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Winter Park-Maitland observer
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00209
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park FL
Publication Date: 04-19-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates: 28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID: UF00091444:00209

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407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC USPS 00-6186 Publisher statement on page 4. Thursday, April 19, 2012 50+ tax wpmobserver.com Subscribe now! Visit wpmobserver.com This Earth Day, make a difference through the simple act of donating clothing or household items. Page 16 Letters to the editor Healthy Living Stephanie Arthurs twins are among the 633 babies born preterm every week in Florida, March of Dimes says. Page 11 Josh Garrick Baby has been on Winter Park Playhouse director Roy Alans production wish list for years. Page 32 Calendar The Third Annual Hannibal Square Heritage Center Folk Art and Traditional Craft Festival is Saturday. Page 8 TAX DEFERREDFIXED ANNUITY RATE FOR 5 YEARS.Bob Adams 407-644-6646THE NATIONAL 5 YEAR CD RATE IS 1.34%3.35% 451 Maitland Ave, Altamonte Springs, FL 32701NEW Dermatology Ofce!407-599-SKIN (7546)*Waive co-payment up to $25 No referral needed Accepting all insurances Dr. John Cottam Dr. Ross Wheeler Cutting back on city funding by 10 per cent in 2013, decreasing an initial lease with the city from 51 to two years, and going on a sooner than agreed upon a year ago are all ways Art & History Museums Maitland leaders say theyre willing to work to main tain their cultural partnership with the city of Maitland. Were basically ready to commit [harakiri] here, A&H President Bill Taulbee said at the second workshop between A&H and the Maitland City Council on April 10 where he presented these ideas. The two groups are working to solidify the future of their public-private cultural partnership before the 2010-formed orga nizations lease of the citys Maitland Art Center (MAC) properties reaches the end of its one-year trial lease, which automatically renews for 51 years on Oct. 1. Though similar workshops are sched uled with all cultural partners, including one with the Maitland Public Library held Councilman Phil Bonus raised questions of the bang for the buck the city was getting from its current partnership with A&H and direction in which its leadership was head ing at a January Council meeting. If we keep on with the poor business model that we have with making no rev enue back (to the city), were doomed to repeat the failures of the past and are not working forward to improve the MAC, Bo nus said. vin, curator at the MAC for more than 15 Tyree Forbes was 2 years old when he started at the Winter Park Day Nursery, and hes one student the teachers there will never forget. His heart was warm and full of love, but sometimes that just couldnt overpower his anger. His grandmother, who was taking care of him, didnt know what to do. But Ali DeMa ria, his teacher then and now executive direc tor of the Nursery, knew all he needed was to feel safe and loved. We just kept showing him that we cared, she said. dently sent him off to elementary school, and teacher and a switch to the right school for him, the little boy has seen more success than loving it. said. I have his report card And thats what the Winter Park Day Nursery is all about. The care center and pre school in Winter Park was started as a place to offer quality, affordable care for low-income working families. Its childcare fees are based on a sliding scale depending on the parents income. DeMaria said 89 per cent of her children come from low-income households, and the majority of families pay the lowest price of $67 per week, but that it costs the center $200 to care for and educate each child. The Nursery will hold its Orange Blossom Jubilee on April 27 to help bridge that gap between what their parents can afford, and the cost of the quality education the Nursery provides. The funds they raise at this annual event will provide for operational costs anything from keeping the lights on and ren ovating the old bathrooms, to purchasing the supplies for their monthly birthday parties. I think its really important to give every body a good foundation regardless of income level to build a strong community and to build productive citizens for the rest of their PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Five-year-old Caden, above, enjoys the playground at the Winter Park Day Nursery, which charges parents for care based on a sliding scale of income. The nursery is holding a fundraising event on April 27 to help keep its doors open. Please see NURSERY on page 3 Nursery kindles young minds The Winter Park Day Nursery will hold its Orange Blossom Jubilee on Friday, April 27, to help cover child care costs for its low-income families BRITTNI JOHNSON Observer Staff The Winter Park Day Nurserys 11th Annual Orange Blossom Jubilee will be held from 6:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. at the Winter Park Community Center on Friday, April 27. The Nursery is still looking for corporate sponsorships and auction item donations, and individual tickets are available and cost $75 each. Call the Nursery at 407-647-0505 or email Heather@winterparkdaynursery.org for more information. A&H bargains to save itself Please see ART on page 3 Workshop between Maitland and nonprot organization leaves cultural partnership in question SARAH WILSON Observer Staff As part of A&Hs plan to show its dedication to Maitland and give back to the city, admission to all A&H museums will be free for Maitland residents throughout the month of May. For more information, visit ArtandHistory.org

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Page 2 Thursday, April 19, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer FORUMSSmall Business www.mica.house.govU.S. Congressman J ohn L. MicaSponsored byMaitland 407-657-8080 Deltona 386-860-1499 Learn about Federal, state and local resources to develop or expand business. Experts from the Small Business Administration, IRS, Department of Commerce, Seminole State College Small Business Development Center, Enterprise Florida and local banks.SBA Programs & FinancingFederal Market Contracting IRS Info Exporting Agency ExpertsBusiness Summit Focused on SW Volusia County Deltona City Hall 2345 Providence Blvd, Deltona 32725 Forum Export Assistance Forum Veterans Assistance 558 W. New England Ave, Winter Park, Florida Classic Iron Beds AND Designer Linens 407-982-4319www.ClassicIronBeds.comAll iron & brass beds are made in the USA and guaranteed for 2 generations 20% off Pine Cone Hill Linens through April GODWIN, LARRYMr. Larry Godwin of Winter Park passed peacefully Thursday, April 12th, with his loved ones by his side. A two-time lymphoma survivor, he ultimately succumbed to his third bout with cancer, 21 years after the rst diagnosis. He was 69 years of age. He is survived by his four children and six grandchildren. A successful entrepreneur, Mr. Godwin most recently was founder and Chairman of First Colony Bank in Maitland. He served our country in the armed forces, strengthened our community with his wisdom and aided those in need with encouragement and generosity. A dedicated Christian; he was and continues to be a humble servant of our Lord. A Memorial Service will be held at 10:30am Thursday, April 19th at First United Methodist Church in Winter Park, 125 North Interlachen Avenue, Winter Park, FL 32789. Donate on his behalf to the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. http://www.lls.org. Online memory book at http://www.baldwinfairchild.com. Some years ago in New Yorks Metropolitan Museum of Art, my beautiful wife (b.w.) and I heard a remarkably sung concert by Chanticleer, the extraordinary 12-member male vocal group from San Francisco. Shortly there after we founded the Festival of Orchestras in Orlando, and attractions we booked. Chanti cleer scored brilliantly and has concert since then. On Sunday Chapel, the Bach Festival Society presented Chanticleer once again. The name Chanticleer is taken from Geoffrey Chaucers clarionvoiced rooster. Not surprisingly, Chanticleer opened the program with 15th and 16th century sacred music of Sebastian de Vivanco and Tomas Luis de Victoria. Two contempo rary songs from Le Cantique des Cantiques, much in the ancient style, followed. Chansons of Claudin de Sermisy, Clement Janequin and Claude Le Jeune utilizing antiph onal singing, interesting modula tions and intricate counterpoint Sermisy was sung by a quartet. A second quartet of four other voices sang Toute les Nuits by Janequin. Then a quintet sang the voici venir du Printemps, a very intricate and exacting selection. Strauss Mnnerchore showed an enticing variety of styles by the great German roman tic. Modulating sections, some Wagner and resplendent with galloping waltz a brim with hap piness. Contemporary composer Steven Sametz brought lyricism to the fore in his Not an End of Loving. This Marriage of Eric Whi tacre, and A Village Wedding of Sir John Tavener opened the concerts second half. Taveners music was of special interest be cause of its introduction of Greek harmonies sung in a circle by the 12 singers. Three engaging songs of Stephen Paulus based on Chinese poems of Tzu Yeh added capti vating color to the afternoon. Perhaps the programs most appreciated moment occurred when Chanticleer assumed the role of a s blues band each member imitating with amazing and amusing effect the sound of a (wa-wah) Dixieland jazz player. Here the audience rose to its feet in thunderous applause. propriate romantic treatment and full vocal beauty. An encore of sorts, Somebody to Love, origi nally written for the rock group Ages a very fun afternoon! Throughout the concert, Chanticleer was a professional musicians delight to hear. Intonation, with an occasional Attacks and cutoffs, sans con ductor, were models of precision. Tone was beautiful, raucous, solemn, ethereal, crisp and demanded. Chanticleers excellent solo voices demonstrated that this virtuoso chorus is made up of thoroughly trained individual singers. Chanticleer lived up to its reputation as Americas premier vocal ensemble. PHOTO BY KRISTEN WHEELER KHPHOTOGRAPHICS The Art & History Museums Maitlands Participation, Circus of the Surreal, was an artis tic and nancial success. The event raised $24,080, an increase of $5,277 over last year. Chanticleer charms again Their virtuosic harmonizing is like no other LOUIS RONEY Observer Staff The Bach Festival Society of Winter Park concludes its 2011 season with Spring in Vienna on Saturday, April 28, at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, April 29, at 3 p.m. at Knowles Memorial Chapel, Rollins College. Tickets range from $20 to $50. Call the Box Ofce at 407-646-2182 or visit www.BachFestivalFlorida.org Chanticleer Girl who played with re

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Page 3 Thursday, April 19, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer years, resigned on April 9. At the workshop, Colvin described watching A&H turn the MAC into a money pit in the past year, which led him to seek em ployment elsewhere. As of 2012, A&H receives 49 percent of its funding from the city, a $425,000 contribution, A&H Director Andrea BaileyCox said. That money along with the rest of A&Hs funding is rein vested back into MAC programs and services and both directly and indirectly into the Maitland community, she said, which is es timated at $862,000. Some members of Council, however, said they dont feel that estimated repayment is giving enough directly back to the city given its investment, especially on the eve of another strappedfor-cash budget season. Bonus proposed the city take the run ning of the MAC under its leisure services department to make up though numbers for the cost of this have yet to be drawn up. Councilwoman Linda Frosch said the core of the issue is mak ing sure the 17,000 residents of Maitland, whose tax dollars are funding all the cultural partners, are getting utilized in the most possible. Were not closing the Art Center or changing programs, exhibits, the mission or doing anything like that, Frosch said. We want to make it better, and thats what we want to give you help with, to make it better. A&H took bargaining into its own hands at the April 10 meet ing, saying they would amend what would become a 51-year lease with the city in October, to a two-year lease. President Taulbee, a former councilman, said A&H also offered to cut its requested funding to the city for 2013 to 39 percent of its budget, at $360,000, and accelerating from its 16-year master plan to ing on the city for only 10 to 15 percent of its budget by 2015. You told us to get out there and spread our wings and raise our own funds, and weve done that but we hear you; we have to change the way we do busi ness and we have to enhance the way we engage the community, Taulbee said, and were ready to do that, too. No vote or decision was made, other than that the issue needs to be further addressed in the com ing months, with Frosch and Bo nus urging that action needs to be taken now, and Mayor How ard Schieferdecker and Council man Ivan Valdes favoring letting A&H have some time to work out some of its kinks on its own. Go out and start doing a bet ter job, Valdes urged to mem bers of the A&H board. Go be come the very best you can be, and make it a hard decision for us to say we want to go in a dif ferent direction. lives, said Skye Guthrie, who is on the board of directors and co-chair of the event. And the people here do a great job at that because they really care about it, its not just about child care, its about education and support and families. Heather Cortese, whose son has had trouble with other schools in the past, said instead of tears each day when he comes home, hes happy. Its a relief for her to bring her son to a place where he feels safe and she has help. There were times when I had to put food on my table or keep the electric on, she said. And it was very helpful to me to be able to come here and take food from the food pantry during that pe riod of time, because it was really tough. Winter Park resident and par ent Gayla Faulkner agreed. She was paying full price for child care in the past and was barely surviving. Its been a lifesaver [the cost of child care] was killing me, she said. I was literally living paycheck to paycheck. That can lead to stress, but at the Nursery, teachers are there to give parents guidance and sup port, too. When the parents come in, many of whom are raising their children alone, they get a friendly welcome, an offer of a cup of cof fee, and another adult actually asking them how they are. Its probably the only place where the family is as impor tant as the child, said Heather and volunteer coordinator for the school. Theyre concerned for you and for your child, Faulkner said. Its just so family oriented you just feel like you get a big hug when you walk in the door. And thats not only great for the tired moms lacking appre ciation in their everyday lives some walk all the way from the other side of Winter Park to get their kids there each morning but for their children, too. We want to make sure their family is included because that really affects how successful the child is going to be, to see what kind of family support that they have, DeMaria said. It sets the stage for their education. If theyre shown what a quality education looks like and theyre supported in helping their children be what their children can be, then theyre more likely to be successful in the future. When they do get back on their feet, these families give right back to their school and commu nity. Cortese has donated an auc tion item for the Jubilee, and the grandmother whose grandson is another family that was in need of a home. She still visits the school to show her appreciation and to tell them how she learned to be a better caregiver from their guid ance. They realize the importance of giving, Caldwell said. Hurry! Sale E nds Soon! Design Pro Screens Longwood FL 32750 Toll Free: 1 888724 9868 Ext. 71232 71232 Securities offered through NEXT Financial Group, Inc., Member FINRA/SIPC. Investment Advisory Services offered through Dorman Financial Management, P.A. None of the entities named herein are afliated with NEXT Financial Group, Inc. Dorman Financial Management, P.A., 341 N. Maitland Ave., Ste. 250, Maitland, FL 32751 (407)774-6815 Be part of the excitement at our 5th AnnualShred-Fest 2012Protect your identity and free up your space at Dorman Financial Managements annual document shredding event. Bring in your old important documents to shred and enjoy coffee and bagels. Plus, participate in these two exciting contests: Register to win your own personal shredder just for attending the event. Bring the oldest document to be shredded and win a gift basket. Shred any of the below items from 2004 and earlier: When: Saturday, April 21st 9:00 am 11:00 am Where: Dorman Financial Management 341 N. Maitland Ave., Ste. 250 Maitland, FL 32751 Feel free to bring a friend and RSVP today to (407) 774-6815 or sgenovese@DormanFinancial.com Sponsored by: old utility bills credit card ads cancelled checks old school records old tax returns old statements www.dormannancial.com NURSERY | Care facility says it truly cares about kids, parents C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE ART | Board president says organization can be financially independent in three years instead of planned 16 C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE ARCHIVE PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Art & History Museums Maitland has used events such as Culture and Cocktails (above) to raise additional funds for its operations. It has pledged to become even more independent.

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Page 4 Thursday, April 19, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer USPS 00-6186 ISSN 1064-3613 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835-5705 Member of: Chamber of Commerce Publisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor. Submission does not guarantee publication. Columnists opinions are made independently of the newspaper. All rights reserved. Winter Park / Maitland Observer 2012 Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster www.wpmobserver.com | Phone: 407-563-7000 | Fax: 407-563-7099 | editor@observernewspapers.com Published Thursday, April 19, 2012 CONTACTS Volume 24, Issue Number 16 PUBLISHER T racy Craft 407-515-2605 tcraft@observernewspapers.com MANAGING EDITOR Jenny Andreasson 407-563-7026 editor@observernewspapers.com DESIGNER Jonathan Gallagher 407-563-7054 jgallagher@observernewspapers.com ASSOCIATE EDITOR Isaac Babcock 407-563-7023 isaacb@observernewspapers.com LEGALS | CLASSIFIEDS Ashley McBride legal@FLAlegals.com classieds@observernewspapers.com STAFF WRITERS Sarah Wilson Brittni Johnson Kristy Vickery COPY EDITORS Sarah Wilson COLUMNISTS Chris Jepson Jepson@MediAmerica.us Louis Roney LRoney@c.rr.com Josh Garrick joshgarrick9@gmail.com ADVERTISING SALES Linda Stern 407-563-7058 LStern@observernewspapers.com SUBSCRIPTIONS | CIRCULATION Katie Reyes kreyes@turnstilemediagroup.com 407-563-7073 INTERN Andy Ceballos Police looking for 4 Rivers suspects At about 6:15 a.m. on Tuesday, April 10, ofcers responded to the 4 Riv ers Smokehouse in Winter Park in reference to a reported robbery. Pre liminary investigations at the scene revealed that two males, armed with a handgun and knife, robbed the business. The rst suspect is a black male, about 20-30 years of age, about 6 feet tall, with a medium build. He was was wearing a gray hooded sweat shirt, jeans and a half mask. The second suspect is described as an about 5-foot-10-inch to 6-foot-tall, slender built male, armed with a knife wearing a black half mask, a navy blue hooded sweatshirt, dark jeans, and light gray Vans brand sneakers. If you know the whereabouts of these persons, or details of the crime, you may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Call 1-800-423-TIPS (8477) or visit CrimeLine.org Maitland teacher runs for Florida House Maitland teacher and resident Karen Castor Dentel announced her candi dacy on April 16 for the newly drawn Florida State House District 30. I am running to improve public education and ght for better economic oppor tunities for our neighbors in Orange and Seminole, Dentel said. Den tel, an Orlando resident since 1990, teaches at Dommerich Elementary. Dentels mother, Betty Castor, former ly served in the Florida Senate and as state education commissioner. Her sister, Kathy Castor, has represented Floridas 11th Congressional District since 2007. Winter Park company to raise $100K for nonprot Building Drops Inc. of Winter Park has pledged to raise $100,000 for Orange County Athletics, a nonprot organi zation that provides services for in dividuals with autism and other dis abilities in the Greater Orlando area by having their suppliers contribute to the organization. Building Drops has offered to start a scholarship fund for consumers that would otherwise miss OCAs event. Visit gooca.org Kids say theyll be less nancially independent A new study from Junior Achievement USA and The Allstate Foundation re vealed that only 56 percent of teens 14-18 years old think they will be as nancially well-off or better than their parents. That represents a 37 percent drop from 2011 (89 percent). The 2012 Junior Achievement Teens and Personal Finance survey also un covered a dramatic shift in the age teens think they will be nancially independent from their parents or guardians. Less than half of teens who responded indicated theyd be independent by age 20 versus a year ago. Craig Polejes, president of Junior Achievement of Central Florida said, Junior Achievement, with the col laboration of key partners like The Allstate Foundation, will continue to expand young peoples access to the tools they need to succeed in the global economy, including critical money-management skills. Goodwill seeks donations Goodwill Industries of Central Florida is calling for donations of new or gently used items clothing, ap pliances, electronics and furniture. Sales from donated goods helps fund job training programs. These centers provide employment placement ser vices and other community-based programs for people with disabilities, lack education or job experience, or face other employment challenges. Visit goodwillc.org Send submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com Meal and door prizes are provided. COMMUNITY SEMINAR EVENT PLEASE RSVP TO (800) 307-8527. STEI2300 Temple Drive Winter Park, FL 32789 Offering the Simplicity Plan BaldwinFairchild.com Wednesday, A pril 25, 2012, 6:30 p.m.Complimentary Dinner at Buca Di Beppo BFCremSeminarAd_3colx5.indd 1 4/13/12 2:14 PM Business Briefs Community Bulletin Miller Legg improving natural lands Miller Leggs Winter Park ofce has been awarded a ve-year continuing contract by Seminole County to im prove its natural lands. Approximate ly $3.2 million in funding is available through a 2004 bond referendum. FYAO gets on a bus Eight winning nonprot organiza tions will have their logos placed on a L YNX bus for the next 12 months. Among the winners is Florida Y oung Artists Orchestra of Winter Park, a group of music professionals, teach ers and community leaders commit ted to providing a positive orchestral experience for young musicians. Rollins expands virtual reach In an effort to maximize resources and accommodate curriculum de mands, 16 liberal arts colleges, including Rollins College, of the As sociated Colleges of the South (ACS) joined forces to offer online, interac tive, upper-level courses through any ACS campus. It is dubbed The New Paradigm Initiative, and uses faceto-face and online instruction across all ACS campuses. Historic building sold NAI Realvest negotiated a $1.2 mil lion sale price for the 36,264-squarefoot, six-story historic ofce building and its 0.89-acre site at 101 East First St. in downtown Sanford. Patio party raises $2,100 Fannie Hillman + Associates and many of its clients and friends at tending the companys patio party recently raised $2,100 and lled a van full of kitchen essentials for the Community Food & Outreach Center. Loan made for $6 million The Winter Park ofce of Richmondbased Transact AOCP recently ar ranged a $6 million loan agreement for Coral Industries Inc. of Tuscaloo sa, Ala., by a multi-year debt facility provided by TAB Bank. Six loans closed Mercantile Capital Corporation closed six commercial loans to nance projects valued at more than $31.5 million. Rollins student wins merit award Rollins College full-time MBA student Jessica Merrell has been awarded this years SunTrust Distinguished Leader of Merit award. David Fuller, president and CEO of SunTrust Central Florida, presented Merrell with the award during a cer emony at the school, and Merrell will be recognized again for her achievement during the Rollins MBA commencement ceremony on April 28. In addition to Merrell, Rollins MBA students Meredith Lohwasser and Rohini Das were named SunTrust Leaders of Merit, and Joshua Aguilar and Shannon Walsh were also recognized for exemplary community engagement at the ceremony.

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Page 5 Thursday, April 19, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer ORLANDO RED CARPET PREMIERE A DOCUMENT ARY FILM FROM EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS MICHAEL WOLFE AND ALEX KRONEMER, DIRECTED BY ROB GARDNERNARRA TED BY ACADEMY AWA RD WINNER SUSAN SARANDON Thursday April 26th6:00 TO 8:30PMRECEPTION FOLLOWED BY MOVIE ORLANDO MUSEUM OF ART 2416 NORT H MILLS A VENU E O RLANDO, FLORIDA 32803 Islamic Art: Mirror of the Invisible World. Exploring global journey to present the stories behind the Event: 2.5hrs, movie: 90mins. RESERVE YOUR TICKETS AT: (WITH ID) : http://OrlandoArtMovie.eventbrite. com/ Please contact c4p@iscf. orgWWW.ISLAMICART.TV : http://OrlandoArtMovie.eventbrite. com/ Please contact c4p@iscf. orgWWW.ISLAMICART.TV Wildcats dominated the tennis court in the last week with two powerful team performances led by strong individual matches by two stars. The girls and boys teams won every match in the regional tourna ment April 12 to go on to the state the boys side and Joulia Likhanska against the best in the state, with English bowing out in the quarter Likhanskaia destroying her compe tition en route to a repeat title. Likhanskaias decisive wins punctuated the tournament with 6-4, 6-2; 6-3, 6-1; and 6-3, 6-2 scores to close out her junior year on top. Baseball bamboozled Winter Park entered their game against Boone with a string of four wins and a massive barrage of strong hitting. They left smarting from an 8-0 loss. For the Wildcats (14-8, 6-1), was highlighted by two doubledigit wins before they faced the Braves. Theyd just come off an April 11 shutout win over Free dom in which theyd piled on nine runs. But a lights-out pitching per formance from Boones Frank Grandinette made the game a quiet one for Winter Park, which failed to score in the blowout shutout. The Wildcats will play their baseball on the road, starting at 7 p.m. Thursday, April 19, at Os ceola before heading for Olympia at 4 p.m. Friday, April 20, to close things out. Then district play be gins next week. The Knights once again took a setback and turned it into a tri umph in the past week, vaulting themselves into the NCAA base ball No. 13 slot in the process. After trashing Florida A&M 16-4 and Bethune Cookman 6-2 on April 10-11, the Knights hit the road for Southern Miss (20-15, 4-5) to face a Golden Eagles team with a solid overall record, but strug gling in the conference. with a usually powerful UCF of fense reduced to scoreless as two Southern Miss pitchers worked 14 innings of shutouts while striking out 15 UCF batters. The Knights had some high-powered hurlers of their own, with Brian Adkins tossing a three-hit start through seven innings. In the bottom of the 14th inning way, allowing a hit and a double to end the game in a hurry after a The Knights got revenge in a big way in the next two games, turning on the bats and drilling the Eagles for a combined 23 runs to easily take the series. Theyll return home this week end for a trio of games against another middling conference foe, Memphis (16-20, 6-6). The Tigers the Knights this season. T ars lose nail-biters Its been an up-and-down diamond, as theyve lost three of their last four games. Two of those losses were only by a run, as the Tars have struggled to get the of fensive spark against tough pitch ing. Thats not for a lack of trying on the Tars part. In their most re cent loss to Barry University (17continuously behind after Barry scored all of its seven runs in the the game within a run on a hitand-run play in the top of the sev tying run, with the game ending on a groundout. In the game shortstop Nick Ad hammered their ninth doubles of the year. The Tars host Florida Tech (2213, 7-5) this weekend starting at 6 p.m. Friday, April 20. Knights get revenge again ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff Wildcats nish strong in state tournament ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff Wildcats baseball Next game at Osceola, Thursday, April 19, 7 p.m.

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Page 6 Thursday, April 19, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Lets begin by agreeing on the simple truth of those words by Theodor S. Geisel (Dr. Seuss), Fun is good! Its as if the Mait land Area Chamber of Commerce used those words as a guideline for last weekends Spring Arts Festival. Because if there is one thing the Festival provided, it was fun. A whole weekend of commu nity-based pet and family friendly fun in the park. Lake Lily shined again as the backdrop for the Spring Arts Fes tival. The Chamber used all of its est show it has ever produced. The Friday night hours added a fun new dimension to the show, which pleased the exhibitors and the public alike. Parking was a breeze and a bargain and a boon to the local scout troops who han dled the duties beautifully, thank you very much! And the food was exceptional this year, as four lo cal community partners provided delicious high quality tastings in a postcard perfect setting. Thanks to SoNapa Grille, RanGetsu, Sam Sneads, and An tonios for participating with the Chamber on a giant leap of prog ress for festival food. And lets not leave out Performing Arts of Mait land and the Maitland Mens Club for once again demonstrating their unwavering commitment to local events. The Chamber, PAM and Mens Club are solid partners supporting local businesses. The Maitland Library was involved, as they held a book fair on their lawn adjacent to the Festival en trance. Maitlands own Enzian Theater was busy kicking off its annual Film Festival. The town was jumping. The entire weekend was once more an example of the power of positive collaboration. Special thanks goes out to the Take 7 girls a cappella group from Winter Park High School. They were fabulous, and we all wish them good luck on their up coming New York City competi tion! Maitlands newest jazz bar, JazzTastings, was a sponsor of smooth jazz, and their sensational weekend band, 2EEZ featuring AndrewLuv, was very warmly re ceived on Friday night. The success of the festival is the result of a lot of hard work by a core group of dedicated Chamber members, under the leadership of the Chambers new executive di rector, Maria Simmons, as much as it is a tribute to the several lo cal and national corporate spon made it all possible. But lets get back to the fun. The weather was delightful, the artists and vendors were upbeat and prosperous. The crowd was local. Neighbors strolled together around the beautiful lake, which the citys tireless Leisure Services and Public Works departments maintain so professionally. Lake Lily is Maitlands iconic commu nity gathering area, and the fes tival proved a delightful way to enjoy it. At one point a trio of wellknown radio personalities, who have perhaps 100 years of local professional experience between them, sat contentedly in the shade of an event like the Spring Arts Festival. Its accessible, and one felt comfortable lounging along the breezy shoreline visiting with neighbors. So many shows have become so crowded and cramped one can barely slow down to chat. The Chamber show distinguished itself otherwise. It was effortless. Local artists wares were comfort ably within reach. Local musicians were pleasingly within earshot. And the smells of great food from familiar vendors were constantly enticing ones senses. It was fun. And fun is good. So well do it again. Thanks Chamber! See you next year The Chamber thanks the fol lowing sponsors: Orlando Senti nel; WUCF Radio; City of Mait land; Progress Energy; The Q; Bailey, Zobel, Pilcher; Sheraton Orlando North; Florida Hospital Altamonte; Orlando Living Cen ters; Days Inn-Fern Park; Costco; Maitland Stage Band; Winter Park-Maitland Observer; Life style Magazine; Mercedes Benz of Maitland; JazzTastings; Arts & History Museums; Courtyard By Marriott; Gulf States Credit Union; M&I a part of BMO Finan cial Group; Regions Bank; Trustco Bank; Seacoast Bank; Hunter Vi sion; Lowes; Orlando Direct Buy; Roach Family Chiropractic; Sultana Law P.A.; J&J Creations; Baterbys Art Auction Gallery; Maitland Jewelers; guitarist Matt Shenk; Everything Bling LLC; and Maitland Public Library. Meeting of April 23 City Council meets the second and fourth Monday of the month at 6:30 p.m. The next meeting is scheduled for April 23 in the Council Chambers, 1776 Indepen dence Lane. Below are items that will be addressed at that meeting. ard Schieferdecker Ordinance Creating the Downtown Maitland Zoning Dis trict Ordinance Rezone Properties within the Downtown Maitland Zoning District Visit itsmymaitland.com for the complete agenda and ap proved meeting minutes. www.gulfstatescu.org 407-831-8844A Refreshing Alternative to Conventional Banking.9405 S. Highway 17-92 Maitland, FL 32751 Maitland City Talk BY PHIL BONUS COUN C ILMAN Fun is good IN THEA TERS APRIL 27www.thepirates-movie.com To get passes, visit WWW .GOFOBO.COM/RSVP and enter code: WPMOA3XPYoung Pirates are encouraged to attend the screening in their favorite pirate costume. The best dressed pirate will win a prize pack from the lm. AT REGAL WINTER P ARK SA TURDA Y, APRIL 21, 10:30 AMThis lm is rated PG. Passes are good for two complimentary admissions. You must have a pass to attend. Seating is on a rst-come, rst-served basis and is not guaranteed. Supplies are limited and available only while supplies last. No purchase necessary. INVITES YOU AND A GUEST TO AN ADV ANCE SCREENING OF

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Page 7 Thursday, April 19, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer For more information go to www W i n t e r P a rkP a i n t O u t o r g 6 3 3 O s c e o l a A v e n u e, W i n t e r P a rk F L 3 2 7 8 9 4 0 7 6 4 7 6 2 9 4 Monday, April 23 Friday, April 27 Wednesday, April 25 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm 215 S. Orlando Avenue in Winter Park Call 407-740-4005 to reserve your table. Saturday, April 28 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm Albin Polasek Museum and Sculpture Gardens Tickets $45 in advance, $60 at the door Special Events A r t Ha p p e n s W a t c h The A r s t s P ain t V i e w a n d P u r c h a s e N e w P a i n n g s D a i l yGardens and Gallery Open, Free to the PublicMonday, April 23 to Friday April 27 10 am to 6 pmSaturday, April 28 Winter Park City Talk BY RANDY KNIGHT CITY MANAGER The April 23 City Commission meeting will be held at the Winter Park Community Center April 23 City Commission meeting topics of interest There will be a City Commis sion meeting at 3:30 p.m. on Mon day, April 23, at the Winter Park Community Center located at 721 W. New England Ave. Below are a few topics of interest: Mayors Report Recognition of Dr. Barbara Jenkins, Orange County Public Schools Superintendent Proclamation WPHS Cheerleading State and National Championships Day Proclamation North Amer ican Occupational Safety and Health Week; and Occupational Safety and Health Professional Day Employee of the Quarter Craig M. ONeil, Assistant Direc tor of Communications Appointment of Wired for Winter Park Task Force members Resolution Supporting fair trade when possible among mer chants in the city of Winter Park. City Managers Report Presentation Interim report on tree/vegetation management City Attorneys Report Tolling agreements Consent Agenda Approve the minutes of April 9. Approve staff to enter into ne list can be found at cityofwinter park.org > Government > City Commission > Agenda Packets). Approve the Cemetery Disin terment Policy. Approve the mid-year budget adjustment for the General Fund. Approve the adjustment to the Waste Pro rates. Action items requiring discussion Approval of the strategic planning session list of priorities Winter Park train station de sign development update from ACi Inc. Public Hearings Second reading of the ordi nance relating to Pain Manage ment Clinics and Pharmacies, and repealing the moratorium. Resolution Designating 1509 N. Orange Ave. as a historic re source in the Winter Park Register of Historic Places. Request of Mr. Barry Render: split the property at 1200 Howell Branch Road into two single-fam ily lots zoned R-1AA. Request of CNL Commercial Real Estate: al to construct a three-story, ing site, at 941 W. Morse Blvd. City Commission Reports full agenda at cityofwinterpark. org and by clicking on Govern ment > City Commission > Pack ets. Earth Day in the Park The city and Rollins College present Earth Day in the Park from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, April 21, in Central Park. Winter Park Mayor Ken Bradley and Rol lins College President Lewis Dun can will address attendees at 11 a.m. from the main stage. Earth Day in the Park will provide educational workshops focused on recycling, native land scaping, growing organic food and awareness of endangered species. Music will be provided by the Rollins College Music Depart ment led by Dr. John Sinclair. Ad ditional music and a live broad cast will be provided WPRK, the radio station of Rollins College. The citys Forestry Division tendance to answer questions and perform a live tree-planting dem onstration with a 25-foot-tall Live Oak at 11:30 a.m. near the main stage. The division will also give away an array of 3-gallon contain erized trees for city residents to plant at home (proof of city resi dency will be requested). A rope course will also be available for anyone willing to try his or her hand at ascending/descending a tree. For more information, call 407599-3364 or visit www.rollins. edu/earthday Hazardous Waste Disposal The city, in partnership with Waste Pro will be offering haz ardous waste disposal for all city residents from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, April 21, at the Public Works Compound located at 1439 Howell Branch Road, directly be hind Fire Station 64. Please bring proof of city residency (drivers license or utility bill statement) along with your hazardous waste items. For more information, call 407-599-3364. Event road closure The city of Winter Park will host the 11th annual Dinner on the Avenue at 6 p.m. on Saturday, April 21. Tickets have sold out and a record-breaking crowd of 1,200 diners is expected to attend this unique social event. Park Av enue will be closed to all thru traf England Avenue, beginning at 3 p.m. on Saturday, April 21. Call 407-643-1627. MLK Input Meeting On Oct. 10, 2011, the City Com mission unanimously voted to ap point a Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., (MLK) Task Force for the purpose of recommending an appropri ate naming opportunity of a city street, park or venue that would honor the memory and accom plishments of Dr. King. The MLK Task Force will host its second public input meeting from 7 to 8 p.m. on Tuesday, April 24, at Mount Moriah Missionary Baptist Church located at 421 S. Pennsylvania Ave. The purpose of this meeting is to discuss the in meeting, and help the task force make a recommendation to the city commission. The attendees were asked to keep the following criteria in mind as they offered suggestions for po tential naming opportunities: The street, park or venue No street, park or venue al ready named after one of the founding or other prominent fam ilies should be renamed. If a street is selected, the number of businesses/residences that will have to incur the incon venience and cost of an address change should be minimized. If a street is selected for re naming, it should either be the whole street or at least start at one end of the street. Safety & Connectivity Forum The citys Pedestrian & Bicycle Advisory Board will present a Pedestrian & Bicycle Safety and Connectivity Forum from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Thursday, April 26, at the Rachel D. Murrah Civic Cen ter located at 1050 W. Morse Blvd. Attendees will be encouraged to offer comments and share ideas relating to city projects and pro grams so interested parties can work together to make Winter Park friendlier for pedestrians and bicyclists. The forum will also provide in formation on Winter Parks com prehensive pedestrian and bicycle facilities plan. Call 407-599-3217.

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Page 8 Thursday, April 19, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer THIS WEEK The 2012 Florida Film Festival con tinues at the Enzian Theater in Mait land through Sunday, April 22. Tickets start at $10. Visit FloridaFilmFestival. com APRIL 19 The Custom & Remodel Home T our is April 19. Register at tinyurl.com/ Homes-Parade There will be a Cocktail Reception and Fashion Show at Wearable Art by Scott Laurent from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. on April 19. The Orange Audubon Society will host Shore Nesting Birds: Audubon of Floridas Conservation Efforts by Marianne Korosy at 7 p.m. on April 19 at Leu Gardens. Winter Park Institute Making a Dif ference: An Evening with Dr. Jane Goodall is at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, April 19, at Rollins College. Visit rol lins.edu/wpi The Center for Independent Livings Spring into Health fair is from 2 to 6 p.m on Thursday, April 19, at 720 N. Denning Drive in Winter Park. It is free to attend. APRIL 20 The Winter Park Playhouse proudly presents the Tony-Nominated hit Broadway musical Baby from April 20 to May 12. Visit winterparkplay house.org The historic Annie Russell Theatre at Rollins College produces William Shakespeares Loves Labours Lost from April 20-28. Call 407646-2145. APRIL 21 Hazardous waste disposal for all Winter Park residents is from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, April 21, at the Public Works Compound. The 11th Annual Dinner On The Av enue is sold out. It is being held from 6 to 10 p.m. on April 21 on Park Av enue. James Gamble Rogers II Colloquium on Historic Preservation Back to the Future is at 10 a.m. on Satur day, April 21, at the Winter Park Com munity Center. Contact bowens@ casafeliz.us The Mid-Florida Milers Walking Club will host a walk starting at Mead Gar den, on April 21. Visit midoridamil ers.org Rollins Yoga Club is hosting Well Being for Water from 9:30 a.m. to noon on Saturday, April 21 at Rollins Colleges Mills Lawn. Email rbogdan@ Rollins.edu The next Works of PURE Love ben et for the Back to Nature Wildlife Refuge is 7 to 9 p.m. on Saturday, April 21, at Harwood-Watson Dance Studios. Visit worksofpurelove.org On April 21, the Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra will present Symphony in HD: Live at Full Sail University at Full Sail Live in Winter Park. Visit OrlandoPhil.org/HD APRIL 22 The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculp ture Gardens hosts the Fourth Annual Winter Park Paint Out April 22-28. Call 407-647-6294 or visit winter parkpaintout.org The Annual Friends of First ResponseMaitland Kickball Fundraiser is Sun day, April 22. Contact june@ower slabs.com APRIL 24 Sister Madonna Buder known as the Iron Nun, speaks at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, April 24, at the Florida Hos pital Orlandos Werner Auditorium. Call 407-303-1700. The Central Florida Watercolor So cietys Watercolor Impressions, runs April 24 to July 15 at Leu Gar dens. An opening reception will be held April 24 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Visit centraloridawatercolor.org APRIL 25 Hillstone, formerly known as Hous tons, is hosting the Sunset PaintIn on Lake Killarney at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, April 25. The public is invited. APRIL 26 A Pedestrian & Bicycle Safety and Connectivity Forum will be from 6 to 8 p.m. on Thursday, April 26, at the Rachel D. Murrah Civic Center. Call 407-599-3217. The Islamic Society of Central Florida presents a screening and reception for the lm Islamic Art: Mirror of the Invisible World from 6 to 8 p.m. on Thursday, April 26, at the Orlando Museum of Art. Visit OrlandoArtMovie. eventbrite.com For Tickets, Class Registration & Schedule of Eventswww.FestivalofChocolate.com April 27-29, 2012The University of Central Florida Arena Orlando, Florida The Ultimate All-Chocolate Shopping, Interactive and Educational Event Featuring the Regions Best Chocolate & Confection Companies SCAN TO WIN Maitland Coin & Currency Show Sunday, April 229:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.Maitland Civic Center 641 South Maitland Avenue Maitland, FL 32751FREE ADMISSIONShow open to the public Buy Sell Trade AppraisalsFor more information call or visitOrlando Coin Exchange 6301 S. Orange Avenue Orlando, FL 32809www.MaitlandCoinShow.comorlandocoinexchange@gmail.com407-730-3116 Join Today! Get Involved!Winter Park Republican Womens GroupLuncheon Meetings held monthly at Flemings in Winter Park. Spouses welcome! Call 407-718-9355 for more information. Calendar Folk Art Festival The Third Annual Hannibal Square Heritage Center Folk Art and Traditional Craft Festival is from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday, April 21, at 642 New England Ave. in Winter Park. Its free.

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Page 9 Thursday, April 19, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Lifestyles 6TH ANNUAL SHRED EVENT Many people start to look to ward retirement when theyre 55. They shore up their savings and turn the page on a more relaxed chapter of their lives. But for Carole Arthurs, age 55 was the beginning of a journey that would have her interview ing former President George H.W. Bush, the Backstreet Boys, and even Captain Kangaroo. Arthurs joined the Winter Park-Maitland Observer, headed by publisher Gerhard Munster, in the late s, becoming one of the areas most familiar faces during her more than 20 years with the paper. She recently bid the com munity a fond farewell as she headed to North Carolina to live with her daughter, leaving behind a lifetime of friends, memories and special connections. During her time as a journalist, she became well known for stay obligation: accuracy. Winter Park Mayor Ken Bradley recently gave her a proclamation, honoring her service to the community. Ive been interviewed by na tional media in my role as mayor, and let me just say this, they never got it right. Carole gets it right, he said. the staff was made up of Arthurs, Munster, and Munsters mother, who was the company bookkeep er. This forced Arthurs to become a jack-of-all-trades, writing, tak ing photos, editing, selling ad vertising and even pasting up the newspaper on production days. For some of her stories, she went beyond simply doing inter views, immersing herself into top ics. Arthurs recalls going through the Winter Park Citizens Police Academy, as well as the Maitland Citizens Police Academy, so that she could do a story about them. I knew the organization exist ed, and I knew most people didnt know about it, she said. I also wanted to get more people inter ested in going through the pro gram so that if there ever was a disaster, you would have citizens able to help. member of the Maitland Commu nity Emergency Response Team with the same goal in mind. She has many fond memories from her reporting days, such as when she went to cover a press confer ence with President George H.W. Bush at Walt Disney World, with her trusty recorder and camera in tow. Here I am, this little old girl in the middle of all these seasoned reporters, holding up this little re corder, and all of these seasoned reporters had their big, huge cam eras, she said. And here I am, Id never been on a press confer ence in my life. It was something else. After the Observer, she would PHOTO BY ANDY CEBALLOS THE OBSERVER Carole Arthurs, right, is pictured with her daughter, Jamie Snyder, and her son Kris Marks at her home April 12. She moved on Saturday. Please see CAROLE on page 10 Arthurs got her start as a writer at 55 ANDY CEBALLOS Observer Staff Carole Arthurs spent 20 years at the Winter Park-Maitland Observer. Arthurs has also worked at The Park Press, and was involved with many organizations in the community, such as the University Club of Winter Park, and the Winter Park and Maitland Rotary clubs.

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Page 10 Thursday, April 19, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Family Calendar go on to work for The Park Press and eventually became involved in the community as a member of many chambers of commerce, as well as rotary clubs and other community service activities. Debra Hendrickson, vice presi dent of the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce, recalls Arthurs work in Leadership Winter Park, motes potential leaders from the business community who desire to become involved in making a difference in Winter Park. Arthurs is a graduate of the 1996 class of that program. She kind of went from being a student, to being on the board of directors, to being a leader of a class, Hendrickson said. She was always willing and able to participate as a volunteer and as a leader for Leadership Winter Park. Bob Mellen, former president of the Maitland Rotary Club, said Arthurs was dedicated to editing the Rotarys weekly bulletin, as well as times she would lead the club in song. She was incredibly dedicat ed, he said. She led the singing, and she would come up with a lot of really clever songs to sing other than Rotary songs. Arthurs said she now plans to continue her work in photog raphy, which became one of her lifelong passions after Munster talked her into starting her own photography business, Carole Ar thurs Photography, in case some thing happened with the paper. She continues to take photos today and has received many awards for them. Arthur will always be remem bered for the mark shes left in the Winter Park and Maitland communities. Bradley described Arthurs not just as a committed reporter, but as a friend. Carole was a true friend of the community, Bradley said. If you spend time with Carole, you know that afterwards youre bet ter than you [were] before you spent time with her. I think thats a great testimony for her and for her work, and for her legacy in this community. 250 North Orlando Avenue Winter Park, Florida 32789 407.677.9777 A Premier Flooring Source nCARPETOODTONE TILELAMINATE AREA RUGINDO TREATMENT Featuring Exquisite Products for Residential & Commercial Projects Custom Design and Quality Installationn APRIL 20 Park Maitland Perspectives opens on Friday, April 20, at the Maitland Art Center with a free reception that evening from 6 to 8 p.m. The exhibit features the works of the skillful sixth-grade Park Maitland School students instructed by arts educator Sandy Bonus. Call 407-539-2181 or visit ArtandHistory.org Cornell Fine Arts Museum, in col laboration with the Department of Art and Art History at Rollins College, opens Menagerie, an exhibition to debut the work of 11 senior art majors from the Class of 2012 from 5:30-7:30 p.m. on Friday, April 20. This event is free and open to the public. APRIL 20 & 27 Friday Nights at the Morse fea tures free admission to the Morse Museum from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Fridays through April 27. Visit morsemuseum.org APRIL 21 The city of Winter Park and Rollins College present Earth Day in the Park on Saturday, April 21, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. in Central Park. The city of Maitland Leisure Services spring Movie in the Park is 8 p.m. Saturday, April 21, featuring the critically acclaimed movie Hugo at Quinn Strong Park. The Maitland Public Library will be hosting a 5k run event on April 21 at Quinn Strong Park. Registra tion opens at 7 a.m. and the race starts at 8 a.m. There is a kids run at 9 a.m. for ages 10 and younger. Call 407-647-7700. ONGOING At 10:30 a.m. each Tuesday, the Maitland Public Library hosts preschool story and craft time. At 10:30 a.m. each Thursday, it hosts baby time stories and activity. At 4 p.m. each Thursday, it hosts Reading Buddies for kindergarten through fth-grade. Call 407-6477700. The Winter Park Farmers Mar ket is held from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Saturday. It is located at the old train depot, at 200 W. New England Ave. Visit CityofWinter Park.org The Maitland Farmers Market is from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. every Sun day. It is located at Lake Lily Park. Visit ItsMyMaitland.com or call 407-539-6268. Food T ruck Caf is from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. every Wednesday at Lake Lily Park in Maitland. Music at the Casa is a free week ly open house from noon to 3 p.m. on Sundays, featuring live perfor mances and tours of the historic Casa Feliz, at 656 N. Park Ave. in Winter Park. Visit CasaFeliz.us or call 407-628-8200, extension 3. Send submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com CAROLE | Winter Parks mayor says Arthurs was a true friend of the community C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 9 PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER The Ninth Annual Doggie Art Festival was held on Park Avenue on April 15. Artist John Margerum, left, shows off his work, appropriately titled Dogs. Lap of luxury

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Page 11 Thursday, April 19, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Healthy Living Doctors told Stephanie Arthur her twin boys only had a 20 percent chance of sur vival. I looked at my husband, and said, A 20 percent chance is better than a zero percent chance, Arthur said. Arthurs twins were born premature, at 23 weeks, four months too soon, and have been defying the odds ever since with the support of the March of Dimes. We were told Jackson (her son) would be paralyzed from the waist down, and basically told to turn off the machine for Quincy (her other twin son), she said. It was a pretty traumatic and emotional time for us. Arthurs twins are among the 633 ba bies born preterm every week in Florida, and like so many other mothers she never thought shed be tackling the obstacles that can accompany babies born prematurely. When many women get pregnant you think youre going to have a natural and full pregnancy, she said. You never, ever think youre going to have to encounter what we encountered. Arthur said that when she started re searching the causes of premature births March of Dimes immediately came up. After reading hundreds of stories (on the March of Dimes online support group), I through this, but at the same time I realized there was a purpose there for me, she said. And once I saw the impact they (March of Dimes) made on the community, and how I could get involved, thats really what drove me to really make a difference. The March of Dimes is continuing to impact lives with their biggest fundraising event, March for Babies, at Lake Eola on run will help raise money and awareness for the March of Dimes, and support fami lies in need. March of Dimes Central Florida Divi sions Executive Director Elisabeth Stuart said the March for Babies is a family event. This years goal is for the event to raise $670,000. We have a lot of family teams that are parents that have had babies born prema ture or with a birth defect, and they know have received from all of the advances in medicine that have been achieved by the March of Dimes, Stuart said. The infant mortality rate is 6.9 per 1,000 live births in Orange County, and one in seven babies (14.8 percent of live births) are born preterm. The March of Dimes spends 75 percent of the money raised in March for Babies on research and programs that promote the health of babies. By walking and raising money to help the March of Dimes, it sup ports all-important research offering pre ventions and solutions for babies born too soon or with birth defects, educates wom en on things they can do to increase their chances of having a healthy baby, provides comfort and information to families with a baby in intensive care and pushes for new born screening and health insurance for all pregnant women and children. March of Dimes board member and vol unteer Roger Jeffrey has been involved with the March of Dimes for 25 years, and said he believes its a great way to help others. You cant walk away from that event without feeling good about people, because everyones there for the same purpose to do something in some way shape, or form to save babies, Jeffrey said. Its very uplift ing and a joy to be involved. Arthur and her family are now also ex periencing the joy of being involved in the March of Dimes by becoming this years ambassador family, as they continue to tackle the obstacles that come their way; while reaching out to share their story and walking for a cause near and dear to their hearts. We decided to share our story and give parents hope, Arthur said. It doesnt mat ter how many times I talk about them, my eyes always tear up. 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Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com The 2012 March of Dimes, March for Babies is on Saturday, April 28, at Lake Eola in downtown Orlando. Registration begins at 6:30 a.m. For more information or to sign up visit marchforbabies.org or call 407-599-5077. PHOTOS COURTESY OF MARCH OF DIMES The 2012 March of Dimes March for Babies is Satur day, April 28, at Lake Eola to bring awareness to preterm babies. Stephanie Arthur right, poses with her twin boys, who were born four months early. Walking for babies KRISTY VICKER Y Observer Staff

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Page 12 Thursday, April 19, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer You are what you eat, a common refrain, also translates to your baby is what you eat, too. Moms healthy eating for growing a strong, healthy baby starts before conception and continues through breastfeeding. The healthier you are before getting pregnant, the more likely you are to have a healthy pregnancy and a healthy baby. Balanced meals with a variety of fruits and veg etables of many colors, mixed with lean pro tein sources and whole grains are a great formula for good health. Whole grains with plenty of fruits and vegetables can give your body and your growing baby the nutrients for good health. Find new ways to add vegetables to your meals. Switch to veggie pizzas. Add an extra tomato slice to your sandwich. Of course, avoid alcohol and tobacco before and after having a baby. We dont know what a safe level of alcohol might be, so it is best to avoid all beer, wine and other alcoholic drinks. And the damage of prenatal smoking and second-hand smoke is well known. Dont do it to yourself or your baby. If you smoke, call the Florida Tobacco Free Help Line at 877-UCANNOW for help. Look for these nutrients: Folate, a Vitamin B, prevents birth defects affecting the brain and Prior to and during pregnancy, try to have plenty of foods with folate. Folate is found in leafy green vegetables, beans, citrus, prenatal folic acid. Calcium is a critical building block for bones and teeth, and a great source of Vitamin D. Aim for at least three cups a day of low-fat milk, yogurt or cheeses. If you and milk dont get along, try calciumIron is used to make red blood blood cells that are too small and too light) can be avoided with dark leafy vegetables. Popeye got his strength from spinach (a dark leafy vegetable) precisely because it prevented anemia. Popeyes mother also ate spinach when she was pregnant. Lean protein helps the babys growth. Look for lean cuts of meats and dont underestimate the power of beans and soy cooked with good Water is a basic building block of life. Especially in the warm weather, aim to drink 10 glasses of water, sodas as much as possible. They provide no nutrition and give you ers. Avoid risky foods provide protein and omega-3 fatty acids, which are good for brain development. But with so much contamination in our planets mercury to hurt a babys nervous system development. Avoid the mercury seafood such as shrimp, canned tuna. Stick to well-cooked foods. Raw or eggs can carry harmful bacteria and viruses. When you are preg nant, your immune system is not as strong so you need to avoid infec tion risks. Raw oysters may be the food of love, but not of pregnancy. en, turkey or eggs can make you sick, too. Eggs over easy may not go over easy with your health. Pasteur ized dairy products are also a safer way to go than unpasteurized. Breastfeeding When breastfeeding your pre cious baby, continue to eat healthy foods and drink plenty of water so your body can make healthy milk. Know that anything that can cause gas or heart burn in you is doubly likely to upset a newborn stomach. A great night out at Taco Tuesday may mean staying up late Tuesday night with an unhappy baby. Maitland resident Nancy Rudner Lugo is a nurse practitioner and president of Health Action, offering workplace health consulting and nurse coaching. Visit www.healthaction. biz Dr. Nancy Rudner Lugo Health Action Think: Y our food, your baby On Saturday, April 21, and Sunday, April 22, Bike MS: The Citrus Tour will host more than 1,000 bikers as they take to the roads of Bok Tower Gardens to help fundraise for multiple sclerosis. This is the 25th anniversary of the National MS Society Mid-Florida Chapters signature fund raising event. The event is recognized as one of the best two-day, fully sup ported cycling events in Florida, annually attracting more than 1,500 cyclists of all skill levels from across the country. Bike MS takes place in more than 100 cities nationwide and is one of the largest fundraising bike events in the United States. MS is a chronic, often disabling disease that attacks the central nervous system, which is made up of the brain, spi nal cord and optic nerves. Symptoms may be mild, such as numbness in the limbs, or severe, such as paralysis or loss of vision. The local MS Chapter serves more than 73,000 people in a 23 county area. Typically targeting adults between the ages of 20 and 50, this disease typically impacts people in the peak of their careers and life plans. Mark A. Eberbach, MD, at Eberbach Plastic Surgery, has headed his own team for years and has these helpful tips for riders: 1) A great ride experience needs planning and practice. Dont change your gear just before the big ride. No one wants sores or achy joints from new shoes or saddle posi tion. Remember your chamois butter. 2) Good nutrition is essential for a 100-mile ride. You will need about 100 calories for every 20 minutes of riding. You should use the sponsored SAG stops to your advan tage, and eat small quantities frequently. 3) Hydration. On a hot day in April one could easily go through 1 liter every hour of riding. Hydrate well the night before and start early the morning of the ride. Bike MS: The Citrus Tour to help beat multiple sclerosis Join the Movement toward a world free of MS by making donations or participating in Bike MS: The Citrus Tour 2012. For more information visit http://Bikec.nationalmssociety.org health y 125 t he Cit y of W i n t er P a r k 188 7 201 2t hA NNIVER SA R Y Work Well Winter Park is a movement spearheaded by the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce.Visit us at www.workwellwinterpark.org 1. Mondays with Mandy Fun fitness classes held at Winter Park Community Center. Details available at www.WorkWellWinterPark.org.2. Tuesday Tips Sign up at www.WorkWellWinterPark.org for weekly email. Check your inbox for simple health and wellness tips.3. Health Education Series Monthly lunch and learns featuring experts in nutrition, physical activity and stress management. Free admission for Work Well Winter Park participating companies; $5 for non-participants.4. Weekly Walk Get a fresh start to your morning with a 30-minute walk. Meet at Winter Park Welcome Center every Thursday at 8 a.m.Start Working Well!Work Well Winter Park Day was a tremendous success! Carry the momentum forward with four simple ways to work well:

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Page 13 Thursday, April 19, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer 2012 CENTRAL FLORIDA MARCH FOR BABIES FACT SHEET WHEN: Saturday, April 28, 2012 WHERE: WHAT: $1.9 billion WHY: The United States has a higher infant mortality rate than 29 other countries HOW: Or sign up at marchforbabies.org ONE HOURMASSAGE$3995*A $79.95 V A LUE! ONE HOURFACIAL$4995*A $79.95 V A LUE! MASSAGE | FACIALS | WAXING MASSAGE AND FACIAL SPA Open 7 days | Walk-ins Welcome Extended Hourshandandstone.comHand & Stone Massage and Facial Spa consistently delivers professional massage & facial services at affordable prices 7 days a week. WINTER PARK | 407-622-0227 480 N Orlando Ave l Winter Park Village Grand Opening!*Introductory offers valid for first time visit only. Not valid for gift cards. Sessions include time for consultation and dressing. Rates and services may vary by location. Offers may not be combined. MM22195/CE9988346 Hand & Stone Franchise Corp. Franchises Available. Independently Owned & Operated. Tom Carey SundewGardens@gmail.comHomegrown always tastes better. Experience homegrown gardening: If you are a new mother or recently pregnant, chances are you have felt the wisp of air that follows the pendulum of mod ern medicine as it swings by yet again. The topic this time: elective deliveries before 39 weeks of ges tation. Prior to taking a hard look at outcomes, the consen sus in the medical community was that 37 weeks was considered term and deliveries after that point are deemed safe. So off we went and phone calls funneled into labor and deliver wards to schedule elective deliveries. Her husband is getting de ployed. Texas to help with the sibling. Shes miserable. We are head In 1990, 10 percent of deliver ies were electively performed before 39 weeks. Until recently, they accounted for nearly 25 percent of all deliveries. With the emphasis of evidence-based medicine, the pendulum is now swinging the other way and we, as a community, are learning that there is true merit to the saying, patience is a virtue. So what is the big deal? It has become apparent that babies born between 37 and 39 weeks are more likely to have respiratory problems and simply put, they have more growing to do. The brain and liver continue to develop between 39 and 40 weeks. Perhaps most evident is the increased trouble they have with feeding because the coordi nation required for sucking has not matured. On the maternal front, there is a higher rate of Csections in this patient population as well. This mode of delivery inherently carries increased risks including infection, bleeding and post-delivery pain. And if this isnt reason enough to shy away from early elective cant economic impact as a result of this practice. C-sections are more expensive to perform and lead to longer hospitalizations. Infants that are not fully mature can require intensive neonatal care and that is costly. A study last year estimated that reducing early-term births to 1.7 percent could save close to $1 billion an nually. I personally have found that after appropriate counsel ing, patients are supportive of whatever delivery plan is best for their baby. Not only is an elective induction before 39 weeks against my practices policy, but it is also against hospital policy. Increased awareness of the dangers associ ated with preterm births is on the rise thanks to initiatives such as the March of Dimes Prematurity Campaign. Hospitals in multiple states, including Florida, have stopped elective deliveries inductions and cesarean sections before 39 weeks. This information wouldnt be complete without offering a few care professionals do not hesitate to recommend delivery before 39 weeks if there is a medical reason to proceed. These indications could include, but are not limited to: a mother sick with preeclamp sia, uncontrolled diabetes and concerns for babys health, such as small size. Patient care in these situations is very individual ized, and the risks of continuing the pregnancy can outweigh the This subject leads me to reminiscence about my inter view days before residency. A wise physician sat in front of me, looked at my resume, and then pulled his reading glasses down on his nose to look me in the eyes. He then asked, Can you tell me three attributes that make a good obstetrician? As I paused and shifted uncomfortably in my chair, much to my relief, he proceeded, A good obstetrician is a team player, decisive and perhaps most importantly is patient. We are the only docs that wait 9 months for something to happen. Dont rush things in its Stone. Coming from a physician who has long felt the breeze from the ever-swinging pendulum of medicine, I take great heed in his guidance. And from our experi ences, weve learned. It is time to be patient and let Mother Nature do the planning. Dr. Pamela Snook is a board-certied obstetrician and gynecologist who completed her residency at Shands at the University of Florida. She has been a practicing physician for more than seven years and has garnered a special interest in high-risk obstetrics, infertility and gynecologic surgery. She practices at Contemporary Womens Care, 2111 Glenwood Drive, Ste. 208 in Winter Park. Visit www.myobgynorlando.com Try to avoid pre-term delivery DR. P AMELA SNOOK Guest Writer Pamela Snook

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Page 14 Thursday, April 19, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Healthy lifestyles have never tain. Our hectic schedules make to exercise or prepare a healthy meal for our family. The fact of the matter is that we all have the time and re sources necessary to make smart choices to ensure a healthy future for our families and ourselves. The manufactured appeal of so-called conveniences put thousands at risk for developing preventable diseases, including Type 2 diabetes. Diabetes is a serious health condition that can lead to heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, high blood pressure and blind ness. Millions of Americans are diagnosed with the disease each year, and 35 percent of all adults have been diagnosed as pre-dia betic. Nearly 15 percent of those considered pre-diabetic will prog ress to diabetes this year. Local organizations in the community have rallied to provide resources and programs to combat these startling statistics. The YMCA Diabetes Preven tion Program is one such pro gram created in partnership with UnitedHealth Group and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Program partici pants meet with trained lifestyle coaches who teach lessons about healthy eating, physical activity and other behaviors that can help reduce their risk for developing the disease. You can take charge and reclaim your health by participat ing in similar prevention pro grams, or making a few simple swaps in your daily life. mend 150 minutes of weekly physical activity. Switch up your routine by walking on your lunch break or bicycling around the neighborhood with your family after work. takes a few minutes to prepare a healthy meal for your family, and your local grocery store is a great resource for quick, weeknight dinner recipes. In the time you spend waiting in the drive-thru line for your order, you could have enjoyed a fresh meal with your family. Enjoy one guilt-free home cooked meal and youll never think about those on-the-go meals again. help you succeed can be found right in your own community. Local organizations provide educational resources, and your friends and neighbors can help motivate you. Try meeting friends to walk together or host a healthy cookout to encourage others to enjoy nutritious new tastes. Lets change the way we think about health and wellness. Maintaining a healthy lifestyle is achievable and together we can reduce our communitys risk for Type 2 diabetes. Kelly Prather is the wellness operations director for the YMCA of Central Florida. Its not just about getting you back on your feet. Its about getting you back to your life. HCR Healthcare, LLC Rehabilitation and Skilled Nursing Hours: M-F 8am to 4:30pm 2315 Lee Road Winter Park, Florida 32789 Your Guiding Beacon for Quality Healthcare Harbour Private Duty Nursing, LLCSkilled Nursing Physical Therapy Occupational Therapy Companionship Home Health Aid Homemaking Flexible Schedules Free RN Assessments The Services of Harbour Private Duty Nursing provide peace of mind to loved ones, trust ofcers, guardians and physicians. Our professional team prides itself on making your life easier. We also provide in-hospital private duty care, which offers close, personal attention and reassurance in an unfamiliar and often frightening environment. Our ofce hours are Monday through Friday, 8:00 am to 4:30 pm. Our professional team is available 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. During hours when the ofce is closed and during the weekends and holidays, the on-call coordinator is available by telephone 24 hours per day.www.HarbourPrivateDutyNursing.com License # 299991382phone (407) 895-8188 fax 407-895-9339 More and more births are being scheduled a little early for non-medical reasons. Experts are learning that this can cause problems for both mom and baby. If possible, the March of Dimes recommends for you to stay pregnant for at least 39 weeks. If your pregnancy is healthy, wait for labor to begin on its own. We know you cant wait to meet your baby face to face. But getting to at least 39 weeks gives your baby the time he needs to grow. There are lots of important things happening to your baby in the last few weeks of pregnancy. For example, your baby's brain and lungs are still growing. You might not have a choice about when to have your baby. If there are problems with your pregnancy or your baby's health, you may need to have your baby earlier. But if you have a choice and you're planning to schedule your baby's birth, wait until at least 39 weeks. The March of Dimes Healthy Babies are Worth the Wait education campaign and obstetric provider groups advise that you wait until at least 39 weeks to induce labor or have a cesarean birth (also called a c-section) if it is needed. The campaign was developed in response to the growing number of inductions and c-sections prior to 39 weeks for non-medical reasons.Why babies need timeBabies born too early may have more health problems at birth and later in life than babies born full term. Here's why your baby needs 39 weeks: time they need to develop. birth. a healthy weight have an easier time staying warm than babies born too small. eat after he's born. Babies born early sometimes can't do these things.Why scheduling an early birth can be a problem Experts are learning that scheduling an early birth for nonmedical reasons can cause problems for mom and baby. For example: hard to know just when you got pregnant. Even with an ultrasound, your due date can be off by as much as 2 weeks. If you schedule to induce labor or schedule a c-section and your date is off by a week or two, your baby may be born too early. medicine your doctor or certied nurse-midwife gives you may not start your labor. When this happens, you may need to have a c-section. by c-section may have more breathing and other medical problems than babies born by vaginal birth. (Most babies are born by vaginal birth. The mother's uterus contracts to help push the baby out through the vagina, also called the birth canal.) Once you have a c-section, you may be more likely in future pregnancies to have a c-section. The more c-sections you have, the more problems you and your baby may have, including problems with the placenta. you to recover from a c-section than from a vaginal birth. You can expect to spend 2 to 4 days in the hospital after a c-section. Then you'll need 4 to 6 weeks after you go home to fully recover. You also could have complications from to stay in touch with your health care provider even after you go home. The March of Dimes is the leading nonprot organization for pregnancy and baby health. With chapters nationwide and its premier event, March for Babies, the March of Dimes works to improve the health of babies by preventing birth defects, premature birth and infant mortality. For the latest resources and information, visit marchofdimes.com/orida or nacersano.org. Find us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter. For more information and questions to ask your medical provider, please visit our website at marchofdimes.com. March of Dimes wants you to know that Healthy Babies are Worth the Wait Reduce your risk for Type 2 diabetes KELLY PRA THER Guest Writer Kelly Prather

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Page 15 Thursday, April 19, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer On Wednesday, April 11, Work Well Winter Park hosted its rst lunch and learn in the new Health Education Series. Work Well partner Whole Foods Market kickedo the series by introducing the Heath Starts Here Program. is program incorporates Whole Foods Markets 7th core value, Promoting the health of our stake holders by healthy eating education. Healthy Eating Specialist, Lois Dorotiak, introduced the basic components of the program: whole foods, plant strong, healthy fats and nutrient dense. She then explained each of the four pillars. When foods are in their pur est state, whole food, we believe they taste the best and are the most nutritious food available. No matter what type of diet you follow-including those with dairy, meat or seafoodyour plate at each meal should contain an abundance of plants. at is what plant strong means. Healthy fats come from whole plant sources, such as nuts, seeds and avocado. ese foods are rich in micronutrients. We work to eliminate extracted oils and processed fats. Nutrient dense foods are rich in micronutrients when compared to total calories. Micronutrients include vita mins, minerals, antioxidants and phytochemicals. Lois taught attendees that regularly utilizing this simple format when lling ones plate sets the stage for a healthy eating lifestyle. To drive these points home, Lois served a fresh fruit salad with a sprinkle of cinnamon. She oered samples of nut milks and a variety of seeds. en, she water sauted a variety of vegetables and added a plant strong protein. is was layered with avor using no salt seasonings and no oil dressings. Adding a cooked portion of vegetables to a raw bed of mixed greens proved to delight the audi ence. Dessert was simple, yet seemed decadent. By removing the stone from a medjool date and lling it with a combination of pecan pieces and raw cacao, Lois created a creamy chocolate taste. She likened it to chocolate pecan pie, though loaded with nutrients instead of processed sugar. Perhaps the biggest surprise was experienced by the audience. Oen when eating this way, most think they will not become full or satised. Instead, the group recognized how little they needed to experi ence a satised yet full stomach. Whole Foods Market has an extensive website featuring the Health Starts Here program. You can easily revise your pantry, take a 28-day challenge and explore a wide array of recipes. For more information visit www.WholeFoodsMarket.com or stop by the Whole Foods Market in Winter Park and pay Lois a visit. Work Well Winter Park is a movement spearheaded by the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce to improve the health and well-being of the workforce in our community by creating lasting, cultural change. is collaborative and easily implemented initiative will encourage employ ers in Winter Park to adopt and execute practical policies supporting workplace wellness. For more information, visit www.workwellwinterpark.org.Lois DorotiakHealthy Eating/Green Mission Specialist1989 Aloma Ave Winter Park, FL 32792 Tel: 407-673-8788 Around this time of year it begins. Bathing suits in the windows of your favorite stores, magazine covers of celebrities sporting their bikinis on white sandy beaches, and the ever present thought that you should probably start eating healthier. As a young woman in this community and a mother of two children under 4, I can tell you it is hard to choose healthy. Finding the time to work out, let alone Im trying to get out the door in the morning is not an easy task. But I know it can be done! get healthy for my two little boys. I want to be a good example for them on what someone should eat and what one shouldnt. I want to live a long, healthy, active life so that I can be around for them. And wouldnt we all love to rock a bikini body and be excited about the way we look? I even have a little extra motivation after picking out a gorgeous bikini from Thread Winter Park. Here are some things you should know about me: My diet has grilled cheese sandwiches. When they eat Menchies frozen yogurt, I eat Menchies! Need less to say I do not feel bikini ready this year. My mother has guru since I was young, and I was raised playing sports with my brothers. So I have always been active, but where do you little boys, community efforts and a full-time job? And lets just say my diet makes my mother cringe. I can tell you that I have never looked at a plate and counted calories, and I am blessed that I enjoy running be cause I never pass on a dessert. This year I want to take advantage of this motivation I have to look good in my bathing suit this summer and become a healthier person for myself and for my family. So here is the plan: For the next 60 days, I am going to eat right and commit to exercising on a regular basis, and I am going to be accountable to you through my Fit for the Fourth blog debuting Monday, April 23, on the Winter Park-Maitland Observers website, and I am going to share all her tips with you. I am also going to work with local trainers and take different classes around town and tell not thin. I want it to be about feeling healthy, and in the end, I want to achieve a bikini body I am proud of just in time for the Fourth of July. I am going to be honest with you through it all. If over the weekend I dive into some chocolate chip cookie dough, you are go ing to hear about it. If I skip a workout, you can give me a hard time. But I also want this to inspire you to try a new class, or maybe curve your appetite to something a little healthier. Join me in my 60-day challenge to get Fit for the Fourth! PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER New Hope for Kids held its annual Art of the Vine fundraiser at Fields BMW on April 13. Join me in my pledge to get t SARAH GRAFTON Guest Writer Sarah Grafton To read Sarahs Fit for the Fourth blog debuting Monday, April 23, scan this QR code or visit wpmobserver.com Benet for hope

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Page 16 Thursday, April 19, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Opinions Nobody likes having to pay taxes, not even Warren Buffett. But as a piece of legislation with the famed billionaires name on learned the insane extreme our legislators are willing to go to stop them. Should the richest Americans be allowed to avoid paying taxes on their investment income? Should the most successful investors, raking in billions, only have to pay 15 percent tax on it? Should Buffett get to pay a lower tax percentage than his secretary? On Monday the U.S. Senate said yes to all three, grossly distorting the process. In a perfect world, where everybody got along, everybody pitched in equally, and nobody ever victimized anybody else, maybe we wouldnt need taxes. It would be the perfect balance of share, and wed all get what we deserve through some magical system that made everything we communally enjoy roads, wa ter, clean air and protection from universal. But our uniquely American standard of living isnt free. It never has been. Human nature dictates that in order to protect ourselves from the freedom of anarchy, we need to all contribute to keep society together. That costs money. So we have taxes the necessary evil of living in our great society to pay for it. Despite lessons learned in exactly what works and what doesnt to bolster our economy, as the Keynesians argue with the Friedmanites over bottom-up versus top-down growth, weve entered a new era of absurdity in taking an eraser to the chalk board of history class. And thats given rise to an untenable precept That the necessary evil of taxes isnt necessary at all. Its just evil. Enter the starve the beast concept: highlight the national debt as a hulking harbinger of our doom, use it to encourage cutting all non-military, non-pris on government programs, and outlaw the idea of raising taxes on anybody. Thats where we run into the confusing array of politically aligned directives that seem to be grossly inappropriate bedfel lows. The pro-war, pro-military themselves in the same ranks as those who want to cut govern ment spending and cut taxes, even for, and sometimes espe cially for, the rich. No coincidence that, according to a November 2011 ABC News poll, 67 percent of the Senate and 47 percent of Congress are millionaires. The professed fear by our legislature is that any added (or merely maintained) tax burden on the so-called job creators would hurt their post-tax in comes and blunt the hypothetical future job creating they would be doing. But in leaving the top 1 per cent of earners with their lowest top tier tax rate in 80 years, as re ported by the Urban Institute and Brookings Institute Tax Policy Center, weve seen exactly what wed expect to see, given human nature. Those who were already very rich, particularly individual investment speculators, have done very little to add jobs while enjoying the lions share of the economic growth weve experi enced in the last three years. According to a study by the University of California pub lished March 2, the top 1 percent of earners saw 93 percent of the the economic recovery alone. And if those income gains came from investments (the Dow Jones Industrial Average has more than doubled since its crash level of 6,547.05 in 2008), then were getting nearly nothing for their gains at our expense. And despite this professed need to cut taxes on the rich so theyll create jobs, weve created no mecha nism to force them to actually do so. We can promise the top earners that well keep their taxes low, but we can never be ensured that theyll hold up their end of the bargain. Of course the cries of Buffett should just volunteer to pay more taxes have resounded off the thick dome of the blogosphere ever since he suggested we force the super rich to pay more. But that point rings hollow to those who know human nature. Taxes are a necessary evil because, if were not forced to contribute, the richest among us will do any thing they can to avoid contribut ing to the necessary good. Our Observation Letters to the editor Send your thoughts (400 words or less) to Managing Editor Jenny Andreasson at editor@observernewspapers.com Go green with giving With the proliferation of advice on sustainable living, its no wonder that con sumers are overwhelmed by the thought of going green. This Earth Day, Goodwill Industries of Central Florida wants the public to know that they can make a dif ference through the simple act of donating gently used clothing or household items to Goodwill. Each year, donors help Goodwill divert more than two billion pounds of usable the environment is only part of the story. Revenue from the sale of donated items at Goodwill stores funds job training pro grams, employment placement services and other vital programs in the commu To show individuals that their dona tions truly impact their communities, Goodwill developed the patent-pending Donation Impact Calculator at www. donate.goodwill.org The calculator shows son receiving services from Goodwill. For example, one working computer translates into 5.8 hours of a job search class. On Earth Day, April 22, commit to mak ing one small green change in your life. In dividual actions add up to global impact. Bill Oakley President and CEO Goodwill Industries of Central Florida Attend disabilities forum on T uesday As a state legislator, I have the unique opportunity to listen and work with many different individuals and groups on a vari ety of issues. One cause that is of particular importance to me is facilitating opportuni ties for individuals with disabilities. Here in Central Florida, we are fortunate to have several strong support organizations for disabled individuals, such as Quest Inc. We also have local employers such as Rosen Hotels and Publix Supermarkets that have created diverse job opportuni ties to help people work hard and earn good livings. However, there are people and employers who have not yet learned of the opportunities that exist when they connect, and on Tuesday, April 24, I will be hosting a summit in Apopka to bring our community together. My summit is geared toward connect ing our community members and local incentives and opportunities that are available for hiring individuals with dis abilities. If you have a family member or a tion, you are highly encouraged to attend as many outstanding community partners will be on hand to discuss education op portunities, vocation support programs, among other important information. Goodwill Industries of Central Florida has been extremely helpful in securing outstanding presenters and participants, including Walt Disney World, Lynx and the Disability Chamber of Commerce of Central Florida. This free community event opens at 8 a.m. for networking at the Apopka Com munity Center/VFW located at 519 S. Central Ave. in Apopka. At 8:30 a.m., I will begin the program, along with Goodwill Industries CEO Mr. William Oakley. Ms. Jeannie Amendola from Walt Disney World will be providing some myth bust ing about hiring persons with disabilities, while Mr. Bill Hearndon from Lynx will talk about the transportation programs available for individuals who may have well as the future of this important issue. Two exciting panels will follow focusing on several critical issues such as on-the-job training, employment scenarios as well as sharing success stories from local employ ers. The event will conclude before 11 a.m. In addition to panels and speakers, sev eral government and community organiza tions will be on hand to share information on the services and programs available to both prospective employers and employ ees and their families. The State Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, the Agency for Persons with Disabilities, the Veterans Administration and Social Security are just some of the key organizations that will be on hand during the event. This is an excel lent chance to meet with representatives from these agencies and discuss the pro grams available for your friend or loved one please make sure you attend! I am extremely pleased to invite you to attend this important summit on working with and hiring individuals with disabili ties. With persons with disabilities facing an unemployment rate above 15 percent, it is important that we work together to educate our local businesses on the op portunity we have to address this issue. This is a win-win situation for employers, the employees and their families, and our community. I look forward to a strong response from our community for this important discussion. If you would like to participate in this event as a local partner or would like additional information, look forward to seeing you on Tuesday! State Rep. Bryan Nelson District 38 Buffeting a move for fairer taxes The richest will do anything they can to avoid contributing to the necessary good. King Features Weekly ServiceApril 16, 2012 King Features Weekly ServiceApril 16, 2012

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Page 17 Thursday, April 19, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer I spoke with Joel Salatin this week. Joel is working on the lead ing edge of sustainable farming practices at his Polyface Farm in the Shenandoah Valley of Vir ginia. He makes an appearance in the movie Food, Inc. and numerous other contemporary agricultural media produc tions. Hes written several books, with his most recent titled Folks, This Aint Normal. The Homegrown Co-op online farmers market and Slow Foods sponsored Joels speaking visit to Rollins College on April 18. Tom Carey: How big is your vegetable garden? Joel Salatin: Its hard to say, but a quarter acre would be about correct and add a quarter acre in hoop houses. As the animals from the hoop houses come out in the spring, we then go in with veg etables starting with sweet corn. We do a lot of micro-site garden ing. Shitake logs under the eaves of the barn get the roof dripping on them. Where the cows are kept at the hay shed in the wintertime, the deep bedding gets churned up muddy and heavily fertilized, almost compost. We grow our potatoes there, its already tilled up, and so we just set the pota toes on the ground under some straw. Another barn we have has a southern exposure and thats where we grow our cucumbers. They grow up the side of the barn with moisture dripping from the awnings. Its a real nice fertile micro-site, full of red wrigglers, with compost from the barn ani mals. You can get a lot of space real quick using micro-sites. Tom: At my gardens, I get a lot of requests from folks wanting to help to get some dirt under their Farms Facebook posts and blogs by your interns and apprentices. Do you look at your educational help as a source of affordable labor, or do you put emphasis on teaching the next generation of farmers to help them dip their toe in the water? Joel: We do look at it as an education, and while we certainly do work them plenty hard, we also do some formal evening lectures; we visit other farms and agricultural enterprises. Lest anybody think this is cheap labor when youve rewelded the trailer hitch for the 10th time because somebody took off without lift ing up the jack. This cheap labor comes with a cost. Tom: Ive read your new book, Folks, This Aint Nor mal, and numerous Acres USA columns and articles. Following the themes you write about, do you see that decentralized food cient due to appropriate technol ogy and information sources? Joel: We are seeing a lo cal food tsunami that is being enabled by technology. A big hurdle has been economy of scale farm and fork. You cant expect everybody to drive around to 10 farms to get their food. Now, there are companies that are elec tronic farmers markets (Home grown Co-op). The electronic media technology was developed for globalization but is being coopted to enable localization. Well see a move away from bricks and mortar to embracing the elec tronic commerce interface. Were to interface the customer and producer. Were making an end run around big warehousing. Retail faades are too expensive, from display coolers and cash registers, to stocking shelves with retail processed products. We did a comparison of our prices and were now cheaper than most competitors in our area, even the organic supermarkets. By lever electronic interface were seeing the beginning of the future. To be continued Pick up the April 26 issue of the Observer for the second part of my interview with Joel Salatin. Tom Carey is the owner of Sundew Gar dens, a you-pick gardening business in Oviedo. Visit the Sundew Gardens Face book page. Chris Jepson Perspectives On loosening ones jaw Musica Proibita In the mind of every mature artist resides a memory that was the beginning of his art, an inspiration that grew into an all-encompassing passion. The mind of an his grateful lifetimes work. In 1932, I began seventh grade in a class of 27 at Winter Park High School, which was over on Huntington Avenue. (The small center building of today was once grades seven through 12.) My family had moved from a little house almost on the Rollins campus to Forest Hills, at that time a sparsely settled, even lonely, part of Winter Park near Lake Sue. Forest Hills particularly after dark had an eerie, wild beauty with its few houses, untended orange groves, and palmetto and pine wildernesses resound ing with the cries of Chuck-wills-widows in the night. Across Lake Sue was Orlando, another country seldom invaded by us, except for necessary visits to Sears and Roebuck. Our only neighbors my age were Hope Strong, across Lake Chelton, Peggy Caldwell (later Mrs. Hope Strong), a next door neighbor a hundred yards away through the forest, and Bob Pratt, who house on the shore of Lake Sue. In our house on Rockwood Road, I found a large, hand-cranked Victrola in the room assigned to me as my bedroom. This outmoded machine was the last vestige of past tenants. I found one lone record in the stor age compartment at the bottom of the Victrola.Presto change-o! I was the proud owner not only of an enormous Victrola, but also a record to play. The one-sided, thick but very frag ile Victor record was of Enrico Caruso, singing in Italian a song called Musica Proibita (Forbidden Music). Day after day I played that record, to the distraction of my parents, and maybe even the Caldwells, who were within earshot. Soon I had learned the song in Italian, by rote, though I did not understand a word. I began singing along with the immor tal voice of Caruso. I felt the power and strength of that in comparable voice, and somehow equated Carusos natural manly singing technique with my other interests, such as the Boy Scouts, boxing, tennis and 100-pound football. I was later the center and captain of the Winter Park High School team, the Wildcats. I dont know what my rough and tumble teammates would have thought of my trying to sing in the manner of Caruso. I certainly didnt tell them; much less try my voice out in the large shower room we all shared. However, after four years at Harvard College, followed by four years as a naval an opera and concert star in North Ameri ca and most of the countries of Europe. All my concert programs since my de but as soloist with the New York Philhar monic in 1948 included my inspirational song, Musica Proibita. This was a piece I never had to learn the notes were chiseled in my head and heart for all time. After I learned Italian, the words spoke to me eloquently. Eighty years later, that song is still a thrilling challenge, just as it was when it dared me, a kid of 10, to get up on my hind legs and sing to the world! About Roney: HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney) You take the same exit off Interstate 4 to reach the luxurious Mall at Millenia or The Holy Land Experience. I laughed out loud when I made that connection. Contrary to Matthew 6:24, you can have both God and mammon. Just off Exit 78 in Orlando, Fla. God as a theme park? The idea of God quill to parchment. To claim to know the mind of God is what classic Greeks con demned most in man hubris, a quality harshly punished by the Greek gods. That doesnt seem so much the case these days. Folks (devout and otherwise) speak for God with impunity; I suppose because they think they have immunity. Or, they have the word. Is that one and the same? Subscribing to the word anoints one with immunity? Certainty and righteousness are two human qualities that set my jaw. One of my favorite Ralph Waldo Emerson quotes goes, A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds, adored by little statesman and philosophers and divines. And I accuse myself of an intol closed mind. I grew up an atheist. My father, as did his father, had little use for organized religion. He simply didnt see the need for either God or the accompanying religions claiming to know the word. It was ludicrous. Why subscribe to super stition? Why ignore mankinds extended history of an evolving godhead? Why absolve God for the atrocities done in his name (see all of human history)? Why check your brain at the door when considering God and faith? Why spend (much or any) time on what is undeni ably unknowable? Whats interesting about my fathers relationship to religion is that he never once said categorically, I am an atheist. He would have wanted me to reach my own conclusions without his fatherly imprimatur. And I did. Clichs say it all: the acorn doesnt fall far from the tree or as the twig is bent so grows the tree. I am my fathers son, and I am proud to say so, but along with the wheat came the chaff. And that is an important thing to separate. To let go of, if you will. Father had a pro found intolerance for ignorance. It was unacceptable. Sloppy thinking was unac ceptable. Subscribing to superstition and religion (one and the same) are examples of shoddy thinking and hence I agree wholeheartedly with his per spective, except I have reconsidered his disdain for sloppy thinking. I choose to critique the faithful not so much as thinking sloppily, but as thinking differ ently. And that, I confess, has been a long time in coming. Indeed. ing. How can one not? To claim to know the mind of God, cmon. Hubris? And your God is jealous? Stop it! What intrigues me is the low regard in which atheists are considered in America. One recent poll had atheists trailing rap ists in public approval. Elect an atheist rapist I have a recommendation concerning the dialogue of religion in public life. Lets start from the following premise: As an atheist, I am no more immoral for believing as I do, as you are necessarily ignorant for believing as you do. I think that go ahead and laugh ecumeni cal. After all, Reciprocity is the lubricant of life. A biblical verse? Live it. Jepson is a 24-year resident of Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.US Louis Roney Play On! Tom Carey From my garden to yours Joel Salatin talks gardens, technology Joel Salatin

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Page 18 Thursday, April 19, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer SUNDAY 2-5 MEDITERRANEAN HOME IN MAITLAND 1161 Banbury Trail, Maitland. 4BD/2.5BA. 2,738SF.Enter through a gated brick courtyard. Kitchen has granite, stainless appliances, and dark wood cabinets. Views of pool and private backyard. Great landscap ing and outdoor lighting with covered lanai. Wood beamed ceilings, and re done baths. Master suite has French doors to private patio. Two car garage. $499,000 SUNDAY 2-5 BALDWIN PARK POOL HOME 4002 Ethan Lane, Orlando. 5BD/4BA, 4,155SF. Traditional pool home on large corner lot overlooking park. Downstairs study could be 5th bed room. Gourmet kitchen with custom cabinetry, large granite island, gas range and double ovens. Brick patio with saltwater pool and spa. Three car garage. Double wraparound porches on both levels. $939,000 SUNDAY 1-4 WINTER PARK CHARMER 1051 Aragon Avenue, Winter Park. 3BD/2.5BA, 1,669SF. Perfectly main tained two-story townhome in quaint community. Private front patio and wraparound fenced-in yard. Tile floors and spacious living room with woodburning fireplace. Kitchen has break fast bar, large pantry, and rolling is land. Master suite has pitched ceilings and his and hers closets. $209,900 SUNDAY 1-4 SOUTHERN COLONIAL CUSTOM HOME 1911 Stonehurst Road, Winter Park. 4BD/4full+2half baths, 4,916SF. Cus tom home with gourmet kitchen, cus tom cabinets, granite, wood & stone flooring, crown molding, and coffered ceilings. Downstairs master. Large front porch & beautiful landscaping. 3 car garage, huge workshop, & green house. $1,300,000 Community Yard Sale Email or Call Spaces going out fast. East River High School. Kema Brillhart, 407318-4050, Kema.Brillhart@ocps.net Stoneybrook East Community Garage Sale Saturday, April 21st 8AM-2PM -Huge community-wide garage sale! Dozens of homes participating. All types of items including furniture, household items, childrens items and more. Gated com munity open to public only once a year! Stoneybrook Management Office, 407249-7930, sboffice@sbeo.net GARAGE SALES Winter Park Benefit Shop 140 Lyman Avenue. We need items to sell, clothing, bedding, jewelry, kitchenware & Bric-a-brac. We also need volunteers. Shop is open 930a-1pm every Tues & Fri (Sat 10am-1p). Proceeds from the Ben efit Shop support Childrens Programs & Blind Assoc. of CF. 407-647-8276 MISCELLANEOUS 20 Acres Live on Land NOW!!! Only $99/mo. $0 Down, Owner Financ ing, NO CREDIT CHECKS! Near El Paso, TX Beautiful Mountain Views! FREE Color Brochure. sunsetranches.com, 800-755-8953 Mobile Home with acreage ready to move in, great for pets. Lots of space for the price, 3BR/2BA. Serious offers only, no renters. Mobile Home with Land, 850-308-6473 New York State Land Sale Discounted to 1990s prices! 3 Acre Starter Camp $17,995. 5 acres w/Farmhouse $49,995. 52 acres, Stream, 2 ponds, Beautiful woods & views. Access to road front, utilities and state land Limited offer. Call Christmas & Associates. 800-229-7843 or visit lan dandcamps.com REAL EST A TE: FOR SALE ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE FROM HOME. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice. Job placement available. Computer avail able. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. 877-206-5165 Can You Dig It? We will train, certify & provide lifetime assistance landing work. Hiring in Flori da. Start digging as a heavy equipment operator. 866-362-6497 EDUCA TION Historic Winter Park Estate Sale Estate Sale at 1570 Lakehurst Avenue from April 27-29. Doors Opens at 9:00 a.m. until 5:00 pm Antiques, Collectibles, Decor, Rare Art, Gold, Jewelry, Toys and much more. EST A TE SALES Class-A FlatBed Drivers $$ Home EVERY weekend, Run S.E. US RE QUIRES 1Yr OTR Flatbed exp. & Pay UP TO $.39/mile. Sunbelt Transport, LLC 800-572-5489 ext 227 AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Housing available. 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Call now to diversify your advertising with Advertis ing Networks of Florida. 866-742-1373 ANNOUNCEMENTS WORKFORCE JOB LISTINGS Orange County The Marketplace Fannie Hillman OPEN HOUSES OBSERVER Open Houses Drivers: New Flatbed Freight Lanes! We Offer: No Tarping!!! Great Miles, Pay-up to .60cpm, Benets & Home Time. CDL-A, 1yr OTR Exp, Good MVR Frank Donnelly at: 1-888-567-4969, x22. Call now to diversify your advertising. 866.742.1373 www.Florida-Classifieds.com ank you to our media partners: WKMG Local 6 and Magic 107.7. RowellAuctions.comRowell Auctions, Inc.800-323-8388 10% Buyers Premium GAL AU-C002594For Detailed Information Visit RowellAuctions.com BANKRUPTCY AUCTION"Selling by Order of the U.S. Bankruptcy Court"Colquitt County, GA Apr 21, 2012 -:10:00 AMPine Ridge Angus Farms3 Farms Totaling 308 Acres Sunday, 2-5pm 920 Pace Avenue, Maitland Sunday, 2-5pm 1005 Lakeview Drive, Winter Park Sunday, 1-4pm 2404 Temple Drive, Winter Park Saturday, 10am-6pm, AND Sunday, 10am-6pm 2411 Euston Road, Winter Park SATURDAY 2-5 RENOVATED POOL HOME 417 Langholm Drive, Winter Park. 3BD/2.5BA, 3,000SF. A must-see home on a neighbor-friendly, beautifully tree lined street. Wonderful open spaces! Emeril inspired, spacious kitchen. 16x19 dining room with dry bar buffet. 12x18 screened patio & an additional 14x17 covered area. The pool has a salt water chlorinator & waterfall. Min utes to Park Avenue. $598,000 SUNDAY 1-4 NEW PRICE! UPDATED HOME IN BEVERLY SHORES 1235 Munster Street, Orlando. 4BR/2BA, 2,451SF. Split plan. Updated home with wood floors, plantation shutters, kitchen with stainless steel appliances, custom walk-in closet in master. Family room addition with vaulted ceilings, wood burning fire place, built-in TV space (TV stays). Fenced backyard with pavered patio and outdoor mounted TV (also stays). Newer AC and roof. $487,500 OBSERVER Just Sold Homes 666 Overspin Drive, Winter Park, $132,000 John McDade 1911 Summerland Avenue, Winter Park, $495,000 MaryStuart Day/Megan Cross MaryStuart Day/Megan Cross 3706 Pickwick Drive, Orlando, $95,000 Melissa Woodman 1300 Arden Street, Longwood, $155,000 Sharon Helsby 601 Mission Lane, Howey Hills, $215,000 Meg Dolan 1410 Mayfield Avenue, Winter Park, $545,000 Lisa Fleming Nancy Bagby 1210 Raintree Place, Winter Park, $596,500 Allison Chambers Log on to WorkforceCentralFlorida.com where you can enter the Job Title in the "Search for Jobs" box to see more infor mation on these jobs and search thou sands of additional openings throughout Central Florida, at NO COST. Apply by following the directions listed. For further help visit JobVantage at 4360 East Colo nial Dr., Orlando, or call (407) 531-1227 Registered Nurse (RN) SVFL Job Description: Responsible for pro viding a full range of personal care and support services to developmentally disabled clients in a group home setting, Ensure that services are in accordance and compliance with all applicable regu latory requirements, utilizing all available resources. Applicant must possess a cur rent Florida RN License and a minimum of one year of nursing experience. Addi tional qualifications apply. Pay Rate: Salary based on experience. Job Order Number: 9663561 Architect/Project Manager Job Description: Responsible for leading a project team; generating documents for all design phases; coordinating with engineering disciplines; and responsi bly maintaining project schedules and budgets to promote project completion based upon client satisfaction and profit ability. Applicant must possess Bachelor Degree and a minimum of ten years re cent experience working on commercial projects. Additional qualifications apply. Pay Rate: Salary based on experience. Job Order Number: 9663422 Customer Management Representative Job Description: Responsible for de veloping a business relationship at as signed accounts and for providing these accounts with information about selling, profitability and placement of company products while increasing the promotion al activity, sales volume and profitability of these accounts. Applicant must pos sess Bachelor Degree and relationship building, communication, marketing and analytical skills. Additional qualifications apply. Pay Rate: Salary based on experience. Job Order Number: 9663346 Mobile Services Calibration Technician Job Description: Responsible for per forming routine and complex work re lated to the repair and calibration of test, measurement and diagnostic equipment. Applicant must possess a minimum of four years of experience in the repair and calibration of electronic equipment; a valid driver's license; and a point free driving record. Additional qualifications apply. Pay Rate: Salary based on experience. Job Order Number: 9663121 Business Development Professional Job Description: Responsible for identify ing new areas of business development. Evaluate funding sources, competitive environment, market dynamics, priceto-win analyses and probability of win. Participate/lead in the preparation of pro posals in response to various requests. Applicant must possess Bachelor Degree in Business Administration or related area (MBA preferred) and a minimum of five years in business development with a proven, verifiable, track record of suc cess. Additional qualifications apply. Pay Rate: Salary based on experience. Job Order Number: 9662937

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Page 32 Thursday, April 19, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Barry Levinson Cloris Leachman Enjoy a beautiful spring evening of great wine while strolling through downtown Winter Park Thursday, May 3 5 8:30 p.m. Tickets are $30 in advance Purchase online at www.winterpark.org For information call (407) 644-8281 winter park sip and stroll Josh Garrick Culture worthy of your calendar April 20 to May 12 Baby at Winter Park Playhouse After seeing the original (Tony-nominated) Broadway pro duction, Baby has been on my production wish list for years, says Roy Alan, artistic director for the Winter Park Playhouse. With lyrics by Richard Maltby Jr. and music by David Shire, Baby follows the stories of three couples in different stages of life as they experience the rewarding, agonizing and often poignant consequences of pregnancy and parenthood. This beautiful musical comedy features Central including Heather Alexander, Natalie Cordone, Shawn Kilgore, Bryan Minyard, Kathryn Nash, Candace Neal, Timothy Pappas, Sage Starkey and Kate Zaloumes. Performances are from April 20 to May 12 at the Playhouse, located at 711 Orange Ave., in Winter Park. Call 407-645-0145 or visit winterparkplayhouse.org April 20 to May 27 The Music Man The Garden Theatre in Winter Garden has already produced an impressive string of selfproduced musicals in which the community comes together to act in and create major musicals onstage. Adding a 76-trombone salute to that theatrical history is The Music Man, running from April 20 to May 27. Led by Dustin Cunningham, as Prof. Harold Hill, a cast of more than 60 performers and dozens of stage-crew volunteers ranging in age from 5 to 65 will bring this musical to life. The show is recommended for all ages. The Garden Theatre is at 160 W. Plant St. Call 407-877-GRDN (4736) or visit gardentheatre.org April 21 Orlando Phil in Hi Def The Orlando Philharmonic Or chestra is building a name and an audience based on new, ex citing ways to present symphonic music, and their fundraiser on April 21 may just top all others. Presented in association with Full Sail University, the Philhar monic will present Symphony in HD: Live at Full Sail as a live orchestra performance with pho tography, animation and a virtual opera set created by Full Sail University faculty and students. Guests at the fundraiser will en joy a three-course meal and live ting the Orlando Philharmonic. It all begins at 6 p.m. with drinks and a silent auction on Full Sails Hollywood-style backlot. After dinner and the concert, an out door party will take place with Philharmonic musicians and Full Sail faculty. To purchase tickets, visit orlandophil.org/HD or call 407-896-6700, extension 236. April 21 Creald Festival at Hannibal Square Music and art will be created during Creald School of Arts 3rd Annual Hannibal Square Her itage Center Folk Art and Craft Festival from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, April 21. The festival features artwork for sale by some of Floridas great folk artists during this daylong celebration free childrens activities, resource agencies and Southern-style barbecue for sale. Dance to the sounds of Cajun Zydeco music by The Porch Dogs and the rhythms of Orisirisi African Folklore. Children can create their own Aztec Indian headband, shirt and tambourine to wear and play at the Aztec Pre-Columbian Musi cal Circle parade. Storytellers, a kid-folk art workshop, childrens musical parade and African folklore are on the schedule. The Hannibal Square Heritage Center is located at 642 New England Ave., in Winter Park. Call 407671-1886 or 407-539-2680 or visit crealde.org April 21 to July 15 Paintings of Florida Drawn from the largest known private collection of Florida-based art, The Orlando Museum of Art (OMA) con tinues its Made in Florida project, celebrating Florida art Paintings of Florida 1865-1965 from the Collection of Cici and Hyatt Brown, opening April 21 and running through July 15. who worked in Florida over a period of 100 years including Herman Herzog, George Inness, Thomas Hart Benton and N.C. Wyeth. The exhibition includes 70 paintings, which depict the evolution of Floridas landscape while offering a new perspective of the works of these renowned artists, says Marena Grant Mor risey, executive director of OMA. OMA is located in Orlandos Loch Haven Park. Call 407-8964231 or visit omart.org And not to be missed This week Disneys The Lion King is at the Bob Carr through May 13. Visit OrlandoBroadway.com Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906. Baby rewards



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407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC USPS 00-6186 Publisher statement on page 4. Thursday, April 19, 2012 50+ tax wpmobserver.comSubscribe now!Visit wpmobserver.com This Earth Day, make a difference through the simple act of donating clothing or household items.Page 16Letters to the editor Healthy Living Stephanie Arthurs twins are among the 633 babies born preterm every week in Florida, March of Dimes says.Page 11 Josh GarrickBaby has been on Winter Park Playhouse director Roy Alans production wish list for years.Page 32 Calendar The Third Annual Hannibal Square Heritage Center Folk Art and Traditional Craft Festival is Saturday.Page 8 TAX DEFERREDFIXED ANNUITY RATE FOR 5 YEARS.Bob Adams 407-644-6646THE NATIONAL 5 YEAR CD RATE IS 1.34%3.35% 451 Maitland Ave, Altamonte Springs, FL 32701NEW Dermatology Ofce!407-599-SKIN (7546)*Waive co-payment up to $25 No referral needed Accepting all insurances Dr. John CottamDr. Ross Wheeler Cutting back on city funding by 10 per cent in 2013, decreasing an initial lease with the city from 51 to two years, and going on a sooner than agreed upon a year ago are all ways Art & History Museums Maitland leaders say theyre willing to work to main tain their cultural partnership with the city of Maitland. Were basically ready to commit [harakiri] here, A&H President Bill Taulbee said at the second workshop between A&H and the Maitland City Council on April 10 where he presented these ideas. The two groups are working to solidify the future of their public-private cultural partnership before the 2010-formed orga nizations lease of the citys Maitland Art Center (MAC) properties reaches the end of its one-year trial lease, which automatically renews for 51 years on Oct. 1. Though similar workshops are sched uled with all cultural partners, including one with the Maitland Public Library held Councilman Phil Bonus raised questions of the bang for the buck the city was getting from its current partnership with A&H and direction in which its leadership was head ing at a January Council meeting. If we keep on with the poor business model that we have with making no rev enue back (to the city), were doomed to repeat the failures of the past and are not working forward to improve the MAC, Bo nus said. vin, curator at the MAC for more than 15 Tyree Forbes was 2 years old when he started at the Winter Park Day Nursery, and hes one student the teachers there will never forget. His heart was warm and full of love, but sometimes that just couldnt overpower his anger. His grandmother, who was taking care of him, didnt know what to do. But Ali DeMa ria, his teacher then and now executive director of the Nursery, knew all he needed was to feel safe and loved. We just kept showing him that we cared, she said. dently sent him off to elementary school, and teacher and a switch to the right school for him, the little boy has seen more success than loving it. said. I have his report card And thats what the Winter Park Day Nursery is all about. The care center and pre school in Winter Park was started as a place to offer quality, affordable care for low-income working families. Its childcare fees are based on a sliding scale depending on the parents income. DeMaria said 89 per cent of her children come from low-income households, and the majority of families pay the lowest price of $67 per week, but that it costs the center $200 to care for and educate each child. The Nursery will hold its Orange Blossom Jubilee on April 27 to help bridge that gap between what their parents can afford, and the cost of the quality education the Nursery provides. The funds they raise at this annual event will provide for operational costs anything from keeping the lights on and ren ovating the old bathrooms, to purchasing the supplies for their monthly birthday parties. I think its really important to give every body a good foundation regardless of income level to build a strong community and to build productive citizens for the rest of their PhHOtTO bBY IsSAAcC BABcCOcCK theTHE ObserverBSERVER Five-year-old Caden, above, enjoys the playground at the Winter Park Day Nursery, which charges parents for care based on a sliding scale of income. The nursery is holding a fundraising event on April 27 to help keep its doors open. Please see NURsSERY on page 3 NNursery kindles young minds The Winter Park Day Nursery will hold its OOrange Blossom Jubilee on Friday, April 27, to help cover child care costs for its low-income families BBRITTNI JOhHNsSON OObserver Staff The Winter Park Day Nurserys 11th Annual OOrange Blossom Jubilee will be held from 6:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. at the Winter Park Community Center on Friday, April 27. The Nursery is still looking for corporate sponsorships and auction item donations, and individual tickets are available and cost $75 each. Call the Nursery at 407-647-0505 or email Heather@winterparkdaynursery.org for more information. A&H bargains to save itself Please see ART on page 3Workshop between Maitland and nonprot organization leaves cultural partnership in question SARAhH WIlsLSON OObserver Staff As part of A&Hs plan to show its dedication to Maitland and give back to the city, admission to all A&H museums will be free for Maitland residents throughout the month of May. For more information, visit ArtandHistory.org

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Page 2 Thursday, April 19, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland OObserver FORUMSSmall Business www.mica.house.govU.S. Congressman J ohn L. MicaSponsored byMaitland 407-657-8080 Deltona 386-860-1499 Learn about Federal, state and local resources to develop or expand business. Experts from the Small Business Administration, IRS, Department of Commerce, Seminole State College Small Business Development Center, Enterprise Florida and local banks.SBA Programs & FinancingFederal Market Contracting IRS InfoExporting Agency ExpertsBusiness Summit Focused on SW Volusia County Deltona City Hall 2345 Providence Blvd, Deltona 32725 Forum Export Assistance Forum Veterans Assistance 558 W. New England Ave, Winter Park, Florida Classic Iron Beds AND Designer Linens 407-982-4319www.ClassicIronBeds.comAll iron & brass beds are made in the USA and guaranteed for 2 generations 20% off Pine Cone Hill Linens through April GODWIN, LARRYMr. Larry Godwin of Winter Park passed peacefully Thursday, April 12th, with his loved ones by his side. A two-time lymphoma survivor, he ultimately succumbed to his third bout with cancer, 21 years after the rst diagnosis. He was 69 years of age. He is survived by his four children and six grandchildren. A successful entrepreneur, Mr. Godwin most recently was founder and Chairman of First Colony Bank in Maitland. He served our country in the armed forces, strengthened our community with his wisdom and aided those in need with encouragement and generosity. A dedicated Christian; he was and continues to be a humble servant of our Lord. A Memorial Service will be held at 10:30am Thursday, April 19th at First United Methodist Church in Winter Park, 125 North Interlachen Avenue, Winter Park, FL 32789. Donate on his behalf to the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. http://www.lls.org. Online memory book at http://www.baldwinfairchild.com. Some years ago in New Yorks Metropolitan Museum of Art, my beautiful wife (b.w.) and I heard a remarkably sung concert by Chanticleer, the extraordinary 12-member male vocal group from San Francisco. Shortly there after we founded the Festival of Orchestras in Orlando, and attractions we booked. Chanticleer scored brilliantly and has concert since then. On Sunday Chapel, the Bach Festival Society presented Chanticleer once again. The name Chanticleer is taken from Geoffrey Chaucers clarionvoiced rooster. Not surprisingly, Chanticleer opened the program with 15th and 16th century sacred music of Sebastian de Vivanco and Tomas Luis de Victoria. Two contemporary songs from Le Cantique des Cantiques, much in the ancient style, followed. Chansons of Claudin de Sermisy, Clement Janequin and Claude Le Jeune utilizing antiphonal singing, interesting modula tions and intricate counterpoint Sermisy was sung by a quartet. A second quartet of four other voices sang Toute les Nuits by Janequin. Then a quintet sang the voici venir du Printemps, a very intricate and exacting selection. Strauss Mnnerchore showed an enticing variety of styles by the great German roman tic. Modulating sections, some Wagner and resplendent with galloping waltz a brim with hap piness. Contemporary composer Steven Sametz brought lyricism to the fore in his Not an End of Loving. This Marriage of Eric Whi tacre, and A Village Wedding of Sir John Tavener opened the concerts second half. Taveners music was of special interest because of its introduction of Greek harmonies sung in a circle by the 12 singers. Three engaging songs of Stephen Paulus based on Chinese poems of Tzu Yeh added captivating color to the afternoon. Perhaps the programs most appreciated moment occurred when Chanticleer assumed the role of a s blues band each member imitating with amazing and amusing effect the sound of a (wa-wah) Dixieland jazz player. Here the audience rose to its feet in thunderous applause. propriate romantic treatment and full vocal beauty. An encore of sorts, Somebody to Love, origi nally written for the rock group Ages a very fun afternoon! Throughout the concert, Chanticleer was a professional musicians delight to hear. Intonation, with an occasional Attacks and cutoffs, sans con ductor, were models of precision. Tone was beautiful, raucous, solemn, ethereal, crisp and demanded. Chanticleers excellent solo voices demonstrated that this virtuoso chorus is made up of thoroughly trained individual singers. Chanticleer lived up to its reputation as Americas premier vocal ensemble. PhHOtTO bBY KKRIsSTEN WhHEElLER KHPhHOtTOGraphRAPHIcsCS TThe A Art & History Museums Maitlands Participation, Circus of the Surreal, was an artis tic and nancial success. The event raised $24,080, an increase of $5,277 over last year.Chanticleer charms againTheir virtuosic harmonizing is like no other LOUIsS RRONEY OObserver Staff The Bach Festival Society of Winter Park concludes its 2011 season with Spring in Vienna on Saturday, April 28, at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, April 29, at 3 p.m. at Knowles Memorial Chapel, Rollins College. Tickets range from $20 to $50. Call the Box OOfce at 407-646-2182 or visit www.BachFestivalFlorida.org Chanticleer Girl who played with re

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Page 3 Thursday, April 19, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland OObserver years, resigned on April 9. At the workshop, Colvin described watching A&H turn the MAC into a money pit in the past year, which led him to seek em ployment elsewhere. As of 2012, A&H receives 49 percent of its funding from the city, a $425,000 contribution, A&H Director Andrea BaileyCox said. That money along with the rest of A&Hs funding is rein vested back into MAC programs and services and both directly and indirectly into the Maitland community, she said, which is es timated at $862,000. Some members of Council, however, said they dont feel that estimated repayment is giving enough directly back to the city given its investment, especially on the eve of another strappedfor-cash budget season. Bonus proposed the city take the run ning of the MAC under its leisure services department to make up though numbers for the cost of this have yet to be drawn up. Councilwoman Linda Frosch said the core of the issue is mak ing sure the 17,000 residents of Maitland, whose tax dollars are funding all the cultural partners, are getting utilized in the most possible. Were not closing the Art Center or changing programs, exhibits, the mission or doing anything like that, Frosch said. We want to make it better, and thats what we want to give you help with, to make it better. A&H took bargaining into its own hands at the April 10 meet ing, saying they would amend what would become a 51-year lease with the city in October, to a two-year lease. President Taulbee, a former councilman, said A&H also offered to cut its requested funding to the city for 2013 to 39 percent of its budget, at $360,000, and accelerating from its 16-year master plan to ing on the city for only 10 to 15 percent of its budget by 2015. You told us to get out there and spread our wings and raise our own funds, and weve done that but we hear you; we have to change the way we do busi ness and we have to enhance the way we engage the community, Taulbee said, and were ready to do that, too. No vote or decision was made, other than that the issue needs to be further addressed in the com ing months, with Frosch and Bo nus urging that action needs to be taken now, and Mayor How ard Schieferdecker and Council man Ivan Valdes favoring letting A&H have some time to work out some of its kinks on its own. Go out and start doing a better job, Valdes urged to mem bers of the A&H board. Go be come the very best you can be, and make it a hard decision for us to say we want to go in a dif ferent direction. lives, said Skye Guthrie, who is on the board of directors and co-chair of the event. And the people here do a great job at that because they really care about it, its not just about child care, its about education and support and families. Heather Cortese, whose son has had trouble with other schools in the past, said instead of tears each day when he comes home, hes happy. Its a relief for her to bring her son to a place where he feels safe and she has help. There were times when I had to put food on my table or keep the electric on, she said. And it was very helpful to me to be able to come here and take food from the food pantry during that pe riod of time, because it was really tough. Winter Park resident and par ent Gayla Faulkner agreed. She was paying full price for child care in the past and was barely surviving. Its been a lifesaver [the cost of child care] was killing me, she said. I was literally living paycheck to paycheck. That can lead to stress, but at the Nursery, teachers are there to give parents guidance and sup port, too. When the parents come in, many of whom are raising their children alone, they get a friendly welcome, an offer of a cup of coffee, and another adult actually asking them how they are. Its probably the only place where the family is as impor tant as the child, said Heather and volunteer coordinator for the school. Theyre concerned for you and for your child, Faulkner said. Its just so family oriented you just feel like you get a big hug when you walk in the door. And thats not only great for the tired moms lacking appre ciation in their everyday lives some walk all the way from the other side of Winter Park to get their kids there each morning but for their children, too. We want to make sure their family is included because that really affects how successful the child is going to be, to see what kind of family support that they have, DeMaria said. It sets the stage for their education. If theyre shown what a quality education looks like and theyre supported in helping their children be what their children can be, then theyre more likely to be successful in the future. When they do get back on their feet, these families give right back to their school and commu nity. Cortese has donated an auc tion item for the Jubilee, and the grandmother whose grandson is another family that was in need of a home. She still visits the school to show her appreciation and to tell them how she learned to be a better caregiver from their guid ance. They realize the importance of giving, Caldwell said. Hurry! Sale E nds Soon! Design Pro Screens Longwood, FL 32750 Toll Free: 1-888-724-9868 Ext. 71232 71232 Securities offered through NEXT Financial Group, Inc., Member FINRA/SIPC. Investment Advisory Services offered through Dorman Financial Management, P.A. None of the entities named herein are afliated with NEXT Financial Group, Inc. Dorman Financial Management, P.A., 341 N. Maitland Ave., Ste. 250, Maitland, FL 32751 (407)774-6815 Be part of the excitement at our 5th AnnualShred-Fest 2012Protect your identity and free up your space at Dorman Financial Managements annual document shredding event. Bring in your old important documents to shred and enjoy coffee and bagels. Plus, participate in these two exciting contests: Register to win your own personal shredder just for attending the event. Bring the oldest document to be shredded and win a gift basket. Shred any of the below items from 2004 and earlier: When: Saturday, April 21st 9:00 am 11:00 am Where: Dorman Financial Management 341 N. Maitland Ave., Ste. 250 Maitland, FL 32751 Feel free to bring a friend and RSVP today to (407) 774-6815 or sgenovese@DormanFinancial.com Sponsored by: old utility bills credit card ads cancelled checks old school records old tax returns old statements www.dormannancial.com NURsSERY | Care facility says it truly cares about kids, parents C OONTIINUED FROOM frFROntNT paPAGeE ART | BBoard president says organization can be financially independent in three years instead of planned 16 C OONTIINUED FROOM frFROntNT paPAGeE archARCHIveVE PhHOtTO bBY IsSAAcC BABcCOcCK theTHE ObserverBSERVER Art & History Museums Maitland has used events such as Culture and Cocktails (above) to raise additional funds for its operations. IIt has pledged to become even more independent.

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Page 4 Thursday, April 19, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland OObserver USPS 00-6186 ISSN 1064-36131500 Park Center Drive OOrlando, FL 32835-5705 Member of: Chamber of CommercePublisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor. Submission does not guarantee publication. Columnists opinions are made independently of the newspaper. All rights reserved. Winter Park / Maitland Observer 2012 Established in 1989 by GGerhard J.W. Munster www.wpmobserver.com | Phone: 407-563-7000 | Fax: 407-563-7099 | editor@observernewspapers.com Published TThursday, AApril 19, 2012 CONTAONTACTTS Volume 24, IIssue NNumber 16 PUBLIISHER TT racy Craft 407-515-2605 tcraft@observernewspapers.com manaMANAGInNG EDIITOOR Jenny AAndreasson 407-563-7026 editor@observernewspapers.com DESIGIGNER Jonathan Gallagher 407-563-7054 jgallagher@observernewspapers.com assASSOcCIateATE edEDItTOrR IIsaac BBabcock 407-563-7023 isaacb@observernewspapers.com LeEGalsALS | ClassLASSIfFIedsEDS AAshley McBBride legal@FLAlegals.com classieds@observernewspapers.com staffSTAFF wr WRItersTERS Sarah Wilson BBrittni Johnson KKristy Vickery COOPYY EDIITOORS Sarah Wilson COOLUMNIISTS Chris Jepson Jepson@MediAmerica.us Louis RRoney LRoney@c.rr.com Josh Garrick joshgarrick9@gmail.com ADVERTIISIINGG SALES Linda Stern 407-563-7058 LStern@observernewspapers.com subscrSUBSCRIptPTIOnsNS | cCIrculatRCULATIOnN KKatie RReyes kreyes@turnstilemediagroup.com 407-563-7073 InternNTERN AAndy Ceballos Police looking for 4 RRivers suspects At about 6:15 a.m. on Tuesday, April 10, ofcers responded to the 4 Riv ers Smokehouse in Winter Park in reference to a reported robbery. Pre liminary investigations at the scene revealed that two males, armed with a handgun and knife, robbed the business. The rst suspect is a black male, about 20-30 years of age, about 6 feet tall, with a medium build. He was was wearing a gray hooded sweat shirt, jeans and a half mask. The second suspect is described as an about 5-foot-10-inch to 6-foot-tall, slender built male, armed with a knife wearing a black half mask, a navy blue hooded sweatshirt, dark jeans, and light gray Vans brand sneakers. IIf you know the whereabouts of these persons, or details of the crime, you may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Call 1-800-423-TIIPS (8477) or visit CrimeLine.orgMaitland teacher runs for Florida HouseMaitland teacher and resident Karen Castor Dentel announced her candi dacy on April 16 for the newly drawn Florida State House District 30. II am running to improve public education and ght for better economic oppor tunities for our neighbors in O Orange and Seminole, Dentel said. Den tel, an O Orlando resident since 1990, teaches at Dommerich Elementary. Dentels mother, Betty Castor, former ly served in the Florida Senate and as state education commissioner. Her sister, Kathy Castor, has represented Floridas 11th Congressional District since 2007. Winter Park company to raise $100KK for nonprot Building Drops I Inc. of Winter Park has pledged to raise $100,000 for O Orange County Athletics, a nonprot organi zation that provides services for individuals with autism and other dis abilities in the G Greater O Orlando area by having their suppliers contribute to the organization. Building Drops has offered to start a scholarship fund for consumers that would otherwise miss OOCAs event. Visit gooca.org KKids say theyll be less nancially independentA new study from Junior Achievement USA and The Allstate Foundation re vealed that only 56 percent of teens 14-18 years old think they will be as nancially well-off or better than their parents. That represents a 37 percent drop from 2011 (89 percent). The 2012 Junior Achievement Teens and Personal Finance survey also uncovered a dramatic shift in the age teens think they will be nancially independent from their parents or guardians. Less than half of teens who responded indicated theyd be independent by age 20 versus a year ago. Craig Polejes, president of Junior Achievement of Central Florida said, Junior Achievement, with the col laboration of key partners like The Allstate Foundation, will continue to expand young peoples access to the tools they need to succeed in the global economy, including critical money-management skills. Goodwill seeks donations GGoodwill I Industries of Central Florida is calling for donations of new or gently used items clothing, appliances, electronics and furniture. Sales from donated goods helps fund job training programs. These centers provide employment placement ser vices and other community-based programs for people with disabilities, lack education or job experience, or face other employment challenges. Visit goodwillc.orgSend submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com Meal and door prizes are provided. COMMUNITY SEMINAR EVENT PLEASE RSVP TO (800) 307-8527. STEI2300 Temple Drive Winter Park, FL 32789 Offering the Simplicity Plan BaldwinFairchild.com Wednesday, A pril 25, 2012, 6:30 p.m.Complimentary Dinner at Buca Di Beppo BFCremSeminarAd_3colx5.indd 1 4/13/12 2:14 PM BBusiness BBriefs Community BBulletin Miller Legg improving natural landsMiller Leggs Winter Park ofce has been awarded a ve-year continuing contract by Seminole County to im prove its natural lands. Approximate ly $3.2 million in funding is available through a 2004 bond referendum. FYAOYAO gets on a bus Eight winning nonprot organiza tions will have their logos placed on a LY YNX bus for the next 12 months. Among the winners is Florida Y Y oung Artists O Orchestra of Winter Park, a group of music professionals, teach ers and community leaders commit ted to providing a positive orchestral experience for young musicians. RRollins expands virtual reach IIn an effort to maximize resources and accommodate curriculum de mands, 16 liberal arts colleges, including Rollins College, of the As sociated Colleges of the South (ACS) joined forces to offer online, interac tive, upper-level courses through any ACS campus. I It is dubbed The New Paradigm I Initiative, and uses faceto-face and online instruction across all ACS campuses. Historic building sold NAII Realvest negotiated a $1.2 mil lion sale price for the 36,264-squarefoot, six-story historic ofce building and its 0.89-acre site at 101 East First St. in downtown Sanford.Patio party raises $2,100Fannie Hillman + Associates and many of its clients and friends at tending the companys patio party recently raised $2,100 and lled a van full of kitchen essentials for the Community Food & OOutreach Center. Loan made for $6 millionThe Winter Park ofce of Richmondbased Transact AOOCP recently ar ranged a $6 million loan agreement for Coral I Industries I Inc. of Tuscaloo sa, Ala., by a multi-year debt facility provided by TAB Bank.Six loans closedMercantile Capital Corporation closed six commercial loans to nance projects valued at more than $31.5 million. RRollins student wins merit award Rollins College full-time MBA student Jessica Merrell has been awarded this years SunTrust Distinguished Leader of Merit award. David Fuller, president and CEOO of SunTrust Central Florida, presented Merrell with the award during a cer emony at the school, and Merrell will be recognized again for her achievement during the Rollins MBA commencement ceremony on April 28. I In addition to Merrell, Rollins MBA students Meredith Lohwasser and Rohini Das were named SunTrust Leaders of Merit, and Joshua Aguilar and Shannon Walsh were also recognized for exemplary community engagement at the ceremony.

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Page 5 Thursday, April 19, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland OObserver ORLANDO RED CARPET PREMIERE A DOCUMENTARY FILM FROM EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS MICHAEL WOLFE AND ALEX KRONEMER, DIRECTED BY ROB GARDNERNARRATED BY ACADEMY AWA RD WINNER SUSAN SARANDON Thursday April 26th6:00 TO 8:30PMRECEPTION FOLLOWED BY MOVIE ORLANDO MUSEUM OF ART 2416 NORT H MILLS AVENUE O RLANDO, FLORIDA 32803 Islamic Art: Mirror of the Invisible World. Exploring global journey to present the stories behind the Event: 2.5hrs, movie: 90mins. RESERVE YOUR TICKETS AT: (WITH ID) : http://OrlandoArtMovie.eventbrite. com/ Please contact c4p@iscf. orgWWW.ISLAMICART.TV : http://OrlandoArtMovie.eventbrite. com/ Please contact c4p@iscf. orgWWW.ISLAMICART.TV Wildcats dominated the tennis court in the last week with two powerful team performances led by strong individual matches by two stars. The girls and boys teams won every match in the regional tourna ment April 12 to go on to the state the boys side and Joulia Likhanskaagainst the best in the state, with English bowing out in the quarter Likhanskaia destroying her competition en route to a repeat title. Likhanskaias decisive wins punctuated the tournament with 6-4, 6-2; 6-3, 6-1; and 6-3, 6-2 scores to close out her junior year on top. BBaseball bamboozled Winter Park entered their game against Boone with a string of four wins and a massive barrage of strong hitting. They left smarting from an 8-0 loss. For the Wildcats (14-8, 6-1), was highlighted by two doubledigit wins before they faced the Braves. Theyd just come off an April 11 shutout win over Free dom in which theyd piled on nine runs. But a lights-out pitching per formance from Boones Frank Grandinette made the game a quiet one for Winter Park, which failed to score in the blowout shutout. The Wildcats will play their baseball on the road, starting at 7 p.m. Thursday, April 19, at Os ceola before heading for Olympia at 4 p.m. Friday, April 20, to close things out. Then district play begins next week. The Knights once again took a setback and turned it into a tri umph in the past week, vaulting themselves into the NCAA base ball No. 13 slot in the process. After trashing Florida A&M 16-4 and Bethune Cookman 6-2 on April 10-11, the Knights hit the road for Southern Miss (20-15, 4-5) to face a Golden Eagles team with a solid overall record, but struggling in the conference. with a usually powerful UCF of fense reduced to scoreless as two Southern Miss pitchers worked 14 innings of shutouts while striking out 15 UCF batters. The Knights had some high-powered hurlers of their own, with Brian Adkins tossing a three-hit start through seven innings. In the bottom of the 14th inning way, allowing a hit and a double to end the game in a hurry after a The Knights got revenge in a big way in the next two games, turning on the bats and drilling the Eagles for a combined 23 runs to easily take the series. Theyll return home this week end for a trio of games against another middling conference foe, Memphis (16-20, 6-6). The Tigers the Knights this season. TT ars lose nail-biters Its been an up-and-down diamond, as theyve lost three of their last four games. Two of those losses were only by a run, as the Tars have struggled to get the of fensive spark against tough pitch ing. Thats not for a lack of trying on the Tars part. In their most re cent loss to Barry University (17continuously behind after Barry scored all of its seven runs in the the game within a run on a hitand-run play in the top of the sev tying run, with the game ending on a groundout. In the game shortstop Nick Adhammered their ninth doubles of the year. The Tars host Florida Tech (2213, 7-5) this weekend starting at 6 p.m. Friday, April 20. Knights get revenge again IsISAAcC BBABcCOcCK OObserver Staff Wildcats nish strong in state tournament IsISAAcC BBABcCOcCK OObserver Staff Wildcats baseball Next game at OOsceola, Thursday, April 19, 7 p.m.

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Page 6 Thursday, April 19, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Lets begin by agreeing on the simple truth of those words by Theodor S. Geisel (Dr. Seuss), Fun is good! Its as if the Mait land Area Chamber of Commerce used those words as a guideline for last weekends Spring Arts Festival. Because if there is one thing the Festival provided, it was fun. A whole weekend of commu nity-based pet and family friendly fun in the park. Lake Lily shined again as the backdrop for the Spring Arts Fes tival. The Chamber used all of its est show it has ever produced. The Friday night hours added a fun new dimension to the show, which pleased the exhibitors and the public alike. Parking was a breeze and a bargain and a boon to the local scout troops who han dled the duties beautifully, thank you very much! And the food was exceptional this year, as four local community partners provided delicious high quality tastings in a postcard perfect setting. Thanks to SoNapa Grille, RanGetsu, Sam Sneads, and An tonios for participating with the Chamber on a giant leap of prog ress for festival food. And lets not leave out Performing Arts of Mait land and the Maitland Mens Club for once again demonstrating their unwavering commitment to local events. The Chamber, PAM and Mens Club are solid partners supporting local businesses. The Maitland Library was involved, as they held a book fair on their lawn adjacent to the Festival en trance. Maitlands own Enzian Theater was busy kicking off its annual Film Festival. The town was jumping. The entire weekend was once more an example of the power of positive collaboration. Special thanks goes out to the Take 7 girls a cappella group from Winter Park High School. They were fabulous, and we all wish them good luck on their up coming New York City competition! Maitlands newest jazz bar, JazzTastings, was a sponsor of smooth jazz, and their sensational weekend band, 2EEZ featuring AndrewLuv, was very warmly received on Friday night. The success of the festival is the result of a lot of hard work by a core group of dedicated Chamber members, under the leadership of the Chambers new executive director, Maria Simmons, as much as it is a tribute to the several local and national corporate sponmade it all possible. But lets get back to the fun. The weather was delightful, the artists and vendors were upbeat and prosperous. The crowd was local. Neighbors strolled together around the beautiful lake, which the citys tireless Leisure Services and Public Works departments maintain so professionally. Lake Lily is Maitlands iconic commu nity gathering area, and the fes tival proved a delightful way to enjoy it. At one point a trio of wellknown radio personalities, who have perhaps 100 years of local professional experience between them, sat contentedly in the shade of an event like the Spring Arts Festival. Its accessible, and one felt comfortable lounging along the breezy shoreline visiting with neighbors. So many shows have become so crowded and cramped one can barely slow down to chat. The Chamber show distinguished itself otherwise. It was effortless. Local artists wares were comfort ably within reach. Local musicians were pleasingly within earshot. And the smells of great food from familiar vendors were constantly enticing ones senses. It was fun. And fun is good. So well do it again. Thanks Chamber! See you next year The Chamber thanks the fol lowing sponsors: Orlando Sentinel; WUCF Radio; City of Mait land; Progress Energy; The Q; Bailey, Zobel, Pilcher; Sheraton Orlando North; Florida Hospital Altamonte; Orlando Living Centers; Days Inn-Fern Park; Costco; Maitland Stage Band; Winter Park-Maitland Observer; Lifestyle Magazine; Mercedes Benz of Maitland; JazzTastings; Arts & History Museums; Courtyard By Marriott; Gulf States Credit Union; M&I a part of BMO Finan cial Group; Regions Bank; Trustco Bank; Seacoast Bank; Hunter Vi sion; Lowes; Orlando Direct Buy; Roach Family Chiropractic; Sultana Law P.A.; J&J Creations; Baterbys Art Auction Gallery; Maitland Jewelers; guitarist Matt Shenk; Everything Bling LLC; and Maitland Public Library.Meeting of April 23City Council meets the second and fourth Monday of the month at 6:30 p.m. The next meeting is scheduled for April 23 in the Council Chambers, 1776 Indepen dence Lane. Below are items that will be addressed at that meeting. ard Schieferdecker Ordinance Creating the Downtown Maitland Zoning Dis trict Ordinance Rezone Properties within the Downtown Maitland Zoning District Visit itsmymaitland.com for the complete agenda and ap proved meeting minutes. www.gulfstatescu.org 407-831-8844A Refreshing Alternative to Conventional Banking.9405 S. Highway 17-92 Maitland, FL 32751 Maitland City Talk BY pPHIL BONUS COUNc C ILMAN Fun is good IN THEATERS APRIL 27www.thepirates-movie.com To get passes, visit WWW.GOFOBO.COM/RSVP and enter code: WPMOA3XPYoung Pirates are encouraged to attend the screening in their favorite pirate costume. The best dressed pirate will win a prize pack from the lm. AT REGAL WINTER PARK SATURDAY, APRIL 21, 10:30 AMThis lm is rated PG. Passes are good for two complimentary admissions. You must have a pass to attend. Seating is on a rst-come, rst-served basis and is not guaranteed. Supplies are limited and available only while supplies last. No purchase necessary. INVITES YOU AND A GUEST TO AN ADVANCE SCREENING OF

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Page 7 Thursday, April 19, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer For more information go to www.WinterPa rkPaintOut.org 633 Osceola Avenue, Winter Park, FL 32789 407-647-6294 Monday, April 23 Friday, April 27 Wednesday, April 25 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm 215 S. Orlando Avenue in Winter Park Call 407-740-4005 to reserve your table. Saturday, April 28 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm Albin Polasek Museum and Sculpture Gardens Tickets $45 in advance, $60 at the door Special Events Art Happens Watch The Ar sts P aint! View and Purchas e New Pain ngs DailyGardens and Gallery Open, Free to the PublicMonday, April 23 to Friday April 27 10 am to 6 pmSaturday, April 28 Winter Park City Talk BY RaANDY KNIGHT CITY MMANAGER The April 23 City Commission meeting will be held at the Winter Park Community CenterApril 23 City Commission meeting topics of interestThere will be a City Commis sion meeting at 3:30 p.m. on Mon day, April 23, at the Winter Park Community Center located at 721 W. New England Ave. Below are a few topics of interest:Mayors ReportRecognition of Dr. Barbara Jenkins, Orange County Public Schools Superintendent Proclamation WPHS Cheerleading State and National Championships Day Proclamation North Amer ican Occupational Safety and Health Week; and Occupational Safety and Health Professional Day Employee of the Quarter Craig M. ONeil, Assistant Direc tor of Communications Appointment of Wired for Winter Park Task Force members Resolution Supporting fair trade when possible among mer chants in the city of Winter Park.City Managers ReportPresentation Interim report on tree/vegetation management City Attorneys Report Tolling agreementsConsent AgendaApprove the minutes of April 9. Approve staff to enter into ne list can be found at cityofwinter park.org > Government > City Commission > Agenda Packets). Approve the Cemetery Disin terment Policy. Approve the mid-year budget adjustment for the General Fund. Approve the adjustment to the Waste Pro rates.Action items requiring discussionApproval of the strategic planning session list of priorities Winter Park train station de sign development update from ACi Inc. Public HHearings Second reading of the ordi nance relating to Pain Manage ment Clinics and Pharmacies, and repealing the moratorium. Resolution Designating 1509 N. Orange Ave. as a historic resource in the Winter Park Register of Historic Places. Request of Mr. Barry Render: split the property at 1200 Howell Branch Road into two single-fam ily lots zoned R-1AA. Request of CNL Commercial Real Estate: al to construct a three-story, ing site, at 941 W. Morse Blvd.City Commission Reports full agenda at cityofwinterpark. org and by clicking on Govern ment > City Commission > Packets. Earth DDay in the Park The city and Rollins College present Earth Day in the Park from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, April 21, in Central Park. Winter Park Mayor Ken Bradley and Rol lins College President Lewis Dun can will address attendees at 11 a.m. from the main stage. Earth Day in the Park will provide educational workshops focused on recycling, native land scaping, growing organic food and awareness of endangered species. Music will be provided by the Rollins College Music Depart ment led by Dr. John Sinclair. Ad ditional music and a live broad cast will be provided WPRK, the radio station of Rollins College. The citys Forestry Division tendance to answer questions and perform a live tree-planting dem onstration with a 25-foot-tall Live Oak at 11:30 a.m. near the main stage. The division will also give away an array of 3-gallon containerized trees for city residents to plant at home (proof of city resi dency will be requested). A rope course will also be available for anyone willing to try his or her hand at ascending/descending a tree. For more information, call 407599-3364 or visit www.rollins. edu/earthday HHazardous Waste DDisposal The city, in partnership with Waste Pro will be offering hazardous waste disposal for all city residents from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, April 21, at the Public Works Compound located at 1439 Howell Branch Road, directly be hind Fire Station 64. Please bring proof of city residency (drivers license or utility bill statement) along with your hazardous waste items. For more information, call 407-599-3364.Event road closureThe city of Winter Park will host the 11th annual Dinner on the Avenue at 6 p.m. on Saturday, April 21. Tickets have sold out and a record-breaking crowd of 1,200 diners is expected to attend this unique social event. Park Avenue will be closed to all thru traf England Avenue, beginning at 3 p.m. on Saturday, April 21. Call 407-643-1627. MLLK IInput Meeting On Oct. 10, 2011, the City Com mission unanimously voted to ap point a Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., (MLK) Task Force for the purpose of recommending an appropri ate naming opportunity of a city street, park or venue that would honor the memory and accom plishments of Dr. King. The MLK Task Force will host its second public input meeting from 7 to 8 p.m. on Tuesday, April 24, at Mount Moriah Missionary Baptist Church located at 421 S. Pennsylvania Ave. The purpose of this meeting is to discuss the in meeting, and help the task force make a recommendation to the city commission. The attendees were asked to keep the following criteria in mind as they offered suggestions for po tential naming opportunities: The street, park or venue No street, park or venue al ready named after one of the founding or other prominent fam ilies should be renamed. If a street is selected, the number of businesses/residences that will have to incur the incon venience and cost of an address change should be minimized. If a street is selected for re naming, it should either be the whole street or at least start at one end of the street. SSafety & Connectivity Forum The citys Pedestrian & Bicycle Advisory Board will present a Pedestrian & Bicycle Safety and Connectivity Forum from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Thursday, April 26, at the Rachel D. Murrah Civic Cen ter located at 1050 W. Morse Blvd. Attendees will be encouraged to offer comments and share ideas relating to city projects and pro grams so interested parties can work together to make Winter Park friendlier for pedestrians and bicyclists. The forum will also provide in formation on Winter Parks com prehensive pedestrian and bicycle facilities plan. Call 407-599-3217.

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Page 8 Thursday, April 19, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer THISTHIS WEEK The 2012 Florida Film Festival continues at the Enzian Theater in Mait land through Sunday, April 22. Tickets start at $10. Visit FloridaFilmFestival. com APRILIL 19 The Custom & Remodel H Home T T our is April 19. Register at tinyurl.com/ Homes-Parade There will be a Cocktail Reception and Fashion Show at Wearable Art by Scott Laurent from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. on April 19. The Orange Audubon Society will host SShore N Nesting B Birds: Audubon of Floridas Conservation Efforts by Marianne Korosy at 7 p.m. on April 19 at Leu Gardens. Winter Park Institute Making a Dif ference: An Evening with DDr. Jane GGoodall is at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, April 19, at Rollins College. Visit rollins.edu/wpi The Center for Independent Livings SSpring into H Health fair is from 2 to 6 p.m on Thursday, April 19, at 720 N. Denning Drive in Winter Park. It is free to attend. APRILIL 20 The Winter Park Playhouse proudly presents the Tony-Nominated hit Broadway musical BBaby from April 20 to May 12. Visit winterparkplay house.org The historic Annie Russell Theatre at Rollins College produces William Shakespeares LLoves L Labours LLost from April 20-28. Call 407646-2145. APRILIL 21 HHazardous waste disposal for all Winter Park residents is from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, April 21, at the Public Works Compound. The 11th Annual DDinner O On T The Av enue is sold out. It is being held from 6 to 10 p.m. on April 21 on Park Av enue. James Gamble Rogers II Colloquium on Historic Preservation BBack to the Future is at 10 a.m. on Satur day, April 21, at the Winter Park Com munity Center. Contact bowens@ casafeliz.us The Mid-Florida Milers Walking Club will host a walk starting at Mead Gar den, on April 21. Visit midoridamilers.org Rollins Yoga Club is hosting Well BBeing for Water from 9:30 a.m. to noon on Saturday, April 21 at Rollins Colleges Mills Lawn. Email rbogdan@ Rollins.edu The next Works of PUURE L Love ben et for the Back to Nature Wildlife Refuge is 7 to 9 p.m. on Saturday, April 21, at Harwood-Watson Dance Studios. Visit worksofpurelove.org On April 21, the Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra will present SSymphony in HD HD: L Live at Full S Sail U University at Full Sail Live in Winter Park. Visit OrlandoPhil.org/HD APRILIL 22 The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculp ture Gardens hosts the Fourth Annual Winter Park Paint O Out April 22-28. Call 407-647-6294 or visit winter parkpaintout.org The Annual Friends of First ResponseMaitland Kickball Fundraiser is Sunday, April 22. Contact june@ower slabs.com APRILIL 24 SSister Madonna B Buder known as the Iron Nun, speaks at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, April 24, at the Florida Hos pital Orlandos Werner Auditorium. Call 407-303-1700. The Central Florida Watercolor Societys Watercolor I Impressions, runs April 24 to July 15 at Leu Gar dens. An opening reception will be held April 24 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Visit centraloridawatercolor.org APRILIL 25 Hillstone, formerly known as Houstons, is hosting the Sunset PaintIIn on Lake Killarney at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, April 25. The public is invited. APRILIL 26 A Pedestrian & B Bicycle S Safety and Connectivity Forum will be from 6 to 8 p.m. on Thursday, April 26, at the Rachel D. Murrah Civic Center. Call 407-599-3217. The Islamic Society of Central Florida presents a screening and reception for the lm IIslamic Art: Mirror of the I Invisible World from 6 to 8 p.m. on Thursday, April 26, at the Orlando Museum of Art. Visit OrlandoArtMovie. eventbrite.com For Tickets, Class Registration & Schedule of Eventswww.FestivalofChocolate.com April 27-29, 2012The University of Central Florida Arena Orlando, Florida The Ultimate All-Chocolate Shopping, Interactive and Educational Event Featuring the Regions Best Chocolate & Confection Companies SCAN TO WIN Maitland Coin & Currency Show Sunday, April 229:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.Maitland Civic Center 641 South Maitland Avenue Maitland, FL 32751FREE ADMISSIONShow open to the public Buy Sell Trade AppraisalsFor more information call or visitOrlando Coin Exchange 6301 S. Orange Avenue Orlando, FL 32809www.MaitlandCoinShow.comorlandocoinexchange@gmail.com407-730-3116 Join Today! Get Involved!Winter Park Republican Womens GroupLuncheon Meetings held monthly at Flemings in Winter Park. Spouses welcome! Call 407-718-9355 for more information. Calendar Folk Art FestivalThe Third Annual Hannibal Square Heritage Center Folk Art and Traditional Craft Festival is from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday, April 21, at 642 New England Ave. in Winter Park. Its free.

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Page 9 Thursday, April 19, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer LLifestyles 6TH ANNUAL SHRED EVENT Many people start to look to ward retirement when theyre 55. They shore up their savings and turn the page on a more relaxed chapter of their lives. But for Carole Arthurs, age 55 was the beginning of a journey that would have her interviewing former President George H.W. Bush, the Backstreet Boys, and even Captain Kangaroo. Arthurs joined the Winter Park-Maitland Observer, headed by publisher Gerhard Munster, in the late s, becoming one of the areas most familiar faces during her more than 20 years with the paper. She recently bid the community a fond farewell as she headed to North Carolina to live with her daughter, leaving behind a lifetime of friends, memories and special connections. During her time as a journalist, she became well known for stay obligation: accuracy. Winter Park Mayor Ken Bradley recently gave her a proclamation, honoring her service to the community. Ive been interviewed by national media in my role as mayor, and let me just say this, they never got it right. Carole gets it right, he said. the staff was made up of Arthurs, Munster, and Munsters mother, who was the company bookkeeper. This forced Arthurs to become a jack-of-all-trades, writing, taking photos, editing, selling advertising and even pasting up the newspaper on production days. For some of her stories, she went beyond simply doing inter views, immersing herself into top ics. Arthurs recalls going through the Winter Park Citizens Police Academy, as well as the Maitland Citizens Police Academy, so that she could do a story about them. I knew the organization exist ed, and I knew most people didnt know about it, she said. I also wanted to get more people inter ested in going through the pro gram so that if there ever was a disaster, you would have citizens able to help. member of the Maitland Commu nity Emergency Response Team with the same goal in mind. She has many fond memories from her reporting days, such as when she went to cover a press confer ence with President George H.W. Bush at Walt Disney World, with her trusty recorder and camera in tow. Here I am, this little old girl in the middle of all these seasoned reporters, holding up this little re corder, and all of these seasoned reporters had their big, huge cam eras, she said. And here I am, Id never been on a press confer ence in my life. It was something else. After the Observer, she would PhotoHOTO byBY aANDY ceCEBaALLOS theTHE observerOBSERVER Carole Arthurs, right, is pictured with her daughter, Jamie Snyder, and her son Kris Marks at her home April 12. She moved on Saturday. Please see carCAROLeE on page 10Arthurs got her start as a writer at 55 ANDY CeEBaALLOS Observer Staff Carole Arthurs spent 20 years at the Winter Park-Maitland Observer. Arthurs has also worked at The Park Press, and was involved with many organizations in the community, such as the University Club of Winter Park, and the Winter Park and Maitland Rotary clubs.

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Page 10 Thursday, April 19, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer FamilyCalendar go on to work for The Park Press and eventually became involved in the community as a member of many chambers of commerce, as well as rotary clubs and other community service activities. Debra Hendrickson, vice president of the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce, recalls Arthurs work in Leadership Winter Park, motes potential leaders from the business community who desire to become involved in making a difference in Winter Park. Arthurs is a graduate of the 1996 class of that program. She kind of went from being a student, to being on the board of directors, to being a leader of a class, Hendrickson said. She was always willing and able to participate as a volunteer and as a leader for Leadership Winter Park. Bob Mellen, former president of the Maitland Rotary Club, said Arthurs was dedicated to editing the Rotarys weekly bulletin, as well as times she would lead the club in song. She was incredibly dedicat ed, he said. She led the singing, and she would come up with a lot of really clever songs to sing other than Rotary songs. Arthurs said she now plans to continue her work in photog raphy, which became one of her lifelong passions after Munster talked her into starting her own photography business, Carole Ar thurs Photography, in case something happened with the paper. She continues to take photos today and has received many awards for them. Arthur will always be remem bered for the mark shes left in the Winter Park and Maitland communities. Bradley described Arthurs not just as a committed reporter, but as a friend. Carole was a true friend of the community, Bradley said. If you spend time with Carole, you know that afterwards youre bet ter than you [were] before you spent time with her. I think thats a great testimony for her and for her work, and for her legacy in this community. 250 North Orlando Avenue Winter Park, Florida 32789 407.677.9777 A Premier Flooring Source nCARPETOODTONE TILELAMINATE AREA RUGINDO TREATMENT Featuring Exquisite Products for Residential & Commercial Projects Custom Design and Quality Installationn APRILIL 20 Park Maitland Perspectives opens on Friday, April 20, at the Maitland Art Center with a free reception that evening from 6 to 8 p.m. The exhibit features the works of the skillful sixth-grade Park Maitland School students instructed by arts educator Sandy Bonus. Call 407-539-2181 or visit ArtandHistory.org Cornell Fine Arts Museum, in col laboration with the Department of Art and Art History at Rollins College, opens Menagerie, an exhibition to debut the work of 11 senior art majors from the Class of 2012 from 5:30-7:30 p.m. on Friday, April 20. This event is free and open to the public. APRILIL 20 & 27 Friday N Nights at the Morse features free admission to the Morse Museum from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Fridays through April 27. Visit morsemuseum.org APRILIL 21 The city of Winter Park and Rollins College present Earth D Day in the Park on Saturday, April 21, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. in Central Park. The city of Maitland Leisure Services spring Movie in the Park is 8 p.m. Saturday, April 21, featuring the critically acclaimed movie Hugo at Quinn Strong Park. The Maitland Public Library will be hosting a 5k run event on April 21 at Quinn Strong Park. Registra tion opens at 7 a.m. and the race starts at 8 a.m. There is a kids run at 9 a.m. for ages 10 and younger. Call 407-647-7700. ONGOINGONGOING At 10:30 a.m. each Tuesday, the Maitland Public L Library hosts preschool story and craft time. At 10:30 a.m. each Thursday, it hosts baby time stories and activity. At 4 p.m. each Thursday, it hosts Reading Buddies for kindergarten through fth-grade. Call 407-6477700. The Winter Park Farmers Mar ket is held from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Saturday. It is located at the old train depot, at 200 W. New England Ave. Visit CityofWinter Park.org The Maitland Farmers Market is from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. every Sunday. It is located at Lake Lily Park. Visit ItsMyMaitland.com or call 407-539-6268. Food T T ruck Caf is from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. every Wednesday at Lake Lily Park in Maitland. Music at the Casa is a free week ly open house from noon to 3 p.m. on Sundays, featuring live perfor mances and tours of the historic Casa Feliz, at 656 N. Park Ave. in Winter Park. Visit CasaFeliz.us or call 407-628-8200, extension 3. Send submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com carCAROLeE | Winter Parks mayor says Arthurs was a true friend of the community C ONTINUED FROM pagePAGE 9 PhotosHOTOS byBY ISaacAAC BaABcCOckCK theTHE observerOBSERVER TThe NNinth Annual DDoggie Art Festival was held on Park Avenue on April 15. Artist John Margerum, left, shows off his work, appropriately titled Dogs. LLap of luxury

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Page 11 Thursday, April 19, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer HHealthy LLiving Doctors told Stephanie Arthur her twin boys only had a 20 percent chance of sur vival. I looked at my husband, and said, A 20 percent chance is better than a zero percent chance, Arthur said. Arthurs twins were born premature, at 23 weeks, four months too soon, and have been defying the odds ever since with the support of the March of Dimes. We were told Jackson (her son) would be paralyzed from the waist down, and basically told to turn off the machine for Quincy (her other twin son), she said. It was a pretty traumatic and emotional time for us. Arthurs twins are among the 633 ba bies born preterm every week in Florida, and like so many other mothers she never thought shed be tackling the obstacles that can accompany babies born prematurely. When many women get pregnant you think youre going to have a natural and full pregnancy, she said. You never, ever think youre going to have to encounter what we encountered. Arthur said that when she started re searching the causes of premature births March of Dimes immediately came up. After reading hundreds of stories (on the March of Dimes online support group), I through this, but at the same time I realized there was a purpose there for me, she said. And once I saw the impact they (March of Dimes) made on the community, and how I could get involved, thats really what drove me to really make a difference. The March of Dimes is continuing to impact lives with their biggest fundraising event, March for Babies, at Lake Eola on run will help raise money and awareness for the March of Dimes, and support fami lies in need. March of Dimes Central Florida Divi sions Executive Director Elisabeth Stuart said the March for Babies is a family event. This years goal is for the event to raise $670,000. We have a lot of family teams that are parents that have had babies born prema ture or with a birth defect, and they know have received from all of the advances in medicine that have been achieved by the March of Dimes, Stuart said. The infant mortality rate is 6.9 per 1,000 live births in Orange County, and one in seven babies (14.8 percent of live births) are born preterm. The March of Dimes spends 75 percent of the money raised in March for Babies on research and programs that promote the health of babies. By walking and raising money to help the March of Dimes, it sup ports all-important research offering pre ventions and solutions for babies born too soon or with birth defects, educates wom en on things they can do to increase their chances of having a healthy baby, provides comfort and information to families with a baby in intensive care and pushes for new born screening and health insurance for all pregnant women and children. March of Dimes board member and volunteer Roger Jeffrey has been involved with the March of Dimes for 25 years, and said he believes its a great way to help others. You cant walk away from that event without feeling good about people, because everyones there for the same purpose to do something in some way shape, or form to save babies, Jeffrey said. Its very uplift ing and a joy to be involved. Arthur and her family are now also ex periencing the joy of being involved in the March of Dimes by becoming this years ambassador family, as they continue to tackle the obstacles that come their way; while reaching out to share their story and walking for a cause near and dear to their hearts. We decided to share our story and give parents hope, Arthur said. It doesnt matter how many times I talk about them, my eyes always tear up. 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Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! 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Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com The 2012 March of Dimes, March for Babies is on Saturday, April 28, at Lake Eola in downtown Orlando. Registration begins at 6:30 a.m. For more information or to sign up visit marchforbabies.org or call 407-599-5077. PhotosHOTOS courtesyCOURTESY ofOF marcMARCH OfF DImeMES TThe 2012 March of D Dimes March for B Babies is Satur day, April 28, at Lake Eola to bring awareness to preterm babies. SStephanie Arthur right, poses with her twin boys, who were born four months early.Walking for babies KrRISTY VIckerCKER Y Observer Staff

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Page 12 Thursday, April 19, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer You are what you eat, a common refrain, also translates to your baby is what you eat, too. Moms healthy eating for growing a strong, healthy baby starts before conception and continues through breastfeeding. The healthier you are before getting pregnant, the more likely you are to have a healthy pregnancy and a healthy baby. Balanced meals with a variety of fruits and vegetables of many colors, mixed with lean pro tein sources and whole grains are a great formula for good health. Whole grains with plenty of fruits and vegetables can give your body and your growing baby the nutrients for good health. Find new ways to add vegetables to your meals. Switch to veggie pizzas. Add an extra tomato slice to your sandwich. Of course, avoid alcohol and tobacco before and after having a baby. We dont know what a safe level of alcohol might be, so it is best to avoid all beer, wine and other alcoholic drinks. And the damage of prenatal smoking and second-hand smoke is well known. Dont do it to yourself or your baby. If you smoke, call the Florida Tobacco Free Help Line at 877-UCANNOW for help. Look for these nutrients: Folate, a Vitamin B, prevents birth defects affecting the brain and Prior to and during pregnancy, try to have plenty of foods with folate. Folate is found in leafy green vegetables, beans, citrus, prenatal folic acid. Calcium is a critical building block for bones and teeth, and a great source of Vitamin D. Aim for at least three cups a day of low-fat milk, yogurt or cheeses. If you and milk dont get along, try calciumIron is used to make red blood blood cells that are too small and too light) can be avoided with dark leafy vegetables. Popeye got his strength from spinach (a dark leafy vegetable) precisely because it prevented anemia. Popeyes mother also ate spinach when she was pregnant. Lean protein helps the babys growth. Look for lean cuts of meats and dont underestimate the power of beans and soy cooked with good Water is a basic building block of life. Especially in the warm weather, aim to drink 10 glasses of water, sodas as much as possible. They provide no nutrition and give you ers. Avoid risky foods provide protein and omega-3 fatty acids, which are good for brain development. But with so much contamination in our planets mercury to hurt a babys nervous system development. Avoid the mercury seafood such as shrimp, canned tuna. Stick to well-cooked foods. Raw or eggs can carry harmful bacteria and viruses. When you are preg nant, your immune system is not as strong so you need to avoid infection risks. Raw oysters may be the food of love, but not of pregnancy. en, turkey or eggs can make you sick, too. Eggs over easy may not go over easy with your health. Pasteur ized dairy products are also a safer way to go than unpasteurized. BBreastfeeding When breastfeeding your pre cious baby, continue to eat healthy foods and drink plenty of water so your body can make healthy milk. Know that anything that can cause gas or heart burn in you is doubly likely to upset a newborn stomach. A great night out at Taco Tuesday may mean staying up late Tuesday night with an unhappy baby. Maitland resident Nancy Rudner Lugo is a nurse practitioner and president of Health Action, offering workplace health consulting and nurse coaching. Visit www.healthaction. biz Dr. Nancy Rudner LugoHealth Action TThink: YY our food, your baby On Saturday, April 21, and Sunday, April 22, Bike MS: The Citrus Tour will host more than 1,000 bikers as they take to the roads of Bok Tower Gardens to help fundraise for multiple sclerosis. This is the 25th anniversary of the National MS Society Mid-Florida Chapters signature fundraising event. The event is recognized as one of the best two-day, fully supported cycling events in Florida, annually attracting more than 1,500 cyclists of all skill levels from across the country. Bike MS takes place in more than 100 cities nationwide and is one of the largest fundraising bike events in the United States. MS is a chronic, often disabling disease that attacks the central nervous system, which is made up of the brain, spi nal cord and optic nerves. Symptoms may be mild, such as numbness in the limbs, or severe, such as paralysis or loss of vision. The local MS Chapter serves more than 73,000 people in a 23 county area. Typically targeting adults between the ages of 20 and 50, this disease typically impacts people in the peak of their careers and life plans. Mark A. Eberbach, MD, at Eberbach Plastic Surgery, has headed his own team for years and has these helpful tips for riders: 1) A great ride experience needs planning and practice. Dont change your gear just before the big ride. No one wants sores or achy joints from new shoes or saddle posi tion. Remember your chamois butter. 2) Good nutrition is essential for a 100-mile ride. You will need about 100 calories for every 20 minutes of riding. You should use the sponsored SAG stops to your advan tage, and eat small quantities frequently. 3) Hydration. On a hot day in April one could easily go through 1 liter every hour of riding. Hydrate well the night before and start early the morning of the ride. Bike MS: The Citrus Tour to help beat multiple sclerosis Join the Movement toward a world free of MS by making donations or participating in Bike MS: The Citrus Tour 2012. For more information visit http://Bikec.nationalmssociety.org healthy 125 the City of Winter Park 188 7 201 2thA NNIVERSA RY Work Well Winter Park is a movement spearheaded by the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce.Visit us at www.workwellwinterpark.org 1. Mondays with Mandy Fun fitness classes held at Winter Park Community Center. Details available at www.WorkWellWinterPark.org.2. Tuesday Tips Sign up at www.WorkWellWinterPark.org for weekly email. Check your inbox for simple health and wellness tips.3. Health Education Series Monthly lunch and learns featuring experts in nutrition, physical activity and stress management. Free admission for Work Well Winter Park participating companies; $5 for non-participants.4. Weekly Walk Get a fresh start to your morning with a 30-minute walk. Meet at Winter Park Welcome Center every Thursday at 8 a.m.Start Working Well!Work Well Winter Park Day was a tremendous success! Carry the momentum forward with four simple ways to work well:

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Page 13 Thursday, April 19, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer 2012 CENTRAL FLORIDA MARCH FOR BABIES FACT SHEET WHEN: Saturday, April 28, 2012 WHERE: WHAT: $1.9 billion WHY: The United States has a higher infant mortality rate than 29 other countries HOW: Or sign up at marchforbabies.org ONE HOURMASSAGE$3995*A $79.95 VA LUE! ONE HOURFACIAL$4995*A $79.95 VA LUE! MASSAGE | FACIALS | WAXING MASSAGE AND FACIAL SPA Open 7 days | Walk-ins Welcome Extended Hourshandandstone.comHand & Stone Massage and Facial Spa consistently delivers professional massage & facial services at affordable prices 7 days a week. WINTER PARK | 407-622-0227 480 N Orlando Ave l Winter Park Village Grand Opening!*Introductory offers valid for first time visit only. Not valid for gift cards. Sessions include time for consultation and dressing. Rates and services may vary by location. Offers may not be combined. MM22195/CE9988346 Hand & Stone Franchise Corp. Franchises Available. Independently Owned & Operated. Tom Carey SundewGardens@gmail.comHomegrown always tastes better. Experience homegrown gardening: If you are a new mother or recently pregnant, chances are you have felt the wisp of air that follows the pendulum of mod ern medicine as it swings by yet again. The topic this time: elective deliveries before 39 weeks of gestation. Prior to taking a hard look at outcomes, the consensus in the medical community was that 37 weeks was considered term and deliveries after that point are deemed safe. So off we went and phone calls funneled into labor and deliver wards to schedule elective deliveries. Her husband is getting deployed. Texas to help with the sibling. Shes miserable. We are headIn 1990, 10 percent of deliver ies were electively performed before 39 weeks. Until recently, they accounted for nearly 25 percent of all deliveries. With the emphasis of evidence-based medicine, the pendulum is now swinging the other way and we, as a community, are learning that there is true merit to the saying, patience is a virtue. So what is the big deal? It has become apparent that babies born between 37 and 39 weeks are more likely to have respiratory problems and simply put, they have more growing to do. The brain and liver continue to develop between 39 and 40 weeks. Perhaps most evident is the increased trouble they have with feeding because the coordination required for sucking has not matured. On the maternal front, there is a higher rate of Csections in this patient population as well. This mode of delivery inherently carries increased risks including infection, bleeding and post-delivery pain. And if this isnt reason enough to shy away from early elective cant economic impact as a result of this practice. C-sections are more expensive to perform and lead to longer hospitalizations. Infants that are not fully mature can require intensive neonatal care and that is costly. A study last year estimated that reducing early-term births to 1.7 percent could save close to $1 billion an nually. I personally have found that after appropriate counsel ing, patients are supportive of whatever delivery plan is best for their baby. Not only is an elective induction before 39 weeks against my practices policy, but it is also against hospital policy. Increased awareness of the dangers associ ated with preterm births is on the rise thanks to initiatives such as the March of Dimes Prematurity Campaign. Hospitals in multiple states, including Florida, have stopped elective deliveries inductions and cesarean sections before 39 weeks. This information wouldnt be complete without offering a few care professionals do not hesitate to recommend delivery before 39 weeks if there is a medical reason to proceed. These indications could include, but are not limited to: a mother sick with preeclampsia, uncontrolled diabetes and concerns for babys health, such as small size. Patient care in these situations is very individualized, and the risks of continuing the pregnancy can outweigh the This subject leads me to reminiscence about my inter view days before residency. A wise physician sat in front of me, looked at my resume, and then pulled his reading glasses down on his nose to look me in the eyes. He then asked, Can you tell me three attributes that make a good obstetrician? As I paused and shifted uncomfortably in my chair, much to my relief, he proceeded, A good obstetrician is a team player, decisive and perhaps most importantly is patient. We are the only docs that wait 9 months for something to happen. Dont rush things in its Stone. Coming from a physician who has long felt the breeze from the ever-swinging pendulum of medicine, I take great heed in his guidance. And from our experiences, weve learned. It is time to be patient and let Mother Nature do the planning. Dr. Pamela Snook is a board-certied obstetrician and gynecologist who completed her residency at Shands at the University of Florida. She has been a practicing physician for more than seven years and has garnered a special interest in high-risk obstetrics, infertility and gynecologic surgery. She practices at Contemporary Womens Care, 2111 Glenwood Drive, Ste. 208 in Winter Park. Visit www.myobgynorlando.comTry to avoid pre-term delivery DrDR. Pame AMELaA SSNOOkK Guest Writer Pamela SSnook

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Page 14 Thursday, April 19, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Healthy lifestyles have never tain. Our hectic schedules make to exercise or prepare a healthy meal for our family. The fact of the matter is that we all have the time and resources necessary to make smart choices to ensure a healthy future for our families and ourselves. The manufactured appeal of so-called conveniences put thousands at risk for developing preventable diseases, including Type 2 diabetes. Diabetes is a serious health condition that can lead to heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, high blood pressure and blind ness. Millions of Americans are diagnosed with the disease each year, and 35 percent of all adults have been diagnosed as pre-diabetic. Nearly 15 percent of those considered pre-diabetic will prog ress to diabetes this year. Local organizations in the community have rallied to provide resources and programs to combat these startling statistics. The YMCA Diabetes Preven tion Program is one such program created in partnership with UnitedHealth Group and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Program partici pants meet with trained lifestyle coaches who teach lessons about healthy eating, physical activity and other behaviors that can help reduce their risk for developing the disease. You can take charge and reclaim your health by participat ing in similar prevention pro grams, or making a few simple swaps in your daily life. mend 150 minutes of weekly physical activity. Switch up your routine by walking on your lunch break or bicycling around the neighborhood with your family after work. takes a few minutes to prepare a healthy meal for your family, and your local grocery store is a great resource for quick, weeknight dinner recipes. In the time you spend waiting in the drive-thru line for your order, you could have enjoyed a fresh meal with your family. Enjoy one guilt-free home cooked meal and youll never think about those on-the-go meals again. help you succeed can be found right in your own community. Local organizations provide educational resources, and your friends and neighbors can help motivate you. Try meeting friends to walk together or host a healthy cookout to encourage others to enjoy nutritious new tastes. Lets change the way we think about health and wellness. Maintaining a healthy lifestyle is achievable and together we can reduce our communitys risk for Type 2 diabetes. Kelly Prather is the wellness operations director for the YMCA of Central Florida. Its not just about getting you back on your feet. Its about getting you back to your life. HCR Healthcare, LLC Rehabilitation and Skilled Nursing Hours: M-F 8am to 4:30pm 2315 Lee Road Winter Park, Florida 32789 Your Guiding Beacon for Quality Healthcare Harbour Private Duty Nursing, LLCSkilled Nursing Physical Therapy Occupational Therapy Companionship Home Health Aid Homemaking Flexible Schedules Free RN Assessments The Services of Harbour Private Duty Nursing provide peace of mind to loved ones, trust ofcers, guardians and physicians. Our professional team prides itself on making your life easier. We also provide in-hospital private duty care, which offers close, personal attention and reassurance in an unfamiliar and often frightening environment. Our ofce hours are Monday through Friday, 8:00 am to 4:30 pm. Our professional team is available 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. During hours when the ofce is closed and during the weekends and holidays, the on-call coordinator is available by telephone 24 hours per day.www.HarbourPrivateDutyNursing.com License # 299991382phone (407) 895-8188 fax 407-895-9339 More and more births are being scheduled a little early for non-medical reasons. Experts are learning that this can cause problems for both mom and baby. If possible, the March of Dimes recommends for you to stay pregnant for at least 39 weeks. If your pregnancy is healthy, wait for labor to begin on its own. We know you cant wait to meet your baby face to face. But getting to at least 39 weeks gives your baby the time he needs to grow. There are lots of important things happening to your baby in the last few weeks of pregnancy. For example, your baby's brain and lungs are still growing. You might not have a choice about when to have your baby. If there are problems with your pregnancy or your baby's health, you may need to have your baby earlier. But if you have a choice and you're planning to schedule your baby's birth, wait until at least 39 weeks. The March of Dimes Healthy Babies are Worth the Wait education campaign and obstetric provider groups advise that you wait until at least 39 weeks to induce labor or have a cesarean birth (also called a c-section) if it is needed. The campaign was developed in response to the growing number of inductions and c-sections prior to 39 weeks for non-medical reasons.Why babies need timeBabies born too early may have more health problems at birth and later in life than babies born full term. Here's why your baby needs 39 weeks: time they need to develop. birth. a healthy weight have an easier time staying warm than babies born too small. eat after he's born. Babies born early sometimes can't do these things.Why scheduling an early birth can be a problem Experts are learning that scheduling an early birth for nonmedical reasons can cause problems for mom and baby. For example: hard to know just when you got pregnant. Even with an ultrasound, your due date can be off by as much as 2 weeks. If you schedule to induce labor or schedule a c-section and your date is off by a week or two, your baby may be born too early. medicine your doctor or certied nurse-midwife gives you may not start your labor. When this happens, you may need to have a c-section. by c-section may have more breathing and other medical problems than babies born by vaginal birth. (Most babies are born by vaginal birth. The mother's uterus contracts to help push the baby out through the vagina, also called the birth canal.) Once you have a c-section, you may be more likely in future pregnancies to have a c-section. The more c-sections you have, the more problems you and your baby may have, including problems with the placenta. you to recover from a c-section than from a vaginal birth. You can expect to spend 2 to 4 days in the hospital after a c-section. Then you'll need 4 to 6 weeks after you go home to fully recover. You also could have complications from to stay in touch with your health care provider even after you go home. The March of Dimes is the leading nonprot organization for pregnancy and baby health. With chapters nationwide and its premier event, March for Babies, the March of Dimes works to improve the health of babies by preventing birth defects, premature birth and infant mortality. For the latest resources and information, visit marchofdimes.com/orida or nacersano.org. Find us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter. For more information and questions to ask your medical provider, please visit our website at marchofdimes.com. March of Dimes wants you to know that Healthy Babies are Worth the Wait Reduce your risk for Type 2 diabetes KeELLY PraRA THerER Guest Writer Kelly Prather

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Page 15 Thursday, April 19, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer On Wednesday, April 11, Work Well Winter Park hosted its rst lunch and learn in the new Health Education Series. Work Well partner Whole Foods Market kickedo the series by introducing the Heath Starts Here Program. is program incorporates Whole Foods Markets 7th core value, Promoting the health of our stake holders by healthy eating education. Healthy Eating Specialist, Lois Dorotiak, introduced the basic components of the program: whole foods, plant strong, healthy fats and nutrient dense. She then explained each of the four pillars. When foods are in their purest state, whole food, we believe they taste the best and are the most nutritious food available. No matter what type of diet you follow-including those with dairy, meat or seafoodyour plate at each meal should contain an abundance of plants. at is what plant strong means. Healthy fats come from whole plant sources, such as nuts, seeds and avocado. ese foods are rich in micronutrients. We work to eliminate extracted oils and processed fats. Nutrient dense foods are rich in micronutrients when compared to total calories. Micronutrients include vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and phytochemicals. Lois taught attendees that regularly utilizing this simple format when lling ones plate sets the stage for a healthy eating lifestyle. To drive these points home, Lois served a fresh fruit salad with a sprinkle of cinnamon. She oered samples of nut milks and a variety of seeds. en, she water sauted a variety of vegetables and added a plant strong protein. is was layered with avor using no salt seasonings and no oil dressings. Adding a cooked portion of vegetables to a raw bed of mixed greens proved to delight the audience. Dessert was simple, yet seemed decadent. By removing the stone from a medjool date and lling it with a combination of pecan pieces and raw cacao, Lois created a creamy chocolate taste. She likened it to chocolate pecan pie, though loaded with nutrients instead of processed sugar. Perhaps the biggest surprise was experienced by the audience. Oen when eating this way, most think they will not become full or satised. Instead, the group recognized how little they needed to experience a satised yet full stomach. Whole Foods Market has an extensive website featuring the Health Starts Here program. You can easily revise your pantry, take a 28-day challenge and explore a wide array of recipes. For more information visit www.WholeFoodsMarket.com or stop by the Whole Foods Market in Winter Park and pay Lois a visit. Work Well Winter Park is a movement spearheaded by the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce to improve the health and well-being of the workforce in our community by creating lasting, cultural change. is collaborative and easily implemented initiative will encourage employers in Winter Park to adopt and execute practical policies supporting workplace wellness. For more information, visit www.workwellwinterpark.org.Lois DorotiakHealthy Eating/Green Mission Specialist1989 Aloma Ave Winter Park, FL 32792 Tel: 407-673-8788 Around this time of year it begins. Bathing suits in the windows of your favorite stores, magazine covers of celebrities sporting their bikinis on white sandy beaches, and the ever present thought that you should probably start eating healthier. As a young woman in this community and a mother of two children under 4, I can tell you it is hard to choose healthy. Finding the time to work out, let alone Im trying to get out the door in the morning is not an easy task. But I know it can be done! get healthy for my two little boys. I want to be a good example for them on what someone should eat and what one shouldnt. I want to live a long, healthy, active life so that I can be around for them. And wouldnt we all love to rock a bikini body and be excited about the way we look? I even have a little extra motivation after picking out a gorgeous bikini from Thread Winter Park. Here are some things you should know about me: My diet has grilled cheese sandwiches. When they eat Menchies frozen yogurt, I eat Menchies! Needless to say I do not feel bikini ready this year. My mother has guru since I was young, and I was raised playing sports with my brothers. So I have always been active, but where do you little boys, community efforts and a full-time job? And lets just say my diet makes my mother cringe. I can tell you that I have never looked at a plate and counted calories, and I am blessed that I enjoy running be cause I never pass on a dessert. This year I want to take advantage of this motivation I have to look good in my bathing suit this summer and become a healthier person for myself and for my family. So here is the plan: For the next 60 days, I am going to eat right and commit to exercising on a regular basis, and I am going to be accountable to you through my Fit for the Fourth blog debuting Monday, April 23, on the Winter Park-Maitland Observers website, and I am going to share all her tips with you. I am also going to work with local trainers and take different classes around town and tell not thin. I want it to be about feeling healthy, and in the end, I want to achieve a bikini body I am proud of just in time for the Fourth of July. I am going to be honest with you through it all. If over the weekend I dive into some chocolate chip cookie dough, you are go ing to hear about it. If I skip a workout, you can give me a hard time. But I also want this to inspire you to try a new class, or maybe curve your appetite to something a little healthier. Join me in my 60-day challenge to get Fit for the Fourth! PhotoHOTO byBY ISaacAAC BaABcCOckCK theTHE observerOBSERVER NNew HHope for Kids held its annual Art of the Vine fundraiser at Fields BMW on April 13.Join me in my pledge to get t SaraSARAH GrafGRAFTON Guest Writer SSarah GGrafton To read Sarahs Fit for the Fourth blog debuting Monday, April 23, scan this QR code or visit wpmobserver.com BBenet for hope

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Page 16 Thursday, April 19, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer OOpinions Nobody likes having to pay taxes, not even Warren Buffett. But as a piece of legislation with the famed billionaires name on learned the insane extreme our legislators are willing to go to stop them. Should the richest Americans be allowed to avoid paying taxes on their investment income? Should the most successful investors, raking in billions, only have to pay 15 percent tax on it? Should Buffett get to pay a lower tax percentage than his secretary? On Monday the U.S. Senate said yes to all three, grossly distorting the process. In a perfect world, where everybody got along, everybody pitched in equally, and nobody ever victimized anybody else, maybe we wouldnt need taxes. It would be the perfect balance of share, and wed all get what we deserve through some magical system that made everything we communally enjoy roads, wa ter, clean air and protection from universal. But our uniquely American standard of living isnt free. It never has been. Human nature dictates that in order to protect ourselves from the freedom of anarchy, we need to all contribute to keep society together. That costs money. So we have taxes the necessary evil of living in our great society to pay for it. Despite lessons learned in exactly what works and what doesnt to bolster our economy, as the Keynesians argue with the Friedmanites over bottom-up versus top-down growth, weve entered a new era of absurdity in taking an eraser to the chalk board of history class. And thats given rise to an untenable precept That the necessary evil of taxes isnt necessary at all. Its just evil. Enter the starve the beast concept: highlight the national debt as a hulking harbinger of our doom, use it to encourage cutting all non-military, non-pris on government programs, and outlaw the idea of raising taxes on anybody. Thats where we run into the confusing array of politically aligned directives that seem to be grossly inappropriate bedfel lows. The pro-war, pro-military themselves in the same ranks as those who want to cut government spending and cut taxes, even for, and sometimes espe cially for, the rich. No coincidence that, according to a November 2011 ABC News poll, 67 percent of the Senate and 47 percent of Congress are millionaires. The professed fear by our legislature is that any added (or merely maintained) tax burden on the so-called job creators would hurt their post-tax incomes and blunt the hypothetical future job creating they would be doing. But in leaving the top 1 per cent of earners with their lowest top tier tax rate in 80 years, as re ported by the Urban Institute and Brookings Institute Tax Policy Center, weve seen exactly what wed expect to see, given human nature. Those who were already very rich, particularly individual investment speculators, have done very little to add jobs while enjoying the lions share of the economic growth weve experienced in the last three years. According to a study by the University of California published March 2, the top 1 percent of earners saw 93 percent of the the economic recovery alone. And if those income gains came from investments (the Dow Jones Industrial Average has more than doubled since its crash level of 6,547.05 in 2008), then were getting nearly nothing for their gains at our expense. And despite this professed need to cut taxes on the rich so theyll create jobs, weve created no mecha nism to force them to actually do so. We can promise the top earners that well keep their taxes low, but we can never be ensured that theyll hold up their end of the bargain. Of course the cries of Buffett should just volunteer to pay more taxes have resounded off the thick dome of the blogosphere ever since he suggested we force the super rich to pay more. But that point rings hollow to those who know human nature. Taxes are a necessary evil because, if were not forced to contribute, the richest among us will do anything they can to avoid contribut ing to the necessary good. Our Observation LLetters to the editor Send your thoughts (400 words or less) to Managing Editor Jenny Andreasson at editor@observernewspapers.com GGo green with giving With the proliferation of advice on sustainable living, its no wonder that consumers are overwhelmed by the thought of going green. This Earth Day, Goodwill Industries of Central Florida wants the public to know that they can make a dif ference through the simple act of donating gently used clothing or household items to Goodwill. Each year, donors help Goodwill divert more than two billion pounds of usable the environment is only part of the story. Revenue from the sale of donated items at Goodwill stores funds job training pro grams, employment placement services and other vital programs in the commuTo show individuals that their donations truly impact their communities, Goodwill developed the patent-pending Donation Impact Calculator at www. donate.goodwill.org The calculator shows son receiving services from Goodwill. For example, one working computer translates into 5.8 hours of a job search class. On Earth Day, April 22, commit to making one small green change in your life. In dividual actions add up to global impact. Bill Oakley President and CEO Goodwill Industries of Central Florida Attend disabilities forum on TT uesday As a state legislator, I have the unique opportunity to listen and work with many different individuals and groups on a vari ety of issues. One cause that is of particular importance to me is facilitating opportunities for individuals with disabilities. Here in Central Florida, we are fortunate to have several strong support organizations for disabled individuals, such as Quest Inc. We also have local employers such as Rosen Hotels and Publix Supermarkets that have created diverse job opportunities to help people work hard and earn good livings. However, there are people and employers who have not yet learned of the opportunities that exist when they connect, and on Tuesday, April 24, I will be hosting a summit in Apopka to bring our community together. My summit is geared toward connecting our community members and local incentives and opportunities that are available for hiring individuals with disabilities. If you have a family member or a tion, you are highly encouraged to attend as many outstanding community partners will be on hand to discuss education op portunities, vocation support programs, among other important information. Goodwill Industries of Central Florida has been extremely helpful in securing outstanding presenters and participants, including Walt Disney World, Lynx and the Disability Chamber of Commerce of Central Florida. This free community event opens at 8 a.m. for networking at the Apopka Com munity Center/VFW located at 519 S. Central Ave. in Apopka. At 8:30 a.m., I will begin the program, along with Goodwill Industries CEO Mr. William Oakley. Ms. Jeannie Amendola from Walt Disney World will be providing some myth bust ing about hiring persons with disabilities, while Mr. Bill Hearndon from Lynx will talk about the transportation programs available for individuals who may have well as the future of this important issue. Two exciting panels will follow focusing on several critical issues such as on-the-job training, employment scenarios as well as sharing success stories from local employ ers. The event will conclude before 11 a.m. In addition to panels and speakers, sev eral government and community organizations will be on hand to share information on the services and programs available to both prospective employers and employees and their families. The State Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, the Agency for Persons with Disabilities, the Veterans Administration and Social Security are just some of the key organizations that will be on hand during the event. This is an excellent chance to meet with representatives from these agencies and discuss the programs available for your friend or loved one please make sure you attend! I am extremely pleased to invite you to attend this important summit on working with and hiring individuals with disabilities. With persons with disabilities facing an unemployment rate above 15 percent, it is important that we work together to educate our local businesses on the op portunity we have to address this issue. This is a win-win situation for employers, the employees and their families, and our community. I look forward to a strong response from our community for this important discussion. If you would like to participate in this event as a local partner or would like additional information, look forward to seeing you on Tuesday!State Rep. Bryan Nelson District 38 BBuffeting a move for fairer taxes The richest will do anything they can to avoid contributing to the necessary good. King Features Weekly ServiceApril 16, 2012 King Features Weekly ServiceApril 16, 2012

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Page 17 Thursday, April 19, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer I spoke with Joel Salatin this week. Joel is working on the leading edge of sustainable farming practices at his Polyface Farm in the Shenandoah Valley of Vir ginia. He makes an appearance in the movie Food, Inc. and numerous other contemporary agricultural media productions. Hes written several books, with his most recent titled Folks, This Aint Normal. The Homegrown Co-op online farmers market and Slow Foods sponsored Joels speaking visit to Rollins College on April 18. Tom Carey: How big is your vegetable garden? Joel Salatin: Its hard to say, but a quarter acre would be about correct and add a quarter acre in hoop houses. As the animals from the hoop houses come out in the spring, we then go in with veg etables starting with sweet corn. We do a lot of micro-site gardening. Shitake logs under the eaves of the barn get the roof dripping on them. Where the cows are kept at the hay shed in the wintertime, the deep bedding gets churned up muddy and heavily fertilized, almost compost. We grow our potatoes there, its already tilled up, and so we just set the potatoes on the ground under some straw. Another barn we have has a southern exposure and thats where we grow our cucumbers. They grow up the side of the barn with moisture dripping from the awnings. Its a real nice fertile micro-site, full of red wrigglers, with compost from the barn animals. You can get a lot of space real quick using micro-sites. Tom: At my gardens, I get a lot of requests from folks wanting to help to get some dirt under their Farms Facebook posts and blogs by your interns and apprentices. Do you look at your educational help as a source of affordable labor, or do you put emphasis on teaching the next generation of farmers to help them dip their toe in the water? Joel: We do look at it as an education, and while we certainly do work them plenty hard, we also do some formal evening lectures; we visit other farms and agricultural enterprises. Lest anybody think this is cheap labor when youve rewelded the trailer hitch for the 10th time because somebody took off without lift ing up the jack. This cheap labor comes with a cost. Tom: Ive read your new book, Folks, This Aint Nor mal, and numerous Acres USA columns and articles. Following the themes you write about, do you see that decentralized food cient due to appropriate technol ogy and information sources? Joel: We are seeing a lo cal food tsunami that is being enabled by technology. A big hurdle has been economy of scale farm and fork. You cant expect everybody to drive around to 10 farms to get their food. Now, there are companies that are elec tronic farmers markets (Home grown Co-op). The electronic media technology was developed for globalization but is being coopted to enable localization. Well see a move away from bricks and mortar to embracing the electronic commerce interface. Were to interface the customer and producer. Were making an end run around big warehousing. Retail faades are too expensive, from display coolers and cash registers, to stocking shelves with retail processed products. We did a comparison of our prices and were now cheaper than most competitors in our area, even the organic supermarkets. By lever electronic interface were seeing the beginning of the future. To be continued Pick up the April 26 issue of the Observer for the second part of my interview with Joel Salatin.Tom Carey is the owner of Sundew Gar dens, a you-pick gardening business in Oviedo. Visit the Sundew Gardens Facebook page. Chris Jepson Perspectives OOn loosening ones jaw Musica Proibita In the mind of every mature artist resides a memory that was the beginning of his art, an inspiration that grew into an all-encompassing passion. The mind of an his grateful lifetimes work. In 1932, I began seventh grade in a class of 27 at Winter Park High School, which was over on Huntington Avenue. (The small center building of today was once grades seven through 12.) My family had moved from a little house almost on the Rollins campus to Forest Hills, at that time a sparsely settled, even lonely, part of Winter Park near Lake Sue. Forest Hills particularly after dark had an eerie, wild beauty with its few houses, untended orange groves, and palmetto and pine wildernesses resounding with the cries of Chuck-wills-widows in the night. Across Lake Sue was Orlando, another country seldom invaded by us, except for necessary visits to Sears and Roebuck. Our only neighbors my age were Hope Strong, across Lake Chelton, Peggy Caldwell (later Mrs. Hope Strong), a next door neighbor a hundred yards away through the forest, and Bob Pratt, who house on the shore of Lake Sue. In our house on Rockwood Road, I found a large, hand-cranked Victrola in the room assigned to me as my bedroom. This outmoded machine was the last vestige of past tenants. I found one lone record in the stor age compartment at the bottom of the Victrola.Presto change-o! I was the proud owner not only of an enormous Victrola, but also a record to play. The one-sided, thick but very fragile Victor record was of Enrico Caruso, singing in Italian a song called Musica Proibita (Forbidden Music). Day after day I played that record, to the distraction of my parents, and maybe even the Caldwells, who were within earshot. Soon I had learned the song in Italian, by rote, though I did not understand a word. I began singing along with the immor tal voice of Caruso. I felt the power and strength of that in comparable voice, and somehow equated Carusos natural manly singing technique with my other interests, such as the Boy Scouts, boxing, tennis and 100-pound football. I was later the center and captain of the Winter Park High School team, the Wildcats. I dont know what my rough and tumble teammates would have thought of my trying to sing in the manner of Caruso. I certainly didnt tell them; much less try my voice out in the large shower room we all shared. However, after four years at Harvard College, followed by four years as a naval an opera and concert star in North America and most of the countries of Europe. All my concert programs since my de but as soloist with the New York Philhar monic in 1948 included my inspirational song, Musica Proibita. This was a piece I never had to learn the notes were chiseled in my head and heart for all time. After I learned Italian, the words spoke to me eloquently. Eighty years later, that song is still a thrilling challenge, just as it was when it dared me, a kid of 10, to get up on my hind legs and sing to the world!About Roney: HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney)You take the same exit off Interstate 4 to reach the luxurious Mall at Millenia or The Holy Land Experience. I laughed out loud when I made that connection. Contrary to Matthew 6:24, you can have both God and mammon. Just off Exit 78 in Orlando, Fla. God as a theme park? The idea of God quill to parchment. To claim to know the mind of God is what classic Greeks con demned most in man hubris, a quality harshly punished by the Greek gods. That doesnt seem so much the case these days. Folks (devout and otherwise) speak for God with impunity; I suppose because they think they have immunity. Or, they have the word. Is that one and the same? Subscribing to the word anoints one with immunity? Certainty and righteousness are two human qualities that set my jaw. One of my favorite Ralph Waldo Emerson quotes goes, A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds, adored by little statesman and philosophers and divines. And I accuse myself of an intol closed mind. I grew up an atheist. My father, as did his father, had little use for organized religion. He simply didnt see the need for either God or the accompanying religions claiming to know the word. It was ludicrous. Why subscribe to super stition? Why ignore mankinds extended history of an evolving godhead? Why absolve God for the atrocities done in his name (see all of human history)? Why check your brain at the door when considering God and faith? Why spend (much or any) time on what is undeni ably unknowable? Whats interesting about my fathers relationship to religion is that he never once said categorically, I am an atheist. He would have wanted me to reach my own conclusions without his fatherly imprimatur. And I did. Clichs say it all: the acorn doesnt fall far from the tree or as the twig is bent so grows the tree. I am my fathers son, and I am proud to say so, but along with the wheat came the chaff. And that is an important thing to separate. To let go of, if you will. Father had a pro found intolerance for ignorance. It was unacceptable. Sloppy thinking was unacceptable. Subscribing to superstition and religion (one and the same) are examples of shoddy thinking and hence I agree wholeheartedly with his per spective, except I have reconsidered his disdain for sloppy thinking. I choose to critique the faithful not so much as thinking sloppily, but as thinking differ ently. And that, I confess, has been a long time in coming. Indeed. ing. How can one not? To claim to know the mind of God, cmon. Hubris? And your God is jealous? Stop it! What intrigues me is the low regard in which atheists are considered in America. One recent poll had atheists trailing rap ists in public approval. Elect an atheist rapist I have a recommendation concerning the dialogue of religion in public life. Lets start from the following premise: As an atheist, I am no more immoral for believing as I do, as you are necessarily ignorant for believing as you do. I think that go ahead and laugh ecumenical. After all, Reciprocity is the lubricant of life. A biblical verse? Live it.Jepson is a 24-year resident of Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.USLouis Roney Play On! Tom Carey From my garden to yoursJoel Salatin talks gardens, technology Joel SSalatin

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Page 18 Thursday, April 19, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer SUNDAY 2-5 MEDITERRANEAN HOME IN MAITLAND 1161 Banbury Trail, Maitland. 4BD/2.5BA. 2,738SF.Enter through a gated brick courtyard. Kitchen has granite, stainless appliances, and dark wood cabinets. Views of pool and private backyard. Great landscaping and outdoor lighting with covered lanai. Wood beamed ceilings, and redone baths. Master suite has French doors to private patio. Two car garage. $499,000SUNDAY 2-5BALDWIN PARK POOL HOME4002 Ethan Lane, Orlando. 5BD/4BA, 4,155SF. Traditional pool home on large corner lot overlooking park. Downstairs study could be 5th bed room. Gourmet kitchen with custom cabinetry, large granite island, gas range and double ovens. Brick patio with saltwater pool and spa. Three car garage. Double wraparound porches on both levels. $939,000SUNDAY 1-4WINTER PARK CHARMER1051 Aragon Avenue, Winter Park. 3BD/2.5BA, 1,669SF. Perfectly main tained two-story townhome in quaint community. Private front patio and wraparound fenced-in yard. Tile floors and spacious living room with woodburning fireplace. Kitchen has break fast bar, large pantry, and rolling is land. Master suite has pitched ceilings and his and hers closets. $209,900SUNDAY 1-4SOUTHERN COLONIAL CUSTOM HOME1911 Stonehurst Road, Winter Park. 4BD/4full+2half baths, 4,916SF. Cus tom home with gourmet kitchen, cus tom cabinets, granite, wood & stone flooring, crown molding, and coffered ceilings. Downstairs master. Large front porch & beautiful landscaping. 3 car garage, huge workshop, & green house. $1,300,000 Community Yard Sale Email or Call Spaces going out fast. East River High School. Kema Brillhart, 407318-4050, Kema.Brillhart@ocps.net Stoneybrook East Community Garage SaleSaturday, April 21st 8AM-2PM -Huge community-wide garage sale! Dozens of homes participating. All types of items including furniture, household items, childrens items and more. Gated com munity open to public only once a year! Stoneybrook Management Office, 407249-7930, sboffice@sbeo.net GGARAGGE SSALLESS Winter Park Benefit Shop 140 Lyman Avenue. We need items to sell, clothing, bedding, jewelry, kitchenware & Bric-a-brac. We also need volunteers. Shop is open 930a-1pm every Tues & Fri (Sat 10am-1p). Proceeds from the Ben efit Shop support Childrens Programs & Blind Assoc. of CF. 407-647-8276 MISISCELLLLANNEOUSOUS 20 Acres Live on Land NOW!!!Only $99/mo. $0 Down, Owner Financ ing, NO CREDIT CHECKS! Near El Paso, TX Beautiful Mountain Views! FREE Color Brochure. sunsetranches.com, 800-755-8953 Mobile Home with acreage ready to move in, great for pets.Lots of space for the price, 3BR/2BA. Serious offers only, no renters. Mobile Home with Land, 850-308-6473 New York State Land Sale Discounted to 1990s prices!3 Acre Starter Camp $17,995. 5 acres w/Farmhouse $49,995. 52 acres, Stream, 2 ponds, Beautiful woods & views. Access to road front, utilities and state land Limited offer. Call Christmas & Associates. 800-229-7843 or visit lan dandcamps.com REALL ESTST AT TE: FOOR SSALLE ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE FROM HOME.*Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice. Job placement available. Computer avail able. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. 877-206-5165 Can You Dig It? We will train, certify & provide lifetime assistance landing work. Hiring in Florida. Start digging as a heavy equipment operator. 866-362-6497 EDUDUCATION TION Historic Winter Park Estate SaleEstate Sale at 1570 Lakehurst Avenue from April 27-29. Doors Opens at 9:00 a.m. until 5:00 pm Antiques, Collectibles, Decor, Rare Art, Gold, Jewelry, Toys and much more. ESTST AT TE SSALLESS Class-A FlatBed Drivers $$ Home EVERY weekend, Run S.E. US REQUIRES 1Yr OTR Flatbed exp. & Pay UP TO $.39/mile. Sunbelt Transport, LLC 800-572-5489 ext 227 AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Housing available. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance. 866314-3769 Freight Up = More $ 2 mos. CDL Class A Driving Exp. www. meltontruck.com/drive. 877-258-8782 Drivers New Freight for Refrigerated & Dry Van lanes.Annual Salary $45K $60K. Flexible Hometime. Modern Trucks! CDL-A, 3 months Current OTR experience. www. driveknight.com, 800-414-9569 Medical Billing Trainees Needed!Train to become a Medical Office Assistant! No Experience needed! Job Training & Local Placement assistance. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! 888-374-7294 25 Driver Trainees Needed Now at Schneider National!Become a driver for Schneider National! Earn $800 per week! No experience needed! CDL & Job Ready in just 3 weeks! 888-374-7644 HHELLP WANTNTEDD HUGE DISCOUNTS WHEN YOU BUY 2 TYPES OF ADVERTISING!120 community newspapers, 32 web sites, 26 daily newspapers. Call now to diversify your advertising with Advertising Networks of Florida. 866-742-1373 ANNOUNNNOUNCEMENTSNTS WOORKFOORCE JOBOB LISTINGSLISTINGS OOrange County TheMarketplace Fannie HHillman OpePEN HOUSeES OBSERVER Open Houses Drivers: New Flatbed Freight Lanes! We Offer: No Tarping!!! Great Miles, Pay-up to .60cpm, Benets & Home Time. CDL-A, 1yr OTR Exp, Good MVR Frank Donnelly at: 1-888-567-4969, x22. Call now to diversify your advertising. 866.742.1373 www.Florida-Classifieds.com ank you to our media partners: WKMG Local 6 and Magic 107.7. RowellAuctions.comRowell Auctions, Inc.800-323-8388 10% Buyers Premium GAL AU-C002594For Detailed Information Visit RowellAuctions.com BANKRUPTCY AUCTION"Selling by Order of the U.S. Bankruptcy Court"Colquitt County, GA Apr 21, 2012 -:10:00 AMPine Ridge Angus Farms3 Farms Totaling 308 Acres Sunday, 2-5pm 920 Pace Avenue, Maitland Sunday, 2-5pm 1005 Lakeview Drive, Winter Park Sunday, 1-4pm 2404 Temple Drive, Winter Park Saturday, 10am-6pm, AND Sunday, 10am-6pm 2411 Euston Road, Winter Park SATURDAY 2-5 RENOVATED POOL HOME 417 Langholm Drive, Winter Park. 3BD/2.5BA, 3,000SF. A must-see home on a neighbor-friendly, beautifully tree lined street. Wonderful open spaces! Emeril inspired, spacious kitchen. 16x19 dining room with dry bar buffet. 12x18 screened patio & an additional 14x17 covered area. The pool has a salt water chlorinator & waterfall. Min utes to Park Avenue. $598,000 SUNDAY 1-4NEW PRICE!UPDATED HOME IN BEVERLY SHORES1235 Munster Street, Orlando. 4BR/2BA, 2,451SF. Split plan. Updated home with wood floors, plantation shutters, kitchen with stainless steel appliances, custom walk-in closet in master. Family room addition with vaulted ceilings, wood burning fire place, built-in TV space (TV stays). Fenced backyard with pavered patio and outdoor mounted TV (also stays). Newer AC and roof. $487,500 OBSERVER Just Sold Homes 666 Overspin Drive, Winter Park, $132,000 John McDade 1911 Summerland Avenue, Winter Park, $495,000 MaryStuart Day/Megan Cross MaryStuart Day/Megan Cross 3706 Pickwick Drive, Orlando, $95,000 Melissa Woodman 1300 Arden Street, Longwood, $155,000 Sharon Helsby 601 Mission Lane, Howey Hills, $215,000 Meg Dolan 1410 Mayfield Avenue, Winter Park, $545,000 Lisa Fleming Nancy Bagby 1210 Raintree Place, Winter Park, $596,500 Allison Chambers Log on to WorkforceCentralFlorida.com where you can enter the Job Title in the "Search for Jobs" box to see more infor mation on these jobs and search thou sands of additional openings throughout Central Florida, at NO COST. Apply by following the directions listed. For further help visit JobVantage at 4360 East Colo nial Dr., Orlando, or call (407) 531-1227 Registered Nurse (RN) SVFLJob Description: Responsible for pro viding a full range of personal care and support services to developmentally disabled clients in a group home setting, Ensure that services are in accordance and compliance with all applicable regu latory requirements, utilizing all available resources. Applicant must possess a cur rent Florida RN License and a minimum of one year of nursing experience. Addi tional qualifications apply. Pay Rate: Salary based on experience. Job Order Number: 9663561Architect/Project ManagerJob Description: Responsible for leading a project team; generating documents for all design phases; coordinating with engineering disciplines; and responsibly maintaining project schedules and budgets to promote project completion based upon client satisfaction and profit ability. Applicant must possess Bachelor Degree and a minimum of ten years re cent experience working on commercial projects. Additional qualifications apply. Pay Rate: Salary based on experience. Job Order Number: 9663422Customer Management RepresentativeJob Description: Responsible for developing a business relationship at as signed accounts and for providing these accounts with information about selling, profitability and placement of company products while increasing the promotional activity, sales volume and profitability of these accounts. Applicant must pos sess Bachelor Degree and relationship building, communication, marketing and analytical skills. Additional qualifications apply. Pay Rate: Salary based on experience. Job Order Number: 9663346Mobile Services Calibration TechnicianJob Description: Responsible for per forming routine and complex work related to the repair and calibration of test, measurement and diagnostic equipment. Applicant must possess a minimum of four years of experience in the repair and calibration of electronic equipment; a valid driver's license; and a point free driving record. Additional qualifications apply. Pay Rate: Salary based on experience. Job Order Number: 9663121Business Development Professional Job Description: Responsible for identifying new areas of business development. Evaluate funding sources, competitive environment, market dynamics, priceto-win analyses and probability of win. Participate/lead in the preparation of pro posals in response to various requests. Applicant must possess Bachelor Degree in Business Administration or related area (MBA preferred) and a minimum of five years in business development with a proven, verifiable, track record of suc cess. Additional qualifications apply. Pay Rate: Salary based on experience. Job Order Number: 9662937

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Page 32 Thursday, April 19, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Barry LevinsonCloris Leachman Enjoy a beautiful spring evening of great wine while strolling through downtown Winter Park Thursday, May 3 5 8:30 p.m. Tickets are $30 in advance Purchase online at www.winterpark.org For information call (407) 644-8281 winter park sip and stroll Josh Garrick Culture worthy of your calendar April 20 to May 12 BBaby at Winter Park PlayhouseAfter seeing the original (Tony-nominated) Broadway production, Baby has been on my production wish list for years, says Roy Alan, artistic director for the Winter Park Playhouse. With lyrics by Richard Maltby Jr. and music by David Shire, Baby follows the stories of three couples in different stages of life as they experience the rewarding, agonizing and often poignant consequences of pregnancy and parenthood. This beautiful musical comedy features Central including Heather Alexander, Natalie Cordone, Shawn Kilgore, Bryan Minyard, Kathryn Nash, Candace Neal, Timothy Pappas, Sage Starkey and Kate Zaloumes. Performances are from April 20 to May 12 at the Playhouse, located at 711 Orange Ave., in Winter Park. Call 407-645-0145 or visit winterparkplayhouse.org April 20 to May 27 TThe Music ManThe Garden Theatre in Winter Garden has already produced an impressive string of selfproduced musicals in which the community comes together to act in and create major musicals onstage. Adding a 76-trombone salute to that theatrical history is The Music Man, running from April 20 to May 27. Led by Dustin Cunningham, as Prof. Harold Hill, a cast of more than 60 performers and dozens of stage-crew volunteers ranging in age from 5 to 65 will bring this musical to life. The show is recommended for all ages. The Garden Theatre is at 160 W. Plant St. Call 407-877-GRDN (4736) or visit gardentheatre.org April 21 OOrlando Phil in HHi DDef The Orlando Philharmonic Or chestra is building a name and an audience based on new, exciting ways to present symphonic music, and their fundraiser on April 21 may just top all others. Presented in association with Full Sail University, the Philhar monic will present Symphony in HD: Live at Full Sail as a live orchestra performance with photography, animation and a virtual opera set created by Full Sail University faculty and students. Guests at the fundraiser will enjoy a three-course meal and live ting the Orlando Philharmonic. It all begins at 6 p.m. with drinks and a silent auction on Full Sails Hollywood-style backlot. After dinner and the concert, an outdoor party will take place with Philharmonic musicians and Full Sail faculty. To purchase tickets, visit orlandophil.org/HD or call 407-896-6700, extension 236. April 21 Creald Festival at HHannibal SSquare Music and art will be created during Creald School of Arts 3rd Annual Hannibal Square Her itage Center Folk Art and Craft Festival from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, April 21. The festival features artwork for sale by some of Floridas great folk artists during this daylong celebration free childrens activities, resource agencies and Southern-style barbecue for sale. Dance to the sounds of Cajun Zydeco music by The Porch Dogs and the rhythms of Orisirisi African Folklore. Children can create their own Aztec Indian headband, shirt and tambourine to wear and play at the Aztec Pre-Columbian Musi cal Circle parade. Storytellers, a kid-folk art workshop, childrens musical parade and African folklore are on the schedule. The Hannibal Square Heritage Center is located at 642 New England Ave., in Winter Park. Call 407671-1886 or 407-539-2680 or visit crealde.org April 21 to July 15 Paintings of Florida Drawn from the largest known private collection of Florida-based art, The Orlando Museum of Art (OMA) con tinues its Made in Florida project, celebrating Florida art Paintings of Florida 1865-1965 from the Collection of Cici and Hyatt Brown, opening April 21 and running through July 15. who worked in Florida over a period of 100 years including Herman Herzog, George Inness, Thomas Hart Benton and N.C. Wyeth. The exhibition includes 70 paintings, which depict the evolution of Floridas landscape while offering a new perspective of the works of these renowned artists, says Marena Grant Mor risey, executive director of OMA. OMA is located in Orlandos Loch Haven Park. Call 407-8964231 or visit omart.org And not to be missed This week Disneys The Lion King is at the Bob Carr through May 13. Visit OrlandoBroadway.comJosh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906. BBaby rewards