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Winter Park-Maitland observer
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00241
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park FL
Publication Date: 11-29-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates: 28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID: UF00091444:00241

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Your age clouds your vision and also hardens your approach to all things new. Youve become the problem .Page 14Hot off the Web Park StyleiLashWorks in Winter Park specializes in eyelash extensions, including dramatic and everyday varieties.Page 12 LifestylesTour an 1880s-era Maitland hometurned-museum during Holidays at the Waterhouse through Jan. 13.Page 9 CalendarThe Holiday Tree Lighting Ceremony begins at 5:15 p.m. Friday in Central Park, followed by a screening of Elf.Page 8 CALL US TODAY FOR A COPY OF Your Guide to Social Security Bob@aSafeHarbor.com | ASafeHarbor.com(407) 644-6646 Learn more visit www.ss.vip2site.com When faced with stormy nancial waters, seek... Call us today for your guide to Social Security!404-644-6646 or visit www.ss.vip2site.com Winter Park Recovery CenterExecutive Drug & Alcohol Treatment Services Suboxone Maintenance For Opioid Abuse Naltrexone/Acamprosate for Alcohol2056 Aloma Ave, Suite 100, Winter Park, FL 32792 www.winterparkrecoverycenter.com 407-629-0413 PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERTiffany Coburn sings O Holy Night at The Orlando Philharmonic Orchestras Holiday Pops concert in Winter Parks Central Park on Sunday, Nov. 25. SOUNDS OF THE SEASONPHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK OBSERVER STAFFWith the FlexBus, Maitland may have a solution to transportation to and from its upcoming Sunrail station, which is under construction and set to open in 2013. YMCA ght ends with expansionISAAC BABCOCK Observer StaffThe Winter Park YMCA Family Center is a step closer to expand ing, but will it be for the last time? That question rankled residents and perturbed some members of the City Commission at Mondays meeting, as they fought over how much is too much for the build ings expansion. reading to allow a rezoning that paved the way to expansion, but mission will face residents one more time before the deal is done. Some neighbors character ized the YMCA along Lakemont Avenue as a corporate behemoth as they asked the Commission to reject a proposed zoning change that would allow the facility to sprout a bigger parking lot and a zero-depth pool. The scale of the project shifts it from a neighborhood Y to a regional Y because most of their members dont even live in the area, said Margaret Deboer, add ing that the Y had seen mostly non-resident signatures in its peti tion to gain support. She also accused the Y of be ing secretive to nearby neighbors Please see COMMISSION on page 2For better or worse, someone al ways has to be the one to try somecil agreed, voting to continue to ositions aimed at growing business and transportation within the city. At its meeting on Monday, Nov. 26, the Council voted unanimously study of Flexbus, an on-demand mass transit system set to launch in late 2013. And despite harsh criti cism and skepticism from Maitland legality, the Council also agreed to continue talks with developer Dan Bellows regarding his proposition of commoditizing impact fees. This shows that we are reaching out in innovative ways to make development more successful in said, adding that the city will never know how successful or unsuc cessful these things will ulti mately be unless they at least look into their processes.Being exible with FlexBusFollowing years of planning, a Please see COUNCIL on page 5FlexBus inches forward, Bellows request on holdCouncil signs FlexBus agreement and tells developer to prove legality of another proposalSARAH WILSON Observer Staff

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Page 2 (407) 514-0087 3.05% Certain restrictions apply.Rates may vary depending on deposit amount. We broker CDs for FDIC insured banks. Promotional incentive may be included to obtain yield.www.oldharborf inancial.com Old Harbor FINANCIAL12 Month CDAlso oer IRA Specials & free 401k ReviewsAPYHigher Rates for Longer Term Feld Entertainment 214099 FELD ENTERTAINMENTJob No.: Engagement City: Media: Insertion Date(s): Ad Size: Section:RD21409 Orlando, FL NEWSPAPER AD 5.875 X 10 ENTERTAINMENT Thu. JAN. 10 7:30 PM Fri.Sat.Sun. JAN. 117:30 PM+JAN. 1211:30 AM 3:30 PM 7:30 PMJAN. 131:00 PM+5:00 PM+OPENING NIGHT TICKETS $15!**Opening Night offer excludes Circus Celebrity, Front Row and VIP seats. Additional fees may apply. No double discounts.SAVE $5 on Tickets!+JAN. 10 13 Ringling.com+Valid for select performances. Excludes Circus CelebritySM, Front Row and VIP seats. Limit of six (6) tickets per order. No double discounts. Not valid day of show.3 Easy Ways to Redeem Your Savings:1. Go to the Amway Center Box Ofce 2. Call at 1-800-745-3000 and mention code 13SAVE 3. Log on to Ticketmaster.com and use code 13SAVE Meet the stars an hour before the show at the All Access Pre-show FREE to all ticket holders!Presented locally by Effective November 21, 2012, Neha Doshi, MD will no longer be seeing patients at Doshi Internal Medicine at 149 Edinburgh Drive, Winter Park, Florida 32792. In order to ensure continuity of care, Andrew Dauer, DO and Amira Elsayed, MD will begin seeing patients at the current ofce location, beginning November 26, 2012. Dr Dauer and Dr. Elsayed are board-certied in family medicine with a focus on preventative care, treatment of acute and chronic illnesses and womens health. Patient medical records will remain in le at the current practice location in Winter Park, unless otherwise indicated. For additional information, call 407-644-1241. Notice to Patients Doshi Internal Medicine Neha Doshi, MD 149 Edinburgh Drive Winter Park, Florida 32792 about its plans in the past, and Weve had to do this because not once have they reached out and spoke to us, she said. We have not even seen the new devel opers agreement that they shared with you today. Briggs said that despite com plaints from neighbors about expansion, the Y does its best to blend in with the neighborhood. It must work, because we have two brand new houses un der construction across the street, he said. Though some in the audience agreed that the Y had done a good job of melding with nearby resi dences, they expressed fear that if the Ys expansion remained un checked, it could keep growing forever. Any other place this would be a fairly benign request: a park ing lot and a pool, Commissioner Tom McMacken said, adding that the Y had agreed not to do so 15 years ago. We had a developers agreement. We shook hands, and said no more. Its about the city being able to trust the entity that negotiated this. The line has been crossed, McMacken said. Its been vio lated already. Mayor Ken Bradley said that an agreement in 1997, which largely stated that the Y wouldnt expand again, was ill-advised. Its ludicrous of a commission to accept an agreement that says I will never do anything, Bradley said. Though detractors of the ex pansion, which would add a pool suitable for young children, the elderly and the disabled as well as adding another 30 parking spaces, were among the most vocal, they were outnumbered by the Ys proponents. Sports are un-measurable for how important they are to kids, resident Tonya Mellen said. If we cant provide it and the city cant provide it, the Y provides it. I ask you not to consider the Y any thing but a very, very important community asset. Theyre not a corporation and they do not make money. Before the vote that would make it a step closer to reality, Fay Register, a Maitland resident who said the zero-depth pool would tivities, implored the Commission to allow it to be built. It would allow me the dignity to get into a pool by myself, she said. No I dont live in Winter Park, but I am one of those grate ful Y members that appreciate what they do for myself and what they do for other people in the community. When somebody in your fam ily is struck with a debilitating disability that takes away their freedom. I ask you that youll be able to look back upon this day to say, I am so glad that I voted to expand the Y so they could have that pool and the extra parking.COMMISSION | McMacken: YMCA and City Commission already crossed line about no more expansions CONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE ARCHIVE PHOTO BY AMY SIMPSON THE OBSERVERYMCA members were pumped up about an expansion, which rankled nearby residents.

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Page 3 The Knights ended the regu lar season with a bang Saturday, crushing UAB 49-24 in a game they dominated from the outset. Now the Knights (9-3, 7-1) are headed to the postseason with another Conference USA East championship crown. Theyll face Tulsa (9-3, 7-1) next week, with the Golden Hurricane fresh the season. The Knights will have the momentum advantage heading into that game, after a trouncing of the UAB Blazers that showed that ease. that the Blazers could never re verse. But some of the numbers would look confusing for such a blowout. UAB would outgain the Knights with 599 yards to 473, in cluding one of the worst pass de fense games in UCF history. The Knights would allow 510 yards in the air in the game, more than combined. Though the Knights would allow a massive amount of yard age in the game, they stopped the the Blazers six times after they crossed onto UCFs side of the on the ground, with running back Latavius Murray rushing for 94 yards, while receiver Quincy per carry en route to 79 on the ground. Blake Bortles threw for 225 yards in the game, though his longest bomb only went 43 yards. may have been on the Knights defense, when defensive back UAB pass near the red zone and raced it back 78 yards for a touch down, raising the score to 28-3. Now the Knights face a Tulsa team that just lost one of the most lopsided games theyve had all season. The Golden Hurricane outgained SMU 591 yards to 301, and still managed to lose 35-27. SMU game may have summed up the entire four quarters in one drive just a footstep from the end zone and a shot at tying the game. sa at noon on Saturday, Dec. 1. The Winter Park boys are already making a mark on the basketball court as they ready for the Thursday. With two wins under their belts, the Wildcats (2-0) are on a streak to start the season. But thats just what happened last year, just before the Wildcats took what may be their biggest season-to-season nosedive in school history. The 2010-11 Wild cats won 28 games and a state championship. The 2011-12 Wild two wins, but went on to win only four more, losing every district game in the process. seeming newcomers to the court this season, with Jay Wimbley, Eli jah Farley, Nils Lehman and Kyle Brown leading the way at the basket, the Wildcats have a new face compared to last season. While a few of them saw minimal time on the court, none were stars last year. Now theyre all having break out years at once. Those four sank double digit points each (led by Wimbleys 15) in the Wildcats most recent win, edging East Ridge 60-56 Nov. 23. out whether they can break last years curse, and get some re venge on Lake Brantley (2-1) in the process. And theyll see if Wildcats star turned college phenom turned NBA player Austin Rivers younger brother Spencer can have his own breakout year. Game one for Winter Park tips BCBS239776_Orlando_Winter Park Maitland Observer 10.25 x 8 Were here for you. Visit your local Florida Blue Center, Monday Saturday 9 a.m. 8 p.m. ET, to speak with a Licensed Agent.Orlando In Winter Park Village 434 N. Orlando Ave. Winter Park, FL 32789 A new generation of plans for your generation.Blue MedicareSM HMO** PlanFollow us on: Were Florida Blue, Floridas Blue Cross and Blue Shield plan. You can take advantage of a $0 monthly plan premium*. You have the freedom to choose your primary care physician. You have access to a large network of doctors, hospitals and pharmacies. Theres no deductible on prescriptions. Dental, hearing and vision coverage included. You can join SilverSneakers, a special member tness program (new for 2013). *You must continue to pay the Medicare Part B premium. If it is determined that you owe a late enrollment penalty, you will still have to continue to pay this amount. **In select counties. Limitations, copayments and restrictions may apply. The benet information provided is a brief summary, not a complete description of benets. For more information, contact the plan. Benets, formulary, pharmacy network, premium and/or co-payments/ co-insurance may change on January 1 of each year. Florida Blue HMO is a Medicare Advantage organization with a Medicare contract. A Medicareapproved Part D sponsor. Health insurance is offered by Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida, D/B/A Florida Blue. HMO coverage is offered by Health Options, Inc., D/B/A Florida Blue HMO, an HMO subsidiary of Florida Blue. These companies are independent licensees of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. Y0011_74482 0812 CMS Accepted 74720 Call toll-free 1-877-352-5830 (TTY 1-800-955-8771). Or visit floridablue.com. Zero Monthly Plan Premium* PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERJay Wimbley leads the Wildcats in scoring this season, despite little varsity experience. PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERUCF wide receiver Rannell Hall races toward defenders during the Knights 49-24 trouncing of UAB. Saturday they head to Tulsa for a rematch at the C-USA championships.Wildcats dj vu start reaches crucial momentISAAC BABCOCK Observer StaffKnights seek revengeISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff

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Page 4 Business Briefs Community Bulletin Winter Park Relay seeks leadersRelay for Life has been part of Winter Parks com munity since 1999, and now is looking for members to join the 2013 planning committee. To learn more email Tab.Bartlett@cancer.orgJewish Family Services hosts food and toy driveJewish Family Services is collecting food, toys and gift-cards to distribute to families in need during the holidays. Call 407-645-7593 or email marni.chepe nik@jfsorlando.org to donate.Leu Gardens gets holiday makeoverThe Leu House Museum is getting a personalized touch for the holidays by Seminole State College of Floridas interior design students. Rooms throughout the house will be decorated to display the holiday traditions and memories of six notables.Rollins awards scholarshipThe Rollins College Center for Advanced Entrepre neurship has awarded Florida-based REBUILD Glob allys company founder, Julie Colombino, a full schol arship for the Rollins Business Accelerator program.Golng for baseballThe Florida Collegiate Summer League, an Orlando non-prot that provides college baseball players summer competition opportunities, raised more than $50,000 at the 2012 Florida League Celebrity Golf Tournament on Nov. 10 and 11.Winter Park rowing recruitsWinter Park High Schools Crew team has nine row ers being recruited by colleges across the country. The recruits are Courtney Crossley, University of Ten nessee; Lauren Sand, Drexel University; Jill Hannick, University of Virginia; Stephani Dinkel, Barry Univer sity; John Brkich, University of California Berkeley; Everett Hamilton, United States Naval Academy; Har rison Thayer, University of Pennsylvania Wharton; Sam Ward, Princeton University.Pop Warner team going to Super BowlPop Warners Southeast Region will be represented by the Mitey-Mites in the Pop Warner Super Bowl at Walt Disney Worlds Wide World of Sports on Dec. 1. The Central Florida Hotel and Lodging Associa tion held a blood drive from May to August in support of Florida Blood Center. More than 3,600 donors participated, all of them associated with the CFHLAs hotels, resorts and theme parks. Because of their donations more than 10,800 lives were saved or sustained. Florida Blood Centers will recognize the CFHLAs successful drive with an award. Cuhaci & Peterson Architects Engineers Plan ners, based in Baldwin Park, recently earned a rst place award in an international design competition in Atlanta, sponsored by Autodesk, the producers of REVIT (BIM) software, an engineering and architec ture program. Steve Blevins led a team of designers who used the software to depict the remodeling of a Winn-Dixie store. Denise Morris Hammond, a partner in the Orlando law rm Wright, Fulford, Moorhead & Brown, dis cussed Frequent Issues in Design and Construc tion Contracts, during the Nov. 13 meeting of the Women in Architecture Division of the American In stitue of Architects in Orlando. Hammonds practice includes the representation of architects, engineers, contractors and owners in projects of all size and complexity. Mercantile Capital Corporation nanced seven commercial loans in October. These loans provided more than $28 million dollars to fund projects across the nation, including Florida. Mercantile Capital Cor poration is one of the nations leading small business lenders. Full Sail graduates and staff members took home honors during the 23rd Annual Crystal Reel Awards put on by the Florida Motion Picture & Television Association. The Crystal Reel Awards are a way of recognizing outstanding achievements in motion picture, television, audio recoding and digital media in Florida. In all, 13 Full Sail student lms were nomi nated and six graduates won awards in ve catego ries: Matt Dunham, Best Sound Mixing for Short Film for Men of This Life; Charlie Turner and Ashlie Cas sell, Best Script in a produced Short Film/Video for Kaleidoscope; C.A. Barrow, Best Art Direction/Set Design for Short Film for Men of This Life; Charles McCrary, Best Director of Photography for Short Film for Kaleidoscope; and Peter Clotfelter Quenelle for Best Director for Short Film for At Night. Full Sail staff members also took home an award for Best Sound/Sound Mixing for a Feature, Dubbing Stage Engineer Michael Orlowski, Assistant Dubbing Stage Manager Dave Chmela, Course Director Colin Hart and Lab Specialist John Stazell all worked on Re nee. Cuhaci & Peterson Winn-Dixie Maitland nurse wins award The Student Nursing Association at Seminole State College of Florida received the Chapter of the Year Award at the Florida Nursing Student Association convention held Nov. 1-3 in Daytona Beach. The award recognizes the SCC chapter for participation in events throughout the year. Alanna Jo Alvarez, of Maitland, (plctured at right) submitted a resolution supporting increased education and awareness regarding HPV in men. Maitland resident helps pack meals for AfricaMore than 3,000 volunteers packed more than 500,000 meals during the Million Meal Challenge Orlando event. The packets will be shipped by Stop Hunger Now to the west African nation of Burkina Faso, and distrib uted by Catholic Relief Services. Pictured: Jamie Moses (left) of Maitland helps Mack Russell of Windermere seal a food packet.

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trial study of the FlexBus mass transit sys tem got the go ahead this week, with Maitland being the last of its four participating cities to sign a letter of commitment to the project. The city joins Altamonte Springs, Casselberry and Longwood in the demonstration on-demand service in its multi-city route. Maitland is set to house seven of those sta tions including one at the eventual SunRail station, all of which is estimated to cost the city $210,000 in 2014. City transportation lobbyist Louis Rotundo said signing the agreement is the equivalent of reserving a ticket to a show youre not going to see or have to pay for until eight months from now. Youre reserving a ticket you havent paid for it, but youve got it. in June you decide if you want to pay and go to the show, Rotundo said. Flowers said the system could develop into a great tool for the city, or be a great disappointment, but that its too early to tell and its worth moving forward on for now. Its like a ticket on the Titanic, Councilman Ivan Valdes added with a laugh. cial obligations in 2014 without additional costs to its residents and businesses, funds to initiate the study will be allocated in late2013. We all know that we need a transportation system here and it all needs to start somewhere, Councilwoman Bev Reponen said. Outside opinion sought on impact fee issueIf the city decides to pursue an agree ment with Ravaudage developer Dan Bellows to help him commoditize impact fees, have to seek outside legal counsel to do so. If you do this, I dont think I can defend you successfully, Shepard said, adding that in his research on the legality of the agreement, he found no case law to support pursuing the idea. Ive called a lot of people and Ive asked a lot of questions but I dont have any answers that are favorable to this solution, he said. After a back-and-forth between Shepard and Bellows attorney, Kim Booker, over le gal details of the deal, the Council decided olution to the legality of selling impact fees and present his or her opinion to Council at a future meeting. This may be a little bit of a learning curve for the city of Maitland but at least the word will get out that were not these stogy old people that we have been in the past, the ones who arent willing to work out of the box, Councilwoman Linda Frosch said.Page 5Thursday, Nov. 29, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Florida Institute of Technology is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award associate, baccalaureate, masters, education specialist and doctoral degrees. Flori da Institute of Technology does not discriminate on the basis of race, gender, color, religion, creed, national origin, ancestry, marital status, age, disability, sexual orientation, Vietnam-era veterans status or any other dis crimination prohibited by law in the admission of students, administration of its educational policies, scholarship and loan programs, employment policies, and athletic or other university sponsored programs or activities.OC-969-1112 WE PREPARE EXCEPTIONAL LEADERS Orlando CONTACT US TODAY www.fit.edu/orlando(407) 629-7132 | orlando@fit.eduConsidering pursuing a masters degree from Florida Techs Orlando site? Join us for: Information session Meet & greet with faculty/staff Food and drinks Easily apply and enroll INSTANT DECISION DAY THURSDAY, DEC. 6 6 P.M.2420 Lakemont Ave., Suite 190 Orlando, FL 32814 Register by Nov. 30 to orlando@t.edu Application Fee Waived! Member of(407)-644-6646www.aSafeHarbor.comBob Adams President/CEOA SafeHarbor, LLC bob@asafeharbor.com* Illustration period: 1-1-2000 though 1-1-2012 Now you can accumulate money for your r etir ement without the risks of market downturns by annuity. When the market goes down, your accumulated value stays put until another upswing guaranteed. Its something youve seen many times beforeand will probably see again. The market goes up, then comes down. Then up, then down again. Illustration period: 1 -1-2000 through 1-1-2012. Each example shown assumes $100,000 initial premium with no withdrawals. Market value based on the S&P 500 Historical performance o f the S&P 500 Index should not be considered a representation of current or future performance of the Index or of any annuity. Hypothetical index annuity product illustration assumes crediting method of a 6% annual point-to-point cap and annual reset. Hypothetical Income Rider Value assumes a 7% annual rate of return for income purposes. Illustration values represent gross returns. Assumed annuity rates and actual historical prices of the S&P 500 Index were used in this purely hypothetical example for the purpose of illustrating comparitive values and to illustrate how the Interest-Crediting Strategy might have guaranteed. Past performance does not guarantee future results. I f th e m a r k e t f a l l s a g a i n rest easier knowing your retirement savings wont fall with it Guaranteed. W h e n COUNCIL | Bellows unusual plan tabled by Council CONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE This may be a little bit of a learning curve for the city of Maitland but at least the word will get out that were not these stogy old people that we have been in the past, the ones who arent willing to work out of the box. Councilwoman Linda Frosch

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Page 6 Maitlands Season of Light cel ebration will take place at Lake Lily Park on Saturday, Dec. 1, at 5 p.m. The annual holiday celebra tion presented by Maitland Leifestivities for the community with music, fun and holiday treats on the shores of Lake Lily located at the corner of U.S. Highway 17-92 and Maitland Avenue. Each year this Maitland tradi tion provides a performance opportunity for many of the com munitys young performers from the Maitland Middle School and the Colby Dance Studio. The Lake Lily overlook stage will come to life at 5 p.m. when the musical program is presented featuring performances by the Maitland Middle School Wind Ensemble, Maitland Middle School Chamber Singers, Maitland Middle School Orchestra and dancers from the Maitland Colby Dance Studio, to the delight of one and all. The activities are a prelude to the arrival of a special guest from the North Pole who will be joined switch to light up Lake Lily Park season in Maitland. The evening promises to provide surprises and smiles for one and all with an opportunity for youngsters to meet the jolly visitor from the north. Food trucks nale will highlight the evening at 7 p.m. Make plans today to attend!Santas ParadeOn Saturday, Dec. 15, the Mai tland Police Department will sponsor Santas Parade through the streets of Maitland between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. Passing through all of Maitlands neighborhoods, Santa and Mrs. Claus will have an opportunity to wish young and old a jolly holiday season. For more information and an esti mated time schedule, please visit itsmymaitland.com To one and all, all of us at the city of Maitland wish you and your family happy holidays!City Council Meeting of Nov. 26The Maitland City Council met on Nov. 26 at 6:30 p.m. in the City Hall Council Chambers. Below is a synopsis of that meeting. The next regular scheduled Council meeting will be held on Monday, Dec. 10.Public Hearings: an ordinance proposing amend ments to the City Charter and adopt ballot language and titles for questions to be submitted to a vote of the Electors on March 12, 2012. proposed changes to the Shore line Protection Ordinance.Consent: were approved as presented. a Physio-Control Corporations Lifepak 15, Cardiac Monitor/ De sary accessories in the amount of $29,338.95. The equipment allows Paramedics to obtain 12-lead electrocardiograms (ECGs) in the medical skills. Police Chief to execute the Orange County Municipal Agency Mutual Aid Agreement. This agree ment allows the law enforcement agencies who are a part of this agreement to enter into a Volun tary Cooperation Agreement for assistance of a routine law en forcement nature that crosses ju risdictional lines and a Requested Operational Assistance Agree ment for the rendering of assistance in connection with a law enforcement emergency. Masci General Contractor Inc. in the amount of $1,525,901.15 for intersection improvements on U.S. Highway 17-92 at Horatio Avenue, George Avenue and Syb elia Parkway, and the intersection of Horatio Avenue and Swoope Avenue. Order Reconciliation for the City Hall contract, adjusting the contract from $3,319,362.67 to $3,359,978.70.Decisions: rizing the City Manager to sign a letter of commitment to a one-year fair share of FlexBus demonstra tion program operations funding, subject to certain conditions. Don Reid Ford Annexation Agree ment with the recommended text changes. Impact Fee Credit Assignment Agreement Between the city of Maitland, Sydgan Corporation and Uptown Maitland Partners, LTD was tabled to a future meet ing. To listen to a recording of the meeting, please check our website at itsmymaitland.com presented by University of Central Florida Friday, November 30; 5 p.m. Central Park presented by Fannie Hillman + Associates and Vanson Constructors Saturday, December 1; 7 10:30 a.m. Central Park Stage presented by Bright House Networks Saturday, December 1; 9 a.m. Park Avenue For information, visit winterpark.org or call (407) 644-8281. the City of Wi nter Park1887 2012thANNIVERSARY Maitland City TalkBY HOWARD SCHIEFERDECKER MAYOR Season of Light

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Page 7Thursday, Nov. 29, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer 7 9 0 1 Kin g s p o in t e P a r kwa y S u it e 2 8 O r la n d o FL 3 2 8 1 9 O f f ic e : 40 7 -3 5 1 -1 5 7 3 Fa x: 40 7 -6 41 -9 0 9 0 AD PROOF LAS ER FO O T S U R G ER Y INS TITU TE LLC C o n t a c t Ag e n c y P h o n e Fa x (407) 341-7484 (407) 876-1963 Ext. Cell Ac c o u n t R e p MADELINE Proofcarefullyforspellingandgenerallayout. Wecannotassumeresponsibilityforerrorsafter thisproofisapproved.Pleasefaxbackorcall with changes. X AP P R O VAL R EAD Y TO P R INT DR RICHARD M. COWIN DR RICHARD M. COWIN 1 1 0 1 1 2 ISSUE 1/4 AD SIZE $ 3 5 1 .0 0 TOTAL DUE FOR THIS AD THIS ISSUE Winter Park City TalkBY RANDY KNIGHT CITY MANAGER Nov. 26 meeting highlightsThere was a City Commission meeting Nov. 26. Below are a few highlights of deci sions made:Consent Agenda formal solicitations were approved. ing for construction workers during the pe riod of construction of the Alfond Inn was ate accumulated building permit revenues to scan large building plans was approved.Action Items Requiring Discussion process was approved. were approved.Public Hearings YMCA requests for the properties located at 1751 and 1761 Palmer Ave. were ap proved to change the existing designation of Single Family Residential to Institutional and to change the existing zoning designa tion of Single Family Residential District to Public Quasi-Public District. In addi tion the construction of an additional zero depth childrens swimming pool and ex pansion of the existing YMCA parking lot was also approved. construct a new 13,550-square-foot ABC Liquors Retail Store on the property at 401 N. Orlando Ave. was approved. City of Winter Park to revise the permitted uses for fast-casual restaurants along Park Avenue in the block south of Comstock Avenue was tabled. amending Chapter 58 Land Development Code Article V, Environmental Protection Regulations Division 6, Tree Preservation and Protection was approved. ordinance for 600 Lee Road was approved. Park Venture, LLC, to amend condition #3 of the conditional use approval for the townhouse project at 434 W. Swoope Ave. was approved. thorizing the issuance of a redevelopment refunding revenue note for the purpose of refunding CRA notes 2003-1, 2003-2, 20051, and 2005-2 was approved. thorizing the issuance of refunding notes for the purpose of refunding the outstand ing Orange Avenue Improvement Revenue Bond, Series 2007 and outstanding Park Avenue Refunding Improvement Revenue Bond, Series 2010 was approved. A full copy of the Nov. 26 City Commis sion minutes will be available at cityofwin terpark.org the week of Dec. 10, pending approval by the City Commission.Winter Park tennis center public feedback meetingsIn March 2013, the Winter Park Tennis Center management company contract will expire. If you are a regular customer of the Winter Park Tennis Center or just visit occa sionally, the city would like to get feedback on your recent experiences there at public meetings at the Winter Park Tennis Center located at 1075 Azalea Lane: For information, call 407-599-3397.Holiday window contest & wristband promotion beginsThe Holiday Window Contest, begin ning Saturday, Dec. 1, will feature partici pating downtown merchants as they transform their storefronts into works of art. categories, the Design Excellence Award and Peoples Choice Award. Vote for your favorite window display Dec. 1-Jan. 6 at cityofwinterpark.org/HWC The wristband promotion encourages patrons of the Winter in the Park holiday ice skating rink to show their wristbands at participating merchants to take advantage of savings that can be a minimum of savings. Visit the citys ofcial website at cityofwinterpark. org, like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and watch us on Vimeo.

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Page 8 NOV. 29 Trinity Preparatory School will be per forming the musical theater production Pippin. Show times are Thursday, Nov. 29, at 4:30 p.m.; Friday, Nov. 30, at 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, Dec. 1, at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, Dec. 2, at 2:30 p.m. All tickets are $5. Trinity Prep is located at 5700 Trinity Prep Lane, Winter Park. For more informa tion, visit TrinityPrep.org or call 407-6714140. Wine and Cheese for Conservation, a charity event for i.F.r.o.g.s. (Indigenous Forest Research Organization for Global Sustainability) will be hosted by the Cor nell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College on Thursday, Nov. 29, from 6 to 9 p.m. The event will be held on the shores of Lake Virginia, and will raise funds for the all-volunteer team of scientists preparing for a humanitarian and conservation ex pedition to Madagascar. The deadline for reservations has passed. For more infor mation, please contact Ferrara.iFrogs@ gmail.com or 772-486-8280. The Pair: Chocolate & Wine 101 will be taught at Peterbrooke Chocolatier of Win ter Park from 7 to 8:30 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 29. The interactive class, set for 10, will be taught by Kevin Wray, owner of Pe terbrooke Winter Park alongside Lisa Wilk of Orlando Uncorked. The participants will sample six wines and eight chocolates, try their hand at tempering chocolate and receive a 10 percent discount on pur chases made that night. Those interested in attending must RSVP by contacting the Winter Park Peterbrooke. The price is $40 per person.NOV. 30The Holiday Tree Lighting Ceremony in Winter Park will be Friday, Nov. 30, at 5:15 p.m. in Central Park. Bring the entire family for a night of holiday cheer at this free event. For more information, please call 407-644-8281.DEC. 1Explore festive holiday home designs as neighbors in Winter Park and Baldwin Park open their doors to show off their holiday creativity. Tickets are $30 at the door of the rst home toured, and show ings are Saturday, Dec. 1 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday, Dec. 2 from noon to 5 p.m. Visit FrontierCivitanClub.com/ Tour_of_Homes.html Leadership Winter Park Class 23 will host the annual Leadership Winter Park Breakfast at Central Parks main stage from 7 to 10:30 a.m. on Saturday, Dec. 1. Tickets are $6 for adults and $4 for chil dren. For more information, please call 407-644-8281. The city of Maitland will usher in the holiday season at the annual Season of Light event at 5 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 1, at Lake Lily Park. BRIO Tuscan Grille in Winter Park Village will have Breakfast with Santa on Satur day, Dec. 1, from 9 to 10:30 a.m. The cost is $11.95 for adults and $5.95 for chil dren, the proceeds benet Toys for Tots.DEC. 2The Orlando Poetry Troupe will have a presentation of their poetry at the Winter Park Public Library on Sunday, Dec. 2, at 2 p.m. For more information, please email angelight@comcast.net Surviving the Holidays a program for those dealing with grief during the holi days will be at St. John Lutheran Church on Dec. 2 from noon to 2 p.m. For more information, please contact concactus@ mysj.org or 407-644-1783DEC. 3The Ear, Nose, Throat and Plastic Surgery Associates in Winter Park will be holding a three-day screening for residents to see if they suffer hearing loss. Free appoint ments are available from Monday, Dec. 3, through Wednesday, Dec. 5, by calling 407-644-4883. Each appointment will have a complimentary consultation and listening demonstration with a registered audiologist and a 20-day risk-free trial of an Intiga Hearing Device. The ofce is lo cated at 133 Benmore Drive, Winter Park. DEC. 6The Orange County Retired Educators Association will meet Thursday, Dec. 6, at 10 a.m., at College Park United Meth odist Church, 644 W. Princeton St., Or lando, for a music program by the Silver Chimers & Nineties Club Recognition. For more information, please visit ocrea-.org or call 407-677-0446. Members of the Jewish Pavilion are in vited to attend JP Connections, a luncheon for women on Dec. 6, at 11 a.m. at Heathrow Country Club in Lake Mary. For $25, participants will enjoy a gourmet meal and informal modeling from Wear able Art. The event will also include a mini-holiday bazaar. To receive an invita tion or learn more, call 407-678-9363 or e-mail Nancy Ludin at nancyludin@jew ishpavilion.org The 34th annual Christmas in the Park Celebration will be Thursday, Dec. 6. This Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of Ameri can Art holiday tradition will be held in Central Park, which creates the beautiful backdrop for the lighting of eight turn-ofthe-century Tiffany windows as the Bach Festival Choir performs in concert on the main stage. The two-hour program begins at 6:15 p.m. For more information, please call 407-645-5311. To complement the annual Christmas in the Park Celebration, Friends of Casa Feliz will present Christmas at the Casa, sponsored by Commerce National Bank and Trust, on Thursday, Dec. 6, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., at Casa Feliz located at 656 N. Park Ave. Santa Claus will be on hand to greet everyone, the house will be decorated for the season and costumed carolers will lead attendees in holiday fa vorites. For more information, please call 407-628-8200. Orlando Museum of Arts First Thursday will be Thursday, Dec. 6 from 6 to 9 p.m. Besides a special holiday sale, Art Under $200 Tis the Season, there will be a live jazz performance, magical illu sions, an art demonstration and food from Orchid Thai. Caf offerings, handcrafted beers, wine, soft drinks and water will be available for purchase throughout the evening. Admission to First Thursdays is $10, free for OMA Members and includes admission to the OMAs permanent collections of American Art, African Art and Art of the Ancient Americas. For more in formation, call 407-896-4231 extension 260, or visit OMArt.org Visit www.wpmobserver.com/ events/search for more details. Send submissions to ibabcock@ turnstilemediagroup.com Savannah Court and CoveExcellence in Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation 1301 W. Maitland Blvd. Maitland, FL 32751407-645-3990www.SavannahCourtMaitland.comAssisted Living Facility License No. 8447 Skilled Nursing Facility License No. 1635096 Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above!A Senior Living Community where Hospitality is a Way of Life.OPEN HOUSE Thursday, November 29th 12:00pm-5:00pmVisit our community and enjoy some light holiday refreshments. Just stop by and take home a special treat. Please RSVP to 407 645-3990. Have you or someone you know been diagnosed with Irritable Bowel Syndrome? If so, there is now an opportunity to join a new research study.Are you eligible? irritable bowel syndrome Abdominal Pain, Bloating, DiarrheaQUALIFIED PARTICIPANTS:Will receive investigational medication or inactive placebo, study-related testing, physical exams, and lab work at no charge. ADDITIONALLY:Compensation may be available travel).For More Information Call: 407 937-1036 Fre dlund Fine Arts These paintings make great Christmas gifts. Fredlund Fine Arts1143 Orange Ave. Winter Park 407-622-0102 fredlundgallery.comWinter Hours:10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mon. thur Sat.For the month of December Over 20 artistsAnnual Small Painting show, over 50 paintings by Florida artists Calendar DEC. 1: Ye Olde Hometown Parade On Saturday, Dec. 1, Park Avenue comes to life at 9 a.m. with the 60th annual Win ter Park Ye Olde Hometown Christmas Parade. This family-friendly occasion showcases holiday-themed oats, Santa Claus and well-known locals. For more information, please call 407-644-8281.

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Page 9 Lifestyles Alzheimer's Association Central & North Florida Chapter Blue Horizon Eating Disorder Services, LLC Capital Guardian Wealth Management Cash To Go, Inc. Copytronics Florida Hospital Centre for Family Medicine Scott Hall Shannon Herring Magnolia Advisors, LLC Orlando Estate Buyer, Inc. Piazza Italia on Park Avenue Whole Foods Market Your Orlando Mortgage Comfort Inn & Suites Orlando / Winter Park DePrince, Race and Zollo, Inc. Fleming's Prime Steakhouse & Wine Bar GEICO Insurance Shari Hodgson Lake Fairview Marina, Inc. Mead Botanical Garden Mellow Mushroom Orlando Psychiatric Center Orlando Shakespeare Theater D. Scott Rotatori, M.D., P.A. William Segal Una Donna Piu Winter Park Housing Authority CFE Federal Credit Union Chick-Fil-A Hampton Inn & Suites Kelly Price & Company Orange County Public Schools Pizzeria Valdiano Wells Fargo Home Mortgage Winter Park Breakfast Rotary Club Tudor Electric Arthur's Catering Inc. Glenridge Middle School Interlachen Country Club Nelson Investment Planning Services Robert J. Dorff, M.D., P.A. First Market Insurance Agency Winter Park Tech A walk into the Waterhouse Residence Museum on any day during the holiday season trans ports visitors into the past, wel coming them with a smell of cinnamon and banisters laced with garland, just like the Waterhouses wouldve had their home in the 1880s. Its Christmas before electricity. In each room of the downstairs there is a small tree, explained Marla Pickelsimer, the tour guide for the Waterhouse Museum. In the parlor, next to the court ing sofa, a small Christmas tree covered with pink ornaments col ors the room. On the table in front of the sofa, Pickelsimer points out an oddly-shaped mustache cup, so-called and shaped so that men with mustaches dont get their fa back in the steam age. Mr. Waterhouse built his house out of heart of pine in 1883 when he moved his family down from New York. In the dining room there was room for a family of four. There were cloth napkins with unique sterling silver napkin rings around each one. These were used to designate whose napkin was whose, said participated in the tour. Out the back door by the dining room, theres a breezeway, a small area used as extra workspace. An old laundry bucket with an agita tor and a washboard for Mrs. Wa terhouse hides in the back. People lived in the house until 1989 when, just beyond its centen nial, it became a museum. Once the Waterhouse family moved out, a kitchen was added just past the breezeway. Now, there is a cast iron stove, a washing tub and an ice bucket to represent the time period the house was originally built. The upstairs has three bed rooms and a sewing room. One room is designed to be a young boys room with antique toys such as marbles and dominoes. In the sewing room theres an art piece that many women during that time would make. It looks like a wreath, but is made with past rel atives hair. In the family room is where a large Christmas tree bedazzles with an assortment of ornaments. This room has the original pump organ and bookcase that belonged to the Waterhouses, who would spend time writing letters, read ing books and the local newspa per. If it was a nice day out, they plained John Carpenter, a Maitland resident who took the tour. One of the other bedrooms upstairs is known as Stellas room, having belonged to Mr.Waterhouses 13-year-old daughter. Her original bible rests on the vanity by her bed, an innovative, though anachronous, rope bed that could be tucked and tightened by pulling ropes. These beds are where the term sleep tight came from, Pickelsimer said.PHOTO COURTESY OF THE WATERHOUSE MUSEUM Christmas takes a trip into the past at the Waterhouse Museum, showing visitors what it was like to have the holidays during Maitlands early days with one of its pioneering families. The home has been restored with period furniture and decorations from a century past. Waterhouseat theSARA LANE Observer Staff Nostalgic noel The Art & History Museums Maitland (A&H) hosts Holidays at the Waterhouse through Jan. 13. The exhibition will be at the historic Waterhouse Residence Museum, 820 Lake Lily Drive, Maitland. Museum hours are from noon to 4 p.m. Thursday through Sunday. Admission is $3 for adults and $2 for seniors ages 55 and older, and children 4 to 18. Members and children 3 and younger are free. Call 407-539-2181 or visit ArtandHistory.org

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Page 10 SoNapa Grille grew rela tively quickly from a wine club in New Smyrna Beach to a full service restaurant in Maitland, immediately making its mark on Maitlands new restaurant row. This happened because Owner/ Manager Adam Barringer has brought a lifetime of experience working with Outback Steak new venture along with an MBA and a Ph.D. Add his personal love for wine along with sommelier training, and Mr. Barringer may be the most erudite restaura teur in all of Central Florida. The happy news is that all that great new restaurant in Maitland run by a charming gentleman who recognizes wines endless possibilities for making customers happy whether served by the glass at the relaxed and wel coming bar, or when serving as the inspiration for great food. During his training, Mr. Barringer developed a special enthusiasm for California wines particularly those from Napa Valley and Sonoma County, and the wonderful SoNapa is the result. The large space has the feel of walking into a tasting room in any of the major California wineries. Beige stucco walls, rich dark woods in the booths and us to Sonoma and Napa counties before we even see the wineThe Yountville Artichoke Dip is rich and creamy with plenty of served in a bread bowl. The Dry Creek Egg Rolls bring new taste and dignity to the egg roll with perfectly seasoned pulled duck mixed with vegetables and a mango dipping sauce (highly recommended), and the Sea Ranch Scallops are artfully pan-seared, wrapped in bacon and served with a lemon-butter sauce that makes your taste buds decide that scallops should never be served any other way. The Santa Rosa is my favorite with chunks of chicken and creamy queso, drizzled with a tastefully spicy chipotle sauce that adds the proper zest to this the chicken. A new menu item is those who eat cheese) featuring portabella mushrooms, mozzarella, and arugula pesto drizzled breads, soups, and salads are also SoNapas early wine-club days, but also the closest thing to a real tapas bar to be found in Central Florida. This brings me to an observation I made again and again as I dined at SoNapa intelligence shows itself. Everything about dining at SoNapa has been well thought out to bring the great est comfort and pleasure to their guests from the wine choices to the wine-infused menu. For our entrees we chose the new-to-the-menu Sonoma Farms Chicken, which begins with a remarkably juicy chicken breast topped with all my favorites sundried tomatoes, spinach, goat cheese and a chardonnay-infused butter sauce. Its simply amazing. At our servers suggestion we also chose the Calistoga Filet Mignon, which can be ordered in either Sonoma or Napa style. We went with the Napa style which topped with crab meat, grilled asparagus, a chardonnay butter sauce, and something the Chef calls wine barrel spicing. Its a series of tastes that work together. And theres even more good news. Beginning this week, SoNapa introduces its All American SoHappy Hour from 4 to 7 p.m. every day with half-price wines by the glass, specials on beers including the microbrewery selectionsand special mentioned as appetizers. We didnt really have room for dessert, but our server strongly suggested the Carneros Cheesecake, and we are so glad he did. I pass along the same strong suggestion to you. And if youve read this far, SoNapa wants to celebrate its one-year anniversary in Maitland free glass of house wine with each entre for the month of December when you mention this article and tell them Josh sent me. NOV. 29Trinity Preparatory School will per form the musical Pippin. Show times are Thursday, Nov. 29, at 4:30 p.m.; Friday, Nov. 30, at 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, Dec. 1, at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, Dec. 2, at 2:30 p.m. All tick ets are $5. Trinity Prep is located at 5700 Trinity Prep Lane, Winter Park. Visit TrinityPrep.org or call 407-6714140.NOV. 30The Holiday Tree Lighting Ceremo ny in Winter Park will be Friday, Nov. 30, at 5:15 p.m. in Central Park. For information, call 407-644-8281. Elf will be shown on Friday, Nov. 30, at 7 p.m. as park of Winter Parks Popcorn Flicks in Central Park. For information, call 407-629-0054.DEC. 1The annual Leadership Winter Park Breakfast will be at Central Parks main stage from 7 to 10:30 a.m. on Saturday, Dec. 1. Tickets are $6 for adults and $4 for children. For infor mation, call 407-644-8281 On Saturday, Dec. 1, the 60th annual Winter Park Ye Olde Hometown Christmas Parade will begin on Park Avenue at 9 a.m. Call 407-644-8281. BRIO Tuscan Grille will have Breakfast with Santa on Saturday, Dec. 1, from 9 to 10:30 a.m. The cost is $11.95 for adults and $5.95 for chil dren, proceeds will benet Toys for Tots. The city of Maitland will usher in the holiday season at the annual Season of Light event at 5 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 1, at Lake Lily Park.DEC. 2Orangewood will host a chili dinner and concert by the worship band on Sunday, Dec. 2, at 5:30 p.m. Attend ees should bring a dish to share. For information, visit orangewood.org/ communityevents or email info@or angewood.orgONGOINGSanta Claus will be visiting and taking pictures with children at the Orlando Fashion Square mall daily through Monday, Dec. 24. From 6 to 8 p.m. on Mondays through Dec. 17 he will be available for pet pictures. Visit OrlandoFashionSquare.com or call 407-896-1131.Maitland Public Library EventsFriday, Nov. 30, the Share a Title Book Club will meet at 10 a.m. Sunday, Dec. 2, there will be Holi day Tea at 2:30 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 5, the Friends Book Sale will be from 10 a.m. to noon. Wednesday, Dec. 5, the LCC Health Series will have an acupunc ture lesson with the Stillwater Center at 6:30 p.m., registration is required. Friday, Dec. 7, the E Lab will be from 10 a.m. to noon. Saturday, Dec. 8, the Second Sat urday Winter Wonderland will be from 2 to 4 p.m. The Library hosts preschool story and craft time every Tuesday at 10:30 a.m. Baby time stories and activities are at 10:30 a.m. every Thursday. Reading Buddies for kindergarten through fth grade is at 4 p.m. every Thursday. Legos Engineers for ages 9-14 is at 4 p.m. on Mondays. The Food for Fines program will run through Sunday, Dec. 16. Call 407-647-7700 to register. Send submissions to ibabcock@ turnstilemediagroup.comSoNapa: Intelligent wining and dining JOSH GARRICK Observer Staff PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERWine and inventive food combine at SoNa pa in Maitland, founded by a sommelier. SoNapa Grille is at 640 S. Orlando Ave. on restaurant row in Maitland. Its open Monday to Thursday 11:30 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Friday and Saturday 11:30 a.m. to 11 p.m.; and Sunday 4 p.m. to 10 p.m. Call 407-637-2933 or visit sonapa.com From the Corner Table

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Page 11 Dec. 1 Letters to Santa at the Enzian The whole family will enjoy holiday treats, activities and a at the Enzian on Dec. 1. Children younger than 12 will receive a free letter writing kit to send their wish-list to Santa, complete with return address envelope so Santa can send the letter back to mom and dad as a keepsake after he reads it. A special menu, including cookie decorating kits and hot cocoa will be available to order, and Santa will stop by for a visit and photographs (available for purchase). Call 407-629-1088 or visit Enzian.orgDec. 1 and 2 Crealdes annual Holiday Art SaleJust in time for the holidays, the talented artists from Creald artwork for sale to the public. Unique gifts including jewelry, ceramics, glass and paintings are available on Dec. 1 and 2 with a portion of the proceeds supporting Crealds educational programs. Creald is located at 600 Saint Andrews Blvd. in Winter Park. Call 407-571-1886 or visit Crealde.org Dec. 4 through 9 Direct from Broadway, Sister Act nominated musical hit Sister Act is coming to Orlando. Called DIVINE! by the Associated Press, Sister Act will be at the Bob Carr PAC from Dec. 4-9. When disco diva Deloris Van Cartier witnesses a murder, she is put in protective custody in the one place cops are sure she wont be found a convent! Disguised as a nun, she uses her fabulous disco voice to inspire the choir, but its soon nun-on-the-run time, and she can only be saved by her newly found sisterhood. Produced by Whoopi Goldberg, and featuring an original score by Alan Menken, Sister Act nominations. Visit OrlandoBroadway.com or by call 1-800-9822787.Dec. 5 and 6 Kate Zaloumes Singing Myself HomeWith the voice of a Christmas vescent Kate Zaloumes will present Singing Myself Home as she returns to The Winter Park Playhouse on Dec. 5 and 6. Accompanied by pianist Christopher Leavy, and featuring holiday music and standards that remind her of warmth and family, Kate is a Central Florida favorite. Tickets are $20 and include a drink from the bar. Call 407-6450145 or visit winter parkplayhouse.orgDec. 7 Free Friday Nights at the Morse Museum For each of the Friday evenings in December, visitors to the Morse Museum can enjoy free ad mission and live music from 4 to 8 p.m. In addition, the Morse will major exhibition in the Museums new wing. The Dec. 14 program includes a family tour of selected galleries with a free take-home art activity for children. Admission to the Museum is also free on Dec. 22 and 23. For a complete schedule of Morse Museum holi day events, visit morsemuseum. orgDec. 8 Saturday Matinee Classic: Its a Wonderful LifeThe holiday season would not be complete without a screening of the Frank Capra winter-time Life starring Jimmy Stewart. We can all help an angel earn showing at noon on Dec. 8 at the Enzian at 1300 S. Orlando Avenue (17-92) in Maitland. Call 407-6291088 or visit Enzian.orgDec. 8 Florida Symphony Youth OrchestraThe Florida Symphony Youth Orchestra will collaborate with WMKG Local 6 to present a Holithe Salvation Armys Angel Tree Network at 4 p.m. Dec. 8. Hosted by WKMG news anchors, and featuring all four FSYO orchestras, the concert presents the sounds of the season and a visit from a very special ho-ho-holiday guest at the Disney Amphitheater at Lake Eola in downtown Orlando. Admission is free, but donations to the Salvation Army are sug gested. Visit fsyo.orgJosh Garrick Culture worthy of your calendar AT ROLLINS COLLEGE SINCE 1935 JOHN V. SINCLAIR, ARTISTIC DIRECTOR AND CONDUCTORA CLASSIC CHRISTMASWith John V. Sinclair Knowles Memorial Chapel DEC 15 | 7:30 PM DEC 16 | 2:00 PM Always a sellout. GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY!THE BACH FESTIVAL CHOIR AND ORCHESTRAMAKE THE SEASON SING The Elizabeth Morse Genius Foundation The Galloway Foundation Orange County Arts & Cultural Affairs This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORG @EnzianTheater Starring Philip Seymour Hoffman, Catherine Keener & Christopher Walken A LATE QUARTET Fri Sat 3:45, 6:30, 9:15 Sun 4:15, 7:00, 9:30 Mon 9:30 Tue Thur 6:30, 9:15 Letters to Santa: THE YEAR WITHOUT A SANTA CLAUS Sat 1:00 14th Annual Central Florida Jewish Film Festival Sun 11:00AM, 1:45PM Mon 4:30 & 7:00 Kate Zaloumes Dec. 5 and 6

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Page 12 I f youre someone who likes to stand out a bit in a crowd, youre already aware of what Im about to write: When it comes to the end of the year holidays, especially Christmas, its time to up your fashion game. Youve got new competition to get noticed, and it includes Christmas lights, tinsel and more. Turn it up, or simply prepare to enjoy the show. That are, just a brighter, more colorful version. With that attitude in mind, I hit Park Avenue last week to ask local fashion gurus whats in this year. Many of the words I heard were like music to my ears. Bebes for a chat with Liz Sheppard. Whats the word here? Liz tells me about gowns customers purchased for a recent ball. Old time glamorous is what they were, she says. Rita Hayworth, Eva Gardner. The girls wanted to look sexy, but they wanted to look glamorous at the same time. They wanted the big slits up the they wanted all the glitz and glam that went with it. She con tinued, Theyre trying to make women looked glamorous again, you know, that old world glam that we used to have. I remark about her eyewear, encrusted with tiny Swarovski crystals. She says they sell lots of them. Women want to have that look. She speaks of crystals, rhinestones and sequins, Its a better class of glitz. Over at Siegels, John and Robin Siegel talk of really fun, festive, Christmas pants, Christmas shirts. A rack of shirts with embroidered Christmas trees is just beside me, a table of cords as well. Got them out of the box yesterday and already sold four, Robin says. John says purple is a predominant color, Anything in the bright tones is always real good. As for a gift idea, Robin shows me Happy Everything plates, which can change by the season with various ceramic embel lishments that attach via Velcro. Theres a turkey and, of course, Santa. Down at John Craig, Cheryl Arbutine immediately takes me Robert Graham. Always colorful, the mix of shirts, vests and jackets here is amazingly festive. Robert Graham does all these novelty vests and shirts, she says. Im especially taken with the stained glass print that reoccurs as a linSand label shirts are a great way to do a more conservative look, in red and dark green plaids. Owner Craig Delongy adds, This fall were seeing a lot of soft coats layered up with quarter zip sweaters. Beautiful colors in magentas and lavenders, purples, some great looking deep oranges. He says a soft coat is one that resists wrinkling and is great with jeans. Next door at Current, Shana Goldman talks of vintage. A throw back where its going to be kind of James Dean, Mad Men, 1920s, 1930s style; thats been in, but a new version of it. Everythings a little bit more tailored, a little bit brighter, lots of metallics, lots of leathers, lots of layering and lots of plum and burgundy Clyde Moore I LUV Park Avenue StyleAs the models sway up and down the runway, all eyes are on peacock feathers soar and heavy metal glitters hang from their eyelids. The looks are whimsical, ethereal, sometimes tough and edgy, and always surprising. No one is looking at the clothes, only the tiny masterpieces lining the models eyes. At Harrietts Park Avenue Fashion Week, the eyelash artists from iLashWorks in Winter Park revealed some of their most dra matic works. The most fun was watching the peoples faces, some in disbe lief, said Kit Stephenson, owner of iLashWorks. People were actually paying attention to it; they were waiting to see the next look. The iLashWorks team had their own lineup at the runway show this year, and they used the cre ative opportunity to the fullest. of services, including facials and massages, but Stephensons passion is eyelashes. She said her studio brings a lit tle something extra and unique to the Winter Park scene, and takes beauty to the next level. Were the frosting on the cake whats a world without eye lashes? she said. They make the face. iLashWorks has been in Winter Park for four years, and special izes in eyelash extensions. For photo shoots and fashion shows theyll take it over the top with rhinestones and neon, but for ev eryday beauty theyve got options for every woman, and theyre at your local pharmacy. Theirs are hand applied, each lush lash to your own lash, creating a look that rivals a Kardashian smolder. Stephenson said clients have come in without them and left with extensions making them look 10 years younger. Many of her cli ents have given up manicures to keep up their lash obsession. When I dont have them, I feel naked, like Im missing some thing, said Nora Reinfeld, who drives from Gainesville to get her lashes done at iLashWorks. Laurie Fortune, an Oviedo cli ent, agreed. Its just so convenient, if I dont do anything, I always main tain my eyelashes, she said. You look beautiful. While beauty doesnt actually necessitate pain in the eyelash world as many women take a lit tle nap during the two-hour long appointment its not an easy task for the eyelash artists. They apply one lash at a time, using a special glue on each individual eyelash. Tiny tweezers, a magnifying glass and a dedication to detail are in valuable to the process. Its like threading a needle, you have to be able to have a steady hand and the patience for it, Stephenson said. Its not for everybody, its very tedious. Stephenson loves the creative side, but the lashes dont have to be crazy. Shed love more op portunities to create drama on the eyes like she did for Fash ion Week, but she says making a woman look glamorous and beau tiful for everyday is just as great. And while shell never admit it, it takes a particular talent to make eyes come alive the way she does. Ive never really considered myself an artist, I just look and do, Stephenson said. Its fun; Ive always been playing with col ors and curvature. And the clients see that, too. When people walk in the doors here, they walk out feeling pampered and they feel special and they feel important, said friend and lash photographer Carolyn Dolan. Stephenson has been training her own artists, and soon hopes to be able to start a business in eye lash extension consulting. Shed love to see a lash bar in every Winter Park salon, and it would be even better if it were called iLashWorks, she said. You could put a lash bar in any salon, she said. The more people who are educated, it will just become more and more popu lar.PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERiLashWorks wildest styles were on display at Harrietts Park Avenue Fashion Week, but most of its customers choose a tamer look. ExtremeiLashWorks in Winter Park does a variety of eyelash extensions, from high-fashion glam and glitter to subtly lush lashesBRITTNI JOHNSON Observer Staff For more information about iLashWorks, located at 111 S. Knowles Ave. in Winter Park, visit ilashworks.com or call 407-6220226. lashes Please see CLYDE on page 13 PHOTO BY CLYDE MOORE THE OBSERVERMelissa Caligiuri shows off some fall fashions at Lilly Pulitzer on Park Avenue, where sequins and more muted colors are taking some spotlight from the stores colorful items. Up your fashion game

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Page 13 The lights have been strung around the light poles along Park Avenue, baristas are concocting peppermint mochas at Barnies Park Village has a little elf play ing hide-and-seek at the retail center it must be time for the holidays! There is no shortage of oppor tunities to get in the spirit of the season, and the Orlando Philharmonic Orchestras Holiday Pops Concert this past weekend holidays. In case you missed it, local merchants, arts and cultural groups, and even the Chamber of Commerce have a variety of The local business community, through the Winter Park Cham ber of Commerce, is responsible for two important traditions: the Holiday Tree Lighting Ceremony and the Winter Park Ye Olde Hometown Christmas Parade. In other communities it might be a function of a municipality or the undertaking of a civic club, but in Winter Park, these holiday favorites are an opportunity for local businesses to give back to a community that supports them year-round. Come to Central Park and celebrate the season on Nov. 30 at 5 p.m. with the lighting of the holiday tree, live on WFTV Channel 9. Then, come back Dec. 1 for the parade, which and dance troupes beginning at 9 a.m. Before and after the parade, Leadership Winter Park will serve pancakes and sausage as a fundraiser for local elementary schools at the Central Park stage. Cant make it out this weekend? Read up on all the events happening downtown at ExperienceParkAvenue.com/holidays and plan some time to enjoy the sights and sounds of the season.Shop till you dropRed Bag Days and Small Busi holiday shopping season, each attracting patrons to our down town. Red Bag Days brought peo ple from across Central Florida to discover the unique shops of Park Avenue, like Timothys Gal lery and The Ancient Olive. Both stores also participated in Small Business Saturday, along with many other locally owned small businesses. If youre still in need of some local retail shopping, many stores have extended hours during the holidays, including during the Merchant Open House on Dec. 14. Park Avenue will be lined with luminaries, stores will serve light refreshments and, as an extra incentive, many will donate a portion of their proceeds to the American Red Cross for Hurri Election season continuesThe holiday season is also a chance to show some love to your favorite businesses, and not just with your wallet. While youre in downtown for a special event, dinner party or shopping, be sure to take note of the decorated store windows. See one you really like? Cast your vote in the Holiday Window Contest at cityofwinter park.org from Dec. 1 31. There is also a new best of local busi ness contest going on right now called The Ovations. Its a chance for you to vote for your favorite local businesses in 52 categories, which may seem daunting, but take a minute, read the categories gers will be nominating the best places to shop, dine and enjoy life in our community. Voting is open now through Jan. 2, 2013, at surveymonkey.com/s/Winter ParkOvationsErika Spence is the senior director of marketing and communications at the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce. Visit WinterPark.org for more information. colors. She shows a big smile as she says, Bowties and pocket square are coming back in a big way. She describes it as Great Gatsby meets the 2000 era. On to Lilly Pulitzer, Me lissa Caligiuri gets me back to sequins. We have lots of dresses with sequins, she says. I see lots of black, ivory, and glitter, a gold clutch with an unexpected wishbone embellishment. Sequins are big everywhere this year, she says, also mentioning metal lics. At the front of the store are some great more typically Lilly coral prints in black and white, and red and turquoise, along with their Wilda resort wear dresses in bright pink and tur quoise, and navy and white. At Downeast, Don Sexton Milly and Shoshanna. One has a satin top and a unique detail on the skirt. Thats what Millys all about. Shes doing things no one else is doing, he says. The Shoshanna dresses are in a bright Christmas red, one with large bow. For men, he says, Bowties are really a big hit. He then shows me their new Echo Touch leather gloves, with smartphone compatible a smartphone with gloves on. At Sultre, Traci Kabran says, Dont be afraid to do a lot of bright colors, even neons, which were typically used for spring, now being incorporated into the holidays as well. Glitz is back as well, youre seeing a lot of sequins, sequin jackets paired with leather accents, leather pants. Vintage jewelry is really strong. Leather and lace, its really strong. Youre seeing everyone from Kelly Ripa to people on the news are mixing that trend. A leather sleeve paired with silk. Leather and lace is really, really popular. At Tuni, Brittnie Gallo says, Big trends for the holidays since were in Florida. Fur vests, silk blouse, skinny jeans, printed jeans right now, especially wax denim, are huge. Leather and I love. She mentions reversible jeans Id seen recently on their Facebook page. She says sequins are great, As long as you match it with something else, not too much sequin. I think if you break it up it looks holiday. She suggests ankle booties for a holiday party, to edge it up. And killer statement bags are in, she notes, suggestively. And great weekender bags. I love that, too, just in case youre wondering what to get me.Clyde Moore operates local sites ILUVWinterPark.com and ILUVParkAve. com, and aims to help local businesses promote themselves for free. Email him at iluvwinterpark@earthlink. net or write to ILuv Winter Park on Facebook or Twitter. Check out his blog on WPMObserver.com by navigating to Columnists > Clyde MooreCLYDE | Bowties, metal coming back CONTINUED FROM PAGE 12Erika Spence Business in the ParkSeasons greetings Park Avenue Merchants Holiday Open HouseFriday, December 14 5 8 p.m. Luminaries along Park Avenue, Extended Store Hours & Light Refreshments plus...Winter in the Park Ice Rink, Free Admission at the Morse Museum & a Sneak Peek at Downton Abbey Season 3!a portion of sales at participating stores will benefit hurricane sandy relief efforts. details at ExperienceParkAvenue.com.

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Page 14 Opinions Is it just me, or was this year a blur? I no longer feel comfortable saying as slow as Christmas. Its speedy arrival has had me con templating the words of the great American philosopher George Carlin. He had a bit he did about getting older. As he explained, the process of aging one year when youre a child goes by oh so slowly birthday, summer, July 4, Labor Day, Halloween, Thanksgiving, Christmas. Of course, he said all of this very slowly, accenting his point. But if youre one of the lucky ones, those who live a long, full life, the passing of time eventually ends up like this: birthday, birthday, birthday! And that is said quickly, just as this year has seemed to me. Is it just me, or has someone hit the fast-forward button? I may need a neck brace for that whiplash feeling in my neck. The unreasonable, I guess. But we hit July 4 and its been a slip n slide to years end. And for any young sters out there, Slip N Slide toy involving water, a long strip of plastic and outdoor grassy patches from decades gone by. Back then we called video games Atari and so many years later I still want a T-shirt with the logo. Time passed by more slowly then. Or, so it seemed. Christmas, the whole period from Thanksgiving to New Years mark on any year. Fitting, I guess, that it comes last. Its that grand works display, the time when the ooohs and ahhhs are plentiful Fixated on the whole passage of time thing, I began thinking back to my own memorable Christmas holidays. I was sur prised which ones immediately came to mind, and others that didnt. It took me a few moments to think of the one in the mids when my parents gave me a car. We went over to our friends house where it waited for me in their garage, a large red bow on top. That was an awesome Christmas, no question. I wonder, though, if it might not be one my mother would think of sooner than I did, because the Christwere the ones in which Id given someone else something special. I remember giving my mother a lot of clothes in the late s after shed lost a lot of weight. I thought of giving my father a stereo and a great leather jacket. I remembered in 2000 giving my parents a trip to Europe, the looks on their faces as they pieced the puzzle together and then the sto ries they shared after they were home. Kids think some funny, weird things. When I was a kid I was convinced that when my mother wrote a check, she was creating money. That innocence and, I guess, ignorance, is part of what makes this time of the year that much more magical. Santa Claus magical reindeer handing out toys after passing up and down chimneys. Men made of snow can laugh and sing, just the same as you and me. A reindeer with a nose that glows can not only a beacon through inclement weather. I know Ive mentioned my trip to India a few times, a reminder to myself how impactful it was was to be the Elora and Ajanta caves. Before the visit I thought spelunking in India seemed an odd stop. I was that much more amazed when it turned out the caves were temples carved from mountainsides throughout many generations. I think of that now when Im in a rush, or see others in one. We want everything today, or better yet, yester day. These people began things they knew neither they nor their children would ever see completed. Personally, that would never work for me. Yet, I appreciate a people who had such dedica tion and commitment, and the staggering beauty of what they created. by. And the modern day Christmas experience is often all about rushing here and there to buy this gift, to attend that event, to see something, do something. We do so much rushing we often forget to stop and take it all in, and to appreciate the here and now to ensure it is well remembered and Last year at this time I was operating The Attic upstairs at Downeast. I came out of the store one night, was headed across Central Park to my car, but at the Emily fountain turned to look back at Park Avenue and its lights, brightening in the increasing darkness. I was so taken with what I saw, I turned around and began a more than two hour walk up and down the street simply taking photos of the store windows, the white lights hanging at intersections, the large lit Christmas tree in the park, the fountains, the insides of some restaurants. It was an unexpected little piece of magic that I am now, almost a year later, happy a few hours to view the world again with a little bit of magic. I plan to look for similar opportunities this year. Thank goodness, Christmas! I thought it would never get here.Clyde Moore operates local sites ILUVWinterPark.com and ILUVParkAve. com, and aims to help local businesses promote themselves for free and help save them money, having some fun along the way. Email him at iluvwinterpark@ earthlink.net or write to ILuv Winter Park on Facebook or Twitter. Check out his blog on WPMObserver.com by navigating to Columnists > Clyde MooreClyde Moore I LUV Winter ParkIn response to Louis Roneys Nov. 15 column, As the roof caves in:Your age clouds your vision and also hardens your approach to all things new. You have become the problem in the US of A, not any part of a solution. But it will not be your America too much longer, so your whining will be history soon. ELLIOTIn response to the Nov. 1 article Winter Parker As a matter of FACT, they did do things that male pilots refused to do... it took a WASP going up and successfully piloting The Widowmaker to make the men quit whining and go do it themselves! And I sincerely doubt that men were lining up three-deep to y towing targets for others to learn how to shoot down enemy aircraft. JO MEACHEMHeres what a reader wrote in response to the Letter to the Editor submitted by Beth Hall, which ran Nov. 15: You complain about the Obama camp for demonizing Romney, but make no mention of the Republicans organized character assault on Mr. Obama for the last ve years. According to the Republicans he is a secret Muslim, not a citizen of the USA, and conspired to cover up an attack on our embassy in Libya, just to name a few of the failed attempts to discredit Mr. Obama. You say Mr. Romney always chose the high road...I say at least 47 percent of people disagree with you. MARK BLAKE Christmas, already? We highlight local businesses that are utilizing and selling items made by other locals. Send submissions to iluvwinterpark@earthlink.net Local Luvn Local Artsy gifts at Artistree Artistree Gifts in College Park offers local art from a wide variety of local artists, including Kimberly BrownTurner, who paints animals, owers and other still-life scenes. In addition, Artistree is now offering art classes, including ones taught by Kim. Call them at 407-999-5251 or check out their website at artistreegifts.com or Facebook page for upcoming events. Art by Kimberly Brown-Turner PHOTOS BY CLYDE MOORE THE OBSERVERHoliday lights shine along Park Avenue, which has lit up a festive glow in the past week.

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Page 15 An Armistice is a time when the may not necessarily be over. In France, I made a point of driving out to the Forest of Compigne. There I entered a lonely railway car that sits on a short section of track in the woods. I sat down at the long table where, on Nov. 11, 1918, the Armistice was signed to end World War I, in which my father had fought as a U.S. infantryman. When France fell to the Nazis in June 1940, Hitler ordered that the surrender papers be signed in that very same railway car. It occurs to me that life itself is one long war interspersed with blessed Armistice pauses, during which people rely for a while on hopes and dreams that never seem to come completely true. In the peace-bringing Treaty of Versailles named Adolf Hitler who was later to bring the world years of horrendous killing. After six years of World War II came the Korean war, then the Vietnam War fol which are now almost beyond recall. In the Middle Ages one man with a sword and a shield could kill another man armed identically. Today, one man has the power to initiate with his thumb the total destruction of a city of thousands. Such has been our progress in ways that are, if nothing else, measureable. have elected a president who has never and yet has the power of life and death over countless people who wear our colors. Presently, a distinguished married former general and head of the CIA, who was worth much to us if war should come, may have been thrown in the trash bin because he romanced his lady biographer. The trouble with people is that they invariably turn out to be people. Did we sign this man on as a faultless moralist, or as a brilliant warrior with the ability to protect us from our enemies? When Dwight D. Eisenhower was romantically involved with his BritEurope, he was dressed down sternly by his superior, Gen. George C. Mar shall. However, Eisenhower did not lose his command a good thing for our side. Boys will be boys and sometimes Napoleans or Eisenhowers. Even the dullest of us may embody immorality, but boys liking girls is not what kills people. It produces people. And the smartest State Department guy in Washington on our side, it seems to me, should never forget that our embassies are considered to be American territory, protected by our own armed forces, even if our president chooses not to enforce that logical need. Training foreigners to protect our property and secrets is not long on smarts. As a child, I often heard, love makes the world go round. The nature of adult life is that loves revolutions all too often collide with a stark reality that is everywhere with us in our newspapers and broadcasts. Man is a quixotic creature with a restlessness in his very core that opposes peace at every turn. I have come to the conclusion that if I can create in my immediate surroundings an armistice of peace and love for a moment or two, I may indulge myself in the wild hope that I have brightened at least a small fragment of humanity.About Roney: HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney)The Platonic idealist is the man by nature so wedded to perfection that he sees in everything not the reality but the faultless ideal which the reality misses George Santayana Irony, of late, has garnered a bad name. Sincerity is the valued coin of the realm these days. And so it is with the burgeoning secessionist movement, where disillusioned Americans petition to withdraw from the union. My inclination is to ridicule such sentiments particularly since the location of secessionist rhetoric is centered in the Heart of Dixie. I do attach racist and nativist underpinnings to the secessionist argument, but I think something else is going on as well. An appropriate illustration of where themselves (me, too, at times) is in our sympathy for the character Michael Douglas plays in the 1993 movie Falling Down. Douglas plays recently laid Foster. Foster is divorced, disillusioned, depressed and in despair. All he wants is to attend his daughters birthday party, but has a restraining order against him by his divorced wife. Caught in Los Angeles begins the long walk across the city to see his daughter. Foster has many run-ins on his journey crossing a modern American hell, but the classic confrontation (for me) occurs in a fast-food restaurant featuring the visual menu showing the quintessential perfect hamburgerThe Whammy Burgerphotographed in steaming culi nary perfection. Alas, when it arrives, it is anything but. Its pathetic. Soggy bread, wilted lettuce and a piece of meat the size of a burnt quarter. What happens next is what all of us have all dreamed ofWalter Mitty-likedoing. Worth a look-see. I liken the secessionist mindset to Fosters viewing of the perfect Whammy Burger. In the back of the secessionists mind is some ideal of an American golden age, a blessed America, of that shining city on the hill. Yet the reality of our pluralistic democracy, with all our diverse constituencies vying for power and preference is, well, a shockingly rude slap to the face to those who have an idealized (or infantile) conception of American history. As has been observed, the making of slaughterhouse sausage and representa tive democracy have much in common. Secessionists lament the loss of freedom. I am unsure of what loss they mourn. I recently attended a private ShootNAnnie along the St. Johns River with enough guns and ammo to have respectably defended Stalingrad in 1943. I do not see any loss of freedom when it comes to the Second Amendment. No one mind in America. No, Jepson, loss of freedom when it comes to taxes and onerous regulations (like being required to contribute to your health care). Ah, taxes and regulations. Oh, wouldnt it be loverly to again have an American population of 3.9 million, as was the United States in 1787, with an entire continent at your feet, virtually vacant, to exploit. Just over the next hill, the long arm of that onerous govern ment nonexistent. America was never the faultless ideal, the most perfect of Whammy Burger Nations. And this, dear reader, is what is. A diet of illusion and ignorance are always menu options in a democracy. Whats the tagline? Tastes ing in the long run, however. For the individual or the nation.Jepson is a 24-year resident of Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.US Chris Jepson PerspectivesLouis Roney Play On!Armistice Whammy Burger nationDespite the Election Day hoopla, the political environment for American smallbusiness owners is virtually unchanged from Nov. 6. Many of the challenges theyve long faced still loom large: An administration hostile to free enterprise (You didnt build that), an earnings-looting mandated healthcare law and the promise of more complex federal regulations. According to the National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB), optimism among owners is wallowing at recession levels due to fears of bolder government and the continuing fog of economic uncertainty billowing out of Washington, D.C. Is it any wonder that small-business owners are now operating in maintenance mode, not hiring, expanding or or dering more inventories until responsible leadership returns to the nations capital? And even though theyre very disappointed with the results of the Nov. 6 elec during the election. Whats more, theyre ton, or a state capital for that matter, who doesnt appreciate the valuable contribu tions they bring to the American system of free enterprise. Ever in search of the positive, these free enterprise practitioners see a silver lining in the Nov. 6 balloting. There were some real small business advances, particularly in many states that elected pro-smallbusiness legislatures and governors, and ever before. In meaningful numbers, owners all across the country stepped up to run for ing in the political process with great in and spoke out against some of the most abusive and disrespectful politics that have ever been leveled at job creators. This courage bodes well for free enter prise and for the future of our country. It sends a strong signal that they demand to be heard and refuse to be intimidated. so much passion during this election? Because their businesses are much more than places to make a living. Those little Theyre also stages upon which entrepre neurs can demonstrate free enterprise values for their children, and exhibit meaningful jobs and life-improving experiences for employees. Thats why NFIBs I Built My Busi ness bus tour attracted so much public attention. When President Obama ques tioned Main Streets ability, determination and commitment by charging You didnt build that it was the last straw for millions of them. The elections results might feel like a harsh blow to small-business owners, but they arent going to slink away quietly with the administration and its congressional supporters in the days ahead. But theyre no strangers to such struggles. As entrepreneurs whove survived the challenges of starting and running a small business, they arent quitters. In fact, the tougher the challenge, the more invigo rated they become.Dan Danner is a board member of the National Federation of Independent Business. Dan DannerElection results spur small business will to ghtDAN DANNER Guest Writer Ever in search of the positive, these free enterprise practitioners see a silver lining in the Nov. 6 balloting. Secessionists lament the loss of freedom. I am unsure of what loss they mourn. I recently attended a private ShootNAnnie along the St. Johns River with enough guns and ammo to have respectably defended Stalingrad in 1943. In the Middle Ages one man with a sword and a shield could kill another man armed identically. Today, one man has the power to initiate with his thumb the total destruction of a city of thousands. Such has been our progress in ways that are, if nothing else, measureable.

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Page 16 WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA LIQUIDATION SALE!Somersby Park is an established com munity in Hendersonville, NC offering homesites starting in the mid-$20s. Call Today! 828-489-6760 of SomersbyPark. net Coastal Cottage! Deepwater Ocean Accesswith boat slips only $69,900. SALE Sat 12/1. New ready to finish cottage. Prime coastal Georgia location. Gated entrance, paved roads, underground utilities. FREE water/sewer tap. Historically lowest financing. Call now 866-952-5303 x1641. REAL ESTATE: FOR SALE The Paint ManagerEnjoy Our Fall Savings: 15% off all Exte rior painting; 10% off all Interior paint ing. 5% off all pressure washing. Decks, Poolcages, Patios, Drive-ways, Commu nity side walks, Apartments, Hotels etc. 10% off all Texturing: Popcorn or Knock down Enjoy savings thru Dec. 2012 Lic/ Ins. Call Ray Wheeler. 407-592-9935. thepaintmanager@aol.com PROFESSIONAL SERVICE ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE FROM HOME.*Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if quali fied. SCHEV certified. 888-203-3179 AIRLINE CAREERSBecome an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance. 866-314-3769 MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED!Become a Medical Office ASsistant. NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training gets you job ready ASAP! HS Diploma/ GED & PC/Internet needed! 888-3747294 MEDICAL CAREERS begin hereTrain ONLINE for Allied Health and Medi cal Management. Job placement assis tance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888203-3179. www.CenturaOnline.com NURSING CAREERS begin hereTrain in months, not years. Financial Aid if qualified. Housing available. Job Place ment assistance. Call Centura Institute Orlando. Call 877-206-6559. Can You Dig It? Heavy Equipment School.3wk Training Program. Backhoes, Bull dozers, Excavators. Local Job Placement Asst. VA Benefits Approved. 2 National Certifications. 866-362-6497. EDUCATION START NOW! OPEN RED HOT DOLLAR,DOLLAR PLUS, MAILBOX, DISCOUNT PARTY, $10 CLOTHING STORE, TEEN STORE, FITNESS CENTER FROM $51,900 WORLDWIDE! WWW.DRSS20.COM 800518-3064 CONSIGNMENT ART AUCTION on Dec 15, 2012 (Saturday) at 4pm.9101 International Drive, Ste 1008, Or lando, FL 32819. Artworks below $100, complimentary hors doeuvres and FREE ART PRINT for attending. Artists include Picasso, Dali, Chagall, Max and local art ists. Call 1-866-537-1013 or visit www. Baterbys.com for more information or to RSVP. A Glorious Christmas ConcertDec. 2, 8:30 and 11am; First United Methodist Church Winter Park 125 N. Interlachen Avenue; FREE event ANNOUNCEMENTS Baldwin Baby Grand Piano for saleBuilt in 1951 and has been owned by only 2 families, we are asking $5,000 but the price is negotiable. Very Good Quality. Call 407-616-4543 and /or e-mail never giveup1@bellsouth.net. Mahogany Mink for saleFull length coat has a shawl collar -diagonal sleeves with bracelet cuffs -length is 46 1/2 and has an 80 sweep $4,000 -price is negotiable. Appraisal on mink available on request. Very good quality. Call 407-616-4543 and/or email: nevergiveup1@bellsouth.net Ranch Mink Vest for saleHas zipper front stand up collar length is 26 and has 53 sweep $1,500 price is negotiable. Appraisal on mink available on request. Very good quality. Call 407-616-4543 and/or email: never giveup1@bellsouth.net MERCHANDISE The Marketplace 1504 The Oaks, Maitland, $805,000 MaryStuart Day/Megan Cross Barbara + Jeff Friedman Its free to place estate sales, garage sales and yard sales on this page! Visit WPMObserver .com and click Create Your Classified Order your classified ad online! At WPMObserver.com you can create, customize and pay for your ad in one convenient place! Sunday, December 2nd, 1-4 PM 1729 Elizabeths Walk, Winter Park FL 327894 BR | 3.5 BA | 3,736 SF | $979,000Spectacular Italian Villa in the prestigious Windsong Community. The great room features a stone fireplace, 25 coffered ceilings, and beautiful built-ins. Wellequipped, oversized chefs kitchen has 5 burner gas stove, island, and oversized pantry with wine storage along with a wine fridge in the wet bar. You will love the spacious master bedroom with jetted tub and his/hers closets! Hosted by: Jenni Sloan 1555 Palmer Avenue, Winter Park FL 327894 BR | 2 BA | 2,139 SF | $390,000Classic Winter Park home featuring a cozy wood burning fireplace in the liv ing room, separate kitchen with large pantry, dining area and bright spacious family room with beautiful parquet floors throughout. This home offers a split floor plan with large master suite and spa cious walk-in closet. Enjoy time on the back patio by the tranquil pond or walk to Park Avenue! Hosted by: Gwyn Clark 1245 N. Park Avenue, Winter Park FL 37894 BR | 3.2 BA | 4,116 SF | $799,000Amazing one story pool home with a stunning two story formal living room, beautiful fireplace, formal dining room with wet bar and a double-sided fire place! The eat-in kitchen is open to the family room with glass doors and views of the pool. The spacious master suite of fers plenty of privacy, sliding glass doors to a secluded screened patio, two walkin closets and luxurious master bath. The fenced backyard features a sparkling pool, outdoor shower and open patio. Walk or ride bikes down Park Avenue to the shopping district, great restaurants or Central Park! Hosted by: Debbie Olson Sunday, December 2nd, 2-5 PM 1235 Preserve Point, Winter Park FL 327895 BR | 4.5 BA | 4,398 SF | $1,325,000Brand new custom home in Windsong! The lovely open floor plan offers a formal dining room, beautiful great room with a wall of glass doors that open to a covered lanai, and a spacious gourmet kitchen with a large marble island, a six burner gas range, walk in pantry wine refrigera tor and breakfast nook! A luxurious summer kitchen and fireplace overlook the breath-taking pool. Hosted by: Kelly Price OBSERVEROpen Houses 200 Carolina Avenue #302, Winter Park, FL 32789 sold by Gwyn Clark 804 Thistle Lane, Maitland, FL 32751 sold by Gwyn Clark 1609 Slash Pine Place, Oviedo, FL 32765 sold by Sherri Dyer 1600 Alabama Drive #301 sold by Pamela Ryan 530 Bryn Mawr Street, Orlando, FL 32804 sold by Jennifer King 728 W. Princeton Street sold by Jennifer King 3309 Australian Circle, Winter Park, FL 32792 sold by Catherine DAmico 3001 S. Atlantic Avenue #424, New Smyrna Beach, FL 32169 sold by Kelly Price OBSERVERJust Sold Homes EmployFlorida.com1-866-352-2345 Employ Florida is an equal opportunity program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. The Employ Florida telephone number may be reached by persons using TTY/TTD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711. Disponible en Espanol. JOB RESOURCES at EmployFlorida.com helped me nd a new job I enjoy earning higher pay than I did before I was laid off. You too can discover REAL RESULTS with Employ Florida. HIRED.RANDAL HAR DBOWER Industrial Electrician Green Circle Bio Energy Inc. 866-314-3769AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE Call 888-203-3179www. CenturaOnline.com Donate A Boat sponsored by boat angel outreach centers STOP CRIMES AGAINST CHILDREN www.boatangel.com2-Night Free Vacation!or Car Today! 800 1 CAR L ANGE KEEP UP WITH MAITLAND NEWS AND EVENTS!www.IndependenceLane.com Facebook.com/ItsMyMaitland Drivers Class A Flatbed,HOME EVERY WEEKEND! 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Must type at least 60 WPM accurately, proof read material and make corrections, cut out newspaper advertisements and paste them to affi davits. Ideal candidate will have strong computer software/hardware skills. Ex perience with the following is preferred: Quark, InDesign, FileMaker, Macs. Legal background a plus. For immediate con sideration, please email your resume to: employment@flalegals.com. Location: Orlando (near Universal Studios). Com pensation: Competitive hourly wage, will discuss at interview. Please, no phone calls about this job (emails only). Do not contact job poster about other services, products or commercial interests. HELP WANTED SUNDAY 1-4UPDATED HOME IN QUIET NEIGHBORHOODOrlando, 32804. 3BD/4BA, 3,875SF. Large expansive living areas with amenities including wine fridge, stone-faced fireplace, breakfast room, plantation shutters, crown molding, wet bar and inside utility room. Master suite has office and remodeled bath with whirlpool tub. Large enclosed porch overlooks pond. $549,900 SUNDAY 1-4POOL HOME ON WINTER PARK CUL-DE-SAC2033 Cove Trail, Winter Park. 5BD/3.5BA, 2,807SF. Situated on a corner lot, this home is well maintained by original owner. Split plan, where one bedroom could function as office. Master suite has walk-in closet and private courtyard. Two wood burning fireplaces. Kitchen boasts island, wine fridge and desk. Screened pool, newer windows and re-plumbed. $449,000 Find I LUV Winter Park merchandise and local art at ILUVParkAvenue.com407-539-3977

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Your age clouds your vision and also hardens your approach to all things new. Youve become the problem Page 14 Hot off the Web Park Style iLashWorks in Winter Park specializes in eyelash extensions, including dramatic and everyday varieties. Page 12 Lifestyles Tour an 1880s-era Maitland hometurned-museum during Holidays at the Waterhouse through Jan. 13. Page 9 Calendar The Holiday Tree Lighting Ceremony begins at 5:15 p.m. Friday in Central Park, followed by a screening of Elf. Page 8 CALL US TODAY FOR A COPY OF Your Guide to Social Security Bob@aSafeHarbor.com | ASafeHarbor.com(407) 644-6646 Learn more visit www.ss.vip2site.com When faced with stormy nancial waters, seek... Call us today for your guide to Social Security!404-644-6646 or visit www.ss.vip2site.com Winter Park Recovery CenterExecutive Drug & Alcohol Treatment Services Suboxone Maintenance For Opioid Abuse Naltrexone/Acamprosate for Alcohol2056 Aloma Ave, Suite 100, Winter Park, FL 32792 www.winterparkrecoverycenter.com 407-629-0413 PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Tiffany Coburn sings O Holy Night at The Orlando Philharmonic Orchestras Holiday Pops concert in Winter Parks Central Park on Sunday, Nov. 25. SOUNDS OF THE SEASON PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK OBSERVER STAFF With the FlexBus, Maitland may have a solution to transportation to and from its upcoming Sunrail station, which is under construction and set to open in 2013. YMCA ght ends with expansion ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff The Winter Park YMCA Family Center is a step closer to expand ing, but will it be for the last time? That question rankled residents and perturbed some members of the City Commission at Mondays meeting, as they fought over how much is too much for the build ings expansion. reading to allow a rezoning that paved the way to expansion, but mission will face residents one more time before the deal is done. Some neighbors character ized the YMCA along Lakemont Avenue as a corporate behemoth as they asked the Commission to reject a proposed zoning change that would allow the facility to sprout a bigger parking lot and a zero-depth pool. The scale of the project shifts it from a neighborhood Y to a regional Y because most of their members dont even live in the area, said Margaret Deboer, add ing that the Y had seen mostly non-resident signatures in its peti tion to gain support. She also accused the Y of be ing secretive to nearby neighbors Please see COMMISSION on page 2 For better or worse, someone al ways has to be the one to try some cil agreed, voting to continue to ositions aimed at growing business and transportation within the city. At its meeting on Monday, Nov. 26, the Council voted unanimously study of Flexbus, an on-demand mass transit system set to launch in late 2013. And despite harsh criti cism and skepticism from Maitland legality, the Council also agreed to continue talks with developer Dan Bellows regarding his proposition of commoditizing impact fees. This shows that we are reach ing out in innovative ways to make development more successful in said, adding that the city will never know how successful or unsuc cessful these things will ulti mately be unless they at least look into their processes. Being exible with FlexBus Following years of planning, a Please see COUNCIL on page 5 FlexBus inches forward, Bellows request on hold Council signs FlexBus agreement and tells developer to prove legality of another proposal SARAH WILSON Observer Staff

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Page 2 (407) 514-0087 3.05% Certain restrictions apply. Rates may vary depending on deposit amount. We broker CDs for FDIC insured banks. Promotional incentive may be included to obtain yield.w w w .oldhar bor f inancial .c om Old Harbor FINANCIAL12 Mon t h CDAlso oer IRA Specials & free 401k ReviewsAPYHigher Rates for Longer Term Feld Entertainment 214099 FELD ENTERTAINMENTJob No.: Engagement City: Media: Insertion Date(s): Ad Size: Section:RD21409 Orlando, FL NEWSPAPER AD 5.875 X 10 ENTERTAINMENT Thu. JAN. 10 7:30 PM Fri. Sat. Sun. JAN. 117:30 PM+JAN. 1211:30 AM 3:30 PM 7:30 PMJAN. 131:00 PM+5:00 PM+OPENING NIGHT TICKETS $15!**Opening Night offer excludes Circus Celebrity, Front Row and VIP seats. Additional fees may apply. No double discounts.SAVE $5 on Tickets!+JAN. 10 13 Ringling.com+Valid for select performances. Excludes Circus CelebritySM, Front Row and VIP seats. Limit of six (6) tickets per order. No double discounts. Not valid day of show.3 Easy Ways to Redeem Your Savings:1. Go to the Amway Center Box Ofce 2. Call at 1-800-745-3000 and mention code 13SAVE 3. Log on to Ticketmaster.com and use code 13SAVE Meet the stars an hour before the show at the All Access Pre-show FREE to all ticket holders!Presented locally by Effective November 21, 2012, Neha Doshi, MD will no longer be seeing patients at Doshi Internal Medicine at 149 Edinburgh Drive, Winter Park, Florida 32792. In order to ensure continuity of care, Andrew Dauer, DO and Amira Elsayed, MD will begin seeing patients at the current ofce location, beginning November 26, 2012. Dr Dauer and Dr. Elsayed are board-certied in family medicine with a focus on preventative care, treatment of acute and chronic illnesses and womens health. Patient medical records will remain in le at the current practice location in Winter Park, unless otherwise indicated. For additional information, call 407-644-1241. Notice to Patients Doshi Internal Medicine Neha Doshi, MD 149 Edinburgh Drive Winter Park, Florida 32792 about its plans in the past, and Weve had to do this because not once have they reached out and spoke to us, she said. We have not even seen the new devel opers agreement that they shared with you today. Briggs said that despite com plaints from neighbors about expansion, the Y does its best to blend in with the neighborhood. It must work, because we have two brand new houses un der construction across the street, he said. Though some in the audience agreed that the Y had done a good job of melding with nearby resi dences, they expressed fear that if the Ys expansion remained un checked, it could keep growing forever. Any other place this would be a fairly benign request: a park ing lot and a pool, Commissioner Tom McMacken said, adding that the Y had agreed not to do so 15 years ago. We had a developers agreement. We shook hands, and said no more. Its about the city being able to trust the entity that negotiated this. The line has been crossed, McMacken said. Its been vio lated already. Mayor Ken Bradley said that an agreement in 1997, which largely stated that the Y wouldnt expand again, was ill-advised. Its ludicrous of a commission to accept an agreement that says I will never do anything, Bradley said. Though detractors of the ex pansion, which would add a pool suitable for young children, the elderly and the disabled as well as adding another 30 parking spaces, were among the most vocal, they were outnumbered by the Ys pro ponents. Sports are un-measurable for how important they are to kids, resident Tonya Mellen said. If we cant provide it and the city cant provide it, the Y provides it. I ask you not to consider the Y any thing but a very, very important community asset. Theyre not a corporation and they do not make money. Before the vote that would make it a step closer to reality, Fay Register, a Maitland resident who said the zero-depth pool would tivities, implored the Commission to allow it to be built. It would allow me the dignity to get into a pool by myself, she said. No I dont live in Winter Park, but I am one of those grate ful Y members that appreciate what they do for myself and what they do for other people in the community. When somebody in your fam ily is struck with a debilitating disability that takes away their freedom. I ask you that youll be able to look back upon this day to say, I am so glad that I voted to expand the Y so they could have that pool and the extra parking. COMMISSION | McMacken: YMCA and City Commission already crossed line about no more expansions C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE ARCHIVE PHOTO BY AMY SIMPSON THE OBSERVER YMCA members were pumped up about an expansion, which rankled nearby residents.

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Page 3 The Knights ended the regu lar season with a bang Saturday, crushing UAB 49-24 in a game they dominated from the outset. Now the Knights (9-3, 7-1) are headed to the postseason with another Conference USA East championship crown. Theyll face Tulsa (9-3, 7-1) next week, with the Golden Hurricane fresh the season. The Knights will have the mo mentum advantage heading into that game, after a trouncing of the UAB Blazers that showed that ease. that the Blazers could never re verse. But some of the numbers would look confusing for such a blowout. UAB would outgain the Knights with 599 yards to 473, in cluding one of the worst pass de fense games in UCF history. The Knights would allow 510 yards in the air in the game, more than combined. Though the Knights would allow a massive amount of yard age in the game, they stopped the the Blazers six times after they crossed onto UCFs side of the on the ground, with running back Latavius Murray rushing for 94 yards, while receiver Quincy per carry en route to 79 on the ground. Blake Bortles threw for 225 yards in the game, though his longest bomb only went 43 yards. may have been on the Knights defense, when defensive back UAB pass near the red zone and raced it back 78 yards for a touch down, raising the score to 28-3. Now the Knights face a Tulsa team that just lost one of the most lopsided games theyve had all season. The Golden Hurricane outgained SMU 591 yards to 301, and still managed to lose 35-27. SMU game may have summed up the entire four quarters in one drive just a footstep from the end zone and a shot at tying the game. sa at noon on Saturday, Dec. 1. The Winter Park boys are al ready making a mark on the bas ketball court as they ready for the Thursday. With two wins under their belts, the Wildcats (2-0) are on a streak to start the season. But thats just what happened last year, just before the Wildcats took what may be their biggest season-to-season nosedive in school history. The 2010-11 Wild cats won 28 games and a state championship. The 2011-12 Wild two wins, but went on to win only four more, losing every district game in the process. seeming newcomers to the court this season, with Jay Wimbley, Eli jah Farley, Nils Lehman and Kyle Brown leading the way at the bas ket, the Wildcats have a new face compared to last season. While a few of them saw minimal time on the court, none were stars last year. Now theyre all having break out years at once. Those four sank double digit points each (led by Wimbleys 15) in the Wildcats most recent win, edging East Ridge 60-56 Nov. 23. out whether they can break last years curse, and get some re venge on Lake Brantley (2-1) in the process. And theyll see if Wildcats star turned college phe nom turned NBA player Austin Rivers younger brother Spencer can have his own breakout year. Game one for Winter Park tips BCBS239776_Orlando_Winter Park Maitland Observer 10.25 x 8 Were here for you. Visit your local Florida Blue Center, Monday Saturday 9 a.m. 8 p.m. ET, to speak with a Licensed Agent.Orlando In Winter Park Village 434 N. Orlando Ave. Winter Park, FL 32789 A new generation of plans for your generation.Blue MedicareSM HMO** PlanFollow us on: Were Florida Blue, Floridas Blue Cross and Blue Shield plan. You can take advantage of a $0 monthly plan premium*. You have the freedom to choose your primary care physician. You have access to a large network of doctors, hospitals and pharmacies. Theres no deductible on prescriptions. Dental, hearing and vision coverage included. You can join SilverSneakers, a special member tness program (new for 2013). *You must continue to pay the Medicare Part B premium. If it is determined that you owe a late enrollment penalty, you will still have to continue to pay this amount. **In select counties. Limitations, copayments and restrictions may apply. The benet information provided is a brief summary, not a complete description of benets. For more information, contact the plan. Benets, formulary, pharmacy network, premium and/or co-payments/ co-insurance may change on January 1 of each year. Florida Blue HMO is a Medicare Advantage organization with a Medicare contract. A Medicareapproved Part D sponsor. Health insurance is offered by Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida, D/B/A Florida Blue. HMO coverage is offered by Health Options, Inc., D/B/A Florida Blue HMO, an HMO subsidiary of Florida Blue. These companies are independent licensees of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. Y0011_74482 0812 CMS Accepted 74720 Call toll-free 1-877-352-5830 (TTY 1-800-955-8771). Or visit floridablue.com. Zero Monthly Plan Premium* PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Jay Wimbley leads the Wildcats in scoring this season, despite little varsity experience. PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER UCF wide receiver Rannell Hall races toward defenders during the Knights 49-24 trouncing of UAB. Saturday they head to Tulsa for a rematch at the C-USA championships. Wildcats dj vu start reaches crucial moment ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff Knights seek revenge ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff

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Page 4 Business Briefs Community Bulletin Winter Park Relay seeks leaders Relay for Life has been part of Winter Parks com munity since 1999, and now is looking for members to join the 2013 planning committee. To learn more email Tab.Bartlett@cancer.org Jewish Family Services hosts food and toy drive Jewish Family Services is collecting food, toys and gift-cards to distribute to families in need during the holidays. Call 407-645-7593 or email marni.chepe nik@jfsorlando.org to donate. Leu Gardens gets holiday makeover The Leu House Museum is getting a personalized touch for the holidays by Seminole State College of Floridas interior design students. Rooms throughout the house will be decorated to display the holiday traditions and memories of six notables. Rollins awards scholarship The Rollins College Center for Advanced Entrepre neurship has awarded Florida-based REBUILD Glob allys company founder, Julie Colombino, a full schol arship for the Rollins Business Accelerator program. Golng for baseball The Florida Collegiate Summer League, an Orlando non-prot that provides college baseball players summer competition opportunities, raised more than $50,000 at the 2012 Florida League Celebrity Golf Tournament on Nov. 10 and 11. Winter Park rowing recruits Winter Park High Schools Crew team has nine row ers being recruited by colleges across the country. The recruits are Courtney Crossley, University of Ten nessee; Lauren Sand, Drexel University; Jill Hannick, University of Virginia; Stephani Dinkel, Barry Univer sity; John Brkich, University of California Berkeley; Everett Hamilton, United States Naval Academy; Har rison Thayer, University of Pennsylvania Wharton; Sam Ward, Princeton University. Pop Warner team going to Super Bowl Pop Warners Southeast Region will be represented by the Mitey-Mites in the Pop Warner Super Bowl at Walt Disney Worlds Wide World of Sports on Dec. 1. The Central Florida Hotel and Lodging Associa tion held a blood drive from May to August in sup port of Florida Blood Center. More than 3,600 donors participated, all of them associated with the CFHLAs hotels, resorts and theme parks. Because of their donations more than 10,800 lives were saved or sustained. Florida Blood Centers will recognize the CFHLAs successful drive with an award. Cuhaci & Peterson Architects Engineers Plan ners, based in Baldwin Park, recently earned a rst place award in an international design competition in Atlanta, sponsored by Autodesk, the producers of REVIT (BIM) software, an engineering and architec ture program. Steve Blevins led a team of designers who used the software to depict the remodeling of a Winn-Dixie store. Denise Morris Hammond, a partner in the Orlando law rm Wright, Fulford, Moorhead & Brown, dis cussed Frequent Issues in Design and Construc tion Contracts, during the Nov. 13 meeting of the Women in Architecture Division of the American In stitue of Architects in Orlando. Hammonds practice includes the representation of architects, engineers, contractors and owners in projects of all size and complexity. Mercantile Capital Corporation nanced seven commercial loans in October. These loans provided more than $28 million dollars to fund projects across the nation, including Florida. Mercantile Capital Cor poration is one of the nations leading small business lenders. Full Sail graduates and staff members took home honors during the 23rd Annual Crystal Reel Awards put on by the Florida Motion Picture & Television Association. The Crystal Reel Awards are a way of recognizing outstanding achievements in motion picture, television, audio recoding and digital media in Florida. In all, 13 Full Sail student lms were nomi nated and six graduates won awards in ve catego ries: Matt Dunham, Best Sound Mixing for Short Film for Men of This Life; Charlie Turner and Ashlie Cas sell, Best Script in a produced Short Film/Video for Kaleidoscope; C.A. Barrow, Best Art Direction/Set Design for Short Film for Men of This Life; Charles McCrary, Best Director of Photography for Short Film for Kaleidoscope; and Peter Clotfelter Quenelle for Best Director for Short Film for At Night. Full Sail staff members also took home an award for Best Sound/Sound Mixing for a Feature, Dubbing Stage Engineer Michael Orlowski, Assistant Dubbing Stage Manager Dave Chmela, Course Director Colin Hart and Lab Specialist John Stazell all worked on Re nee. Cuhaci & Peterson Winn-Dixie Maitland nurse wins award The Student Nursing Association at Seminole State College of Florida received the Chapter of the Year Award at the Florida Nursing Student Association convention held Nov. 1-3 in Daytona Beach. The award recognizes the SCC chapter for participation in events throughout the year. Alanna Jo Alvarez, of Maitland, (plctured at right) submitted a resolution supporting increased education and awareness regarding HPV in men. Maitland resident helps pack meals for Africa More than 3,000 volunteers packed more than 500,000 meals during the Million Meal Challenge Orlando event. The packets will be shipped by Stop Hunger Now to the west African nation of Burkina Faso, and distrib uted by Catholic Relief Services. Pictured: Jamie Moses (left) of Maitland helps Mack Russell of Windermere seal a food packet.

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trial study of the FlexBus mass transit sys tem got the go ahead this week, with Mait land being the last of its four participating cities to sign a letter of commitment to the project. The city joins Altamonte Springs, Cassel berry and Longwood in the demonstration on-demand service in its multi-city route. Maitland is set to house seven of those sta tions including one at the eventual SunRail station, all of which is estimated to cost the city $210,000 in 2014. City transportation lobbyist Louis Ro tundo said signing the agreement is the equivalent of reserving a ticket to a show youre not going to see or have to pay for until eight months from now. Youre reserving a ticket you havent paid for it, but youve got it. in June you decide if you want to pay and go to the show, Rotundo said. Flowers said the system could develop into a great tool for the city, or be a great disappointment, but that its too early to tell and its worth moving forward on for now. Its like a ticket on the Titanic, Coun cilman Ivan Valdes added with a laugh. cial obligations in 2014 without additional costs to its residents and businesses, funds to initiate the study will be allocated in late2013. We all know that we need a transporta tion system here and it all needs to start somewhere, Councilwoman Bev Reponen said. Outside opinion sought on impact fee issue If the city decides to pursue an agree ment with Ravaudage developer Dan Bel lows to help him commoditize impact fees, have to seek outside legal counsel to do so. If you do this, I dont think I can de fend you successfully, Shepard said, add ing that in his research on the legality of the agreement, he found no case law to support pursuing the idea. Ive called a lot of people and Ive asked a lot of questions but I dont have any answers that are favorable to this solution, he said. After a back-and-forth between Shepard and Bellows attorney, Kim Booker, over le gal details of the deal, the Council decided olution to the legality of selling impact fees and present his or her opinion to Council at a future meeting. This may be a little bit of a learning curve for the city of Maitland but at least the word will get out that were not these stogy old people that we have been in the past, the ones who arent willing to work out of the box, Councilwoman Linda Frosch said. Page 5 Thursday, Nov. 29, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Florida Institute of Technology is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award associate, baccalaureate, masters, education specialist and doctoral degrees. Flori da Institute of Technology does not discriminate on the basis of race, gender, color, religion, creed, national origin, ancestry, marital status, age, disability, sexual orientation, Vietnam-era veterans status or any other dis crimination prohibited by law in the admission of students, administration of its educational policies, scholarship and loan programs, employment policies, and athletic or other university sponsored programs or activities.OC-969-1112 WE PREPARE EXCEPTIONAL LEADERS Orlando CONTACT US TODAY www.fit.edu/orlando(407) 629-7132 | orlando@fit.eduConsidering pursuing a masters degree from Florida Techs Orlando site? Join us for: Information session Meet & greet with faculty/staff Food and drinks Easily apply and enroll INSTANT DECISION DAY THURSDAY, DEC. 6 6 P.M.2420 Lakemont Ave., Suite 190 Orlando, FL 32814 Register by Nov. 30 to orlando@t.edu Application Fee Waived! M ember of(407)-644-6646w w w .aS af eHar b or .c omB ob A dams P r esiden t/CEOA S af eHar bor LL C bob@asaf ehar bor .c om* Illustration period: 1-1-2000 though 1-1-2012 Now you can accumulate money for your r etir ement without the risks of market downturns by annuity. When the market goes down, your accumulated value stays put until another upswing guaranteed. Its something youve seen many times beforeand will probably see again. The market goes up, then comes down. Then up, then down again. I llustr a tion per iod: 1 -1-2000 thr ough 1-1-2012. Each e xample sho wn assumes $100,000 initial pr emium with no withdr a w als M ar ket v alue based on the S&P 500 H i s t o r i c a l perf o r m a n c e o f the S & P 5 0 0 I n d e x s h o u l d not be c onsider ed a r epr esen ta tion of cur r en t or futur e per f or manc e of the I nde x or of an y annuit y H ypothetical inde x annuit y pr oduc t illustr a tion assumes cr editing method of a 6% annual poin t -t o -poin t cap and annual r eset H ypothetical I nc ome R ider V alue assumes a 7% annual r a t e of r etur n f or inc ome pur poses I llustr a tion v alues r epr esen t g r oss r etur ns A ssumed annuit y r a t es and ac tual hist or ical pr ic es of the S&P 500 I nde x w er e used in this purely hypothetical example for the purpose of illustrating comparitive values and to illustrate how the Interest-Crediting Strategy might have guaranteed. Past performance does not guarantee future results. I f th e m a r k e t f a l l s a g a i n rest easier knowing your retirement savings wont fall with it Guaranteed. W h e n COUNCIL | Bellows unusual plan tabled by Council C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE This may be a little bit of a learning curve for the city of Maitland but at least the word will get out that were not these stogy old people that we have been in the past, the ones who arent willing to work out of the box. Councilwoman Linda Frosch

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Page 6 Maitlands Season of Light cel ebration will take place at Lake Lily Park on Saturday, Dec. 1, at 5 p.m. The annual holiday celebra tion presented by Maitland Lei festivities for the community with music, fun and holiday treats on the shores of Lake Lily located at the corner of U.S. Highway 17-92 and Maitland Avenue. Each year this Maitland tradi tion provides a performance op portunity for many of the com munitys young performers from the Maitland Middle School and the Colby Dance Studio. The Lake Lily overlook stage will come to life at 5 p.m. when the musical program is presented featuring performances by the Maitland Middle School Wind Ensemble, Maitland Middle School Chamber Singers, Maitland Middle School Orchestra and dancers from the Maitland Colby Dance Studio, to the delight of one and all. The activities are a prelude to the arrival of a special guest from the North Pole who will be joined switch to light up Lake Lily Park season in Maitland. The evening promises to pro vide surprises and smiles for one and all with an opportunity for youngsters to meet the jolly visi tor from the north. Food trucks nale will highlight the evening at 7 p.m. Make plans today to at tend! Santas Parade On Saturday, Dec. 15, the Mai tland Police Department will sponsor Santas Parade through the streets of Maitland between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. Passing through all of Maitlands neighborhoods, Santa and Mrs. Claus will have an opportunity to wish young and old a jolly holiday season. For more information and an esti mated time schedule, please visit itsmymaitland.com To one and all, all of us at the city of Maitland wish you and your family happy holidays! City Council Meeting of Nov. 26 The Maitland City Council met on Nov. 26 at 6:30 p.m. in the City Hall Council Chambers. Below is a synopsis of that meeting. The next regular scheduled Council meeting will be held on Monday, Dec. 10. Public Hearings: an ordinance proposing amend ments to the City Charter and adopt ballot language and titles for questions to be submitted to a vote of the Electors on March 12, 2012. proposed changes to the Shore line Protection Ordinance. Consent: were approved as presented. a Physio-Control Corporations Lifepak 15, Cardiac Monitor/ De sary accessories in the amount of $29,338.95. The equipment allows Paramedics to obtain 12-lead electrocardiograms (ECGs) in the medical skills. Police Chief to execute the Orange County Municipal Agency Mu tual Aid Agreement. This agree ment allows the law enforcement agencies who are a part of this agreement to enter into a Volun tary Cooperation Agreement for assistance of a routine law en forcement nature that crosses ju risdictional lines and a Requested Operational Assistance Agree ment for the rendering of assis tance in connection with a law enforcement emergency. Masci General Contractor Inc. in the amount of $1,525,901.15 for intersection improvements on U.S. Highway 17-92 at Horatio Avenue, George Avenue and Syb elia Parkway, and the intersection of Horatio Avenue and Swoope Avenue. Order Reconciliation for the City Hall contract, adjusting the contract from $3,319,362.67 to $3,359,978.70. Decisions: rizing the City Manager to sign a letter of commitment to a one-year fair share of FlexBus demonstra tion program operations funding, subject to certain conditions. Don Reid Ford Annexation Agree ment with the recommended text changes. Impact Fee Credit Assignment Agreement Between the city of Maitland, Sydgan Corporation and Uptown Maitland Partners, LTD was tabled to a future meet ing. To listen to a recording of the meeting, please check our website at itsmymaitland.com presented by University of Central Florida Friday, November 30; 5 p.m. Central Park presented by Fannie Hillman + Associates and Vanson Constructors Saturday, December 1; 7 10:30 a.m. Central Park Stage presented by Bright House Networks Saturday, December 1; 9 a.m. Park Avenue For information, visit winterpark.org or call (407) 644-8281. the City of Wi nter Park1887 2012thANNIVERSARY Maitland City Talk BY HOWARD SCHIEFERDECKER MAYOR Season of Light

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Page 7 Thursday, Nov. 29, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer 7 9 0 1 Kin g s p o in t e P a r kwa y S u it e 2 8 O r la n d o FL 3 2 8 1 9 O f f ic e : 40 7 -3 5 1 -1 5 7 3 Fa x: 40 7 -6 41 -9 0 9 0 AD PROOF LAS ER FO O T S U R G ER Y INS TITU TE LLC C o n t a c t Ag e n c y P h o n e Fa x (407) 341-7484 (407) 876-1963 Ext. Cell Ac c o u n t R e p MADELINE Proof carefully for spelling and general layout. We cannot assume responsibility for errors after this proof is approved. Please fax back or call with changes. X AP P R O VAL R EAD Y TO P R INT DR RICHARD M. COWIN DR RICHARD M. COWIN 1 1 0 1 1 2 ISSUE 1/4 AD SIZE $ 3 5 1 .0 0 TOTAL DUE FOR THIS AD THIS ISSUE Winter Park City Talk BY RANDY KNIGHT CITY MANAGER Nov. 26 meeting highlights There was a City Commission meeting Nov. 26. Below are a few highlights of deci sions made: Consent Agenda formal solicitations were approved. ing for construction workers during the pe riod of construction of the Alfond Inn was ate accumulated building permit revenues to scan large building plans was approved. Action Items Requiring Discussion process was approved. were approved. Public Hearings YMCA requests for the properties located at 1751 and 1761 Palmer Ave. were ap proved to change the existing designation of Single Family Residential to Institutional and to change the existing zoning designa tion of Single Family Residential District to Public Quasi-Public District. In addi tion the construction of an additional zero depth childrens swimming pool and ex pansion of the existing YMCA parking lot was also approved. construct a new 13,550-square-foot ABC Li quors Retail Store on the property at 401 N. Orlando Ave. was approved. City of Winter Park to revise the permitted uses for fast-casual restaurants along Park Avenue in the block south of Comstock Av enue was tabled. amending Chapter 58 Land Development Code Article V, Environmental Protection Regulations Division 6, Tree Preservation and Protection was approved. ordinance for 600 Lee Road was approved. Park Venture, LLC, to amend condition #3 of the conditional use approval for the townhouse project at 434 W. Swoope Ave. was approved. thorizing the issuance of a redevelopment refunding revenue note for the purpose of refunding CRA notes 2003-1, 2003-2, 20051, and 2005-2 was approved. thorizing the issuance of refunding notes for the purpose of refunding the outstand ing Orange Avenue Improvement Revenue Bond, Series 2007 and outstanding Park Avenue Refunding Improvement Revenue Bond, Series 2010 was approved. A full copy of the Nov. 26 City Commis sion minutes will be available at cityofwin terpark.org the week of Dec. 10, pending approval by the City Commission. Winter Park tennis center public feedback meetings In March 2013, the Winter Park Tennis Center management company contract will expire. If you are a regular customer of the Winter Park Tennis Center or just visit occa sionally, the city would like to get feedback on your recent experiences there at public meetings at the Winter Park Tennis Center located at 1075 Azalea Lane: For information, call 407-599-3397. Holiday window contest & wristband promotion begins The Holiday Window Contest, begin ning Saturday, Dec. 1, will feature partici pating downtown merchants as they trans form their storefronts into works of art. categories, the Design Excellence Award and Peoples Choice Award. Vote for your favorite window display Dec. 1-Jan. 6 at cityofwinterpark.org/HWC The wristband promotion encourages patrons of the Winter in the Park holiday ice skating rink to show their wristbands at participating merchants to take advan tage of savings that can be a minimum of savings. Visit the citys ofcial website at cityofwinterpark. org, like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and watch us on Vimeo.

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Page 8 NOV. 29 Trinity Preparatory School will be per forming the musical theater production Pippin. Show times are Thursday, Nov. 29, at 4:30 p.m.; Friday, Nov. 30, at 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, Dec. 1, at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, Dec. 2, at 2:30 p.m. All tickets are $5. Trinity Prep is located at 5700 Trinity Prep Lane, Winter Park. For more informa tion, visit TrinityPrep.org or call 407-6714140. Wine and Cheese for Conservation , a charity event for i.F.r.o.g.s. (Indigenous Forest Research Organization for Global Sustainability) will be hosted by the Cor nell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College on Thursday, Nov. 29, from 6 to 9 p.m. The event will be held on the shores of Lake Virginia, and will raise funds for the all-volunteer team of scientists preparing for a humanitarian and conservation ex pedition to Madagascar. The deadline for reservations has passed. For more infor mation, please contact Ferrara.iFrogs@ gmail.com or 772-486-8280. The Pair: Chocolate & Wine 101 will be taught at Peterbrooke Chocolatier of Win ter Park from 7 to 8:30 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 29. The interactive class, set for 10, will be taught by Kevin Wray, owner of Pe terbrooke Winter Park alongside Lisa Wilk of Orlando Uncorked. The participants will sample six wines and eight chocolates, try their hand at tempering chocolate and receive a 10 percent discount on pur chases made that night. Those interested in attending must RSVP by contacting the Winter Park Peterbrooke. The price is $40 per person. NOV. 30 The Holiday Tree Lighting Ceremony in Winter Park will be Friday, Nov. 30, at 5:15 p.m. in Central Park. Bring the entire fam ily for a night of holiday cheer at this free event. For more information, please call 407-644-8281. DEC. 1 Explore festive holiday home designs as neighbors in Winter Park and Baldwin Park open their doors to show off their holiday creativity. Tickets are $30 at the door of the rst home toured, and show ings are Saturday, Dec. 1 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday, Dec. 2 from noon to 5 p.m. Visit FrontierCivitanClub.com/ Tour_of_Homes.html Leadership Winter Park Class 23 will host the annual Leadership Winter Park Breakfast at Central Parks main stage from 7 to 10:30 a.m. on Saturday, Dec. 1. Tickets are $6 for adults and $4 for chil dren. For more information, please call 407-644-8281. The city of Maitland will usher in the holiday season at the annual Season of Light event at 5 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 1, at Lake Lily Park. BRIO Tuscan Grille in Winter Park Village will have Breakfast with Santa on Satur day, Dec. 1, from 9 to 10:30 a.m. The cost is $11.95 for adults and $5.95 for chil dren, the proceeds benet Toys for Tots. DEC. 2 The Orlando Poetry Troupe will have a presentation of their poetry at the Winter Park Public Library on Sunday, Dec. 2, at 2 p.m. For more information, please email angelight@comcast.net Surviving the Holidays a program for those dealing with grief during the holi days will be at St. John Lutheran Church on Dec. 2 from noon to 2 p.m. For more information, please contact concactus@ mysj.org or 407-644-1783 DEC. 3 The Ear, Nose, Throat and Plastic Surgery Associates in Winter Park will be holding a three-day screening for residents to see if they suffer hearing loss. Free appoint ments are available from Monday, Dec. 3, through Wednesday, Dec. 5, by calling 407-644-4883. Each appointment will have a complimentary consultation and listening demonstration with a registered audiologist and a 20-day risk-free trial of an Intiga Hearing Device. The ofce is lo cated at 133 Benmore Drive, Winter Park. DEC. 6 The Orange County Retired Educators Association will meet Thursday, Dec. 6, at 10 a.m., at College Park United Meth odist Church, 644 W. Princeton St., Or lando, for a music program by the Silver Chimers & Nineties Club Recognition. For more information, please visit ocrea-.org or call 407-677-0446. Members of the Jewish Pavilion are in vited to attend JP Connections, a lun cheon for women on Dec. 6, at 11 a.m. at Heathrow Country Club in Lake Mary. For $25, participants will enjoy a gourmet meal and informal modeling from Wear able Art. The event will also include a mini-holiday bazaar. To receive an invita tion or learn more, call 407-678-9363 or e-mail Nancy Ludin at nancyludin@jew ishpavilion.org The 34th annual Christmas in the Park Celebration will be Thursday, Dec. 6. This Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of Ameri can Art holiday tradition will be held in Central Park, which creates the beautiful backdrop for the lighting of eight turn-ofthe-century Tiffany windows as the Bach Festival Choir performs in concert on the main stage. The two-hour program begins at 6:15 p.m. For more information, please call 407-645-5311. To complement the annual Christmas in the Park Celebration, Friends of Casa Feliz will present Christmas at the Casa, sponsored by Commerce National Bank and Trust, on Thursday, Dec. 6, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., at Casa Feliz located at 656 N. Park Ave. Santa Claus will be on hand to greet everyone, the house will be decorated for the season and costumed carolers will lead attendees in holiday fa vorites. For more information, please call 407-628-8200. Orlando Museum of Arts First Thursday will be Thursday, Dec. 6 from 6 to 9 p.m. Besides a special holiday sale, Art Un der $200 Tis the Season, there will be a live jazz performance, magical illu sions, an art demonstration and food from Orchid Thai. Caf offerings, handcrafted beers, wine, soft drinks and water will be available for purchase throughout the evening. Admission to First Thursdays is $10, free for OMA Members and includes admission to the OMAs permanent col lections of American Art, African Art and Art of the Ancient Americas. For more in formation, call 407-896-4231 extension 260, or visit OMArt.org Visit www.wpmobserver.com/ events/search for more details. Send submissions to ibabcock@ turnstilemediagroup.com Savannah Court and CoveExcellence in Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation 1301 W. Maitland Blvd. Maitland, FL 32751407-645-3990www.SavannahCourtMaitland.comAssisted Living Facility License No. 8447 Skilled Nursing Facility License No. 1635096 Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above!A Senior Living Community where Hospitality is a Way of Life.OPEN HOUSE Thursday, November 29th 12:00pm-5:00pmVisit our community and enjoy some light holiday refreshments. Just stop by and take home a special treat. Please RSVP to 407 645-3990. Have you or someone you know been diagnosed with Irritable Bowel Syndrome? If so, there is now an opportunity to join a new research study.Are you eligible? irritable bowel syndrome Abdominal Pain, Bloating, DiarrheaQUALIFIED PARTICIPANTS:Will receive investigational medication or inactive placebo, study-related testing, physical exams, and lab work at no charge. ADDITIONALLY:Compensation may be available travel).For More Information Call: 407 937-1036 Fre dlund Fine Arts These paintings make great Christmas gifts. Fredlund Fine Arts1143 Orange Ave. Winter Park 407-622-0102 fredlundgallery.comWinter Hours:10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mon. thur Sat.For the month of December Over 20 artistsAnnual Small Painting show, over 50 paintings by Florida artists Calendar DEC. 1: Ye Olde Hometown Parade On Saturday, Dec. 1, Park Avenue comes to life at 9 a.m. with the 60th annual Win ter Park Ye Olde Hometown Christmas Parade. This family-friendly occasion showcases holiday-themed oats, Santa Claus and well-known locals. For more information, please call 407-644-8281.

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Page 9 Lifestyles Alzheimer's Association Central & North Florida Chapter Blue Horizon Eating Disorder Services, LLC Capital Guardian Wealth Management Cash To Go, Inc. Copytronics Florida Hospital Centre for Family Medicine Scott Hall Shannon Herring Magnolia Advisors, LLC Orlando Estate Buyer, Inc. Piazza Italia on Park Avenue Whole Foods Market Your Orlando Mortgage Comfort Inn & Suites Orlando / Winter Park DePrince, Race and Zollo, Inc. Fleming's Prime Steakhouse & Wine Bar GEICO Insurance Shari Hodgson Lake Fairview Marina, Inc. Mead Botanical Garden Mellow Mushroom Orlando Psychiatric Center Orlando Shakespeare Theater D. Scott Rotatori, M.D., P.A. William Segal Una Donna Piu Winter Park Housing Authority CFE Federal Credit Union ChickFil A Hampton Inn & Suites Kelly Price & Company Orange County Public Schools Pizzeria Valdiano Wells Fargo Home Mortgage Winter Park Breakfast Rotary Club Tudor Electric Arthur's Catering Inc. Glenridge Middle School Interlachen Country Club Nelson Investment Planning Services Robert J. Dorff, M.D., P.A. First Market Insurance Agency Winter Park Tech A walk into the Waterhouse Residence Museum on any day during the holiday season trans ports visitors into the past, wel coming them with a smell of cin namon and banisters laced with garland, just like the Waterhouses wouldve had their home in the 1880s. Its Christmas before electric ity. In each room of the downstairs there is a small tree, explained Marla Pickelsimer, the tour guide for the Waterhouse Museum. In the parlor, next to the court ing sofa, a small Christmas tree covered with pink ornaments col ors the room. On the table in front of the sofa, Pickelsimer points out an oddly-shaped mustache cup, so-called and shaped so that men with mustaches dont get their fa back in the steam age. Mr. Waterhouse built his house out of heart of pine in 1883 when he moved his family down from New York. In the dining room there was room for a family of four. There were cloth napkins with unique sterling silver napkin rings around each one. These were used to designate whose napkin was whose, said participated in the tour. Out the back door by the dining room, theres a breezeway, a small area used as extra workspace. An old laundry bucket with an agita tor and a washboard for Mrs. Wa terhouse hides in the back. People lived in the house until 1989 when, just beyond its centen nial, it became a museum. Once the Waterhouse family moved out, a kitchen was added just past the breezeway. Now, there is a cast iron stove, a washing tub and an ice bucket to represent the time period the house was originally built. The upstairs has three bed rooms and a sewing room. One room is designed to be a young boys room with antique toys such as marbles and dominoes. In the sewing room theres an art piece that many women during that time would make. It looks like a wreath, but is made with past rel atives hair. In the family room is where a large Christmas tree bedazzles with an assortment of ornaments. This room has the original pump organ and bookcase that belonged to the Waterhouses, who would spend time writing letters, read ing books and the local newspa per. If it was a nice day out, they plained John Carpenter, a Mait land resident who took the tour. One of the other bedrooms upstairs is known as Stellas room, having belonged to Mr.Waterhouses 13-year-old daughter. Her original bible rests on the vanity by her bed, an in novative, though anachronous, rope bed that could be tucked and tightened by pulling ropes. These beds are where the term sleep tight came from, Pickelsimer said. PHOTO COURTESY OF THE WATERHOUSE MUSEUM Christmas takes a trip into the past at the Waterhouse Museum, showing visitors what it was like to have the holidays during Maitlands early days with one of its pioneering families. The home has been restored with period furniture and decorations from a century past. Waterhouse at the SARA LANE Observer Staff Nostalgic noel The Art & History Museums Maitland (A&H) hosts Holidays at the Waterhouse through Jan. 13. The exhibition will be at the historic Waterhouse Residence Museum, 820 Lake Lily Drive, Maitland. Museum hours are from noon to 4 p.m. Thursday through Sunday. Admission is $3 for adults and $2 for seniors ages 55 and older, and children 4 to 18. Members and children 3 and younger are free. Call 407-539-2181 or visit ArtandHistory.org

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Page 10 SoNapa Grille grew rela tively quickly from a wine club in New Smyrna Beach to a full service restaurant in Maitland, immediately making its mark on Maitlands new restaurant row. This happened because Owner/ Manager Adam Barringer has brought a lifetime of experience working with Outback Steak new venture along with an MBA and a Ph.D. Add his personal love for wine along with som melier training, and Mr. Barringer may be the most erudite restaura teur in all of Central Florida. The happy news is that all that great new restaurant in Maitland run by a charming gentleman who recognizes wines endless possibilities for making custom ers happy whether served by the glass at the relaxed and wel coming bar, or when serving as the inspiration for great food. During his training, Mr. Barringer developed a special enthusiasm for California wines particularly those from Napa Valley and Sonoma County, and the wonderful SoNapa is the re sult. The large space has the feel of walking into a tasting room in any of the major California wineries. Beige stucco walls, rich dark woods in the booths and us to Sonoma and Napa counties before we even see the wineThe Yountville Artichoke Dip is rich and creamy with plenty of served in a bread bowl. The Dry Creek Egg Rolls bring new taste and dignity to the egg roll with perfectly seasoned pulled duck mixed with vegetables and a mango dipping sauce (highly rec ommended), and the Sea Ranch Scallops are artfully pan-seared, wrapped in bacon and served with a lemon-butter sauce that makes your taste buds decide that scallops should never be served any other way. The Santa Rosa is my favorite with chunks of chicken and creamy queso, drizzled with a tastefully spicy chipotle sauce that adds the proper zest to this the chicken. A new menu item is those who eat cheese) featuring portabella mushrooms, mozza rella, and arugula pesto drizzled breads, soups, and salads are also SoNapas early wine-club days, but also the closest thing to a real tapas bar to be found in Central Florida. This brings me to an observa tion I made again and again as I dined at SoNapa intelligence shows itself. Everything about dining at SoNapa has been well thought out to bring the great est comfort and pleasure to their guests from the wine choices to the wine-infused menu. For our entrees we chose the new-to-the-menu Sonoma Farms Chicken, which begins with a remarkably juicy chicken breast topped with all my favorites sundried tomatoes, spinach, goat cheese and a chardonnay-infused butter sauce. Its simply amazing. At our servers suggestion we also chose the Calistoga Filet Mignon, which can be ordered in either Sonoma or Napa style. We went with the Napa style which topped with crab meat, grilled asparagus, a chardonnay butter sauce, and something the Chef calls wine barrel spicing. Its a series of tastes that work together. And theres even more good news. Beginning this week, SoNapa introduces its All Ameri can SoHappy Hour from 4 to 7 p.m. every day with half-price wines by the glass, specials on beers including the microbrewery selections and special mentioned as appetizers. We didnt really have room for dessert, but our server strongly suggested the Carneros Cheese cake, and we are so glad he did. I pass along the same strong sug gestion to you. And if youve read this far, SoNapa wants to celebrate its one-year anniversary in Maitland free glass of house wine with each entre for the month of December when you mention this article and tell them Josh sent me. NOV. 29 Trinity Preparatory School will per form the musical Pippin. Show times are Thursday, Nov. 29, at 4:30 p.m.; Friday, Nov. 30, at 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, Dec. 1, at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, Dec. 2, at 2:30 p.m. All tick ets are $5. Trinity Prep is located at 5700 Trinity Prep Lane, Winter Park. Visit TrinityPrep.org or call 407-6714140. NOV. 30 The Holiday Tree Lighting Ceremo ny in Winter Park will be Friday, Nov. 30, at 5:15 p.m. in Central Park. For information, call 407-644-8281. Elf will be shown on Friday, Nov. 30, at 7 p.m. as park of Winter Parks Popcorn Flicks in Central Park. For in formation, call 407-629-0054. DEC. 1 The annual Leadership Winter Park Breakfast will be at Central Parks main stage from 7 to 10:30 a.m. on Saturday, Dec. 1. Tickets are $6 for adults and $4 for children. For infor mation, call 407-644-8281 On Saturday, Dec. 1, the 60th annual Winter Park Ye Olde Hometown Christmas Parade will begin on Park Avenue at 9 a.m. Call 407-644-8281. BRIO Tuscan Grille will have Break fast with Santa on Saturday, Dec. 1, from 9 to 10:30 a.m. The cost is $11.95 for adults and $5.95 for chil dren, proceeds will benet Toys for Tots. The city of Maitland will usher in the holiday season at the annual Season of Light event at 5 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 1, at Lake Lily Park. DEC. 2 Orangewood will host a chili dinner and concert by the worship band on Sunday, Dec. 2, at 5:30 p.m. Attend ees should bring a dish to share. For information, visit orangewood.org/ communityevents or email info@or angewood.org ONGOING Santa Claus will be visiting and taking pictures with children at the Orlando Fashion Square mall daily through Monday, Dec. 24. From 6 to 8 p.m. on Mondays through Dec. 17 he will be available for pet pictures. Visit OrlandoFashionSquare.com or call 407-896-1131. Maitland Public Library Events Friday, Nov. 30, the Share a Title Book Club will meet at 10 a.m. Sunday, Dec. 2, there will be Holi day Tea at 2:30 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 5, the Friends Book Sale will be from 10 a.m. to noon. Wednesday, Dec. 5, the LCC Health Series will have an acupunc ture lesson with the Stillwater Center at 6:30 p.m., registration is required. Friday, Dec. 7, the E Lab will be from 10 a.m. to noon. Saturday, Dec. 8, the Second Sat urday Winter Wonderland will be from 2 to 4 p.m. The Library hosts preschool story and craft time every Tuesday at 10:30 a.m. Baby time stories and activities are at 10:30 a.m. every Thursday. Reading Buddies for kindergarten through fth grade is at 4 p.m. every Thursday. Legos Engineers for ages 9-14 is at 4 p.m. on Mondays. The Food for Fines program will run through Sunday, Dec. 16. Call 407-647-7700 to register. Send submissions to ibabcock@ turnstilemediagroup.com SoNapa: Intelligent wining and dining JOSH GARRICK Observer Staff PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Wine and inventive food combine at SoNa pa in Maitland, founded by a sommelier. SoNapa Grille is at 640 S. Orlando Ave. on restaurant row in Maitland. Its open Monday to Thursday 11:30 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Friday and Saturday 11:30 a.m. to 11 p.m.; and Sunday 4 p.m. to 10 p.m. Call 407-637-2933 or visit sonapa.com From the Corner Table

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Page 11 Dec. 1 Letters to Santa at the Enzian The whole family will enjoy holiday treats, activities and a at the Enzian on Dec. 1. Children younger than 12 will receive a free letter writing kit to send their wish-list to Santa, complete with return address envelope so Santa can send the letter back to mom and dad as a keepsake after he reads it. A special menu, includ ing cookie decorating kits and hot cocoa will be available to order, and Santa will stop by for a visit and photographs (available for purchase). Call 407-629-1088 or visit Enzian.org Dec. 1 and 2 Crealdes annual Holiday Art Sale Just in time for the holidays, the talented artists from Creald artwork for sale to the public. Unique gifts including jewelry, ceramics, glass and paintings are available on Dec. 1 and 2 with a portion of the proceeds support ing Crealds educational pro grams. Creald is located at 600 Saint Andrews Blvd. in Winter Park. Call 407-571-1886 or visit Crealde.org Dec. 4 through 9 Direct from Broadway, Sister Act nominated musical hit Sister Act is coming to Orlando. Called DIVINE! by the Associ ated Press, Sister Act will be at the Bob Carr PAC from Dec. 4-9. When disco diva Deloris Van Cartier witnesses a murder, she is put in protective custody in the one place cops are sure she wont be found a convent! Disguised as a nun, she uses her fabulous disco voice to inspire the choir, but its soon nun-on-the-run time, and she can only be saved by her newly found sisterhood. Produced by Whoopi Goldberg, and featuring an original score by Alan Menken, Sister Act nominations. Visit OrlandoBroad way.com or by call 1-800-9822787. Dec. 5 and 6 Kate Zaloumes Singing Myself Home With the voice of a Christmas vescent Kate Zaloumes will present Singing Myself Home as she returns to The Winter Park Playhouse on Dec. 5 and 6. Accompanied by pianist Christopher Leavy, and featuring holiday music and standards that remind her of warmth and family, Kate is a Cen tral Florida favorite. Tickets are $20 and include a drink from the bar. Call 407-6450145 or visit winter parkplayhouse.org Dec. 7 Free Friday Nights at the Morse Museum For each of the Friday eve nings in December, visitors to the Morse Museum can enjoy free ad mission and live music from 4 to 8 p.m. In addition, the Morse will major exhibition in the Museums new wing. The Dec. 14 program includes a family tour of selected galleries with a free take-home art activity for children. Admis sion to the Museum is also free on Dec. 22 and 23. For a complete schedule of Morse Museum holi day events, visit morsemuseum. org Dec. 8 Saturday Matinee Classic: Its a Wonderful Life The holiday season would not be complete without a screening of the Frank Capra winter-time Life starring Jimmy Stewart. We can all help an angel earn showing at noon on Dec. 8 at the Enzian at 1300 S. Orlando Avenue (17-92) in Maitland. Call 407-6291088 or visit Enzian.org Dec. 8 Florida Symphony Youth Orchestra The Florida Symphony Youth Orchestra will collaborate with WMKG Local 6 to present a Holi the Salvation Armys Angel Tree Network at 4 p.m. Dec. 8. Hosted by WKMG news anchors, and featuring all four FSYO orchestras, the concert presents the sounds of the season and a visit from a very special ho-ho-holiday guest at the Disney Amphitheater at Lake Eola in downtown Orlando. Admission is free, but donations to the Salvation Army are sug gested. Visit fsyo.org Josh Garrick Culture worthy of your calendar AT ROLLINS COLLEGE SINCE 1935 JOHN V. SINCLAIR, ARTISTIC DIRECTOR AND CONDUCTORA CLASSIC CHRISTMASWith John V. Sinclair Knowles Memorial Chapel DEC 15 | 7:30 PM DEC 16 | 2:00 PM Always a sellout. GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY!THE BACH FESTIVAL CHOIR AND ORCHESTRAMAKE THE SEASON SING The Elizabeth Morse Genius Foundation The Galloway Foundation Orange County Arts & Cultural Affairs This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORG @EnzianTheater Starring Philip Seymour Hoffman, Catherine Keener & Christopher Walken A LATE QUARTET Fri Sat 3:45, 6:30, 9:15 Sun 4:15, 7:00, 9:30 Mon 9:30 Tue Thur 6:30, 9:15 Letters to Santa: THE YEAR WITHOUT A SANTA CLAUS Sat 1:00 14th Annual Central Florida Jewish Film Festival Sun 11:00AM, 1:45PM Mon 4:30 & 7:00 Kate Zaloumes Dec. 5 and 6

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Page 12 I f youre someone who likes to stand out a bit in a crowd, youre already aware of what Im about to write: When it comes to the end of the year holidays, especially Christmas, its time to up your fashion game. Youve got new competition to get noticed, and it includes Christmas lights, tinsel and more. Turn it up, or simply prepare to enjoy the show. That are, just a brighter, more colorful version. With that attitude in mind, I hit Park Avenue last week to ask local fashion gurus whats in this year. Many of the words I heard were like music to my ears. Bebes for a chat with Liz Shep pard. Whats the word here? Liz tells me about gowns customers purchased for a recent ball. Old time glamorous is what they were, she says. Rita Hayworth, Eva Gardner. The girls wanted to look sexy, but they wanted to look glamorous at the same time. They wanted the big slits up the they wanted all the glitz and glam that went with it. She con tinued, Theyre trying to make women looked glamorous again, you know, that old world glam that we used to have. I remark about her eyewear, encrusted with tiny Swarovski crystals. She says they sell lots of them. Women want to have that look. She speaks of crystals, rhinestones and sequins, Its a better class of glitz. Over at Siegels, John and Robin Siegel talk of really fun, festive, Christmas pants, Christ mas shirts. A rack of shirts with embroidered Christmas trees is just beside me, a table of cords as well. Got them out of the box yesterday and already sold four, Robin says. John says purple is a pre dominant color, Anything in the bright tones is always real good. As for a gift idea, Robin shows me Happy Everything plates, which can change by the season with various ceramic embel lishments that attach via Velcro. Theres a turkey and, of course, Santa. Down at John Craig, Cheryl Arbutine immediately takes me Robert Graham. Always colorful, the mix of shirts, vests and jackets here is amazingly festive. Robert Graham does all these novelty vests and shirts, she says. Im especially taken with the stained glass print that reoccurs as a lin Sand label shirts are a great way to do a more conservative look, in red and dark green plaids. Owner Craig Delongy adds, This fall were seeing a lot of soft coats layered up with quarter zip sweaters. Beautiful colors in magentas and lavenders, purples, some great looking deep orang es. He says a soft coat is one that resists wrinkling and is great with jeans. Next door at Current, Shana Goldman talks of vintage. A throw back where its going to be kind of James Dean, Mad Men, 1920s, 1930s style; thats been in, but a new version of it. Every things a little bit more tailored, a little bit brighter, lots of metallics, lots of leathers, lots of layering and lots of plum and burgundy Clyde Moore I LUV Park Avenue Style As the models sway up and down the runway, all eyes are on peacock feathers soar and heavy metal glitters hang from their eyelids. The looks are whimsical, ethereal, sometimes tough and edgy, and always surprising. No one is looking at the clothes, only the tiny masterpieces lining the models eyes. At Harrietts Park Avenue Fashion Week, the eyelash artists from iLashWorks in Winter Park revealed some of their most dra matic works. The most fun was watching the peoples faces, some in disbe lief, said Kit Stephenson, owner of iLashWorks. People were ac tually paying attention to it; they were waiting to see the next look. The iLashWorks team had their own lineup at the runway show this year, and they used the cre ative opportunity to the fullest. of services, including facials and massages, but Stephensons pas sion is eyelashes. She said her studio brings a lit tle something extra and unique to the Winter Park scene, and takes beauty to the next level. Were the frosting on the cake whats a world without eye lashes? she said. They make the face. iLashWorks has been in Winter Park for four years, and special izes in eyelash extensions. For photo shoots and fashion shows theyll take it over the top with rhinestones and neon, but for ev eryday beauty theyve got options for every woman, and theyre at your local pharmacy. Theirs are hand applied, each lush lash to your own lash, creating a look that rivals a Kardashian smolder. Stephenson said clients have come in without them and left with extensions making them look 10 years younger. Many of her cli ents have given up manicures to keep up their lash obsession. When I dont have them, I feel naked, like Im missing some thing, said Nora Reinfeld, who drives from Gainesville to get her lashes done at iLashWorks. Laurie Fortune, an Oviedo cli ent, agreed. Its just so convenient, if I dont do anything, I always main tain my eyelashes, she said. You look beautiful. While beauty doesnt actually necessitate pain in the eyelash world as many women take a lit tle nap during the two-hour long appointment its not an easy task for the eyelash artists. They apply one lash at a time, using a special glue on each individual eyelash. Tiny tweezers, a magnifying glass and a dedication to detail are in valuable to the process. Its like threading a needle, you have to be able to have a steady hand and the patience for it, Stephenson said. Its not for everybody, its very tedious. Stephenson loves the creative side, but the lashes dont have to be crazy. Shed love more op portunities to create drama on the eyes like she did for Fash ion Week, but she says making a woman look glamorous and beau tiful for everyday is just as great. And while shell never admit it, it takes a particular talent to make eyes come alive the way she does. Ive never really considered myself an artist, I just look and do, Stephenson said. Its fun; Ive always been playing with col ors and curvature. And the clients see that, too. When people walk in the doors here, they walk out feeling pampered and they feel special and they feel important, said friend and lash photographer Carolyn Dolan. Stephenson has been training her own artists, and soon hopes to be able to start a business in eye lash extension consulting. Shed love to see a lash bar in every Winter Park salon, and it would be even better if it were called iL ashWorks, she said. You could put a lash bar in any salon, she said. The more people who are educated, it will just become more and more popu lar. PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER iLashWorks wildest styles were on display at Harrietts Park Avenue Fashion Week, but most of its customers choose a tamer look. Extreme iLashWorks in Winter Park does a variety of eyelash extensions, from high-fashion glam and glitter to subtly lush lashes BRITTNI JOHNSON Observer Staff For more information about iLashWorks, located at 111 S. Knowles Ave. in Winter Park, visit ilashworks.com or call 407-6220226. l a s h e s Please see CLYDE on page 13 PHOTO BY CLYDE MOORE THE OBSERVER Melissa Caligiuri shows off some fall fashions at Lilly Pulitzer on Park Avenue, where sequins and more muted colors are taking some spotlight from the stores colorful items. Up your fashion game

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Page 13 The lights have been strung around the light poles along Park Avenue, baristas are concocting peppermint mochas at Barnies Park Village has a little elf play ing hide-and-seek at the retail center it must be time for the holidays! There is no shortage of oppor tunities to get in the spirit of the season, and the Orlando Phil harmonic Orchestras Holiday Pops Concert this past weekend holidays. In case you missed it, local merchants, arts and cultural groups, and even the Chamber of Commerce have a variety of The local business community, through the Winter Park Cham ber of Commerce, is responsible for two important traditions: the Holiday Tree Lighting Ceremony and the Winter Park Ye Olde Hometown Christmas Parade. In other communities it might be a function of a municipality or the undertaking of a civic club, but in Winter Park, these holiday favorites are an opportunity for local businesses to give back to a community that supports them year-round. Come to Central Park and celebrate the season on Nov. 30 at 5 p.m. with the lighting of the holiday tree, live on WFTV Channel 9. Then, come back Dec. 1 for the parade, which and dance troupes beginning at 9 a.m. Before and after the parade, Leadership Winter Park will serve pancakes and sausage as a fundraiser for local elementary schools at the Central Park stage. Cant make it out this weekend? Read up on all the events hap pening downtown at Experien ceParkAvenue.com/holidays and plan some time to enjoy the sights and sounds of the season. Shop till you drop Red Bag Days and Small Busi holiday shopping season, each attracting patrons to our down town. Red Bag Days brought peo ple from across Central Florida to discover the unique shops of Park Avenue, like Timothys Gal lery and The Ancient Olive. Both stores also participated in Small Business Saturday, along with many other locally owned small businesses. If youre still in need of some local retail shopping, many stores have extended hours during the holidays, including during the Merchant Open House on Dec. 14. Park Avenue will be lined with luminaries, stores will serve light refreshments and, as an extra incentive, many will donate a portion of their proceeds to the American Red Cross for Hurri Election season continues The holiday season is also a chance to show some love to your favorite businesses, and not just with your wallet. While youre in downtown for a special event, dinner party or shopping, be sure to take note of the decorated store windows. See one you really like? Cast your vote in the Holiday Window Contest at cityofwinter park.org from Dec. 1 31. There is also a new best of local busi ness contest going on right now called The Ovations. Its a chance for you to vote for your favorite local businesses in 52 categories, which may seem daunting, but take a minute, read the categories gers will be nominating the best places to shop, dine and enjoy life in our community. Voting is open now through Jan. 2, 2013, at surveymonkey.com/s/Winter ParkOvations Erika Spence is the senior director of marketing and communications at the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce. Visit WinterPark.org for more information. colors. She shows a big smile as she says, Bowties and pocket square are coming back in a big way. She describes it as Great Gatsby meets the 2000 era. On to Lilly Pulitzer, Me lissa Caligiuri gets me back to sequins. We have lots of dresses with sequins, she says. I see lots of black, ivory, and glitter, a gold clutch with an unexpected wish bone embellishment. Sequins are big everywhere this year, she says, also mentioning metal lics. At the front of the store are some great more typically Lilly coral prints in black and white, and red and turquoise, along with their Wilda resort wear dresses in bright pink and tur quoise, and navy and white. At Downeast, Don Sexton Milly and Shoshanna. One has a satin top and a unique detail on the skirt. Thats what Millys all about. Shes doing things no one else is doing, he says. The Shoshanna dresses are in a bright Christmas red, one with large bow. For men, he says, Bowties are really a big hit. He then shows me their new Echo Touch leather gloves, with smartphone compatible a smartphone with gloves on. At Sultre, Traci Kabran says, Dont be afraid to do a lot of bright colors, even neons, which were typically used for spring, now being incorporated into the holidays as well. Glitz is back as well, youre seeing a lot of se quins, sequin jackets paired with leather accents, leather pants. Vintage jewelry is really strong. Leather and lace, its really strong. Youre seeing everyone from Kelly Ripa to people on the news are mixing that trend. A leather sleeve paired with silk. Leather and lace is really, really popular. At Tuni, Brittnie Gallo says, Big trends for the holidays since were in Florida. Fur vests, silk blouse, skinny jeans, printed jeans right now, especially wax denim, are huge. Leather and I love. She mentions reversible jeans Id seen recently on their Facebook page. She says sequins are great, As long as you match it with something else, not too much sequin. I think if you break it up it looks holiday. She sug gests ankle booties for a holiday party, to edge it up. And killer statement bags are in, she notes, suggestively. And great weekender bags. I love that, too, just in case youre wondering what to get me. Clyde Moore operates local sites ILUVWinterPark.com and ILUVParkAve. com, and aims to help local businesses promote themselves for free. Email him at iluvwinterpark@earthlink. net or write to ILuv Winter Park on Facebook or Twitter. Check out his blog on WPMObserver.com by navigating to Columnists > Clyde Moore CLYDE | Bowties, metal coming back C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 12 Erika Spence Business in the Park Seasons greetings Park Avenue Merchants Holiday Open HouseFriday, December 14 5 8 p.m. Luminaries along Park Avenue, Extended Store Hours & Light Refreshments plus...Winter in the Park Ice Rink, Free Admission at the Morse Museum & a Sneak Peek at Downton Abbey Season 3!a portion of sales at participating stores will benefit hurricane sandy relief efforts. details at ExperienceParkAvenue.com.

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Page 14 Opinions Is it just me, or was this year a blur? I no longer feel comfortable saying as slow as Christmas. Its speedy arrival has had me con templating the words of the great American philosopher George Carlin. He had a bit he did about getting older. As he explained, the process of aging one year when youre a child goes by oh so slowly birthday, summer, July 4, Labor Day, Halloween, Thanks giving, Christmas. Of course, he said all of this very slowly, accenting his point. But if youre one of the lucky ones, those who live a long, full life, the passing of time eventually ends up like this: birthday, birthday, birthday! And that is said quickly, just as this year has seemed to me. Is it just me, or has someone hit the fast-forward button? I may need a neck brace for that whiplash feeling in my neck. The unreasonable, I guess. But we hit July 4 and its been a slip n slide to years end. And for any young sters out there, Slip N Slide toy involving water, a long strip of plastic and outdoor grassy patches from decades gone by. Back then we called video games Atari and so many years later I still want a T-shirt with the logo. Time passed by more slowly then. Or, so it seemed. Christmas, the whole period from Thanksgiving to New Years mark on any year. Fitting, I guess, that it comes last. Its that grand works display, the time when the ooohs and ahhhs are plentiful Fixated on the whole passage of time thing, I began thinking back to my own memorable Christmas holidays. I was sur prised which ones immediately came to mind, and others that didnt. It took me a few moments to think of the one in the mids when my parents gave me a car. We went over to our friends house where it waited for me in their garage, a large red bow on top. That was an awesome Christmas, no question. I wonder, though, if it might not be one my mother would think of sooner than I did, because the Christ were the ones in which Id given someone else something special. I remember giving my mother a lot of clothes in the late s after shed lost a lot of weight. I thought of giving my father a stereo and a great leather jacket. I remembered in 2000 giving my parents a trip to Europe, the looks on their faces as they pieced the puzzle together and then the sto ries they shared after they were home. Kids think some funny, weird things. When I was a kid I was convinced that when my mother wrote a check, she was creating money. That innocence and, I guess, ignorance, is part of what makes this time of the year that much more magical. Santa Claus magical reindeer handing out toys after passing up and down chimneys. Men made of snow can laugh and sing, just the same as you and me. A reindeer with a nose that glows can not only a beacon through inclement weather. I know Ive mentioned my trip to India a few times, a reminder to myself how impactful it was was to be the Elora and Ajanta caves. Before the visit I thought spelunking in India seemed an odd stop. I was that much more amazed when it turned out the caves were temples carved from mountainsides throughout many generations. I think of that now when Im in a rush, or see others in one. We want every thing today, or better yet, yester day. These people began things they knew neither they nor their children would ever see complet ed. Personally, that would never work for me. Yet, I appreciate a people who had such dedica tion and commitment, and the staggering beauty of what they created. by. And the modern day Christ mas experience is often all about rushing here and there to buy this gift, to attend that event, to see something, do something. We do so much rushing we often forget to stop and take it all in, and to appreciate the here and now to ensure it is well remembered and Last year at this time I was operating The Attic upstairs at Downeast. I came out of the store one night, was headed across Central Park to my car, but at the Emily fountain turned to look back at Park Avenue and its lights, brightening in the increasing darkness. I was so taken with what I saw, I turned around and began a more than two hour walk up and down the street simply taking photos of the store windows, the white lights hanging at intersections, the large lit Christmas tree in the park, the fountains, the insides of some restaurants. It was an unexpected little piece of magic that I am now, almost a year later, happy a few hours to view the world again with a little bit of magic. I plan to look for similar opportu nities this year. Thank goodness, Christmas! I thought it would never get here. Clyde Moore operates local sites ILUVWinterPark.com and ILUVParkAve. com, and aims to help local businesses promote themselves for free and help save them money, having some fun along the way. Email him at iluvwinterpark@ earthlink.net or write to ILuv Winter Park on Facebook or Twitter. Check out his blog on WPMObserver.com by navigating to Columnists > Clyde Moore Clyde Moore I LUV Winter Park In response to Louis Roneys Nov. 15 column, As the roof caves in: Your age clouds your vision and also hardens your approach to all things new. You have become the problem in the US of A, not any part of a solution. But it will not be your America too much longer, so your whining will be history soon. ELLIOT In response to the Nov. 1 article Winter Parker As a matter of FACT, they did do things that male pilots refused to do... it took a WASP going up and successfully piloting The Widowmaker to make the men quit whining and go do it themselves! And I sincerely doubt that men were lining up three-deep to y towing targets for others to learn how to shoot down enemy aircraft. JO MEACHEM Heres what a reader wrote in response to the Letter to the Editor submitted by Beth Hall, which ran Nov. 15: You complain about the Obama camp for demonizing Romney, but make no mention of the Republicans organized character assault on Mr. Obama for the last ve years. According to the Republicans he is a secret Muslim, not a citizen of the USA, and conspired to cover up an attack on our embassy in Libya, just to name a few of the failed attempts to discredit Mr. Obama. You say Mr. Romney always chose the high road...I say at least 47 percent of people disagree with you. MARK BLAKE Christmas, already? We highlight local businesses that are utilizing and selling items made by other locals. Send submissions to iluvwinterpark@earthlink.net Local Luvn Local Artsy gifts at Artistree Artistree Gifts in College Park offers local art from a wide variety of local artists, including Kimberly BrownTurner, who paints animals, owers and other still-life scenes. In addition, Artistree is now offering art classes, including ones taught by Kim. Call them at 407-999-5251 or check out their website at artistreegifts.com or Facebook page for upcoming events. Art by Kimberly Brown-Turner PHOTOS BY CLYDE MOORE THE OBSERVER Holiday lights shine along Park Avenue, which has lit up a festive glow in the past week.

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Page 15 An Armistice is a time when the may not necessarily be over. In France, I made a point of driving out to the Forest of Compigne. There I entered a lonely railway car that sits on a short section of track in the woods. I sat down at the long table where, on Nov. 11, 1918, the Armistice was signed to end World War I, in which my father had fought as a U.S. infantryman. When France fell to the Nazis in June 1940, Hitler ordered that the surrender papers be signed in that very same railway car. It occurs to me that life itself is one long war interspersed with blessed Armistice pauses, during which people rely for a while on hopes and dreams that never seem to come completely true. In the peace-bringing Treaty of Versailles named Adolf Hitler who was later to bring the world years of horrendous kill ing. After six years of World War II came the Korean war, then the Vietnam War fol which are now almost beyond recall. In the Middle Ages one man with a sword and a shield could kill another man armed identically. Today, one man has the power to initiate with his thumb the total destruction of a city of thousands. Such has been our progress in ways that are, if nothing else, measureable. have elected a president who has never and yet has the power of life and death over countless people who wear our colors. Presently, a distinguished married former general and head of the CIA, who was worth much to us if war should come, may have been thrown in the trash bin because he romanced his lady biographer. The trouble with people is that they invariably turn out to be people. Did we sign this man on as a faultless moralist, or as a brilliant warrior with the ability to protect us from our enemies? When Dwight D. Eisenhower was romantically involved with his Brit Europe, he was dressed down sternly by his superior, Gen. George C. Mar shall. However, Eisenhower did not lose his command a good thing for our side. Boys will be boys and sometimes Napoleans or Eisenhowers. Even the dullest of us may embody immorality, but boys liking girls is not what kills people. It produces people. And the smartest State Department guy in Washington on our side, it seems to me, should never forget that our embassies are considered to be American territory, protected by our own armed forces, even if our president chooses not to enforce that logical need. Training foreigners to protect our property and secrets is not long on smarts. As a child, I often heard, love makes the world go round. The nature of adult life is that loves revolutions all too often collide with a stark reality that is everywhere with us in our newspapers and broadcasts. Man is a quixotic creature with a restlessness in his very core that opposes peace at every turn. I have come to the conclusion that if I can create in my immediate surroundings an armistice of peace and love for a moment or two, I may indulge myself in the wild hope that I have brightened at least a small frag ment of humanity. About Roney: HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney) The Platonic idealist is the man by nature so wedded to perfection that he sees in everything not the reality but the faultless ideal which the reality misses George Santayana Irony, of late, has garnered a bad name. Sincerity is the valued coin of the realm these days. And so it is with the burgeoning secessionist movement, where disillusioned Americans petition to withdraw from the union. My inclination is to ridicule such sentiments particularly since the location of secessionist rhetoric is centered in the Heart of Dixie. I do at tach racist and nativist underpinnings to the secessionist argument, but I think something else is going on as well. An appropriate illustration of where themselves (me, too, at times) is in our sympathy for the character Michael Douglas plays in the 1993 movie Fall ing Down. Douglas plays recently laid Foster. Foster is divorced, disillusioned, depressed and in despair. All he wants is to attend his daughters birthday party, but has a restraining order against him by his divorced wife. Caught in Los Angeles begins the long walk across the city to see his daughter. Foster has many run-ins on his journey crossing a modern American hell, but the classic confrontation (for me) occurs in a fast-food restaurant featuring the visual menu showing the quintessen tial perfect hamburgerThe Whammy Burgerphotographed in steaming culi nary perfection. Alas, when it arrives, it is anything but. Its pathetic. Soggy bread, wilted lettuce and a piece of meat the size of a burnt quarter. What happens next is what all of us have all dreamed ofWal ter Mitty-likedoing. Worth a look-see. I liken the secessionist mindset to Fosters viewing of the perfect Whammy Burger. In the back of the secessionists mind is some ideal of an American golden age, a blessed America, of that shining city on the hill. Yet the reality of our pluralistic democracy, with all our diverse constituencies vying for power and pref erence is, well, a shockingly rude slap to the face to those who have an idealized (or infantile) conception of American his tory. As has been observed, the making of slaughterhouse sausage and representa tive democracy have much in common. Secessionists lament the loss of freedom. I am unsure of what loss they mourn. I recently attended a private ShootNAnnie along the St. Johns River with enough guns and ammo to have respectably defended Stalingrad in 1943. I do not see any loss of freedom when it comes to the Second Amendment. No one mind in America. No, Jepson, loss of freedom when it comes to taxes and onerous regulations (like being required to contribute to your health care). Ah, taxes and regulations. Oh, wouldnt it be loverly to again have an American population of 3.9 million, as was the United States in 1787, with an entire continent at your feet, virtually vacant, to exploit. Just over the next hill, the long arm of that onerous govern ment nonexistent. America was never the faultless ideal, the most perfect of Whammy Burger Nations. And this, dear reader, is what is. A diet of illusion and ignorance are always menu options in a democracy. Whats the tagline? Tastes ing in the long run, however. For the individual or the nation. Jepson is a 24-year resident of Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.US Chris Jepson Perspectives Louis Roney Play On! Armistice Whammy Burger nation Despite the Election Day hoopla, the political environment for American smallbusiness owners is virtually unchanged from Nov. 6. Many of the challenges theyve long faced still loom large: An administration hostile to free enterprise (You didnt build that), an earnings-looting mandated healthcare law and the promise of more complex federal regulations. According to the National Federation of Independent Busi ness (NFIB), optimism among owners is wallowing at recession levels due to fears of bolder government and the continuing fog of economic uncertainty billowing out of Washington, D.C. Is it any wonder that small-business owners are now operating in mainte nance mode, not hiring, expanding or or dering more inventories until responsible leadership returns to the nations capital? And even though theyre very disap pointed with the results of the Nov. 6 elec during the election. Whats more, theyre ton, or a state capital for that matter, who doesnt appreciate the valuable contribu tions they bring to the American system of free enterprise. Ever in search of the positive, these free enterprise practitioners see a silver lining in the Nov. 6 balloting. There were some real small business advances, particularly in many states that elected pro-smallbusiness legislatures and governors, and ever before. In meaningful numbers, owners all across the country stepped up to run for ing in the political process with great in and spoke out against some of the most abusive and disrespectful politics that have ever been leveled at job creators. This courage bodes well for free enter prise and for the future of our country. It sends a strong signal that they demand to be heard and refuse to be intimidated. so much passion during this election? Because their businesses are much more than places to make a living. Those little Theyre also stages upon which entrepre neurs can demonstrate free enterprise val ues for their children, and exhibit mean ingful jobs and life-improving experiences for employees. Thats why NFIBs I Built My Busi ness bus tour attracted so much public attention. When President Obama ques tioned Main Streets ability, determination and commitment by charging You didnt build that it was the last straw for mil lions of them. The elections results might feel like a harsh blow to small-business owners, but they arent going to slink away quietly with the administration and its congres sional supporters in the days ahead. But theyre no strangers to such struggles. As entrepreneurs whove survived the challenges of starting and running a small business, they arent quitters. In fact, the tougher the challenge, the more invigo rated they become. Dan Danner is a board member of the National Federation of Independent Business. Dan Danner Election results spur small business will to ght DAN DANNER Guest Writer Ever in search of the positive, these free enterprise practitioners see a silver lining in the Nov. 6 balloting. Secessionists lament the loss of freedom. I am unsure of what loss they mourn. I recently attended a private ShootNAnnie along the St. Johns River with enough guns and ammo to have respectably defended Stalingrad in 1943. In the Middle Ages one man with a sword and a shield could kill another man armed identically. Today, one man has the power to initiate with his thumb the total destruction of a city of thousands. Such has been our progress in ways that are, if nothing else, measureable.

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Page 16 WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA LIQUIDATION SALE! Somersby Park is an established com munity in Hendersonville, NC offering homesites starting in the mid-$20s. Call Today! 828-489-6760 of SomersbyPark. net Coastal Cottage! Deepwater Ocean Access with boat slips only $69,900. SALE Sat 12/1. New ready to finish cottage. Prime coastal Georgia location. Gated entrance, paved roads, underground utilities. FREE water/sewer tap. Historically lowest fi nancing. Call now 866-952-5303 x1641. REAL ESTATE: FOR SALE The Paint Manager Enjoy Our Fall Savings: 15% off all Exte rior painting; 10% off all Interior paint ing. 5% off all pressure washing. Decks, Poolcages, Patios, Drive-ways, Commu nity side walks, Apartments, Hotels etc. 10% off all Texturing: Popcorn or Knock down Enjoy savings thru Dec. 2012 Lic/ Ins. Call Ray Wheeler. 407-592-9935. thepaintmanager@aol.com PROFESSIONAL SERVICE ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE FROM HOME. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. 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Local Job Placement Asst. VA Benefits Approved. 2 National Certifications. 866-362-6497. EDUCATION START NOW! OPEN RED HOT DOLLAR, DOLLAR PLUS, MAILBOX, DISCOUNT PARTY, $10 CLOTHING STORE, TEEN STORE, FITNESS CENTER FROM $51,900 WORLDWIDE! WWW.DRSS20.COM 800518-3064 CONSIGNMENT ART AUCTION on Dec 15, 2012 (Saturday) at 4pm. 9101 International Drive, Ste 1008, Or lando, FL 32819. Artworks below $100, complimentary hors doeuvres and FREE ART PRINT for attending. Artists include Picasso, Dali, Chagall, Max and local art ists. Call 1-866-537-1013 or visit www. Baterbys.com for more information or to RSVP. A Glorious Christmas Concert Dec. 2, 8:30 and 11am; First United Methodist Church Winter Park 125 N. Interlachen Avenue; FREE event ANNOUNCEMENTS Baldwin Baby Grand Piano for sale Built in 1951 and has been owned by only 2 families, we are asking $5,000 but the price is negotiable. Very Good Quality. Call 407-616-4543 and /or e-mail never giveup1@bellsouth.net. Mahogany Mink for sale Full length coat has a shawl collar -diagonal sleeves with bracelet cuffs -length is 46 1/2 and has an 80 sweep $4,000 -price is negotiable. Appraisal on mink available on request. Very good quality. Call 407-616-4543 and/or email: nevergiveup1@bellsouth.net Ranch Mink Vest for sale Has zipper front stand up collar length is 26 and has 53 sweep $1,500 price is negotiable. Appraisal on mink available on request. Very good quality. Call 407-616-4543 and/or email: never giveup1@bellsouth.net MERCHANDISE The Marketplace 1504 The Oaks, Maitland, $805,000 MaryStuart Day/Megan Cross Barbara + Jeff Friedman Its free to place estate sales, garage sales and yard sales on this page! Visit WPMObserver .com and click Create Your Classified Order your classified ad online! At WPMObserver.com you can create, customize and pay for your ad in one convenient place! Sunday, December 2nd, 1-4 PM 1729 Elizabeths Walk, Winter Park FL 32789 4 BR | 3.5 BA | 3,736 SF | $979,000 Spectacular Italian Villa in the prestigious Windsong Community. The great room features a stone fireplace, 25 coffered ceilings, and beautiful built-ins. Wellequipped, oversized chefs kitchen has 5 burner gas stove, island, and oversized pantry with wine storage along with a wine fridge in the wet bar. You will love the spacious master bedroom with jetted tub and his/hers closets! Hosted by: Jenni Sloan 1555 Palmer Avenue, Winter Park FL 32789 4 BR | 2 BA | 2,139 SF | $390,000 Classic Winter Park home featuring a cozy wood burning fireplace in the liv ing room, separate kitchen with large pantry, dining area and bright spacious family room with beautiful parquet floors throughout. This home offers a split floor plan with large master suite and spa cious walk-in closet. Enjoy time on the back patio by the tranquil pond or walk to Park Avenue! Hosted by: Gwyn Clark 1245 N. Park Avenue, Winter Park FL 3789 4 BR | 3.2 BA | 4,116 SF | $799,000 Amazing one story pool home with a stunning two story formal living room, beautiful fireplace, formal dining room with wet bar and a double-sided fire place! The eat-in kitchen is open to the family room with glass doors and views of the pool. The spacious master suite of fers plenty of privacy, sliding glass doors to a secluded screened patio, two walkin closets and luxurious master bath. The fenced backyard features a sparkling pool, outdoor shower and open patio. Walk or ride bikes down Park Avenue to the shopping district, great restaurants or Central Park! Hosted by: Debbie Olson Sunday, December 2nd, 2-5 PM 1235 Preserve Point, Winter Park FL 32789 5 BR | 4.5 BA | 4,398 SF | $1,325,000 Brand new custom home in Windsong! The lovely open floor plan offers a formal dining room, beautiful great room with a wall of glass doors that open to a covered lanai, and a spacious gourmet kitchen with a large marble island, a six burner gas range, walk in pantry wine refrigera tor and breakfast nook! A luxurious sum mer kitchen and fireplace overlook the breath-taking pool. Hosted by: Kelly Price OBSERVER Open Houses 200 Carolina Avenue #302, Winter Park, FL 32789 sold by Gwyn Clark 804 Thistle Lane, Maitland, FL 32751 sold by Gwyn Clark 1609 Slash Pine Place, Oviedo, FL 32765 sold by Sherri Dyer 1600 Alabama Drive #301 sold by Pamela Ryan 530 Bryn Mawr Street, Orlando, FL 32804 sold by Jennifer King 728 W. Princeton Street sold by Jennifer King 3309 Australian Circle, Winter Park, FL 32792 sold by Catherine DAmico 3001 S. Atlantic Avenue #424, New Smyrna Beach, FL 32169 sold by Kelly Price OBSERVER Just Sold Homes EmployFlorida.com1-866-352-2345 Employ Florida is an equal opportunity program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. The Employ Florida telephone number may be reached by persons using TTY/TTD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711. Disponible en Espanol. JOB RESOURCES at EmployFlorida.com helped me nd a new job I enjoy earning higher pay than I did before I was laid off. You too can discover REAL RESULTS with Employ Florida. HIRED.RANDAL HAR DBOWER Industrial Electrician Green Circle Bio Energy Inc. 866-314-3769AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE Call 888-203-3179www. CenturaOnline.com Donate A Boat sponsored by boat angel outreach centers STOP CRIMES AGAINST CHILDREN www.boatangel.com2-Night Free Vacation!or Car Today! 800 1 CAR L ANGE KEEP UP WITH MAITLAND NEWS AND EVENTS!www.IndependenceLane.com Facebook.com/ItsMyMaitland Drivers Class A Flatbed, HOME EVERY WEEKEND! 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Must type at least 60 WPM accurately, proof read material and make corrections, cut out newspaper advertisements and paste them to affi davits. Ideal candidate will have strong computer software/hardware skills. Ex perience with the following is preferred: Quark, InDesign, FileMaker, Macs. Legal background a plus. For immediate con sideration, please email your resume to: employment@flalegals.com. Location: Orlando (near Universal Studios). Com pensation: Competitive hourly wage, will discuss at interview. Please, no phone calls about this job (emails only). Do not contact job poster about other services, products or commercial interests. HELP WANTED SUNDAY 1-4 UPDATED HOME IN QUIET NEIGHBORHOOD Orlando, 32804. 3BD/4BA, 3,875SF. Large expansive living areas with ame nities including wine fridge, stone-faced fireplace, breakfast room, plantation shutters, crown molding, wet bar and in side utility room. Master suite has office and remodeled bath with whirlpool tub. Large enclosed porch overlooks pond. $549,900 SUNDAY 1-4 POOL HOME ON WINTER PARK CUL-DE-SAC 2033 Cove Trail, Winter Park. 5BD/3.5BA, 2,807SF. Situated on a corner lot, this home is well maintained by original owner. Split plan, where one bedroom could function as office. Master suite has walk-in closet and private courtyard. Two wood burning fireplaces. Kitchen boasts island, wine fridge and desk. Screened pool, newer windows and re-plumbed. $449,000 Find I LUV Winter Park merchandise and local art at ILUVParkAvenue.com407-539-3977

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