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Winter Park-Maitland observer
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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00210
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park FL
Publication Date: 04-26-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates: 28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID: UF00091444:00210

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407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC USPS 00-6186 Publisher statement on page 4. Thursday, April 26, 2012 50+ tax wpmobserver.comSubscribe now!Visit wpmobserver.com Taking care of our neighbors is an American value, and feeding our neighbors is a shared responsibility. Page 14Letters to the editor News Hundreds gathered to say goodbye to two Winter Park friends alongside a Cady Way Trail bridge on Thursday.Page 2 Restaurant reviewAt Cocina 214, quesadillas are comfort food for the hungry and sophisticated palate, Garrick says.Page 12 Calendar The fastest canines are training for the 5th Annual Doggie Derby, held Saturday, April 28, in Baldwin Park. Page 10 TAX DEFERREDFIXED ANNUITY RATE FOR 5 YEARS.Bob Adams 407-644-6646THE NATIONAL 5 YEAR CD RATE IS 1.34%3.35% 451 Maitland Ave, Altamonte Springs, FL 32701NEW Dermatology Ofce!407-599-SKIN (7546)*Waive co-payment up to $25 No referral needed Accepting all insurances Dr. John CottamDr. Ross Wheeler When Winter Parks coveted tree canopy started losing branches in a hurry, residents wondered why their trees were hit with the ugly stick. At the City Commission meeting on Monday, they found out. Telling a gruesome tale of how he nearly lost a leg and was badly burned by touching a 7,200 volt power line as a child, city engineer Don Marcotte opened a talk about safety versus aesthetics in regards to trees and power lines. While climbing a tree he accidentally touched a high voltage line that was within arms reach. The resulting brush with death and eight surgeries left him with a painful re minder of the danger of tree branches being too close to power lines. That safety issue led city staff to make a presentation created by Florida Power & Light Company to help the Commission and residents to understand why it was suddenly cutting trees so that their trunks and branches forked around power lines in a deep V shape. The reason, Marcotte said, was to keep power lines away from curious hands. Im certainly glad to see trees that are not near power lines, of course, he said. Recent changes to regulations for tree branch radius around nearby power lines increased Winter Parks allowable distance from 3 1/2 feet to 4 feet, then to 10 feet. Rather than trim ming the tops of trees to keep them away from lines, the city had been cutting trees using di rectional trimming, which causes the trees to fork around and away from power lines, leav ing a V-shaped gap in the middle of the canopy. Only in the last few weeks had the city actually seen the larger cuts taking place. Aesthetics are extremely important, but said. Trees and power lines do not mix. During her presentation, Assistant City Manager Michelle del Valle said that direction al trimming is also healthier for the trees, which could ultimately help preserve the canopy. Commissioner Steven Leary said that if the trees health was in jeopardy and there was a safety issue, then the cuts should be made, cit Martha Bryant-Hall nimbly navigates the sandy gravel streets outside her Maitland home, while stray rocks, dips and roots easily trip up those more than half her age. After more than 30 years liv ing off unpaved Amado Lane, near the Maitland Boulevard overpass on U.S. Highway 1792, shes an expert on the literal living in what was once called the Woodbridge subdivision, an nexed into Maitland in 2003. Once home to 13 houses, the small U-shaped enclave is down to six. The others, she says, have either burned down or fallen in on themselves over the years since she built her home here in 1979. Shell tell you of the peaks, a quiet peaceful neighborhood where everyone knows everyone, and she has ample space to plant her papaya plants and aza lea bushes. Shell also show you the pits. Shell point you to where the neighborhoods water main line dead-ends outside of her prop erty, and the dusty roads single overhead streetlight where it meets Mechanic Street. Shell walk you less than 200 feet from her driveway to the Maitland Boulevard overpass hear, the restless squeaky colony of bats that took up residence in the crevices under the bridge years ago. Now numbering an estimated 1,000 members, they come out to play in Woodbridge when the sun sets. When I built back here I thought itd be better by now, by the s I thought itd have improved, she said. But every place has changed around us, ex cept these little pockets of black communities. Id like for my neighbor hood to look like all the other neighborhoods around it. But it shows that theres really two cities of Maitland: the haves and the have-nots. for the have-nots to have their day at the negotiating table for ange County and, for the past 10 years, with the city of Maitland. But up until after she spoke her case in January at the Maitland mayoral candidate forum, Bry ant says shes never even been offered a seat. They wouldnt even give us a crumb from the table and Im a taxpayer just like everybody else, she said. Its not right. On Jan. 26, Maitland Mayor Howard Schieferdecker reached out and scheduled a workshop so Bryant could introduce him to her decades-old plight of the services she sees in her commu nity. The unpaved roads, lack of streetlights, bat infestation and lack of accessibility to Lake Jackson in another primarily blackpopulated area of Maitland near Bellamy Park with boundaries PhHOtTO bBY IsSAAcC BABcCOcCK thTHE ObsBSERvVER AA stop sign is falling over at the corner of Amado Lane and Mechanic Street just beyond the Maitland Boulevard overpass, whose crevices are home to a colony of bats Please see MAITlLAnND on page 6Shedding light on legacy problemsSome worry newly imposed tree-trimming regulations could affect Winter Park property valuesMaitland promises to x decades-old inequities in city services for a pocket of black residents SArRAH WIlsLSOnN OObserver Staff V-shaped trees cause uproar IsISAAcC BBABcCOcCK OObserver Staff PhHOtTO bBY IsSAAcC BABcCOcCK thTHE ObsBSERvVER AA tree sports a new look after the city enforced strict er clearances between branches and powerlines. Please see TrREEsS on page 5

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Page 2 Thursday, April 26, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland OObserver Visions of the family, com munity and pedestrian-friendly downtown that Maitland has been working toward for years on Monday. Two of the citys downtown de velopment partners, Bill Finfrock of Finfrock Design Inc. and Sean Law of American Realty Development, presented their updated de sign proposals for downtown Maitland at the April 23 City Council meeting. Finfrock proposed plans for the lot currently housing City Hall on Independence Lane, and Law showed plans for the area between Horatio and George av enues off U.S. Highway 17-92. Finfrock displayed plans for a four-story parking garage struc ture with frontal mixed-use business space for restaurants, retail of Maitland French-colonial de sign: The Elysian Plaza would include 25,000 square feet of res taurant and retail space, 15,000 square feet for outdoor public plazas, 400 parking spaces and 200 apartments. The city is in the process of hearing out proposals and set ting up development agreements to solidify plans for its planned downtown zoning district, what Maitland Mayor Howard Schieferdecker says is the most impor tant legislation facing the City Council in years. Law says the designs goal is to make Maitland a destination in Central Florida. He said it features a four-story parking garage, large alfresco public plaza and luxury apartments all in a New Orleansstyle pedestrian-friendly setting. It even has plans for rooftop restaurants, pools and gardens. What were looking at here is a festival of life and community, he said. Schieferdecker said the city is currently working out a develop Finfrocks parking garage plans for the land where City Hall now stands, he said, are con tingent upon plans in develop ment of what will be built across the street from the Independence Lane property at the site of the former Winn-Dixie and Royal Pla za. Butch Charlan, with Charlan Brock & Associates architects and planners, is in early talks about developing that property, and is working closely with Finfrock. Schieferdecker, who was also re-sworn in as mayor at the meet ing, said he hopes the City Coun cil, staff, community and its part ners can work together to make Maitland the best that it can be as plans continue to develop for the downtown area. As the sun set just beyond a stand of trees the evening of April 19, hundreds gathered to say goodbye to two friends along a creekside bridge on the Cady Way Trail. For best friends Jeremy Stewart, 18, and Nicholas Nic Presha, 16, this was the last place they would be seen together, victims of an apparent homicide. The two had been a popular pair at Winter Park High School, Jeremys father, James Stewart, said. They were good boys who didnt deserve their fate. He had a heart of gold, James Stewart said of his son at the candlelight vigil. No body deserves to die like this. As he stood in the center of a growing crowd of Winter Park High School students, well-wishers and friends, the grieving fa ther at times brought the group to tears and laughter remembering his son. He was the boy who loved to hug, whod snuggle in bed and be teased by his father for his affectionate nature. Hed smile and laugh it off anyway. Gathered around his father, friends laughed and smiled too, re membering happier times. the bodies of the two students were found burning along the Cady Way Trail between Metric Drive and Forsyth Road by bicyclists early Sunday morning. They were victims of an apparent homi at the nearby Sun Bay Apartments may be connected. while students dealt with grief. On Mon day that testing resumed. Rumors spread quickly through the school, speculating that the murders were drug related, due to an unpaid debt. Those were false, said Alex McHugh, who had known Nic for nine years. Thats just rumor, he said. None of its true. He was a nice kid, just genuine. Friend Tyler Winters, who had helped organize the vigil, said the pair werent the type to get into this kind of trouble. They were good kids, he said. They never hurt anyone. As friends gathered in between prayers, they spoke about coming to terms with what had happened on that early Sunday morning. said. I didnt want to. Trying to lend relief to the crowd, pas tor Joshua Shapiro gathered in the middle of a ring of mourners as he led a prayer and helped the group sing Amazing Grace atop the soggy grass along the trail. My life was changed by murder, Sha piro said. I hope to help these kids too. When something good happens from trag edy, it ripples outward. For James Stewart, it was a moment to ask for answers. A fund has been set up to raise money for a reward for information leading to catching the killer or killers. The victims families set up the fund at United Legacy Bank, 425 S. U.S. Highway 17-92 in Longwood. Speaking to a throng of news media, James Stewart wanted to know what hap pened to his son and his sons best friend. Did he suffer? I dont know. I want to know so I can have closure. Hours: M-F 8am to 4:30pm 2315 Lee Road Winter Park, Florida 32789 Your Guiding Beacon for Quality Healthcare Harbour Private Duty Nursing, LLCSkilled Nursing Physical Therapy Occupational Therapy Companionship Home Health Aid Homemaking Flexible Schedules Free RN Assessments The Services of Harbour Private Duty Nursing provide peace of mind to loved ones, trust ofcers, guardians and physicians. Our professional team prides itself on making your life easier. We also provide in-hospital private duty care, which offers close, personal attention and reassurance in an unfamiliar and often frightening environment. Our ofce hours are Monday through Friday, 8:00 am to 4:30 pm. Our professional team is available 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. During hours when the ofce is closed and during the weekends and holidays, the on-call coordinator is available by telephone 24 hours per day.www.HarbourPrivateDutyNursing.com License # 299991382phone (407) 895-8188 fax 407-895-9339 Studios & 1 Bedrooms Available!! Studios/1: base rent $591, 1/1: base rent $678THE PLYMOUTH APTSA HUD Property for Seniors Over 62ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR OUR WAITING LIST!PLEASE APPLY IN PERSON STARTING: APRIL 27, 8AM 1PM AND 2PM 5PM 1550 Gay Rd., Winter Park FL 32789 407-644-4551 TTY/TTD 711 proof of income for ALL adult members of household. Applications will be processed and your place on the waiting Studios & 1 Bedrooms Available!! THE PLYMOUTH APTSEQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY The Maitland Development RReview Committee approved plans last week for a Dunkin Donuts to be developed at 1605 S. OOrlando Ave., near the ACEE Hardware, pending approval from Planning & Zoning. A seventh workshop for proposing and creating the Downtown Maitland Zoning District will be held at 6:30 p.m. on Monday, April 30, in the Maitland Council Chambers. For more information, visit itsmymaitland.com Anyone with information about the case should call CrimeLine at 1-800-423-TIPS. Y Y ou may be eligible for a $5,000 reward. PhHOtTO bBY IsSAAcC BABcCOcCK thTHE ObsBSERvVER James Stewart, father of slain Winter Park High School student Jeremy Stewart, speaks during a candlelight vigil held April 19 next to Cady Way Trail, where Jeremy and friend Nicholas Nic Presha were found dead on April 15. Putting a face on downtown MMaitlands future Remembering Jeremy and NicFather asks for answers at vigil for slain Winter Park students IsISAAcC BBABcCOcCK OObserver Staff SArRAH WIlsLSOnN OObserver Staff Downtown Maitland Special District mapMAP cCOURt TEsSY OfF cCITY OF MAITlLAnND TThe proposed MMaitland DDowntown Special DDistrict includes the area around City Hall.

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Page 3 Thursday, April 26, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland OObserver Loch Berry Loch Berry Loch Berry WPOAPR12

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Page 4 Thursday, April 26, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland OObserver USPS 00-6186 ISSN 1064-3613 1500 Park Center DDrive OOrlando, FFL 32835-5705 MMember of: Chamber of CommercePublisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor. Submission does not guarantee publication. Columnists opinions are made independently of the newspaper. All rights reserved. Winter Park / Maitland Observer 2012 EEstablished in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster www.wpmobserver.com | Phone: 407-563-7000 | Fax: 407-563-7099 | editor@observernewspapers.com Published TThursday, AApril 26, 2012 COONTATACTTS Volume 24, IIssue Number 17 PUUBLISHERER TT racy Craft 407-515-2605 tcraft@observernewspapers.com managingMANAGING EEDITOROR Jenny AAndreasson 407-563-7026 editor@observernewspapers.com DEESIGNERER Jonathan Gallagher 407-563-7054 jgallagher@observernewspapers.com assASSOciatCIATE EditDITOR IIsaac BBabcock 407-563-7023 isaacb@observernewspapers.com LEgalsGALS | ClassifiLASSIFIEdsDS AAshley MMcBBride legal@FLAlegals.com classieds@observernewspapers.com staffSTAFF w WRitITERsS Sarah Wilson BBrittni Johnson KKristy Vickery COOPYY EEDITORORS Sarah Wilson COOLUUMNISTS Chris Jepson Jepson@MediAmerica.us Louis Roney LRRoney@c.rr.com Josh Garrick joshgarrick9@gmail.com ADVERER TISING SALEES TT racy Craft 407-515-2605 tcraft@observernewspapers.com sSUbscBSCRiptiIPTIOnsNS | ciCIRcCUlatiLATIOnN KKatie Reyes kreyes@turnstilemediagroup.com 407-563-7073 intINTERnN AAndy Ceballos BBusiness BBriefs Community BBulletin TT aste winners OO n Wednesday, April 18, the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce hosted the 27th annual Taste of Winter Park presented by CenturyLink, the organizations annual food festival. The R R avenous Pig was honored with Best Main Course for its lobster hot dog. Best Side Dish was presented to Mi Tomatina, Paella Bar for its braised ox tail. The Bohemian Bakers lavender tea cake was awarded Best Dessert. The Best Booth Display went to 4 R Rivers Smokehouse. Finally, a new award this year recognized the Best Healthy Dish and was presented to The Ancient O O live/ The Spice & Tea EE xchange for the pairing of Waterkist Farms heirloom tomato with olive oils, balsamic vinegars and specialty salt. Gold KKey scholar Winter Parks R R ose Chirillo, a junior Marketing Communication at E E merson College, was inducted into the Gold Key Honor Society at a ceremony on Wednesday, April 18, at the Tufte Per formance and Production Centers Semel Theater; 10 Boylston Place, in Boston. HHall of famer Kenn Hall, a Central Florida resident, businessman and former All-American college pitcher, has been inducted into the athletic Hall of Fame at Nassau Col lege in Garden City, N.YY Hall currently owns and operates KR R 2H Marketing and Media RRelations in Apopka. Personal nance challengeApril is national nancial literacy awareness month and to celebrate Fifth Third Bank of Central Florida has com mitted to a JA/53 Challenge, in which representatives will teach 53 ve-week personal nance classes in local high schools. The JA/53 Challenge will begin in O Orange County at E Edgewater and EE vans high schools, followed by high schools in Seminole, Volusia and Duval counties. Visit jacentral.org FFree mammograms The Central Florida Afliate of Susan G. Komen for the Cure has awarded a $50,000 grant to Health Care Center for the Homeless to provide free mammo grams to patients from O Orange, Semi nole and O O sceola counties. The grant from Komen for the Cure will support the Femmes de Coeur Mammography Program, an initiative to ensure that homeless patients and uninsured pa tients have access to regular screenings. Visit hcch.org Send submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com HH and & Stone M M assage and F F acial Spa opened its rst location in Winter Park at 480 N. O Orlando Ave. Hand & Stone pro vides massage and facial services to Winter Park and its neighboring towns. Visit handandstone.com/spa/Florida/Win ter-Park-Village or call 407-622-0227. Cloudware I Inc., the creator of CloudBooksTM PRO RO Accounting, has opened on Park Avenue. CloudBooks PRO RO allows users to conduct their business and enter information into their accounting system from anywhere. Its available anywhere there is a Wi-Fi connection, or via 3G or 4G. Visit mycloudaccounting.com Small B Bay Partners, LLC, whose CommerCenters offers small business users throughout Central Florida affordable industrial warehouse facilities, recently sold a 1,350-square-foot warehouse condominium to Sepco Air Inc., at Monroe CommerCenter IV, located on Church Street off U U .S. 17-92 in Sanford. Sepco Air paid $114,750 for the facility. The International law rm Greenberg Traurig, P.A. has announced that E E ric Castleson has joined the rm as an as sociate in its OOrlando ofce. NAIAI Realvest recently negotiated two re newal lease agreements: Parkline Properties, LLC of Columbus, OO hio, landlord of R R egional Airport Center at 8350 Parkline Blvd. off O Orange Av enue and Jetport Drive, renewed a lease agreement for 12,000 square feet. Ten ant SimCom Inc. is a simulator-training rm. Monroe CommerCenter South, the Landlord COOP-Monroe LLC of Maitland, renewed a lease agreement for 9,750 square feet at 719 and 723 Progress Way and 4153 Flex Court with the tenant, MCS Group Inc., a nationally recognized provider of records retrieval and litigation support services. MMercantile Capital Corporation recently launched the SmartChoice Loan Cal culator iPhone application, available free online at the iPhone Apps Store. Altamonte Springs-based general contractor and construction manager Roger BB. K Kennedy I Inc. broke ground on April 9 for The Flats at E E asley Mill, a $13 million student housing facility slated to open in June 2013 in Athens, Ga. Winston James D Development recently negotiated a lease agreement for an ex isting tenant at Aloma Business Center in Winter Park. Applied Behavior, a consulting company that works with students with learning disabilities, increased its facilities from 910 square feet to 1,900 square feet. New HHope raises $200KK The New Hope for Kids 11th annual Art of the Vine at Fields BMW on April 13 netted $218,299 for their Center for Grieving Children and Wishes for Kids programs. Ken Champion of Winter Park won a new 2012 BMW 128i in a chance drawing. Library director to retireAfter two and a half decades of service, Winter Park Public Library Director Bob Melanson (center) has announced to the Librarys Board of Trustees his plan to retire no later than Dec. 31, 2013. UUnder Melansons leadership, the Library has seen tremendous growth and innovation including the migration from a paper-based card catalog to a digi tal catalog, a major facilities expansion that added the third oor, and much more. We have built a library that is responsive to and reects the needs of this community for information, education and entertainment, Melanson said. Princeton top teacher RRollins College Associate Professor of Communication R Rick Bommelje was named one of The Best 300 Profes sors by The Princeton R Review and RRateMyProfessors.com this week. Bommelje has more than 30 years of professional experience in leader ship, supervision, management and adult education. This man changed my life. Hes not warm and fuzzy but hes very fair and an incredibly good, inspirational teacher. He not only teaches the course content but he gives you life lessons that will stay with you forever, commented one student. HHouse-sized hole Workers at the east end of Morse Boulevard are installing a large storm water treatment system that will treat storm water before it enters Lake O Osceola. The hole right by the Winter Park Scenic Boat Tour is so huge that an entire house could t into it.

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Page 5 Thursday, April 26, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland OObserver Call 866.610.7768Espaol 866.960.7085Like us on Facebook facebook.com/CenturyLinkPrismTV Prism Project Demonstrations are with non-Prism TV customers using basic CenturyLink Prism TV service with standard features in High Denition on an HD-ready television on 11/12/2011 in Las Vegas, NV. Participants were not acting as professional actors, but were compensated by CenturyLink for their participation in the demonstration and this advertisement. Offer ends 5/31/2012. Offer and stated rates are available to new, rst-time CenturyLink Prism TV residential customers only. The Pick Two bundle offer applies to Prism TV package and choice of High-Speed Internet (speeds up to 10 Mbps) or a qualifying CenturyLink calling plan with no term commitment and free HD service for twelve (12) months. An $8.99 monthly DVR service fee applies when the Quad Play DVR is purchased with the Prism TV programming package. 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Charges subject to TV Guarantee will be credited or refunded, as applicable, on customers next bill cycle, as determined at CenturyLinks sole discretion. 2012 CenturyLink, Inc. All Rights Reserved. The name CenturyLink and the pathways logo are trademarks of CenturyLink, Inc. All other marks are the property of their respective owners. Prism TV + InternetPrism TV + Voice NO CONTRACT & FREE HD! WHEN YOU PICK 2.(for 12 months) Test-drive it online at SeePrismTV.com or in store today:175 East Altamonte Dr., Altamonte Springs 3030 East Semoran Blvd., Apopka 260 Citrus Tower Blvd., Clermont 1359 East Vine St., Kissimmee 3244 North John Young Pkwy., Kissimmee CNTL12-601_WinterParkObserver_10.15_x_9_r1.indd 1 4/2/12 5:36 PM ing that only six percent of trees in the city would be subject to the cuts. I dont like the looks of those cuts any more than anybody else does, Leary said. But they sound like theyre neces sary. Resident and philanthropist Marc Hagle said that the citys existing trim ming policy had been in place long enough to see if it would have negative consequences. I thought the presentation was inter esting, but it was presented by Florida Power and Light, Hagle said. We dont need to do anything differently than wed been doing. Weve had a tree-trimming policy from 1983 to 2007 of 4 feet. Commissioner Carolyn Cooper, agreed, saying that the city should go back to more-traditional cuts that pre serve the aesthetics of the trees. If youre going to continue to cut, then please stay with the cuts weve been using for 20 years, Cooper said. I un derstand [directional cutting], but I also understand property values. Leary said that if trees start decaying and dying early due to improper trim ming, thatll also hurt property values, and take longer to recover from. Nobodys saying God this is gor geous, but at the same time, nobody wants trees falling on cars, falling on kids, taking out power lines and spending more to clean it up, Leary said. Weve got to do whats right, not whats pretty. TrREEsS | C OONTINUEUED FROROM fFROntNT pagPAGE PhHOtTOsS bBY IsSAAcC BABcCOcCK thTHE ObsBSERvVER TThe T T aste of Winter Park featured food samplings from restaurants such as the Mellow Mushroom (top) and live music at the Winter Park Farmers Market April 18. PhHOtTO bBY IsSAAcC BABcCOcCK thTHE ObsBSERvVER DDr. B Barbara Jenkins, top right, the upcoming O Orange County Public Schools super intendent and a Winter Park resident, was recognized at Mondays Winter Park City Commission meeting. Also, Mayor Ken Bradley, top left, proclaimed April 23 as Win ter Park High School Cheerleading State and National Championships Day. Pictured above are the championship cheerleading squad accepting the big honor. HHappy tastebuds Honors at dais

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Page 6 Thursday, April 26, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland OObserver woven in with neighboring Eatonville topped her list. I wasnt aware of these things until Martha brought it up at the meet the can didates night, Schieferdecker said, and then Ive been making a continued effort ever since to try and rectify these things. On April 13, Bryant, along with a room of 10 or so of her neighbors and local supporters, met with the mayor, City Manager Jim Williams and City Transportation Engineer Charlie Wallace to get an update on what was being done to address her concerns. I think its long overdue, Schiefer decker said. Martha and her neighbors are all citizens of Maitland, too, and should get the same treatment as everybody else.Words into actionAt the meeting, Williams outlined what progress has been made since January: bidding to pave Mechanic Street from the Maitland Boulevard ramp to where Amado Lane begins is set to be completed in the next two to three months; starting the de sign process with Progress Energy to in stall streetlights on existing wood poles in Woodbridge; and contact with the Florida Department of Transportation regarding the bats in the bridge. It sounds like a step in the right direc tion, but, having lived a history of forgotten promises, members of the community are hesitant to trust that the situation will change. Weve reached a point when words dont have any meaning, Bryants daugh ter Jacqueline Daise said. These words sound good, but action is so much better. In 2006 a local developer, Cecil Allen, set high hopes for Bryant and her neighbors on Mechanic Street, with visions of the re development they had always dreamed of, only to have plans fall through a year later before shovels touched dirt, she said. Tired of broken promises, chiropractor and pastor Ronald Fulmore said he was tired of watching his tax dollars improve the rest of the city. When are we going to stop being treat ed like second-class citizens? Fulmore asked the room. We all pay taxes and other neighborhood roads, and picking up everyone elses garbage. Mayor Schieferdecker in turn apolo gized for the actions, or lack thereof, of those in the past, urging everyone to focus on the only thing they can work together to change: the future. FF encing frustration An 8-foot-tall barbed-wire fence was not what Bryant had in mind when she told accessibility to Lake Jackson near Bellamy Park, but its what she got. The fence, she said, was recently barbed and extended, to beyond the waterline, cut ting off residents who live in her daugh ters neighborhood from the wooded area they had informally used for access to the lake. On the other side, water lapping the shoreline of a predominately white neigh borhood, the lake is open. I see this, Bryant, 68, says motioning to the fence, and it reminds me when I was growing up in the South. When addressed at the workshop, City Manager Jim Williams said the fence was installed by the city on city land, per com plaints from residents on the east shore of the lake claiming burglars were using the woods as an access and hiding place before and after breaking into their homes. The fence, he says, was put in place to minimize that likelihood. Following public outcry at the meeting, Williams said the city would start survey ing the area and look at other options and the legality of such a fence, while working to secure a deal to give riparian rights, or rights to reasonable use of the water, to lakefront residents. To do so, the city is working to draft a land swap, giving prop erty owners access to the lake, and the city ownership of Brooke Drive so it can offer public services, such as trash pick up, to those who live off of it. We have people saying, They have rights over there, but we dont have rights that, Williams said. Bryant says shes not holding her breath that all the issues she has faced in her 30 ever, but shes putting her faith in the city to do the right thing. We dont have to all look alike to get along, Daise said. I just want my mother to be able to enjoy all that she has struggled for in her community. Enjoy a beautiful spring evening of great wine while strolling through downtown Winter Park Thursday, May 3 5 8:30 p.m. Tickets are $30 in advance Purchase online at www.winterpark.org For information call (407) 644-8281 winter park sip and stroll PhHOtTO bBY IsSAAcC BABcCOcCK thTHE ObsBSERvVER Resident M Martha B Bryant-HHall points out the home of about 1,000 bats near her home. Also on her list of concerns presented to the city are the communitys unpaved roads, lack of streetlights and blocked access to Lake Jackson. MAITlLAnND | MMayor Schieferdecker and staff are working to address all of the neighborhoods concerns C OONTINUEUED FROROM fFROntNT pagPAGE I see this, and it reminds me when I was growing up in the South. Bryant

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Page 7 Thursday, April 26, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer New spring inventory has arrived including mens Camp shirts, shorts, pants, swimwear, and much more from sizes Small to XX Large. Wednesday, May 23 7:45 a.m. Senator Andy Gardiner Mayor Teresa Jacobs Commissioner Ted Edwards Mayor Ken Bradley www.winterpark.org For more information on the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce, our members, or upcoming events, visit us at the Winter Park Welcome Center, call (407) 644-8281 or log on to www.winterpark.org. Things & Fashion Andrew J. Hull, DC, P.A. Bajalia Baumgarten Financial, LLC Blue Door Denim Shoppe Business Appraisal Group, LLC Carr Riggs & Ingram, LLC Chepenik Financial Coffee Counseling, Coaching & Consulting Community Association Law Group Coralia Leets Jewelry Boutique Croissant Gourmet Current DC Graphix Down Syndrome Association of Central Florida Earth Inspired Living, LLC Extra Space Storage Gary Lambert Salon and Spa Gordon Wealth Management Group Heather L. Childers, D.D.S., P.A. Karl's Event Rental, Inc LaBella Intimates & Boutique Lilly Pulitzer Marvaldi A Hair & Makeup Studio Mattamy Homes Moss, Krusick and Associates, LLC Orlando City Soccer Club Pella Windows & Doors RE/MAX 200 Realty Seaside National Bank & Trust The NICE Life, LLC Grafton Wealth Management Bates & Company, Inc. Consensus Communications, Inc. Costco Wholesale #185 Dexters of Winter Park Friends of Fleet Peeples Park, Inc. J & S Multimedia, Inc. Paul Mitchell The School Orlando Pratt & Morrison, P.A. SESCO Lighting, Inc. The Bistro on Park Avenue Tropical Smoothie Cafe Winter Park Chocolate Bright House Networks Business Solutions Charles Clayton Construction, Inc. Consumer Debt Counselors M & I Bank Nelson's Tents & Events Pinnacle Awards & Promotions Winter Park Breakfast Rotary Club Partridge Tree Gift Shop John Craig Clothier Siegel's Winter Park Valencia College Clifton LarsonAllen Wells Fargo Fannie Hillman & Associates The Keewin Real Property Company Baldwin-Fairchild Cemeteries Chamber Trustees are listed in blue Denotes Park Avenue Area Association membership The No. 10 Knights are streak ing after blasting off against Southern Miss and going on a tear across the country on the baseball diamond. After trashing Southern Miss, they came back home for a onegame showdown against Florida Atlantic on April 17. The bats stayed hot for UCF (34-8, 12-3), thanks in large part to the middle and bottom of their batting order. JoMarcos Woods went 3-for-4 with two RBIs, while Nick Carril lo, Erik Barber and Travis Shreve all contributed two RBIs on their own. Erik Skoglunds seven strikeouts helped carry the win. Against Tulane (26-14, 5-7), three straight nail-biters in New Orleans ended with the Knights sweeping just their second con ference series of the season. Never had a series been tough er for the Knights this year, with to a Jeramy Matos solo shot that sailed into the night over left cen run in the game, after the Green Wave threatened repeatedly with 10 hits but couldnt connect enough to make it home. What few could have predicted was a 15-run slugfest to follow in Game 2, as the Green Wave tried to get revenge and the Knights fought desperately to hold onto an early lead. That would prove futile for UCF through nine in nings, as they entered the bottom of the ninth ahead by two runs, only to watch in horror as Tulane plated two to tie things up. Two scoreless innings would follow before the Knights found their swing again, thanks to a pair of doubles by D.J. Hicks and Alex Friedrich, who combined for the deciding run in the 8-7 victory. Tulane attempted another wild the Knights jumping ahead with six runs early. Four of those runs came courtesy of Chris Taladay, who blasted three triples for four RBIs. Roman Madrid grabbed the save with a scoreless ninth. Whats next for the Knights? A three-game homestand against Memphis (17-23, 6-9) this weekend starts at 6:30 p.m. Friday, April 27. Theyll play another at 4 p.m. Saturday and 1 p.m. Sun day before taking a short walk to Stetson for a 6:30 p.m. Wednes day, May 2, game. Tars Triumph in MassachusettsA wild up and down swing ended on a high note for Rollins baseball (24-16), which bamboozled Bentley (22-20) in a 7-4 come backer on April 24. Zach Persky brought home three runners with an RBI double in the win. The Tars will head to confer ence rival St. Leo for a threegame series this weekend, with an oddball schedule starting with April 26, followed by a double header at 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. on Sunday. Only one team has beaten Winter Park twice on the baseball diamond this season, and its Olym pia. The Wildcats had their chance at sweet revenge after losing to the Titans near the start of the sea son by a demoralizing 7-0 score. That was a feat of scorelessness that only one other team would match Boone who won 8-0 on April 12. In their comeback attempt the Wildcats had newly hot bats but had to deal with Olympia starter Michael Hennessey, who not only threw a complete game in the 4-3 Titans win, but also took care of the winning run himself. For the Wildcats (15-9, 6-1), district play began this week at Timber Creek. That tournament will go through Friday, with the championship game playing at 7:30 p.m. Edgewater downedThe Eagles (9-10, 5-3) had trou ble against Apopka again, losing in a 1-0 heartbreaker April 19. That loss was the second against the Blue Darters this season, after the Eagles struggled to beat them early in the season. Class 6A District 8 play started Monday, April 23, at Mainland, with the Eagles hoping for a shot at the title game at 7 p.m. Thurs day after press time.Baseball enters districts ISAAC BAbBCOCK Observer Staff ISAAC BAbBCOCK Observer StaffUCF breaks Wave Tournament play Next championship game is Friday, April 27, at 7:30 p.m. at Timber Creek

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Page 8 Thursday, April 26, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer ONE HOURMASSAGE$3995*A $79.95 VA LUE! ONE HOURFACIAL$4995*A $79.95 VA LUE! MASSAGE | FACIALS | WAXING MASSAGE AND FACIAL SPA Open 7 days | Walk-ins Welcome Extended Hourshandandstone.comHand & Stone Massage and Facial Spa consistently delivers professional massage & facial services at affordable prices 7 days a week. WINTER PARK | 407-622-0227 480 N Orlando Ave l Winter Park Village Grand Opening!*Introductory offers valid for first time visit only. Not valid for gift cards. Sessions include time for consultation and dressing. Rates and services may vary by location. Offers may not be combined. MM22195/CE9988346 Hand & Stone Franchise Corp. Franchises Available. Independently Owned & Operated. There are poems hidden in your newsIn the process, I invented a unique form of poetry. I call it News Print Poetry. It all started when a friend showed me a black-out poem. It was composed by taking a written document and using a marker pen to blackout the unwanted words. What remained was the poem. I was intrigued with the idea of a poem emerging from a news story, a poster, a letter from my insurance agent, and other unlikely sources. I decided to take a slightly differ ent slant, however. Instead of deleting the words I did not want, I would select the words I did want. Instead of obliterating the original topic, I would create a poem using the topic of the story. I set up a few rules. The title of the poem must be taken from the headline of the story. The words selected from the news story must remain in their original order and no words can be added. I could have free reign with punctuation, and if absolutely necessary, I could change case or tense of verbs or make singular nous plural and vice versa. I started on Jan. 1 and every day since, without fail, I post a new poem to my blog. (http://newsprintpoetry2012.blogspot. com) The blog is important because it instills discipline. If I feel like skipping a day, I cant because I have made a public commitment and I dont want to disap point my readers. Some days writing the poem is quick and easy. Other days, I spend hours on it. Sometimes, I have to abandon one or two attempted poems because I just cant get it to work. The topics run the gamut of the type of stories you see in newspapers politics, crime, events, holidays, sports, health, science, education, accidents, food, celebrities, advice, etc. Some of the poems have an important some of the poems are serious, some are funny. Some days, the poems are perfect little gems; they seem to be exactly as I would write them if I had no restrictions at all. Other days, I want to call in rewrite. Writing News Print Po ems is both fun and challenging. Some people like to do the Sunday New York Times crossword puzzle, some people like to do Sudoku, and some others like to do 1,000-piece jigsaw puzzles. I like to do News Print Poetry. The thrill hidden poem as if it had just jumped right off the page, is just as big a thrill as comTaken together, the poems will be a retrospective of the years events and provide a panoramic and historic view of our society. Taken individually, each poem provides an inspirational, amusing, and/or poignant view of life.You can meet Catherine Giordano at the book launch party for News Print Poetry 2012: Volume 1 January to March at the Maitland Public Library at 2:30 p.m. on Sunday, April 29. She will do a multimedia presentation of some of the poems. Admission is free and refreshments will be provided. Details are on her website www.talksallabout.com or from the library. The library prefers that you call to register at 407-647-7700. Catherine Giordano is the author of two other books, The Poetry Connection, a collection of poems and What Ifs, If Onlys, and So Whats, a collection of essays. Her work has been published in magazines and anthologies. In addition to writing, she does public speaking giving light-hearted life-afrming talks on a variety of subjects. PhotoHOTO coCOURt TEsySY ofOF CitITY OF WiINteTER pP ARK CChildren help to plant a tree at Winter Parks EEarth Day in the Park event in Central Park on Saturday, April 23. NNews Print Poetry nds hidden poems in newspaper CC At THeERiINeE GiIORDANO Guest Writer Thursday, Jan. 26 2012: The Year of the DragonChinese New Year. The Year of the Dragon. The mythical creature brings optimism, and hope for better times. The dragon the most powerful sign of the zodiac delivers energy and prosperity. 2012 Catherine Giordano CCatherine Giordano Earth Day party

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Page 9 Thursday, April 26, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer AApril 23 CCity CCommission meeting highlightsThere was a City Commission meeting held at 3:30 p.m. on April 23 at the Winter Park Community Center. Below are a few highlights of decisions made: Mayors RReport Dr. Barbara Jenkins, the upcoming new Orange County Pub lic Schools superintendent, was recognized and congratulated on her new role that begins May 2012. A proclamation was made declaring Winter Park High School Cheerleading State and National Championships Day. A proclamation was made declaring North American Occupa tional Safety and Health Week; and Occupational Safety and Health Professional Day. A presentation was made to Craig M. ONeil, assistant direc tor of communications for being awarded Employee of the Quar ter. CConsent AAgenda The minutes of April 9 were approved. Staff was approved to enter into negotiations with a list of complete list can be found at cityofwinterpark.org > Government > City Commission > Agenda Packets). The Cemetery Disinterment Policy was approved. The mid-year budget adjustment for the General Fund was approved. The adjustment to the Waste Pro rates was approved. AAction items requiring discussionThe strategic planning session list of priorities was approved. The Winter Park train station design development update from ACi Inc. was approved. The discussion of the City At torney contract item was tabled until the May 14 meeting. Public HHearings The resolution supporting fair trade when possible among mer chants in the city of Winter Park was approved with an amend ment. The second reading of the or dinance relating to pain manage ment clinics and pharmacies as well as repealing the moratorium was approved. The resolution designating 1509 N. Orange Ave. as a historic resource in the Winter Park Reg ister of Historic Places was ap proved. The subdivision request of Mr. Barry Render to split the property at 1200 Howell Branch Road into two single-family lots zoned R1AA was approved. The request of CNL Commer cial Real Estate for Conditional Use approval to construct a threebuilding on the former State Of Blvd. was approved. A full copy of the April 23, City Commission minutes will be available at cityofwinterpark.org the week of May 14, pending approval by the City Commission. Pedestrian & Bicycle SSafety and CConnectivity FForum The citys Pedestrian & Bicycle Advisory Board will present a Pedestrian & Bicycle Safety and Connectivity Forum on Thursday, April 26, from 6 to 8 p.m., at the Rachel D. Murrah Civic Center lo cated at 1050 W. Morse Blvd. The forum will provide an op portunity to review how recent events, developing plans and re gional initiatives have heightened the need for improved pedestrian and bicycle safety and connectivity. Attendees will be encouraged to offer comments and share ideas relating to city projects and pro grams so that interested parties can work together to make Win ter Park friendlier for pedestrians and bicyclists. The forum will also provide in formation on Winter Parks com prehensive pedestrian & bicycle facilities plan. For more informa tion, please call 407-599-3217. WWinter Park train station design The proposed elevations and train station are currently avail able for viewing at the following locations: Rachel D. Murrah Civic Center, 1050 W. Morse Blvd. Winter Park Amtrak Station, 150 W. Morse Blvd. Winter Park City Hall West Wing Lobby, 401 S. Park Ave. Winter Park Community Cen ter, 721 W. New England Ave. Winter Park Public Library, 460 E. New England Ave. Winter Park Welcome Center, 151 W. Lyman Ave. The proposed plans are also available for viewing on the citys park.org > Info at Your Fingertips > Amtrak & SunRail Information > Winter Park Amtrak Station In formation.Trees for PeaceThe city of Winter Park and the Multifaith Education Project are proud to announce the ninth annual Trees for Peace Interfaith Tree Planting Project on Tuesday, May 1, at Cady Way Park located at 2525 Cady Way. Vice Mayor Ste ven Leary will begin the ceremony at 11:30 a.m. and the program will be led by Louise Franklin Sheehy, director of the Multifaith Educa tion Project. More than 100 Christian, Jew ish and Muslim students and faculty, representing The Geneva Christian School, The Jewish Academy and The Leaders Prepa ratory School, will join together to plant trees for peace. In recogni tion of their commitment to work together in the spirit of unity, the students will plant three trees and bless them in traditional man ner according to each faith. They will then celebrate the occasion with a picnic on the lawn of Cady Way Park. According to Sheehy, One quote that represents the essence of this project is by Mar garet Wheatley, Dont ask what is wrong. Ask what is possible and keep asking. The city of Winter Parks Forestry Division will supervise the students with the planting of 21 red cedars, 12 long leaf pines and 12 sand hill live oaks. Tree size will vary from 45-gallon to 3-gallon containers. The planted trees will serve as sym bols of students working together for peace. In addition, the Forestry Division will donate a tree to each school so the students can hold a planting ceremony on school prop erty to remind them of this event for years. This unique tree-planting proj ect represents a continuing effort to encourage children to appreci ate diversity while building positive relationships with people of other faiths. Winter Park appreciates and supports the efforts of the project along with the students.Visit the citys ofcial website at cityofwinterpark.org, nd us on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter.It is wonderful living in an active city. It is true that much of the activity started very recently, but the momentum is building. My long-held vision that Maitland would become a multifaceted cul tural attraction for Central Florida is evolving, more participants are attending events, and my vision may become a not-so-distant real ity. To say I was shocked was an understatement, when I heard in March what the librarians at the public library had planned. They told me they were going to put on a 5K run/walk to help reach the young adult age group and raise money to purchase comput was, how are you going to run the event? Their response was Fleet Feet, whose owner resides in Mai tland, would hold the race event. That was the start of a wonderful morning that moved librarians away from the book stacks and out into the community. This past Saturday, the director of the library, Ellen Schellhause, along with her staff, board mem bers and many library support ers, met at Quinn Strong Park to set up the event. The horn for the races start sounded at 8 a.m. I was assigned a turn along the 3.1 glanced at resident Missy Baker going past me, I thought, That Then it hit me participants were encouraged to dress as their favorite literary character. I also saw a mother and daughter dressed in pink tutus, while another woman had a quilted placard front and back, and one young man ran the race wearing a 2-foot-tall hat. What made this event so community and culturally minded was what occurred before, during and after the event. One driver try ing to avoid the race asked what was occurring and offered to mail in a donation to the library. Sev eral residents, when called, vol unteered to man the corner where they resided. Five women from a Maitland church volunteered as part of their churchs commu nity outreach project. They said they cheered for each participant At the end of the race there were bananas, bagels, oranges, coffee, cookies, bottled water and prizes, all donated by businesses desiring to support the library and what it provides for the citizens. Maitland residents are sup porting their town. SoNapa, the citys newest restaurant, has huge crowds. Last Fridays opening night for the Enzians Film Festi val was jammed. The weeklong The same evening, Art & Historys Culture and Cocktails event experienced very high attendance, and an enthusiastic crowd kicked off the Chambers art festival at Lake Lily. In addition, ribbon cut tings at two new Lake Avenue businesses, JazzTastings and Lily Lace Antique Market, occurred in the past few weeks. They too were attended by excited residents who wanted to say, Maitland is open for business and the city is be coming a happening place. Meeting of AApril 23 The Maitland City Council met on at 6:30 p.m. on April 23 in the City Hall Council Chambers. Below is a synopsis of that meet ing. The next regularly scheduled Council meeting will be held on Monday, May 14. Inauguration Ceremony Mayor Howard Schieferdecker ond term. Public HHearings: Moved to continue the Public Hearings creating the Downtown Maitland Zoning District and the rezoning of properties within that District until the May 14 Council meeting. CConsent: Approved various meeting minutes. Authorized the city manager to sign the Satisfaction of Mortgage acknowledging full payment of the mortgage executed by the Maitland Civic Center Inc. to the city of Maitland on June 26, 1964. rental fees for a Maitland Little League Summer Camp. Approved the 2012 holiday op eration schedule for city parks. To listen to a recording of the meeting, visit itsmymaitland.com Winter Park City Talk bBY RRANDY KKNigIGHtT CITY MANAGER Maitland City Talk bBY BeEV RepREPONeEN COUNc C ILWOm M AN Maitland welcomes cultural events

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Page 10 Thursday, April 26, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer AAPRRIL 26 The city of Winter Parks Pedestrian & Bicycle Advisory Board will present a Pedestrian & Bicycle S S afety and C C onnectivity FForum from 6 to 8 p.m. on Thursday, April 26, at the R Rachel D. Murrah Civic Center located at 1050 W. Morse Blvd. Call 407599-3217. The Islamic Society of Central Florida pres ents a screening and reception for the lm Islamic A A rt: Mirror of the Invisible WW orld from 6 to 8 p.m. on Thursday, April 26, at the Orlando Museum of Art, 2416 N. Mills Ave. Visit OrlandoArtMovie.eventbrite. com Join prosecutor Jeff A Ashton at the Win ter Park Public Library as he shares the behind-the-scenes story of the Casey Anthony case at Author Talk at 10:30 a.m. on Thursday, April 26. Discuss the unique issues of Jewish men and women at risk of developing or diag nosed with cancer at 6:30 p.m. on April 26, at Jewish Family Services. Call 407-6447593 or visit jfsorlando.org AAPRRIL 27 The proper disposal of sensitive documents can help lower the risk of identity theft. Join Commerce National Bank & Trust for their SSixth A Annual S Shred Event at from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Friday, April 27, at the branch at the corner of Highway 17-92 and Or ange Avenue in Winter Park. Limit six boxes please. The American Cancer Societys RR elay for Life of Maitland is an overnight relay-style walking event that will take place at Or angewood Presbyterian Church on April 2728. Opening ceremonies start at 6 p.m. on Friday and closing ceremonies are at noon on Saturday. Visit relayforlife.org/maitland or email maitland.relay@yahoo.com AAPRRIL 28 The 8th A A nnual N N ational A A lliance on Mental Illness Greater O Orlando 5KK W W alk Changing Minds One Step at a Time will be held at 8 a.m. on Saturday, April 28, at Lake Lily Park in Maitland. There are activi ties for children, a silent auction and prizes. Visit namigo.org or call 407-253-1900. The 2012 Great S Strides 5KK beneting the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation is at 8:30 a.m. on Saturday, April 28, at Harbor Park in Baldwin Park. R Registration opens at 7:30 a.m. Visit cff.org/great_strides/nd_a_ walk_site/index.cfm The RRun for the Trees Jeanette Genius McKKean Memorial 5KK will be held at 7:30 a.m. at Showalter Field, 2535 Cady Way in Winter Park, on Saturday, April 28. There will be a kids run at 8:45 a.m. and an awards presentation at 9:15 a.m. Visit tinyurl.com/runforthetrees Flemings Prime Steakhouse & Wine Bar and WE E SH News Anchor Martha Sugalski will kick off the CC ord for Life F F oundation CCentral F Florida A A wareness C Campaign from 7 to 10 p.m. on Saturday, April 28, with an incredible food and wine experi ence by Flemings Chef Partner Tom Nadol ski. Tickets are $75. Call 407-927-5988 or visit emingssteakhouse.com Tate Music Group AArtist Petula Beckles will perform on at 11 a.m. on April 28 at the Patmos Chapel, 821 W. Swoope Ave. in Win ter Park. Beckles will be performing songs from her album, My Song of Jesus. From 2 to 6 p.m. on Saturday, April 28, Sec ond Harvest Food Bank of Central Florida will host its second annual WWine W W omen & SShoes fundraising event at R Rosen Shingle Creek, located at 9939 U U niversal Blvd. in Orlando. Visit winewomenshoes.com/or lando2012 AAPRRIL 29 CCatherine Giordano a Central Florida speaker, writer, blogger and poet, will pres ent a poetry reading at the Maitland Public Library at 2:30 p.m. on Sunday, April 29. Call 407-647-7700. MAYAY 1 The Art & History Museums Maitland (A&H) celebrates the residents of Maitland throughout the entire month of May. Maitland residents receive free admission to the A&H Museums May 1-31. Just show proof of residence. The Tarower Chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society will meet at 7 p.m. on Tues day, May 1, at Harry P. Leu Gardens, 1920 North Forest Ave., in Orlando. Mike Martin with the F Florida D Division of F Forestry will discuss successful prescribed burns in the Seminole State Forest. It is free and open to the public. MAYAY 2 Trivia 4 U will be held at 7 p.m. on May 2 at the U University Club of Winter Park. The event is free but donations are accepted. Trivial pursuit games are on the rst Wednesday of each month from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Wines and snacks are provided. Call 407-810-3611 or visit universityclubwinterpark.com MAYAY 3 Carol Stein is back by popular demand in her cabaret, A A Little N Naughty Music, at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, May 3, and Thurs day, May 17, as part of the popular Winter Park Playhouse Spotlight Cabaret Series. Tickets are $20 and include a drink from the bar. Call 407-645-0145 or visit winter parkplayhouse.org MAYAY 4 The Breakthrough Theatre of Winter Park will present the John Pielmeier drama, A Agnes of God, from May 4-14. The Breakthrough Theatre is located at 419A W. Fairbanks Ave. in Winter Park. Call 407920-4034. DDate N Night at Leu Gardens featuring Step Mom is Friday, May 4. It opens at 6 p.m. and movie time is 8:30 p.m., weather per mitting. You may bring a dinner picnic basket. Alcohol is permitted. Garden admission is $5 plus tax for adults and $2 plus tax for children. Visit leugardens.org MAYAY 5 The Crohns & Colitis Foundation of America Take S Steps W W alk is Saturday, May 5, at Lake Lily Park in Maitland. Visit cctakesteps.org The Third A Annual D Derby Jubilee and A Auc tion is from 5 p.m. to midnight on Saturday, May 5, at E E astside Bistro, 3461 E E Colonial Drive, in Orlando. Visit doggiederby.com Visit wpmobserver.com/events for more details. Send submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com CCalendar AAPRRIL 28: Paint OOut Garden Party The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens Fourth Annual Winter Park Paint Out concludes with The Paint Out Garden Party from 6 to 9 p.m. on Saturday, April 28. All artists will be present to discuss and sell their works. Tickets are $45 in advance, or $60 at the door. Call 407-647-6294 or visit winterparkpaintout.org MAYAY 3: WWinter Park SSip and SStroll The Winter Park Sip and Stroll, hosted by the Park Avenue Area Association and the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce, will be held from 5 to 8:30 p.m. on May 3 at the corner of Morse Boulevard and Park Avenue. The cost is $30 per person in advance. Visit winterpark.org MAYAY 5: CCinco de Mayo partyCOCINA|214 is celebrating Cinco de Mayo with a block party in downtown Winter Park. From noon to 10 p.m. on Saturday, May 5, COCINA|214 will close a portion of Welbourne Avenue between Center Street and Knowles Avenue for the event. It is open to the public, and there is no cover charge. Call 407790-7997 or visit cocina214.com AAPRRIL 28: DDoggie DDerby in Baldwin Park The 5th Annual Doggie Derby is Saturday, April 28, at Corrine Commons. The Doggie Derby is an annual charity event where canines compete in a 25-yard sprint race among dogs of similar sizes. Visit brightsideevents.org AAPRRIL 28: SSpring in VV ienna The Bach Festival Society of Winter Park concludes its 2011 season with Spring in Vienna at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, April 28, and at 3 p.m. on Sunday, April 29, at Knowles Memorial Chapel, R Rol lins College. Call 407-646-2182 or visit BachFestivalFlorida.org

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Page 11 Thursday, April 26, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Lifestyles The large, puffy and oh-socute Parker the Owl pops up ev erywhere along Park Avenue, at celebrations, parades, on your Facebook feed and the pages of ILuvWinterPark.com He seems to always know whats going on down the Ave nue, alerting fans to the latest happenings in Winter Parks business and social scenes. But who is the man underneath that furry owl head? Its a question he gets often, in little messages sent to his ILu vWinterPark Facebook account, and it makes him smile. The man underneath Parker the Owl, the face of his website islocal Clyde Moore. Donning an animal costume and living in Winter Park werent personality perfectly, Moore said. The best things in life are the ones you sort of stumble into, he said. And that applies to a few things Moore loves most in his life falling into his owl costume, spontaneously buying a home in Winter Park on a weekend trip to the town, and the start of ILu vWinterPark.com The site offers a place for Winter Park businesses to promote themselves, for free, with deal vouchers for customers. Its very similar to a Groupon site, but its by locals for locals, and there are no merchant fees Groupon takes half of the sales revenue. Moore said he hopes his site can help Winter Park business will come back again and again, not just customers after a one-time deal. He said he loves helping his Parkpreneurs and keeping the city he loves full of successful, di verse shops and restaurants. I do love living in a dynamic environment and Id like to be the place that these businesses can turn, rather than some of the big deal sites that are out there, be cause I think that a lot of those can be detrimental to small business, he said. I wanted to be the posi tive, very localized alternative to them. HHelpful to business and the communityI think its astounding the number of people that come in as a result of that, and what it does is it gives not only us exposure, but it gives Park Avenue exposure, said Lettie Sexton, owner of Downeast. He brings in an entirely different person that has ever come in the store, people perhaps who would never have come in the store. Moore runs The Attic @ Downeast on the second level of the retail store facing the Avenue. The Attic sells local art including Moores own mosaics, and high-end designer closeouts from Downeast. He often invites artto-ceiling window that overlooks Central Park. He also helps with promotion for Downeast. Sexton calls him helpful to a fault, and said his creativity knows no bounds. Hell even text her in the middle of the night if he gets an idea for her store. Moore, who has a background in marketing and journalism, said he has always had an entrepreneurial and fun, free spirit, and felt like Floridas atmosphere was a perfect match for that. Its made for small businesses, he said, and whole community. And merchants share his vision Ginny Enstad of Ginnys Orchids said his enthusiasm and help make all the difference for small businesses in a competitive, Every penny that you spend locally, that money trickles right down into our own economy; in Winter Park it helps, Sexton said. I think people forget that if you dont shop locally, your commu nity suffers all the way. Moore, who moved to Winter Park six years ago, has a passion for the city that is clear the mo ment he starts talking about it. Theres not a thing he doesnt like about his home. Actually, he said he barely ever leaves it. He jokes that if his partner wants dinner outside of his little bubble, hell He wont go outside the zip code, his partner, Jim Kiger, said. And the good thing is you dont really have to. Soon, his insider knowledge and enthusiasm for our city will be coming to the pages of the Observer with Moores weekly column spotlighting what he sees as wonderful, unique and great in Winter Park. Through his site and the column, hell share what town, and learn a few things about it himself. Sometimes thats just remind ing people what we have at our tunate to live in a community and a place that I love so much. This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH O RLANDO A VE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.E NZIAN.ORG Academy Award Nominee! From Israel FOOTNOTE Fri. Sun. 3:45, 6:30, 9:15 Mon. Thurs. 6:30, 9:15 Wednesday Night Pitcher Show EASY RIDER Wed. 8 or Sunset FREE Fit for the Fourth blog See how Sarah Grafton did on Week 1 of her 60-day get-t challenge. Scan this QRR code with your smart phone or visit wpmobserver.com PhotosHOTOS byBY iISAAC bBAbBCOCK thTHE obsOBSERvVER WWinter Park resident CClyde Moore greets some young fans as Parker the Owl in Central Park on Thursday, April 19. WWinter Parks NNo. 1 fan unmasked The man behind the owl and ILuvWinterPark.com brings his insider perspective to the pages of The Observer starting May 3 BRittITTNiI JOHNSON Observer Staff Check out Clyde Moores deals at ILuvWinterPark.com or on Facebook at Facebook.com/winterpark Moores weekly column in The Observer debuts on May 3. AArt in the square PhotoHOTO byBY AANNA JANNOtti TTI AAn artist paints in plein air at the Third Annual Hannibal Square Heritage Center Folk Art and Traditional Craft Festival held Saturday, April 21, at the Center in Winter Park.

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Page 12 Thursday, April 26, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer FamilyCalendar Even when you add the word contemporary to a description of the amazing Cocina 214 Mexican and Tex-Mex kitchen, it doesnt begin to do justice to my favorite new Central Florida restaurant. And you know I do not say that lightly. A combination of the Spanish word for kitchen and the area code for Dallas, Cocina 214 is the beautiful dream of two brave Texans who grew up in restaurant families and moved to Winter Park only to miss the food they had grown up eating. Somehow that translated into Lets open a restaurant, and one year later the rest is culinary history. Fortunately, this hunger for Tex-Mex comfort food led Lambrine Macejewski, husband Ron, and the pairs charming little daughter to bring their considerable level of taste and their taste buds to share with us in Winter Park. I thank former Mayor Terry Hotard for leading me to Cocina just off Park Avenue on Wel bourne Avenue, between Morris Boulevard and New England Avenue. Having found it, I can now tell you, dear readers, that this is derstated and welcoming from the front porch to the sculptural banquettes in the main dining room. It is, simply stated, one of the most beautiful restaurants in all of Florida. And I am thrilled to report that the food lives up to the beautiful surroundings. This is a kitchen that truly cares about fresh, local ingredients, served in an elegant setting. My din ing partner and I began with the quesadillas. At Cocina 214, quesadillas are comfort food for the hungry and sophisticated palate. Please order a full portion of the and then call me Ill be there in a hurry; on that you can depend oil-infused babies will bring me back again and again. (Secret: Quesadillas never tasted this good.) And the grilled chicken breast quesadilla proved that pico de gallo does not have to be too spicy. Offerings are served with three levels of hot sauce all freshly made in-house, thereby giving the dinner the option of how much hotness is added to the food. We moved on to the beef brisket tacos, beautifully pre sented as pulled beef on a series of little open-face tortillas. This is a popular item, and the tasty mix I also tried the corn-crusted tion and coated lightly with the most wonderful vegetable butter sauce. The fresh veggies in the sauce allowed me to feel healthy while ordering extra sauce yes, its that good. And I hasten to add that the three hot sauces sat there ready to be used, but I enjoyed the taste of fresh ingredi ents in all the dishes, not needing to heat them up. The wonderful news is that we are all invited to a double celebra tion on Saturday, May 5, which happens to be a Mexican holiday (Cinco de Mayo) and the one-year anniversary of Cocina 214. I love this place so much Ill probably be there from noon to 10 p.m. as Cocina 214 closes a portion of Welbourne Avenue for the event. There will be music, beer, frozen margaritas, free samples and prizes and no cover charge. We never imagined the success and warm welcome weve received from the community, owner Lambrine Macejewski said. This Cinco de Mayo is a chance to give back with a block party open to the public. If youve read this far, Im happy to say that if you tell your server that Josh sent me or bring in the April 26 Observer, Cocina 214 will offer a free rocks or frozen margarita with any entre. AAPRRIL 27 The nal FFriday N Nights at the Morse which features free admission to the Morse Museum from 4 to 8 p.m. on Fridays, is April 27. Visit morsemu seum.org Winter Park Day Nursery will hold its 11th A Annual O Orange Blossom Jubilee on from 6:30 to 10:30 p.m. on Friday, April 27, at the Winter Park Community Center in Hannibal Square; 721 W. New E England Ave. in Winter Park. The event will raise funds to bridge the gap between what the day nurserys lower-income working families can afford versus the cost of preschool education to their children. Tickets are $75 each. Contact Winter Park Day Nursery at 407-647-0505 or email Heather@WinterParkDayNurs ery.org AAPRRIL 28 You are invited to celebrate Maitland Little Leagues 50th season at CCock tails & C Cleats a dinner and silent auction fundraising event that will be held Saturday, April 28. Proceeds will be directed toward capital improve ments for Maitland Little League at Keller Fields. Tickets are available for purchase in the concession stand, at New Traditions Bank (Maitland Branch) or from any Board member. Make checks payable to Maitland Little League. Contact Greg Stake at Gstake@c.rr.com, or Marty Wareing at w.martinwareing@gmail.com MAYAY 1 The city of Winter Park and the Multi faith E Education Project hold the ninth annual Trees for Peace Interfaith Tree Planting Project on Tuesday, May 1, at Cady Way Park located at 2525 Cady Way. Vice Mayor Steven Leary will begin the ceremony at 11:30 a.m. The Art & History Museums Maitland (A&H) celebrates the residents of Mai tland throughout the entire month of May. Maitland residents receive free admission to the A&H Museums from May 1-31 with proof of residence. MAYAY 3 WWPHSHS 2012 N Night on Broadway presents Les Miserables. Join the Winter Park High School Chorus for this years benet event at 7:30 p.m. from May 3 through May 5 at the Ann Deringer Auditorium at Winter Park High School. Tickets are $15. E Email NOBtickets@aol.com for tickets. ONONGOOINNG An open house will be held at Page Private School from 9 to 11 a.m. on April 26 and April 27, and from 10 a.m. to noon on April 28. There are two locations: U University Park at 10250 U University Blvd., in Orlando, and Towne Center at 100 Aero Lane, in Sanford. Call 407-324-1144 or visit pageschool.com At 10:30 a.m. each Tuesday, the Maitland Public Library hosts preschool story and craft time. At 10:30 a.m. each Thursday, it hosts baby time stories and activity. At 4 p.m. each Thursday, it hosts R Reading Buddies for kindergarten through fth-grade. Call 407-647-7700. Orange County Public Schools Food and Nutrition Services provides free meals to children during the sum mer at many locations. There are no income requirements or registration. Contact FSsummer@ocps.net or dial 211. Send submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com From the Corner Table PhotosHOTOS byBY iISAAC bBAbBCOCK thTHE obsOBSERvVER Josh Garrick samples the Cocina 214 trufe and mushroom quesadilla (above). At right are the beef brisket tacos, presented as pulled beef on little open-face tortillas.Tex-Mex deluxe and delish JOSH GARRiICK Observer Staff Cocina 214 is open seven days a week, for lunch and dinner with complimentary valet parking for dinner at 151 EE. Welbourne Ave. in Winter Park. Hours are 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Sunday. Call 407-790-7997 or visit cocina214.com

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Page 13 Thursday, April 26, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer AApril 29 OOne H Huge Unveiling One of the most highly anarts world will take place when legendary artist Harold Gardes huge 8-by-24 foot masterpiece Iconoclass will be unveiled to the public from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. on April 29. The mural was recently re-discovered by collectors and patrons Bill and Kathie Hohns and has not been shown publicly in more than 35 years. The color ful original has been copied and laminated, and will be attached to the outside of the building at the Museum of Florida Art. The event will coincide with a Strappo exhibit opening, and will feature the original Icono class inside the Museum. The Museum of Florida Art is at 600 N. Woodland Blvd. in DeLand. Call 386-734-4371 or visit museuAApril 28 & 29 DDietwhat diet? Its time for the 11th Annual Great American Pie Festival (and Championships). Last year 447 commercial, 142 professional and 301 amateur bakers competed for the title of Americas top pie bak er, but the big news is that 32,000 of us pie lovers will descend upon the town of Celebration on April 28 and 29 for the Never-Ending Pie Buffet. Last year 87,000 slices of pie and a lot of ice cream from Americas best-known bakers were served. Stage enter tainment and demonstrations are free; tickets for the pie buffet are $10 for adults and $5 for children ages 5 and younger to enjoy all we can eat! May 3 FFull SSail at the OOrlando Museum of AArt The original once-a-month day on the calendar (devoted to art) is First Thursday at the Orlando Mu seum of Art. From 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. on May 3, the Museum will honor another extraordinary home of the arts in Central Florida Full Sail University. Full Sail is much more than a college; it has literally educated some of the most celebrated arts technicians in the country in every medium from computer gaming to music videos. On May 3 we may enjoy an eclectic mix of various art forms created by Full Sail students, faculty and alumni. These young people make up the cutting edge of whats happening in the arts today. Call 407896-4231, extension 260 or visit OMArt.org May 3 WWinter Park SSip & SStroll The clever folks at the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce have come up with The Winter Park Sip & Stroll, a concept event that encourages us to have a glass of wine or two while we visit stores and restaurants at our own pace. We can enjoy a wine tasting and appetizer at each participating location, including Bajalia, Bayhill Jewelers on Park, Breakaway Bicycles, Charyli, Cocina 214, Downeast, Gary Lambert Salon, Kilwins Chocolates, Lilly Pulitzer, Luma on Park, Luxury Trips, Park Plaza Gardens, Peterbrooke Chocolatier, Sultre, Synergy, Ten Thousand Villages, Bistro on Park, The Doggie Door, Things & FASHION, Through the Look ing Glass, Timothys Gallery and Tollas Italian Cafe. The event is from 5 to 8:30 p.m. on May 3, and the tickets are $30 in advance. Call 407-644-8281 or visit winterpark. org May 3 to 13 Mad CCows HHerd of CCabaret Talent and we can hear them too. Gimme a break how often do I use a lousy pun? And its all in the name of fun as Mad Cow Theatre in Downtown Orlando hosts the 10th Annual Orlando Cabaret Festival from May 3-13 including 25 performances of jazz, pop, Broadway, comedy and a few surprises. Eight vocalists team up to present four unique shows including It Was A Very Good Year 1962, An Animated Night of Cabaret, A Gay Night for Singing! and And The Tony Goes To The Festival also of fers weekday lunchtime perfor mances that last 45 minutes so within an hour. Call 407-297-8788 or visit orlandocabaret.com AAnd not to be missed Now through May 13 Disneys The Lion King has leapt onto the stage of the Bob Carr Performing Arts Center with all its stunning theatricality and be loved musical score. Africa comes to life as the Tony Award-winning Broadway sensation features themes of love, family and the strength of friendship woven into this perfect family musical. Visit OrlandoBroadway.comJosh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906. Josh Garrick Culture worthy of your calendarIconoglass opens FFull SSail @ OOMAA

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Page 14 Thursday, April 26, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer OOpinions Immediately following an attack, survivors of sexual as sault may exhibit the following reactions according to the Florida Council Against Sexual Violence: nausea, trembling, effects on eat ing and sleeping, and feelings of helplessness. Long-term reactions can mune system, self blame, fear of large crowds and withdrawal. The Florida Council told the limited funding to rape crisis cen ters throughout the state, victims of rape and domestic violence often have to wait anywhere from several weeks to three months for services. This year the Council asked the state for a $1.5 million funding increase. It is unfathomable to endure that kind of trauma and then have to wait weeks or months before gaining access to the services needed to cope. A bill that would grant the extra money to 30 rape crisis centers throughout Florida made it all the way to Florida Gov. Rick Scotts desk only to be vetoed this week. The kicker: its Sexual Assault Awareness Month. the state already contributes $6.5 million to rape prevention and sexual assault services and said that the $1.5 million would only pay for duplicative services, The governor also said that no one was able to explain to him why the additional funding was needed. The Councils executive director, Jennifer Dritt, said she outlined the increase in the number of victims in the state U.S. is sexually assaulted every two minutes and an average of 233,986 Amercians age 12 and older are victims of sexual violence every year, according to the Victim Service Center (VSC) of Central Florida. VSC is the only rape crisis center in Orange County, and it offers a 24-hour sexual assault hotline, acute (less than 120 hours after the assault) and nonacute sexual assault services, which in clude an exam, forensic evidence collection and access to victim ad vocates, therapy, support groups, and outreach and prevention services. that $1.5 million may seem like a lot, but that money was to be spread throughout 67 counties. Some of the Councils current $6.5 million goes to education and prevention programs, which ing sexual violence, but it doesnt help cut down the waiting lists for crisis centers throughout the state. Sexual attacks often change victims entire lives. We should do all we can to make sure they get crisis services in a more timely manner. Our Observation Letters to the editor Send your thoughts (400 words or less) to Managing EEditor Jenny Andreasson at editor@observernewspapers.comThe state should do more for victims FFor the children Thank you Brittni Johnson for your headline article Nursery kindles young minds (published April 19) highlighting the mission and accomplishments of the Winter Park Day Nursery and its upcoming annual fundraiser, the Orange Blossom Jubilee. pre-K child care and education facility for many years, assisting the teaching staff in the classroom and facilitating physical coordination activities on the playground. As a former treasurer on the Board of Direc of raising funds to offset the sliding scale tuitions that cover only a portion of the nurserys annual expenses. Local nonprofits continue to vie for funds in an everdiminishing pool of available resources, and the Winter Park Day Nursery is no exception. And, dont let the name mislead you. While located on Pennsylvania Avenue just south of Fairbanks Avenue in Win ter Park, the nurserys doors are open to children outside the city. Also, the organi zation receives no dedicated funding from the city of Winter Park. In addition to the Winter Park Day institutions offering child care, education and life preparation activities for our kids in need such as the Orlando Day Nursery in Orlando and Welbourne Av enue Nursery, also in Winter Park. They all support. I cant think of a better cause than supporting child care, family enrichment and educational opportunities for at-risk and the Observers effort to highlight the service these pre-K nurseries provide our greater community.Michael Dick Winter Park Day Nursery volunteer FF ederal budget and the FF arm Bill There are a lot of myths circulating about SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition As sistance Program), formerly food stamps, misinformation stigmatizes the entire program, and now is being used as justifunding cuts that would make it harder for families struggling to get by day-to-day to put food on the table. The U.S. House budget approved last month proposes to cut SNAP by nearly 20 percent, gutting support for millions of this? The program has grown too much in recent years too many people are get in recent years. But it is only shocking that SNAP participation grew by 70 percent from 2006 to 2011 if you fail to mention that the ranks of the unemployed grew by 94 percent over the same period. The Agriculture Committees are rewrit ing Farm Bill legislation beginning this month, and SNAP and other anti-hunger programs are at risk of cuts at a time when they need to be strengthened and pro tected. Food insecurity is a national problem that needs a national solution, and that starts with a strong federal commitment to SNAP. SNAP responded quickly and effectively during the recession, working as it was designed by growing in response to growing need to ensure that Florida families, children and seniors have enough to eat. Weve all heard the myths, but what about the facts? SNAP is targeted at the most vulnerable households: 76 percent of SNAP households include a child, elderly person or disabled person, and 85 percent of SNAP households have gross income at or below 100 percent of the poverty line. are not overly generous the average $134. Thats less than $1.50 per meal. While youre more likely to hear sen sational stories of program abuse, the fact of the matter is that these bad actors are outliers. For every one allegation of SNAP stories of heartbreaking need, but those are the stories you dont hear, such as single parents trying to make ends meet, senior citizens deciding whether to buy food or medicine and many more. Our food bank, Second Harvest Food Bank of Central Florida, experienced a 30 percent increase in requests for food this past year. Without SNAP in place to respond to growing need in the recession, the increased demand on charities like ours would be crippling. Were struggling to keep up with need as it is, especially with recent sharp declines in federal food donations from The Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP), which is another Farm Bill program. We understand the importance of getwe strongly believe that a good paying job is the best solution to hunger and poverty. But until we restore opportunity and mo bility, our nation cannot walk back on our commitment to caring for our neighbors in need. Taking care of our neighbors is an American value, and feeding our neighbors is a shared responsibility. We see support of our volunteers and donors. This through important anti-hunger programs such as SNAP and TEFAP. We strongly urge our nations leaders to protect anti-hunger programs such as SNAP and make needed investments in TEFAP to protect families from hunger and help charities like ours keep up with need in our community. We also ask them and you to look at SNAP with fresh eyes and an open heart. If you have any doubt that families are struggling, please visit us at Second Harvest Food Bank of Central Florida and meet the people whose lives are affected by the choices Congress will make in the Farm Bill. Dave Krepcho President/CEEO Second Harvest Food Bank of Central Florida Taking care of our neighbors is an American value, and feeding our neighbors is a shared responsibility. Dave Krepcho Sexual attacks often change victims entire lives. King Features Weekly ServiceApril 23, 2012 King Features Weekly ServiceApril 23, 2012

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Page 15 Thursday, April 26, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer I spoke with Joel Salatin ear lier this month. Joel is working on the leading edge of sustainable farming practices at his Polyface Farm in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia. Hes written several books, including Folks, This Aint Normal. This is the sec ond half of our conversation. Tom Carey: Food deserts in inner cities are starting to be served by urban farms using high-intensity hydroponic and aquaponic systems, hoop houses and framed raised beds. Theres just not a lot of acreage growing in the ground. I like to say Im a dirt farmer, trying to grow the best crop of dirt I can. Are you comfortable with these high-tech methods? Joel Salatin: Theres still so much we can do using traditional methods. This country has 35 million acres of lawns, 36 million acres for recreational horses, and we havent even touched golf courses. Cornell University did a study, and the state of New York has 3.1 million acres of fallow farms, land that is no longer working farms. Twenty years ago there was so much concern over suburban development and malls gobbling up farmland, but the bigger issue now is land abandonment. I do not espouse the idea that the only way to heal land is to abandon it. Human involvement with land is not inherently evil or debilitating. Our mandate as humans is to use our intellect to massage the landscape into better productivity, i.e. more solar energy converted into grow ing biomass, than nature does if left in a static state. Tom: I started with half per cent organic matter, and now its up to 2 percent, thats a four-fold increase, but it still looks like beach sand. Hydroponic plants not attached to the earth, grown in an inert media, even with or ganic fertilizers and pest controls, have different types of roots and nutrient demands. When organic produce, grown in real soil, must are not), while all the other hightech methods, not to mention conventional chemical farming, confusing. Joel: Theres no comparison to knowing your farmer, visiting the farm, taking a look around and satisfying yourself. People say I dont have time to do that, but they do have time to watch TV, go on a Caribbean cruise, visit Disney World, to shop for $100 designer jeans with holes already in the knees. We tend to make time for the things we think are important. We need to choose to take our time to discover the farm treasures in our communities. Youll get knowledgeable and Tom: Are that many more people getting the message (about local sustainable agriculture)? These things happen gradually, but are we at a point in history where these are becoming important issues? Joel: I see two sides to this is sue. One is that there is a general sense we are on the precipitous, precarious precipices, that things cant go on the way they are. Theres peak oil, food prices, the economy, China, debt, health costs, obesity, diabetes. There is a general feeling that something is out of whack. The way we are running as a culture, it wont be like this in 100 years. The other is that most people dont want to analyze the situation or are too disconnected to know what anchor to grab, what lifeline to get a hold of. Part of the reason for writing this book (Folks, This Aint Normal) is not only to shake people up, but to also make people aware that there are a lot of lifelines out there from your own personal garden, to community food production, how to develop your larder, to your own culinary skills. You can actually have your own fresh, frozen, dried or canned food so you dont have to run to the supermarket every three days. No lasting change ever comes without some effort. If you missed the rst half of the interview, visit wpmobserver.comFrench political writer Alexis de Tocqueville wrote his famous book, Democracy in America in the 1830s, and the prognosis he made did not portend a protracted and successful future for the American social experiment. The long and short of it was that democracys reliance upon the masses of common people was equivalent to build tion. De Tocqueville wrote, Upon my ar rival in the United States, the religious that struck my attention; and the longer I stayed there, the more did I perceive the great political consequences resulting from this state of thing learn that the concepts of our nations founders were not based on the kind of wide-open democracy that the U.S. enjoys today. The fact that the vote of a highly intelligent person could be invalidated by the bought vote of an illiterate dis enchanted people then as it still may do today. De Tocqueville wrote of Political Consequences of the Social State of the man heart a depraved taste for equality, which impels the weak to want to bring the strong down to their level, and which reduces men to preferring equality in servitude to inequality in freedom. He further comments on equality by saying, Furthermore, when citizens are all to defend their independence against the aggressions of power. As none of them is tage, the only guarantee of liberty is for everyone to combine forces. But such a combination is not always in evidence. The 1789 French Revolution produced in the French people concepts of democracy that were not identical to those that the 1775 American Revolution had produced in American citizens. Cer tainly notable was the fact that Napoleon crowned himself emperor in Notre Dame Cathedral, some years after George Washington had refused the offer of an American crown. De Tocqueville tried to understand why America was so different from Europe in the last throes of aristocracy. America, in contrast to the aristocratic ethic, was a society where hard work and money making were the dominant ethics, where the common man enjoyed a level of dignity that was unprecedented, where commoners never deferred to elites, and where what he described as crass indi vidualism and market capitalism had taken root to an extraordinary degree. De Tocquevilles idea was that, Among a democratic people, where there is no hereditary wealth, every man works to earn a living.... Labor is held in honor; the prejudice is not against labor, but in its favor. (!) De Tocqueville added that this equal ity of social conditions bred political and civilian values that determined the type of legislation passed in the colonies and later in the free states. De Tocqueville was a forward-thinking prophet when, in his Democracy in America, he seems to predict the future of the world in the Cold War saying, There are now two great nations in the world, which starting from different points, seem to be advancing toward the same goal: the Russians and the AngloAmericans. Each seem called by some secret design of Providence one day to hold in its hands the destinies of half the world. De Tocquevilles prophetic foresight was as stunning then as it is now! About RRoney: Harvard42Distinguished Prof, E E m.U U CF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy RRoney) Tom Carey From my garden to yoursOn the edge of a food revolutionChris Jepson Perspectives Louis RRoney Play On! The cocktail for the ages AAmerican DDemocracy I want a busy life, a just mind, and a timely death. Zora Neale Hurston I am going to employ a standard rhetorical device called paralipsis by saying it is unnecessary to state the obvious (but do it anyway). The boomer genera tion is retiring, is getting out of the way, is moving on. About 13 percent of the American population today is 65 or older, and when the last of the boomers retire in 2030, 18 percent of our population will be older than 65. Ten thousand boomers are retiring every day and will for the next 19 years. Steven M. Gillon, author of Boomer Nation, described it this way: The pig has moved through the python, and is suggest that nearly 30 percent of Medicare payments cover the cost of care for people in the last year of life. Whew! Thats a big number. Need more? Twelve percent of Medicare spending is allocated for people who are in the last two months of their life. We will mortgage our future, borrow billions from China for medical care for the last 60 days of an individuals life? Is that money well spent? Whatta waste! Gosh, we could be spending that on bombing Iran, or tanks or on something that goes Atten-hut! I jest. But I dont when it comes to boomer end times. In 1729 Jonathan Swift wrote A Modest Proposal in which he satirically recommended that impoverished Irish sell their children as food to rich gentleman and ladies. A tasty morsel of an idea, yes? Modest I suppose because he simply didnt suggest they be ground up and used as a natural fertilizer to increase crop production to lessen the Irish famine. Nothing like a little 18th century Juvena lian satire to get the blood racing. I have a modest recommendation for boomers, but, unlike Swift, I am unequivocally sincere in my proposal. Ms. Hurston suggested of living that we experience a timely death. I recommend for my fellow boomers that we exit with dignity. Die with grace. On your own terms. Die at a moment of your choosing. Do it for yourself. Do so for your children and America. One of the ironies of Alzheimers lost your marbles, you dont give a damn about your dignity. Let alone for those who are now responsible for your welfare. You are reduced to walking vegetable matter, and society is left caring for decaying fruit. That is a harsh but accurate assessment. You may select to experience that end; I will not. Ive come to the conclusion that I want to die as I have lived. With purpose, intent and in control. That may be an illusion (philosophical or otherwise) but it has been my modus operandi since it occurred to me that I was master of my own thoughts (age 5 or so). Ive considered the question of whethyou are a burden to children and country. Consider the timely death. It is an ethical choice. I predict more and more boomers will choose a timely death. Do so with intent and prior to those last horrendous, humiliating and costly two months. Phenobarbital and whiskey. The cocktail for the ages. Or, rather, for the aged. Skl.Jepson is a 24-year resident of Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. RReach him at Jepson@MEEDIAmerica.UUS I recommend for my fellow boomers that we exit with dignity. Tom CCarey and Joel SSalatin

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Page 28 Thursday, April 26, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Class-A FlatBed Drivers $$ Home E EVERER Y weekend, R Run S.EE. U US RE RE QUUIRERES 1Yr OTRR Flatbed exp. & Pay U UP TO $.39/mile. Sunbelt Transport, LLC. 800-572-5489 ext 227 AIRRLINEES ARERE HIRRING Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Housing available. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance. 866314-3769 Apply Now, 12 Drivers Needed Top 5% Pay 2 mos. CDL Class A Driving E Exp. www. meltontruck.com/drive 877-258-8782 Drivers Knight has steady Dry Van & RRefrigerated freight. Annual Salary $45K $60K. Flexible Hometime. Modern Trucks! CDL-A, 3 months Current OTRR experience. www. driveknight.com, 800-414-9569 HIRRING EEXPERERIEENCEED/ INEEXPERERIEENCEED TANKERER DRRIVERERS! Great Benefits and Pay! New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 year OTRR E Exp R Req. Tanker Training Available. Call Today 877-8826537 www.OakleyTransport.com DRRIVERERS WANTEED: CLASS A-CDL W/HAZMAT Company & O/Os. OTRR/RRegional runs. Lots of freight to move. Call 877-8939645 Medical Billing Trainees Needed!Train to become a Medical Office Assistant! No E Experience needed! Job Training & Local Placement assistance. HS Diploma/GEED & PC/Internet needed! 888-374-7294 NEEW TO TRURUCKING? Your career starts now! $0 Tuition Cost No Credit Check Great Pay & Benefits, Short employment commitment required. 866-297-8916 www.JoinCRRST.com Log on to WorkforceCentralFlorida.com where you can enter the Job Title in the Search for Jobs box to see more infor mation on these jobs and search thou sands of additional openings throughout Central Florida, at NO COST. Apply by following the directions listed. For further help visit JobVantage at 4360 E East Colo nial Dr., Orlando, or call (407) 531-1227 Sales & Marketing Coordinator Job Description: R Responsible for perform ing clerical duties such as typing BEEOs, tent cards, amenity forms, correspon dence and reports; filing; and answering phones. Maintain and upkeep various filing systems, including vendor informa tion where necessary. Assist managers in scheduling appointments and meetings. Applicant must possess Bachelor Degree and two years of experience. Additional qualifications apply. Pay RRate: Salary based on experience. Job Order Number: 9666038Security Guard Instructors Job Description: R Responsible for teaching G Armed and D U Unarmed Licensed courses. Applicant must possess three years of experience and a Florida Secu rity DI License or K License. Pay RRate: $10.00 $11.00 per hour Job Order Number: 9665468Draftsperson Job Description: R Responsible for provid ing Auto CAD drawings in compliance with the Companys specifications as required by the needs of the projects as signed and defined in the Project Man agement Manual. Applicant must pos sess High School Diploma or equivalent and nine months of prior experience. Pay RRate: $15.00 $19.00 per hour Job Order Number: 9665212Pharmacy Technician Job Description: R Responsible for support ing tasks, including answering calls from physicians, pharmacists and members regarding prior authorizations; providing customer service through telephone and written communication; resolving claim adjudication issues; filing, preparing let ters; and other daily tasks as required. Applicant must be a Licensed Pharmacy Technician or possess a minimum of one year of health care experience, along with knowledge of medical and phar macy terminology and coding. Additional qualifications apply. Pay RRate: Salary based on experience. Job Order Number: 9664391 25 Driver Trainees Needed Now at Schneider National!Become a driver for Schneider National! EEarn $800 per week! No experience needed! CDL & Job R Ready in just 3 weeks! 888-374-7644 HUUGEE OPPORR TUUNITY NEEW CO. COMING TO THEE AREREA, LOOK ING FORR (3) PRROFEESSIONAL SALEES PEEOPLEE W/MANAGEEMEENT SKILLS...SIX FIGUREURE INCOMEE. CALL: (410) 202-2324 LEEAVEE MSG. HHELP WANWANTEDD JUUNEES SEENIORR LIVING JUUNEES RE RESIDEENCEE PRROVIDEES A HOMEE STLYEE ATMOSPHEREERE FORR SEENIORRS INSTEEAD OF AN INSTITUUTIONAL E EN VIRRONMEENT. $800.00 TO $1000.00/ MONTH. JUUNEE COGAN, 407-399-1317, JC1950@GMAIL.COM RREAAL ESSTA A TE: FORFOR RRENNT 20 Acres Live on Land NOW!!!Only $99/mo. $0 Down, Owner Financ ing, NO CREREDIT CHEECKS! Near E El Paso, TX Beautiful Mountain Views! FREEREE Color Brochure. sunsetranches.com, 800-755-8953 RREAAL ESSTA A TE: FORFOR SASALE Winter Park Benefit Shop 140 Lyman Avenue. We need items to sell, clothing, bedding, jewelry, kitch enware & Bric-a-brac. We also need volunteers. Shop is open 930a-1pm ev ery Tues & Fri (Sat 10am-1p). Proceeds from the Benefit Shop support Childrens Programs & Blind Assoc. of CF. E Elizabeth Comer, 407-647-8276 SIDEE BY SIDEE REREFRRIGERERATORR FORR SALEE Four year old black Frigidaire, Gallery Se ries, side by side refrigerator and freezer with built in water and ice machine. Located in Clermont, Florida. Please call 321.297.5075 MISCSCELLANANEOOUSS ATTEEND COLLEEGEE ONLINEE FRROM HOMEE. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice. Job placement available. Computer avail able. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEEV certified. 877-206-5165 Can You Dig It? We will train, certify & provide lifetime assistance landing work. Hiring in Florida. Start digging as a heavy equipment operator. 866-362-6497 EDDUCACA TIONON BUUY/SEELL AN RRV ONLINEE Best Deals and Selection. visit R RVT.com Classifieds. Thousands of R RVs for Sale by Owner and Dealer Listings. www.RRVT. com or call 888-260-2043 AAUTOSOS HUUGEE DISCOUUNTS WHEEN YOUU BUUY 2 TYPEES OF ADVERER TISING! 120 community newspapers, 32 web sites, 26 daily newspapers. Call now to diversify your advertising with Advertising Networks of Florida. 866-742-1373 ANNOANNOUNCNCEMENNTSS WORKFORCWORKFORCE JOOB LISSTINNGSS OOrange CCounty WORKFORCWORKFORCE JOOB LISSTINNGSS OOrange CCounty WORKFORCWORKFORCE JOOB LISSTINNGSS OOrange CCounty TheMarketplace OBSERVER Open Houses OBSERVER Just Sold Homes Its free to place estate sales, garage sales and yard sales on this page! Visit WPMObserver .com and click Create Your Classified Its free to place estate sales, garage sales and yard sales on this page! Visit WPMObserver   com and click Create Your Classified 1-866-742-1373Get your business noticedOne Call One Order One Payment Almost 4 million readers statewide are waiting to see your advertising message. Dont make them wait any longer. Call us today! ank you to our media partners: WKMG Local 6 and Magic 107.7. Sunday 2-5pm 1689 Lake Baldwin Lane, Orlando FL 32814. Audra Wilks is hosting the open house. Saturday 2-5pm 185 Spring Lake Hills Drive, Altamonte Springs, FL 32714. Audra Wilks is hosting the open house. Sunday 1-4pm 1806 Antilles Place Orlando FL 32806. 4 Bedrooms | 4 Bathrooms | 2971 SF | $389,500. Hosted by Teresa Jones-Cintron and EElim Cintron. Sunday 1-5pm 1729 R Reppard R Road Orlando, FL 32803. 3 Bedrooms | 2 and one half bathrooms | 2,244 SF | $499,900. Hosted by Jim Keelings. 1017 Guernsey Street, Orlando, $250,000 Melissa Woodman 6506 Merrick Landing, Windermere, $105,000 Katherine Bordelon 1539 Golfside Drive, Winter Park, $257,000 Jack Ballard 5800 Oxford Moor Blvd, Windermere, $740,000 Katherine Bordelon 2050 Goldwater Circle, Maitland, $315,000 Janis Fuller 1505 Cherry Ridge Drive, Maitland, $330,000 Julie Williams/Meg Dolan Drivers: New Flatbed Freight Lanes! We Offer: No Tarping!!! Great Miles, Pay-up to .60cpm, Benets & Home Time. CDL-A, 1yr OTR Exp, Good MVR Frank Donnelly at: 1-888-567-4969, x22. Wheelchair wanted Wanted: U Used wheelchair. Call 407-6291480. WANteTED Staff Development Coordinator Job Description: R Responsible for ensur ing the facility is in compliance with regulatory requirements relating to staff credentialing and education. Provide services associated with ongoing pro fessional development of staff at the facility. Applicant must possess clinical skills, educational experience, as well as knowledge and hands-on experience in Infection Control and R Risk Management. Additional qualifications apply. Pay RRate: Salary based on experience. Job Order Number: 9665012Office Assistant Job Description: R Responsible for as signed clerical duties in accordance with the office procedures of individual establishments that may include a combination of answering telephones, book keeping, typing or word processing, stenography, office machine operation, and filing. Applicant must possess High School Diploma or equivalent and two years of experience. Additional qualifications apply. Pay RRate: $12.00 $14.00 per hour Job Order Number: 9664715 EEngineer Software Associate Job Description: R Responsible for ana lyzing, designing, creating, modifying, porting, and maintaining source code for simulation and training applications. Develop design concepts for software work products. Participate in design re views under technical leadership. Prepare design documentation for review by technical leadership. Applicant must possess Bachelor Degree in Computer Science or E Engineering/Technical de gree and five years of software develop ment experience in related industries, or Masters Degree in Computer Science or EEngineering/Technical degree and three years of software development experi ence in related industries. Additional qualifications apply. Pay RRate: Salary based on experience. Job Order Number: 9664606 Heavy EEquipment Operator Job Description: R Responsible for operat ing a vibratory roller, a front end loader, a bulldozer, an excavator on tracks, or more than one of the equipment listed. Applicant must possess a minimum of one year experience in operation of one or more of the equipment. Additional qualifications apply. Pay RRate: $100.00 $14.00 per hour Job Order Number: 9664015Construction Worker/Wall Panel Installer Job Description: R Responsible for general construction labor, constructing earth retaining walls and related concrete and wall installation work. Some small tool and equipment operation is also re quired. Applicant must possess one year of experience in Heavy Civil or Highway Construction. No minimum education is required. Pay RRate: $8.00 $12.00 per hour Job Order Number: 9663663 RRestaurant cashier Job Description: R Responsible for serv ing drinks and meals for the guest in the restaurant and room service. Applicant must possess High School Diploma or equivalent and one year of experience. Additional qualifications apply. Pay RRate: $8.00 per hour Job Order Number: 9665192Store Manager Job Description: R Responsible for achiev ing sales and profit plan by controlling expenses, working capital, inventory, and shrinkage and growing net contribution. RRecruit, train, direct, motivate, discipline and resolve associate issues. Maintain an understanding of local market, operations based selling and customer base. Applicant must possess a minimum of High School Diploma/G.EE.D., some col lege credits preferred, and 3 to five years of retail sales experience, with manage ment experience preferred, 3 to 5 years retail sales experience, with manage ment experience preferred. Additional qualifications apply. Pay RRate: Salary based on experience. Job Order Number: 9665032Mental Health/Disabilities Specialist Job Description: R Responsible for plan ning, administering, and overseeing Mental Health/ Disabilities (MHD) services and ensuring services are delivered to children and families in accordance with the Head Start Performance Standards. Applicant must possess Bachelor Degree in E Early Childhood E Education, Psychology, Social Work or a related field and two years of experience in securing and indi vidualizing needed services for children with disabilities. Additional qualifications apply. Pay R Rate: $30,346.00 $35,306.00 per year Job Order Number: 9664673



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407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC USPS 00-6186 Publisher statement on page 4. Thursday, April 26, 2012 50+ tax wpmobserver.com Subscribe now! Visit wpmobserver.com Taking care of our neighbors is an American value, and feeding our neighbors is a shared responsibility. Page 14 Letters to the editor News Hundreds gathered to say goodbye to two Winter Park friends alongside a Cady Way Trail bridge on Thursday. Page 2 Restaurant review At Cocina 214, quesadillas are comfort food for the hungry and sophisticated palate, Garrick says. Page 12 Calendar The fastest canines are training for the 5th Annual Doggie Derby, held Saturday, April 28, in Baldwin Park. Page 10 TAX DEFERREDFIXED ANNUITY RATE FOR 5 YEARS.Bob Adams 407-644-6646THE NATIONAL 5 YEAR CD RATE IS 1.34%3.35% 451 Maitland Ave, Altamonte Springs, FL 32701NEW Dermatology Ofce!407-599-SKIN (7546)*Waive co-payment up to $25 No referral needed Accepting all insurances Dr. John Cottam Dr. Ross Wheeler When Winter Parks coveted tree canopy started losing branches in a hurry, residents wondered why their trees were hit with the ugly stick. At the City Commission meeting on Monday, they found out. Telling a gruesome tale of how he nearly lost a leg and was badly burned by touching a 7,200 volt power line as a child, city engineer Don Marcotte opened a talk about safety versus aes thetics in regards to trees and power lines. While climbing a tree he accidentally touched a high voltage line that was within arms reach. The resulting brush with death and eight surgeries left him with a painful re minder of the danger of tree branches being too close to power lines. That safety issue led city staff to make a presentation created by Florida Power & Light Company to help the Commission and residents to understand why it was suddenly cutting trees so that their trunks and branches forked around power lines in a deep V shape. The reason, Marcotte said, was to keep pow er lines away from curious hands. Im certainly glad to see trees that are not near power lines, of course, he said. Recent changes to regulations for tree branch radius around nearby power lines increased Winter Parks allowable distance from 3 1/2 feet to 4 feet, then to 10 feet. Rather than trim ming the tops of trees to keep them away from lines, the city had been cutting trees using di rectional trimming, which causes the trees to fork around and away from power lines, leav ing a V-shaped gap in the middle of the canopy. Only in the last few weeks had the city actually seen the larger cuts taking place. Aesthetics are extremely important, but said. Trees and power lines do not mix. During her presentation, Assistant City Manager Michelle del Valle said that direction al trimming is also healthier for the trees, which could ultimately help preserve the canopy. Commissioner Steven Leary said that if the trees health was in jeopardy and there was a safety issue, then the cuts should be made, cit Martha Bryant-Hall nimbly navigates the sandy gravel streets outside her Maitland home, while stray rocks, dips and roots easily trip up those more than half her age. After more than 30 years liv ing off unpaved Amado Lane, near the Maitland Boulevard overpass on U.S. Highway 1792, shes an expert on the literal living in what was once called the Woodbridge subdivision, an nexed into Maitland in 2003. Once home to 13 houses, the small U-shaped enclave is down to six. The others, she says, have either burned down or fallen in on themselves over the years since she built her home here in 1979. Shell tell you of the peaks, a quiet peaceful neighborhood where everyone knows every one, and she has ample space to plant her papaya plants and aza lea bushes. Shell also show you the pits. Shell point you to where the neighborhoods water main line dead-ends outside of her prop erty, and the dusty roads single overhead streetlight where it meets Mechanic Street. Shell walk you less than 200 feet from her driveway to the Maitland Boulevard overpass hear, the restless squeaky colony of bats that took up residence in the crevices under the bridge years ago. Now numbering an estimated 1,000 members, they come out to play in Woodbridge when the sun sets. When I built back here I thought itd be better by now, by the s I thought itd have improved, she said. But every place has changed around us, ex cept these little pockets of black communities. Id like for my neighbor hood to look like all the other neighborhoods around it. But it shows that theres really two cities of Maitland: the haves and the have-nots. for the have-nots to have their day at the negotiating table for ange County and, for the past 10 years, with the city of Maitland. But up until after she spoke her case in January at the Maitland mayoral candidate forum, Bry ant says shes never even been offered a seat. They wouldnt even give us a crumb from the table and Im a taxpayer just like everybody else, she said. Its not right. On Jan. 26, Maitland Mayor Howard Schieferdecker reached out and scheduled a workshop so Bryant could introduce him to her decades-old plight of the services she sees in her commu nity. The unpaved roads, lack of streetlights, bat infestation and lack of accessibility to Lake Jack son in another primarily blackpopulated area of Maitland near Bellamy Park with boundaries PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER A stop sign is falling over at the corner of Amado Lane and Mechanic Street just beyond the Maitland Boulevard overpass, whose crevices are home to a colony of bats Please see MAITLAND on page 6 Shedding light on legacy problems Some worry newly imposed tree-trimming regulations could affect Winter Park property values Maitland promises to x decades-old inequities in city services for a pocket of black residents SARAH WILSON Observer Staff V-shaped trees cause uproar ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER A tree sports a new look after the city enforced strict er clearances between branches and powerlines. Please see TREES on page 5

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Page 2 Thursday, April 26, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Visions of the family, com munity and pedestrian-friendly downtown that Maitland has been working toward for years on Monday. Two of the citys downtown de velopment partners, Bill Finfrock of Finfrock Design Inc. and Sean Law of American Realty Develop ment, presented their updated de sign proposals for downtown Mai tland at the April 23 City Council meeting. Finfrock proposed plans for the lot currently housing City Hall on Independence Lane, and Law showed plans for the area between Horatio and George av enues off U.S. Highway 17-92. Finfrock displayed plans for a four-story parking garage struc ture with frontal mixed-use busi ness space for restaurants, retail of Maitland French-colonial de sign: The Elysian Plaza would include 25,000 square feet of res taurant and retail space, 15,000 square feet for outdoor public pla zas, 400 parking spaces and 200 apartments. The city is in the process of hearing out proposals and set ting up development agreements to solidify plans for its planned downtown zoning district, what Maitland Mayor Howard Schief erdecker says is the most impor tant legislation facing the City Council in years. Law says the designs goal is to make Maitland a destination in Central Florida. He said it features a four-story parking garage, large alfresco public plaza and luxury apartments all in a New Orleansstyle pedestrian-friendly setting. It even has plans for rooftop res taurants, pools and gardens. What were looking at here is a festival of life and community, he said. Schieferdecker said the city is currently working out a develop Finfrocks parking garage plans for the land where City Hall now stands, he said, are con tingent upon plans in develop ment of what will be built across the street from the Independence Lane property at the site of the former Winn-Dixie and Royal Pla za. Butch Charlan, with Charlan Brock & Associates architects and planners, is in early talks about developing that property, and is working closely with Finfrock. Schieferdecker, who was also re-sworn in as mayor at the meet ing, said he hopes the City Coun cil, staff, community and its part ners can work together to make Maitland the best that it can be as plans continue to develop for the downtown area. As the sun set just beyond a stand of trees the evening of April 19, hundreds gathered to say goodbye to two friends along a creekside bridge on the Cady Way Trail. For best friends Jeremy Stewart, 18, and Nicholas Nic Presha, 16, this was the last place they would be seen together, victims of an apparent homicide. The two had been a popular pair at Winter Park High School, Jeremys father, James Stewart, said. They were good boys who didnt deserve their fate. He had a heart of gold, James Stewart said of his son at the candlelight vigil. No body deserves to die like this. As he stood in the center of a growing crowd of Winter Park High School students, well-wishers and friends, the grieving fa ther at times brought the group to tears and laughter remembering his son. He was the boy who loved to hug, whod snuggle in bed and be teased by his father for his affectionate nature. Hed smile and laugh it off anyway. Gathered around his father, friends laughed and smiled too, re membering happier times. the bodies of the two students were found burning along the Cady Way Trail between Metric Drive and Forsyth Road by bicyclists early Sunday morning. They were victims of an apparent homi at the nearby Sun Bay Apartments may be connected. while students dealt with grief. On Mon day that testing resumed. Rumors spread quickly through the school, speculating that the murders were drug related, due to an unpaid debt. Those were false, said Alex McHugh, who had known Nic for nine years. Thats just rumor, he said. None of its true. He was a nice kid, just genuine. Friend Tyler Winters, who had helped organize the vigil, said the pair werent the type to get into this kind of trouble. They were good kids, he said. They never hurt anyone. As friends gathered in between prayers, they spoke about coming to terms with what had happened on that early Sunday morning. said. I didnt want to. Trying to lend relief to the crowd, pas tor Joshua Shapiro gathered in the middle of a ring of mourners as he led a prayer and helped the group sing Amazing Grace atop the soggy grass along the trail. My life was changed by murder, Sha piro said. I hope to help these kids too. When something good happens from trag edy, it ripples outward. For James Stewart, it was a moment to ask for answers. A fund has been set up to raise money for a reward for information leading to catching the killer or killers. The victims families set up the fund at United Legacy Bank, 425 S. U.S. Highway 17-92 in Longwood. Speaking to a throng of news media, James Stewart wanted to know what hap pened to his son and his sons best friend. Did he suffer? I dont know. I want to know so I can have closure. Hours: M-F 8am to 4:30pm 2315 Lee Road Winter Park, Florida 32789 Your Guiding Beacon for Quality Healthcare Harbour Private Duty Nursing, LLCSkilled Nursing Physical Therapy Occupational Therapy Companionship Home Health Aid Homemaking Flexible Schedules Free RN Assessments The Services of Harbour Private Duty Nursing provide peace of mind to loved ones, trust ofcers, guardians and physicians. Our professional team prides itself on making your life easier. We also provide in-hospital private duty care, which offers close, personal attention and reassurance in an unfamiliar and often frightening environment. Our ofce hours are Monday through Friday, 8:00 am to 4:30 pm. Our professional team is available 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. During hours when the ofce is closed and during the weekends and holidays, the on-call coordinator is available by telephone 24 hours per day.www.HarbourPrivateDutyNursing.com License # 299991382phone (407) 895-8188 fax 407-895-9339 Studios & 1 Bedrooms Available!! Studios/1: base rent $591, 1/1: base rent $678THE PLYMOUTH APTSA HUD Property for Seniors Over 62ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR OUR WAITING LIST!PLEASE APPLY IN PERSON STARTING: APRIL 27, 8AM 1PM AND 2PM 5PM 1550 Gay Rd., Winter Park FL 32789 407-644-4551 TTY/TTD 711 proof of income for ALL adult members of household. Applications will be processed and your place on the waiting Studios & 1 Bedrooms Available!! THE PLYMOUTH APTSEQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY The Maitland Development Review Committee approved plans last week for a Dunkin Donuts to be developed at 1605 S. Orlando Ave., near the ACE Hardware, pending approval from Planning & Zoning. A seventh workshop for proposing and creating the Downtown Maitland Zoning District will be held at 6:30 p.m. on Monday, April 30, in the Maitland Council Chambers. For more information, visit itsmymaitland.com Anyone with information about the case should call CrimeLine at 1-800-423-TIPS. Y ou may be eligible for a $5,000 reward. PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER James Stewart, father of slain Winter Park High School student Jeremy Stewart, speaks during a candlelight vigil held April 19 next to Cady Way Trail, where Jeremy and friend Nicholas Nic Presha were found dead on April 15. Putting a face on downtown Maitlands future Remembering Jeremy and Nic Father asks for answers at vigil for slain Winter Park students ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff SARAH WILSON Observer Staff Downtown Maitland Special District MAP COUR TESY OF CITY OF MAITLAND The proposed Maitland Downtown Special District includes the area around City Hall.

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Page 3 Thursday, April 26, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Loch Berry Loch Berry Loch Berry WPOAPR12

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Page 4 Thursday, April 26, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer USPS 00-6186 ISSN 1064-3613 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835-5705 Member of: Chamber of Commerce Publisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor. Submission does not guarantee publication. Columnists opinions are made independently of the newspaper. All rights reserved. Winter Park / Maitland Observer 2012 Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster www.wpmobserver.com | Phone: 407-563-7000 | Fax: 407-563-7099 | editor@observernewspapers.com Published Thursday, April 26, 2012 CONTACTS Volume 24, Issue Number 17 PUBLISHER T racy Craft 407-515-2605 tcraft@observernewspapers.com MANAGING EDITOR Jenny Andreasson 407-563-7026 editor@observernewspapers.com DESIGNER Jonathan Gallagher 407-563-7054 jgallagher@observernewspapers.com ASSOCIATE EDITOR Isaac Babcock 407-563-7023 isaacb@observernewspapers.com LEGALS | CLASSIFIEDS Ashley McBride legal@FLAlegals.com classieds@observernewspapers.com STAFF WRITERS Sarah Wilson Brittni Johnson Kristy Vickery COPY EDITORS Sarah Wilson COLUMNISTS Chris Jepson Jepson@MediAmerica.us Louis Roney LRoney@c.rr.com Josh Garrick joshgarrick9@gmail.com ADVER TISING SALES T racy Craft 407-515-2605 tcraft@observernewspapers.com SUBSCRIPTIONS | CIRCULATION Katie Reyes kreyes@turnstilemediagroup.com 407-563-7073 INTERN Andy Ceballos Business Briefs Community Bulletin T aste winners O n Wednesday, April 18, the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce hosted the 27th annual Taste of Winter Park presented by CenturyLink, the organizations an nual food festival. The R avenous Pig was honored with Best Main Course for its lobster hot dog. Best Side Dish was presented to Mi Tomatina, Paella Bar for its braised ox tail. The Bohemian Bakers lavender tea cake was awarded Best Dessert. The Best Booth Display went to 4 Rivers Smokehouse. Finally, a new award this year recognized the Best Healthy Dish and was presented to The Ancient O live/ The Spice & Tea E xchange for the pairing of Waterkist Farms heirloom tomato with olive oils, balsamic vinegars and specialty salt. Gold Key scholar Winter Parks R ose Chirillo, a junior Marketing Communication at E merson College, was inducted into the Gold Key Honor Society at a ceremony on Wednesday, April 18, at the Tufte Per formance and Production Centers Semel Theater; 10 Boylston Place, in Boston. Hall of famer Kenn Hall, a Central Florida resident, businessman and former All-American college pitcher, has been inducted into the athletic Hall of Fame at Nassau Col lege in Garden City, N.Y Hall currently owns and operates K R 2H Marketing and Media Relations in Apopka. Personal nance challenge April is national nancial literacy awareness month and to celebrate Fifth Third Bank of Central Florida has com mitted to a JA/53 Challenge, in which representatives will teach 53 ve-week personal nance classes in local high schools. The JA/53 Challenge will be gin in Orange County at Edgewater and E vans high schools, followed by high schools in Seminole, Volusia and Duval counties. Visit jacentral.org Free mammograms The Central Florida Afliate of Susan G. Komen for the Cure has awarded a $50,000 grant to Health Care Center for the Homeless to provide free mammo grams to patients from Orange, Semi nole and O sceola counties. The grant from Komen for the Cure will support the Femmes de Coeur Mammography Program, an initiative to ensure that homeless patients and uninsured pa tients have access to regular screen ings. Visit hcch.org Send submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com H and & Stone M assage and F acial Spa opened its rst location in Winter Park at 480 N. Orlando Ave. Hand & Stone pro vides massage and facial services to Winter Park and its neighboring towns. Visit handandstone.com/spa/Florida/Win ter-Park-Village or call 407-622-0227. Cloudware Inc., the creator of Cloud BooksTM P RO Accounting, has opened on Park Avenue. CloudBooks P RO allows users to conduct their business and enter information into their accounting system from anywhere. Its available anywhere there is a Wi-Fi connection, or via 3G or 4G. Visit mycloudaccounting.com Small Bay Partners, LLC, whose Com merCenters offers small business users throughout Central Florida affordable industrial warehouse facilities, recently sold a 1,350-square-foot warehouse condominium to Sepco Air Inc., at Mon roe CommerCenter IV, located on Church Street off U .S. 17-92 in Sanford. Sepco Air paid $114,750 for the facility. The International law rm Greenberg Traurig, P.A. has announced that E ric Castleson has joined the rm as an as sociate in its Orlando ofce. NAI Realvest recently negotiated two re newal lease agreements: Parkline Properties, LLC of Columbus, O hio, landlord of R egional Airport Center at 8350 Parkline Blvd. off Orange Av enue and Jetport Drive, renewed a lease agreement for 12,000 square feet. Ten ant SimCom Inc. is a simulator-training rm. Monroe CommerCenter South, the Landlord COP-Monroe LLC of Maitland, renewed a lease agreement for 9,750 square feet at 719 and 723 Progress Way and 4153 Flex Court with the tenant, MCS Group Inc., a nationally recognized provider of records retrieval and litigation support services. Mercantile Capital Corporation recent ly launched the SmartChoice Loan Cal culator iPhone application, available free online at the iPhone Apps Store. Altamonte Springs-based general con tractor and construction manager Roger B. Kennedy Inc. broke ground on April 9 for The Flats at E asley Mill, a $13 million student housing facility slated to open in June 2013 in Athens, Ga. Winston James Development recently negotiated a lease agreement for an ex isting tenant at Aloma Business Center in Winter Park. Applied Behavior, a consult ing company that works with students with learning disabilities, increased its facilities from 910 square feet to 1,900 square feet. New Hope raises $200K The New Hope for Kids 11th annual Art of the Vine at Fields BMW on April 13 netted $218,299 for their Center for Grieving Children and Wishes for Kids programs. Ken Champion of Winter Park won a new 2012 BMW 128i in a chance drawing. Library director to retire After two and a half decades of service, Winter Park Public Library Director Bob Melanson (center) has announced to the Librarys Board of Trustees his plan to retire no later than Dec. 31, 2013. Under Melansons leadership, the Library has seen tremendous growth and innovation including the migration from a paper-based card catalog to a digi tal catalog, a major facilities expansion that added the third oor, and much more. We have built a library that is responsive to and reects the needs of this community for information, education and entertainment, Melanson said. Princeton top teacher Rollins College Associate Professor of Communication Rick Bommelje was named one of The Best 300 Profes sors by The Princeton Review and RateMyProfessors.com this week. Bommelje has more than 30 years of professional experience in leader ship, supervision, management and adult education. This man changed my life. Hes not warm and fuzzy but hes very fair and an incredibly good, inspirational teacher. He not only teaches the course content but he gives you life lessons that will stay with you forever, commented one student. House-sized hole Workers at the east end of Morse Boulevard are installing a large storm water treatment system that will treat storm water before it enters Lake Osceola. The hole right by the Winter Park Scenic Boat Tour is so huge that an entire house could t into it.

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Page 5 Thursday, April 26, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Call 866.610.7768Espaol 866.960.7085Like us on Facebook facebook.com/CenturyLinkPrismTV Prism Project Demonstrations are with non-Prism TV customers using basic CenturyLink Prism TV service with standard features in High Denition on an HD-ready television on 11/12/2011 in Las Vegas, NV. Participants were not acting as professional actors, but were compensated by CenturyLink for their participation in the demonstration and this advertisement. Offer ends 5/31/2012. Offer and stated rates are available to new, rst-time CenturyLink Prism TV residential customers only. The Pick Two bundle offer applies to Prism TV package and choice of High-Speed Internet (speeds up to 10 Mbps) or a qualifying CenturyLink calling plan with no term commitment and free HD service for twelve (12) months. An $8.99 monthly DVR service fee applies when the Quad Play DVR is purchased with the Prism TV programming package. 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Resident and philanthropist Marc Hagle said that the citys existing trim ming policy had been in place long enough to see if it would have negative consequences. I thought the presentation was inter esting, but it was presented by Florida Power and Light, Hagle said. We dont need to do anything differently than wed been doing. Weve had a tree-trimming policy from 1983 to 2007 of 4 feet. Commissioner Carolyn Cooper, agreed, saying that the city should go back to more-traditional cuts that pre serve the aesthetics of the trees. If youre going to continue to cut, then please stay with the cuts weve been using for 20 years, Cooper said. I un derstand [directional cutting], but I also understand property values. Leary said that if trees start decaying and dying early due to improper trim ming, thatll also hurt property values, and take longer to recover from. Nobodys saying God this is gor geous, but at the same time, nobody wants trees falling on cars, falling on kids, taking out power lines and spending more to clean it up, Leary said. Weve got to do whats right, not whats pretty. TREES | C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER The T aste of Winter Park featured food samplings from restaurants such as the Mellow Mushroom (top) and live music at the Winter Park Farmers Market April 18. PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Dr. Barbara Jenkins, top right, the upcoming Orange County Public Schools super intendent and a Winter Park resident, was recognized at Mondays Winter Park City Commission meeting. Also, Mayor Ken Bradley, top left, proclaimed April 23 as Win ter Park High School Cheerleading State and National Championships Day. Pictured above are the championship cheerleading squad accepting the big honor. Happy tastebuds Honors at dais

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Page 6 Thursday, April 26, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer woven in with neighboring Eatonville topped her list. I wasnt aware of these things until Martha brought it up at the meet the can didates night, Schieferdecker said, and then Ive been making a continued effort ever since to try and rectify these things. On April 13, Bryant, along with a room of 10 or so of her neighbors and local support ers, met with the mayor, City Manager Jim Williams and City Transportation Engineer Charlie Wallace to get an update on what was being done to address her concerns. I think its long overdue, Schiefer decker said. Martha and her neighbors are all citizens of Maitland, too, and should get the same treatment as everybody else. Words into action At the meeting, Williams outlined what progress has been made since January: bidding to pave Mechanic Street from the Maitland Boulevard ramp to where Amado Lane begins is set to be completed in the next two to three months; starting the de sign process with Progress Energy to in stall streetlights on existing wood poles in Woodbridge; and contact with the Florida Department of Transportation regarding the bats in the bridge. It sounds like a step in the right direc tion, but, having lived a history of forgot ten promises, members of the community are hesitant to trust that the situation will change. Weve reached a point when words dont have any meaning, Bryants daugh ter Jacqueline Daise said. These words sound good, but action is so much better. In 2006 a local developer, Cecil Allen, set high hopes for Bryant and her neighbors on Mechanic Street, with visions of the re development they had always dreamed of, only to have plans fall through a year later before shovels touched dirt, she said. Tired of broken promises, chiropractor and pastor Ronald Fulmore said he was tired of watching his tax dollars improve the rest of the city. When are we going to stop being treat ed like second-class citizens? Fulmore asked the room. We all pay taxes and other neighborhood roads, and picking up everyone elses garbage. Mayor Schieferdecker in turn apolo gized for the actions, or lack thereof, of those in the past, urging everyone to focus on the only thing they can work together to change: the future. F encing frustration An 8-foot-tall barbed-wire fence was not what Bryant had in mind when she told accessibility to Lake Jackson near Bellamy Park, but its what she got. The fence, she said, was recently barbed and extended, to beyond the waterline, cut ting off residents who live in her daugh ters neighborhood from the wooded area they had informally used for access to the lake. On the other side, water lapping the shoreline of a predominately white neigh borhood, the lake is open. I see this, Bryant, 68, says motioning to the fence, and it reminds me when I was growing up in the South. When addressed at the workshop, City Manager Jim Williams said the fence was installed by the city on city land, per com plaints from residents on the east shore of the lake claiming burglars were using the woods as an access and hiding place before and after breaking into their homes. The fence, he says, was put in place to minimize that likelihood. Following public outcry at the meeting, Williams said the city would start survey ing the area and look at other options and the legality of such a fence, while working to secure a deal to give riparian rights, or rights to reasonable use of the water, to lakefront residents. To do so, the city is working to draft a land swap, giving prop erty owners access to the lake, and the city ownership of Brooke Drive so it can offer public services, such as trash pick up, to those who live off of it. We have people saying, They have rights over there, but we dont have rights that, Williams said. Bryant says shes not holding her breath that all the issues she has faced in her 30 ever, but shes putting her faith in the city to do the right thing. We dont have to all look alike to get along, Daise said. I just want my mother to be able to enjoy all that she has struggled for in her community. Enjoy a beautiful spring evening of great wine while strolling through downtown Winter Park Thursday, May 3 5 8:30 p.m. Tickets are $30 in advance Purchase online at www.winterpark.org For information call (407) 644-8281 winter park sip and stroll PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Resident Martha Bryant-Hall points out the home of about 1,000 bats near her home. Also on her list of concerns presented to the city are the communitys unpaved roads, lack of streetlights and blocked access to Lake Jackson. MAITLAND | Mayor Schieferdecker and staff are working to address all of the neighborhoods concerns C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE I see this, and it reminds me when I was growing up in the South. Bryant

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Page 7 Thursday, April 26, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer New spring inventory has arrived including mens Camp shirts, shorts, pants, swimwear, and much more from sizes Small to XX Large. Wednesday, May 23 7:45 a.m. Senator Andy Gardiner Mayor Teresa Jacobs Commissioner Ted Edwards Mayor Ken Bradley www.winterpark.org For more information on the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce, our members, or upcoming events, visit us at the Wint er Park Welcome Center, call (407) 6448281 or log on to www.winterpark.org. Things & Fashion Andrew J. Hull, DC, P.A. Bajalia Baumgarten Financial, LLC Blue Door Denim Shoppe Business Appraisal Group, LLC Carr Riggs & Ingram, LLC Chepenik Financial Coffee Counseling, Coaching & Consulting Community Association Law Group Coralia Leets Jewelry Boutique Croissant Gourmet Current DC Graphix Down Syndrome Association of Central Florida Earth Inspired Living, LLC Extra Space Storage Gary Lambert Salon and Spa Gordon Wealth Management Group Heather L. Childers, D.D.S., P.A. Karl's Event Rental, Inc LaBella Intimates & Boutique Lilly Pulitzer Marvaldi A Hair & Makeup Studio Mattamy Homes Moss, Krusick and Associates, LLC Orlando City Soccer Club Pella Windows & Doors RE/MAX 200 Realty Seaside National Bank & Trust The NICE Life, LLC Grafton Wealth Management Bates & Company, Inc. Consensus Communications, Inc. Costco Wholesale #185 Dexters of Winter Park Friends of Fleet Peeples Park, Inc. J & S Multimedia, Inc. Paul Mitchell The School Orlando Pratt & Morrison, P.A. SESCO Lighting, Inc. The Bistro on Park Avenue Tropical Smoothie Cafe Winter Park Chocolate Bright House Networks Business Solutions Charles Clayton Construction, Inc. Consumer Debt Counselors M & I Bank Nelson's Tents & Events Pinnacle Awards & Promotions Winter Park Breakfast Rotary Club Partridge Tree Gift Shop John Craig Clothier Siegel's Winter Park Valencia College Clifton LarsonAllen Wells Fargo Fannie Hillman & Associates The Keewin Real Property Company Baldwin-Fairchild Cemeteries Chamber Trustees are listed in blue Denotes Park Avenue Area Association membership The No. 10 Knights are streak ing after blasting off against Southern Miss and going on a tear across the country on the baseball diamond. After trashing Southern Miss, they came back home for a onegame showdown against Florida Atlantic on April 17. The bats stayed hot for UCF (34-8, 12-3), thanks in large part to the middle and bottom of their batting order. JoMarcos Woods went 3-for-4 with two RBIs, while Nick Carril lo, Erik Barber and Travis Shreve all contributed two RBIs on their own. Erik Skoglunds seven strikeouts helped carry the win. Against Tulane (26-14, 5-7), three straight nail-biters in New Orleans ended with the Knights sweeping just their second con ference series of the season. Never had a series been tough er for the Knights this year, with to a Jeramy Matos solo shot that sailed into the night over left cen run in the game, after the Green Wave threatened repeatedly with 10 hits but couldnt connect enough to make it home. What few could have predicted was a 15-run slugfest to follow in Game 2, as the Green Wave tried to get revenge and the Knights fought desperately to hold onto an early lead. That would prove futile for UCF through nine in nings, as they entered the bottom of the ninth ahead by two runs, only to watch in horror as Tulane plated two to tie things up. Two scoreless innings would follow before the Knights found their swing again, thanks to a pair of doubles by D.J. Hicks and Alex Friedrich, who combined for the deciding run in the 8-7 victory. Tulane attempted another wild the Knights jumping ahead with six runs early. Four of those runs came courtesy of Chris Taladay, who blasted three triples for four RBIs. Roman Madrid grabbed the save with a scoreless ninth. Whats next for the Knights? A three-game homestand against Memphis (17-23, 6-9) this week end starts at 6:30 p.m. Friday, April 27. Theyll play another at 4 p.m. Saturday and 1 p.m. Sun day before taking a short walk to Stetson for a 6:30 p.m. Wednes day, May 2, game. Tars Triumph in Massachusetts A wild up and down swing ended on a high note for Rollins baseball (24-16), which bamboo zled Bentley (22-20) in a 7-4 come backer on April 24. Zach Persky brought home three runners with an RBI double in the win. The Tars will head to confer ence rival St. Leo for a threegame series this weekend, with an oddball schedule starting with April 26, followed by a double header at 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. on Sunday. Only one team has beaten Win ter Park twice on the baseball dia mond this season, and its Olym pia. The Wildcats had their chance at sweet revenge after losing to the Titans near the start of the sea son by a demoralizing 7-0 score. That was a feat of scorelessness that only one other team would match Boone who won 8-0 on April 12. In their comeback attempt the Wildcats had newly hot bats but had to deal with Olympia starter Michael Hennessey, who not only threw a complete game in the 4-3 Titans win, but also took care of the winning run himself. For the Wildcats (15-9, 6-1), district play began this week at Timber Creek. That tournament will go through Friday, with the championship game playing at 7:30 p.m. Edgewater downed The Eagles (9-10, 5-3) had trou ble against Apopka again, losing in a 1-0 heartbreaker April 19. That loss was the second against the Blue Darters this season, after the Eagles struggled to beat them early in the season. Class 6A District 8 play started Monday, April 23, at Mainland, with the Eagles hoping for a shot at the title game at 7 p.m. Thurs day after press time. Baseball enters districts ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff UCF breaks Wave Tournament play Next championship game is Friday, April 27, at 7:30 p.m. at Timber Creek

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Page 8 Thursday, April 26, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer ONE HOURMASSAGE$3995*A $79.95 V A LUE! ONE HOURFACIAL$4995*A $79.95 V A LUE! MASSAGE | FACIALS | WAXING MASSAGE AND FACIAL SPA Open 7 days | Walk-ins Welcome Extended Hourshandandstone.comHand & Stone Massage and Facial Spa consistently delivers professional massage & facial services at affordable prices 7 days a week. WINTER PARK | 407-622-0227 480 N Orlando Ave l Winter Park Village Grand Opening!*Introductory offers valid for first time visit only. Not valid for gift cards. Sessions include time for consultation and dressing. Rates and services may vary by location. Offers may not be combined. MM22195/CE9988346 Hand & Stone Franchise Corp. Franchises Available. Independently Owned & Operated. There are poems hidden in your news In the process, I invented a unique form of poetry. I call it News Print Poetry. It all started when a friend showed me a black-out poem. It was composed by taking a written document and using a marker pen to blackout the unwanted words. What remained was the poem. I was in trigued with the idea of a poem emerging from a news story, a poster, a letter from my insurance agent, and other unlikely sources. I decided to take a slightly differ ent slant, however. Instead of deleting the words I did not want, I would select the words I did want. Instead of obliterating the original topic, I would create a poem using the topic of the story. I set up a few rules. The title of the poem must be taken from the headline of the story. The words selected from the news story must remain in their original order and no words can be added. I could have free reign with punctuation, and if absolutely necessary, I could change case or tense of verbs or make singular nous plural and vice versa. I started on Jan. 1 and every day since, without fail, I post a new poem to my blog. (http://newsprintpoetry2012.blogspot. com) The blog is important because it instills discipline. If I feel like skipping a day, I cant because I have made a public commitment and I dont want to disap point my readers. Some days writing the poem is quick and easy. Other days, I spend hours on it. Sometimes, I have to abandon one or two attempted poems because I just cant get it to work. The topics run the gamut of the type of stories you see in news papers politics, crime, events, holidays, sports, health, science, education, accidents, food, celebrities, advice, etc. Some of the poems have an important some of the poems are seri ous, some are funny. Some days, the poems are perfect little gems; they seem to be exactly as I would write them if I had no restrictions at all. Other days, I want to call in rewrite. Writing News Print Po ems is both fun and challeng ing. Some people like to do the Sunday New York Times crossword puzzle, some people like to do Sudoku, and some others like to do 1,000-piece jigsaw puzzles. I like to do News Print Poetry. The thrill hidden poem as if it had just jumped right off the page, is just as big a thrill as com Taken together, the poems will be a retrospective of the years events and provide a panoramic and historic view of our society. Taken individually, each poem provides an inspirational, amusing, and/or poi gnant view of life. You can meet Catherine Giordano at the book launch party for News Print Poetry 2012: Volume 1 January to March at the Maitland Public Library at 2:30 p.m. on Sunday, April 29. She will do a multimedia presentation of some of the poems. Admission is free and refreshments will be provided. Details are on her website www.talksallabout.com or from the library. The library prefers that you call to register at 407-647-7700. Catherine Giordano is the author of two other books, The Poetry Connection, a collection of poems and What Ifs, If Onlys, and So Whats, a collection of essays. Her work has been published in magazines and anthologies. In addition to writing, she does public speaking giving light-hearted life-afrming talks on a variety of subjects. PHOTO COUR TESY OF CITY OF WINTER P ARK Children help to plant a tree at Winter Parks Earth Day in the Park event in Central Park on Saturday, April 23. News Print Poetry nds hidden poems in newspaper C A THERINE GIORDANO Guest Writer Thursday, Jan. 26 2012: The Year of the Dragon Chinese New Year. The Year of the Dragon. The mythical creature brings optimism, and hope for better times. The dragon the most powerful sign of the zodiac delivers energy and prosperity. 2012 Catherine Giordano Catherine Giordano Earth Day party

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Page 9 Thursday, April 26, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer April 23 City Commission meeting highlights There was a City Commission meeting held at 3:30 p.m. on April 23 at the Winter Park Community Center. Below are a few highlights of decisions made: Mayors Report Dr. Barbara Jenkins, the up coming new Orange County Pub lic Schools superintendent, was recognized and congratulated on her new role that begins May 2012. A proclamation was made de claring Winter Park High School Cheerleading State and National Championships Day. A proclamation was made de claring North American Occupa tional Safety and Health Week; and Occupational Safety and Health Professional Day. A presentation was made to Craig M. ONeil, assistant direc tor of communications for being awarded Employee of the Quar ter. Consent Agenda The minutes of April 9 were approved. Staff was approved to enter into negotiations with a list of complete list can be found at cit yofwinterpark.org > Government > City Commission > Agenda Packets). The Cemetery Disinterment Policy was approved. The mid-year budget adjust ment for the General Fund was approved. The adjustment to the Waste Pro rates was approved. Action items requiring discussion The strategic planning session list of priorities was approved. The Winter Park train station design development update from ACi Inc. was approved. The discussion of the City At torney contract item was tabled until the May 14 meeting. Public Hearings The resolution supporting fair trade when possible among mer chants in the city of Winter Park was approved with an amend ment. The second reading of the or dinance relating to pain manage ment clinics and pharmacies as well as repealing the moratorium was approved. The resolution designating 1509 N. Orange Ave. as a historic resource in the Winter Park Reg ister of Historic Places was ap proved. The subdivision request of Mr. Barry Render to split the property at 1200 Howell Branch Road into two single-family lots zoned R1AA was approved. The request of CNL Commer cial Real Estate for Conditional Use approval to construct a threebuilding on the former State Of Blvd. was approved. A full copy of the April 23, City Commission minutes will be available at cityofwinterpark.org the week of May 14, pending ap proval by the City Commission. Pedestrian & Bicycle Safety and Connectivity Forum The citys Pedestrian & Bicycle Advisory Board will present a Pedestrian & Bicycle Safety and Connectivity Forum on Thursday, April 26, from 6 to 8 p.m., at the Rachel D. Murrah Civic Center lo cated at 1050 W. Morse Blvd. The forum will provide an op portunity to review how recent events, developing plans and re gional initiatives have heightened the need for improved pedestrian and bicycle safety and connectiv ity. Attendees will be encouraged to offer comments and share ideas relating to city projects and pro grams so that interested parties can work together to make Win ter Park friendlier for pedestrians and bicyclists. The forum will also provide in formation on Winter Parks com prehensive pedestrian & bicycle facilities plan. For more informa tion, please call 407-599-3217. Winter Park train station design The proposed elevations and train station are currently avail able for viewing at the following locations: Rachel D. Murrah Civic Center, 1050 W. Morse Blvd. Winter Park Amtrak Station, 150 W. Morse Blvd. Winter Park City Hall West Wing Lobby, 401 S. Park Ave. Winter Park Community Cen ter, 721 W. New England Ave. Winter Park Public Library, 460 E. New England Ave. Winter Park Welcome Center, 151 W. Lyman Ave. The proposed plans are also available for viewing on the citys park.org > Info at Your Fingertips > Amtrak & SunRail Information > Winter Park Amtrak Station In formation. Trees for Peace The city of Winter Park and the Multifaith Education Project are proud to announce the ninth annual Trees for Peace Interfaith Tree Planting Project on Tuesday, May 1, at Cady Way Park located at 2525 Cady Way. Vice Mayor Ste ven Leary will begin the ceremony at 11:30 a.m. and the program will be led by Louise Franklin Sheehy, director of the Multifaith Educa tion Project. More than 100 Christian, Jew ish and Muslim students and faculty, representing The Geneva Christian School, The Jewish Academy and The Leaders Prepa ratory School, will join together to plant trees for peace. In recogni tion of their commitment to work together in the spirit of unity, the students will plant three trees and bless them in traditional man ner according to each faith. They will then celebrate the occasion with a picnic on the lawn of Cady Way Park. According to Sheehy, One quote that represents the essence of this project is by Mar garet Wheatley, Dont ask what is wrong. Ask what is possible and keep asking. The city of Winter Parks Forestry Division will supervise the students with the planting of 21 red cedars, 12 long leaf pines and 12 sand hill live oaks. Tree size will vary from 45-gallon to 3-gallon containers. The planted trees will serve as sym bols of students working together for peace. In addition, the Forestry Division will donate a tree to each school so the students can hold a planting ceremony on school prop erty to remind them of this event for years. This unique tree-planting proj ect represents a continuing effort to encourage children to appreci ate diversity while building positive relationships with people of other faiths. Winter Park appreciates and supports the efforts of the project along with the students. Visit the citys ofcial website at cityofwinterpark.org, nd us on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter. It is wonderful living in an ac tive city. It is true that much of the activity started very recently, but the momentum is building. My long-held vision that Maitland would become a multifaceted cul tural attraction for Central Florida is evolving, more participants are attending events, and my vision may become a not-so-distant real ity. To say I was shocked was an understatement, when I heard in March what the librarians at the public library had planned. They told me they were going to put on a 5K run/walk to help reach the young adult age group and raise money to purchase comput was, how are you going to run the event? Their response was Fleet Feet, whose owner resides in Mai tland, would hold the race event. That was the start of a wonderful morning that moved librarians away from the book stacks and out into the community. This past Saturday, the director of the library, Ellen Schellhause, along with her staff, board mem bers and many library support ers, met at Quinn Strong Park to set up the event. The horn for the races start sounded at 8 a.m. I was assigned a turn along the 3.1 glanced at resident Missy Baker going past me, I thought, That Then it hit me participants were encouraged to dress as their fa vorite literary character. I also saw a mother and daughter dressed in pink tutus, while another woman had a quilted placard front and back, and one young man ran the race wearing a 2-foot-tall hat. What made this event so com munity and culturally minded was what occurred before, during and after the event. One driver try ing to avoid the race asked what was occurring and offered to mail in a donation to the library. Sev eral residents, when called, vol unteered to man the corner where they resided. Five women from a Maitland church volunteered as part of their churchs commu nity outreach project. They said they cheered for each participant At the end of the race there were bananas, bagels, oranges, coffee, cookies, bottled water and prizes, all donated by businesses desiring to support the library and what it provides for the citizens. Maitland residents are sup porting their town. SoNapa, the citys newest restaurant, has huge crowds. Last Fridays opening night for the Enzians Film Festi val was jammed. The weeklong The same evening, Art & His torys Culture and Cocktails event experienced very high attendance, and an enthusiastic crowd kicked off the Chambers art festival at Lake Lily. In addition, ribbon cut tings at two new Lake Avenue businesses, JazzTastings and Lily Lace Antique Market, occurred in the past few weeks. They too were attended by excited residents who wanted to say, Maitland is open for business and the city is be coming a happening place. Meeting of April 23 The Maitland City Council met on at 6:30 p.m. on April 23 in the City Hall Council Chambers. Below is a synopsis of that meet ing. The next regularly scheduled Council meeting will be held on Monday, May 14. Inauguration Ceremony Mayor Howard Schieferdecker ond term. Public Hearings: Moved to continue the Public Hearings creating the Downtown Maitland Zoning District and the rezoning of properties within that District until the May 14 Council meeting. Consent: Approved various meeting minutes. Authorized the city manager to sign the Satisfaction of Mortgage acknowledging full payment of the mortgage executed by the Maitland Civic Center Inc. to the city of Maitland on June 26, 1964. rental fees for a Maitland Little League Summer Camp. Approved the 2012 holiday op eration schedule for city parks. To listen to a recording of the meeting, visit itsmymaitland.com Winter Park City Talk BY RANDY KNIGHT CITY MANAGER Maitland City Talk BY BEV REPONEN COUN C ILWO M AN Maitland welcomes cultural events

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Page 10 Thursday, April 26, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer APRIL 26 The city of Winter Parks Pedestrian & Bi cycle Advisory Board will present a Pedes trian & Bicycle S afety and C onnectivity Forum from 6 to 8 p.m. on Thursday, April 26, at the Rachel D. Murrah Civic Center located at 1050 W. Morse Blvd. Call 407599-3217. The Islamic Society of Central Florida pres ents a screening and reception for the lm Islamic A rt: Mirror of the Invisible W orld from 6 to 8 p.m. on Thursday, April 26, at the Orlando Museum of Art, 2416 N. Mills Ave. Visit OrlandoArtMovie.eventbrite. com Join prosecutor Jeff Ashton at the Win ter Park Public Library as he shares the behind-the-scenes story of the Casey An thony case at Author Talk at 10:30 a.m. on Thursday, April 26. Discuss the unique issues of Jewish men and women at risk of developing or diag nosed with cancer at 6:30 p.m. on April 26, at Jewish Family Services. Call 407-6447593 or visit jfsorlando.org APRIL 27 The proper disposal of sensitive documents can help lower the risk of identity theft. Join Commerce National Bank & Trust for their Sixth Annual Shred Event at from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Friday, April 27, at the branch at the corner of Highway 17-92 and Or ange Avenue in Winter Park. Limit six boxes please. The American Cancer Societys R elay for Life of Maitland is an overnight relay-style walking event that will take place at Or angewood Presbyterian Church on April 2728. Opening ceremonies start at 6 p.m. on Friday and closing ceremonies are at noon on Saturday. Visit relayforlife.org/maitland or email maitland.relay@yahoo.com APRIL 28 The 8th A nnual N ational A lliance on Mental Illness Greater Orlando 5K W alk Changing Minds One Step at a Time will be held at 8 a.m. on Saturday, April 28, at Lake Lily Park in Maitland. There are activi ties for children, a silent auction and prizes. Visit namigo.org or call 407-253-1900. The 2012 Great Strides 5K beneting the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation is at 8:30 a.m. on Saturday, April 28, at Harbor Park in Baldwin Park. Registration opens at 7:30 a.m. Visit cff.org/great_strides/nd_a_ walk_site/index.cfm The Run for the Trees Jeanette Genius McKean Memorial 5K will be held at 7:30 a.m. at Showalter Field, 2535 Cady Way in Winter Park, on Saturday, April 28. There will be a kids run at 8:45 a.m. and an awards presentation at 9:15 a.m. Visit tinyurl.com/runforthetrees Flemings Prime Steakhouse & Wine Bar and W E SH News Anchor Martha Sugalski will kick off the C ord for Life F oundation Central Florida A wareness Campaign from 7 to 10 p.m. on Saturday, April 28, with an incredible food and wine experi ence by Flemings Chef Partner Tom Nadol ski. Tickets are $75. Call 407-927-5988 or visit emingssteakhouse.com Tate Music Group Artist Petula Beckles will perform on at 11 a.m. on April 28 at the Patmos Chapel, 821 W. Swoope Ave. in Win ter Park. Beckles will be performing songs from her album, My Song of Jesus. From 2 to 6 p.m. on Saturday, April 28, Sec ond Harvest Food Bank of Central Florida will host its second annual Wine W omen & Shoes fundraising event at Rosen Shingle Creek, located at 9939 U niversal Blvd. in Orlando. Visit winewomenshoes.com/or lando2012 APRIL 29 Catherine Giordano a Central Florida speaker, writer, blogger and poet, will pres ent a poetry reading at the Maitland Public Library at 2:30 p.m. on Sunday, April 29. Call 407-647-7700. MAY 1 The Art & History Museums Maitland (A&H) celebrates the residents of Maitland throughout the entire month of May. Mai tland residents receive free admission to the A&H Museums May 1-31. Just show proof of residence. The Tarower Chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society will meet at 7 p.m. on Tues day, May 1, at Harry P. Leu Gardens, 1920 North Forest Ave., in Orlando. Mike Martin with the Florida Division of Forestry will discuss successful prescribed burns in the Seminole State Forest. It is free and open to the public. MAY 2 Trivia 4 U will be held at 7 p.m. on May 2 at the University Club of Winter Park. The event is free but donations are accepted. Trivial pursuit games are on the rst Wednesday of each month from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Wines and snacks are provided. Call 407-810-3611 or visit universityclubwin terpark.com MAY 3 Carol Stein is back by popular demand in her cabaret, A Little Naughty Music, at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, May 3, and Thurs day, May 17, as part of the popular Winter Park Playhouse Spotlight Cabaret Series. Tickets are $20 and include a drink from the bar. Call 407-645-0145 or visit winter parkplayhouse.org MAY 4 The Breakthrough Theatre of Winter Park will present the John Pielmeier drama, Agnes of God, from May 4-14. The Breakthrough Theatre is located at 419A W. Fairbanks Ave. in Winter Park. Call 407920-4034. Date Night at Leu Gardens featuring Step Mom is Friday, May 4. It opens at 6 p.m. and movie time is 8:30 p.m., weather per mitting. You may bring a dinner picnic bas ket. Alcohol is permitted. Garden admission is $5 plus tax for adults and $2 plus tax for children. Visit leugardens.org MAY 5 The Crohns & Colitis Foundation of America Take Steps W alk is Saturday, May 5, at Lake Lily Park in Maitland. Visit cctakesteps.org The Third Annual Derby Jubilee and Auc tion is from 5 p.m. to midnight on Saturday, May 5, at E astside Bistro, 3461 E Colonial Drive, in Orlando. Visit doggiederby.com Visit wpmobserver.com/events for more details. Send submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com Calendar APRIL 28: Paint Out Garden Party The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens Fourth Annual Winter Park Paint Out concludes with The Paint Out Garden Party from 6 to 9 p.m. on Saturday, April 28. All artists will be present to discuss and sell their works. Tickets are $45 in advance, or $60 at the door. Call 407-647-6294 or visit winterparkpaintout.org MAY 3: Winter Park Sip and Stroll The Winter Park Sip and Stroll, hosted by the Park Avenue Area Association and the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce, will be held from 5 to 8:30 p.m. on May 3 at the corner of Morse Boulevard and Park Avenue. The cost is $30 per person in advance. Visit winterpark.org MAY 5: Cinco de Mayo party COCINA|214 is celebrating Cinco de Mayo with a block party in downtown Winter Park. From noon to 10 p.m. on Saturday, May 5, COCINA|214 will close a portion of Welbourne Avenue between Center Street and Knowles Avenue for the event. It is open to the public, and there is no cover charge. Call 407790-7997 or visit cocina214.com APRIL 28: Doggie Derby in Baldwin Park The 5th Annual Doggie Derby is Saturday, April 28, at Corrine Commons. The Doggie Derby is an annual charity event where canines compete in a 25-yard sprint race among dogs of similar sizes. Visit brightsideevents.org APRIL 28: Spring in V ienna The Bach Festival Society of Winter Park concludes its 2011 season with Spring in Vienna at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, April 28, and at 3 p.m. on Sunday, April 29, at Knowles Memorial Chapel, Rol lins College. Call 407-646-2182 or visit BachFestivalFlorida.org

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Page 11 Thursday, April 26, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Lifestyles The large, puffy and oh-socute Parker the Owl pops up ev erywhere along Park Avenue, at celebrations, parades, on your Facebook feed and the pages of ILuvWinterPark.com He seems to always know whats going on down the Ave nue, alerting fans to the latest hap penings in Winter Parks business and social scenes. But who is the man underneath that furry owl head? Its a question he gets often, in little messages sent to his ILu vWinterPark Facebook account, and it makes him smile. The man underneath Parker the Owl, the face of his website islocal Clyde Moore. Donning an animal costume and living in Winter Park werent personality perfectly, Moore said. The best things in life are the ones you sort of stumble into, he said. And that applies to a few things Moore loves most in his life falling into his owl costume, spontaneously buying a home in Winter Park on a weekend trip to the town, and the start of ILu vWinterPark.com The site offers a place for Win ter Park businesses to promote themselves, for free, with deal vouchers for customers. Its very similar to a Groupon site, but its by locals for locals, and there are no merchant fees Groupon takes half of the sales revenue. Moore said he hopes his site can help Winter Park business will come back again and again, not just customers after a one-time deal. He said he loves helping his Parkpreneurs and keeping the city he loves full of successful, di verse shops and restaurants. I do love living in a dynamic environment and Id like to be the place that these businesses can turn, rather than some of the big deal sites that are out there, be cause I think that a lot of those can be detrimental to small business, he said. I wanted to be the posi tive, very localized alternative to them. Helpful to business and the community I think its astounding the number of people that come in as a result of that, and what it does is it gives not only us exposure, but it gives Park Avenue exposure, said Lettie Sexton, owner of Downeast. He brings in an entirely different person that has ever come in the store, people perhaps who would never have come in the store. Moore runs The Attic @ Downeast on the second level of the retail store facing the Avenue. The Attic sells local art includ ing Moores own mosaics, and high-end designer closeouts from Downeast. He often invites art to-ceiling window that overlooks Central Park. He also helps with promotion for Downeast. Sexton calls him helpful to a fault, and said his creativity knows no bounds. Hell even text her in the middle of the night if he gets an idea for her store. Moore, who has a background in marketing and journalism, said he has always had an entrepre neurial and fun, free spirit, and felt like Floridas atmosphere was a perfect match for that. Its made for small businesses, he said, and whole community. And merchants share his vi sion Ginny Enstad of Ginnys Orchids said his enthusiasm and help make all the difference for small businesses in a competitive, Every penny that you spend locally, that money trickles right down into our own economy; in Winter Park it helps, Sexton said. I think people forget that if you dont shop locally, your commu nity suffers all the way. Moore, who moved to Winter Park six years ago, has a passion for the city that is clear the mo ment he starts talking about it. Theres not a thing he doesnt like about his home. Actually, he said he barely ever leaves it. He jokes that if his partner wants dinner outside of his little bubble, hell He wont go outside the zip code, his partner, Jim Kiger, said. And the good thing is you dont really have to. Soon, his insider knowledge and enthusiasm for our city will be coming to the pages of the Observer with Moores weekly column spotlighting what he sees as wonderful, unique and great in Winter Park. Through his site and the column, hell share what town, and learn a few things about it himself. Sometimes thats just remind ing people what we have at our tunate to live in a community and a place that I love so much. This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH O RLANDO A VE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.E NZIAN.ORG Academy A ward Nominee! From Israel FOOTNOTE Fri. Sun. 3:45, 6:30, 9:15 Mon. Thurs. 6:30, 9:15 Wednesday Night Pitcher Show EASY RIDER Wed. 8 or Sunset FREE Fit for the Fourth blog See how Sarah Grafton did on Week 1 of her 60-day get-t challenge. Scan this QR code with your smart phone or visit wpmobserver.com PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Winter Park resident Clyde Moore greets some young fans as Parker the Owl in Central Park on Thursday, April 19. Winter Parks No. 1 fan unmasked The man behind the owl and ILuvWinterPark.com brings his insider perspective to the pages of The Observer starting May 3 BRITTNI JOHNSON Observer Staff Check out Clyde Moores deals at ILuvWinterPark.com or on Facebook at Facebook.com/winterpark Moores weekly column in The Observer debuts on May 3. Art in the square PHOTO BY ANNA JANNO TTI An artist paints in plein air at the Third Annual Hannibal Square Heritage Center Folk Art and Traditional Craft Festival held Saturday, April 21, at the Center in Winter Park.

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Page 12 Thursday, April 26, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Family Calendar Even when you add the word contemporary to a descrip tion of the amazing Cocina 214 Mexican and Tex-Mex kitchen, it doesnt begin to do justice to my favorite new Central Florida res taurant. And you know I do not say that lightly. A combination of the Spanish word for kitchen and the area code for Dallas, Cocina 214 is the beautiful dream of two brave Texans who grew up in restaurant families and moved to Winter Park only to miss the food they had grown up eating. Somehow that translated into Lets open a restaurant, and one year later the rest is culinary history. Fortunately, this hunger for Tex-Mex comfort food led Lambrine Macejewski, husband Ron, and the pairs charming little daughter to bring their considerable level of taste and their taste buds to share with us in Winter Park. I thank former Mayor Terry Hotard for leading me to Cocina just off Park Avenue on Wel bourne Avenue, between Morris Boulevard and New England Av enue. Having found it, I can now tell you, dear readers, that this is derstated and welcoming from the front porch to the sculptural banquettes in the main dining room. It is, simply stated, one of the most beautiful restaurants in all of Florida. And I am thrilled to report that the food lives up to the beautiful surroundings. This is a kitchen that truly cares about fresh, local ingredients, served in an elegant setting. My din ing partner and I began with the quesadillas. At Cocina 214, que sadillas are comfort food for the hungry and sophisticated palate. Please order a full portion of the and then call me Ill be there in a hurry; on that you can depend oil-infused babies will bring me back again and again. (Secret: Quesadillas never tasted this good.) And the grilled chicken breast quesadilla proved that pico de gallo does not have to be too spicy. Offerings are served with three levels of hot sauce all freshly made in-house, thereby giving the dinner the option of how much hotness is added to the food. We moved on to the beef brisket tacos, beautifully pre sented as pulled beef on a series of little open-face tortillas. This is a popular item, and the tasty mix I also tried the corn-crusted tion and coated lightly with the most wonderful vegetable butter sauce. The fresh veggies in the sauce allowed me to feel healthy while ordering extra sauce yes, its that good. And I hasten to add that the three hot sauces sat there ready to be used, but I enjoyed the taste of fresh ingredi ents in all the dishes, not needing to heat them up. The wonderful news is that we are all invited to a double celebra tion on Saturday, May 5, which happens to be a Mexican holiday (Cinco de Mayo) and the one-year anniversary of Cocina 214. I love this place so much Ill probably be there from noon to 10 p.m. as Cocina 214 closes a portion of Welbourne Avenue for the event. There will be music, beer, frozen margaritas, free samples and prizes and no cover charge. We never imagined the suc cess and warm welcome weve received from the community, owner Lambrine Macejewski said. This Cinco de Mayo is a chance to give back with a block party open to the public. If youve read this far, Im happy to say that if you tell your server that Josh sent me or bring in the April 26 Observer, Cocina 214 will offer a free rocks or frozen margarita with any entre. APRIL 27 The nal Friday Nights at the Morse which features free admission to the Morse Museum from 4 to 8 p.m. on Fridays, is April 27. Visit morsemu seum.org Winter Park Day Nursery will hold its 11th Annual Orange Blossom Jubilee on from 6:30 to 10:30 p.m. on Friday, April 27, at the Winter Park Community Center in Hannibal Square; 721 W. New England Ave. in Winter Park. The event will raise funds to bridge the gap between what the day nurserys lower-income working families can afford versus the cost of preschool education to their children. Tickets are $75 each. Contact Winter Park Day Nursery at 407-647-0505 or email Heather@WinterParkDayNurs ery.org APRIL 28 You are invited to celebrate Maitland Little Leagues 50th season at Cock tails & Cleats a dinner and silent auction fundraising event that will be held Saturday, April 28. Proceeds will be directed toward capital improve ments for Maitland Little League at Keller Fields. Tickets are available for purchase in the concession stand, at New Traditions Bank (Maitland Branch) or from any Board member. Make checks payable to Maitland Little League. Contact Greg Stake at Gstake@c.rr.com, or Marty Wareing at w.martinwareing@gmail.com MAY 1 The city of Winter Park and the Multi faith Education Project hold the ninth annual Trees for Peace Interfaith Tree Planting Project on Tuesday, May 1, at Cady Way Park located at 2525 Cady Way. Vice Mayor Steven Leary will begin the ceremony at 11:30 a.m. The Art & History Museums Maitland (A&H) celebrates the residents of Mai tland throughout the entire month of May. Maitland residents receive free admission to the A&H Museums from May 1-31 with proof of residence. MAY 3 WPHS 2012 Night on Broadway presents Les Miserables. Join the Winter Park High School Chorus for this years benet event at 7:30 p.m. from May 3 through May 5 at the Ann Deringer Auditorium at Winter Park High School. Tickets are $15. Email NOBtickets@aol.com for tickets. ONGOING An open house will be held at Page Private School from 9 to 11 a.m. on April 26 and April 27, and from 10 a.m. to noon on April 28. There are two locations: University Park at 10250 University Blvd., in Orlando, and Towne Center at 100 Aero Lane, in Sanford. Call 407-324-1144 or visit pageschool.com At 10:30 a.m. each Tuesday, the Mai tland Public Library hosts preschool story and craft time. At 10:30 a.m. each Thursday, it hosts baby time stories and activity. At 4 p.m. each Thursday, it hosts Reading Buddies for kindergarten through fth-grade. Call 407-647-7700. Orange County Public Schools Food and Nutrition Services provides free meals to children during the sum mer at many locations. There are no income requirements or registration. Contact FSsummer@ocps.net or dial 211. Send submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com From the Corner Table PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Josh Garrick samples the Cocina 214 trufe and mushroom quesadilla (above). At right are the beef brisket tacos, presented as pulled beef on little open-face tortillas. Tex-Mex deluxe and delish JOSH GARRICK Observer Staff Cocina 214 is open seven days a week, for lunch and dinner with complimentary valet parking for dinner at 151 E. Welbourne Ave. in Winter Park. Hours are 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Sunday. Call 407-790-7997 or visit cocina214.com

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Page 13 Thursday, April 26, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer April 29 One Huge Unveiling One of the most highly an arts world will take place when legendary artist Harold Gardes huge 8-by-24 foot masterpiece Iconoclass will be unveiled to the public from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. on April 29. The mural was recently re-discovered by collectors and patrons Bill and Kathie Hohns and has not been shown publicly in more than 35 years. The color ful original has been copied and laminated, and will be attached to the outside of the building at the Museum of Florida Art. The event will coincide with a Strappo exhibit opening, and will feature the original Icono class inside the Museum. The Museum of Florida Art is at 600 N. Woodland Blvd. in DeLand. Call 386-734-4371 or visit museu April 28 & 29 Dietwhat diet? Its time for the 11th Annual Great American Pie Festival (and Championships). Last year 447 commercial, 142 professional and 301 amateur bakers competed for the title of Americas top pie bak er, but the big news is that 32,000 of us pie lovers will descend upon the town of Celebration on April 28 and 29 for the Never-Ending Pie Buffet. Last year 87,000 slices of pie and a lot of ice cream from Americas best-known bakers were served. Stage enter tainment and demonstrations are free; tickets for the pie buffet are $10 for adults and $5 for children ages 5 and younger to enjoy all we can eat! May 3 Full Sail at the Orlando Museum of Art The original once-a-month day on the calendar (devoted to art) is First Thursday at the Orlando Mu seum of Art. From 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. on May 3, the Museum will honor another extraordinary home of the arts in Central Florida Full Sail University. Full Sail is much more than a college; it has literally edu cated some of the most celebrated arts technicians in the country in every medium from computer gaming to music videos. On May 3 we may enjoy an eclectic mix of various art forms created by Full Sail students, faculty and alumni. These young people make up the cutting edge of whats happen ing in the arts today. Call 407896-4231, extension 260 or visit OMArt.org May 3 Winter Park Sip & Stroll The clever folks at the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce have come up with The Winter Park Sip & Stroll, a concept event that encourages us to have a glass of wine or two while we visit stores and restaurants at our own pace. We can enjoy a wine tasting and appetizer at each participating location, including Bajalia, Bayhill Jewelers on Park, Breakaway Bicycles, Charyli, Cocina 214, Downeast, Gary Lambert Salon, Kilwins Chocolates, Lilly Pulit zer, Luma on Park, Luxury Trips, Park Plaza Gardens, Peterbrooke Chocolatier, Sultre, Synergy, Ten Thousand Villages, Bistro on Park, The Doggie Door, Things & FASHION, Through the Look ing Glass, Timothys Gallery and Tollas Italian Cafe. The event is from 5 to 8:30 p.m. on May 3, and the tickets are $30 in advance. Call 407-644-8281 or visit winterpark. org May 3 to 13 Mad Cows Herd of Cabaret Talent and we can hear them too. Gimme a break how often do I use a lousy pun? And its all in the name of fun as Mad Cow Theatre in Downtown Orlando hosts the 10th Annual Orlando Cabaret Festival from May 3-13 including 25 performances of jazz, pop, Broadway, comedy and a few surprises. Eight vocalists team up to present four unique shows including It Was A Very Good Year 1962, An Animated Night of Cabaret, A Gay Night for Singing! and And The Tony Goes To The Festival also of fers weekday lunchtime perfor mances that last 45 minutes so within an hour. Call 407-297-8788 or visit orlandocabaret.com And not to be missed Now through May 13 Dis neys The Lion King has leapt onto the stage of the Bob Carr Performing Arts Center with all its stunning theatricality and be loved musical score. Africa comes to life as the Tony Award-winning Broadway sensation features themes of love, family and the strength of friendship woven into this perfect family musical. Visit OrlandoBroadway.com Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906. Josh Garrick Culture worthy of your calendar Iconoglass opens Full Sail @ OMA

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Page 14 Thursday, April 26, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Opinions Immediately following an attack, survivors of sexual as sault may exhibit the following reactions according to the Florida Council Against Sexual Violence: nausea, trembling, effects on eat ing and sleeping, and feelings of helplessness. Long-term reactions can mune system, self blame, fear of large crowds and withdrawal. The Florida Council told the limited funding to rape crisis cen ters throughout the state, victims of rape and domestic violence often have to wait anywhere from several weeks to three months for services. This year the Council asked the state for a $1.5 million funding increase. It is unfathomable to endure that kind of trauma and then have to wait weeks or months be fore gaining access to the services needed to cope. A bill that would grant the extra money to 30 rape crisis centers throughout Florida made it all the way to Florida Gov. Rick Scotts desk only to be vetoed this week. The kicker: its Sexual As sault Awareness Month. the state already contributes $6.5 million to rape prevention and sexual assault services and said that the $1.5 million would only pay for duplicative services, The governor also said that no one was able to explain to him why the additional funding was needed. The Councils executive director, Jennifer Dritt, said she outlined the increase in the number of victims in the state U.S. is sexually assaulted every two minutes and an average of 233,986 Amercians age 12 and older are victims of sexual vio lence every year, according to the Victim Service Center (VSC) of Central Florida. VSC is the only rape crisis center in Orange County, and it offers a 24-hour sexual assault hotline, acute (less than 120 hours after the assault) and nonacute sexual assault services, which in clude an exam, forensic evidence collection and access to victim ad vocates, therapy, support groups, and outreach and prevention services. that $1.5 million may seem like a lot, but that money was to be spread throughout 67 counties. Some of the Councils current $6.5 million goes to education and prevention programs, which ing sexual violence, but it doesnt help cut down the waiting lists for crisis centers throughout the state. Sexual attacks often change victims entire lives. We should do all we can to make sure they get crisis services in a more timely manner. Our Observation Letters to the editor Send your thoughts (400 words or less) to Managing Editor Jenny Andreasson at editor@observernewspapers.com The state should do more for victims For the children Thank you Brittni Johnson for your headline article Nursery kindles young minds (published April 19) highlighting the mission and accomplishments of the Winter Park Day Nursery and its upcom ing annual fundraiser, the Orange Blossom Jubilee. pre-K child care and education facility for many years, assisting the teaching staff in the classroom and facilitating physical co ordination activities on the playground. As a former treasurer on the Board of Direc of raising funds to offset the sliding scale tuitions that cover only a portion of the nurserys annual expenses. Local nonprof its continue to vie for funds in an everdiminishing pool of available resources, and the Winter Park Day Nursery is no exception. And, dont let the name mislead you. While located on Pennsylvania Avenue just south of Fairbanks Avenue in Win ter Park, the nurserys doors are open to children outside the city. Also, the organi zation receives no dedicated funding from the city of Winter Park. In addition to the Winter Park Day institutions offering child care, educa tion and life preparation activities for our kids in need such as the Orlando Day Nursery in Orlando and Welbourne Av enue Nursery, also in Winter Park. They all support. I cant think of a better cause than sup porting child care, family enrichment and educational opportunities for at-risk and the Observers effort to highlight the service these pre-K nurseries provide our greater community. Michael Dick Winter Park Day Nursery volunteer F ederal budget and the F arm Bill There are a lot of myths circulating about SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition As sistance Program), formerly food stamps, misinformation stigmatizes the entire program, and now is being used as justi funding cuts that would make it harder for families struggling to get by day-to-day to put food on the table. The U.S. House budget approved last month proposes to cut SNAP by nearly 20 percent, gutting support for millions of this? The program has grown too much in recent years too many people are get in recent years. But it is only shocking that SNAP participation grew by 70 percent from 2006 to 2011 if you fail to mention that the ranks of the unemployed grew by 94 percent over the same period. The Agriculture Committees are rewrit ing Farm Bill legislation beginning this month, and SNAP and other anti-hunger programs are at risk of cuts at a time when they need to be strengthened and pro tected. Food insecurity is a national problem that needs a national solution, and that starts with a strong federal commitment to SNAP. SNAP responded quickly and effectively during the recession, working as it was designed by growing in response to growing need to ensure that Florida families, children and seniors have enough to eat. Weve all heard the myths, but what about the facts? SNAP is targeted at the most vulnerable households: 76 percent of SNAP households include a child, elderly person or disabled person, and 85 percent of SNAP households have gross income at or below 100 percent of the poverty line. are not overly generous the average $134. Thats less than $1.50 per meal. While youre more likely to hear sen sational stories of program abuse, the fact of the matter is that these bad actors are outliers. For every one allegation of SNAP stories of heartbreaking need, but those are the stories you dont hear, such as single parents trying to make ends meet, senior citizens deciding whether to buy food or medicine and many more. Our food bank, Second Harvest Food Bank of Central Florida, experienced a 30 percent increase in requests for food this past year. Without SNAP in place to respond to growing need in the recession, the increased demand on charities like ours would be crippling. Were struggling to keep up with need as it is, especially with recent sharp declines in federal food donations from The Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP), which is another Farm Bill program. We understand the importance of get we strongly believe that a good paying job is the best solution to hunger and poverty. But until we restore opportunity and mo bility, our nation cannot walk back on our commitment to caring for our neighbors in need. Taking care of our neighbors is an American value, and feeding our neigh bors is a shared responsibility. We see support of our volunteers and donors. This through important anti-hunger programs such as SNAP and TEFAP. We strongly urge our nations leaders to protect anti-hunger programs such as SNAP and make needed investments in TEFAP to protect families from hunger and help charities like ours keep up with need in our community. We also ask them and you to look at SNAP with fresh eyes and an open heart. If you have any doubt that families are struggling, please visit us at Second Harvest Food Bank of Central Florida and meet the people whose lives are affected by the choices Congress will make in the Farm Bill. Dave Krepcho President/CEO Second Harvest Food Bank of Central Florida Taking care of our neighbors is an American value, and feeding our neighbors is a shared responsibility. Dave Krepcho Sexual attacks often change victims entire lives. King Features Weekly ServiceApril 23, 2012 King Features Weekly ServiceApril 23, 2012

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Page 15 Thursday, April 26, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer I spoke with Joel Salatin ear lier this month. Joel is working on the leading edge of sustainable farming practices at his Polyface Farm in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia. Hes written several books, including Folks, This Aint Normal. This is the sec ond half of our conversation. Tom Carey: Food deserts in inner cities are starting to be served by urban farms using high-intensity hydroponic and aquaponic systems, hoop houses and framed raised beds. Theres just not a lot of acreage growing in the ground. I like to say Im a dirt farmer, trying to grow the best crop of dirt I can. Are you comfortable with these high-tech methods? Joel Salatin: Theres still so much we can do using traditional methods. This country has 35 million acres of lawns, 36 million acres for recreational horses, and we havent even touched golf courses. Cornell University did a study, and the state of New York has 3.1 million acres of fallow farms, land that is no longer working farms. Twenty years ago there was so much concern over suburban development and malls gobbling up farmland, but the bigger issue now is land abandonment. I do not espouse the idea that the only way to heal land is to abandon it. Human involvement with land is not in herently evil or debilitating. Our mandate as humans is to use our intellect to massage the landscape into better productivity, i.e. more solar energy converted into grow ing biomass, than nature does if left in a static state. Tom: I started with half per cent organic matter, and now its up to 2 percent, thats a four-fold increase, but it still looks like beach sand. Hydroponic plants not attached to the earth, grown in an inert media, even with or ganic fertilizers and pest controls, have different types of roots and nutrient demands. When organic produce, grown in real soil, must are not), while all the other hightech methods, not to mention conventional chemical farming, confusing. Joel: Theres no comparison to knowing your farmer, visiting the farm, taking a look around and satisfying yourself. People say I dont have time to do that, but they do have time to watch TV, go on a Caribbean cruise, visit Disney World, to shop for $100 designer jeans with holes already in the knees. We tend to make time for the things we think are important. We need to choose to take our time to discover the farm treasures in our communities. Youll get knowledgeable and Tom: Are that many more people getting the message (about local sustainable agri culture)? These things happen gradually, but are we at a point in history where these are becoming important issues? Joel: I see two sides to this is sue. One is that there is a general sense we are on the precipitous, precarious precipices, that things cant go on the way they are. Theres peak oil, food prices, the economy, China, debt, health costs, obesity, diabetes. There is a general feeling that something is out of whack. The way we are running as a culture, it wont be like this in 100 years. The other is that most people dont want to analyze the situ ation or are too disconnected to know what anchor to grab, what lifeline to get a hold of. Part of the reason for writing this book (Folks, This Aint Normal) is not only to shake people up, but to also make people aware that there are a lot of lifelines out there from your own personal garden, to community food production, how to develop your larder, to your own culinary skills. You can actually have your own fresh, frozen, dried or canned food so you dont have to run to the supermarket every three days. No lasting change ever comes without some effort. If you missed the rst half of the interview, visit wpmobserver.com French political writer Alexis de Toc queville wrote his famous book, De mocracy in America in the 1830s, and the prognosis he made did not portend a protracted and successful future for the American social experiment. The long and short of it was that democracys reliance upon the masses of common people was equivalent to build tion. De Tocqueville wrote, Upon my ar rival in the United States, the religious that struck my attention; and the longer I stayed there, the more did I perceive the great political consequences resulting from this state of thing learn that the concepts of our nations founders were not based on the kind of wide-open democracy that the U.S. enjoys today. The fact that the vote of a highly intelligent person could be invalidated by the bought vote of an illiterate dis enchanted people then as it still may do today. De Tocqueville wrote of Political Consequences of the Social State of the man heart a depraved taste for equality, which impels the weak to want to bring the strong down to their level, and which reduces men to preferring equality in servitude to inequality in freedom. He further comments on equality by say ing, Furthermore, when citizens are all to defend their independence against the aggressions of power. As none of them is tage, the only guarantee of liberty is for everyone to combine forces. But such a combination is not always in evidence. The 1789 French Revolution produced in the French people concepts of de mocracy that were not identical to those that the 1775 American Revolution had produced in American citizens. Cer tainly notable was the fact that Napoleon crowned himself emperor in Notre Dame Cathedral, some years after George Washington had refused the offer of an American crown. De Tocqueville tried to understand why America was so different from Europe in the last throes of aristocracy. America, in contrast to the aristocratic ethic, was a society where hard work and money making were the dominant ethics, where the common man enjoyed a level of dignity that was unprecedented, where commoners never deferred to elites, and where what he described as crass indi vidualism and market capitalism had taken root to an extraordinary degree. De Tocquevilles idea was that, Among a democratic people, where there is no hereditary wealth, every man works to earn a living.... Labor is held in honor; the prejudice is not against labor, but in its favor. (!) De Tocqueville added that this equal ity of social conditions bred political and civilian values that determined the type of legislation passed in the colonies and later in the free states. De Tocqueville was a forward-thinking prophet when, in his Democracy in America, he seems to predict the future of the world in the Cold War saying, There are now two great nations in the world, which starting from different points, seem to be advancing toward the same goal: the Russians and the AngloAmericans. Each seem called by some secret design of Providence one day to hold in its hands the destinies of half the world. De Tocquevilles prophetic foresight was as stunning then as it is now! About Roney: Harvard42Distinguished Prof, E m. U CF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney) Tom Carey From my garden to yours On the edge of a food revolution Chris Jepson Perspectives Louis Roney Play On! The cocktail for the ages American Democracy I want a busy life, a just mind, and a timely death. Zora Neale Hurston I am going to employ a standard rhetorical device called paralipsis by say ing it is unnecessary to state the obvious (but do it anyway). The boomer genera tion is retiring, is getting out of the way, is moving on. About 13 percent of the American population today is 65 or older, and when the last of the boomers retire in 2030, 18 percent of our population will be older than 65. Ten thousand boomers are retiring every day and will for the next 19 years. Steven M. Gillon, author of Boomer Nation, described it this way: The pig has moved through the python, and is suggest that nearly 30 percent of Medicare payments cover the cost of care for people in the last year of life. Whew! Thats a big number. Need more? Twelve percent of Medicare spending is allocated for people who are in the last two months of their life. We will mortgage our future, borrow billions from China for medical care for the last 60 days of an individuals life? Is that money well spent? Whatta waste! Gosh, we could be spending that on bombing Iran, or tanks or on something that goes Atten-hut! I jest. But I dont when it comes to boomer end times. In 1729 Jonathan Swift wrote A Modest Proposal in which he satirically recommended that impoverished Irish sell their children as food to rich gentle man and ladies. A tasty morsel of an idea, yes? Modest I suppose because he simply didnt suggest they be ground up and used as a natural fertilizer to increase crop production to lessen the Irish famine. Nothing like a little 18th century Juvena lian satire to get the blood racing. I have a modest recommendation for boomers, but, unlike Swift, I am unequivocally sincere in my proposal. Ms. Hurston suggested of living that we experience a timely death. I recommend for my fellow boomers that we exit with dignity. Die with grace. On your own terms. Die at a moment of your choosing. Do it for yourself. Do so for your children and America. One of the ironies of Alzheimers lost your marbles, you dont give a damn about your dignity. Let alone for those who are now responsible for your welfare. You are reduced to walking vegetable matter, and society is left caring for decaying fruit. That is a harsh but accurate assessment. You may select to experience that end; I will not. Ive come to the conclusion that I want to die as I have lived. With purpose, intent and in control. That may be an illusion (philosophical or otherwise) but it has been my modus operandi since it occurred to me that I was master of my own thoughts (age 5 or so). Ive considered the question of wheth you are a burden to children and country. Consider the timely death. It is an ethi cal choice. I predict more and more boomers will choose a timely death. Do so with intent and prior to those last horrendous, humiliating and costly two months. Phenobarbital and whiskey. The cocktail for the ages. Or, rather, for the aged. Skl. Jepson is a 24-year resident of Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.US I recommend for my fellow boomers that we exit with dignity. Tom Carey and Joel Salatin

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WANTED Staff Development Coordinator Job Description: Responsible for ensur ing the facility is in compliance with regulatory requirements relating to staff credentialing and education. Provide services associated with ongoing pro fessional development of staff at the facility. Applicant must possess clinical skills, educational experience, as well as knowledge and hands-on experience in Infection Control and Risk Management. Additional qualifications apply. Pay Rate: Salary based on experience. Job Order Number: 9665012 Office Assistant Job Description: Responsible for as signed clerical duties in accordance with the office procedures of individual establishments that may include a com bination of answering telephones, book keeping, typing or word processing, stenography, office machine operation, and filing. Applicant must possess High School Diploma or equivalent and two years of experience. Additional qualifica tions apply. 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