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Winter Park-Maitland observer
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00236
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park FL
Publication Date: 10-25-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates: 28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID: UF00091444:00236

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Many people fear the effect Halloweens sugary treats will have on their weight and overall health. Page 18 Letters to the editor Lifestyles Maitland Police Departments newest patrol ofcer, and their only one with four legs, hits the ground running. Page 13 Calendar The Goldenrod Parade & Festival is Saturday morning while Cows n Cabs is Saturday evening in Winter Park. Page 12 Fashion coverage Find the latest fashion news and trends from Park Avenue and beyond in our new monthly section. Page 16 Winter Park Recovery Center Executive Drug & Alcohol Treatment Services Suboxone Maintenance For Opioid Abuse Naltrexone Extinction for Alcohol 2056 Aloma Ave, Suite 100, Winter Park, FL 32792 www.YourLifeRecovery.com 407-629-0413 CALL US TODAY FOR A COPY OF Your Guide to Social Security Bob@aSafeHarbor.com | ASafeHarbor.com(407) 644-6646 Learn more visit www.ss.vip2site.com When faced with stormy nancial waters, seek... Call us today for your guide to Social Security!404-644-6646 or visit www.ss.vip2site.com After more than a decade in the making, Mead Botanical Gar den now has a full-time steward with hopes of a thriving event center and revival of a nature preserve dancing in its directors head. Friends of Mead Garden, now called Mead Botanical Garden Inc. (MBG), had been working to revive the overgrown nature At Monday nights Winter Park City Commission meeting, it be the park, but the parks destiny as a combination preserve and MBGs hands. Its your park, MBG Execu tive Director Blydenburgh said. Its everybodys park. But for the next 50 years MBG of the parks visitor facilities, in cluding the under-construction Grove amphitheater thats ex pected to draw in thousands in the years to come. But the deal is by no means McMacken said, pointing out an opt-out clause that lets the city reevaluate its contract with MBG every six months. future issues about how residents are allowed to use the park dur ing special events or whether the park will be closed entirely. seat, Maitland Mayor Howard Schieferdecker decreed Monday the chair left empty on the dais fol lowing Phil Bonus resignation two weeks prior. Four former city leaders and the current chair of the Planning & Zoning Commission threw their ers, who served on Council from 2004 to 2012, went from former to present Council member Monday Hes the only one thats been here at all the Council meetings, Councilman Ivan Valdes said as he nominated Flowers for the seat. the seat needed to be up to speed on city issues, and Flowers was the ARCHIVE PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER The 13th annual Park Avenue Pet Costume Contest will be 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 28, at the Doggie Door/Unleashed. Please see FLOWERS on page 3 Haunts around town Friends group takes over Mead operations Replacing Councilman Flowers will serve until March election ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff SARAH WILSON Observer Staff Flowers back in power in Maitland RENDERING COURTESY OF MEAD BOTANICAL GARDEN The Grove at Mead Garden concert venue planned since 2010, will serve as a music performance hub for Winter Park and the 250 youths involved in orchestra programs. Please see MEAD on page 3 Turn to page 6 for a Halloween events calendar

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Page 2 reviews know that Im a classic meat and potatoes kinda guy, so you can imagine my stom ach rumbling at me as I walked through the doors of the nation ally acclaimed Ethos Vegan Kitchen. Now vegan is serious vegetarian, and this extraordi narily well-planned restaurant is no meat (duh), and no dairy, eggs, honey or any other animal derivatives. So in my best crusader atti tude I met with owner, manager and chef Kelly Shockley (hes totally vegan) and basically said, Lets check out that menu. And I am happy to report that Chef Kelly, while overseeing a daily menu that is 100 percent vegan, answered me by saying, thing. First, we want the food to taste good. We are a full-service restaurant and want to be com pared to other restaurants not Now I must say the menu reads like that of any ssshh (meat-serving) restaurant, so we started with an appetizer of Sausage Rolls and Black Bean soup. Hey wait a minute that spicy sausage baked inside a was explained to me that the sau sage which looks and tastes like any spicy Italian sausage was made from wheat gluten. Its all in the spices, said the chef, and I settled back in my seat a assignment may be easier than I thought. My dining partner and I went wiches, each of which included a meat analog, which is a plantbased food spiced to look and taurant favorite is the Whats the Dilly, Philly?, which looks and tastes like a Philly cheese steak. Remembering that spices play a big part here, its a great sand wich, and the meat is replaced by seitan (be careful with that spell ing). Chef Kelly explained that seitan is, pure wheat protein (with more protein than there is in a steak), and it was developed by Buddhist monks more than a thousand years ago. Awesome. Special of the Day, which turned out to be a real winner. tofu (made to look like sliced tur key) served with sauerkraut, soy cheese and a homemade Russian third sandwich was the Coconut Curry Wrap, which featured grilled tofu the most recogniz able of the lot along with celery, raisins, walnuts and coconut with a veganaise dressing. Pasta is, of course, a staple in a vegan restaurant and their Pump kin Seed Pesto Penne Pasta is for this foodie who says there is no such thing as too much pesto. Loved it along with the main dish of Pecan Crusted Eggplant, which can be real eggplant, because eggplant is a vegetable! My inquisitive nature, however, wanted to know about the deli cious gravy and mashed potatoes that accompanied said eggplant. Chef Kelly explained the gravy is and liquid aminos (a soy sauce alternative), which added won every bit as good as Grandmas turkey gravy. It should be noted that they do their own version of Shepherds Pie, Crab cakes and Orange Chicken as main dishes as well. With all these choices so deliciously prepared this is cross-over food that could turn a cowboy into a vegan. For dessert, we shared a deli cious chocolate amaretto mousse, the basis of which is silken tofu, and of course, cookies of all kinds that are generous in size and taste. Ethos Vegan Kitchen is a restau rant serving hearty, home-style the vegan research to the chef to worry about. All we have to do is wonderful food choice in Winter Park, and by eating there, we may be a little healthier than we would be by eating at some other home-style restaurant. moral nature of a person or insti tution, and the name rings true to this socially responsible and environmentally aware business. (407) 514-0087 3.05% Certain restrictions apply. Rates may vary depending on deposit amount. We broker CDs for FDIC insured banks. Promotional incentive may be included to obtain yield.w w w .oldhar bor f inancial .c om Old Harbor FINANCIAL12 Mon t h CDAlso oer IRA Specials & free 401k ReviewsAPYHigher Rates for Longer Term There are 3 convenient ways to vote in the November 6th General Election. Vote by mail with an absentee ballot Vote prior to Election Day at an Early Voting Center (Oct 27Nov 3) Vote on Election Day at your assigned Polling PlaceVoters will be mailed a sample ballot prior to the election. Pre-mark your ballot selections and use it as a guide on Election Day. The 2012 General Election ballot will be the longest in Orange County history so take time to prepare to cast your vote! Contact your Orange County Supervisor of Elections Ofce for more details or to request an absentee ballot. (407) 836-8683 www.orangecountyvotes.com Voting Made Easy! HALLOWEEN COSTUME CONTEST! Post your best Halloween costume photos on the Winter Park-Maitland Observer Facebook page for a chance to be published in the paper!PLEASE INCLUDE:rst name your city of residence description of the photoYou must reside in Winter Park, Maitland, Baldwin Park, College Park, or Goldenrod.The deadline to enter is noon Monday, Nov. 5. The deadline to enter is noon Monday, Nov. 5. Facebook.com/WPMObserver From the Corner Table Ethos Vegan Kitchen spices things up JOSH GARRICK Observer Staff PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER The Pecan Crusted Eggplant at Ethos came with delicious gravy and mashed potatoes. Ethos Vegan Kitchen moved from Orlando to Winter Park in July. They are open daily from 11 a.m. until 11 p.m., is family-owned and operated by Laina and Kelly Shockley. Located at 601-B S. New York Ave. in Winter Park, call 407-228-3898 or visit ethosvegankitchen.com Visit the Ethos food booth at VegFest 2012 at Orlando Festival Park on Saturday, Oct. 27. The festival celebrates all things vegetarian and includes food, live music, non-prot and retail vendor booths, food demonstrations, kids activities and more. Plus, enter to win one of three Ethos gift certicates in the VegFest rafe. Visit cfvegfest.com Wear your Halloween costume to Ethos on Wednesday, Oct. 31, and earn a free cookie for your guise. Theyll also be featuring $1 off beer and wine from 5 p.m. to close.

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Page 3 most well informed. Dale McDonald, chair of the Planning and Zoning Commis sion and also a regular at the meetings, was eliminated from the race after Schieferdecker re quested that the appointee not run for the seat in the March would give an unfair advantage, and McDonald has already an nounced his candidacy for Coun cil. Valdes appointment was sec onded by Councilwoman Linda Frosch and sealed by the mayor. Councilwoman Bev Repo nen said she was concerned that Flowers was already so busy as the director of the Performing Arts of Maitland that being on Council may put too much on his plate. She instead nominated former mayor Robert Breaux open to appointment, following former mayor Doug Kinsons this time his nomination was outvoted. I really do like them all, Schieferdecker said. I will vote for any of the four because they ple. But maybe someone else should have a turn. on the spot and took up the seat remainder of the meeting. Flow in and serve in the seat until the March election. Its time to help the Council through these couple of months and then send it on to the next, Flowers said. Flowers also serves as a mem ber of the citys Charter Review Commission, which presented suggestions to the Council this week following a special meet met to draft possible changes to the Charter regarding the citys power to remove Council mem spurred following the Council realizing it had no power to re ing the prostitution and DUI scandal that surrounded him earlier this month and led to his eventual resignation. Commission Chair Robert Gebaide presented possible revi sions to remedy this and other is sues, including adding driving toxication, theft, or prostitution to reasons a Council member will Commission also proposed the city drafting a standard code of would be held. all of the revisions suggested by the Commission, pending more discussion to be had at a special day, Oct. 29, at 6:30 p.m. in Coun cil Chambers. Any proposed revisions to the Charter must be approved by Council and sub mitted to the supervisor of elec tions by Jan. 25 so they can be placed on the March ballot. FLOWERS | City Council seeks power to remove members C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE Commissioner Carolyn Cooper said shed already heard from an gry residents during some of the parks few closures during the for special events, only netted the city $19,640 in revenue, Cooper said residents noticed the down time and feared future charges to get into the park. I think the people of the city need to be able to be in the park without paying a fee or walk through the park without paying a fee, Cooper said. But Mayor Ken Bradley said that groups should be allowed to special events, namely weddings. I dont think people having a wedding there want to have peo ple walking their dogs through it, Bradley said. Most of MBGs locus of control would be over the north side of the park, where most of the parks private events already occur. Its also where the waterfront Grove amphitheater will rise from the edge of wetland that had become overgrown in recent years. herits use of the maintenance barn and the parks dirigible-sized con verted lecture hall and classroom, the same place that once hung plans for Meads revival. And now the onus is on MBG to turn what had been a perpetual that hopes to break even or better vestment last year was $100,000 into construction, maintenance and other expenses. Eventually, McMacken said, the city hopes to not have to fund the park at all, once its pulling in enough visi tors and special events to pay for itself. admission charge such as what Leu Gardens in Orlando charges. admission, Blydenburgh said. Other gardens do, and some charge quite a bit. We want to get to that point where were able to increase the amount of money we can charge for certain events. All of the revenue the park generates will go back into fund ing the park. Only a maximum of 20 percent of revenue can be used toward administrative costs. Blydenburgh holds MBGs sole paid position for now. McMacken said that its a good especially if MBG eventually Were not losing money, Mc being reinvested back into Mead Garden. MEAD | Many say dont charge a fee C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE I dont think people having a wedding there want to have people walking their dogs through it. Mayor Ken Bradley ARCHIVE PHOTO BY KATIE KUSTURA THE OBSERVER Maitland City Councilman Jeff Flowers served from 2004 to 2012. He replaces Bonus.

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Page 4 Business Briefs Community Bulletin Michelin donates to Maitland Soccer Maitland Soccer Club has received $1,658 in donations and equipment from Maitland Tire Co. and Michelin North America. Over the last 12 years, the Michelin Soccer Program has do nated funds and equipment because of committed dealers such as Maitland Tire Co. Ballot background available online A customized sample ballot for every voter in Florida, accompanied by ex tensive information about the candi dates and issues that theyll be voting on is the latest feature of the League of Women Voters of Florida Education Funds nonpartisan online voter re source, BeReadyToVote.org. The web sites sample ballot tool provides infor mation about candidates professional, career and educational information, as well as nancial data about campaign contributions. Other items available on the site include written position statements, videos, answers to the Leagues candidate questionnaire and links to the candidates websites. Program serves 1,203 homeless Fifth Third Banks Summer of Dreams recently concluded the 10-week pro gram, which provided food, activities, mentoring, school supplies and nan cial counseling for parents in Orange, Seminole and Osceola counties. In total, 1,203 homeless students were served. Visit TheSummerofDreams. com New online way to see Central Florida history The University of Central Floridas new RICHES Mosaic Interface, an innova tive online project, taps into places, people and events that shaped the regions history using geography and time to display search results. Visit http://riches.cah.ucf.edu/mosaic.php Garden Club looking for members Orlando Garden Club has openings for new members men and women! If youre interested and want more in formation, call 407-645-0944 or visit orlandogardenclub.org/ Get your u shot Flu shots for children and adults are offered at the Orange County Health Departments Central Health Center at 832 W. Central Blvd., Monday through Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. on a rst-come, rst-served walk-in basis. The immunization program is closed the second Friday of each month. In Seminole County, u shots for children and adults are available at the Seminole County Health Departments Sanford location at 400 W. Airport Blvd. Monday through Friday 8 to 11:30 a.m. and from 1 to 4 p.m. The immunization clinic is only open from 8 to 11:30 a.m. on the second and fourth Thursday of each month. Flu shots are free for children up to 18 years of age. For information, visit orchd.com and SeminoleCoHealth. com Maitland in need of volunteers Maitland residents are invited to par ticipate in their city government. Vol unteers are needed to serve on various advisory boards. Those interested can apply online at ItsMyMaitland.com/of fers_volunteers.aspx or by contacting the City Clerk at mwaldrop@itsmymai tland.com Send submissions to jandreasson@ turnstilemediagroup.com The Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts event on Saturday, Sept. 22, recognized Chef Louis Perrotte as an Ami Spcial du Col lge (Special Friend of the College). The Rollins College Crummer Graduate School of Business has been recognized for the past four consecutive years as a top leadership development educator by Leadership Excellence magazine. For the 2012 ranking, Rollins was cited as 19th in the nation and the highest ranked in Florida. Will Graves has been appointed an adjunct instructor of Business Ethics at Columbia Colleges Orlando campus. In August, individual Amscot customers were asked to donate $1 to their local edu cation foundation. Amscot customers donated over $161,385 and was combined with Amscots match of $10,000 for a total of $171,385. The money was distributed among education foundations to sup port students, teachers and public schools in the counties where Amscot services. J. Jeffrey Deery, a shareholder attorney with Winderweedle, Haines, Ward and Woodman, has received mul tiple professional recognition nods in the past several months. He most recently was lauded as one of Orlando Home and Leisure maga zines top area lawyers. Easter Seals Florida, the Orlando-based non-prot organization that provides exceptional services to children, adults and veterans with disabilities and special needs, has a new member of its Central Florida Advisory Board. Kaleb Harrell, principal of Soapbox Marketing Group, joins as the nations oldest and largest voluntary health organization marks its 93rd year. The University of Central Florida Business Incu bation Program is celebrating its 13th anniversary in October. The job-generating program now has three Orlando facilities at the UCF campus, in Cen tral Florida Research Park and on State Road 50 near downtown, and locations in St. Cloud, Kissim mee, Sanford, Winter Springs, Leesburg, Daytona Beach and Apopka. Send submissions to jandreasson@ turnstilemediagroup.com Student empowers herself and others Izzy Hadala, 14, is on a mission to empower kids with physical differences. Since rst grade, Izzy has given a speech on the rst day of school every year to educate her classmates on her physical disability. Izzy was born with ectodermal dysplasia, or lobster claw syndrome, which halted the development of her teeth, hands and feet. Izzy, a Orangewood Christian School student, wrote the book, The First Day Speech, to help tell her story and empower others who look physically different. Izzy transformed her story into a picture book that follows a little boy named Nathan as he struggles to accept his physical difference, a cleft lip. See more of Izzys story here: http://bit.ly/TEbuCw The Voice in its third year Winter Park High School is home to the nations rst high school chap ter of the English-Speaking Union, an international organization devoted to advancing global understanding by providing educational opportunities through programs and scholarship for students, educators and members. Its goal is to promote communication and open exchange of ideas among the worlds speakers of English. ESU provides tutoring to ESOL students, sponsors writing contests and brings in guest lecturers. Pictured are found er and WPHS senior Sylvie Wise and Kenneth Curry Professor of Literature at Rollins College Maurice OSullivan at the Central Florida English-Speak ing Union dinner held at Maison de Jardin on Oct. 8. For more information about The Voice, the high school chapter of ESU, email Sylvie Wise at Wise. Sylvie@gmail.com Manners moms book published Manners That Matter for Moms, published by Harvest House, was released nation wide on Oct. 1. The launch party was held at Tollas Ital ian Restaurant in Winter Park with author and Winter Park resident Maralee McKee and her family. For more than 10 years, Maralees mentoring and manners programs have been featured nationwide. She has traveled nation ally presenting contemporary etiquette programs for large corporations, universities, womens groups and ministry organizations. Her fun etiquette classes for children gained national media attention and were featured on NBC news. In her new book Manners That Matter for Moms, Maralee gets to the heart of why etiquette is important in todays fast-paced society. Visit www.mannersmentor.com

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Page 5 KEEP UP WITH MAITLAND NEWS AND EVENTS!www.IndependenceLane.com Facebook.com/ItsMyMaitland Wildcats come home Artists converge in Central Park PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Models graced the runway at the annual Harrietts Park Avenue Fashion Week runway show on Saturday, Oct. 20. The show included looks from the Emerging Designers contest that honored the city of Winter Parks 125th anniversary, s uch as top left Above, is a Cur rent model. Middle is a The Collection Bridal model. Top right is a Lilly Pulitzer model. PHOTOS BY REBECCA MALES Fred Hoffman, left, artist of Eggstraordinary Eggs, demonstrates the drill he uses to carve and sculpt eggshells at the Winter Park Autumn Art Festival on Oct. 13. Peggy Miller, top right, artist for Pegs Jewels, shows sample pieces of woven silver to her patrons. Meagan Ward, above right, feels a scarf from Fiberlicious. The Winter Park festival, in its 39th year, awarded more than $16,000 to Florida artists. PHOTOS BY CLYDE MOORE THE OBSERVER Winter Park High School celebrated its homecoming with a parade on Wednesday, Oct. 17, down Park Avenue in Winter Park. Fashion to the forefront

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Page 6 OCT. 25 The Harvest Hustle 5K: Race to End Childhood Hunger will take place in Bald win Park on Thursday, Oct. 25, at 6:30 p.m. Visit www.run4acause.org/jlgo OCT. 26 Halloween Spirit Stroll a costumed pub-crawl through Baldwin Parks Village Center, will be from 7 p.m. to midnight on Friday, Oct. 26. Visit http://bit.ly/Uos0KN The Breakthrough Theatre of Winter Park presents The Twilight Zone from Oct. 26 though Nov. 5. For reservations, call 407-920-4034. Winter Park Cheer Athletics Gyms Haunted House is 8 p.m. to 11 a.m. Oct. 26 and 27 at 6870 Stapoint Court, Winter Park. Call 321-972-6945. OCT. 27 The annual Halloween 5k Run/Walk to benet Haiti will take place on Saturday, Oct. 27, at 7:30 a.m. at Mead Gardens in Winter Park. Visit StMargaretMary.org/ halloween5k.html A Childrens Not So Spooky Tales and Masquerade Ball will be held at the Maitland Public Library on Saturday, Oct. 27, from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. The next wine dinner at SoNapa Grille in Maitland will be Saturday, Oct. 27, at 6:30 p.m. and will have a Halloween theme. Its $60 per person. Call 407637-2933. OCT. 28 Kids Halloween Party: Movies, Cos tumes, and Pizza is Sunday, Oct. 28, at 11 a.m. at Enzian Theater in Maitland. Tickets range from $5 to $15. Visit www. enzian.org The Fall Festiva l in Baldwin Park will be Sunday, Oct. 28, from 6 to 8 p.m. in the North Park Baptist Church parking lot at 2047 Prospect Ave. ONGOING Operation Gratitude collects candy and gifts for American servicemen and women. Drop off candy and letters of appreciation at the following locations: Fire Station 61, 343 W. Canton Ave.; Fire Station 62, 300 S. Lakemont Ave.; Fire Station 64, 1439 Howell Branch Road; Winter Park City Hall, 401 S. Park Ave.; The Winter Park Public Library, 460 E. New England Ave. Call 407-454-0878, e-mail opgratitudeorlando@gmail.com or visit operationgratitude.com Enzian Theatre will be showing Hallow een movies throughout October. Each presentation is $8 general admission and $5 for Enzian Film Society members. The lms include: V/H/S (new release), midnight, Friday, Oct. 26 and Saturday, Oct. 27; Theatre of Blood (1973), 9:30 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 30; Poltergeist (1982), 8 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 31. Visit www.wpmobserver.com/ events/search for more details. Send submissions to jandreasson@ turnstilemediagroup.com Halloween Calendar Happy Hour for Hunger Help us ght hunger in Central Florida! ursday, November 8 5:30 7:30 p.m. at Winter Park Village Tickets: $20 Reserve at winterpark.org Proceeds to benet Event Partners Aloma United Methodist Church Condev Custom Homes Greater Orlando Actors Theatre Holler Hyundai Menchie's Frozen Yogurt at Winter Park Corners Menchie's Frozen Yogurt at Winter Park Village Madeline Moran Sally Ward Interior Design Tsunami Custom Printing UCF Athletics Association, Inc. Unleashing Performance, Inc. All About Travel Arrow Pavement Services, Inc. BARR Financial Services, LLC Big Brothers, Big Sisters of Central Florida Joan Cross International Association of Administrative Professionals J.P. Associates, Inc. Jewett Orthopaedic Convenient Care Center Gerry Marino Seniors First, Inc. Sheraton Orlando North The Ravenous Pig AFLAC Sutton Homes Alzheimer ALF United Legacy Bank EPOCH PROPERTIES, INC. Erik C. Larsen, P.A. Greenberg Traurig Majestic Jewelers, Inc. Victory Martial Arts Goodwill Industries of Central Florida Maile Image, Modeling & Acting Walker & Company Lombardi's Marketplace, LLC HAUNTS AROUND TOWN Visit wpmobserver.com for our full Halloween events calendar. OCT. 27: Carnival Halloween Carnival at Eden Bar is Saturday, Oct. 27, from 8 p.m. to 2 a.m. Its free for ages 21 and older. OCT. 28: Costume Contest The 13th annual Park Avenue Pet Costume Contest will be 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 28, at the Doggie Door/Unleashed, 329 N. Park Ave. Visit the DoggieDoor.com OCT. 31: Pumpkins & Munchkins Pumpkins & Munchkins is Wednesday, Oct. 31, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., in Shady Park, adjacent to the Winter Park Community Cen ter. Call 407-599-3275. OCT. 27: Trick or Treat on Park Kids Trick or Treat on Park Avenue is 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Oct. 27 at participating Park Avenue stores.

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Page 7 to make this one memorable Sat may not meet again. Its been 10 games since the 2002, and in that time theyve traded winning streaks, with the Knights winning the last seven. In the meantime they had an un easy relationship as the Knights pursued bigger teams as their USF Bulls, who own a 4-0 record against the Knights. shot at the Bulls in 2013, but as Conference USA, theyre taking a 35-17 thrashing of Memphis (1-6, 1-2) on the road, with a resurgent Latavius Murray carrying the yardage himself, with 192 yards on the ground. At the same time quarter back Blake Bortles was stymied by Memphis defense, throwing for only 122 yards in the game. UCFs defense helped out in the Bouye snagging a third quarter interception and returning it 32 yards. In the fourth, Bouye did it again, picking up a Memphis fumble and racing 79 yards for the touchdown that would be the deciding score of the game. against Marshall. Despite the Herds seemingly middling re cord, they boast the seasons nation in Rakeem Cato, who av erages more than 375 yards per game in the air. Couple that with Marshalls 59-24 blowout over Southern Miss on Oct. 20 and the Herd is on a roll this season. UCF also has one of the top ranked defenses in the confer ence, adept at stopping oppo nents near the red zone. What could be crucial is stopping big plays by Marshall. In this game the best team at stopping scor ing in the air, UCF, will be play ing the best at making it happen, Marshall. the Knights will have an auto matic bowl bid to take away the sting of last seasons many nar row losses. With a record and onthe 2010 season, the Knights are on pace for one of their greatest seasons of all time. W.Va., at 8 p.m. Saturday night, televised on the CBS Sports Net work. but Winter Park (2-5) struck back again and again in their 27-7 win Oct. 18. Now the Wildcats are looking for gridiron redemption after a midseason skid that lasted four losses. And they may be looking for more support from quarterback Asiantii Woulards right arm after his performance against the Fal cons. Woulard would deliver with 251 yards in the air, including three touchdown passes to lead his team to victory. Gabe McClary raced 69 yards after a reception to take the lead over East River in the second quarter, and the Wildcats didnt look back. since Sept. 7, when they beat Edgewater 26-13 in their only oth er win of the season. team (2-6) thats still struggling to season and have since gone on a six-game skid, including a 63-20 Oct. 18. two games than they had all sea Edgewater Quarterback J.B. Woodman threw for one of the greatest games of his career, but it wasnt enough for Edgewater (2-5) to edge out the Oviedo Lions (6-1), who won by the margin of a sin gle missed extra point, 20-19, on Oct. 18. tually narrowing the gap thanks to Woodmans 205 yards passing game, and hooked up with Keith Dilley for another 45 in the air. Da vid Greens rushing touchdown made it close, but several missed goal line scoring attempts and a Eagles chances. 28 win over West Orange, their narrowest win so far this season. ARCHIVE PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Running back Latavius Murray carried the majority of UCFs total yardage himself against Memphis. Now the Knights are gearing up for their nal matchup with Marshall. Cats break losing streak ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff Knights end a rivalry ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff WINTER PARK Next game vs. Colonial Grenadiers at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 25 EDGEWATER Next game vs. Apopka Blue Darters at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 25

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Page 8 As a Rollins College senior and resident of Winter Park, its hard not to notice the symbiotic relationship between the Winter Park community and the school extending from the west side of campus, means Rollins students at least a sidewalk, if not more, with Winter Park residents. Park Avenue, the heart of downtown Winter Park, runs directly into our campus. Naturally, boundary lines tend to blur. er and Rollins weekly student nating in this monthly column. spur, I work to ensure students are informed about the goings-on of Rollins; it only makes sense to do the same for members of the larger community that houses us. Maintaining this awareness includes presenting information about events, particularly as Rol lins has recently acted as a venue as Jane Goodall and President Barack Obama, providing rare and unique experiences to those in attendance. on reporting news and happen ings around campus, but also on providing an outlet for students to voice opinions and interact with one another. As a student publication, we welcome a wide variety of ideas and understand the importance of sustaining dis course and maintaining relation ships within a community. Park should have every oppor tunity to engage with members of Rollins on a regular basis, and facilitate those opportunities by er about the many Rollins events that are open to the public and free of charge. Halloween Howl Halloween Howl, a safe, daytime Halloween celebration, will be Saturday, Oct. 27, on Mills Lawn from 2 to 5 p.m. First Friday at the Cornell seum, located on campus, hosts various events throughout the year that should be taken advan tage of by students and commu nity members alike. Among these is First Friday at the Cornell, providing later hours and free admission on Nov. 2, from 4 to welcoming Dr. Ena Hellers lec ture, Reading the Bible Aestheti cally, on Nov. 8, from 7 to 7:30 p.m. Honorable Melanne Verveer Ambassador-at-Large for Global Womens Issues, will discuss her part in the advancement of roles of women in economic and politi cal processes around the world through integration into foreign policy, as well as the larger issue to Do: Advancing Women and Girls around the World, at Knowles Memorial Chapel on Monday, Oct. 29, at 7 p.m. Martin Luther King III Also taking place at Knowles Memorial Chapel, as part of the Winter Park Institute, Martin Lu ther King III will speak about his humanitarian work and equality Civil Rights Struggles of the 21st Century, on Nov. 15, from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. I look forward to seeing read events in the future. More infor mation is available at thesand spur.org and rollins.edu, and I can be reached at chief@thesand spur.org Hana Saker is the editor of The Sandspur Floridas oldest college newspaper and a senior at Rollins College. 250 North Orlando Avenue Winter Park, Florida 32789407.677.9777FEATURING ...... AND MUCH MORE! A Premier Flooring Source Wood Floors Savannah Court and CoeExcellence in Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation 1301 W. Maitland Blvd. Maitland, FL 32751407-645-3990www.SavannahCourtMaitland.comAssisted Living Facility License No. 8447 Skilled Nursing Facility License No. 1635096 At Savannah, it feels just like home. Its safe, convenient and the food is excellent. And of course, my mom is a huge fan of Bingo! Ernestine & her daughter PatriciaAssisted Living Rehabilitation and Skilled Nursing Care Variety of Apartment Suite Selections, some with Lake Views Restaurant Style Dining Laundry, Housekeeping, Maintenance Services Transportation to Outings and Medical Appointments Beautifully Landscaped Courtyard Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above. You are always welcome! A Senior Living Community where Hospitality is a Way of Life. IN THEATERS NOVEMBER 2!Paramount.com/flightTickets are available while supplies last. Seating is NOT guaranteed and is on a rst-come, rst-served basis. Theater is overbooked to ensure a full house. YOU AND A GUEST ARE INVITED TO ATTEND THE ADVANCE SCREENING OF For your chance to receive an advance screening pass for two go to WWW.GOFOBO.COM/RSVP and enter the code: WPMOT01H A B CNAME THAT PILOT!Email FLIGHTGiveaway @Gmail.com with the names of the actors who played these pilots and in which movie! Winner will receive First Class seats at the advance screening! Hana Saker The Rollins Report Fostering our relationships Martin Luther King III Melanne Verveer Plan your weekend with The Weekender! This weekly newsletter keeps you up to date on events happening in Central Florida's cities, including Winter Park, Maitland, Oviedo, Winter Springs, Avalon Park and Waterford Lakes. Visit wpmobserver.com and click "Subscribe to Newsletter"

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Page 9 It is hard to believe that fall is already upon us. Our city has been busy during the last month, and there are many things to look forward to during the remaining months of the year. With the arrival of fall comes cooler weather, fall festivals, foot ball games, and of course Hallow een! The city of Maitland is again making safety a top priority dur ing this evenings hours of Hal loween trick or treating. Parents and drivers are reminded to be extra cautious on Halloween when children will be dressed in their costumes and running from house to house looking for those special treats. The Maitland Police Depart ment is actively involved with our citys families each and every Hal loween. The Police Department will have a full complement of po lice cruisers out during the trick or treat hours from 6 to 9 p.m. to add an additional safety presence across all neighborhoods in the city. Continuing their yearly tradi be busy handing out glow sticks for the kids in our neighborhoods. Not only do the kids love them, but they are a great safety feature for kids walking in the neighbor hoods. We would urge anyone who is planning on going out trick or treating this Halloween to stay safe. Listed below are some safety tips to help make your Halloween more enjoyable and safe!! Halloween safety tips: trick-or-treating alone. Be sure older children take a friend, and that a trusted adult accompanies small children. small children to the door of every home they approach. ians are familiar with every home and all people from which the children receive treats. tioned that they should not enter any home without prior permis sion from their parents or guard ians. not to approach any vehicle, occu pied or not, unless they know the owner and are accompanied by a parent or guardian. glow stick when out at dusk and costumes and bags to help drivers see you. make sure children are able to see and breathe properly and easily. All costumes and masks should tant. to never approach a home not well lit without a porch or outside light on. treats. Avoid eating homemade treats unless you know the cook well. tioned to remember any suspi cious incidents and report them to their parents, guardians, and/or Sgt. Louis Grindle Maitland Police Department Special Operations / Community Policing Have a safe and fun Halloween! City Council Meeting of Oct. 22 The Maitland City Council met on Oct. 22, at 6:30 p.m. in the City Hall Council Chambers. Below is a synopsis of that meeting. Special Presentations: Mayor Schieferdecker pre with a Retirement Resolution in appreciation of his 25 years of faithful and devoted service to the city as a member of the Fire Res cue Department and wished him continued good health and pros perity during his retirement years. Consent: utes of Sept. 24, 2012 and received several Advisory Board Minutes. terlocal Agreement with Orange County for the purpose of fund ing and contributing to the Or ange County Watershed Atlas Project. Decisions: velopment Director, was appoint ed Member and Mayor Schiefer decker, Alternate Member to the South Seminole & North Orange County Wastewater Transmission Authority. the Pension Review Committee ter Review Commissions report was tabled and will be discussed again at a special Council Meeting scheduled for Oct. 29. submitted by City Consultants, cepted as presented. Dan Bellows to separate impact fees from an existing develop ment (Gem Lake Apartment) and make them available on the open market was tabled until the Nov. 12 Council meeting. cancy created by the resignation of Councilman Phil Bonus. To listen to a recording of the meeting, visit itsmymaitland.com Oct. 22 City Commission meeting highlights There was a City Commission meeting Oct. 22. Below are a few highlights of decisions made: Mayors Report ed declaring the week of Oct. 27 as the Week of the Family awarding Gary Olson the 2012 Award Consent Agenda approved. purchase software that improves ance and payment processes was approved. Inc. was approved as Insurance Agent of Record. cancelation of the City Commis sion meeting Monday, Dec. 24, was approved. Action Items Requiring Discussion lease and operational agreement was approved with amendments. rected to broaden the scope of the project. Public Hearings and terminating the development Swoope Ave. was approved. lard Properties Inc. regarding the properties at 407 and 409 St. An drews Blvd. was withdrawn by the applicant. dinances related 901 and 911 N. Orlando Ave. for WaWa were ap proved. A full copy of the Oct. 22 City Commission minutes will be available at cityofwinterpark.org the week of Nov. 12, pending ap proval by the City Commission. New re apparatus dedication ceremony On Friday, Oct. 26, at 3 p.m., the Winter Park Fire-Rescue De partment will hold a traditional dedication ceremony formally ac cepting into service the agencys ment. This ceremony will take place at Fire Station 61 located at 343 W. Canton Ave. More than a year ago, the de partment initiated discussions that led to a change in the type of aerial apparatus it would pur chase to replace the existing unit. Seeing an opportunity to improve the department the following ef the citys narrow streets and turns ate, storage space the rear allows for the consolida ment onto one unit bines the technology of today with the proven maneuverability of tiller-driven trucks. The new tractor-drawn aerial truck repre sents the return of an apparatus style that is seeing resurgence around the country. Winter Park joins other Florida cities such as Tampa, Jacksonville and Clearwa ter, which have recently returned these maneuverable units to their The dedication ceremony will include a tour of the unit, driving demonstration and will conclude with the traditional push back of the unit into service. For more information, please call 407-599Early voting at the library The Winter Park Public Library Ave. is a site for early voting for Orange County residents only will run from Saturday, Oct. 27, visit the Orange County Supervi ballots and other voting matters. extra patient and courteous in the library parking lot. Trick or Treat on Park Avenue Kids in costume can trick or treat at participating stores along Park Avenue Saturday, Oct. 27, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. This free event is presented by the Park Av enue Merchants Association. Pumpkins & Munchkins in Shady Park The Parks & Recreation De partment of the City of Winter Park will present Pumpkins & Munchkins in Shady Park on Wednesday, Oct. 31, from 6:30 to Park Community Center at 721 W. Munchkins of all ages are in vited to attend this free familyties will include games, bounce houses, a costume contest, Trickor-Treat Trail and safe Halloween fun for everyone. If inclement weather tries to dampen the eve ning, the event will be moved into the Winter Park Community Cen ter gymnasium. For more information regard ing Pumpkins & Munchkins in Shady Park, please call 407-5993275. Second annual Veterans Day Celebration On Friday, Nov. 9, at 10 a.m., the city of Winter Park will pres Day Celebration. This event will be held in honor of all of the vet erans of Winter Park at the Winter Park Community Center Ruby Ball Amphitheater located at 721 Beginning at 9:30 a.m., the Band will be entertaining guests as they visit with organizations begin with musical tributes, anec dotal speakers and recognition of veterans according to the various military branches and campaigns served. For more information, please Operation Gratitude remembers soldiers The Winter Park Fire-Rescue Department (WPFD) is once again supporting Operation Grati tude, a program designed to col lect candy and gifts for American service men and women who are currently deployed in the remote regions of Afghanistan and other hostile regions of the world. Residents of the community and letters of appreciation be tween now and Saturday, Nov. 10, to one of the following Winter Park locations: Ave. Ave. Branch Road Items will also be collected at Celebration Friday, Nov. 9, at 10 a.m. at the Winter Park Commu nity Center Ruby Ball Amphithe land Ave. For more information regard ing Operation Gratitude, please tudeorlando@gmail.com or visit operationgratitude.com Visit the citys ofcial website at cityofwinterpark.org, like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and watch us on Vimeo. Winter Park City Talk BY RANDY KNIGHT CITY MANAGER Maitland City Talk BY HOWARD SCHIEFERDECKER MAYOR Halloween fun and safety PHOTO BY STEVEN BARNHART THE OBSERVER Center for Independent Living held the Stroll N Roll event around Lake Baldwin on Oct. 13. Rolling for a cause

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Page 10 9 am to 4 pm Saturday, November 10, 2012 Historic Lawton House & Lawton Elementary Downtown Oviedo, FL (Free Parking at Oviedo High School) SPONSORED BY: www.GreatDayOviedo.org Visit our Festival Website FREE ADMISSION FREE PARKING FREE SHUTTLE PRESENTING SPONSORThis festival is a scholarships and grants for 39th Annual Arts & Crafts Festival GREAT DAY IN THE COUNTRY fundraiser to help provide local schools & charities G reat Day in the Country is a huge family-oriented Arts & Crafts event hosted by the GFWC Oviedo Womans Club. We have over 350 Arts & Crafts Booths, Business Booths, and Community Service Booths. throughout the day on 2 stages. We also have a special childrens play area and lots of food & drinks. The event is located on the grounds Graham Avenue, Oviedo, FL 32765. If you go to the intersection of Lake Jessup Avenue and Broadway (also known as S.R. 426 and Aloma), its impossible to miss it. Oviedo High School, and you can from the show. Shuttle Bus Details: The free shuttle bus will run continuously from 9 to 4, but if youd like to walk, the high school is close enough to get to Great Day by foot. The bus picks up from the street that (King Street, look for a big sign). The bus drops/picks up at Great Day on the bus ramp of Lawton cafeteria near ArtFest). It usually circuit once every 20 minutes. The shuttle bus has room to stash strollers and wheelchairs for the ride, and it is air conditioned. privately owned) locations around at rates usually ranging from $5 to local civic groups or charities and signage indicating the rate and the cause. FORECLOSURE DEFENSECERTIFIED FLORIDA SPECIFICFORECLOSURE PREVENTION COUNSELORTim MoranAttorney at Law407-366-TLAW(8529)Fax: 407-366-8528 WILLSCONSUMER BANKRUPTCYTRUSTSCONTRACTSGUARDIAN ADVOCACYPROBATEGARNISHMENTSSHORT SALES Initial Consultation FREE THE LAW O FFICE OFM T M T M T T T T T M T M M TIMOTHY A. MORAN, LLC FORECLOSURE DEFENSECERTIFIED FLORIDA SPECIFICFORECLOSURE PREVENTION COUNSELORTim MoranAttorney at Law407-366-TLAW(8529)Fax: 407-366-8528 WILLSTRUSTSCONTRACTSBANKRUPTCY Initial Consultation FREE LANDLORD/TENANT

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Page 11 are all local acts. They are competing for prizes: $500; $300; $100 O p e n t o a l l a g e s & a c t s T h i n k y o u h a v e w h a t i t t a k e s t o w i n t h e g r a n d p r i z e ? Auditions being held at Oviedo High School Auditorium, 601 King Street, Oviedo, FL Saturday, September 15, 2012 from 9 am to 6 p.m. Go to www.GreatDayOviedo.org for contest details and to download the entry and consent forms. If you have any questions or to submit all forms please email: entertainment@GreatDayOviedo.org As cars speed by on Broadway Street, Oviedo resident Courtney Wright carefully helps a woman carry a box of T-shirts across the busy road. Wright is used to helping cus Helps, a thrift store and food pan try for the needy or homeless. The next day, shell mark her fourth anniversary with the charity. Though she has a passion for helping the homeless and less timately wants to help people in the operating room, to go to medi cal school and be a cardiovascular struggles, Wright is now a fresh man at Seminole State College, ago seemed out of reach. Charities, schools and students looking for scholarships continue thanks to funds raised from the Great Day in the Country Arts and Crafts Festival, an event put on by the General Federation of Womens Clubs (GFWC) Oviedo Womans Club. Saturday, Nov. 10, will mark the 39th annual installment of the festival, a gathering that of fers Oviedo not only a free juried art show, but a fundraiser for the community. Finishing up her last year at Oviedo High School, Wright ap plied for a scholarship from the GFWC Oviedo Womans Club in last February and was informed in April that she had won $3,000 I was very happy to get it. Its been very helpful with the books and everything; I didnt realize how expensive it would total out to be, Wright said. I was very happy to win. Great Day in the Country Chairwoman Angela Iversen said that it was Wrights 700 hours of community service that earned her the scholarship. The award is an example of how the club has put an emphasis on funding edu cation with money earned from the arts and crafts festival. We take it very seriously about handing out the money, Iversen said. We want to make its doing. in the Country raised last year, $15,600 went to scholarships and $10,225 went to nine local schools in need. toward four new iPads for its reading coach. Additionally funded by Ovie do attorney Tim Moran, the iPads are used for communication and reinforcing handwriting and sen tence structure skills. berg applied for the grant last year and was thrilled to have been chosen for the funding. I cant thank them enough, because I would not have had the opportunity to have had an iPad in my classroom, Chellberg said. Because the world is technology need that exposure and to have that experience. Chellberg said the clubs out reach to the community does a lot of good. I have always heard about Great Day in the Country and knew that they did a fundraiser, but I was not aware until I actu ally applied for the grant of all the fabulous things they do and the many organizations that they help, Chellberg said. The Great Day in the Country Arts and Crafts festival taking place this November will be a installment nearly 40 years ago. The festival originally had a doz en booths and raised $500, which The festival now has about 400 booths, including vendors, spon sors and 350 juried artists and crafters, who will be competing for $4,000 in prize money. This years festival will also in troduce a brand new talent show called Great Days Got Talent, for a $500 grand prize and addi tional featured acts will perform. With $4,290 going to charities such as Shepherds Hope, The Great Day in the Country con tinues to be source of culture and hope, Iverson said. There are so many good things in Oviedo, but we feel like making both a contribution going to make our community a better place to live, Iversen said. of life for those who live here be cause youre only as strong as the weakest citizen in your area. We feel that we need to make every body as strong as possible. Oviedo Womans Club gives back to the community through scholarships, grants TIM FREED The Observer The 39th annual Great Day in the Country Arts and Crafts Festival will take place from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 10, at Lawton Elementary School in Oviedo. Admission is free and free parking is available at Oviedo High School. PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Oviedo Womans Club members, from left, Lauratta Tice, Angela Iversen, Leslie Freeman, and Roberta McQueen pose outside the Clubs headquarters in Oviedo. The group has raised and donated thousands of dollars in scholarship money to aspiring local college students. Morgan Gumble Grace Smith & Malavika Kannan Megan Katarina Shannon Broome & Kyle Broome Marlee Piercey Jenna Crouch

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Page 12 Calendar OCTOBER Flemings Prime Steakhouse & Wine Bars latest Cocktail for a Cause is the Sweet Charity. For the entire month of October, sales of Sweet Charity will be donated to The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. The cocktail will be on Flemings for $6 til 7 bar menu and available after 7 p.m. for $9.95. OCT. 25 On Thursday, Oct. 25, at 11:30 a.m., the Maitland Chamber will host a luncheon featuring Bill Donegan Orange County property appraiser. Donegan will discuss how property appraisal can impact busi nesses and the citys tax base. For infor mation or to reserve a spot, email Jlee@ Maitlandchamber.com. The price per person is $25. The event will be held at Sheraton Orlando North. On Thursday, Oct. 25, the Maitland Senior Center will host its rst health fair from noon to 3 p.m. Check out new trends and speak with health care professionals, housing specialists, area service provid ers, Medicare advantage plan providers, home care providers and hearing special ists. The event is free, with free health and hearing screenings. The Maitland Fire Department will also be offering u shots. The Winter Park Playhouse Spotlight Cab aret Series presents Chris Leavy in They Dont Write Em Like That Anymore on Oct. 25 at 7:30 pm. Tickets are $20 or standing room for $10. Seating is limited to 54, so advance reservations are rec ommended. To purchase tickets, call the box ofce at 407-645-0145. For informa tion, visit WinterParkPlayHouse.org On Thursday, Oct. 25, the Winter Park Public Library will host a star panel of chefs and cookbook authors at Books and Cooks, a culinary-themed celebra tion of literature. This ticketed event will take place from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Rachel D. Murrah Civic Center. The $10 ticket includes admission; choice of a glass of wine, beer or a cocktail; and gourmet caramel popcorn from The Ravenous Pig. For tickets visit wppl.org OCT. 27 The Winter Park Food Truck Fiesta Winter Park Style will be at Fleet Peeples Park on Saturday, Oct. 27, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Food Truck Crazy will feature 10 of Central Floridas nest gourmet food trucks. There will also be light music and childrens entertainment. Proceeds will benet Winter Park charities. For informa tion, call 407-296-5882. The opening program of the 2012 Bach Festival Society Choral Masterworks series presents music by six contempo rary composers in two performances by the renowned Bach Festival Choir and Or chestra. The two performances will take place at Knowles Memorial Chapel at Rollins College, but with the pre-concert talks in the music building at Rollins. The rst concert will be Saturday, Oct. 27, at 8 p.m. with the pre-concert talk starting at 6:15 p.m. The second concert will be Sunday, Oct. 28, at 3 p.m. with the preconcert talk starting at 1:45 p.m. Tickets range from $25 to $55. For tickets or in formation visit BachFestivalFlorida.org or call 407-646-2182. Join the Winter Park Breakfast Rotary, the Winter Park Police Department and Shred Pros for Shredfest 2012 beneting The Rotary Foundation and Arts in Action. Destroy old documents and enjoy food, crafts, a rafe and community vendors. Its Saturday, Oct. 27, from noon to 3 p.m. at the Winter Park Police Department. Requested donation for unlimited boxes is $5 for individuals and families, $20 for companies. For information, contact 407588-1147 or cdygan@thegrove.org OCT. 28 The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens will celebrate Czech Indepen dence Day on Oct. 28 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. All visitors to the museum will be admitted free of charge. Free bagel breakfast, live entertainment, giveaways and prizes will be enjoyed at the Jewish Pavilions Party in the Park on Sunday, Oct. 28, at 9:30 a.m. at the Plaza at Cranes Roost Park in Altamonte Springs. Proceeds benet the Jewish Pavilion. For information, visit jewishpa vilion.org OCT. 29 Melanne Verveer U.S. Ambassador-atLarge for Global Womens Issues, will be at Rollins College Knowles Memorial Cha pel on Monday, Oct. 29, at 7 p.m. Her free talk will be about The SMART Thing To Do: Advancing Women and Girls around the World. RedCarpetMonday will have a busi ness networking event on Monday, Oct. 29, from 6 to 9 p.m. at Galopin. Meet and mingle with fellow business own ers, professionals and entrepreneurs while enjoying appetizers, drink and rafe prizes. Tickets are $20 online and $25 at the door. Visit RedCarpetMonday.com and select Orlando. OCT. 31 The Winter Park Garden Club will have a class on line design at 10 a.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 31. Materials will not be provided, and the cost is $10. Registration is required by Oct. 29, and can be done by calling 407-644-5770. NOV. 1 The Orange County Retired Educa tors Association will meet Thursday, Nov. 1, at 10 a.m., at College Park United Methodist Church, 644 W. Princeton St., Orlando, for a program on Lifes a Trip Tours with Barbara Mills. Visit ocrea-.org or call 407-677-0446. Anyone who has worked in education is invited to join. NOV. 2 The 19th Annual Caregiver Conference Another Part of the Puzzle Tack ling Difcult Challenges Caregivers Encounter by the Alzheimers and De mentia Resource Center will be Friday, Nov. 2, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Florida Hospital Church. Registration will begin at 8 a.m. The registration fee is $25 and $10 for additional family members. For infor mation email cindi@ADRCCares.org or call 407-843-1910 extension 301. NOV. 3 Winter Park Methodist Churchs Rum mage Sale is Saturday, Nov. 3, from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. The proceeds will support student mission trips. The sale will be at the corner of East Morse Boulevard and South Knowles Avenue. For information, visit FUMCWP.org North Park Baptist Churchs Women on Mission Outreach Ministry For Military Veterans will gather from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, Nov. 3, to make Christmas Angel meal-tray favors for veterans liv ing at the VA Community Living Center in Lake Baldwin. Bring glue guns and scis sors to create small ornaments for vet erans. For information, contact 321-9725900, npbc@northparkbaptist.org or visit NorthParkBaptist.org There will be an antique show and sale on Saturday, Nov. 3, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday, Nov. 4, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Womans Club of Winter Park, 419 S. Interlachen Ave. Orlando Garden Clubs Annual Holiday Market will be Saturday, Nov. 3, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at 710 E. Rollins St. Parking and admission are free, and lunch and re freshments will be available for purchase. For information call 407-299-5412. Party like a caveman at the Orlando Sci ence Centers sixth annual Neanderthal Ball on Saturday, Nov. 3, from 7 to 11 p.m. For information, call 407-514-2233 or visit osc.org NOV. 4 The Central Florida Watercolor Society will hold its meeting on Sunday, Nov. 4, at 1:30 p.m. at the Maitland Art Center. A short business meeting will be followed with a watercolor demonstration. The demonstration is open to the public, but there will be a $10 fee for non-members to attend, due to limited space availability. Call 407-415-0594. Dena Wild, Florida Master Gardener, will lead a free presentation on Herbs for the Holidays on Sunday, Nov. 4, at 2 p.m. The Orlando Area Historical Rose So ciety meets at Harry P. Leu Gardens. For information, call 407-647-1219. Visit www.wpmobserver.com/ events/search for more details. Send submissions to jandreasson@ turnstilemediagroup.com OCT. 27: Cows n Cabs The Winter Park Food and Wine Classics Cows n Cabs is Saturday, Oct. 27, from 7 to 10 p.m. in the West Meadow. The event will have a foodand-wine walk around with gourmet fare and wine and craft beer tastings from as many as 16 local restaurants. The proceeds will benet the Coalition for the Homeless and Community Food and Outreach Center. The event will be at 151 E. Welbourne Ave. NOV. 4: Witness The Holocaust Memorial Resource and Edu cation Center will have the premiere of a new Readers Theater piece as part of its annual remembrance of Kristallnacht. On Sunday, Nov. 4, the drama Witness will be presented at 4 p.m. in the auditorium of the Jewish Community Center in Maitland. Ad mission is free and reservations are recom mended. For information visit holocaustedu. org or call 407-628-0555. Pictured: The synagogue in Bamberg Germany was one of more than 1,000 synagogues destroyed on the night of Nov. 9-10, 1938. Photo is courtesy of Weiner Library Collection. NOV. 1: Dream Wedding The Art & History Museums Maitland (A&H) will have an evening for anyone planning a wedding. A Midsummer Nights Dream Wedding will be Thursday, Nov. 1, from 6 to 9 p.m. at the A&Hs Chapel and Courtyard. The event is free. To reserve email Rentals@artandhistory.org NOV. 2: First Friday Charity Festival First Friday Charity Festival & Art Stroll will be 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 2, along New Broad Street. For information, visit facebook.com/BaldwinPark FirstFridayFestival OCT. 27: Goldenrod Parade The 34th Annual Goldenrod Parade & Festival will be Saturday, Oct. 27. The festi val will kick off with a pancake breakfast at 7 a.m., the parade at 11 a.m. and end with a cookout and kids corner from noon until 2 p.m. Sponsorship opportunities are available. For information, please contact the chamber at 407-677-5980. This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORG @EnzianTheater OPENS FRIDAY!Produced by Ira Glass from THIS AMERICAN LIFESLEEPWALK WITH ME Fri Sun 4:00, 6:30, 9:15 Mon, Wed, Thurs 6:30 & 9:15 Tues 6:30 only Midnight Movies: V/H/S Fri & Sat 11:59PM Cult Classics: THEATRE OF BLOOD Tue 9:30 Kids Halloween Party: THE NIGHTMARE BEFORE CHRISTMAS Movie, Costumes, and Pizza! Sun 11AM (Event), 1:30PM (Film)Halloween Carnival at Eden Bar

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Page 13 Lifestyles Introducing the newest Tranquil Oaks Cremation Garden at Baldwin-Fairchild Glen Haven a breathtaking garden lled with beautiful and lasting options for families and individuals choosing cremation.Cremation with remembrance...what a beautiful idea. Glen Haven Memorial Park STEIFor a COMPLIMENTARY TOU R OR INF ORMATION, call (877) 531-6257 or visit BaldwinFairchildC remationI nfo.com.Oaklawn Park Cemetery Offering the Simplicity Plan Give them a place to leave flowers. Give them a place to leave flowers. TOBF_WtParkMaitlandObserv_3colx5.indd 1 7/17/12 3:31 PM October 26th & 27th 8pm to 11pm $10 donation OPEN TO THE PUBLIC Winter Park Cheer Athletics Gym 6870 Stapoint Court Winter Park FL 321.972.6945 www.wpcheerathletics.com H A U N T E D H O U S E Its just before 7 p.m. on a Thursday night in October as Maitlands night-shift police of the daytime events, and whats ahead. Two Baker Acts and a recov ered laptop tally out the day shift says. The Weather Channel, si lently projected on the conference room wall, predicts warm, muggy conditions for tonights patrol. He says theres a Muslim speaker at the Roth Jewish Community Cen ter. Theyre expecting a crowd. They want the K-9 to keep the peace, he says. And to give him some good practice. Stitt, the man in the back with uniform shirt, nods before gather ing his things for his 10-hour shift. Stay alert, stay alive is the leaders last instructions before Stitt hits the road with his partneragainst-crime. Bosco, the Maitland Police De and their only one with four legs, hits the ground running, Stitt in tow, on this, his seventh day pa trolling the citys streets. A bathroom break, some au dible slurps from his back-seat water bowl, a few excited whines and a two-mile drive later, and Boscos night begins. You ready? Stitt asks. Leash on, over-sized ears alert and his eyes dilated in focus, the 2-yearold Dutch Shepherd beelines for Top of his class The pair hit the streets in Stitts tober after 600 hours of training and graduating at the top of their training class. Stitt, a seven-year veteran of the department and headstrong Shepherd shipped in from Germany, are Maitlands dog retired in 2009. Its taken months of obedience, narcotics and patrol training to get the pair on the road, which Stitt admits had its highs and lows. From two hospital trips for limbs being in the wrong places during training, to praise of Bosco being the best dog on the job that long-time handlers have seen in years, he says coming together as a K-9 team has been the most trying and rewarding thing hes done in his life. handler it was a struggle for me. But hes so loyal and so obedi ent, he just wants to please you, and its amazing to experience, Stitt says. The pair travels from home to work and back, never leaving each others sides. At home, Bosco is sitting, guarding the bathroom door while Stitt takes a shower, and at work he is never more than a door-opening button push away from his side. [Having the police dog] not only gives us the ability to search for missing persons and suspects scene present, Deputy Chief Bill Stitt says this has already prov en true. When a criminal escaped Winter Park Hospital and hijacked gunpoint before crashing the car into a Maitland home in Septem ber, Bosco and Stitt were there to When you see that guy hit the ground harder than hes ever in his life You cant put a price on that, Stitt said. After that, in my eyes, hes al ready paid for himself, Maitland Councilwoman Linda Frosch said, having had the scene recounted to her at a recent Council meeting. Bosco, his supplies and training were paid for through donations and forfeiture funds collected by the department. On the road After a few walks of the perim eter of the JCC, Boscos nose to the ground smelling for anything that signals trouble, the crowd clears and any possible crisis is averted. The pair goes back on patrol. Theres a pit stop for dinner at McDonalds, Stitt feeding extra fries to Bosco through the fencing that separates the front and back seat. Soggy ones are left behind in the bag. I wouldnt even feed these to him, Stitt says, wiggling a limp fry in the air. The smell of fast food over powers the slight smell of dog that permeates through the car. Stitt says the smell may be the for the past week that theyve been on the road together, but he for the next 10 years, itd still be worth it. Back on the road, as the car ap Maitland Avenue, Bosco whines and wiggles in the backseat. He knows, Stitt says, when he gets here, its playtime. The two pit stop for bathroom and play breaks every hour and half through the night to let Bosco service arent coming in. The excitement for him comes from tracking down the bad guy, Stitt says, but when bad guys arent available, his solid plastic tube toy that Stitt keeps in his work. Boscos marbled brown and black body tenses as he focuses frame on the toy in Stitts hand. behind. The dog thrashes the toy back and forth, as hes trained to do to a criminals forearm when the time comes. Slobber covers the toy, and it wraps its way around his pointed snout. ing back, but Bosco doesnt stop until Stitt calls him back and he unwillingly gives up his plastic prey. Thats one thing Stitt says he can always count on Bosco for, to never give up. Hes not going to give up on the road, Stitt says. Having that drive, man, thats special. Aside from his encounter with the prison escapee last month, most of Boscos on-the-job calls so far have been drug searches of vehicles. The pair gets a call cops there suspect drugs to be in an apprehended subjects car. Bosco darts to the car, circling it, his nose following cracks in door and windows, until he even tually sits next to the drivers side cation of narcotics. A search reveals nothing, but, in the car hands over a pipe with small indications of cocaine resi had done eight searches, signaled four positives, which resulted in drug arrest last week. By having Bosco on the road, safer when responding to calls, but residents can feel safer know ing hes on patrol around town a time. Canine cop patrols the Maitland community Three years after the last K-9 retired, a new four-legged member of For more information about the Maitland Police Department and K-9 program, visit itsmymaitland.com/PD SARAH WILSON Observer Staff PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVER Bosco, a headstrong Dutch Shepherd, stays alert as he sits with handler Ofcer Taylor Stitt.

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Page 14 Saturday, November 3, 2012 Saturday, November 3, 2012 Saturday, November 3, 2012 Saturday, November 3, 2012 Saturday, November 3, 2012 Saturday, November 3, 2012 OCT. 27 On Saturday, Oct. 27, Paws Care will host Time to Share at Pookies Bow Wow Bakery from noon to 3 p.m. It is the kick off of Food for a Good Paws holiday food drive; donations will ben et Paws Care. To learn more, visit PawsCare.org NOV. 1 Popcorn Flicks in Central Park featur ing Chicken Run is 8 to 10 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 1, in Winter Parks Central Park. Trinity Preparatory School invites the public to a middle school musical pro duction of Just So, inspired by the stories of Rudyard Kipling. The show times are: Thursday, Nov, 1, at 4:30 p.m.; Friday, Nov. 2, at 7:30 p.m.; Sat urday, Nov. 3, at 7:30 p.m.; and Sun day, Nov. 4, at 2:30 p.m. All tickets are $5. Trinity Prep is lo cated at 5700 Trinity Prep Lane. Visit TrinityPrep.org or call 407-671-4140 for more information. NOV. 3 The annual Harvest Fest will be from 2 to 6 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 3, at Audubon Park Elementary School. This event includes carnival games, bounce houses, fabulous food trucks, a bake sale, spirit store, live interac tive DJ and the Gifts From The Heart Silent Auction. Paws for Peace Walk will be from 9 a.m. to noon at Blue Jacket Park on Nov. 3. This family and dog-friendly event will raise money for Harbor House Central Florida, which serves domestic abuse victims. Visit harbor house.com NOV. 8 Trinity Preparatory School invites the public to a performance of the one act production Tigers Be Still. The show times are: Thursday, Nov. 8, at 4:30 p.m.; Friday, Nov. 9, at 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, Nov. 10, at 7:30 p.m.; Sun day, Nov. 11, at 2:30 p.m. All tickets are $5. Trinity Prep is located at 5700 Trinity Prep Lane. For more informa tion, visit trinityprep.org or call 407671-4140. NOV. 10 Movie in the Park featuring Mirror Mirror is 7 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 10, at Quinn Strong Park in Maitland. ONGOING Maitland Public Library events: Teen Read Week goes through Saturday, Oct. 20. Sunday, Oct. 28, at 1:30 p.m. there will be a PAM Creative Writing meet ing. Tuesday, Oct. 30, at 4:30 p.m. is Simple Steps to a healthier family diet with Juice Plus. Register by call ing 407-647-7700. Saturday, Nov. 10, is National Gaming Day. It will feature electronic, carnival and board games Wednesday, Nov. 14, 4 to 5 p.m. for grades K through 5 is Culture Club: !Vamos a Mexico! The Maitland Public Library hosts preschool story and craft time every Tuesday at 10:30 a.m. Baby time sto ries and activities are at 10:30 a.m. every Thursday. Reading Buddies for kindergarten through fth grade is at 4 p.m. every Thursday. Legos Engi neers for ages 9-14 is 4 p.m. Mon days. Call 407-647-7700 to register or for more information. Send submissions to jandreasson@ turnstilemediagroup.com Visit PAGE 6 for Halloween event listings. through the doors of the Nemours Childrens Hospital in Orlando, which opened Monday, Oct. 22, the beds had already been laid in to test for comfort. The cribs had been climbed in with their little ones, and the tables had been sat at while by family might be able to have din ner together, even if one has to stay in bed. In the six-year journey to open Nemours Childrens Hospital, it hasnt just been the architects and doctors spending countless hours making design decisions. The families whose children might one day have to stay there got to make decisions too. More than 40 parents are members of the Family Advisory Council, which has committees deciding on the patient rooms features and layout, brainstorm ing ways to make the process easier for families and even inter viewing the doctors and nurses who will work there. They are family-centered care from the ground up, said Mait co-chair of the Family Advisory Council. They integrated every thing we said we were being heard. Family-centered care is at the heart of the organizations philos ophy. They want to include par ents in the care of their children, which to them means listening to their concerns, asking for their opinions and making sure parents always know whats going on with their childs care. Theyre an embedded part of what we do, said Dr. Michael Campbell, director of patient and family-centered care at Nemours. Theyre the real experts and they We live it; were part of every treatment they do; were a part of every doctors visit, Lynda said. Im the one who knows my kid. Lyndas 6-year-old son Cian chronic lung disease. His many trips to the emergency room and stays in the hospital after surgery of experience to draw from when giving feedback on the building of the new hospital. Lynda, without hesitation, has climbed in beds and cribs to test them out for the committee, because she knows when a child is sick, nothing will keep a mom from hopping right in there with them. A week stay in a hospital without her heading to her own bed once isnt unheard of. Now, there will be a comfort able place to sleep, while before that wasnt the case. Weve slept in a chair for a week, she said. hospital will be private and much larger than average, because a whole family along with medical care professionals are intended to Theres a long counter to use for personal items, a refrigerator for family for dinner. Giant windows let in natural light and welcome distractions for kids and parents. Cians brother Patrick, 9, said that his favorite part of the new hospital is that hell have room to be with his little brother. Cians fa his previous hospital stays, their family felt fractured Lynda comforting Cian by staying over night, while Patrick was left with their older son. Now we can stay and be a family unit, the father said. Not only were parents able to give insight into what would make their whole family more comfortable in the hospital rooms, they were also given the oppor tunity to interview the doctors and nurses hired. Lynda has con ducted more than 100 interviews and still does orientations for all employees, from security guards to heads of surgery, sharing what its like for a family of a chronical ly sick child. One of her favorite got into health care. A lot of times it was that emo tional connection that got us, she said. tor will be part of the familys team and not be an outsider mak ing decisions without them. And Nemours takes their suggestions seriously applicants were not hired if the parents didnt feel like they embodied the family-cen tered care philosophy. Its a relief for parents to have doctors they truly trust and like taking care of their children, Lynda said. It makes the connection be tween physicians and families that much stronger, Campbell said. In the end its made for more open relationships, and parents really feeling an ownership over a hospital theyve helped build themselves. Lynda will never for get the day she was driving down saw Nemours Childrens Hospital It was an overwhelming feel ing of comfort and joy and excite ment. PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER From left: The Grifn family, Cian, Patrick, Lynda and Patrick, pose in their Maitland home. Lynda, co-chair of the Family Advisory Council, helped Nemours design their facility. Hospital built by families Nemours Childrens Hospital in Orlando involved families every step of the way in its construction, from design of the rooms to BRITTNI JOHNSON Observer Staff Nemours Childrens Hospital, located in Lake Nona Medical City, opened Oct. 22. The 630,00-square-foot, $397 million hospital includes a clinic, emergency department and education and research facilities. Visit nemours.org for more information.

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Page 15 Now through Jan. 6 Highlights of Morse Museums season The new exhibit at the Morse Museum features a recent gift, an Orientalist painting by Lockwood de Forest. De Forests oil painting haran landscape that is accompa nied by oil studies of other desert scenes and explanatory wall panels. In addition, the museum Glassmaking, a popular exhibit designers and artisans used to create blown-glass vases, leadedglass windows and lamps. Public programs will include free admis sion, live music and more during Friday Nights at the Morse seum.org Oct. 27 and 28 Bach Festival features visiting composers The opening program of the 2012 Bach Festival Society Choral Masterworks series will present music by six contemporary com posers who represent the most accomplished choral and orches tra composers working today. Three of the six composers will be present at the performances including pre-concert talks for the public. The performances will take place on Oct. 27 at 7:30 p.m. (talk at 6:15 p.m.) and Oct. the Chapel on the Rollins College campus in Winter Park. Call 407Florida.org Nov. 3 National Symphony of Cuba in American debut Perhaps the most important and historic orchestral perfor mance of the season will take place in Daytona Beach on Nov. 3 when the National Symphony of Cuba makes its American debut right here in Central Florida. And the auspicious occasion is made even more important as the orchestra presents a block buster program, which includes pianist Nachito Herrera perform ing Gershwins Rhapsody in Blue followed by Beethovens Symphony No. 5. In this notto-be-missed performance, an Orchestra that could not travel to the United States a few years ago opens the Daytona Beach Sym phony Societys 61st season with a glorious program that honors a great American composer and the worlds greatest composer in the or visit dbss.org Oct. 30 to Nov. 4 The Million Dollar Quartet Inspired by the true story of a once-in-a-lifetime recording ses sion that brought together rock Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis and Carl turns the story into a Broadway musical. On Dec. 4, 1956, Sam Phillips brought these four musi cians together in Memphis for what would be one of the greatest jam sessions of all time. Million endary night to life from Oct. 30 to Nov. 4 with its irresistible tale of broken promises, betrayals and No. 1 hit songs at the Bob Carr OrlandoBroadway.com Nov. 3 Orlando Science Centers Neanderthal Ball Time to go huntin for your new caveman couture and step out in Paleolithic style as the Orlando Science Center wel comes you to the sixth annual Neanderthal Ball. As the Science Centers premier fundraising event, the ball is also the wackiest (and most fun) gala of the season. It may be held in a museum, but coolest event this side of the Ice programming at the Science Center, and its an upscale dining event with gourmet food selec tions, themed music and silent contact Kathy Lopus at klopus@ osc.org Nov. 4 Brooklyn Rider Quartet returns to Central Florida The Bach Festival Society will bring the renowned string Florida for a residency reaching more than 3,000 Orange County Public School children. Known for its creative programming, the pretation of existing literature and to the creation of new works, including a newly commissioned work by jazz pianist and compos performance on Sunday, Nov. 4, at 3 p.m. at the Tiedtke Con cert Hall on the Rollins College BachFestivalFlorida.org Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906. PURCHASE TICKETS TODAY www.BachFestivalFlorida.org 407.646.2182 Let there be light! MODERN MASTERWORKS Sat | Oct 27 | 7:30 pm Sun | Oct 28 | 3:00 pmKnowles Memorial ChapelBach Festival Choir and OrchestraWorks by Whitacre, Lauridsen, Moravec*, Paulus*, and more. Pre-concert Talk with Composers: Rm 119, Keene Music Bldg, Rollins Campus The Elizabeth Morse Genius Foundation JOHN V. SINCLAIR, ARTISTIC DIRECTOR AND CONDUCTORGalloway Foundation Josh Garrick Culture worthy of your calendar FOR LEASING INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT rffntb JOINING NATIONAL TENANTS NOW O PEN 130 E Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs PictureShow Cinemas Million Dollar Quartet The Wreck

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Page 16 NAME William Will Davidson President of Max Media WHY WILL? Will stands out. Even on Facebook! Id noticed how dapper this guy always was, tried to nd him and was sure his name was Max. Will is a class act, even more so in person, say ing things like Yes, sir and No, sir. HIS STYLE IN AS FEW WORDS AS POS SIBLE Intriguing, cutting edge, not your norm BEST FASHION PURCHASE EVER My rst custom-tailored Astor & Black suit BIGGEST EVER FASHION MISTAKE Buying a pink blazer MOST RECENT FASHION PURCHASE Four custom Astor & Black suits YOUR LOCAL GO-TO FASHION SPOT John Craig or Current SOMETHING EVERYONE SHOULD KNOW ABOUT FASHION BUT APPARENTLY DOES NOT Youve got me on that one. With me, I think its OK to stand out. IF YOU WERE A DESIGNER, WHAT WOULD YOUR COLLECTION LOOK LIKE Theyd be Italian/Euro cut, slim tting, very sleek, tailored, different from your everyday norm suit. HOW DOES YOUR STYLE FIT WHAT YOU DO Im an entrepreneur. I work for myself. I really dont have to answer to anyone, so if I wanted I could wake up and wear pajamas, but I tend to wear something that Im comfortable in and people know me by. HOW HAS YOUR STYLE CHANGED OVER THE YEARS Everyone goes through phases and I went through a phase where I thought I was going to be the next extreme redneck sportsman. NAME Erika Boesch, Co-owner at Bistro on Park Avenue, formerly owned Absolute Dcor, now also has Bistro Loft Shop WHY ERIKA? Erikas simple style is always so consistent, classic to me, so it ts what she does and her role within the restaurant and seems so well suited to her easy manner and charming way of dealing with her customers. HER STYLE Simple, easy BEST PURCHASE A purse. I usually dont look for any brand, but a purse in pink. My favorite purse for more than three years. BIGGEST MISTAKE Leggings with a short shirt. RECENT PURCHASE A new purse from Coach. GO-TO FASHION SPOT Wright & Company, Piazza Italia, thats where I go most. FAVORITE DESIGNER I like Michael Kors, but usually I dont look for a brand. EVERYONE SHOULD KNOW They should keep in mind that they should look at their whole body when dressing, not using just a small mirror. WHAT WOULD YOUR COLLECTION LOOK LIKE Colorful, very colorful, pink, purple, white and grey tones HOW DOES YOUR STYLE FIT Comfort able, Simple, easy HOW HAS YOUR STYLE CHANGED I keep it very simple, so I havent changed too much. NAME Debra Hendrickson Vice president of the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce and Event director of Park Avenue Fashion Week WHY DEBRA? Dinner on the Avenue 2012 was canceled due to rain but her group went ahead with their good time inside Tuni with a Mad Men theme. I saw a photo on Facebook and Debra looked awesome! STYLE Tailored sophistication BEST FASHION PURCHASE The Tracy Reese dress I bought last year at Tuni that I wore to Park Avenue Fashion Week. BIGGEST MISTAKE Going to a Taste of Winter Park in a dark business suit. But that wasnt a mistake that was just being incorrectly dressed. I wore a cocktail dress to a Western hoe down. RECENT PURCHASE The dress I wore Saturday night for Fashion Week. I got it at LaBella Intimates (Hannibal Square). GO-TO FASHION SPOT I go to Tuni, woman was fanatical about head ing to the salon. Hair could be a little eccentric and wild then, and making an impact instantly was a priority. Big hair, curls sprayed to con crete perfection and total glamour were mandatory for Winter Parks elite women, even if they were just heading to the grocery store. it well, and its what lured her straight into her moms profes sion. They all looked like movie was obsessed with coming to the salon. I got to be around excit ing people who had exciting jobs and were beautiful. and Kendall Hair Color Studio in Winter Park, grew up in the hair salon. Her mom, Kendall Carney, is the original owner and was a staple of the Winter Park hair scene for nearly two decades. shed follow in her moms foot steps. The pull toward the whole scene of women socializing, be ing beautiful and supporting each to resist. Its all I ever really knew, she said. It just felt inherent. She literally grew up in the salon, Carney said. It was natu ral. cosmetology school out of high school, and she had her own The two became partners, with mom as the expert haircutter and daughter as the gifted colorist. They relied on each other to do their best but never had to say a word to know that. The expectation was unspo But she wasnt always a pro. the salon at just 4 years old, was doing laundry and sweeping by 9 and shampooing by 13. Shell poo she had to stand on some phone books to reach the sink, and drenched the poor client to the underwear. The woman had to go home to change before she could get her haircut. Of course her mom was always there to lift her back up. Shes always been a mentor and soundboard. When someone believes in you that much, you dont have the same kind of fear, she said. That same caring way her mother mentored and taught her soft-spoken, instantly trustable nature, and its hard to imagine her being tough or bossy toward anyone. Tara Jarvis, a stylist and man ager for Kendall and Kendall, said thats no show, and the respect they get trickles down to how they treat their own clients. She puts her faith in us. Ive never worked at a place like this before, Jarvis said. I came here and its like a family. Shes the most professional, not only runs a business, but is a true artist in the business, said Kelly Ginsburg, a client for six years. And its the art that really ing the same vision which she says is old Hollywood glamour full of femininity and seeing that come to life is one of the best moments you can have as a hair stylist. She specializes in color and said that no day or head of hair is the same. Your client really is like Coloring hair is painting, and she is a painter, Carney said. And clients can feel that pas sion and gift too. Its palpable, Ginsburg said. She infuses it throughout an en their artistry to work during Har rietts Park Avenue Fashion Week last week when they styled most of the models hair before they headed down the runway. She said its a little piece of heaven a taste of what its like to be the every second counts. Last year they did 90 percent of the models, and were so pumped afterward that they wanted to do it all over again. And she loves that while they are artists and can get the thrill of working down to the moment at Fashion Week, they dont have to be starving. She says its a great way to be creative while making a living, and she gets to create a culture that makes women feel beautiful and support her stylists dreams. I try to emulate the actions Ive seen her take in the salon, Jarvis said. One day I hope to be half as great as her as a business owner. PHOTO COURTESY OF KENDALL MCELVEEN Kendall McElveens salon, Kendall and Kendall Hair Color Studio, did most of the models hair for Harrietts Park Avenue Fashion Week last week. Her style is old Hollywood glamour. Growing up in the salon Kendall and Kendall Hair Color Studio owner started helping her mom, the original owner of the Winter Park salon, when she was 9 BRITTNI JOHNSON Observer Staff Kendall and Kendall Hair Color Studio is located at 339 S. Park Ave. in Winter Park. Owner Kendall McElveen has been making the citys women beautiful since she was just 17 years old, and makes her mark on Harrietts Park Avenue Fashion Week for the second year in a row, with her stylists doing most of the models hair. Visit www.kendallandkendall.com or call 407-629-2299. Clyde Moore I LUV Park Avenue Style Please see CLYDE on page 17 Davidson Boesch Hendrickson Read about Clydes fashion cred on PAGE 18 Describe your style

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Page 17 Photo Courtesy of Sandra Johnson PhotographyFEATURING: Pet Trick or Treat in Park Avenue stores from 12noon to 3pm PLUS: Pet Related Vendors, Caricature Artist, Pet Photographer, Pet TrainersOn the corner of North Park Avenue & Gareld in Downtown Winter Park costume contest BENEFICIARY: FOUND ED & H O STED B Y M EDIA SP ONS OR :FOR MORE INFORMATION: Please call 407-644-2969 or stop by our store at 329 Park Avenue North, Winter Park Winter Park CanalsHenry PeterBy Titusville Artist, Henry Peter was so enamored by his boat tour of our lakes that he went back many times and did a series of paintings. He has made limited edition canvas prints of the 3 of these paintings. ey are available at the Fredlund Fine Arts in Winter Park.Edition sizes are 10 Overpainted by the artist Image size 12 X 18 For more info visit: Fredlund Fine Arts 1143 Orange Ave. Winter Park 407-622-0102www.fredlundgallery.com Downtown Winter Park is still enjoying the success of Park Avenue Fashion Week 2012. The annual seven-day celebration of fashion and design in our com munity held more than 100 events, and salons and honored the city of Winter Parks 125th anniver sary. Thats a tall order and the with style and grace. Kudos to the event chair, Paige Blackwelder, coowner of Tuni, for her leadership in this fabulous event that attracts retail community. The most-anticipated event of the week is always the Runway Show. This year The Collection Bridal and Bay Hill Jewelers on Park stole the show with a surprise proposal for one of the models walking the runway. Her boy friend met her at the end of the she couldnt refuse. The model is the daughter of Mimi Goldman, fashion director at The Collection and she is head-over-heels excited to be planning a wedding. After the show-stopping perfor mance (we had to take an intermis sion after that much excitement), the team from Bay Hill Jewelers went back to preparing their new location. Theyve closed up their store in the Shoppes on Park. Look for them soon in the old Jacobsons space on North Park Avenue. They promise to be open in time for Red Bag Days and the next Sip & Stroll event. Under the tent Fashion Week isnt the only group using the tent constructed in Central Parks West Meadow. This years tent served as the venue for the Winter Park Historical Associa tions Peacock Ball. This weekend it will also host the Winter Park charities. The brainchild of John Rivers, chef and owner at 4 Rivers Smokehouse, and David and Tina Larue of ABC Wine & Spirits, the weekend features a James Beard Tribute Dinner and the return of Cows & Cabs. Next up, look for the tent to get a little smaller and cooler as the city welcomes Winter in the Park, the annual holiday ice skating rink mid-November. The opening of the rink coincides with Red Bag Days, a pre-holiday shop local event at 45 participating Park Avenue area merchants. Shopping locally Now that Ive mentioned it twice, I might as well explain Red Bag Days. The event is modeled after a downtown shopping event resembles Winter Park in many ways, from streetscape to familiar names of shops found in both com Red Bag Days, shoppers can sup their holiday shopping lists. Spe cial savings are planned but they are being kept under wraps at the moment. Details will be released at RedBagDays.com soon. And, as part of Red Bag Days, the Park Avenue merchants will year. The success of the Sip, Stroll & Celebrate event in September has inspired a new theme: Sip, Stroll & Shop. Attendees will enjoy food and beverage pairings at participating store (more than 25 have already signed up) and take advantage of the Red Bag Days savings on Thursday, Nov. 15. Erika Spence is the senior director of marketing and communications at the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce. Visit WinterPark.org for more information. LaBella Intimates, Bella, Chicos. FAVORITE DESIGNER I like Tracy Reese. Sophisticated elegance, designs for the everyday woman. EVERYONE SHOULD KNOW Theres a fabulous Coco Chanel quote that would work perfectly here. But I also like the one that says fashion fades but only style remains the same. WHAT WOULD YOUR COLLECTION LOOK LIKE It would have lots of color. It would be natural fabric, natural Im not a designer! It would be able to t a womans gure, a curvy woman. It would have a long torso, so it would t a tall woman. It would be form-tting, soft and owy, but form-tting. HOW DOES YOUR STYLE FIT I like to be tailored. I like to wear suits, so that ts my Chamber of Com merce hat. I like to get dressed up and that ts my evening life. Im not a casual person. STYLE CHANGED Im not afraid to try some edgier things now than when I was younger. I was much more conservative when I was younger than I am today. NAME Hillary Hudgeons Has worked at Lilly Pulitzer on Park Avenue for about two years WHY HILLARY? Hillary is like the poster girl for the store where she works. I often see her on the stores Facebook page or her own page smiling and exuding as much vi brancy and cheer as Lilly Pulitzers Florida-perfect clothing. STYLE Trendy, but conservative. Classic. BEST PURCHASE The Elsa top from Lilly Pulitzer. Its something I can dress up or dress down, I can wear with everything. I have a favorite pair of blue jeans; I wear them all the time. Theyre from The Gap. BIGGEST MISTAKE My biggest ever fashion mistake, ever in my whole life? Stirrup pants. RECENT PURCHASE My most recent fashion purchase? I just recently bought my wedding dress. GO-TO FASHION SPOT Thats not Lilly? J Crew. FAVORITE DESIGNER Lilly Pulitzer, duh, of course. EVERYONE SHOULD KNOW Just because skinny pants are in style doesnt mean youve got to wear them. You can still be trendy but conservative. WHAT WOULD YOUR COLLECTION LOOK LIKE Well, I like to mix prints and patterns, bright colors, but I like something I can wear all the time. HOW DOES YOUR STYLE FIT My personal style ts in because I wear things I like to mix the prints and patterns but I can wear things and do anything but I still feel dressed and comfortable. STYLE CHANGED Its changed a lot because Im paying attention more to the things that I put together. Clyde Moore operates local sites ILUVWinterPark.com, ILUVParkAve. com and LUVMyRate.com, and aims to help local businesses promote themselves for free and help save them money. Email him at iluvwinterpark@earthlink. net or write to ILuv Winter Park on Facebook or Twitter. Erika Spence Business in the Park Fashion Week was full of success, surprises Proposal on the runway CLYDE | Trendy, conservative, classic C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 16 Hudgeons

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Page 18 Opinions Many know the Coco Chanel But she also said: Fashion is not something that exists in dresses only. Fashion is in the sky, in the street, fashion has to do with ideas, the way we live, what is happening. Im not sure about the sky part, but with the rest I concur. About a month ago the editor of The Observer asked me about doing a separate column for an upcoming section: Park Style (See page 16). I jumped at it. Soon af ter I told a friend who responded: You? Yep! Me. And if I say so my self, Im perfect for the job. Over this past week Ive been talking with locals about their individual style and how it has changed over the years. Funny how some change dramatically and others very little. No matter your individual style, as with most everything else, I think age serves to make you more reso lute in it, comfortable. You know yourself much better with each passing year. Ive kidded my life partner that I may be the missing link. Men may be from Mars and more like a Saturn type. I have a friend I can sit with and gab about fashion, but I lose her when I get as excited as her hubby about The Walking Dead. Clothes were clothes when I was a kid. As you get older, you notice more, want things you see, pair of jeans I had with an arrow across the back. I also remember wearing lots of warm-up type clothes in junior high. Neither are now pleasant memories. I abso period with more fashion donts someone did. What was your biggest fashion mistake? For me, short elf-like suede boots, which were like screaming gay! from a mountaintop. In college I started working at a Gap store as Mickey Drexler was transforming the company and making it into an iconic American retailer. Back then so much was about socks, or the col ors of the socks. Would you like that? You may have had blue and stirred you to purchase. And our UPTs (units per transaction) were upped. I also worked at a small clothing store called The Lodge on Franklin Street in Cha pel Hill. Back home, my parents now had a clothing store, and I thought a visit to the Calvin Klein space at the Atlanta Apparel Mart was near nirvana. When I began working for I discovered my tie and shoe gildo Zegna, Calvin Klein and Armani ties, and mostly Calvin Klein suits. If I say so myself in retrospect, not bad. Then, in 1995 we went to Italy for two weeks. gna ties before, yet he came home with as many as I did. We visited the market in Florence and the drill went like this: drink one beer, buy one tie, drink a second beer, buy two more ties, drink a third beer, yes, three more ties and so on. I needed extra luggage simply to carry my ties. that we were going business casual. That, my friends, is called irony. One fetish was being week to one of my Park Style ma vens, I discovered what a won derful weight control nice suits can be. When you pay a good bit of money for a suit, theres real a big deal to buy a new pair of khakis. So consider yourselves warned with that Confucius-like grain of wisdom. When we moved to Florida in 2001, it was time to go truly laid never wanting to look at my feet out in public. But warm weather and sunshine changed all of that. Shorts and T-shirts to someone who despises cold weather are like Linus comfy blanket. My own personal mode of dress has changed dramatically over the years. I know more than a little bit about fashion, but the reason Im most thrilled to write about Park Style going forward is that, as with this past week, it gives me even more opportuni ties to meet new people, and because I realize that Park Style has no more to do with me and my opinion than it does any other local resident. I simply hope to be a magnifying glass: My desire is to focus on you and your style, that of your friends and neigh bors, and tell your story. These pieces wont be about being the local fashion police as Im not sure I could ever earn such a badge but more the local fashion cheerleader. Go team! Clyde Moore operates local sites ILUVWinterPark.com, ILUVParkAve.com and LUVMyRate.com, and aims to help local businesses promote themselves for free and help save them money. Email iluvwinterpark@earthlink.net or write to ILuv Winter Park on Facebook or Twitter. Clyde Moore I LUV Winter Park We highlight local businesses that are utilizing and selling items made by other locals. Send submissions to iluvwinterpark@earthlink.net Local Luvn Local Loot Jewelry Loot Jewelry is made right here in Winter Park by designer Shauna Allen and her business partner, Day Gigliotti. Each piece of Loot Jewelry is handcrafted using vintage, up-cycled, reclaimed and repurposed treasures many centuries old. They combine these vintage elements with modern ndings. Check it out at the Blue Door Denim Shoppe on Park Avenue. Fashion about local people A healthier Halloween Halloween is right around the corner. With all the candycentered festivities that Hal loween brings, many people have on their weight and overall health. This year, skip the worry healthier Halloween: 1. Prepare a substantial, healthy meal before trick-ortreating. If youre a parent, trickor-treating means huge amounts of sugar for your children. If kids leave in search of candy on an empty stomach, they are more likely to eat the candy before they get home. In order to prevent a candy overload, make sure your children eat a healthy meal that or-treating. This way, they will be less inclined to overeat their collected sweets. 2. Save the seeds from your Jack-O-Lantern. Pumpkin seeds are edible and high in nutri tional value. In fact, the seeds are and other important nutrients. Instead of tossing the seeds aside when carving pumpkins this fall, bake them for a tasty treat that is both healthy and festive. 3. Dont eat sticky candy. If youre going to eat candy this Halloween, make sure its not sticky. This type of candy which can lead to enamel decay and increases your chance of get ting cavities. 4. Do eat chocolate. When consumed in small amounts, chocolate can actually be good for you. Dark chocolate is rich in antioxidants, which boost energy, repel disease and promote overall good health. Some of the most popular chocolate candies are low in calories and sugar, so do your research to make sure youre making the best choice. 5. Take advantage of the fall weather by exercising outside. Many Floridians look forward to the fall as a welcomed relief from the sweltering summer heat. Take advantage of the nicer weather and jog, run or walk outside. You can even make it a family occasion by walking around the neighborhood in search of the best Halloween decorations. Re member, the more you move, the more calories you burn so get out and get moving! Dr. Rene Cruz Board Certied Internal Medicine Physician Greater Orlando Medical Weight Loss Ending senior hunger More than 50 years ago, John F. Kennedy said, The war against hunger is truly mankinds war of liberation. Yet we still niors, its a persistent and increas ingly disturbing problem. Although Americans risk of hunger has fallen since 2009, the concern has actually grown among people 60 and older. Ac cording to the Senior Hunger Re port Card, a national study per formed by the Meals on Wheels Research Foundation, hunger is especially prominent among those just above the national pov erty level. And in Florida, one of the top 10 states for food insecuri ties, senior hunger is even more severe. Throughout the state, the waiting list for home-delivered meals has more than doubled in the last nine years, from 2,976 in In response to the grow ing demand for healthy meals, Seniors First has pledged to help the Meals On Wheels Associa tion of America (MOWAA) end senior hunger by 2020. As part of our mission to enhance Central and help them maintain indepen dence, weve made nutrition pro grams a top priority. Heres how our meal programs measured up in 2011: Through the Meals on Wheels program, Seniors First served 223,362 meals. Another 30,669 meals were provided to elderly and med-waiver clients through our in-home services packages for community care. Through the Neighborhood Lunch Program, Seniors First served 111,993 meals to 1,116 seniors at 16 sites in Orange County. To help seniors prepare for hurricane season and to prevent service interruption due to severe weather our team provided shelf-stable meals. Despite the economic chal lenges we face, the war on hun ger must continue for the health and security of our communitys seniors. To meet their nutrition needs, we need the help of caring, faithful supporters like you. To support our meal programs, visit Thanks for helping Seniors First in the battle against senior hunger. Marsha Lorenz President/CEO Seniors First PHOTO BY CLYDE MOORE THE OBSERVER Loot Jewelry designer Shauna Allen left, and Becky Whitaker modeled for Blue Door Denim Shoppe during the Im A Survivor segment of the Fashion Show on Saturday night. Letters to the editor Send your thoughts (400 words or less) to Managing Editor Jenny Andreasson at jandreasson@turnstilemediagroup.com

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Page 19 Louis Roney Play On! Chris Jepson Perspectives A change of men Putting the e in human Much has been made this election season over which candidate is telling the truth. Or presenting the facts. I am not sure of the relevance of truth, but I do believe uncertainty is critical in a de dialog, limits conversation and is anath ema to developing imaginative solutions to societal issues. My favorite book of the past 20 years begins with, About 200 years ago, the idea that truth was made rather than found began to take hold of the imagi Richard Rortys Contingency, Irony, and Solidarity. His observation about truth being made rather than found crystallized for me a way of thinking about myself and my place in society at large. I consider myself, philosophically, a pragmatist. Pragmatism was an early 20th century American philosophy that can, perhaps, be best summarized by what ever works, is likely true. As reality changes, so too, whatever works. Truth varies. Truth is changeable. No one pos sesses the ultimate truth. We should avoid seeking anything metaphysical, the truth of an idea is in its observable results. Rorty was a pragmatist. He wrote, Modern, literate, secular societies depend on the existence of reason ably concrete, optimistic and plausible scenarios, as opposed to scenarios about redemption beyond the grave. Too much of our national conversation today is overly concerned with matters of faith and truth. Id rather our conversation be a discussion of developing workable ideas of our fellow citizens. Poverty, for example, confronts us all daily. Regardless of whether we are impoverished ourselves, it is hard to ignore the exit ramp veteran hand out, near-toothless vagrant from public hous mayhem besetting his neighborhood. Poverty is a factor of the human condi tion. Deuteronomy 15:11 says, There will always be poor people in the lands. That observation is as accurate today as it was when written thousands of years ago. But because poverty and despair are part and parcel of the human condition does not absolve our nation you and I, America collectively from pursuing solutions. We once, too many decades ago, had a War on Poverty. Many argue it failed. It didnt accomplish its goals. Poverty per sisted. It was too expensive. The results were ambiguous. Besides, the Bible says, There will always be poor people. As if that is an argument for doing less. There are so many clichs that do not erished in America. The poor need to pull themselves up by their bootstraps. Or, Being broke is a temporary situa tion. Being poor is a state of mind. Or, Our life of poverty is as necessary as the work itself. Only in heaven will we see how much we owe to the poor for helping us to love God better because of them. What a crock. All of it. The measure of a culture is how well it takes care of its least capable citizens (its children in particular). Because we once waged war on poverty yet the poor re main does not mean we do not pursue pragmatic approaches to alleviating the remedies. But we must be relentless in our attempts. To be truly human is to be humane. Make that truth, you. Jepson is a 24-year resident of Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.US The natural cure for an ill-administra tion, in a popular or representative consti tution, is a change of men. Alexander Hamilton Well, he did it. I knew he would. I predicted it years ago I even told b.w. he was going to do it. Ill bet you knew it too. The job market numbers came out a few weeks ago. Surprise! Magically that peared. It had to no president has ever been reelected with unemployment rate so close to the election how conve nient! What an amazing turn around, and the timing is a miracle! Isnt it wonderful Obama can now be legitimate! If you believe these numbers, Ive still got that Mrs. Clintons legacy It appears that our auspicious secretary of state, Hillary Clinton, was frozen in a static state while four Americans, includ ing an ambassador, were asking in vain for more security from the State Depart ment prior to their eventual murders in Benghazi. Well probably never know just exactly what happened in this time, which was conveniently blacked out for Clintons/Obamas machinations. Clinton had all the power of the State Department plus the ear of the president. Mrs. Clinton took full responsibility (three weeks her resignation. As we know, Mrs. Clinton is an old hand at cover-ups. Hillarys shall again have proof of her integrity and legacy as well. Meanwhile, she remains Obamas fall-guy. Pols are employees At a political convention this sum mer, we heard the words, government is the only thing we all belong to. And reminded us, We own this country politicians are employees of ours. There are 23-plus million people still looking for work, and as of Jan. 1, the rest of us will be facing a $494 billion tax increase. The sooner our elected employees remem ber this, and all of us remember what our job is (to vote!), the sooner we may make and take a realistic direction toward lib erty and freedom for future generations. Biden out of control Rudeness is a weak mans imita tion of strength, said long-shoreman/ the recent vice presidential debate. The smiling, grimacing, bulling and smirking ing and most unprofessional. There is strated self-control being interrupted debate where Biden showed no control of any kind. Mr. Bidens aggressive job to save Prexy Obamas dismal performance a week earlier was neither credible nor factual. When does energetic blustering overcome intelligence? Can in-yourface insults eradicate $16 trillion debts? Why do the Democrats think they gain by making presidential debates into got cha Letterman shows? We need know-how No people will tamely surrender their liberties, nor can they be easily and virtue is preserved. On the contrary, when people are universally ignorant, and debauched in their manners, they will sink under their own weight without the aid of foreign invaders. Samuel Adams. Trillion for the 4th Straight Year Under Obama. What more needs to be said? Were drowning in debt that you, your children, grandchildren and their chil dren will forever be paying. Obama is borrowing and wasting our money and our futures as he leads all of us into pov cial know-how at the helm seem essential at this time? About Roney: HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney) Regardless of whether we are impoverished ourselves, it is hard to ignore the exit ramp veteran hand out, dirty and demoralized. Or, the ubiquitous near-toothless vagrant from public housing interviewed on TV about the recent mayhem besetting his neighborhood. Support seniors at Walk in the Park on Oct. 28 Imagine what it would be like to lose your health, your spouse, your friends and your home. No one wants to grow old alone. Yet most people do. Isolation, loneli long-term care. People sleeping are what you see when you walk into a nursing home. Why bother to remain awake when there is little to look forward to? To make matters worse, Jewish seniors in assisted living and nurs ing homes often feel abandoned by the Jewish community. They no longer have the opportunity to participate in Jewish holiday celebrations. As former members of a vibrant community, they feel isolated from communal life. The Jewish pavilion is a lifeline for elderly Jews in long-term care. The Jewish someone in our community is in need. look after loved ones, brighten someones day with a gift or lift someones spirits with a visit or holiday celebration. Its in all 54 of the long-term care facilities where our culture is shared with residents of all faiths. Its not a place on the map. Its a place in the heart. Recruiting, training and overseeing a network of volunteers takes time and mon ey. The Pavilion has four paid program directors (north, south, east and west) who coordinate up to 100 volunteers in each of their areas. They plan and facilitate all of the activities in a dozen buildings in their areas including Shabbat meals, holiday festivities, musicales and intergenerational activities. When someone calls the Pavilion, help is needed. Usually, there is a crisis such as mom just fell and now the family needs to determine whether she can continue to live by herself. The Pavilions new resource specialist is a trained social worker who tion, assisting seniors and their loved ones with all aspects of elder care. To provide Shabbat, holiday programs and weekly visitation to seniors, and for tions must be sought to cover the expenses of more than 50 parties a month, which take place all over town. Of the agency budget, 94 percent goes toward the provi sion of programs so that our elders in every facility are visited, feel loved and are included in the Jewish community. Residents of all faiths are invited to share Pavilion on Jewish foods and traditions. No one wants to be forgotten. It is the mission of the Jewish Pavilion to enhance the lives of our elders in long-term care by strengthening their connection to the community. While the word Pavilion to remember our Jewish elders as they transition to a long-term care setting. Your support is needed to ensure that our elders out and participate in A Walk in the Park tainment including the Orlando Jazz Band, a health expo, lots of vendors and activi ties for children, including a bounce house, clowns and face-painting. Win prizes and for more information. Nancy Ludin is the executive director of the Jewish Pavilion. NANCY LUDIN Guest Writer PHOTO COURTESY OF JEWISH PAVILION Pavilion Volunteer Susan Mazlin shares challah and honey cake for the Jewish New Year with a resident at Madison House. The Walk in the Park funds these events.

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Page 20 AUCTION-Real Estate & Personal Property Cliffside Mansion & Cottages, 216+/Acre Country Estates, Offered in 17 Tracts in Carroll County and Galax, VA. Long frontage on New River Trail and Chestnut Creek. Guaranteed to Sell Over $699,000. November 8, 10am Personal Property; November 9, 10am Personal Property, Real Estate sells at NOON. Sale held On-Site-Tract 7, 506 Cliffview Road, Galax, VA 24333. 5% Buyers Premium on Real Estate, 10% Buyers Premium on Personal Property. For more infor mation, go to woltz.com or call Woltz & Associates, Inc, Brokers & Auctioneers, (VA#321) Roanoke, VA (800) 551-3588. 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Online Training with SC Train gets you job ready ASAP! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Job placement assistance when program completed. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Inter net needed. 888-212-5888. EDUCATION The Marketplace Plan your weekend with The Weekender! Visit wpmobserver.com and click "Subscribe to Newsletter" Its free to place estate sales, garage sales and yard sales on this page! Visit WPMObserver .com and click Create Your Classified WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com WPMObserver.com Driver Trainees Needed Now! Become a driver for Werner Enterprises. Earn $800 per week! Local CDL Training. 877-214-3624 Drivers 100% Owner Operator Co. Pay increase/Home weekly, Regional & Dedicated, Class A CDL 1 yr exp in last 3. Call 800-695-9643. www.driveforwat kins.com Drivers/Flatbed Class-A. GET HOME WEEKENDS! Up to $.39/mi. Late model equipment & Big Miles! 1Yr OTR Flatbed experience required. Sun belt Transport, LLC. 800-572-5489 ext 227 AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Housing available. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance. 866314-3769 DRIVERS-HIRING EXPERIENCED/ INEXPERIENCED TANKER DRIVERS! Earn up to $.51/mile! New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 year OTR Exp Req. Tanker Training Available. Call Today 877-8826537. www.oakleytransport.com Apply Now, 13 Drivers. Top 5% Pay & Benefits. Need CDL Class A Driving Exp. 877-258-8782. www.drive 4melton.com HELP WANTED Typist/Proof Reader Publisher is seeking an organized, de tail oriented Typist/Proof Reader for a full time position. Must type at least 60 WPM accurately, proof read material and make corrections, cut out newspaper advertisements and paste them to affi davits. Ideal candidate will have strong computer software/hardware skills. Ex perience with the following is preferred: Quark, InDesign, FileMaker, Macs. Legal background a plus. For immediate con sideration, please email your resume to: employment@flalegals.com. Location: Orlando (near Universal Studios). Com pensation: Competitive hourly wage, will discuss at interview. Please, no phone calls about this job (emails only). Do not contact job poster about other services, products or commercial interests. 866-314-3769AIRLINES ARE HIRING One Click. Job Resources. Real Results.The Employ Florida network helped me to improve my professional skills and connected me with a training opportunity. THE RESUL T : Elizabeth Matthews was trained and hired by Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point.Employ Florida is an equal opportunity program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. The Employ Florida telephone number may be reached by persons using TTY/TTD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711. Disponible en Espanol. ELIZABE TH MATTHE WS Monitor Technician and Unit Secretary Hudson, FL HIRED EmployFlorida.com1-866-FLA-2345 Find I LUV Winter Park merchandise and local art at ILUVParkAvenue.com407-539-3977 OBSERVER Open Houses SUNDAY 2-5 NEW PRICE! HOME ON CORNER LOT IN KINGS ROW 1800 King Arthur Circle, Maitland. 4BD/3BA, 3,052SF. Two master suites, each with own bath and walk-in closet. Formal living and dining rooms. Over sized family room has vaulted ceil ings, fireplace and pool views. Bamboo and coral floors, granite counters, new French doors and windows. New paint inside and out, new AC, newer plumbing and roof. $565,000 OBSERVER Just Sold Homes 111 Mariner Way, Maitland, FL 32751 sold by Catherine DAmico 1329 Medinah Court, Winter Park, FL 32792 sold by Julie Bombardo 805 Maryland Avenue, Winter Park, FL 32789 sold by Sherri Dyer 160 Glenridge Way, Winter Park, $800,000 Nancy Bagby 3846 N. Lake Orlando Pkwy, Orlando, $310,000 Sandra Chitty 1911 Stonehurst Road, Winter Park, $987,500 Jerry Oller 2841 Aloma Lake Run, Oviedo, $402,500 Sharon Helsby 321 Running Wind Lane, Maitland, $767,000 MaryStuart Day/Megan Cross Bill Adams 4477 Barbados Loop, Clermont, $170,000 Jeff + Barbara Friedman 3047 Kasell Alley, Orlando, $465,000 Lisa Fleming

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Many people fear the effect Halloweens sugary treats will have on their weight and overall health. Page 18Letters to the editor LifestylesMaitland Police Departments newest patrol ofcer, and their only one with four legs, hits the ground running.Page 13 CalendarThe Goldenrod Parade & Festival is Saturday morning while Cows n Cabs is Saturday evening in Winter Park.Page 12 Fashion coverageFind the latest fashion news and trends from Park Avenue and beyond in our new monthly section.Page 16 Winter Park Recovery Center Executive Drug & Alcohol Treatment Services Suboxone Maintenance For Opioid Abuse Naltrexone Extinction for Alcohol2056 Aloma Ave, Suite 100, Winter Park, FL 32792 www.YourLifeRecovery.com 407-629-0413 CALL US TODAY FOR A COPY OF Your Guide to Social Security Bob@aSafeHarbor.com | ASafeHarbor.com(407) 644-6646 Learn more visit www.ss.vip2site.com When faced with stormy nancial waters, seek... Call us today for your guide to Social Security!404-644-6646 or visit www.ss.vip2site.com After more than a decade in the making, Mead Botanical Gar den now has a full-time steward with hopes of a thriving event center and revival of a nature preserve dancing in its directors head. Friends of Mead Garden, now called Mead Botanical Garden Inc. (MBG), had been working to revive the overgrown nature At Monday nights Winter Park City Commission meeting, it be the park, but the parks destiny as a combination preserve and MBGs hands. Its your park, MBG Executive Director Blydenburgh said. Its everybodys park. But for the next 50 years MBG of the parks visitor facilities, including the under-construction Grove amphitheater thats ex pected to draw in thousands in the years to come. But the deal is by no means McMacken said, pointing out an opt-out clause that lets the city reevaluate its contract with MBG every six months. future issues about how residents are allowed to use the park dur ing special events or whether the park will be closed entirely. seat, Maitland Mayor Howard Schieferdecker decreed Monday the chair left empty on the dais fol lowing Phil Bonus resignation two weeks prior. Four former city leaders and the current chair of the Planning & Zoning Commission threw their ers, who served on Council from 2004 to 2012, went from former to present Council member Monday Hes the only one thats been here at all the Council meetings, Councilman Ivan Valdes said as he nominated Flowers for the seat. the seat needed to be up to speed on city issues, and Flowers was the ARCHIVE PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERThe 13th annual Park Avenue Pet Costume Contest will be 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 28, at the Doggie Door/Unleashed. Please see FLOWERS on page 3Haunts around townFriends group takes over Mead operationsReplacing Councilman Flowers will serve until March electionISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff SARAH WILSON Observer StaffFlowers back in power in Maitland RENDERING COURTESY OF MEAD BOTANICAL GARDENThe Grove at Mead Garden concert venue planned since 2010, will serve as a music performance hub for Winter Park and the 250 youths involved in orchestra programs. Please see MEAD on page 3 Turn to page 6 for a Halloween events calendar

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Page 2 reviews know that Im a classic meat and potatoes kinda guy, so you can imagine my stom ach rumbling at me as I walked through the doors of the nation ally acclaimed Ethos Vegan Kitchen. Now vegan is serious vegetarian, and this extraordinarily well-planned restaurant is no meat (duh), and no dairy, eggs, honey or any other animal derivatives. So in my best crusader attitude I met with owner, manager and chef Kelly Shockley (hes totally vegan) and basically said, Lets check out that menu. And I am happy to report that Chef Kelly, while overseeing a daily menu that is 100 percent vegan, answered me by saying, thing. First, we want the food to taste good. We are a full-service restaurant and want to be com pared to other restaurants not Now I must say the menu reads like that of any ssshh (meat-serving) restaurant, so we started with an appetizer of Sausage Rolls and Black Bean soup. Hey wait a minute that spicy sausage baked inside a was explained to me that the sausage which looks and tastes like any spicy Italian sausage was made from wheat gluten. Its all in the spices, said the chef, and I settled back in my seat a assignment may be easier than I thought. My dining partner and I went wiches, each of which included a meat analog, which is a plantbased food spiced to look and taurant favorite is the Whats the Dilly, Philly?, which looks and tastes like a Philly cheese steak. Remembering that spices play a big part here, its a great sand wich, and the meat is replaced by seitan (be careful with that spell ing). Chef Kelly explained that seitan is, pure wheat protein (with more protein than there is in a steak), and it was developed by Buddhist monks more than a thousand years ago. Awesome. Special of the Day, which turned out to be a real winner. tofu (made to look like sliced tur key) served with sauerkraut, soy cheese and a homemade Russian third sandwich was the Coconut Curry Wrap, which featured grilled tofu the most recognizable of the lot along with celery, raisins, walnuts and coconut with a veganaise dressing. Pasta is, of course, a staple in a vegan restaurant and their Pump kin Seed Pesto Penne Pasta is for this foodie who says there is no such thing as too much pesto. Loved it along with the main dish of Pecan Crusted Eggplant, which can be real eggplant, because eggplant is a vegetable! My inquisitive nature, however, wanted to know about the delicious gravy and mashed potatoes that accompanied said eggplant. Chef Kelly explained the gravy is and liquid aminos (a soy sauce alternative), which added wonevery bit as good as Grandmas turkey gravy. It should be noted that they do their own version of Shepherds Pie, Crab cakes and Orange Chicken as main dishes as well. With all these choices so deliciously prepared this is cross-over food that could turn a cowboy into a vegan. For dessert, we shared a delicious chocolate amaretto mousse, the basis of which is silken tofu, and of course, cookies of all kinds that are generous in size and taste. Ethos Vegan Kitchen is a restau rant serving hearty, home-style the vegan research to the chef to worry about. All we have to do is wonderful food choice in Winter Park, and by eating there, we may be a little healthier than we would be by eating at some other home-style restaurant. moral nature of a person or institution, and the name rings true to this socially responsible and environmentally aware business. (407) 514-0087 3.05% Certain restrictions apply.Rates may vary depending on deposit amount. We broker CDs for FDIC insured banks. Promotional incentive may be included to obtain yield.www.oldharborf inancial.com Old Harbor FINANCIAL12 Month CDAlso oer IRA Specials & free 401k ReviewsAPYHigher Rates for Longer Term There are 3 convenient ways to vote in the November 6th General Election. Vote by mail with an absentee ballot Vote prior to Election Day at an Early Voting Center (Oct 27Nov 3) Vote on Election Day at your assigned Polling PlaceVoters will be mailed a sample ballot prior to the election. Pre-mark your ballot selections and use it as a guide on Election Day. The 2012 General Election ballot will be the longest in Orange County history so take time to prepare to cast your vote! Contact your Orange County Supervisor of Elections Ofce for more details or to request an absentee ballot. (407) 836-8683 www.orangecountyvotes.com Voting Made Easy! HALLOWEEN COSTUME CONTEST! Post your best Halloween costume photos on the Winter Park-Maitland Observer Facebook page for a chance to be published in the paper!PLEASE INCLUDE:rst name your city of residence description of the photoYou must reside in Winter Park, Maitland, Baldwin Park, College Park, or Goldenrod.The deadline to enter is noon Monday, Nov. 5. The deadline to enter is noon Monday, Nov. 5. Facebook.com/WPMObserver From the Corner TableEthos Vegan Kitchen spices things upJOSH GARRICK Observer StaffPHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERThe Pecan Crusted Eggplant at Ethos came with delicious gravy and mashed potatoes. Ethos Vegan Kitchen moved from Orlando to Winter Park in July. They are open daily from 11 a.m. until 11 p.m., is family-owned and operated by Laina and Kelly Shockley. Located at 601-B S. New York Ave. in Winter Park, call 407-228-3898 or visit ethosvegankitchen.com Visit the Ethos food booth at VegFest 2012 at Orlando Festival Park on Saturday, Oct. 27. The festival celebrates all things vegetarian and includes food, live music, non-prot and retail vendor booths, food demonstrations, kids activities and more. Plus, enter to win one of three Ethos gift certicates in the VegFest rafe. Visit cfvegfest.com Wear your Halloween costume to Ethos on Wednesday, Oct. 31, and earn a free cookie for your guise. Theyll also be featuring $1 off beer and wine from 5 p.m. to close.

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Page 3 most well informed. Dale McDonald, chair of the Planning and Zoning Commis sion and also a regular at the meetings, was eliminated from the race after Schieferdecker requested that the appointee not run for the seat in the March would give an unfair advantage, and McDonald has already an nounced his candidacy for Coun cil. Valdes appointment was sec onded by Councilwoman Linda Frosch and sealed by the mayor. Councilwoman Bev Reponen said she was concerned that Flowers was already so busy as the director of the Performing Arts of Maitland that being on Council may put too much on his plate. She instead nominated former mayor Robert Breaux open to appointment, following former mayor Doug Kinsons this time his nomination was outvoted. I really do like them all, Schieferdecker said. I will vote for any of the four because they ple. But maybe someone else should have a turn. on the spot and took up the seat remainder of the meeting. Flowin and serve in the seat until the March election. Its time to help the Council through these couple of months and then send it on to the next, Flowers said. Flowers also serves as a mem ber of the citys Charter Review Commission, which presented suggestions to the Council this week following a special meet met to draft possible changes to the Charter regarding the citys power to remove Council mem spurred following the Council realizing it had no power to re ing the prostitution and DUI scandal that surrounded him earlier this month and led to his eventual resignation. Commission Chair Robert Gebaide presented possible revi sions to remedy this and other is sues, including adding driving toxication, theft, or prostitution to reasons a Council member will Commission also proposed the city drafting a standard code of would be held. all of the revisions suggested by the Commission, pending more discussion to be had at a special day, Oct. 29, at 6:30 p.m. in Coun cil Chambers. Any proposed revisions to the Charter must be approved by Council and submitted to the supervisor of elec tions by Jan. 25 so they can be placed on the March ballot. FLOWERS | City Council seeks power to remove members CONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGECommissioner Carolyn Cooper said shed already heard from an gry residents during some of the parks few closures during the for special events, only netted the city $19,640 in revenue, Cooper said residents noticed the down time and feared future charges to get into the park. I think the people of the city need to be able to be in the park without paying a fee or walk through the park without paying a fee, Cooper said. But Mayor Ken Bradley said that groups should be allowed to special events, namely weddings. I dont think people having a wedding there want to have peo ple walking their dogs through it, Bradley said. Most of MBGs locus of control would be over the north side of the park, where most of the parks private events already occur. Its also where the waterfront Grove amphitheater will rise from the edge of wetland that had become overgrown in recent years. herits use of the maintenance barn and the parks dirigible-sized con verted lecture hall and classroom, the same place that once hung plans for Meads revival. And now the onus is on MBG to turn what had been a perpetual that hopes to break even or better vestment last year was $100,000 into construction, maintenance and other expenses. Eventually, McMacken said, the city hopes to not have to fund the park at all, once its pulling in enough visitors and special events to pay for itself. admission charge such as what Leu Gardens in Orlando charges. admission, Blydenburgh said. Other gardens do, and some charge quite a bit. We want to get to that point where were able to increase the amount of money we can charge for certain events. All of the revenue the park generates will go back into fund ing the park. Only a maximum of 20 percent of revenue can be used toward administrative costs. Blydenburgh holds MBGs sole paid position for now. McMacken said that its a good especially if MBG eventually Were not losing money, Mc being reinvested back into Mead Garden.MEAD | Many say dont charge a fee CONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE I dont think people having a wedding there want to have people walking their dogs through it. Mayor Ken Bradley ARCHIVE PHOTO BY KATIE KUSTURA THE OBSERVERMaitland City Councilman Jeff Flowers served from 2004 to 2012. He replaces Bonus.

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Page 4 Business Briefs Community Bulletin Michelin donates to Maitland SoccerMaitland Soccer Club has received $1,658 in donations and equipment from Maitland Tire Co. and Michelin North America. Over the last 12 years, the Michelin Soccer Program has do nated funds and equipment because of committed dealers such as Maitland Tire Co.Ballot background available onlineA customized sample ballot for every voter in Florida, accompanied by extensive information about the candi dates and issues that theyll be voting on is the latest feature of the League of Women Voters of Florida Education Funds nonpartisan online voter re source, BeReadyToVote.org. The web sites sample ballot tool provides infor mation about candidates professional, career and educational information, as well as nancial data about campaign contributions. Other items available on the site include written position statements, videos, answers to the Leagues candidate questionnaire and links to the candidates websites. Program serves 1,203 homelessFifth Third Banks Summer of Dreams recently concluded the 10-week program, which provided food, activities, mentoring, school supplies and nancial counseling for parents in Orange, Seminole and Osceola counties. In total, 1,203 homeless students were served. Visit TheSummerofDreams. comNew online way to see Central Florida historyThe University of Central Floridas new RICHES Mosaic Interface, an innova tive online project, taps into places, people and events that shaped the regions history using geography and time to display search results. Visit http://riches.cah.ucf.edu/mosaic.php Garden Club looking for membersOrlando Garden Club has openings for new members men and women! If youre interested and want more in formation, call 407-645-0944 or visit orlandogardenclub.org/ Get your u shotFlu shots for children and adults are offered at the Orange County Health Departments Central Health Center at 832 W. Central Blvd., Monday through Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. on a rst-come, rst-served walk-in basis. The immunization program is closed the second Friday of each month. In Seminole County, u shots for children and adults are available at the Seminole County Health Departments Sanford location at 400 W. Airport Blvd. Monday through Friday 8 to 11:30 a.m. and from 1 to 4 p.m. The immunization clinic is only open from 8 to 11:30 a.m. on the second and fourth Thursday of each month. Flu shots are free for children up to 18 years of age. For information, visit orchd.com and SeminoleCoHealth. comMaitland in need of volunteersMaitland residents are invited to par ticipate in their city government. Vol unteers are needed to serve on various advisory boards. Those interested can apply online at ItsMyMaitland.com/offers_volunteers.aspx or by contacting the City Clerk at mwaldrop@itsmymai tland.com Send submissions to jandreasson@ turnstilemediagroup.com The Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts event on Saturday, Sept. 22, recognized Chef Louis Perrotte as an Ami Spcial du Collge (Special Friend of the College). The Rollins College Crummer Graduate School of Business has been recognized for the past four consecutive years as a top leadership development educator by Leadership Excellence magazine. For the 2012 ranking, Rollins was cited as 19th in the nation and the highest ranked in Florida. Will Graves has been appointed an adjunct instructor of Business Ethics at Columbia Colleges Orlando campus. In August, individual Amscot customers were asked to donate $1 to their local edu cation foundation. Amscot customers donated over $161,385 and was combined with Amscots match of $10,000 for a total of $171,385. The money was distributed among education foundations to support students, teachers and public schools in the counties where Amscot services. J. Jeffrey Deery, a shareholder attorney with Winderweedle, Haines, Ward and Woodman, has received multiple professional recognition nods in the past several months. He most recently was lauded as one of Orlando Home and Leisure maga zines top area lawyers. Easter Seals Florida, the Orlando-based non-prot organization that provides exceptional services to children, adults and veterans with disabilities and special needs, has a new member of its Central Florida Advisory Board. Kaleb Harrell, principal of Soapbox Marketing Group, joins as the nations oldest and largest voluntary health organization marks its 93rd year. The University of Central Florida Business Incu bation Program is celebrating its 13th anniversary in October. The job-generating program now has three Orlando facilities at the UCF campus, in Cen tral Florida Research Park and on State Road 50 near downtown, and locations in St. Cloud, Kissim mee, Sanford, Winter Springs, Leesburg, Daytona Beach and Apopka. Send submissions to jandreasson@ turnstilemediagroup.com Student empowers herself and others Izzy Hadala, 14, is on a mission to empower kids with physical differences. Since rst grade, Izzy has given a speech on the rst day of school every year to educate her classmates on her physical disability. Izzy was born with ectodermal dysplasia, or lobster claw syndrome, which halted the development of her teeth, hands and feet. Izzy, a Orangewood Christian School student, wrote the book, The First Day Speech, to help tell her story and empower others who look physically different. Izzy transformed her story into a picture book that follows a little boy named Nathan as he struggles to accept his physical difference, a cleft lip. See more of Izzys story here: http://bit.ly/TEbuCw The Voice in its third year Winter Park High School is home to the nations rst high school chap ter of the English-Speaking Union, an international organization devoted to advancing global understanding by providing educational opportunities through programs and scholarship for students, educators and members. Its goal is to promote communication and open exchange of ideas among the worlds speakers of English. ESU provides tutoring to ESOL students, sponsors writing contests and brings in guest lecturers. Pictured are found er and WPHS senior Sylvie Wise and Kenneth Curry Professor of Literature at Rollins College Maurice OSullivan at the Central Florida English-Speak ing Union dinner held at Maison de Jardin on Oct. 8. For more information about The Voice, the high school chapter of ESU, email Sylvie Wise at Wise. Sylvie@gmail.com Manners moms book publishedManners That Matter for Moms, published by Harvest House, was released nation wide on Oct. 1. The launch party was held at Tollas Ital ian Restaurant in Winter Park with author and Winter Park resident Maralee McKee and her family. For more than 10 years, Maralees mentoring and manners programs have been featured nationwide. She has traveled nation ally presenting contemporary etiquette programs for large corporations, universities, womens groups and ministry organizations. Her fun etiquette classes for children gained national media attention and were featured on NBC news. In her new book Manners That Matter for Moms, Maralee gets to the heart of why etiquette is important in todays fast-paced society. Visit www.mannersmentor.com

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Page 5 KEEP UP WITH MAITLAND NEWS AND EVENTS!www.IndependenceLane.com Facebook.com/ItsMyMaitland Wildcats come homeArtists converge in Central ParkPHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERModels graced the runway at the annual Harrietts Park Avenue Fashion Week runway show on Saturday, Oct. 20. The show included looks from the Emerging Designers contest that honored the city of Winter Parks 125th anniversary, s uch as top left. Above, is a Cur rent model. Middle is a The Collection Bridal model. Top right is a Lilly Pulitzer model.PHOTOS BY REBECCA MALESFred Hoffman, left, artist of Eggstraordinary Eggs, demonstrates the drill he uses to carve and sculpt eggshells at the Winter Park Autumn Art Festival on Oct. 13. Peggy Miller, top right, artist for Pegs Jewels, shows sample pieces of woven silver to her patrons. Meagan Ward, above right, feels a scarf from Fiberlicious. The Winter Park festival, in its 39th year, awarded more than $16,000 to Florida artists.PHOTOS BY CLYDE MOORE THE OBSERVERWinter Park High School celebrated its homecoming with a parade on Wednesday, Oct. 17, down Park Avenue in Winter Park. Fashion to the forefront

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Page 6 OCT. 25 The Harvest Hustle 5K: Race to End Childhood Hunger will take place in Bald win Park on Thursday, Oct. 25, at 6:30 p.m. Visit www.run4acause.org/jlgoOCT. 26Halloween Spirit Stroll a costumed pub-crawl through Baldwin Parks Village Center, will be from 7 p.m. to midnight on Friday, Oct. 26. Visit http://bit.ly/Uos0KN The Breakthrough Theatre of Winter Park presents The Twilight Zone from Oct. 26 though Nov. 5. For reservations, call 407-920-4034. Winter Park Cheer Athletics Gyms Haunted House is 8 p.m. to 11 a.m. Oct. 26 and 27 at 6870 Stapoint Court, Winter Park. Call 321-972-6945. OCT. 27The annual Halloween 5k Run/Walk to benet Haiti will take place on Saturday, Oct. 27, at 7:30 a.m. at Mead Gardens in Winter Park. Visit StMargaretMary.org/ halloween5k.html A Childrens Not So Spooky Tales and Masquerade Ball will be held at the Maitland Public Library on Saturday, Oct. 27, from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. The next wine dinner at SoNapa Grille in Maitland will be Saturday, Oct. 27, at 6:30 p.m. and will have a Halloween theme. Its $60 per person. Call 407637-2933.OCT. 28Kids Halloween Party: Movies, Cos tumes, and Pizza is Sunday, Oct. 28, at 11 a.m. at Enzian Theater in Maitland. Tickets range from $5 to $15. Visit www. enzian.org The Fall Festiva l in Baldwin Park will be Sunday, Oct. 28, from 6 to 8 p.m. in the North Park Baptist Church parking lot at 2047 Prospect Ave.ONGOINGOperation Gratitude collects candy and gifts for American servicemen and women. Drop off candy and letters of appreciation at the following locations: Fire Station 61, 343 W. Canton Ave.; Fire Station 62, 300 S. Lakemont Ave.; Fire Station 64, 1439 Howell Branch Road; Winter Park City Hall, 401 S. Park Ave.; The Winter Park Public Library, 460 E. New England Ave. Call 407-454-0878, e-mail opgratitudeorlando@gmail.com or visit operationgratitude.com Enzian Theatre will be showing Halloween movies throughout October. Each presentation is $8 general admission and $5 for Enzian Film Society members. The lms include: V/H/S (new release), midnight, Friday, Oct. 26 and Saturday, Oct. 27; Theatre of Blood (1973), 9:30 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 30; Poltergeist (1982), 8 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 31. Visit www.wpmobserver.com/ events/search for more details. Send submissions to jandreasson@ turnstilemediagroup.com Halloween Calendar Happy Hour for Hunger Help us ght hunger in Central Florida! ursday, November 8 5:30 7:30 p.m. at Winter Park Village Tickets: $20 Reserve at winterpark.org Proceeds to benet Event Partners Aloma United Methodist Church Condev Custom Homes Greater Orlando Actors Theatre Holler Hyundai Menchie's Frozen Yogurt at Winter Park Corners Menchie's Frozen Yogurt at Winter Park Village Madeline Moran Sally Ward Interior Design Tsunami Custom Printing UCF Athletics Association, Inc. Unleashing Performance, Inc. All About Travel Arrow Pavement Services, Inc. BARR Financial Services, LLC Big Brothers, Big Sisters of Central Florida Joan Cross International Association of Administrative Professionals J.P. Associates, Inc. Jewett Orthopaedic Convenient Care Center Gerry Marino Seniors First, Inc. Sheraton Orlando North The Ravenous Pig AFLAC Sutton Homes Alzheimer ALF United Legacy Bank EPOCH PROPERTIES, INC. Erik C. Larsen, P.A. Greenberg Traurig Majestic Jewelers, Inc. Victory Martial Arts Goodwill Industries of Central Florida Maile Image, Modeling & Acting Walker & Company Lombardi's Marketplace, LLC HAUNTS AROUND TOWNVisit wpmobserver.com for our full Halloween events calendar. OCT. 27: Carnival Halloween Carnival at Eden Bar is Saturday, Oct. 27, from 8 p.m. to 2 a.m. Its free for ages 21 and older. OCT. 28: Costume Contest The 13th annual Park Avenue Pet Costume Contest will be 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 28, at the Doggie Door/Unleashed, 329 N. Park Ave. Visit theDoggieDoor.com OCT. 31: Pumpkins & Munchkins Pumpkins & Munchkins is Wednesday, Oct. 31, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., in Shady Park, adjacent to the Winter Park Community Cen ter. Call 407-599-3275. OCT. 27: Trick or Treat on Park Kids Trick or Treat on Park Avenue is 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Oct. 27 at participating Park Avenue stores.

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Page 7 to make this one memorable Sat may not meet again. Its been 10 games since the 2002, and in that time theyve traded winning streaks, with the Knights winning the last seven. In the meantime they had an un easy relationship as the Knights pursued bigger teams as their USF Bulls, who own a 4-0 record against the Knights. shot at the Bulls in 2013, but as Conference USA, theyre taking a 35-17 thrashing of Memphis (1-6, 1-2) on the road, with a resurgent Latavius Murray carrying the yardage himself, with 192 yards on the ground. At the same time quarter back Blake Bortles was stymied by Memphis defense, throwing for only 122 yards in the game. UCFs defense helped out in the Bouye snagging a third quarter interception and returning it 32 yards. In the fourth, Bouye did it again, picking up a Memphis fumble and racing 79 yards for the touchdown that would be the deciding score of the game. against Marshall. Despite the Herds seemingly middling re cord, they boast the seasons nation in Rakeem Cato, who av erages more than 375 yards per game in the air. Couple that with Marshalls 59-24 blowout over Southern Miss on Oct. 20 and the Herd is on a roll this season. UCF also has one of the top ranked defenses in the confer ence, adept at stopping oppo nents near the red zone. What could be crucial is stopping big plays by Marshall. In this game the best team at stopping scor ing in the air, UCF, will be play ing the best at making it happen, Marshall. the Knights will have an auto matic bowl bid to take away the sting of last seasons many nar row losses. With a record and onthe 2010 season, the Knights are on pace for one of their greatest seasons of all time. W.Va., at 8 p.m. Saturday night, televised on the CBS Sports Net work. but Winter Park (2-5) struck back again and again in their 27-7 win Oct. 18. Now the Wildcats are looking for gridiron redemption after a midseason skid that lasted four losses. And they may be looking for more support from quarterback Asiantii Woulards right arm after his performance against the Falcons. Woulard would deliver with 251 yards in the air, including three touchdown passes to lead his team to victory. Gabe McClary raced 69 yards after a reception to take the lead over East River in the second quarter, and the Wildcats didnt look back. since Sept. 7, when they beat Edgewater 26-13 in their only oth er win of the season. team (2-6) thats still struggling to season and have since gone on a six-game skid, including a 63-20 Oct. 18. two games than they had all sea Edgewater Quarterback J.B. Woodman threw for one of the greatest games of his career, but it wasnt enough for Edgewater (2-5) to edge out the Oviedo Lions (6-1), who won by the margin of a sin gle missed extra point, 20-19, on Oct. 18. tually narrowing the gap thanks to Woodmans 205 yards passing game, and hooked up with Keith Dilley for another 45 in the air. Da vid Greens rushing touchdown made it close, but several missed goal line scoring attempts and a Eagles chances. 28 win over West Orange, their narrowest win so far this season.ARCHIVE PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERRunning back Latavius Murray carried the majority of UCFs total yardage himself against Memphis. Now the Knights are gearing up for their nal matchup with Marshall.Cats break losing streakISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff Knights end a rivalryISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff WINTER PARKNext game vs. Colonial Grenadiers at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 25EDGEWATERNext game vs. Apopka Blue Darters at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 25

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Page 8 As a Rollins College senior and resident of Winter Park, its hard not to notice the symbiotic relationship between the Winter Park community and the school extending from the west side of campus, means Rollins students at least a sidewalk, if not more, with Winter Park residents. Park Avenue, the heart of downtown Winter Park, runs directly into our campus. Naturally, boundary lines tend to blur. er and Rollins weekly student nating in this monthly column. spur, I work to ensure students are informed about the goings-on of Rollins; it only makes sense to do the same for members of the larger community that houses us. Maintaining this awareness includes presenting information about events, particularly as Rollins has recently acted as a venue as Jane Goodall and President Barack Obama, providing rare and unique experiences to those in attendance. on reporting news and happen ings around campus, but also on providing an outlet for students to voice opinions and interact with one another. As a student publication, we welcome a wide variety of ideas and understand the importance of sustaining discourse and maintaining relationships within a community. Park should have every oppor tunity to engage with members of Rollins on a regular basis, and facilitate those opportunities by er about the many Rollins events that are open to the public and free of charge. Halloween HowlHalloween Howl, a safe, daytime Halloween celebration, will be Saturday, Oct. 27, on Mills Lawn from 2 to 5 p.m.First Friday at the Cornellseum, located on campus, hosts various events throughout the year that should be taken advan tage of by students and community members alike. Among these is First Friday at the Cornell, providing later hours and free admission on Nov. 2, from 4 to welcoming Dr. Ena Hellers lecture, Reading the Bible Aestheti cally, on Nov. 8, from 7 to 7:30 p.m. Honorable Melanne Verveer Ambassador-at-Large for Global Womens Issues, will discuss her part in the advancement of roles of women in economic and politi cal processes around the world through integration into foreign policy, as well as the larger issue to Do: Advancing Women and Girls around the World, at Knowles Memorial Chapel on Monday, Oct. 29, at 7 p.m.Martin Luther King IIIAlso taking place at Knowles Memorial Chapel, as part of the Winter Park Institute, Martin Lu ther King III will speak about his humanitarian work and equality Civil Rights Struggles of the 21st Century, on Nov. 15, from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. I look forward to seeing readevents in the future. More infor mation is available at thesandspur.org and rollins.edu, and I can be reached at chief@thesandspur.orgHana Saker is the editor of The Sandspur Floridas oldest college newspaper and a senior at Rollins College. 250 North Orlando Avenue Winter Park, Florida 32789407.677.9777FEATURING ...... AND MUCH MORE! A Premier Flooring Source Wood Floors Savannah Court and CoeExcellence in Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation 1301 W. Maitland Blvd. Maitland, FL 32751407-645-3990www.SavannahCourtMaitland.comAssisted Living Facility License No. 8447 Skilled Nursing Facility License No. 1635096 At Savannah, it feels just like home. Its safe, convenient and the food is excellent. And of course, my mom is a huge fan of Bingo! Ernestine & her daughter PatriciaAssisted Living Rehabilitation and Skilled Nursing Care Variety of Apartment Suite Selections, some with Lake Views Restaurant Style Dining Laundry, Housekeeping, Maintenance Services Transportation to Outings and Medical Appointments Beautifully Landscaped Courtyard Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above. You are always welcome! A Senior Living Community where Hospitality is a Way of Life. IN THEATERS NOVEMBER 2!Paramount.com/flightTickets are available while supplies last. Seating is NOT guaranteed and is on a rst-come, rst-served basis. Theater is overbooked to ensure a full house. YOU AND A GUEST ARE INVITED TO ATTEND THE ADVANCE SCREENING OF For your chance to receive an advance screening pass for two go to WWW.GOFOBO.COM/RSVP and enter the code: WPMOT01H A B CNAME THAT PILOT!Email FLIGHTGiveaway @Gmail.com with the names of the actors who played these pilots and in which movie! Winner will receive First Class seats at the advance screening! Hana Saker The Rollins ReportFostering our relationships Martin Luther King III Melanne Verveer Plan your weekend withThe Weekender!This weekly newsletter keeps you up to date on events happening in Central Florida's cities, including Winter Park, Maitland, Oviedo, Winter Springs, Avalon Park and Waterford Lakes. Visit wpmobserver.com and click "Subscribe to Newsletter"

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Page 9 It is hard to believe that fall is already upon us. Our city has been busy during the last month, and there are many things to look forward to during the remaining months of the year. With the arrival of fall comes cooler weather, fall festivals, foot ball games, and of course Hallow een! The city of Maitland is again making safety a top priority dur ing this evenings hours of Hal loween trick or treating. Parents and drivers are reminded to be extra cautious on Halloween when children will be dressed in their costumes and running from house to house looking for those special treats. The Maitland Police Depart ment is actively involved with our citys families each and every Hal loween. The Police Department will have a full complement of po lice cruisers out during the trick or treat hours from 6 to 9 p.m. to add an additional safety presence across all neighborhoods in the city. Continuing their yearly tradi be busy handing out glow sticks for the kids in our neighborhoods. Not only do the kids love them, but they are a great safety feature for kids walking in the neighbor hoods. We would urge anyone who is planning on going out trick or treating this Halloween to stay safe. Listed below are some safety tips to help make your Halloween more enjoyable and safe!! Halloween safety tips: trick-or-treating alone. Be sure older children take a friend, and that a trusted adult accompanies small children. small children to the door of every home they approach. ians are familiar with every home and all people from which the children receive treats. tioned that they should not enter any home without prior permis sion from their parents or guardians. not to approach any vehicle, occu pied or not, unless they know the owner and are accompanied by a parent or guardian. glow stick when out at dusk and costumes and bags to help drivers see you. make sure children are able to see and breathe properly and easily. All costumes and masks should tant. to never approach a home not well lit without a porch or outside light on. treats. Avoid eating homemade treats unless you know the cook well. tioned to remember any suspi cious incidents and report them to their parents, guardians, and/or Sgt. Louis Grindle Maitland Police Department Special Operations / Community Policing Have a safe and fun Halloween!City Council Meeting of Oct. 22The Maitland City Council met on Oct. 22, at 6:30 p.m. in the City Hall Council Chambers. Below is a synopsis of that meeting. Special Presentations:Mayor Schieferdecker pre with a Retirement Resolution in appreciation of his 25 years of faithful and devoted service to the city as a member of the Fire Res cue Department and wished him continued good health and pros perity during his retirement years.Consent:utes of Sept. 24, 2012 and received several Advisory Board Minutes. terlocal Agreement with Orange County for the purpose of fund ing and contributing to the Or ange County Watershed Atlas Project.Decisions: velopment Director, was appoint ed Member and Mayor Schiefer decker, Alternate Member to the South Seminole & North Orange County Wastewater Transmission Authority. the Pension Review Committee ter Review Commissions report was tabled and will be discussed again at a special Council Meeting scheduled for Oct. 29. submitted by City Consultants, cepted as presented. Dan Bellows to separate impact fees from an existing develop ment (Gem Lake Apartment) and make them available on the open market was tabled until the Nov. 12 Council meeting. cancy created by the resignation of Councilman Phil Bonus. To listen to a recording of the meeting, visit itsmymaitland.com Oct. 22 City Commission meeting highlightsThere was a City Commission meeting Oct. 22. Below are a few highlights of decisions made:Mayors Report ed declaring the week of Oct. 27 as the Week of the Family awarding Gary Olson the 2012 AwardConsent Agenda approved. purchase software that improves ance and payment processes was approved. Inc. was approved as Insurance Agent of Record. cancelation of the City Commis sion meeting Monday, Dec. 24, was approved. Action Items Requiring Discussion lease and operational agreement was approved with amendments. rected to broaden the scope of the project.Public Hearings and terminating the development Swoope Ave. was approved. lard Properties Inc. regarding the properties at 407 and 409 St. An drews Blvd. was withdrawn by the applicant. dinances related 901 and 911 N. Orlando Ave. for WaWa were ap proved. A full copy of the Oct. 22 City Commission minutes will be available at cityofwinterpark.org the week of Nov. 12, pending ap proval by the City Commission.New re apparatus dedication ceremony On Friday, Oct. 26, at 3 p.m., the Winter Park Fire-Rescue De partment will hold a traditional dedication ceremony formally ac cepting into service the agencys ment. This ceremony will take place at Fire Station 61 located at 343 W. Canton Ave. More than a year ago, the de partment initiated discussions that led to a change in the type of aerial apparatus it would pur chase to replace the existing unit. Seeing an opportunity to improve the department the following ef the citys narrow streets and turns ate, storage space the rear allows for the consolida ment onto one unit bines the technology of today with the proven maneuverability of tiller-driven trucks. The new tractor-drawn aerial truck repre sents the return of an apparatus style that is seeing resurgence around the country. Winter Park joins other Florida cities such as Tampa, Jacksonville and Clearwa ter, which have recently returned these maneuverable units to their The dedication ceremony will include a tour of the unit, driving demonstration and will conclude with the traditional push back of the unit into service. For more information, please call 407-599Early voting at the libraryThe Winter Park Public Library Ave. is a site for early voting for Orange County residents only will run from Saturday, Oct. 27, visit the Orange County Superviballots and other voting matters. extra patient and courteous in the library parking lot.Trick or Treat on Park AvenueKids in costume can trick or treat at participating stores along Park Avenue Saturday, Oct. 27, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. This free event is presented by the Park Avenue Merchants Association. Pumpkins & Munchkins in Shady ParkThe Parks & Recreation De partment of the City of Winter Park will present Pumpkins & Munchkins in Shady Park on Wednesday, Oct. 31, from 6:30 to Park Community Center at 721 W. Munchkins of all ages are in vited to attend this free familyties will include games, bounce houses, a costume contest, Trickor-Treat Trail and safe Halloween fun for everyone. If inclement weather tries to dampen the eve ning, the event will be moved into the Winter Park Community Cen ter gymnasium. For more information regard ing Pumpkins & Munchkins in Shady Park, please call 407-5993275.Second annual Veterans Day CelebrationOn Friday, Nov. 9, at 10 a.m., the city of Winter Park will pres Day Celebration. This event will be held in honor of all of the vet erans of Winter Park at the Winter Park Community Center Ruby Ball Amphitheater located at 721 Beginning at 9:30 a.m., the Band will be entertaining guests as they visit with organizations begin with musical tributes, anec dotal speakers and recognition of veterans according to the various military branches and campaigns served. For more information, please Operation Gratitude remembers soldiersThe Winter Park Fire-Rescue Department (WPFD) is once again supporting Operation Grati tude, a program designed to col lect candy and gifts for American service men and women who are currently deployed in the remote regions of Afghanistan and other hostile regions of the world. Residents of the community and letters of appreciation be tween now and Saturday, Nov. 10, to one of the following Winter Park locations: Ave. Ave. Branch Road Items will also be collected at Celebration Friday, Nov. 9, at 10 a.m. at the Winter Park Commu nity Center Ruby Ball Amphitheland Ave. For more information regard ing Operation Gratitude, please tudeorlando@gmail.com or visit operationgratitude.comVisit the citys ofcial website at cityofwinterpark.org, like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and watch us on Vimeo. Winter Park City TalkBY RANDY KNIGHT CITY MANAGER Maitland City TalkBY HOWARD SCHIEFERDECKER MAYOR Halloween fun and safety PHOTO BY STEVEN BARNHART THE OBSERVERCenter for Independent Living held the Stroll N Roll event around Lake Baldwin on Oct. 13.Rolling for a cause

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Page 10 9 am to 4 pm Saturday, November 10, 2012 Historic Lawton House & Lawton Elementary Downtown Oviedo, FL (Free Parking at Oviedo High School) SPONSORED BY: www.GreatDayOviedo.org Visit our Festival Website FREE ADMISSION FREE PARKING FREE SHUTTLE PRESENTING SPONSORThis festival is a scholarships and grants for 39th Annual Arts & Crafts Festival GREAT DAY IN THE COUNTRY fundraiser to help provide local schools & charities G reat Day in the Country is a huge family-oriented Arts & Crafts event hosted by the GFWC Oviedo Womans Club. We have over 350 Arts & Crafts Booths, Business Booths, and Community Service Booths. throughout the day on 2 stages. We also have a special childrens play area and lots of food & drinks. The event is located on the grounds Graham Avenue, Oviedo, FL 32765. If you go to the intersection of Lake Jessup Avenue and Broadway (also known as S.R. 426 and Aloma), its impossible to miss it. Oviedo High School, and you can from the show. Shuttle Bus Details: The free shuttle bus will run continuously from 9 to 4, but if youd like to walk, the high school is close enough to get to Great Day by foot. The bus picks up from the street that (King Street, look for a big sign). The bus drops/picks up at Great Day on the bus ramp of Lawton cafeteria near ArtFest). It usually circuit once every 20 minutes. The shuttle bus has room to stash strollers and wheelchairs for the ride, and it is air conditioned. privately owned) locations around at rates usually ranging from $5 to local civic groups or charities and signage indicating the rate and the cause. FORECLOSURE DEFENSECERTIFIED FLORIDA SPECIFICFORECLOSURE PREVENTION COUNSELORTim MoranAttorney at Law407-366-TLAW(8529)Fax: 407-366-8528 WILLSCONSUMER BANKRUPTCYTRUSTSCONTRACTSGUARDIAN ADVOCACYPROBATEGARNISHMENTSSHORT SALES Initial Consultation FREE THE LAW O FFICE OFM T M T M T T T T T M T M M TIMOTHY A. MORAN, LLC FORECLOSURE DEFENSECERTIFIED FLORIDA SPECIFICFORECLOSURE PREVENTION COUNSELORTim MoranAttorney at Law407-366-TLAW(8529)Fax: 407-366-8528 WILLSTRUSTSCONTRACTSBANKRUPTCY Initial Consultation FREE LANDLORD/TENANT

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Page 11 are all local acts. They are competing for prizes: $500; $300; $100 O p e n t o a l l a g e s & a c t s T h i n k y o u h a v e w h a t i t t a k e s t o w i n t h e g r a n d p r i z e ? Auditions being held at Oviedo High School Auditorium, 601 King Street, Oviedo, FL Saturday, September 15, 2012 from 9 am to 6 p.m. Go to www.GreatDayOviedo.org for contest details and to download the entry and consent forms. If you have any questions or to submit all forms please email: entertainment@GreatDayOviedo.org As cars speed by on Broadway Street, Oviedo resident Courtney Wright carefully helps a woman carry a box of T-shirts across the busy road. Wright is used to helping cusHelps, a thrift store and food pan try for the needy or homeless. The next day, shell mark her fourth anniversary with the charity. Though she has a passion for helping the homeless and less timately wants to help people in the operating room, to go to medi cal school and be a cardiovascular struggles, Wright is now a fresh man at Seminole State College, ago seemed out of reach. Charities, schools and students looking for scholarships continue thanks to funds raised from the Great Day in the Country Arts and Crafts Festival, an event put on by the General Federation of Womens Clubs (GFWC) Oviedo Womans Club. Saturday, Nov. 10, will mark the 39th annual installment of the festival, a gathering that of fers Oviedo not only a free juried art show, but a fundraiser for the community. Finishing up her last year at Oviedo High School, Wright ap plied for a scholarship from the GFWC Oviedo Womans Club in last February and was informed in April that she had won $3,000 I was very happy to get it. Its been very helpful with the books and everything; I didnt realize how expensive it would total out to be, Wright said. I was very happy to win. Great Day in the Country Chairwoman Angela Iversen said that it was Wrights 700 hours of community service that earned her the scholarship. The award is an example of how the club has put an emphasis on funding edu cation with money earned from the arts and crafts festival. We take it very seriously about handing out the money, Iversen said. We want to make its doing. in the Country raised last year, $15,600 went to scholarships and $10,225 went to nine local schools in need. toward four new iPads for its reading coach. Additionally funded by Ovie do attorney Tim Moran, the iPads are used for communication and reinforcing handwriting and sen tence structure skills. berg applied for the grant last year and was thrilled to have been chosen for the funding. I cant thank them enough, because I would not have had the opportunity to have had an iPad in my classroom, Chellberg said. Because the world is technology need that exposure and to have that experience. Chellberg said the clubs out reach to the community does a lot of good. I have always heard about Great Day in the Country and knew that they did a fundraiser, but I was not aware until I actu ally applied for the grant of all the fabulous things they do and the many organizations that they help, Chellberg said. The Great Day in the Country Arts and Crafts festival taking place this November will be a installment nearly 40 years ago. The festival originally had a dozen booths and raised $500, which The festival now has about 400 booths, including vendors, spon sors and 350 juried artists and crafters, who will be competing for $4,000 in prize money. This years festival will also in troduce a brand new talent show called Great Days Got Talent, for a $500 grand prize and addi tional featured acts will perform. With $4,290 going to charities such as Shepherds Hope, The Great Day in the Country con tinues to be source of culture and hope, Iverson said. There are so many good things in Oviedo, but we feel like making both a contribution going to make our community a better place to live, Iversen said. of life for those who live here because youre only as strong as the weakest citizen in your area. We feel that we need to make every body as strong as possible.Oviedo Womans Club gives back to the community through scholarships, grantsTIM FREED The Observer The 39th annual Great Day in the Country Arts and Crafts Festival will take place from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 10, at Lawton Elementary School in Oviedo. Admission is free and free parking is available at Oviedo High School. PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVEROviedo Womans Club members, from left, Lauratta Tice, Angela Iversen, Leslie Freeman, and Roberta McQueen pose outside the Clubs headquarters in Oviedo. The group has raised and donated thousands of dollars in scholarship money to aspiring local college students. en Morgan Gumbleen Grace Smith & Malavika Kannanen Megan Katarinaen Shannon Broome & Kyle Broomeen Marlee Pierceyen Jenna Crouch

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Page 12 Calendar OCTOBER Flemings Prime Steakhouse & Wine Bars latest Cocktail for a Cause is the Sweet Charity. For the entire month of October, sales of Sweet Charity will be donated to The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. The cocktail will be on Flemings for $6 til 7 bar menu and available after 7 p.m. for $9.95.OCT. 25On Thursday, Oct. 25, at 11:30 a.m., the Maitland Chamber will host a luncheon featuring Bill Donegan, Orange County property appraiser. Donegan will discuss how property appraisal can impact busi nesses and the citys tax base. For infor mation or to reserve a spot, email Jlee@ Maitlandchamber.com. The price per person is $25. The event will be held at Sheraton Orlando North. On Thursday, Oct. 25, the Maitland Senior Center will host its rst health fair from noon to 3 p.m. Check out new trends and speak with health care professionals, housing specialists, area service provid ers, Medicare advantage plan providers, home care providers and hearing special ists. The event is free, with free health and hearing screenings. The Maitland Fire Department will also be offering u shots. The Winter Park Playhouse Spotlight Cab aret Series presents Chris Leavy in They Dont Write Em Like That Anymore on Oct. 25 at 7:30 pm. Tickets are $20 or standing room for $10. Seating is limited to 54, so advance reservations are rec ommended. To purchase tickets, call the box ofce at 407-645-0145. For informa tion, visit WinterParkPlayHouse.org On Thursday, Oct. 25, the Winter Park Public Library will host a star panel of chefs and cookbook authors at Books and Cooks, a culinary-themed celebra tion of literature. This ticketed event will take place from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Rachel D. Murrah Civic Center. The $10 ticket includes admission; choice of a glass of wine, beer or a cocktail; and gourmet caramel popcorn from The Ravenous Pig. For tickets visit wppl.orgOCT. 27The Winter Park Food Truck Fiesta Winter Park Style will be at Fleet Peeples Park on Saturday, Oct. 27, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Food Truck Crazy will feature 10 of Central Floridas nest gourmet food trucks. There will also be light music and childrens entertainment. Proceeds will benet Winter Park charities. For informa tion, call 407-296-5882. The opening program of the 2012 Bach Festival Society Choral Masterworks series presents music by six contempo rary composers in two performances by the renowned Bach Festival Choir and Or chestra. The two performances will take place at Knowles Memorial Chapel at Rollins College, but with the pre-concert talks in the music building at Rollins. The rst concert will be Saturday, Oct. 27, at 8 p.m. with the pre-concert talk starting at 6:15 p.m. The second concert will be Sunday, Oct. 28, at 3 p.m. with the preconcert talk starting at 1:45 p.m. Tickets range from $25 to $55. For tickets or in formation visit BachFestivalFlorida.org or call 407-646-2182. Join the Winter Park Breakfast Rotary, the Winter Park Police Department and Shred Pros for Shredfest 2012 beneting The Rotary Foundation and Arts in Action. Destroy old documents and enjoy food, crafts, a rafe and community vendors. Its Saturday, Oct. 27, from noon to 3 p.m. at the Winter Park Police Department. Requested donation for unlimited boxes is $5 for individuals and families, $20 for companies. For information, contact 407588-1147 or cdygan@thegrove.orgOCT. 28The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens will celebrate Czech Independence Day on Oct. 28 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. All visitors to the museum will be admitted free of charge. Free bagel breakfast, live entertainment, giveaways and prizes will be enjoyed at the Jewish Pavilions Party in the Park on Sunday, Oct. 28, at 9:30 a.m. at the Plaza at Cranes Roost Park in Altamonte Springs. Proceeds benet the Jewish Pavilion. For information, visit jewishpa vilion.org OCT. 29Melanne Verveer, U.S. Ambassador-atLarge for Global Womens Issues, will be at Rollins College Knowles Memorial Cha pel on Monday, Oct. 29, at 7 p.m. Her free talk will be about The SMART Thing To Do: Advancing Women and Girls around the World. RedCarpetMonday will have a busi ness networking event on Monday, Oct. 29, from 6 to 9 p.m. at Galopin. Meet and mingle with fellow business own ers, professionals and entrepreneurs while enjoying appetizers, drink and rafe prizes. Tickets are $20 online and $25 at the door. Visit RedCarpetMonday.com and select Orlando.OCT. 31 The Winter Park Garden Club will have a class on line design at 10 a.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 31. Materials will not be provided, and the cost is $10. Registration is required by Oct. 29, and can be done by calling 407-644-5770.NOV. 1The Orange County Retired Educa tors Association will meet Thursday, Nov. 1, at 10 a.m., at College Park United Methodist Church, 644 W. Princeton St., Orlando, for a program on Lifes a Trip Tours with Barbara Mills. Visit ocrea-.org or call 407-677-0446. Anyone who has worked in education is invited to join. NOV. 2The 19th Annual Caregiver Conference Another Part of the Puzzle Tack ling Difcult Challenges Caregivers Encounter by the Alzheimers and De mentia Resource Center will be Friday, Nov. 2, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Florida Hospital Church. Registration will begin at 8 a.m. The registration fee is $25 and $10 for additional family members. For infor mation email cindi@ADRCCares.org or call 407-843-1910 extension 301.NOV. 3Winter Park Methodist Churchs Rum mage Sale is Saturday, Nov. 3, from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. The proceeds will support student mission trips. The sale will be at the corner of East Morse Boulevard and South Knowles Avenue. For information, visit FUMCWP.org North Park Baptist Churchs Women on Mission Outreach Ministry For Military Veterans will gather from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, Nov. 3, to make Christmas Angel meal-tray favors for veterans liv ing at the VA Community Living Center in Lake Baldwin. Bring glue guns and scis sors to create small ornaments for veterans. For information, contact 321-9725900, npbc@northparkbaptist.org or visit NorthParkBaptist.org There will be an antique show and sale on Saturday, Nov. 3, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday, Nov. 4, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Womans Club of Winter Park, 419 S. Interlachen Ave. Orlando Garden Clubs Annual Holiday Market will be Saturday, Nov. 3, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at 710 E. Rollins St. Parking and admission are free, and lunch and re freshments will be available for purchase. For information call 407-299-5412. Party like a caveman at the Orlando Science Centers sixth annual Neanderthal Ball on Saturday, Nov. 3, from 7 to 11 p.m. For information, call 407-514-2233 or visit osc.orgNOV. 4The Central Florida Watercolor Society will hold its meeting on Sunday, Nov. 4, at 1:30 p.m. at the Maitland Art Center. A short business meeting will be followed with a watercolor demonstration. The demonstration is open to the public, but there will be a $10 fee for non-members to attend, due to limited space availability. Call 407-415-0594. Dena Wild, Florida Master Gardener, will lead a free presentation on Herbs for the Holidays on Sunday, Nov. 4, at 2 p.m. The Orlando Area Historical Rose Society meets at Harry P. Leu Gardens. For information, call 407-647-1219. Visit www.wpmobserver.com/ events/search for more details. Send submissions to jandreasson@ turnstilemediagroup.com OCT. 27: Cows n Cabs The Winter Park Food and Wine Classics Cows n Cabs is Saturday, Oct. 27, from 7 to 10 p.m. in the West Meadow. The event will have a foodand-wine walk around with gourmet fare and wine and craft beer tastings from as many as 16 local restaurants. The proceeds will benet the Coalition for the Homeless and Community Food and Outreach Center. The event will be at 151 E. Welbourne Ave. NOV. 4: Witness The Holocaust Memorial Resource and Edu cation Center will have the premiere of a new Readers Theater piece as part of its annual remembrance of Kristallnacht. On Sunday, Nov. 4, the drama Witness will be presented at 4 p.m. in the auditorium of the Jewish Community Center in Maitland. Admission is free and reservations are recom mended. For information visit holocaustedu. org or call 407-628-0555. Pictured: The synagogue in Bamberg Germany was one of more than 1,000 synagogues destroyed on the night of Nov. 9-10, 1938. Photo is courtesy of Weiner Library Collection. NOV. 1: Dream Wedding The Art & History Museums Maitland (A&H) will have an evening for anyone planning a wedding. A Midsummer Nights Dream Wedding will be Thursday, Nov. 1, from 6 to 9 p.m. at the A&Hs Chapel and Courtyard. The event is free. To reserve email Rentals@artandhistory.org NOV. 2: First Friday Charity Festival First Friday Charity Festival & Art Stroll will be 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 2, along New Broad Street. For information, visit facebook.com/BaldwinPark FirstFridayFestival OCT. 27: Goldenrod Parade The 34th Annual Goldenrod Parade & Festival will be Saturday, Oct. 27. The festi val will kick off with a pancake breakfast at 7 a.m., the parade at 11 a.m. and end with a cookout and kids corner from noon until 2 p.m. Sponsorship opportunities are available. For information, please contact the chamber at 407-677-5980. This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORG @EnzianTheater OPENS FRIDAY!Produced by Ira Glass from THIS AMERICAN LIFESLEEPWALK WITH ME Fri Sun 4:00, 6:30, 9:15 Mon, Wed, Thurs 6:30 & 9:15 Tues 6:30 only Midnight Movies: V/H/S Fri & Sat 11:59PM Cult Classics: THEATRE OF BLOOD Tue 9:30 Kids Halloween Party: THE NIGHTMARE BEFORE CHRISTMAS Movie, Costumes, and Pizza! Sun 11AM (Event), 1:30PM (Film)Halloween Carnival at Eden Bar

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Page 13 Lifestyles Introducing the newest Tranquil Oaks Cremation Garden at Baldwin-Fairchild Glen Haven a breathtaking garden lled with beautiful and lasting options for families and individuals choosing cremation.Cremation with remembrance...what a beautiful idea. Glen Haven Memorial Park STEIFor a COMPLIMENTARY TOUR OR INF ORMATION, call (877) 531-6257 or visit BaldwinFairchildC remationI nfo.com.Oaklawn Park Cemetery Offering the Simplicity Plan Give them a place to leave flowers. Give them a place to leave flowers. TOBF_WtParkMaitlandObserv_3colx5.indd 1 7/17/12 3:31 PM October 26th & 27th 8pm to 11pm $10 donation OPEN TO THE PUBLIC Winter Park Cheer Athletics Gym 6870 Stapoint Court Winter Park FL 321.972.6945 www.wpcheerathletics.com H A U N T E D H O U S E Its just before 7 p.m. on a Thursday night in October as Maitlands night-shift police ofthe daytime events, and whats ahead. Two Baker Acts and a recovered laptop tally out the day shift says. The Weather Channel, silently projected on the conference room wall, predicts warm, muggy conditions for tonights patrol. He says theres a Muslim speaker at the Roth Jewish Community Cen ter. Theyre expecting a crowd. They want the K-9 to keep the peace, he says. And to give him some good practice. Stitt, the man in the back with uniform shirt, nods before gather ing his things for his 10-hour shift. Stay alert, stay alive is the leaders last instructions before Stitt hits the road with his partneragainst-crime. Bosco, the Maitland Police Deand their only one with four legs, hits the ground running, Stitt in tow, on this, his seventh day pa trolling the citys streets. A bathroom break, some au dible slurps from his back-seat water bowl, a few excited whines and a two-mile drive later, and Boscos night begins. You ready? Stitt asks. Leash on, over-sized ears alert and his eyes dilated in focus, the 2-yearold Dutch Shepherd beelines for Top of his classThe pair hit the streets in Stitts tober after 600 hours of training and graduating at the top of their training class. Stitt, a seven-year veteran of the department and headstrong Shepherd shipped in from Germany, are Maitlands dog retired in 2009. Its taken months of obedience, narcotics and patrol training to get the pair on the road, which Stitt admits had its highs and lows. From two hospital trips for limbs being in the wrong places during training, to praise of Bosco being the best dog on the job that long-time handlers have seen in years, he says coming together as a K-9 team has been the most trying and rewarding thing hes done in his life. handler it was a struggle for me. But hes so loyal and so obedi ent, he just wants to please you, and its amazing to experience, Stitt says. The pair travels from home to work and back, never leaving each others sides. At home, Bosco is sitting, guarding the bathroom door while Stitt takes a shower, and at work he is never more than a door-opening button push away from his side. [Having the police dog] not only gives us the ability to search for missing persons and suspects scene present, Deputy Chief Bill Stitt says this has already prov en true. When a criminal escaped Winter Park Hospital and hijacked gunpoint before crashing the car into a Maitland home in Septem ber, Bosco and Stitt were there to When you see that guy hit the ground harder than hes ever in his life You cant put a price on that, Stitt said. After that, in my eyes, hes al ready paid for himself, Maitland Councilwoman Linda Frosch said, having had the scene recounted to her at a recent Council meeting. Bosco, his supplies and training were paid for through donations and forfeiture funds collected by the department.On the roadAfter a few walks of the perimeter of the JCC, Boscos nose to the ground smelling for anything that signals trouble, the crowd clears and any possible crisis is averted. The pair goes back on patrol. Theres a pit stop for dinner at McDonalds, Stitt feeding extra fries to Bosco through the fencing that separates the front and back seat. Soggy ones are left behind in the bag. I wouldnt even feed these to him, Stitt says, wiggling a limp fry in the air. The smell of fast food over powers the slight smell of dog that permeates through the car. Stitt says the smell may be the for the past week that theyve been on the road together, but he for the next 10 years, itd still be worth it. Back on the road, as the car ap Maitland Avenue, Bosco whines and wiggles in the backseat. He knows, Stitt says, when he gets here, its playtime. The two pit stop for bathroom and play breaks every hour and half through the night to let Bosco service arent coming in. The excitement for him comes from tracking down the bad guy, Stitt says, but when bad guys arent available, his solid plastic tube toy that Stitt keeps in his work. Boscos marbled brown and black body tenses as he focuses frame on the toy in Stitts hand. behind. The dog thrashes the toy back and forth, as hes trained to do to a criminals forearm when the time comes. Slobber covers the toy, and it wraps its way around his pointed snout. ing back, but Bosco doesnt stop until Stitt calls him back and he unwillingly gives up his plastic prey. Thats one thing Stitt says he can always count on Bosco for, to never give up. Hes not going to give up on the road, Stitt says. Having that drive, man, thats special. Aside from his encounter with the prison escapee last month, most of Boscos on-the-job calls so far have been drug searches of vehicles. The pair gets a call cops there suspect drugs to be in an apprehended subjects car. Bosco darts to the car, circling it, his nose following cracks in door and windows, until he eventually sits next to the drivers side cation of narcotics. A search reveals nothing, but, in the car hands over a pipe with small indications of cocaine resi had done eight searches, signaled four positives, which resulted in drug arrest last week. By having Bosco on the road, safer when responding to calls, but residents can feel safer knowing hes on patrol around town a time.Canine cop patrols the Maitland community Three years after the last K-9 retired, a new four-legged member of For more information about the Maitland Police Department and K-9 program, visit itsmymaitland.com/PDSARAH WILSON Observer Staff PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVERBosco, a headstrong Dutch Shepherd, stays alert as he sits with handler Ofcer Taylor Stitt.

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Page 14 Saturday, November 3, 2012 Saturday, November 3, 2012 Saturday, November 3, 2012 Saturday, November 3, 2012 Saturday, November 3, 2012 Saturday, November 3, 2012 OCT. 27On Saturday, Oct. 27, Paws Care will host Time to Share at Pookies Bow Wow Bakery from noon to 3 p.m. It is the kick off of Food for a Good Paws holiday food drive; donations will ben et Paws Care. To learn more, visit PawsCare.orgNOV. 1Popcorn Flicks in Central Park featur ing Chicken Run is 8 to 10 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 1, in Winter Parks Central Park. Trinity Preparatory School invites the public to a middle school musical pro duction of Just So, inspired by the stories of Rudyard Kipling. The show times are: Thursday, Nov, 1, at 4:30 p.m.; Friday, Nov. 2, at 7:30 p.m.; Sat urday, Nov. 3, at 7:30 p.m.; and Sunday, Nov. 4, at 2:30 p.m. All tickets are $5. Trinity Prep is lo cated at 5700 Trinity Prep Lane. Visit TrinityPrep.org or call 407-671-4140 for more information. NOV. 3The annual Harvest Fest will be from 2 to 6 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 3, at Audubon Park Elementary School. This event includes carnival games, bounce houses, fabulous food trucks, a bake sale, spirit store, live interac tive DJ and the Gifts From The Heart Silent Auction. Paws for Peace Walk will be from 9 a.m. to noon at Blue Jacket Park on Nov. 3. This family and dog-friendly event will raise money for Harbor House Central Florida, which serves domestic abuse victims. Visit harbor house.comNOV. 8Trinity Preparatory School invites the public to a performance of the one act production Tigers Be Still. The show times are: Thursday, Nov. 8, at 4:30 p.m.; Friday, Nov. 9, at 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, Nov. 10, at 7:30 p.m.; Sun day, Nov. 11, at 2:30 p.m. All tickets are $5. Trinity Prep is located at 5700 Trinity Prep Lane. For more informa tion, visit trinityprep.org or call 407671-4140. NOV. 10Movie in the Park featuring Mirror Mirror is 7 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 10, at Quinn Strong Park in Maitland.ONGOINGMaitland Public Library events: Teen Read Week goes through Saturday, Oct. 20. Sunday, Oct. 28, at 1:30 p.m. there will be a PAM Creative Writing meet ing. Tuesday, Oct. 30, at 4:30 p.m. is Simple Steps to a healthier family diet with Juice Plus. Register by call ing 407-647-7700. Saturday, Nov. 10, is National Gaming Day. It will feature electronic, carnival and board games Wednesday, Nov. 14, 4 to 5 p.m. for grades K through 5 is Culture Club: !Vamos a Mexico! The Maitland Public Library hosts preschool story and craft time every Tuesday at 10:30 a.m. Baby time stories and activities are at 10:30 a.m. every Thursday. Reading Buddies for kindergarten through fth grade is at 4 p.m. every Thursday. Legos Engi neers for ages 9-14 is 4 p.m. Mon days. Call 407-647-7700 to register or for more information. Send submissions to jandreasson@ turnstilemediagroup.com Visit PAGE 6 for Halloween event listings. through the doors of the Nemours Childrens Hospital in Orlando, which opened Monday, Oct. 22, the beds had already been laid in to test for comfort. The cribs had been climbed in with their little ones, and the tables had been sat at while by family might be able to have dinner together, even if one has to stay in bed. In the six-year journey to open Nemours Childrens Hospital, it hasnt just been the architects and doctors spending countless hours making design decisions. The families whose children might one day have to stay there got to make decisions too. More than 40 parents are members of the Family Advisory Council, which has committees deciding on the patient rooms features and layout, brainstorming ways to make the process easier for families and even inter viewing the doctors and nurses who will work there. They are family-centered care from the ground up, said Mait co-chair of the Family Advisory Council. They integrated everything we said we were being heard. Family-centered care is at the heart of the organizations philos ophy. They want to include par ents in the care of their children, which to them means listening to their concerns, asking for their opinions and making sure parents always know whats going on with their childs care. Theyre an embedded part of what we do, said Dr. Michael Campbell, director of patient and family-centered care at Nemours. Theyre the real experts and they We live it; were part of every treatment they do; were a part of every doctors visit, Lynda said. Im the one who knows my kid. Lyndas 6-year-old son Cian chronic lung disease. His many trips to the emergency room and stays in the hospital after surgery of experience to draw from when giving feedback on the building of the new hospital. Lynda, without hesitation, has climbed in beds and cribs to test them out for the committee, because she knows when a child is sick, nothing will keep a mom from hopping right in there with them. A week stay in a hospital without her heading to her own bed once isnt unheard of. Now, there will be a comfort able place to sleep, while before that wasnt the case. Weve slept in a chair for a week, she said. hospital will be private and much larger than average, because a whole family along with medical care professionals are intended to Theres a long counter to use for personal items, a refrigerator for family for dinner. Giant windows let in natural light and welcome distractions for kids and parents. Cians brother Patrick, 9, said that his favorite part of the new hospital is that hell have room to be with his little brother. Cians fahis previous hospital stays, their family felt fractured Lynda comforting Cian by staying over night, while Patrick was left with their older son. Now we can stay and be a family unit, the father said. Not only were parents able to give insight into what would make their whole family more comfortable in the hospital rooms, they were also given the oppor tunity to interview the doctors and nurses hired. Lynda has conducted more than 100 interviews and still does orientations for all employees, from security guards to heads of surgery, sharing what its like for a family of a chronical ly sick child. One of her favorite got into health care. A lot of times it was that emotional connection that got us, she said. tor will be part of the familys team and not be an outsider making decisions without them. And Nemours takes their suggestions seriously applicants were not hired if the parents didnt feel like they embodied the family-centered care philosophy. Its a relief for parents to have doctors they truly trust and like taking care of their children, Lynda said. It makes the connection be tween physicians and families that much stronger, Campbell said. In the end its made for more open relationships, and parents really feeling an ownership over a hospital theyve helped build themselves. Lynda will never for get the day she was driving down saw Nemours Childrens Hospital It was an overwhelming feel ing of comfort and joy and excite ment.PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERFrom left: The Grifn family, Cian, Patrick, Lynda and Patrick, pose in their Maitland home. Lynda, co-chair of the Family Advisory Council, helped Nemours design their facility.Hospital built by familiesNemours Childrens Hospital in Orlando involved families every step of the way in its construction, from design of the rooms to BRITTNI JOHNSON Observer Staff Nemours Childrens Hospital, located in Lake Nona Medical City, opened Oct. 22. The 630,00-square-foot, $397 million hospital includes a clinic, emergency department and education and research facilities. Visit nemours.org for more information.

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Page 15 Now through Jan. 6 Highlights of Morse Museums season The new exhibit at the Morse Museum features a recent gift, an Orientalist painting by Lockwood de Forest. De Forests oil painting haran landscape that is accompa nied by oil studies of other desert scenes and explanatory wall panels. In addition, the museum Glassmaking, a popular exhibit designers and artisans used to create blown-glass vases, leadedglass windows and lamps. Public programs will include free admission, live music and more during Friday Nights at the Morse seum.orgOct. 27 and 28 Bach Festival features visiting composersThe opening program of the 2012 Bach Festival Society Choral Masterworks series will present music by six contemporary com posers who represent the most accomplished choral and orches tra composers working today. Three of the six composers will be present at the performances including pre-concert talks for the public. The performances will take place on Oct. 27 at 7:30 p.m. (talk at 6:15 p.m.) and Oct. the Chapel on the Rollins College campus in Winter Park. Call 407Florida.orgNov. 3 National Symphony of Cuba in American debut Perhaps the most important and historic orchestral perfor mance of the season will take place in Daytona Beach on Nov. 3 when the National Symphony of Cuba makes its American debut right here in Central Florida. And the auspicious occasion is made even more important as the orchestra presents a block buster program, which includes pianist Nachito Herrera performing Gershwins Rhapsody in Blue followed by Beethovens Symphony No. 5. In this notto-be-missed performance, an Orchestra that could not travel to the United States a few years ago opens the Daytona Beach Symphony Societys 61st season with a glorious program that honors a great American composer and the worlds greatest composer in the or visit dbss.org Oct. 30 to Nov. 4 The Million Dollar Quartet Inspired by the true story of a once-in-a-lifetime recording session that brought together rock Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis and Carl turns the story into a Broadway musical. On Dec. 4, 1956, Sam Phillips brought these four musi cians together in Memphis for what would be one of the greatest jam sessions of all time. Million endary night to life from Oct. 30 to Nov. 4 with its irresistible tale of broken promises, betrayals and No. 1 hit songs at the Bob Carr OrlandoBroadway.com Nov. 3 Orlando Science Centers Neanderthal BallTime to go huntin for your new caveman couture and step out in Paleolithic style as the Orlando Science Center welcomes you to the sixth annual Neanderthal Ball. As the Science Centers premier fundraising event, the ball is also the wackiest (and most fun) gala of the season. It may be held in a museum, but coolest event this side of the Ice programming at the Science Center, and its an upscale dining event with gourmet food selections, themed music and silent contact Kathy Lopus at klopus@ osc.orgNov. 4 Brooklyn Rider Quartet returns to Central FloridaThe Bach Festival Society will bring the renowned string Florida for a residency reaching more than 3,000 Orange County Public School children. Known for its creative programming, the pretation of existing literature and to the creation of new works, including a newly commissioned work by jazz pianist and composperformance on Sunday, Nov. 4, at 3 p.m. at the Tiedtke Con cert Hall on the Rollins College BachFestivalFlorida.orgJosh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906. PURCHASE TICKETS TODAY www.BachFestivalFlorida.org 407.646.2182 Let there be light! MODERN MASTERWORKS Sat | Oct 27 | 7:30 pm Sun | Oct 28 | 3:00 pmKnowles Memorial ChapelBach Festival Choir and OrchestraWorks by Whitacre, Lauridsen, Moravec*, Paulus*, and more. Pre-concert Talk with Composers: Rm 119, Keene Music Bldg, Rollins Campus The Elizabeth Morse Genius Foundation JOHN V. SINCLAIR, ARTISTIC DIRECTOR AND CONDUCTORGalloway Foundation Josh Garrick Culture worthy of your calendar FOR LEASING INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT rffntb JOINING NATIONAL TENANTS NOW O PEN 130 E Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs PictureShow Cinemas Million Dollar Quartet The Wreck

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Page 16 NAME William Will Davidson President of Max Media WHY WILL? Will stands out. Even on Facebook! Id noticed how dapper this guy always was, tried to nd him and was sure his name was Max. Will is a class act, even more so in person, saying things like Yes, sir and No, sir. HIS STYLE IN AS FEW WORDS AS POSSIBLE Intriguing, cutting edge, not your norm BEST FASHION PURCHASE EVER My rst custom-tailored Astor & Black suit BIGGEST EVER FASHION MISTAKE Buying a pink blazer MOST RECENT FASHION PURCHASE Four custom Astor & Black suits YOUR LOCAL GO-TO FASHION SPOT John Craig or Current SOMETHING EVERYONE SHOULD KNOW ABOUT FASHION BUT APPARENTLY DOES NOT Youve got me on that one. With me, I think its OK to stand out. IF YOU WERE A DESIGNER, WHAT WOULD YOUR COLLECTION LOOK LIKE Theyd be Italian/Euro cut, slim tting, very sleek, tailored, different from your everyday norm suit. HOW DOES YOUR STYLE FIT WHAT YOU DO Im an entrepreneur. I work for myself. I really dont have to answer to anyone, so if I wanted I could wake up and wear pajamas, but I tend to wear something that Im comfortable in and people know me by. HOW HAS YOUR STYLE CHANGED OVER THE YEARS Everyone goes through phases and I went through a phase where I thought I was going to be the next extreme redneck sportsman. NAME Erika Boesch, Co-owner at Bistro on Park Avenue, formerly owned Absolute Dcor, now also has Bistro Loft Shop WHY ERIKA? Erikas simple style is always so consistent, classic to me, so it ts what she does and her role within the restaurant and seems so well suited to her easy manner and charming way of dealing with her customers. HER STYLE Simple, easy BEST PURCHASE A purse. I usually dont look for any brand, but a purse in pink. My favorite purse for more than three years. BIGGEST MISTAKE Leggings with a short shirt. RECENT PURCHASE A new purse from Coach. GO-TO FASHION SPOT Wright & Company, Piazza Italia, thats where I go most. FAVORITE DESIGNER I like Michael Kors, but usually I dont look for a brand. EVERYONE SHOULD KNOW They should keep in mind that they should look at their whole body when dressing, not using just a small mirror. WHAT WOULD YOUR COLLECTION LOOK LIKE Colorful, very colorful, pink, purple, white and grey tones HOW DOES YOUR STYLE FIT Comfortable, Simple, easy HOW HAS YOUR STYLE CHANGED I keep it very simple, so I havent changed too much. NAME Debra Hendrickson Vice president of the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce and Event director of Park Avenue Fashion Week WHY DEBRA? Dinner on the Avenue 2012 was canceled due to rain but her group went ahead with their good time inside Tuni with a Mad Men theme. I saw a photo on Facebook and Debra looked awesome!STYLE Tailored sophistication BEST FASHION PURCHASE The Tracy Reese dress I bought last year at Tuni that I wore to Park Avenue Fashion Week. BIGGEST MISTAKE Going to a Taste of Winter Park in a dark business suit. But that wasnt a mistake that was just being incorrectly dressed. I wore a cocktail dress to a Western hoe down. RECENT PURCHASE The dress I wore Saturday night for Fashion Week. I got it at LaBella Intimates (Hannibal Square). GO-TO FASHION SPOT I go to Tuni, woman was fanatical about head ing to the salon. Hair could be a little eccentric and wild then, and making an impact instantly was a priority. Big hair, curls sprayed to con crete perfection and total glamour were mandatory for Winter Parks elite women, even if they were just heading to the grocery store. it well, and its what lured her straight into her moms profession. They all looked like movie was obsessed with coming to the salon. I got to be around excit ing people who had exciting jobs and were beautiful. and Kendall Hair Color Studio in Winter Park, grew up in the hair salon. Her mom, Kendall Carney, is the original owner and was a staple of the Winter Park hair scene for nearly two decades. shed follow in her moms foot steps. The pull toward the whole scene of women socializing, be ing beautiful and supporting each to resist. Its all I ever really knew, she said. It just felt inherent. She literally grew up in the salon, Carney said. It was natural. cosmetology school out of high school, and she had her own The two became partners, with mom as the expert haircutter and daughter as the gifted colorist. They relied on each other to do their best but never had to say a word to know that. The expectation was unspo But she wasnt always a pro. the salon at just 4 years old, was doing laundry and sweeping by 9 and shampooing by 13. Shell poo she had to stand on some phone books to reach the sink, and drenched the poor client to the underwear. The woman had to go home to change before she could get her haircut. Of course her mom was always there to lift her back up. Shes always been a mentor and soundboard. When someone believes in you that much, you dont have the same kind of fear, she said. That same caring way her mother mentored and taught her soft-spoken, instantly trustable nature, and its hard to imagine her being tough or bossy toward anyone. Tara Jarvis, a stylist and man ager for Kendall and Kendall, said thats no show, and the respect they get trickles down to how they treat their own clients. She puts her faith in us. Ive never worked at a place like this before, Jarvis said. I came here and its like a family. Shes the most professional, not only runs a business, but is a true artist in the business, said Kelly Ginsburg, a client for six years. And its the art that really ing the same vision which she says is old Hollywood glamour full of femininity and seeing that come to life is one of the best moments you can have as a hair stylist. She specializes in color and said that no day or head of hair is the same. Your client really is like Coloring hair is painting, and she is a painter, Carney said. And clients can feel that pas sion and gift too. Its palpable, Ginsburg said. She infuses it throughout an en their artistry to work during Har rietts Park Avenue Fashion Week last week when they styled most of the models hair before they headed down the runway. She said its a little piece of heaven a taste of what its like to be the every second counts. Last year they did 90 percent of the models, and were so pumped afterward that they wanted to do it all over again. And she loves that while they are artists and can get the thrill of working down to the moment at Fashion Week, they dont have to be starving. She says its a great way to be creative while making a living, and she gets to create a culture that makes women feel beautiful and support her stylists dreams. I try to emulate the actions Ive seen her take in the salon, Jarvis said. One day I hope to be half as great as her as a business owner.PHOTO COURTESY OF KENDALL MCELVEENKendall McElveens salon, Kendall and Kendall Hair Color Studio, did most of the models hair for Harrietts Park Avenue Fashion Week last week. Her style is old Hollywood glamour.Growing up in the salonKendall and Kendall Hair Color Studio owner started helping her mom, the original owner of the Winter Park salon, when she was 9BRITTNI JOHNSON Observer Staff Kendall and Kendall Hair Color Studio is located at 339 S. Park Ave. in Winter Park. Owner Kendall McElveen has been making the citys women beautiful since she was just 17 years old, and makes her mark on Harrietts Park Avenue Fashion Week for the second year in a row, with her stylists doing most of the models hair. Visit www.kendallandkendall.com or call 407-629-2299. Clyde Moore I LUV Park Avenue Style Please see CLYDE on page 17 Davidson Boesch Hendrickson Read about Clydes fashion cred on PAGE 18Describe your style

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Page 17 Photo Courtesy of Sandra Johnson PhotographyFEATURING: Pet Trick or Treat in Park Avenue stores from 12noon to 3pm PLUS: Pet Related Vendors, Caricature Artist, Pet Photographer, Pet TrainersOn the corner of North Park Avenue & Gareld in Downtown Winter Park costume contest BENEFICIARY: FOUNDED & HOSTED BY MEDIA SPONS OR :FOR MORE INFORMATION: Please call 407-644-2969 or stop by our store at 329 Park Avenue North, Winter Park Winter Park CanalsHenry PeterBy Titusville Artist, Henry Peter was so enamored by his boat tour of our lakes that he went back many times and did a series of paintings. He has made limited edition canvas prints of the 3 of these paintings. ey are available at the Fredlund Fine Arts in Winter Park.Edition sizes are 10 Overpainted by the artist Image size 12 X 18 For more info visit: Fredlund Fine Arts 1143 Orange Ave. Winter Park 407-622-0102www.fredlundgallery.com Downtown Winter Park is still enjoying the success of Park Avenue Fashion Week 2012. The annual seven-day celebration of fashion and design in our com munity held more than 100 events, and salons and honored the city of Winter Parks 125th anniver sary. Thats a tall order and the with style and grace. Kudos to the event chair, Paige Blackwelder, coowner of Tuni, for her leadership in this fabulous event that attracts retail community. The most-anticipated event of the week is always the Runway Show. This year The Collection Bridal and Bay Hill Jewelers on Park stole the show with a surprise proposal for one of the models walking the runway. Her boy friend met her at the end of the she couldnt refuse. The model is the daughter of Mimi Goldman, fashion director at The Collection and she is head-over-heels excited to be planning a wedding. After the show-stopping perfor mance (we had to take an intermission after that much excitement), the team from Bay Hill Jewelers went back to preparing their new location. Theyve closed up their store in the Shoppes on Park. Look for them soon in the old Jacobsons space on North Park Avenue. They promise to be open in time for Red Bag Days and the next Sip & Stroll event. Under the tentFashion Week isnt the only group using the tent constructed in Central Parks West Meadow. This years tent served as the venue for the Winter Park Historical Associations Peacock Ball. This weekend it will also host the Winter Park charities. The brainchild of John Rivers, chef and owner at 4 Rivers Smokehouse, and David and Tina Larue of ABC Wine & Spirits, the weekend features a James Beard Tribute Dinner and the return of Cows & Cabs. Next up, look for the tent to get a little smaller and cooler as the city welcomes Winter in the Park, the annual holiday ice skating rink mid-November. The opening of the rink coincides with Red Bag Days, a pre-holiday shop local event at 45 participating Park Avenue area merchants. Shopping locallyNow that Ive mentioned it twice, I might as well explain Red Bag Days. The event is modeled after a downtown shopping event resembles Winter Park in many ways, from streetscape to familiar names of shops found in both com Red Bag Days, shoppers can sup their holiday shopping lists. Special savings are planned but they are being kept under wraps at the moment. Details will be released at RedBagDays.com soon. And, as part of Red Bag Days, the Park Avenue merchants will year. The success of the Sip, Stroll & Celebrate event in September has inspired a new theme: Sip, Stroll & Shop. Attendees will enjoy food and beverage pairings at participating store (more than 25 have already signed up) and take advantage of the Red Bag Days savings on Thursday, Nov. 15.Erika Spence is the senior director of marketing and communications at the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce. Visit WinterPark.org for more information. LaBella Intimates, Bella, Chicos. FAVORITE DESIGNER I like Tracy Reese. Sophisticated elegance, designs for the everyday woman. EVERYONE SHOULD KNOW Theres a fabulous Coco Chanel quote that would work perfectly here. But I also like the one that says fashion fades but only style remains the same. WHAT WOULD YOUR COLLECTION LOOK LIKE It would have lots of color. It would be natural fabric, natural Im not a designer! It would be able to t a womans gure, a curvy woman. It would have a long torso, so it would t a tall woman. It would be form-tting, soft and owy, but form-tting. HOW DOES YOUR STYLE FIT I like to be tailored. I like to wear suits, so that ts my Chamber of Com merce hat. I like to get dressed up and that ts my evening life. Im not a casual person. STYLE CHANGED Im not afraid to try some edgier things now than when I was younger. I was much more conservative when I was younger than I am today. NAME Hillary Hudgeons Has worked at Lilly Pulitzer on Park Avenue for about two years WHY HILLARY? Hillary is like the poster girl for the store where she works. I often see her on the stores Facebook page or her own page smiling and exuding as much vibrancy and cheer as Lilly Pulitzers Florida-perfect clothing. STYLE Trendy, but conservative. Classic. BEST PURCHASE The Elsa top from Lilly Pulitzer. Its something I can dress up or dress down, I can wear with everything. I have a favorite pair of blue jeans; I wear them all the time. Theyre from The Gap. BIGGEST MISTAKE My biggest ever fashion mistake, ever in my whole life? Stirrup pants. RECENT PURCHASE My most recent fashion purchase? I just recently bought my wedding dress. GO-TO FASHION SPOT Thats not Lilly? J Crew. FAVORITE DESIGNER Lilly Pulitzer, duh, of course. EVERYONE SHOULD KNOW Just because skinny pants are in style doesnt mean youve got to wear them. You can still be trendy but conservative. WHAT WOULD YOUR COLLECTION LOOK LIKE Well, I like to mix prints and patterns, bright colors, but I like something I can wear all the time. HOW DOES YOUR STYLE FIT My personal style ts in because I wear things I like to mix the prints and patterns but I can wear things and do anything but I still feel dressed and comfortable. STYLE CHANGED Its changed a lot because Im paying attention more to the things that I put together. Clyde Moore operates local sites ILUVWinterPark.com, ILUVParkAve. com and LUVMyRate.com, and aims to help local businesses promote themselves for free and help save them money. Email him at iluvwinterpark@earthlink. net or write to ILuv Winter Park on Facebook or Twitter.Erika Spence Business in the ParkFashion Week was full of success, surprises Proposal on the runway CLYDE | Trendy, conservative, classic CONTINUED FROM PAGE 16 Hudgeons

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Page 18 Opinions Many know the Coco Chanel But she also said: Fashion is not something that exists in dresses only. Fashion is in the sky, in the street, fashion has to do with ideas, the way we live, what is happening. Im not sure about the sky part, but with the rest I concur. About a month ago the editor of The Observer asked me about doing a separate column for an upcoming section: Park Style (See page 16). I jumped at it. Soon after I told a friend who responded: You? Yep! Me. And if I say so myself, Im perfect for the job. Over this past week Ive been talking with locals about their individual style and how it has changed over the years. Funny how some change dramatically and others very little. No matter your individual style, as with most everything else, I think age serves to make you more resolute in it, comfortable. You know yourself much better with each passing year. Ive kidded my life partner that I may be the missing link. Men may be from Mars and more like a Saturn type. I have a friend I can sit with and gab about fashion, but I lose her when I get as excited as her hubby about The Walking Dead. Clothes were clothes when I was a kid. As you get older, you notice more, want things you see, pair of jeans I had with an arrow across the back. I also remember wearing lots of warm-up type clothes in junior high. Neither are now pleasant memories. I abso period with more fashion donts someone did. What was your biggest fashion mistake? For me, short elf-like suede boots, which were like screaming gay! from a mountaintop. In college I started working at a Gap store as Mickey Drexler was transforming the company and making it into an iconic American retailer. Back then so much was about socks, or the col ors of the socks. Would you like that? You may have had blue and stirred you to purchase. And our UPTs (units per transaction) were upped. I also worked at a small clothing store called The Lodge on Franklin Street in Cha pel Hill. Back home, my parents now had a clothing store, and I thought a visit to the Calvin Klein space at the Atlanta Apparel Mart was near nirvana. When I began working for I discovered my tie and shoe gildo Zegna, Calvin Klein and Armani ties, and mostly Calvin Klein suits. If I say so myself in retrospect, not bad. Then, in 1995 we went to Italy for two weeks. gna ties before, yet he came home with as many as I did. We visited the market in Florence and the drill went like this: drink one beer, buy one tie, drink a second beer, buy two more ties, drink a third beer, yes, three more ties and so on. I needed extra luggage simply to carry my ties. that we were going business casual. That, my friends, is called irony. One fetish was being week to one of my Park Style mavens, I discovered what a won derful weight control nice suits can be. When you pay a good bit of money for a suit, theres real a big deal to buy a new pair of khakis. So consider yourselves warned with that Confucius-like grain of wisdom. When we moved to Florida in 2001, it was time to go truly laid never wanting to look at my feet out in public. But warm weather and sunshine changed all of that. Shorts and T-shirts to someone who despises cold weather are like Linus comfy blanket. My own personal mode of dress has changed dramatically over the years. I know more than a little bit about fashion, but the reason Im most thrilled to write about Park Style going forward is that, as with this past week, it gives me even more opportunities to meet new people, and because I realize that Park Style has no more to do with me and my opinion than it does any other local resident. I simply hope to be a magnifying glass: My desire is to focus on you and your style, that of your friends and neighbors, and tell your story. These pieces wont be about being the local fashion police as Im not sure I could ever earn such a badge but more the local fashion cheerleader. Go team!Clyde Moore operates local sites ILUVWinterPark.com, ILUVParkAve.com and LUVMyRate.com, and aims to help local businesses promote themselves for free and help save them money. Email iluvwinterpark@earthlink.net or write to ILuv Winter Park on Facebook or Twitter.Clyde Moore I LUV Winter ParkWe highlight local businesses that are utilizing and selling items made by other locals. Send submissions to iluvwinterpark@earthlink.net Local Luvn Local Loot Jewelry Loot Jewelry is made right here in Winter Park by designer Shauna Allen and her business partner, Day Gigliotti. Each piece of Loot Jewelry is handcrafted using vintage, up-cycled, reclaimed and repurposed treasures many centuries old. They combine these vintage elements with modern ndings. Check it out at the Blue Door Denim Shoppe on Park Avenue. Fashion about local peopleA healthier HalloweenHalloween is right around the corner. With all the candycentered festivities that Hal loween brings, many people have on their weight and overall health. This year, skip the worry healthier Halloween: 1. Prepare a substantial, healthy meal before trick-ortreating. If youre a parent, trickor-treating means huge amounts of sugar for your children. If kids leave in search of candy on an empty stomach, they are more likely to eat the candy before they get home. In order to prevent a candy overload, make sure your children eat a healthy meal that or-treating. This way, they will be less inclined to overeat their collected sweets. 2. Save the seeds from your Jack-O-Lantern. Pumpkin seeds are edible and high in nutri tional value. In fact, the seeds are and other important nutrients. Instead of tossing the seeds aside when carving pumpkins this fall, bake them for a tasty treat that is both healthy and festive. 3. Dont eat sticky candy. If youre going to eat candy this Halloween, make sure its not sticky. This type of candy which can lead to enamel decay and increases your chance of getting cavities. 4. Do eat chocolate. When consumed in small amounts, chocolate can actually be good for you. Dark chocolate is rich in antioxidants, which boost energy, repel disease and promote overall good health. Some of the most popular chocolate candies are low in calories and sugar, so do your research to make sure youre making the best choice. 5. Take advantage of the fall weather by exercising outside. Many Floridians look forward to the fall as a welcomed relief from the sweltering summer heat. Take advantage of the nicer weather and jog, run or walk outside. You can even make it a family occasion by walking around the neighborhood in search of the best Halloween decorations. Remember, the more you move, the more calories you burn so get out and get moving!Dr. Rene Cruz Board Certied Internal Medicine Physician Greater Orlando Medical Weight LossEnding senior hungerMore than 50 years ago, John F. Kennedy said, The war against hunger is truly mankinds war of liberation. Yet we still niors, its a persistent and increas ingly disturbing problem. Although Americans risk of hunger has fallen since 2009, the concern has actually grown among people 60 and older. According to the Senior Hunger Re port Card, a national study per formed by the Meals on Wheels Research Foundation, hunger is especially prominent among those just above the national poverty level. And in Florida, one of the top 10 states for food insecurities, senior hunger is even more severe. Throughout the state, the waiting list for home-delivered meals has more than doubled in the last nine years, from 2,976 in In response to the grow ing demand for healthy meals, Seniors First has pledged to help the Meals On Wheels Associa tion of America (MOWAA) end senior hunger by 2020. As part of our mission to enhance Central and help them maintain independence, weve made nutrition programs a top priority. Heres how our meal programs measured up in 2011: Through the Meals on Wheels program, Seniors First served 223,362 meals. Another 30,669 meals were provided to elderly and med-waiver clients through our in-home services packages for community care. Through the Neighborhood Lunch Program, Seniors First served 111,993 meals to 1,116 seniors at 16 sites in Orange County. To help seniors prepare for hurricane season and to prevent service interruption due to severe weather our team provided shelf-stable meals. Despite the economic chal lenges we face, the war on hunger must continue for the health and security of our communitys seniors. To meet their nutrition needs, we need the help of caring, faithful supporters like you. To support our meal programs, visit Thanks for helping Seniors First in the battle against senior hunger. Marsha Lorenz President/CEO Seniors First PHOTO BY CLYDE MOORE THE OBSERVERLoot Jewelry designer Shauna Allen left, and Becky Whitaker modeled for Blue Door Denim Shoppe during the Im A Survivor segment of the Fashion Show on Saturday night.Letters to the editor Send your thoughts (400 words or less) to Managing Editor Jenny Andreasson at jandreasson@turnstilemediagroup.com

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Page 19 Louis Roney Play On!Chris Jepson PerspectivesA change of men Putting the e in humanMuch has been made this election season over which candidate is telling the truth. Or presenting the facts. I am not sure of the relevance of truth, but I do believe uncertainty is critical in a dedialog, limits conversation and is anath ema to developing imaginative solutions to societal issues. My favorite book of the past 20 years begins with, About 200 years ago, the idea that truth was made rather than found began to take hold of the imagiRichard Rortys Contingency, Irony, and Solidarity. His observation about truth being made rather than found crystallized for me a way of thinking about myself and my place in society at large. I consider myself, philosophically, a pragmatist. Pragmatism was an early 20th century American philosophy that can, perhaps, be best summarized by what ever works, is likely true. As reality changes, so too, whatever works. Truth varies. Truth is changeable. No one possesses the ultimate truth. We should avoid seeking anything metaphysical, the truth of an idea is in its observable results. Rorty was a pragmatist. He wrote, Modern, literate, secular societies depend on the existence of reasonably concrete, optimistic and plausible scenarios, as opposed to scenarios about redemption beyond the grave. Too much of our national conversation today is overly concerned with matters of faith and truth. Id rather our conversation be a discussion of developing workable ideas of our fellow citizens. Poverty, for example, confronts us all daily. Regardless of whether we are impoverished ourselves, it is hard to ignore the exit ramp veteran hand out, near-toothless vagrant from public hous mayhem besetting his neighborhood. Poverty is a factor of the human condition. Deuteronomy 15:11 says, There will always be poor people in the lands. That observation is as accurate today as it was when written thousands of years ago. But because poverty and despair are part and parcel of the human condition does not absolve our nation you and I, America collectively from pursuing solutions. We once, too many decades ago, had a War on Poverty. Many argue it failed. It didnt accomplish its goals. Poverty per sisted. It was too expensive. The results were ambiguous. Besides, the Bible says, There will always be poor people. As if that is an argument for doing less. There are so many clichs that do not erished in America. The poor need to pull themselves up by their bootstraps. Or, Being broke is a temporary situa tion. Being poor is a state of mind. Or, Our life of poverty is as necessary as the work itself. Only in heaven will we see how much we owe to the poor for helping us to love God better because of them. What a crock. All of it. The measure of a culture is how well it takes care of its least capable citizens (its children in particular). Because we once waged war on poverty yet the poor re main does not mean we do not pursue pragmatic approaches to alleviating the remedies. But we must be relentless in our attempts. To be truly human is to be humane. Make that truth, you.Jepson is a 24-year resident of Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.USThe natural cure for an ill-administration, in a popular or representative consti tution, is a change of men. Alexander Hamilton Well, he did it. I knew he would. I predicted it years ago I even told b.w. he was going to do it. Ill bet you knew it too. The job market numbers came out a few weeks ago. Surprise! Magically that peared. It had to no president has ever been reelected with unemployment rate so close to the election how conve nient! What an amazing turn around, and the timing is a miracle! Isnt it wonderful Obama can now be legitimate! If you believe these numbers, Ive still got that Mrs. Clintons legacyIt appears that our auspicious secretary of state, Hillary Clinton, was frozen in a static state while four Americans, including an ambassador, were asking in vain for more security from the State Depart ment prior to their eventual murders in Benghazi. Well probably never know just exactly what happened in this time, which was conveniently blacked out for Clintons/Obamas machinations. Clinton had all the power of the State Department plus the ear of the president. Mrs. Clinton took full responsibility (three weeks her resignation. As we know, Mrs. Clinton is an old hand at cover-ups. Hillarys shall again have proof of her integrity and legacy as well. Meanwhile, she remains Obamas fall-guy. Pols are employeesAt a political convention this summer, we heard the words, government is the only thing we all belong to. And reminded us, We own this country politicians are employees of ours. There are 23-plus million people still looking for work, and as of Jan. 1, the rest of us will be facing a $494 billion tax increase. The sooner our elected employees remem ber this, and all of us remember what our job is (to vote!), the sooner we may make and take a realistic direction toward lib erty and freedom for future generations. Biden out of controlRudeness is a weak mans imita tion of strength, said long-shoreman/ the recent vice presidential debate. The smiling, grimacing, bulling and smirking ing and most unprofessional. There is strated self-control being interrupted debate where Biden showed no control of any kind. Mr. Bidens aggressive job to save Prexy Obamas dismal performance a week earlier was neither credible nor factual. When does energetic blustering overcome intelligence? Can in-yourface insults eradicate $16 trillion debts? Why do the Democrats think they gain by making presidential debates into got cha Letterman shows? We need know-howNo people will tamely surrender their liberties, nor can they be easily and virtue is preserved. On the contrary, when people are universally ignorant, and debauched in their manners, they will sink under their own weight without the aid of foreign invaders. Samuel Adams. Trillion for the 4th Straight Year Under Obama. What more needs to be said? Were drowning in debt that you, your children, grandchildren and their chil dren will forever be paying. Obama is borrowing and wasting our money and our futures as he leads all of us into povcial know-how at the helm seem essential at this time? About Roney: HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney) Regardless of whether we are impoverished ourselves, it is hard to ignore the exit ramp veteran hand out, dirty and demoralized. Or, the ubiquitous near-toothless vagrant from public housing interviewed on TV about the recent mayhem besetting his neighborhood. Support seniors at Walk in the Park on Oct. 28Imagine what it would be like to lose your health, your spouse, your friends and your home. No one wants to grow old alone. Yet most people do. Isolation, lonelilong-term care. People sleeping are what you see when you walk into a nursing home. Why bother to remain awake when there is little to look forward to? To make matters worse, Jewish seniors in assisted living and nurs ing homes often feel abandoned by the Jewish community. They no longer have the opportunity to participate in Jewish holiday celebrations. As former members of a vibrant community, they feel isolated from communal life. The Jewish pavilion is a lifeline for elderly Jews in long-term care. The Jewish someone in our community is in need. look after loved ones, brighten someones day with a gift or lift someones spirits with a visit or holiday celebration. Its in all 54 of the long-term care facilities where our culture is shared with residents of all faiths. Its not a place on the map. Its a place in the heart. Recruiting, training and overseeing a network of volunteers takes time and money. The Pavilion has four paid program directors (north, south, east and west) who coordinate up to 100 volunteers in each of their areas. They plan and facilitate all of the activities in a dozen buildings in their areas including Shabbat meals, holiday festivities, musicales and intergenerational activities. When someone calls the Pavilion, help is needed. Usually, there is a crisis such as mom just fell and now the family needs to determine whether she can continue to live by herself. The Pavilions new resource specialist is a trained social worker who tion, assisting seniors and their loved ones with all aspects of elder care. To provide Shabbat, holiday programs and weekly visitation to seniors, and for tions must be sought to cover the expenses of more than 50 parties a month, which take place all over town. Of the agency budget, 94 percent goes toward the provi sion of programs so that our elders in every facility are visited, feel loved and are included in the Jewish community. Residents of all faiths are invited to share Pavilion on Jewish foods and traditions. No one wants to be forgotten. It is the mission of the Jewish Pavilion to enhance the lives of our elders in long-term care by strengthening their connection to the community. While the word Pavilion to remember our Jewish elders as they transition to a long-term care setting. Your support is needed to ensure that our elders out and participate in A Walk in the Park tainment including the Orlando Jazz Band, a health expo, lots of vendors and activities for children, including a bounce house, clowns and face-painting. Win prizes and for more information.Nancy Ludin is the executive director of the Jewish Pavilion.NANCY LUDIN Guest WriterPHOTO COURTESY OF JEWISH PAVILIONPavilion Volunteer Susan Mazlin shares challah and honey cake for the Jewish New Year with a resident at Madison House. The Walk in the Park funds these events.

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Page 20 AUCTION-Real Estate & Personal PropertyCliffside Mansion & Cottages, 216+/Acre Country Estates, Offered in 17 Tracts in Carroll County and Galax, VA. Long frontage on New River Trail and Chestnut Creek. Guaranteed to Sell Over $699,000. November 8, 10am Personal Property; November 9, 10am Personal Property, Real Estate sells at NOON. Sale held On-Site-Tract 7, 506 Cliffview Road, Galax, VA 24333. 5% Buyers Premium on Real Estate, 10% Buyers Premium on Personal Property. For more infor mation, go to woltz.com or call Woltz & Associates, Inc, Brokers & Auctioneers, (VA#321) Roanoke, VA (800) 551-3588. 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Ideal candidate will have strong computer software/hardware skills. Ex perience with the following is preferred: Quark, InDesign, FileMaker, Macs. Legal background a plus. For immediate con sideration, please email your resume to: employment@flalegals.com. Location: Orlando (near Universal Studios). Com pensation: Competitive hourly wage, will discuss at interview. Please, no phone calls about this job (emails only). Do not contact job poster about other services, products or commercial interests. 866-314-3769AIRLINES ARE HIRING One Click. Job Resources. Real Results.The Employ Florida network helped me to improve my professional skills and connected me with a training opportunity. THE RESUL T: Elizabeth Matthews was trained and hired by Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point.Employ Florida is an equal opportunity program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. The Employ Florida telephone number may be reached by persons using TTY/TTD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711. Disponible en Espanol. ELIZABE TH MATTHE WS Monitor Technician and Unit Secretary Hudson, FL HIRED EmployFlorida.com1-866-FLA-2345 Find I LUV Winter Park merchandise and local art at ILUVParkAvenue.com407-539-3977 OBSERVEROpen Houses SUNDAY 2-5 NEW PRICE!HOME ON CORNER LOT IN KINGS ROW1800 King Arthur Circle, Maitland. 4BD/3BA, 3,052SF. Two master suites, each with own bath and walk-in closet. Formal living and dining rooms. Over sized family room has vaulted ceil ings, fireplace and pool views. Bamboo and coral floors, granite counters, new French doors and windows. New paint inside and out, new AC, newer plumbing and roof. $565,000 OBSERVER Just Sold Homes111 Mariner Way, Maitland, FL 32751 sold by Catherine DAmico 1329 Medinah Court, Winter Park, FL 32792 sold by Julie Bombardo 805 Maryland Avenue, Winter Park, FL 32789 sold by Sherri Dyer 160 Glenridge Way, Winter Park, $800,000 Nancy Bagby 3846 N. Lake Orlando Pkwy, Orlando, $310,000 Sandra Chitty 1911 Stonehurst Road, Winter Park, $987,500 Jerry Oller 2841 Aloma Lake Run, Oviedo, $402,500 Sharon Helsby 321 Running Wind Lane, Maitland, $767,000 MaryStuart Day/Megan Cross Bill Adams 4477 Barbados Loop, Clermont, $170,000 Jeff + Barbara Friedman 3047 Kasell Alley, Orlando, $465,000 Lisa Fleming

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