tolls on I-4 will not help increase SunRail ridership or These tolls, instead of promoting the SunRail as a viable com muting option, will only create competition that neither we nor SunRail can afford. Interstate 4 toll lanes: an expensive future reality How can legislators now justify this project after investing billions of our dollars into SunRail? There are those among us who wonder why we elected Obama once, and were slightly astounded when he got a second nod. As his second term progresses, dont be surprised if his familiarity breeds contempt and his popularity wanes.

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OBSERVER Just Sold Homes 5135 Duban Avenue, Orlando, FL 32812 sold by Elim Cintron & Teresa Jones-Cintron 1245 N. Park Avenue, Winter Park FL 32789 sold by Kelly L. Price & Cindy Watson 1450 Casa Rio Drive, Orlando, FL 32825 sold by Elim Cintron & Teresa Jones-Cintron 1555 Palmer Avenue, Winter Park FL 32789 sold by Gwyn Clark 2506 Chippewa Trail, Maitland, FL 32751 sold by Cindy Watson 381 Hope Terrace, Maitland, FL 32751 sold by Cindy Watson 5366 Penway Drive, Orlando, FL 32814 sold by Audra Wilks & Padgett McCormick 717 Langston Court, Orlando, FL 32804 sold by Mary Ann Steltenkamp Its FREE to place estate sales, garage sales and yard sales on this page! Visit WPMObserver .com and click Create Your Classified Order your classified ad online! At WPMObserver.com you can create, customize and pay for your ad in one convenient place! MindGymFebruary 18, 2013 MindGymFebruary 18, 2013 Plan your weekend with The Weekender! 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Page 28 Now through March 17 Sense and Sensibility and Othello share the stage The great Shakespearean tradition is to perform plays in repertory, and that is whats hap pening right now at our Shake speare Theater. Othello and Sense and Sensibility are being performed with the same cast performing different roles in the two plays (on different nights). The bad luck of the Dashwood sisters in Sense and Sensibility, leading to scandalous secrets and unexpected twists of fate, seems a tempest in a teapot compared to the jealousy, passion and revenge that gives Othello the reputa tion of being Shakespeares most treacherous play. Visit Orland oshakes.org or call 407-447-1700. Now through March 10 Three weeks to get Wicked One of my favorite Broadway shows of all time (hows that for a recommendation?) is being brought back to Orlando for three weeks through March 10 by Fairwinds Broadway. If you read my column, you already know that Wicked is about what went on in Oz before Dorothy. Along the way it causes you to ques tion what makes a Wicked Witch wicked and whether sweet Glin da is really all that good. Direct your broomstick to the Fairwinds com or call 1-800-982-2787. Now through March 24 Dr. Seusss The Cat in the Hat The Orlando Repertory The atre (the REP) has the honor to present the southeast premiere of a brand-new production of Dr. Seusss The Cat in the Hat as adapted by Katie Miller for the National Theatre of Great Britain. Leaping onto the stage with chaotic exuberance, Cat is per formed at the REP in Orlandos Loch Haven Park. Visit orland orep.com or call 407-896-7365. Now through March 17 Homers Odyssey in a world premiere production Adapted by Charlie Bethel from the epic poem by Homer, this world premiere production re-imagines Odysseus travels over the wine-dark seas of ancient Greece. Bethel brings us shipwrecks, sirens, goddesses, sorcery, death and revenge in a faithful but accessible re-telling of this classic story. Sometimes comic and always thrilling, The Odyssey is suitable for most audiences. Call 407-447-1700 or visit orlandoshakes.org Feb. 21 and Feb. 28 Writers at Rollins Rollins College brings contem porary literature to the commu nity as the 2013 Winter with the Writers Festival of the Literary Arts features African-Puerto Rican author Mayra SantosFebres and Cuban-American poet Ricardo Pau-Llosa on Feb. 21, and ing Lolita in Tehran on Feb. 28. These free afternoon master classes and evening readings take place at Rollins College. Visit rol lins.edu/winterwiththewriters Feb. 22 to March 11 The Breakthrough Theatre has a Bad Seed Artistic Director Wade Hair has more than his garden to wor ry about as he prepares to open The Bad Seed at the Break through Theatre in Winter Park. The play is set in a small South ern town where the Penmarks live with their daughter, Rhoda. Sweet and charming on the surface, little Rhoda is involved in the drowning of a local boy. Is it possible that Rhoda killed the boy? And will she kill again?! Find out at the Breakthrough Theatre at 419A W. Fairbanks Ave. Call 407-920-4034 or visit breakthroughtheatre.com Feb. 22 to March 17 Godspell goes downtown The early Stephen Schwartz musical Godspell will be presented by The Vine Theater at Theatre Downtown from Feb. 22 to March 17. First presented on Broadway in 1971, the musical based on the Gospel of Matthew. This show is for all of us It builds community, offers restora tion and most importantly is just plain fun; Godspell is about life abundantly, says Director Zach Van Dyke. Theatre Downtown is at 2113 N. Orange Ave. in Or lando. Call 407-841-0083 or email thevinetheater@gmail.com Feb. 28 Midtown Men in Daytona They were the original castmembers of a Broadway show that became one of the biggest hits of all-time. Now theyre together again and thrilling audiences with a one-of-a-kind concert/theater experience cel ebrating the music of the 1960s. With classic songs by the Beatles, Motown, The Four Seasons and more, these one-time Boys are now the Midtown Men, who enjoy singing together and shar ing that experience with audienc es from coast-to-coast. The show will be presented one-night-only on Feb. 28 at 7:30 p.m. at the Peabody Auditorium in Daytona Beach. Visit peabodyauditorium. org or call 386-671-3462. Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906. Josh Garrick Culture worthy of your calendar FEATURING THE BACH FESTIVAL CHOIR AND ORCHESTRAAT ROLLINS COLLEGE SINCE 1935 rfntbfbTHIS WEEKENDCONCERTOS BY CANDLELIGHT: MOZART Enjoy the elegance of Mozart and the beauty of the candlelit Knowles Memorial Chapel Fri | Feb 22 | 7:30 pm Sat | Feb 23 | 7:30 pm TEA & TALK: THE MASS AND ITS MASTERS Discussion about the upcoming concert tr Barrymore Laurence Scherer Casa Feliz Sun | Feb 24 | 4:00 pm Bach Festival Society programs are made possible through earned income, grants, donations, and generous contributions from a variety of individuals and community partners. WED LIKE TO GIVE SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR 78TH ANNUAL FESTIVAL SPONSORS:Elizabeth Morse Genius Foundation Martin Andersen-Gracia Andersen Foundation The Galloway Foundation 78TH ANNUAL BACH FESTIVAL 407.646.2182 | www.BachFestivalFlorida.orgReserve seats before they are gone! For more information, Call today!(407)-644-6646www.aSafeHarbor.com Member of Bob Adams President/CEO A SafeHarbor, LLC bob@asafeharbor.comWhen is 3 greater than 7?Many of the individuals I meet with are saving and investing, while hoping to get a 7 percent return. The reality is that the fees inside their accounts could erode their returns to the point that a 3 percent return could beat 7 percent. The Custom Annuity Review with A SafeHarbor can show you Exactly how fees impact your accounts. This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORG @EnzianTheater Nominated for Five Academy Awards! AMOUR Fri-Sat 3:15, 6:30, 9:30 Sun 4:00 only Mon, Wed, Thu 6:30, 9:30 Tue 6:30 only Red Carpet, Bright Lights: An Oscar Watch Party at Eden Bar and on Enzians Big Screen Sun 6:30 Cult Classics: SCREAM BLACULA SCREAM Only $5! Tue 9:30



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WPMOBSERVER.COM PAID TO LOSE WEIGHT?HEALTHY LIVING, 10College Parks CheersA revitalization turned the Tap Room at Dubsdread into a classy restaurant and event center. LIFESTYLES, 8Building during a rampageVolunteers plan to construct ramps for the disabled in one speedy weekend of kindness. LIFESTYLES, 9Eagles nearing state titleEdgewater has two basketball teams with an honest shot at the championship. SPORTS, 4COMMUNITY BULLETIN ........... 4 CALENDAR ................... 7 LIFESTYLES ................... 8 HEALTHY LIVING ............... 10 OPINIONS ................... 14 CLASSIFIEDS ................. 16 CULTURE .................... 28 CALL US TODAY FOR A COPY OF Your Guide to Social Security Bob@aSafeHarbor.com | ASafeHarbor.com(407) 644-6646 Learn more visit www.ss.vip2site.com When faced with stormy nancial waters, seek... Call us today for your Complimentary Custom Annuity Review!407-644-6646 or visit www.asafeharbor.com for your complimentary brochure. Winter Park Recovery CenterExecutive Drug & Alcohol Treatment Services Suboxone Maintenance For Opioid Abuse Sinclair Method for Alcohol ExtinctionMedically Managed Dual Diagnosis Evidenced Based Protocols2056 Aloma Ave, Suite 100, Winter Park, FL 32792 www.WinterParkRecoveryCenter.com 407-629-0413 Ravaudage developer Dan Bellows is ready to play ball in Winter Park, a new 5,000-seat mi nor league baseball stadium be ing the newest project in talks as the focal point of his 50-acre re development project at Lee Road and U.S. Highway 17-92. Bellows is in talks with Roll ins College to build the estimat ed $11 million stadium amid the other mass in-the-works mixed residential and retail develop audage revamp 15 years in the making. What is just so amazing is ment, the retail, the residential its literally the synergy of all of it built off of and around the base ball stadium, Bellows said. While still in the drafting stages, Mike Miller, development director for Rollins College, said that between Rollins, the city of Winter Park, a yet-to-be-named minor league baseball team and Bellows hes hopeful that they can work out an agreement for the stadiums construction to start early next year. Current talks have it encompassing six and a half acres in the center of Ravaudage, with new-urban de sign incorporating nearby retail and residential projects in har mony with the stadium. Weve been talking about it a long time, over a year, Miller said of the colleges plan to build a new stadium in Winter Park with hopes of the Rollins baseball team playing in it half the year, a minor league team utiliz ing it the other half, and the city using it for community events when its available. The whole intention has been to bring in the baseball team and make it more than a Rollins College thing, but a whole community thing. Miller said whether plans at Ravaudage work or not, Rollins plans to fund the stadium project somewhere in the city as soon as the deal is right. While the stadium idea is still PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVERA brick walkway will soon beckon visitors to Ravaudages rst tenant, a Millers Winter Park Ale House set to open in two weeks. The massive mixed-use construction project is now the center of rumors that a baseball stadium could be constructed there. Please see RAVAUDAGE on page 4Ravaudage wants to play ballRavaudage and Alfond Inn take shape, while Bellows and Rollins talk about luring a baseball teamSARAH WILSON Observer StaffBig names rally to save the Wekiva RiverGreen sludge mars the for mer white sandy bottom of the Wekiva River, strings of it wav ing in the current and blocking the sunlight that once glittered off the waters ripples. Some of catching in piles along the bridge where people gather to look for its harder to see them now. What was once a crystal clear, swimming hole paradise, local leaders and environmentalists say, is becoming spoiled. On Saturday, Feb. 16, more than 1,000 nature lovers showed its springs at the Speak Up Weki va Rally at Wekiwa Springs State Park. If we dont do something soon, we may pass the point of no return, said Jimmy Orth, ex ecutive director for the St. Johns Riverkeeper group. Its urgent that we react. What theyre reacting to is a problem years in the making, Orth said. The Wekiva River and the springs that feed it have been declining in water quality and PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVERFormer U.S. Sen. Bob Graham asked for a cleanup of the Wekiva River, which has seen algal blooms and sludge from pesticides and fertilizers that have crept into the water. Please see WEKIVA on page 2Nature lovers have been working to garner public and government attention to help save a declining Wekiva River and spring water supplyBRITTNI JOHNSON Observer Staff

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Page 2 (407) 514-0087 3.05% Certain restrictions apply.Rates may vary depending on deposit amount. We broker CDs for FDIC insured banks. Promotional incentive may be included to obtain yield.www.oldharborf inancial.com Old Harbor FINANCIAL12 Month CDAlso oer IRA Specials & free 401k ReviewsAPYHigher Rates for Longer Term Fre dlund Fine Arts Works by: Peter Pettigrew Henry Peter Henry VonGend Craig Bone Frank Ferranti Kim Robertson Thomas Brooks Kent Ullberg Robert Deurloo Patricia Chute and othersTo create room for new inventory for 2013 were 1143 Orange Ave. Winter Park 407-622-0102 fredlundgallery.comWinter Clearance 25% to 50% all artwork! Sale Sale Sale Sale Maitland residents upset over the idea of development in Mait land Concourse North are taking their concerns to the top, chal lenging changes to the lands pro posed Comprehensive Development Plan to decision makers in Tallahassee. Angry over the Maitland City Councils unanimous decision last month to seek state approval of changing the land use develop ment designation from residential signed an administrative action to stall the process. Mo Shams, Druid Isles resi the complaint in Tallahassee, said he and his neighbors are try ing to close the door on putting commercial development in their neighborhood before the Council can open it despite their opposi tion. Once you open the door for these things you cant close it. Shams said. It just doesnt close anymore. The city argues the exact oppo site, Mayor Howard Schieferdecker saying that by not allowing the door to possible development to open, the city is denying itself the right to decide whether it in fact wants the 56-acre area between lakes Charity, Hope and Faith east of Interstate 4 and west of Mait land Avenue to be developed or not. I am not for the project, I dont even know what the project is yet, Schieferdecker said. I just hope well have an opportu nity to look at it. Design plans have yet to be laid for the area, and wont be drafted or proposed until after the Comprehensive Development Plan is altered if given approval by the state, he said. By offering the challenge to Tallahassee, Shams hopes the state will reconsider the citys pro posed change to allow Maitland to permit this land, owned by the Battaglia Group, to be open for commercial use, including stores of up to 65,000 square feet in size. The potential development, Shams said, will negatively im pact his and his neighbors prop erty values as well as put the area The issue is tentatively scheduled to be back before Council, with feedback from the state, on March 25, but the mayor said the process may be slowed by the Feb. We dont know what to ex pect now, Scheiferdecker said.Battle continues over Battaglia developmentSARAH WILSON Observer Stafffertilizers put on lawns and land used for agriculture, and sew age, that have seeped into the springs. The nitrates create an environment ripe for lots of algae and plants to grow, those plants Wekiva is what happens, he ex plained, degrading the quality Of the eight springs that feed the Wekiva River, four are impaired, including the two largest, said Robert Williams, a member of the counsel for the Center for Earth Jurisprudences Springs the level which there would be spring. The Water Management Dis trict (WMD) is required by law to develop a plan if the levels are be low the minimum or are projected to be in the next 20 years. Williams reached out to the WMD last problem, only to be told theyre studying it. But study after study has been done, all revealing the same information, and no action has been taken to save the river. Theyve known about the damage for a long time, Williams said. Were trying to get them to follow the law, Williams said. We risk losing something that is really irreplaceable. Before the rally, that was something that Williams didnt see happening. But the Friday before, the DEP released its Basin Man agement Action Plan to help river. Its a start, he said. Orlando Democrats Rep. Lin da Stewart and Sen. Darren Soto drafted a bill together to protect the springs as well. Those that or ganized the rally the League of Women Voters of Orange County, Friends of the Wekiva River, St. Johns Riverkeeper and Florida Conservation Coalition are slowly reaching some of their goals to bring political attention to the cause. But its more than just getting the river and springs back to spar kling, their health is a window into our own aquifers health, in the springs may indicate a de clining water level in the aquifer, which supplies 90 percent of Flor idas population with drinking water. Unregulated development and giving permits to businesses and farms to use the water, which is part of the springs problems, could be draining the aquifer too, he said. Were pumping water out of the ground at an unsustainable rate, Orth said. There needs to be a focus on a plan, and the public needs to elect environment, and keep them ac countable, Orth said. It is no longer acceptable to eliminate regulation for the sake of economic development, said Seminole County Commissioner Lee Constantine. And really, Floridas unique and beautiful landscapes are what feed the economy, said Bill Belleville, a local environmental maker. The beaches, the one-of-akind springs and the outdoors are what bring people to visit and live in Florida, not its subdivisions and strip malls. And Belleville has made a career out of exploring of the Earth that are nearly un touched by people and time. The springs are some of those he loves most. You can feel like youre sev eral hundred years back in time, Belleville said. Youre having a very essential experience with nature. visit to Silver Springs in Ocala at 13, before Disney took over Central Florida, and being so amazed with what he saw. No place could compare, and he knew hed be back. I thought it was the most wonderful place I had ever been, Williams said. And thats whats at the heart of those trying to save the springs. Theres nothing like them in the world, and weve got them right here in Central Florida. Theyre a treasure worth saving, said Bob Graham, former Florida governor and U.S. senator. He couldnt help but stop to marvel at the Wekivas beauty as he was driving into the park with his wife on the way to speak at the rally. I feel a spiritual uplift when Im at a place like this, Graham said.I am not for the project, I dont even know what the project is yet. I just hope well have an opportunity to look at it. Mayor Schieferdecker WEKIVA | After years of lip service, organizers say theyve seen tangible moves toward rivers cleanup CONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE To learn more about what you can do to help, and to donate to the cause, visit Friends of the Wekiva River at friendsofwekiva.org or email speakupwekiva@gmail.com PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVERSwimmers enjoy the springs at Wekiwa Springs State Park, the site of a rally by activists to try to save it from further damage.

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Page 4 A fatal blow was dealt to the Winter Park Wildcats Feb. 14 at the hands of Treasure Coast High School in a 52-46 loss in the re The Wildcats (17-11) had el bowed their way into the boys Class 8A regional ladder with trict, falling only to University. But Treasure Coast (19-5) had just come off a district championship with momentum on its side. The game didnt get out of hand for most of its duration for the Wildcats, who watched the scoring gap slowly grow over three quarters to as wide as dou ble digits before they began to mount a comeback, but the surge would be too little, too late. With Treasure Coast shooting 53 percent overall, the Wildcats struggled to keep up. Edgewater The Eagles were on a roll head ing into a showdown against Her itage at press time, after trounc ing Palm Bays Bayside 76-49 in With a win, the Eagles (23-4) will face the winner of a matchup be tween Leesburg and Gainesville at 7 p.m. Feb. 23, with the location TBA. Meanwhile the girls team has been destroying every team its faced on a steady march to the ami Norland at the Lakeland took down Melbourne 64-16 in ville 78-62 for the regional championship.Wildcats fall, Eagles still ghtingISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff in the works, Bellows said theres more to come soon as Ravaud Winter Park Ale House plans to open its doors within the next two weeks, and deals for mixed use residential and retail build ings and townhome sites are begin signed with more con struction starting in the coming months. Its incredible how the land scape (on Lee Road and 17-92) is going to change and how nice its going to be, he said. Youre re ally going to feel like youre en tering a nice place coming into Winter Park.Alfond Inn taking shape and namesSince breaking ground in November 2011, construction of the Alfond Inn at Rollins College has continued on schedule at the corner of Interlachen and New England avenues in downtown Winter Park. Everything is going as good as we had hoped, Rollins Col lege Vice President of Finance, Jeff Eisenbarth, said. Weve seen lots of interest and excite ment around the opening. With major construction still underway, and its targeted midAugust opening still nearly six months away, Eisenbarth said 14 events and 847 room nights have already been booked in the 112room hotel. Eisenbarth said Winter Park residents can expect construc tion to continue up until July 1, when all the accoutrements for the Alfond will begin to move in, in preparation for opening as the fall term begins at Rollins.RAVAUDAGE | Rollins Alfond Inn already booked 847 room nights, opens August CONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVERThe Alfond Inn rises above its concept drawing along New England Avenue in Winter Park.Business Briefs Community Bulletin Fake collections agents soughtThe Department of Business and Profes sional Regulation (DBPR) recently issued a consumer advisory after learning that individuals posing as Department employees are allegedly targeting victims of timeshare scams. The callers are asking victims for cash to pursue refunds for the money they lost. If a person calling claims to be a telemarketer, consumers may report the call to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services at 1-800-HELP-FLA (1-800-435-7352) or at freshfromorida.com SSCs big grantSeminole State College of Florida has received a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant totaling almost $900,000, to be paid over the next three years to prepare students for high-earning careers in engineering, architecture and construc tion. The Advanced Technological Educa tion (ATE) grant is the largest NSF grant in the colleges nearly 50-year history. The goal of the grant is to create interest in careers related to STEM (science, tech nology, engineering and math) and also to provide assistance to help students succeed, says Michael Staley, dean of the School of Engineering, Design and Con struction for Seminole State.Dual degrees at RollinsIn order to prepare its students for the challenges in todays global economy, Rollins College recently announced the creation of the Dual Degree Program (DDP), a four-year program that partners with one of the leading business schools in Germany. The program is currently ac cepting a limited number of applications and will launch in fall 2013.Tiny dancerSelected from a pool of 53 qualifying applicants, 6-year-old Faryn Hughley has been awarded a full scholar ship to study for one year at The Center for Contemporary Dance. Valued at more than $4,000, the scholarship covers the cost of Hughleys attendance in unlimited dance classes and participation in two annual student concerts.KaBooming Fleet PeeplesVolunteers are needed to help build a playground in Fleet Peeples Park starting at 6:30 a.m. on March 2 until the build is completed that day. Contact Charles Names at cnamey@aol.com or 407383-4566 or contact Brenda Moody at Bmoody@cityofwinterpark.org or 407599-3525.New affordable insuranceThe Florida Department of Health in Or ange County announces an affordable insurance option to help children of families without health insurance. Florida KidCare is Floridas child health insurance program for kids through age 18 who do not have insurance. For more information call toll-free 1-888-540-5437 (KIDS) or visit the Florida KidCare website at ori dakidcare.org M/I Homes has acquired a 10-acre site overlooking Bear Lake on Bear Lake Road off Maitland Boulevard for development of a luxury residential community. David Byrnes, president of M/I Homes in Florida, said the Enclave at Bear Lake will include 35 luxury homes that range in size from 1,800 square feet of living space to 3,400 square feet. Byrnes said singlefamily homes at The Enclave at Bear Lake will be priced from $225,990. Site development will start in March, Byrnes said, and M/I Homes will start construction of model homes in October. Craig A. Minegar, a shareholder with the law rm of Winderweedle, Haines, Ward & Woodman, P.A., recently received his re newal as a Florida Bar Board Certied Real Estate Attorney. To be recertied, attorneys must meet stringent require ments similar to those for initial certication, including mandatory continuing education and a peer review assessment of competence in the area of real estate law, character, ethics and professionalism. Mercantile Capital Corporation has an nounced that 2012 was a record year for the nearly 10-year-old company, which specializes in providing commercial prop erty nancing for small business owners via the U.S. Small Business Administra tion 504 loan program. Christopher Hurn, CEO of Mercantile Capital Corporation, said the company nished the year having closed loans on more than $424.2 million in total project costs. This record loan vol ume is an increase of 143 percent from Mercantiles 2011 loan volume of $174.4 million, which was the previous record for the commercial lender. Dunkin Donuts joined the Maitland community in January, adding to its rep ertoire of providing Central Florida with an everyday stop for coffee and baked goods. Hughley

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Page 5 D ear residents, The general election scheduled for March 12 will provide an opportunity for you to vote for candidates running for City Council. Also appearing on the March ballot will be a series of Charter Amendments that are proposed for approval or disap proval by voters. In an effort to provide as much information as possible for this upcoming election, we have worked with the Charter Review Commission and the Maitland Public Library to schedule a Charter Amendment Educational Workshop that is open to all resi dents. The workshop will be held on the Maitland Public Library locat ed at 501 S. Maitland Ave. Please make plans to attend. All residents are invited to visit itsmymaitland.com to view the Charter Commission Report and a Charter Amendments outline under the Community Events listing on the homepage. If you have questions or need more information, please plan on attending the workshop. Cordially, Howard A. Schieferdecker, Mayor City of Maitland City Council Agenda of Feb. 25City Council meets the second and fourth Monday of the month scheduled for Feb. 25 in the Coun cil Chambers, 1776 Independence Lane. Below is the agenda for that meeting. Special Presentation: WoodConsent Agenda: February 11 ny Inc. Sidewalk Replacement Automotive Network provements U.S. Highway 17-92 at Horatio Avenue CCEIDecision Items: Member/Canvassing Board Rotundo Lobbying & Consult ing Services For updates, please check our website at itsmymaitland.com Its TAX time. Appointments Available 7 Days a Week!Tax Form Processing LLC4070 Aloma Ave., Suite 1010 Winter Park, FL 32792Tel: (407) 657-6336www.TaxFormProcessing.com Proudly Serving the Orlando Area for 18 years! Scan QR Code 40$00OffTax PreparationMust present this coupon at time service is provided. Offer valid for one-time use. Cannot be combined with any other offer. Expires April 15, 2013Code: WPMO13 KEEP UP WITH MAITLAND NEWS AND EVENTS!www.IndependenceLane.com Facebook.com/ItsMyMaitland Maitland City TalkBY HOWARD SCHIEFERDECKER MAYOR Invitation to workshop

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Page 6 City Commission meeting There will be a City Commis sion meeting Monday, Feb. 25, at sion Chambers located at 401 S. Park Ave. Below are a few topics Mayors Report Eagle ScoutsNon-action items ber 2012 Consent Agenda 2/11/13. and contracts (for a full listing, please visit cityofwinterpark.org under Whats New > City Com mission Agenda) Action Items Requiring Discussion Commission meeting scheduled for Monday, May 27, due to the Memorial Day HolidayPublic Hearings construct approximately 35,500 square feet of retail, restaurant properties at 111 and 131 N. Or lando Ave. to construct a tennis court on the property at 1551 Via Tuscany. nance to vacate and abandon the utility easement at 1141 Via Capri. nance to amend the Compre hensive Plan Future Land Use map to change the existing Future Land Use designations of Single Family Residential and Institu the properties at 216, 226 and 234 W. Lyman Ave., and to Medium Density Residential Future Land Use on the property at 250 W. Ly man Ave. ing Map to change the existing Single Family District and Public, trict zoning on the properties at 216, 226 and 234 W. Lyman Ave., and to Medium Density MultiFamily Residential District zoning on the property at 250 W. Lyman Ave. (To be held after 5 p.m.) capital improvements to under ground electric/CATV (BHN) facilities along Via Salerno/Via Capri sions full agenda on the home page of cityofwinterpark.org un der Whats New > City Commis sion Agenda.City blood driveOn Monday, Feb. 25, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Florida Blood Cen ters will be in front of Winter Park City Hall located at 401 S. Park Ave., for a blood drive. A critical number of voluntary donations are required every day to meet the need for blood. We appreci ate your lifesaving efforts. To do nate blood, you must be at least 16 years old, weigh 110 pounds, and be in good health. All donors must bring photo ID. For more information, please call 407-599orgProvide input on citys downtown parking mobility planAs in any vibrant downtown, the ability to provide adequate parking is always important. This ter Park with the thousands of residents, shoppers, visitors, din ers and event goers that enjoy its downtown every year. Based on the growth in the downtown and the opening of the citys SunRail stop in 2014, the city has identi ment a downtown Parking Mobil ity Plan. You can help the city of Winter Park develop effective parking strategies to accommodate the demand for downtown parking by participating in the citys Downtown Parking Survey at cityof winterpark.org/ParkingSurveys between now and Friday, March 8. Upon accessing the link, you will be able to select a survey from one of these four categories that best describes your role in down 1. Employee 2. Business owner 3. Resident 4. Visitor Participation will help the city maximize parking opportunities that can enhance the overall downtown experience. Thank you for participating in the parking survey and providing valuable feedback.St. Patricks Day ParadeThe city of Winter Park and the St. Patricks Day Parade Commit tee are proud to present the 34th annual Winter Park St. Patricks Day Parade on Sunday, March 3, at 2 p.m. in downtown Win ter Park. Gather your family and friends and wear some green to enjoy the only St. Patricks Day parade in Central Florida. The pa rade will begin at the Winter Park Country Club and continue south down Park Avenue to Lyman Avenue. More than 75 units will participate. The celebration will also feature Irish music and stepdancing at the main stage in Central Park with demonstrations by the Tir Na Greine School of Irish Dance and the Watters School of Irish Dance. Irish music will be provided by the Tommy Doyle Band. This is one event you wont want to miss! St. Patricks Day began as an annual feast day to celebrate St. Patrick, the most commonly recognized patron saint of Ireland. The Irish have observed this day as a religious holiday for more than a thousand years, and it is currently recognized by people of many other ethnicities. The day is widely celebrated by wearing green clothing and items such as shamrocks. According to Irish tradition, those who do not wear green on St. Patricks Day face the risk of being affectionately pinched. This celebration is made possible by the generous support of event sponsors including the city of Winter Parks Community Re development Agency, Fiddlers Green Irish Pub and Eatery, the Irish American Cultural Society of Central Florida, and Florida Dis tributors Company. For more information regard ing the 34th annual St. Patricks Day Parade, please call 407-2220648.Visit the citys ofcial website at cityofwinterpark.org, like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter and watch us on Vimeo. FEATURING ...... AND MUCH MORE! A Premier Flooring Source (877) 302-6713www.fortiscollege.edu 1573 W. Fairbanks Ave. Winter Park, FL For consumer information visit www.fortis.edu Prepare to become aCAREER OPPORTUNITIES Winter Park City TalkBY RANDY KNIGHT CITY MANAGER

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Page 7 FEB. 21 African-Puerto Rican author Mayra Santos-Febres and Cuban-American poet Ricardo Pau-Llosa will speak on Feb. 21 at the Annie Russell Theatre, located at 1000 Holt Ave. in Winter Park. Pau-Llosas master class will be at 2 p.m. in the Wool son House, followed by Santos-Febres master class at 4 p.m. in the Woolson House. Call 407-646-2000 or visit Rollins. edu for more information on these events. The Holocaust Center, located at 851 N. Maitland Ave., announced that its Febru ary Education Forum will feature a pre sentation by local writer Greg Dawson on Thursday, Feb. 21, at 6 p.m. Dawson will discuss his latest book, Judgment Before Nuremberg. Reservations are suggested, but are not required for this event. Call 407-628-0555 or visit holo caustedu.org for more information on this event.FEB. 24Peter Thatcher, who has been playing the guitar for almost 60 years, will perform at Casa Feliz located at 656 N. Park Ave. in Winter Park, on Sunday, Feb. 24, from noon to 3 p.m. Call 407-628-8196 or visit casafeliz.us/ for more information. Scholar Barrymore Laurence Scherer, a Thomas P. Johnson Distinguished Visiting Scholar, will lead a discussion at Tea and Talk about the upcoming concert, Titans in C, which features works by Beethoven, Haydn and Mozart, on Sunday, Feb. 24, at 4 p.m. at the Casa Feliz Historic Home Museum, located at 656 N. Park Ave. in Winter Park. The event is free. Doors open at 4 p.m., and the program begins at 4:30 p.m. Call 407-628-8196 or visit casafeliz. us/ for more information on this event. The Orlando Museum of Art, located at 2416 N. Mills Ave., will host the Glass Collectors Forum on Sunday, Feb. 24, at 1:30 p.m. as part of the Contempo rary Glass Sculpture: Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of Studio Glass exhibition. Guests will have the opportunity to discuss Studio Glass with noted glass collectors and hear about their experiences collect ing it. Four Florida collectors composed of Arnold Bierman, Norma Roth, Gary So rensen, and Chuck Steinmetz will attend the Glass Collectors Forum for a round table discussion. A complimentary docent tour of the Contemporary Glass Sculpture exhibition will be before the discussion at 12:30 p.m. The event is free with paid gallery admission. This program requires advance registration. Call 407-896-4231, extension 262, or visit omart.org for more information on this event. Music Theater Bavaria, Central Floridas unique nonprot arts education organiza tion that helps college-age opera and mu sical theater students work toward career success, is hosting a Sound of Music movie sing-along at the Enzian, located at 1300 S. Orlando Ave. in Maitland, on Sunday, Feb. 24, at 11 a.m., to benet the Music Theater Bavaria Scholarship Fund. There is no charge for admission, with a suggested minimum donation of $10 per person. Proceeds will fund need-based scholarships for MTBs intensive training and performance summer program in Germany this July. Visit musictheaterbavaria.org for more information about the organization and its program.FEB. 25Winter Park City Hall, located at 401 S. Park Ave., will host the Winter Park City Blood Drive on Monday, Feb. 25, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. The annual Shakespeare Competition sponsored by The English Speaking Union of Central Florida will be held at The Uni versity Club of Winter Park on Feb. 25 at 4 p.m. Students from Seminole, Orange and Osceola counties in grades 9 to 12 will memorize a Shakespearean sonnet and a 20-line passage from one of his plays. The winner receives an all-expenses paid trip to New York to compete in the National E-SU Shakespeare Competition. The rst place winner in New York wins a scholarship to study at the British Ameri can Drama Academy the following sum mer. Contact Nick Leo at 407-365-4051 or nleo@bellsouth.net for information. FEB. 26The Winter Park Chamber of Commerce hosts an Economic Update Breakfast on Feb. 26 at 7:45 a.m., with the program beginning at 8:15 a.m. at the Rachel D. Murrah Civic Center, located at 1050 W. Morse Blvd. in Winter Park. Featured panelists are Harry Collison, co-founder and president, The Real Estate Consortium Inc.; Al Latimer, senior vice president strategic partnerships, Enterprise Florida; and Bill Seyfried, professor of economics, Rollins MBA. For more information, visit winterpark.orgFEB. 27The Maitland Chamber of Commerce presents the Maitland Chamber Com munity Luncheon on Wednesday, Feb. 27, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Maitland Civic Center, located at 641 S. Mai tland Ave. Mayor Howard Schieferdecker will give the State of Maitland update. Reservations, which are a must, cost $15. Call 407-644-0741 for more information on this event. MARCH 2UCPs 20th Anniversary Gala, presented by Republic National Distributing Company, will take place Saturday, March 2, from 5:30 to 10 p.m. at the Buena Vista Palace Hotel & Spa, located at 1900 E. Buena Vista Drive in Lake Buena Vista. The gala, which benets UCP support, education and therapy programs, gener ates valuable dollars that help thousands of children each year. Call 407-856-4827 or visit ucpc.org for more information on the gala. Visit www.wpmobserver.com/ events/search for more details. Send submissions to ibabcock@ turnstilemediagroup.com Find I LUV Winter Park merchandise and local art at ILUVParkAvenue.com407-539-3977 Calendar 866-314-3769AIRLINES ARE HIRING r rfntb t trbt trnnt trbttt r rfffnttb bttrtrt tnttrbrbtbbr trtrb b Private Tutoringwww.harvardcrimsontesting.com 917-637-0438 FEB. 27: Reading Lolita The Winter Park Institute at Rollins College will host Dr. Azar Nasi, author of Reading Lolita in Tehran, on Feb. 27 at 7:30 p.m. in the Tiedtke Concert Hall, Keene Music Building, at Rollins College, which is located at 1000 Holt Ave. in Winter Park. Nasi will discuss the relationship between politics, culture and human rights in Iran. She will also emphasize the rights of women and girls and the role they play in the process of change for pluralism and an open society. Nasi will participate in a book signing immediately following the discussion. This event is free. No tickets are required and free parking is available in the SunTrust parking garage at 166 E. Lyman Ave. Call 407-646-2233 for more information. FEB. 21: Winter Park Sip & Stroll The Winter Park Chamber of Commerce and Park Avenue Merchants will host its rst Winter Park Sip & Stroll for 2013 on Thursday, Feb. 21, from 5 to 8:30 p.m. Attendees will en joy appetizer and beverage samples at more than 25 local merchants. Tickets will not be mailed, but conrmations will be emailed for registrations submitted through PayPal. Only 300 tickets will be sold. Check-in will be at Luxury Trips, located at 190 E. Morse Blvd. in Winter Park, beginning at 5 p.m., and attendees will receive their wine glass and lan yard at check-in. Guests must check in by 7 p.m. Attendees must be 21 or older. The event will be held in rain or shine. Call 407-644-8281 or visit winterpark.org for more information on this event.

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Page 8 Lifestyles Its minutes before 4 p.m. on a Monday afternoon as Steve Biss inger sits on an end-cap barstool swirling the last sip of red wine in his glass. Closest to the entrance and far thest from the kitchen, hes got a of the familiar faces walking in out replaced by those coming for dinner. His is well-sought-after real estate in the trajectory of the Tap Rooms wood-paneled dining room. A VO Canadian whiskey and water replaces his empty glass before he even has to ask, after sitting in this chair three days a week for the past six years, They know what I like, he says, send ing a smile and nod toward the bartender. A man with white wine in hand lingers behind Bissinger as the amber liquid in his own glass lowers. See the guy behind me? This is his seat, he says motion ing toward the man behind him. Once dinner rolls around, he knows I know its his seat, and he knows Ill give it to him. Its a synchronized regular changing of the guard that comes with the routine of a place, he says, where the crowds nearly always the same, and everyone knows your name. Everyone comes here because its the place to come, he says. Its a lot like Cheers. Every body knows your name. The name most commonly bantered about the dimly lit din ing room is that of the man whos taken up shop in the back corner booth during the lull between lunch and dinner service. Laptop open, and papers scattered about, owner Steve Gunter is rarely more than earshot away from the cusCollege Park restaurant all day. The guy really knows how to do business, Bissinger says of Gunter, Hes always around, and he knows everybody Hes done up the place really, really well. Its praise, Gunter said, thats always nice to hear, but that hes quick to divert to others on his staff. Its only with the help of his staff, he said, that hes been able to turn The Tap Rooms struggling golf-side bar space into an awardwinning restaurant and events venue since taking it over in the early 2000s. other owners in had tired, and failed to do in the decade prior, and in the process became Mr. College Park, said College Park Partnership Director Andrea Kud lacz. He knows everybody, and ev erybody knows Steve, she said. Getting there, Gunter said, re quired throwing everything hed thought hed known about running a restaurant, throwing it out the window, and starting from scratch, the key variables in that formula being his mangers Bar bara Teal and Cathie Ashby. I assure you without both of those women I would have been a colossal failure, he said with a laugh. Far from a failure, since Gunter took ownership of the Tap Room the restaurant has won six Orlando Sentinel Foodie Awards and was named as the winner of the Best of in Orlando Magazine three times. Im just lucky to get to come to work here everyday, Gunter said, motioning to the expansive oak tree-lined golf green border ing the outdoor dining area. College Park is a great community that were proud to be a part of. Need To Sell Your House? (855) 755-1818 Just Want Out Behind on Payments Job Transfer or Loss Tired of Being a Landlord Need Repairs Facing Foreclosure Vacant / Abandoned www.Circle18Homes.com CASH $$$ QUICK CLOSE ANY PRICE RANGE ANY CONDITION ANY SITUATION Rick Lee, President and Chief Cluxton Joins Citizens Bank of Florida, Winter Park Member FDIC TAPPING into COLLEGE PARKIn 10 years, the Tap Room at Dubsdread went from troubled bar to thriving restaurant and event spaceSARAH WILSON Observer Staff PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVERSteve Gunter, owner of the Tap Room at Dubsdread and Carol Hollday, restaurant general manager, hold tuna sashimi and tenderloin steak atbread. The Tap Room at Dubsdread is located at 549 W. Par St. in College Park. For more information, visit taproomatdubsdread.com

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Page 9 friday featuring heartsofgoldconcert.com hard rock live at universal citywalk march 1 h ear ts go benefitting coalition for the homeless of central florida ld of 2 0 t h A n n i v e r s a r y SPONSORS: r rfntbWe offer Full-Day Infant Care and Childcare Year-Round, Preschool Classes, Summer Camp, and much more! rfntbrn n n Most of us take for granted the ability to come and go freely from our homes. But its not so simple for Central Floridians with dis abilities who struggle to navigate the steps at their front doors of ten dragging their wheelchairs behind them or relying on a loved one to carry them. In emergency situations, the task becomes even more challenging. While a ramp offers an accessible solution, many in need cant afford to mod ify their homes. Thats why the Center for Inde pendent Living in Central Florida is seeking donations for our sev enth annual RAMPAGE event. On Feb. 23, our volunteers will fan out across the region on a oneday push to construct permanent ramps free of charge to recipients, making a long-term difference in their safety and quality of life. mix of people including seniors, military veterans and children, like 12-year-old Antonio, who has cerebral palsy and was overjoyed last year to cruise down his new ramp all by himself. When people who have dreamed of indepen gift that makes it possible, the ex pressions on their faces are unfor gettable. Each year, Central Florida ral lies behind RAMPAGE, and 2013 is no different. Were honored to partner with a number of volun teer and sponsor groups, includ ing the Home Depot Foundation, Publix Super Markets Charities, CNLBank, Cuhaci & Peterson, and Master Custom Builders Council, among others. However, building ramps properly requires in urgent need of donations to cover the cost of materials to sup port our ongoing ramp-building efforts. A gift of $100 allows us to purchase 30 bags of concrete mix, 1,720 deck screws or eight wood posts. With your support, we can also provide other avenues for clients to reach their goals whether its ing affordable housing or coping with their challenges through mental health counseling. Your gifts to RAMPAGE allow us to empower people with these vital services year round. Donations of any amount are tremendously appreciated, because building pathways to independence takes a community.Elizabeth Howe is the executive director of the Center for Independent Living in Central Florida. To donate or learn more, contact Allison Gould at 407-623-1070, extension 124, or agould@cilorlando.orgBuilding ramps to independenceVolunteers will modify homes with ramps at the Center for Independent Livings RAMPAGE on Feb. 23 ELIZABETH HOWE Guest Writer PHOTO COURTESY OF CENTER FOR INDEPENDENT LIVINGCNL Bank employees, above, with the Center for Independent Living, helped build a ramp for a senior veteran at a past RAMPAGE event. FEB. 22The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art, located at 445 N. Park Ave. in Winter Park, presents Alaska-Yukon-Pacic Exposition: Seattles Forgotten Worlds Fair on Friday, Feb. 22, at noon. Admis sion is $5 for adults, $4 for seniors, $1 for students, and free for those younger than 12. Call 407-645-5311 or visit morsemuseum.org for more information on this event. FEB. 23The Great Duck Derby is returning to Mead Botanical Garden, located at 1500 S. Denning Drive in Winter Park, on Saturday, Feb. 23. Gates will open at 9:15 a.m. The event will begin in the little amphitheatre at 10 a.m. with the Peabody Hotel Duck March and then conclude at 2 p.m. In addition to duck races, there will be other activities, including hay rides, face painting, a bounce house and much more. To enter the duck races, adopt a little yellow rubber racing duck for $5. Proceeds sup port the youth educational program ming at Mead Garden. Prizes will be awarded to winners and runners-up of the races. Parking and activities, excluding the Duck Races, are free. Food and drinks will be available on site for purchase. Call 407-599-2800 or visit meadgarden.org for more information on this event and Mead Garden. UCF will host a Activities Day at the Creative School for Children, located in Building 24 at 4000 Central Florida Blvd., from 9 to 11 a.m. on Saturday, Feb. 23, to celebrate the universitys 50 years. Fifty activities will be done one at a time throughout the morning, including cooking and science activities, obstacle courses, and arts and crafts. The event is free and open to the public. The Creative School also is seeking volunteers for the event. To volunteer, call 407823-2726. To learn more about the school, visit csc.ucf.edu. MARCH 2 The sixth annual Junior League of Greater Orlandos Kids in the Kitchen Fit-n-Fun Fest will take place on Saturday, March 2, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at South Central Park in Winter Park. The free event will feature over 40 exhibitors, free giveaways, music, games, an obstacle course, bounce houses, face painting, healthy snack suggestions and much more. There also will be 25 health related vendors at the event. Call 407-422-5918 or visit jlgo.org for more information on this event. MARCH 3The city of Winter Park and the St. Patricks Day Parade Committee present the 34th annual Winter Park St. Patricks Day Parade on Sunday, March 3, at 2 p.m. in downtown Winter Park. Attendees are encouraged to bring family and friends, and to wear green to the event. Visit cityof winterpark.org for more information on this event.ONGOING The Voyages of Doctor Dolittle will be playing through Feb. 24 at the Orlando Repertory Theatre. The pro duction is perfect for all ages and will be performed in the style of Disneys The Lion King or Animal Kingdoms Finding Nemo: The Musical, with all of Dr. Dolittles animal friends portrayed by live actors with puppets. Visit Orlandorep.com for more information. Send submissions to ibabcock@ turnstilemediagroup.com

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Page 10 New trend: paying workers to be healthyPHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVERKelly Lange, left, brought tness to her ofce with the help of instructor Jon Bergeron. More employers are offering incentives to employees to stay t, with some even paying them. Its estimated that obesityrelated health problems cost employers in the U.S. $73.1 billion a year. The Duke University study found that not only does it cost employers tons of cash for health costs in general, obesity-caused absenteeism and decreases in productivity encompass about half that number at $36.4 billion. that a few companies are trying to combat by implementing their own healthy initiatives. Some companies are paying lenges, run miles and eat their vegetables. Others are offering spa gift cards and paid days off, Jon Bergeron, a Winter Springs resident, owns Underground Fit on-site exercise classes and employee incentive plans that adapt Please see FITNESS on page 11Corporate wellness is catching on, with some companies paying and rewarding employees to get healthyBRITTNI JOHNSON Observer Staff

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Page 11 started his company because of his pas sion for living a healthy lifestyle and shar ing that with others, and because he saw an opportunity when he learned about the costs for employers associated with obesity. Thinking about those billions of dollars struck him. It boggles my mind sometimes, Bergeron said. gram can save employers about $6 per em ployee in medical costs and absenteeism for every dollar invested, but that return on investment takes time up to three years. Corporate wellness is extremely new, but its catching on with compa nies focused on keeping their employees healthy and happy, rather than the end insurance savings. Bergeron consults with companies to decide on what classes theyd like and heads there at any time of day, after work, during the lunch hour or for a quick break during the day, to give personalized classes. Hell also work with the company to help plan a way to get employees excited lenges and incentives to get them to partici company through increased productivity. A healthy employee is a more pro ductive employee, Bergeron said. Your awareness is heightened and your brain activity is actually higher after you work out. Workscapes in downtown Orlando is one of his clients, and has worked with him ager who has worked with him to develop their plan, said shes felt that little rush of energy and focus after workouts. Theyll room, run up and down their stairs and host Zumba and yoga classes. Theyve also developed an incentive program that pays employees in points redeemable for vacation time or spa trips. Lange said not only has Bergerons program helped people at work, but its also given them the motivation to keep up their healthy routine at home. It has an impact when you are focused side of work, she said. PCE, an investmentPark, has developed its own healthy employee program, and has seen the same results. Their employees have de veloped friendships lenges theyve given them. Their focus is to create an exciting, supportive and happy environment for their employees, rather nies demonstrating that they value a work and life balance has become a way to draw prospective employees, and health pro grams do that, Bergeron said. It builds camaraderie among our group, said Luisa Shellhorn, who co-creat ed the program and is marketing coordina tor for PCE. Theyve even seen side bets going on to lose weight, and in their competi goes a long way when it comes to getting around Park Avenue, said Deborah Dom roski, co-creator of their program. Like minds usually come together to motivate each other, said Domroski, huAt PCE, employees have the opportu health goals. They are on a point system, with walking a mile earning a point, for example, and every point they get is worth 10 cents. Domroski said they estimate that it would be easy for employees to make about $200 to $300 a year, and they can of the program will culminate in the whole company running a 5k together. They think their program will stick because of how their co-workers will feel by participating. You just feel much better when you live a healthy lifestyle, Shellhorn said. 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com r fntbt f rtt ftbt bt bnr nr rt b bb f b tb off trtnCoupon redeemable for cash, check or credit card purchases only. Not redeemable for insurance transactions. Excludes custom/special orders & nutritional supplements. May not be combined with any other discounts. Coupon has no cash value. at Winter Park Towers Your room is waiting for you if you need Pain and Symptom Management Hospital Follow-up Complex Treatments, or Crisis Care Referrals 866-742-6655#5019096 www.cornerstonehospice.org www.SeriousIllness.org/cornerstoneMedicare, Medicaid, most commercial insurances accepted February is all about heart health. Did you know that according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women? That is why being proactive about the health of your heart is vital. On Wednesday, Feb. 13, Work Well Winter Park and Winter Park Memorial Hospital hosted Cardiologist Anil Kumar, MD, and Edwin Cabrera, Florida Hospitals executive chef, to participate in the Health Education Series. During the lunch and learn, Dr. Kumar shared these helpful tips to take preventative measures against heart disease: Be active Diabetes, obesity and physical inactivity are a few factors that can put you at a higher risk for heart disease. Reduce your risk by being active. If you with as little as two hours a week of brisk walking you can reduce your risk of major Eat healthy Lowering your cholesterol and blood pressure reduces your risk of heart disease. Try eating more grains, fruits, vegetables and nuts. Eating healthy prevent heart disease, limit your sugar in take, cut down on sweets and lower your sodium intake. Know the warning signs Making sure you know the warning signs and symptoms of a heart attack is key. Heart attacks have several major warning signs such as chest pain or discomfort, shortness of Get heart healthy in February Please see HEART on page 12 For more information about Underground Fitness and how they can help your employees get t, visit undergroundtness.us or call Jon Bergeron at 407-463-6940.FITNESS | Employers finding they improved output, reduced healthcare costs CONTINUED FROM PAGE 10 A healthy employee is a more productive employee. Your awareness is heightened and your brain activity is actually higher after you work out.

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Page 12 Y es you should move now. No, you shouldnt wait. And heres why.Good Samaritan Society Kissimmee is proud to sponsor this no-nonsense, straightforward seminar for seniors, developed by Rick Hunsicker, a nationally known expert in senior living for more than 25 years. Rick covers the issues of lifestyle, health, tness, security and socialization, and ends with a strong message about the nancial issues of owning an older, paid-off home. You may be on the fence, or you may have received conicting advice from friends, family or others. Either way, this is the one seminar you shouldnt miss. Youll come away with the tools you need to take the rst steps toward a satisfying retirement. Delicious desserts and coffee will be served, and three great door prizes await the lucky recipients! Following Ricks presentation, well welcome your questions, and youll have a chance to see and hear the latest from the directors of Good Samaritan Society Kissimmee Village.What Seniors Need to Know Today Seminar Good Samaritan Society Community Center Kissimmee, FL Rick Hunsicker is a leading speaker who tours the country presenting his popular What Seniors Need to Know Today seminar. Rick grew a very successful El Paso real estate practice, starting in 1977. Then, recognizing a need to help seniors move from older homes, Rick founded The Retirement Housing Transition Program for Equitable Relocation, a program that grew to include multiple senior living community clients. After having been recruited for national sales positions by two respected developers of senior living communities, Rick founded Hunsicker Consulting in 2007 to continue providing sales, marketing and customer service support for the senior living profession. Numerous communities across the country have utilized his wealth of experience and strong capabilities, and thousands have attended his timely and informative seminars. One Senior Place ... See our full Calendar of Events at OneSeniorPlace.com407.949.6733715 Douglas Avenue Altamonte Springs, FL 32714M-F 8:30am 5pmFriday, February 22 Fiscal Cliff The New Tax Act 9am 10am Presented by Price Financial Services RSVP 407-339-4500 Fitness Club 11:30am 12:30pm By Arden Courts Memory Care Community RSVP 407-949-6733 Caregiver Workshop 2:30pm 4pm Presented by ADRC RSVP 407-843-1910 Monday, February 25 Senior Club sponsored by Family Physicians Group 10am 1pm Feb 11: Computer Club Feb 18: Movie Day Feb 25: Casino Day Tuesday, February 26th Estate Planning Workshop 9:30am 11:30am Presented by The Law Ofces of Hoyt & Bryan RSVP 407-977-8080 Elder Law Workshop 2pm 4pm Presented by The Law Ofces of Hoyt & Bryan RSVP 407-977-8080 Wednesday, February 27 Why do hearing aids cost so much? 3pm 4:30pm Presented by Harmony Hearing Centers of America RSVP 407-545-4098 Thursday, February 28 Medicare Educational Workshop 3pm 4:30pm Presented by Medicare Plan Options RSVP 407-949-6723 The Real Estate Specialists are IN 9am 3pm Presented by Exit Real Estate ResultsCalendar of Events February 2013 breath, nausea or upper body pain or discomfort. Edwin Cabrera, Florida Hospitals executive chef, performed a cooking demonstration of a heart healthy meal for the group. Chef Edwin explained that it is the small steps that can make the biggest impact. For instance, instead of using vegetable oil, use a small amount of olive oil. He also emphasized that it is important to train your taste buds to appreciate healthy foods and to not be afraid of trying foods as an adult that you may have disliked as a child. For healthy recipes to get you started, visit Healthy100.org Start taking healthy steps today to have a healthier heart for tomorrow. Winter Park Memorial Hospital is part of the Florida Hospital system, one of the nations lead ing centers for cardiac care. Florida Hospital treats more heart patients than any other hospital in the nation, and performs more open-heart surgeries than any other hospital in Florida. For more infor mation, visit WinterParkHospital.com or to schedule an appointment call 407-303-DOCS (3627).HEART | Try new foods CONTINUED FROM PAGE 11 PHOTO COURTESY OF WINTER PARK MEMORIAL HOSPITALCardiologist Dr. Anil Kumar talks heart health during a presentation courtesy of Work Well Winter Park and Winter Park Memorial Hospital. He outlined a series of easy tips to improve heart health by integrating them into daily routines.

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Page 13 It being that time of year (Val entines Day, give or take a week), I couldnt resist addressing the subject of love. To get a better understanding of the current love environment, I trolled some of the more popular advice for the lovelorn. I thought I had seen it all, but I was blown away. Blame my naivet, but I was raised on Dear Abby, where people mostly wanted advice on how to get along with their in-laws and how to communicate with their children. The raciest it ever got might involve a husbands wonderings about appropriate nightwear, or a wifes fears that her husband might be ogling the next-door neighbor. Contemporary advice columns seem to focus more on sexual technique (a wide range of it) and how many partners one must have before its considered cheating. And then there is the sheer volume of requests. Dont people have anyone to talk with about their problems? And what makes the advice columnists so expert, save for their ability to respond in clever and titillating ways? As I sorted through the columns, though, I was struck by a persistent longing for people through their romantic encoun ters. It was never really about the technique, or the numbers, but a called love: to who would cherish, comfort and respect a person. And those seemed to be in short supply. Might I be so bold as to suggest that the lack of suitable partners has a lot to do with how we view love in general? Right now, our society seems to treat love like a lottery rather than an investment. We play right person who will make us happy. That is the stuff romantic comedies are made of. However, in real life, love is much more like an investment: it rather than an occasional splurge. Real love requires an investment of forgiveness, helpfulness (like getting up when the baby is crying), understanding, compassion and trust. None of these are cheap, but the ROI (return on investment) can be amazing! In my church we are blessed with several couples who have enjoyed more than 60 years of marriage. As I look at them, I see incredible returns on their investments. I see the comfortableness of a life built together. I see them bearing with one anothers quirks in order to provide each other with a space to be who they are. I see them holding hands with great tenderness. I see them wiping each others brows when that sickness part of the in sickness and in health rolls around. Thats something day traders in love never get to experience. Like all investments, values couples go through times when they think they will go bankrupt. One person is investing and investing without much seeming return. And yet when they hang on through the bear markets of love, they see their investments multiply. The secret is to patiently wait for the turnaround, while What happens when you run out of stuff to invest? What if your emotional energy and hope are all dried up? A long time ago, Jesus told some of his friends: Love one another as I have loved you (John 13:34). I used to think that Jesus was just telling them to imitate Him: try harder. But I think this truth goes much deeper. I think Jesus is not only giving direction but power here. He understood that people would never be able to love others the way He did unless they knew His love. I have discovered that when I have nothing left, Jesus does. You simply need to know how to access that love. The sad thing about many of those advice columns is that they keep giving the same advice over and over again. Is anyone listening? If technique could do it, wed have a lot more happy people running around than we currently do. Something to think about Rev. Jim Govatos currently serves as Senior Pastor at Aloma United Methodist Church located in Winter Park. A former atheist, Jim is passionate about helping people understand and experience a living faith in Jesus Christ. Please share your thoughts by emailing him at jimg@ alomazone.org Savannah Court and CoeExcellence in Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation 1301 W. Maitland Blvd. Maitland, FL 32751407-645-3990www.SavannahCourtMaitland.comAssisted Living Facility License No. 8447 Skilled Nursing Facility License No. 1635096 At Savannah, it feels just like home. Its safe, convenient and the food is excellent. And of course, my mom is a huge fan of Bingo! Ernestine & her daughter PatriciaAssisted Living Rehabilitation and Skilled Nursing Care Variety of Apartment Suite Selections, some with Lake Views Restaurant Style Dining Laundry, Housekeeping, Maintenance Services Transportation to Outings and Medical Appointments Beautifully Landscaped Courtyard Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above. You are always welcome! A Senior Living Community where Hospitality is a Way of Life. Its not just about getting you back on your feet. Its about getting you back to your life. HCR Healthcare, LLC Rehabilitation and Skilled Nursing George Carroll, M.D., has over 20 years experience in sexual medicine, and is actively involved in the following: Most men can resume a normal sex life without surgery. 407-894-9959 OrlandoSexualMedicine.com Mark your calendar and join us for the inaugural Our Whole Community Healthy Living Expo! Its on March 9 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Winter Park Community Center, providing a great time for family to learn and have fun! This free Expo is being brought to you by Our Whole Community, a Christian organi zation that brings communities together resulting in innovative programs that inspire, motivate and educate individuals in their pursuit of optimal health and wellness. A healthy person has a well-functioning body, an active mind and a loving spirit. When all of these components are in harmony, quality of life is greatly improved. Our mission is to educate our community to live the healthiest life possible, partnering with Winter Park, University of Cen tral Florida College of Nursing and the Florida Hospital Center for Family Medicine to provide free health assessments and education at the Expo! We are providing free health screenings for: cholesterol, blood pressure, diabetes and cancer risks. Your time at the Expo can be spent with a team of professionals who want you to enjoy superi or physical, mental and spiritual health. You will have access to a wealth of information on health and wellness from our team of physicians, nurses, pharmacists and wellness coaches. In addi tion, your family can participate in fun activities such as yoga, healthy cooking demonstrations and participating in discussions on healthy living, disease control and weight management. You are sure to return home richer in the knowledge of good health, nutrition and longevity than you dreamed possible. We have an awesome day planned for you you dont want to miss it. Did I mention that we have free gifts too? We look forward to seeing you and your family at the OWC Healthy Living Expo!Teona Morris is a certied health and wellness coach.Growing wealth in the bank of love Jim Govatos Reality LinesRight now, our society seems to treat love like a lottery rather than an investment.Healthy Living ExpoTEONA MORRIS Guest Writer

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Page 14 Opinions F ew widespread, commonly planned and attended events engender the spectrum of possibilities of the modern day wedding. There are endless shows and movies devoted to such, portraying difbonding-rituals of Bridesmaids, the forgetful antics of bachelor parties followed by hangover recuperation. Weddings are memorable events. Many people have at one time or another become part of a wedding party, ring bearer in my of honor, for others. Some have even more hands on experience. Several years ago I noticed The Winter Park Wedding Chapel on Facebook, but only recently learned its story, and the story of the couple behind it. Transplanted Brits Suzanne and Steven Graffham met in Orlando working for a tour comago, as they welcomed daughter Sienna into the world requiring nursery, and a search for space led to its creation. Once a Methodist church, after theyd moved in, a friend stated the obvious. We came in and we had it as a studio and then the back we started out renting it out to other photographers as well, explained Suzanne. Then one of our close friends came up and said, okay, youve got a chapel, youre a photographer, and my history was I had coordinated weddings at Cypress Grove. And he was like, Hello, duh, why dont you do weddings? We got one of the biggest tour operators, Virgin Holidays because of our connections, we got the manager up here and said, okay, this is what wed like to do. They signed up with us straight away, so they were the I was shopping at Michaels for wedding chapel yet; we were just faking it. They were like yeah, if you change this, do that, well sign up. So, we got in the brochure and we started doing weddings just with them. Then we marketed it locally. Year one they had 20 weddings, 60 the second year, 82 in the third and last year they had 102. The day we met last week shed already had two that morning. Many couples have returned to visit since, stopped in to say hi. As with most small busi nesses, customer requests have led to change. Ive had a couple, they booked from New York, but they came here from China. They had both sets of parents who the six of them. They booked a package with me and it was the They called from New York and said do you do packages? And I didnt, but I said yes and threw one together. The package in cluded horse and carriage, special champagne and more. I ask about most memorable weddings and she recalls one in which the bride wore a red dress, and all the guests were dressed up as characters, mostly Disney characters. The bridesmaids were like sexy Sleeping Beauties. One of the guests, the videographer, was Pinocchio. But the most memorable for other reasons was weddings. I didnt have a carpet here, I had a paper runner Id bought from Michaels and I had it down before people started arrive were these two young girls and this woman, and I couldnt woman to the bride and groom because she was kind of mess ing up the runner. It was almost ripped by the time they were coming in. Anyway, afterwards, I found out she was the ex of the groom. And her parents showed up at the reception at Park Plaza Gardens. Suzanne and Steven were married in Orlando around Little Lake Bryan near Disney. But the proposals yes, plural took place in Hawaii. There for work, Steve invited Suzanne to join him, and had her picked up at the airport in a limo to start a tour of the islands. First one was the big island and we went hiking on the lava, all the way down to this black beach, he said. And we were miles from the car, so I had the ring in my pocket and this is what I planned, this was it, on this black beach. I got down on one knee, took the ring out and she shouted out Noooooooooooo! So, for a mo ment I thought, What? But she said I was going to propose to you on this trip but youve beaten me to it. And it was a leap year, and apparently thats the thing, on a leap year, the girls can ask the men. Not one to miss an opportunity, Suzanne retaliated days later with her own proposal while snorkeling. I said, you go in photos of you. And then I put the ring box in between, she starts laughing, looks at me, in my bikini top. She made the pro posal in the water, literally got the ring out of the box and put which could have been disastrous because if I dropped it, it was thousands of feet down. Chapel operations are becoming a family operation as Sienna, chapel, gets more involved. She helped pass out candy at last years Christmas parade, and had ideas on how to improve for the next year afterward. She helps me from time to time and then, when Im on the phone, explaining things to brides, she pipes up in the back of the car and yells, Mommy, I help change ribbons out, says Suzanne. Adds Steven, There was one day Suzanne was talking to a bride and she was referring to it as my chapel, she said my chapel, and Sienna was in the background saying Its not your chapel, its our chapel.Clyde Moore operates local sites ILUVWinterPark.com and ILUVParkAve. com, and aims to help local businesses promote themselves for free and help save them money, having some fun along the way. Email him at iluvwinterpark@ earthlink.net or write to ILuv Winter Park on Facebook or Twitter. Check out his column on WPMObserver.com by navigating to Columnists > Clyde MooreUnsurprisingly, given its historical tradition of exceptionalism, the United States, in contrast to other advanced democracies such as Canada and Australia, takes a restrictive approach to attracting foreign talent. Like green cards awarded on the basis of employment, H-1B visas (temporary work visas for high-skilled positions) are subject to stringent quotas. As a result of this rigid U.S. policy, our economy forgoes the positive effects of skilled immigration on entrepreneurship and employment creation. But, in the case of high-skill immigrants, the relationship between liberalization of immigration poli cies and job creation is robustly positive. The National Foundation for American Policy found that for every H-1B position requested, U.S. technology companies following year. For technology companies with fewer than 5,000 employees, each H-1B position was associated with increased employment of 7.5 workers. In soft has found that for every H-1B hire we make, we add on average four additional employees to support them in various capacities. And in 2011, the American Enterprise Institute found no evidence that foreign workers hurt U.S. employment; on the contrary, analysis showed that for every 100 H-1B workers added, an addi tional 183 jobs were created for American workers. These studies suggest that the foreignskilled labor force, rather than taking jobs from Americans, creates new job oppor tunities for U.S. workers. Substitution is unlikely since foreign skilled workers are paid equal to Americans in the same jobs. Nothing is simple when it comes to the issue of high-skilled immigration, though. From a global perspective that extends beyond U.S. interests, there is a moral dilemma: vast areas of the global south, already depleted of valuable resources by the north, are undergoing human capital their already disadvantaged position in the world. The brain drain harms native populations, which are deprived of necessary services when doctors, nurses, teachers, engineers and scientists leave their countries of origin. The dilemma is exacerbated when the question of individual freedom of choice is set beside that of the common good of poor countries. Most of the skilled workers who emigrate do so eagerly, to improve their personal and family prospects. Their home countries dont always offer the infrastructure to do research and work they are passionate about. Should we impartial spectators concerned with global justice oppose policies that attract foreign talent to the developed world? Should we plug the brain drain? The answer to this question has to be no, even though there is something ethical ly dubious about robbing poor nations of an opportunity to grow by enticing their brightest and most productive citizens to leave. We may hesitate to restrict emigra tion because we value individual autonomy and do not want to live in a world where national governments hinder the free movement of persons. But a persons right to emigrate does not necessarily entail an obligation on any one state to receive that person. The reason a right to emigrate might entail obligations on the ible immigration rules is that, in a world of sovereign states where no corner of the earth remains outside of some countrys (formal) dominion, the freedom to move is contingent on the (arbitrary) willing ness of receiver countries to maintain open borders to the extent that doing so does not hinder their survival. So if rigid limits to immigration are in tension with individual freedom, why not compensate underdeveloped countries for depriving them of their human capital? This idea is philosophically coherent. After all, the rich northern nations should be held accountable for exacerbating the plight of the resource-poor global south by enacting immigration policies that attract foreign talent. So how should they be compensated? Although the question is complex, a few quick answers come to transfer initiatives, partial debt forgive transfers. Compensation is founded on sound principles of justice and does not offend equally important principles of individual freedom (of movement) across nations and continents. Julia Maskivker is an assistant professor in the Political Science department at Rollins College in Winter Park.Clyde Moore I LUV Winter ParkGoin to the chapelWe highlight local businesses that are utilizing and selling items made by other locals. Send submissions to iluvwinterpark@earthlink.net Local Luvn Local Janes Short & Sweet Janes Short & Sweet shortbread cookies are made in College Park and sold at Sassafras Sweet Shoppe in Winter Park. Janes shortbreads were voted Best Cookie in Central Florida by the readers of Edible Orlando, and named Best Shortbread at the Central Florida Scottish Highland Games. In all, Jane is creating new avors all the time, with a select group available at any one time. PHOTO BY CLYDE MOORE THE OBSERVERSuzanne and Steven Graffham built a wedding chapel from an old church, right in the middle of downtown Winter Park. They say business has quintupled in four years. The other immigration debate: the brain drainJULIA MASKIVKER Guest Writer

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Page 15 Chris Jepson Perspectives create God? There are scientists among us who believe that the universe began with something called a singularity, a speck Nothing was everything, that is. And everything that ever was, or shall be, was buy this idea, although I would ask you not to expect me to explain it. Some people might consider this sin gularity to be God. Thats OK with me since without it, there would be no cre ation of anything. The Earth is but a speck in the universe, and speck. It is not given nite, for we are stuck with small minds that can never escape their Even Einstein admitted his fatal limitations when asked if he believed in God, he could only answer, Well, I didnt make myself. Scientists argue as to whether the universe, far enough out, comes to an end. The more we perfect our nating from the dark void. Light travels at 186,000 miles a second. We know that the light we perceive as being far out in the universe started to travel to us billions of years ago, from sources that may no longer even exist. Things are certainly not located where our human eyes perceive them. We peculiar creatures have come to realize that we shall never understand the exact nature of God. Karl Marx called religion the opiate of the masses. An old folk song goes, I wonder as I wander out under the sky. If faith does it for you, dont knock it, but go on applying loveable human qualities to the creator and enjoy your life while doing so. Otherwise wander on wondering like the rest of us wonder why we elected Obama once, and were slightly astounded when he got a second nod. As his second term pro gresses, dont be surprised if his familiar ity breeds contempt and his popularity wanes. Yogi Berra cemented his niche in history by saying such things as when being asked, What time is it? he answered, You mean now? Great philosophers have perennially pondered the use of the word now, which is no longer now once you have uttered it. Its done. Its over. It becomes then the moment you say it. In the days before I decided to see what was north of the St. Johns River, I was one of the obedient captives in Winter Park public schools. There was, I had heard, lots of stuff going on up north and across the big ocean from New Smyrna. One thing I found out for sure is that human curiosity grows from experience to experience every one opening a door to myriad others. There is no now where one can stop and rest on his laurels. Incidentally, laurels are things I have never been able to locate to rest on. And is the future ahead or up or down? I just hope I have one at all, wherever it is! be suing me today if I had decided to become a plumber? Many a guy is now being sued by the woman he married just because he pledged to make a husband out of himself! About Roney: HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney) cent cigar. Thomas Marshall, former vice president of the United States The cigar quote is attributed to Woodrow Wilsons two-term vice president, Thomas Marshall. Presiding over the Senate and after listening to an interminable senatorial speech on what America needs, Marshall allegedly leaned over to a colleague and offered his pithy assessment of what the country required. And, of course, Marshall is remembered today. A footnote. What do you think America needs today? Seriously, if you could wave a magic wand, what would you imple ment/initiate that would make America a better place? I think the nation is half-measuring itself to the dustbin of history. We seem incapable of achieving two important tasks: 1) Determining (as a society) important national priorities, and 2) Agree ing (a consensus) on how to achieve/ pursue them. I am sadly disheartened regarding the course of America. Is there one particular example that an illustration or two. Send me your examples, but I insist they be unambiguous as to how they clearly demonstrate the nations descent to mediocrity. acts of self-interest (recall Alaskas bridge to nowhere), which was merely legislative pork run-amuck. It is a timeless practice, based on greed and power. No, I want clear-cut examples of systemic Among the many examples that immediately come to mind, Ive one that clearly captures the challenge confront ing the United States. In the summer of 2012, the Texas Republican Party agreed to the following provision in its party platform: Knowledge-Based Education We oppose the teaching of Higher Order tion), critical thinking skills which the purpose of challenging the students authority. To go on record, publicly no less, that as Republicans you oppose teaching our children critical thinking skills is a staggering indictment of the nation as a whole. Why oppose critical thinking? beliefs? What? Critical thinking might For shame, that we ever change our thinking or horrors our behavior! My goodness, Jepson, Im not sending my kid to school so she learns to think for herself! Sacre bleu! What does it say, that the governing political party in the second largest state in the United States goes on public record opposing higher order thinking skills, critical thinking, because bottom line authority may be challenged? This is at the crux of much of human history. Time and time again, author ity opposed change because change is threatening. To power. To privilege. To wealth. To what is known. To the status quo. To the sacred unchallengeable verities. Fortunately, for humanity, such rear guard reactionary actions never succeed in the long run. Change is as predictable as each new day. Mercifully so. No nation, no people remain in power forever. We like to think we Americans are differ ent in that regard, that history is irrel evant, that we will be on top forever. To oppose the teaching of critical thinking facilitates Americas decline, and is emblematic of us today as a culture. Someday future Americans will sadly ask, What were those people thinking? The answer: we werent. Nay, Republicans are actually on record opposing it.Jepson is a 24-year resident of Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.USWhat does this country need? Wondering as were wanderingLouis Roney Play On!JASON KENDALL Guest WriterIt might not be front-page news, but toll lanes on Interstate 4 are quickly and quietly becom ing an expensive reality. Tallahassee has approved nearly a billon dollars in funding these Lexus lanes and needs another billion from private investors. The new project, estimated to take seven years, includes 56 new bridges, along with many replacement bridges and the reconstruction of 15 major inter changes. The I-4 project comes on the heels of SunRail, the construction of which has begun and will be paid for by fares and increased property taxes. The new I-4 construction will undoubtedly create massive congestion for drivers and will only cost taxpayers more money. The estimated cost of a one-way cruise in the private Lexus lane from 434 to downtown will be about $7.70, while the return trip will cost about $5. To most, the fare is lunch and a coffee; for a few, this is spare change. How can legislators now justify this project after invest ing billions of our dollars into SunRail? SunRail was sold as a in the world would we build new toll lanes on I-4? Logic dictates that by creating private toll lanes on I-4, drivers who might pay for a SunRail ticket will now have the option to pay the toll instead, thus only helping to reduce SunRail rider ship. I can only assume I-4 toll supporters feel the need to force drivers onto SunRail by making the morning commute as misera ble as possible. However, the role of government is to help facilitate solutions to problems not to change the behavior of people or, its master plan. Also, where did the billion tax dollars come from? Could this money not be better spent in our communities or schools? Or is this money being spent because unemployment for road builders hovers around 20 percent? Gov. Rick Scott just sent $2 billion back to Washington for the high-speed rail project due to the costs. Now, magically, there is a billion dollars for a toll road. Thanks, but no thanks Im not buying. Why is this important to resi dents of east Seminole County? Simple, I live in Altamonte Springs west of I-4 and, like many other residents in my area, I will hardly ever pass over I-4 to ride the SunRail. Yet I, along with other taxpayers, will be paying for the maintenance and costs of SunRail for many years to come via property taxes. Accordingly, east Seminole County residents who will either take SunRail or drive on the 417 to get to downtown will now be paying for the I-4 toll road although they may never use it. There are other options, though. We could, at no cost, make the inside lanes of I-4, riders-or-more carpool lane. I say if legislators want their $2 billion prove that SunRail is going to be spending our money. Tolls on I-4 will not help increase SunRail ridership or These tolls, instead of promoting the SunRail as a viable commuting option, will only create competition that neither we nor SunRail can afford.Interstate 4 toll lanes: an expensive future reality How can legislators now justify this project after investing billions of our dollars into SunRail? There are those among us who wonder why we elected Obama once, and were slightly astounded when he got a second nod. As his second term progresses, dont be surprised if his familiarity breeds contempt and his popularity wanes.

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Page 16 DISH Network. Starting at $19.99/month(for 12 mos.) & High Speed Internet start ing at $14.95/month (where available). SAVE! Ask about SAME DAY Installation. Call Now: 1-888-685-4144. ADOPTChildless teacher (33) and devoted hus band (37) wish to adopt; promise uncon ditional love, opportunities. Expenses paid. Kristie/Gabe. Attory Adam Sklar, Bar#0150789. 1-800-387-9290 Toll Free Winter Park Benefit Shop140 Lyman Ave, Winter Park needs items to sell: clothing, bedding, jewelry, kitchenware and bric-a brac. Also need ing volunteers. Contact Elizabeth Comer 407-647-8276. Open Tues & Fri at 9:30am; Sat 10am-1pm. All proceeds support childrens programs & the Or lando Blind Association. $399 Cancun All Inclusive SpecialStay 6 Days in a Luxury BeachFront Re sort with Meals and Drinks for $399! http://www.cancun5star.com 888-4819660 Small business needs place to park 4 trucks(trucks are dodge rams) with 20 trailers & equipment. 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OBSERVERJust Sold Homes5135 Duban Avenue, Orlando, FL 32812 sold by Elim Cintron & Teresa Jones-Cintron 1245 N. Park Avenue, Winter Park FL 32789 sold by Kelly L. Price & Cindy Watson 1450 Casa Rio Drive, Orlando, FL 32825 sold by Elim Cintron & Teresa Jones-Cintron 1555 Palmer Avenue, Winter Park FL 32789 sold by Gwyn Clark 2506 Chippewa Trail, Maitland, FL 32751 sold by Cindy Watson 381 Hope Terrace, Maitland, FL 32751 sold by Cindy Watson 5366 Penway Drive, Orlando, FL 32814 sold by Audra Wilks & Padgett McCormick 717 Langston Court, Orlando, FL 32804 sold by Mary Ann Steltenkamp Its FREE to place estate sales, garage sales and yard sales on this page! Visit WPMObserver .com and click Create Your Classified Order your classified ad online!At WPMObserver.com you can create, customize and pay for your ad in one convenient place! MindGymFebruary 18, 2013 MindGymFebruary 18, 2013 Plan your weekend withThe Weekender!Visit wpmobserver.com and click "Subscribe to Newsletter" Sunday, February 14th 948 Versailles Circle, Maitland FL 327514 BR | 3 BA | 2,896 SF | $484,000Pristine pool home with amazing floor plan! Open & airy family room with vault ed ceilings, wood burning fireplace and built-in desk that opens to the fantastic kitchen with maple cabinets, stainless steel appliances and massive granite breakfast bar. The spacious master suite includes a 14x10 attached study/den/ nursery. The second family room which features a wet bar and wall of windows to enjoy your sparkling pool and fenced yard! Hosted by: Catherine DAmico from 1-4 PM 520 Longmeadow Street, Celebration FL 347474 BR | 3.5 BA | 2,834 SF | $449,900Fabulous Celebration! Gorgeous three story townhouse overlooking Savan nah Square. Spacious master suite with walk-in closet and fantastic master bath. The lovely kitchen features granite counters, breakfast bar and stainless ap pliances. Wonderful wood-burning fire place in living room. Fantastic fenced-in private outdoor patio area is perfect for entertaining! Hosted by: Rhonda Chesmore from 1-4 PM 1336 Sunset Drive, Winter Park FL 327894 BR | 3.5 BA | 2,732 SF | $675,000Picturesque two-story traditional home located on a charming brick street in Winter Park! Beautiful wood floors, crown molding, large windows, French doors & high ceilings. Large formal living room, great eat-in kitchen with French doors to the backyard patio, double built-in oven, granite and beautiful wood cabinets. Spacious family room, gorgeous fireplace, lovely master suite and large bath! Quaint fenced backyard has ma ture landscaping with bamboo and ivy covered one car garage. Hosted by: Kelly L. Price from 1-4 PM 9769 Bay Vista Estates Boulevard, Or lando FL 328365 BR | 4 BA | 3,207 SF | $432,000Rare find in Bay Vista Estates! Spacious split floor plan with a large pool and a very large Florida room. Lovely kitchen/ family room combination with volume ceilings and fireplace. Pride of ownership shows with a newer roof (2009), brand new hot water heater, new tile inside home, just painted inside and out within the last two years! Youll enjoy the air conditioned Florida room that looks out onto the over-sized pool. Private boat access to Big Sand Lake and tennis courts! Hosted by: Sherri Dyer from 2-5 PM SUNDAY 1-4 NEW LISTING!DOMMERICH ESTATES BEAUTY1100 Mojave Trail, Maitland. 4BD/2BA, 2,156SF. Beautiful maple wood floors throughout the living areas & bedrooms with porcelain tile in the kitchen and baths. Eat in kitchen. Indoor laundry room. 48 ft. solar heated pool. Lake ac cess to the WP Chain of Lakes. Walking distance to A+ schools. $425,000ORWIN MANOR CHARMER1441 Norfolk Avenue, Winter Park. 3BD/2BA, 1,803SF. 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Page 28 Now through March 17 Sense and Sensibility and Othello share the stage The great Shakespearean tradition is to perform plays in repertory, and that is whats hap pening right now at our Shake speare Theater. Othello and Sense and Sensibility are being performed with the same cast performing different roles in the two plays (on different nights). The bad luck of the Dashwood sisters in Sense and Sensibility, leading to scandalous secrets and unexpected twists of fate, seems a tempest in a teapot compared to the jealousy, passion and revenge that gives Othello the reputa tion of being Shakespeares most treacherous play. Visit Orland oshakes.org or call 407-447-1700. Now through March 10 Three weeks to get Wicked One of my favorite Broadway shows of all time (hows that for a recommendation?) is being brought back to Orlando for three weeks through March 10 by Fairwinds Broadway. If you read my column, you already know that Wicked is about what went on in Oz before Dorothy. Along the way it causes you to question what makes a Wicked Witch wicked and whether sweet Glinda is really all that good. Direct your broomstick to the Fairwinds com or call 1-800-982-2787. Now through March 24 Dr. Seusss The Cat in the HatThe Orlando Repertory Theatre (the REP) has the honor to present the southeast premiere of a brand-new production of Dr. Seusss The Cat in the Hat as adapted by Katie Miller for the National Theatre of Great Britain. Leaping onto the stage with chaotic exuberance, Cat is per formed at the REP in Orlandos Loch Haven Park. Visit orlandorep.com or call 407-896-7365.Now through March 17 Homers Odyssey in a world premiere production Adapted by Charlie Bethel from the epic poem by Homer, this world premiere production re-imagines Odysseus travels over the wine-dark seas of ancient Greece. Bethel brings us shipwrecks, sirens, goddesses, sorcery, death and revenge in a faithful but accessible re-telling of this classic story. Sometimes comic and always thrilling, The Odyssey is suitable for most audiences. Call 407-447-1700 or visit orlandoshakes.org Feb. 21 and Feb. 28 Writers at Rollins Rollins College brings contemporary literature to the commu nity as the 2013 Winter with the Writers Festival of the Literary Arts features African-Puerto Rican author Mayra SantosFebres and Cuban-American poet Ricardo Pau-Llosa on Feb. 21, and ing Lolita in Tehran on Feb. 28. These free afternoon master classes and evening readings take place at Rollins College. Visit rol lins.edu/winterwiththewritersFeb. 22 to March 11 The Breakthrough Theatre has a Bad SeedArtistic Director Wade Hair has more than his garden to wor ry about as he prepares to open The Bad Seed at the Breakthrough Theatre in Winter Park. The play is set in a small Southern town where the Penmarks live with their daughter, Rhoda. Sweet and charming on the surface, little Rhoda is involved in the drowning of a local boy. Is it possible that Rhoda killed the boy? And will she kill again?! Find out at the Breakthrough Theatre at 419A W. Fairbanks Ave. Call 407-920-4034 or visit breakthroughtheatre.comFeb. 22 to March 17 Godspell goes downtown The early Stephen Schwartz musical Godspell will be presented by The Vine Theater at Theatre Downtown from Feb. 22 to March 17. First presented on Broadway in 1971, the musical based on the Gospel of Matthew. This show is for all of us It builds community, offers restoration and most importantly is just plain fun; Godspell is about life abundantly, says Director Zach Van Dyke. Theatre Downtown is at 2113 N. Orange Ave. in Or lando. Call 407-841-0083 or email thevinetheater@gmail.comFeb. 28 Midtown Men in Daytona They were the original castmembers of a Broadway show that became one of the biggest hits of all-time. Now theyre together again and thrilling audiences with a one-of-a-kind concert/theater experience celebrating the music of the 1960s. With classic songs by the Beatles, Motown, The Four Seasons and more, these one-time Boys are now the Midtown Men, who enjoy singing together and shar ing that experience with audienc es from coast-to-coast. The show will be presented one-night-only on Feb. 28 at 7:30 p.m. at the Peabody Auditorium in Daytona Beach. Visit peabodyauditorium. org or call 386-671-3462.Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906.Josh Garrick Culture worthy of your calendar FEATURING THE BACH FESTIVAL CHOIR AND ORCHESTRAAT ROLLINS COLLEGE SINCE 1935 rfntbfbTHIS WEEKENDCONCERTOS BY CANDLELIGHT: MOZART Enjoy the elegance of Mozart and the beauty of the candlelit Knowles Memorial Chapel Fri | Feb 22 | 7:30 pm Sat | Feb 23 | 7:30 pm TEA & TALK: THE MASS AND ITS MASTERS Discussion about the upcoming concert tr Barrymore Laurence Scherer Casa Feliz Sun | Feb 24 | 4:00 pm Bach Festival Society programs are made possible through earned income, grants, donations, and generous contributions from a variety of individuals and community partners. WED LIKE TO GIVE SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR 78TH ANNUAL FESTIVAL SPONSORS:Elizabeth Morse Genius Foundation Martin Andersen-Gracia Andersen Foundation The Galloway Foundation 78TH ANNUAL BACH FESTIVAL 407.646.2182 | www.BachFestivalFlorida.orgReserve seats before they are gone! For more information, Call today!(407)-644-6646www.aSafeHarbor.com Member of Bob Adams President/CEO A SafeHarbor, LLC bob@asafeharbor.comWhen is 3 greater than 7?Many of the individuals I meet with are saving and investing, while hoping to get a 7 percent return. The reality is that the fees inside their accounts could erode their returns to the point that a 3 percent return could beat 7 percent. The Custom Annuity Review with A SafeHarbor can show you Exactly how fees impact your accounts. This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORG @EnzianTheater Nominated for Five Academy Awards! AMOUR Fri-Sat 3:15, 6:30, 9:30 Sun 4:00 only Mon, Wed, Thu 6:30, 9:30 Tue 6:30 only Red Carpet, Bright Lights: An Oscar Watch Party at Eden Bar and on Enzians Big Screen Sun 6:30 Cult Classics: SCREAM BLACULA SCREAM Only $5! Tue 9:30