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Winter Park-Maitland observer
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00206
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park FL
Publication Date: 03-29-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates: 28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID: UF00091444:00206

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407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC USPS 00-6186 Publisher statement on page 4. Thursday, March 29, 2012 50+ tax wpmobserver.comSubscribe now!Visit wpmobserver.com Community members weighed in Monday on how Maitland should work to cut costs, but keep culture in as it moves forward with talks of who should manage the Maitland Art Center. On March 13, there was a workshop between the Maitland City Council and Art & History Museums Maitland (A&H) to address concerns raised by Councilman Phil Bonus as to the cost effectiveness of A&Hs management. At the March 26 City Council meeting, commu nity members provided their thoughts on the issue. Sixteen speakers taking up more than an hour of meeting time spoke about what they want to see happen regarding the management of A&H. Im trying to stir a dialogue with MAHA (A&Hs previous name) and the community at large as of how to best run and preserve the gem that it is, Bonus said. Citizens reacted to Bonus initial proposal of taking the Maitland Art Center under control of the citys Leisure Services Department. This, he said, would give the city the ability to run the center in a more revenue-neutral manner to help balance the citys budget, instead of spending $425,000 to fund A&H and seeing no direct return on investment. I havent heard an idea that bad in a long time, resident Gus Bobes said, on the government getting involved with running the arts center. He said that arts and the city should always oper ate as separate entities. Others offered similar sentiments, saying that Maitland Art Center founder Andre Smith al ways intended for the center to be run for the art community by Andre Smith believed that art should be free and be ex plored; my concern is that if we gave control to the city, would we lose the elements of the arts that Andre Smith lived and died for? said Daniel Van Horn, a historian of Andre Smith. Before the government offers to take the center over, one resident said Council members should instead pinpoint problems and allow A&H an oppor as bad as it is, maybe its time to hand the keys over to the artists that have it maybe its time for the art community to manage it on the city, resident Butch Char lan said. A&H Director Andrea Bailey pendent is the organizations ul timate goal. We are on this path toward The biggest question facing the Winter Park City Commission was not when or how a giant development would transform a with dead grass and empty plots it was whether to burn it all. At Mondays meeting the Commission held a preliminary meeting with Ravaudage devel of an annexation agreement in which Winter Park would swallow up 54 acres of the de velopment at the corner of U.S. Highway 17-92 and Lee Road. dinance will come at the April 9 City Commission meeting. Most of the agreement passed by without a whisper from the Commission, but then came the issue of what to do with the de bris that would be cleared after the development was leveled: haul it off or burn it? Bellows was requesting it be burned off in at least one controlled burn so large that Fire Chief Jim White said it might not be allowed by the state. City code doesnt really allow burning garbage at all. But while the land still belongs to Orange County, they might have a chance to do it be fore it is annexed. In Orange County you can get a burn permit and it's only or ganic materials it's not build ing materials, Bellows said. In Winter Park you can't do this. White said a large-scale burn on county land could be a good precedent for whether the burn could happen without risk to any nearby buildings. They don't have the same additional level of restrictions that we do, White said of the county. If he burns and it's still in the county and he gets a divi sion of forestry permit, that's go ing to be a good heads up wheth er we'll be able to do this down the road. Bellows said that he would use an air curtain burner, which is a cleaner way to burn off the tons of brush that would be cut down on a piece of land the size burners resemble large semitrailer-sized dumpsters with an air blower attached to ventilate ash down. Your article provided no perspective on what caused a need for additional regulation in the banking sector.Page 12Letters to the editor Lifestyles One of seven new faces on Park Avenue include Rosey Wrays Roost, a gift and home dcor store.Page 9 Restaurant reviewFood critic Josh Garrick stops in at Prato, created by Luma on Park executive chef Brandon McGlamery.Page 2 Calendar Check out the Florida Dharma Film Festival in Winter Park this weekend. All of the movie screenings are free.Page 10 TAX DEFERREDFIXED ANNUITY RATE FOR 5 YEARS.Bob Adams 407-644-6646THE NATIONAL 5 YEAR CD RATE IS 1.34%3.35% 451 Maitland Ave, Altamonte Springs, FL 32701NEW Dermatology Ofce!407-599-SKIN (7546)*Waive co-payment up to $25 No referral needed Accepting all insurances Dr. John CottamDr. Ross Wheeler PHoOToO byBY IsSAAcC BABcCOcCK THE obOBSErvRVErR Developer Dan B Bellows, right, asked Winter Park City Commission to support his plans to burn off acres of brush that will be cleared for his Ravaudage project. As long as the land is still unincorporated Orange County, not part of Winter Park, Bellows plans may get the OK. Please see rRAVAUdD AGE on page 5 BBurn 54 acres, save $1 million IsISAAcC BBABcCOcCK Observer SStaff Please see cCOUNcCIlL on page 2City discusses taking over Art Center SArRAH WIlsLSON Observer SStaff TThe last scheduled workshop regarding the creation and standards of the Downtown Maitland Zoning District will be held at 11:30 a.m. on Friday, March 30, in the Maitland City Council Chambers. TThe public is encouraged to attend to have their voices heard in what could be the nal work session on the issue. T The zoning plans are slated to be voted on by the Council at its next meeting, April 9. TThe next workshop with the City Council and Art & HHistory Museums Maitland will be held at 6:30 p.m. on T T uesday, April 10, in the Maitland City Council Chambers.

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Page 2 TThursday, March 29, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer When foodies heard that Chef Brandon McGlamery, who has served as executive chef at Luma on Park since 2006, decided to open a new restaurant just up the street on Park Avenue, we sat up and took note. Creating a restaurant that feels upscale and down-home at the same time is almost impos sible unless youre Brandon McGlamery, and he has done it It begins with the service. As a lone diner, the hostess was ready to put me at a caf tawhen I asked for a booth, she did not hesitate for a moment and seated this lone diner at a place set for four. This was followed by the ingenious water bottle of plain water that was placed on my table so subtly that I didnt even see it happen. It happens that I drink a lot of water, and no more. The simplicity of having that water on the table was a big hit with me. And that is what Prato exemand inspiration that can only come from a chef who is able to subdue his ego enough to see his restaurant through the eyes of the people who actually eat there. My pleasure continued when my waiter approached with a details of the menu. I ask a lot of questions, and Charles was thoroughly informed on every point. For example, I wanted to know about the English peas they show up in more than one dish and the distinction of this special kind of pea is truly worth it. The dcor plays a part in that homey upscale feeling with red brick and rough wood walls rising up around waiters in plaid shirts, blue jeans and long white aprons. The fact that there is a long bar (with televisions) running the length of the restaurant had me concerned with the po tential noise level, but even that is no problem. Is it possible that McGlamery is an acoustician too? With all that working so well, I am happy to say that the food lives up to the inspired simplicity of the room. The menu is Italian-inspired, and the restau rant builds on Italys legendary cuisine by using only the freshest of ingredients, with a commitment to local farms for seasonal and in most cases organic ingredients. McGlamerys handpicked chef di cucina, Matthew Cargo, is an Orlando native, started cooking at the age of 14, and graduated from Le Cordon Bleu Academy. And English peas be praised, he has inherited the best of McGlamerys fascination with mixing fresh produce. Dishes are made up of things such as ca perberries, celery hearts, shaved radishes, arugula and pickled red cabbage that are adventurous and wonderful. He has a light hand with the olive oil sprayed as if by some magic sprayer over the prosciutto; he knows exactly how much cheese to make the pizzas perfect; and he has a second sense about how much anchovyinfused vinaigrette is right for the Caesar salad. So what do I recommend? Ev erything I tasted was wonderful, but if you want that crazy inter esting fusion of tastes that weve come to expect from adventurous chefs, go for the Widow Maker Pizza and be ready to share. Named a "hidden gem" by Orlando SentinelBelly Dancing every Saturday 7:30pm 9:30pm10% o entire check with this adExpires 04/30/12 SUNDAY APRIL 15TH 2PM TO 6PM 1801 W. FAIRBANKS AVE. WINTER PARK, FL 32789 For over 27 years Marjorie Myers greeted diners at her Paco's Mexican Restaurant in Winter Park with a smile and great food. To honor her memory and her commitment to community service, Pacos hosts this annual fundraiser to support the Marjorie A. Myers Memorial Scholarship Fund. Join us for this event; enjo y a special menu of some of Marjs favorite dishes, live music, raffles, a limited time MARJarita; and help give back to the community. TICKETS: $20/PERSON $5/kids under 12 IN ADVANCE LIVE MUSIC Featuring B l u e S t o n e C i r c l e $2.00 MARJaritas MARJarita FIESTA4th Annual PHoOToO byBY IsSAAcC BABcCOcCK THE obOBSErvRVErR Restaurant critic Josh GGarrick enjoys a meal at Prato recently. HHe recoomends the Widow Maker Pizza and says, be ready to share. Prato does upscale, down home JOsSH GGArrRRIcCK Observer SStaff COUNOUNCIIL | C ONTTINUEED FROM fronFRONT pagPAGE worked out in our initial lease with the city, but now with all of this, we are trying to be in novative to get to that path even quicker than we anticipated, she said. A&Hs lease agreement with the city, if no change is made, is set to automatically renew for 51 years on Oct. 1. Other citizens said that the community should hear out Bonus proposal and realize that he is offering it up with the best in tentions. sue, and thats what we need to look into, resident John Peele said, and the city could be very helpful. At the Council and A&Hs second workshop, scheduled for April 10, both sides hope to ures to help sort out the best way to proceed. Councilwoman Bev Reponen said the Council needs more numbers and less emotion to make a sound decision. Mayor Howard Schiefer decker said he hopes the city and A&H will be able to reach a compromise that will make both sides happy. We want to preserve them need to be able to afford it, he said. Its going to be a hard year, but were going to be suc cessful and were going to make it work. Prato is at  124 N. Park Ave., serving lunch from Wednesday to SSunday from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. and dinner Monday through SSaturday from 5:30 to 11 p.m. and SSunday from 5:30 to 10 p.m. Call 407-262-0050 or visit prato-wp.com From the Corner Table

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As part of our commitment to extraordinary patient care, our practice comprises skilled doctors, board-certied in various specialties, including family medicine, pediatrics and geriatrics. As a progressive training facility, our physicians are continuously involved in the latest research, ensuring we build a place youll never outgrow. Evening Hours: Monday Wednesday until 7 pm!Services Include: Pediatric and Adolescent Care Womens and Mens Preventive Care Immunizations and Vaccinations OB/GYN Care and Womens Health Services Dermatologic Care Chronic Condition Management Inpatient Hospital Treatment 133 Benmore Drive, Suite 200 Winter Park, FL 32792 www.CentreForFamilyMedicine.com Accepting New Patients. Same-Day Appointments. Extended Evening Hours. Call (407) 646-7070 to schedule your appointment today (or tonight).FHMG-12-6376A place your family will never outgrow. Providing Excellent Primary Care from Birth and Beyond

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Page 4 TThursday, March 29, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer USPS 00-6186 ISSN 1064-36131500 Park Center Drive OOrlando, FL 32835-5705 Member of: Chamber of CommercePublisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor. Submission does not guarantee publication. Columnists opinions are made independently of the newspaper. All rights reserved. Winter Park / Maitland Observer 2012 EEstablished in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster www.wpmobserver.com | Phone: 407-563-7000 | Fax: 407-563-7099 | editor@observernewspapers.com P.OO BBox 2426 Winter Park, FL 32790 Published Thursday, March 29, 2012 CONONTA ACTS VV olume 24, IIssue NNumber 13 PUBLISHESHER Tracy Craft 407-515-2605 tcraft@observernewspapers.com managingMANAGING EEDITTOR Jenny AAndreasson 407-563-7026 editor@observernewspapers.com DESESIGNEER Jonathan GGallagher 407-563-7054 jgallagher@observernewspapers.com aASSociaOCIA TE EdiDITorOR IIsaac BBabcock 407-563-7023 isaacb@observernewspapers.com LEgalGALS | ClaLASSifiIFIEdDS AAshley McBBride legal@FLAlegals.com classieds@observernewspapers.com STaff AFF wri WRITErRS Sarah Wilson BBrittni Johnson KKristy VV ickery COPY EEDITTOR Sarah Wilson COLUMNISTSSTS Chris Jepson Jepson@MediAmerica.us Louis Roney LRoney@c.rr.com Josh GGarrick joshgarrick9@gmail.com ADVEERT TISSING SSALESES Linda Stern 407-563-7058 LSStern@observernewspapers.com SubUBScripCRIPTionIONS | circulaCIRCULA TionION KKatie Reyes kreyes@turnstilemediagroup.com 407-563-7073 inINTErnRN AAndy Ceballos BBackstage with BBach On March 1, the H Honorary Consul of Germany in Orlando hosted Back stage with Bach in conjunction with the Consulate General of Germany in Miami, a sponsor of the performance of J.SS. Bachs S St. Matthew Passion at the 77th Annual Bach Festival. About 100 guests attended a preview of the SSt. Matthew Passion in rehearsal. Pic tured are J. Brock McClane, H Honorary Consul of the Federal Republic of Ger many, Rev. E Eric Ravndall III, president, Bach Festival S Society of Winter Park, and E Elizabeth (Betsy) Gwinn, execu tive director, Bach Festival S Society of Winter Park. VV ote for Casa Feliz Casa Feliz was nominated by the Florida Chapter of the American In stitute of Architects as one of the top 100 buildings in Florida. Cast your vote at aiatop100.orgResident in Readers DigestWinter Park resident Donna Gropper is featured this month in Readers Di gest, which selected her letter for its React section. Readers Digest re ceives about 8,600 letters to the edi tor each year and only 13 letters were chosen for publication in April. Donna wrote: Kudos to Andy S Simmons for Funniest Moments of the Year. We get so bombarded with negativity and strife in the news that I didnt know I needed a good laugh until I read this piece and laughed out loud, re peatedly. Youre lucky to work with Andygive him a pat on the back!Model behaviorWinter Park Day Nursery was one of ve early childhood programs in Flor ida selected to become state dem onstrations for the implementation of Positive Behavior S Support (PBSS). TThe PBSS model promotes the social emotional competence of all children, prevents the development of behavior challenges, and ensures that young children with behavioral problems get effective intervention. Chili event raises $27KK On T Thursday, Feb. 23, the Rotary Club of Winter Park hosted the inaugural Chili for Charity. A dozen of the areas nest restaurants and caterers served chili to more than 450 attendees with more than $27,000 raised.SunRail surveyUCF has partnered with the Florida Department of T T ransportation to con duct a survey about Central Floridas new commuter rail system, S SunRail. Let them know what you think by visiting tinyurl.com/SSunRailsurvey MaitlandConstruction limits parking As part of the E East Morse Boulevard Improvement Project, construction on the stormwater treatment phase to eliminate pollutants from entering Lake Osceola will begin Monday, April 9 and is expected to be complete by SSaturday, April 28. During construc tion there will be limited parking at the end of E East Morse Boulevard and limited access to the Winter Park SScenic Boat T T our. Donations needed TThe Winter Park Benet S Shop, a long time community thrift shop at 140 Ly man Ave., Winter Park, needs items to sell clothing, bedding, jewelry, kitchenware and bric-a-brac. T They also need volunteers. Please call EElizabeth Comer at 407-647-8276. Proceeds support childrens programs  and Blind Association Of Cen tral Florida. SSend submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com Hours: M-F 8am to 4:30pm 2315 Lee Road Winter Park, Florida 32789 Your Guiding Beacon for Quality Healthcare Harbour Private Duty Nursing, LLCSkilled Nursing Physical Therapy Occupational Therapy Companionship Home Health Aid Homemaking Flexible Schedules Free RN Assessments The Services of Harbour Private Duty Nursing provide peace of mind to loved ones, trust ofcers, guardians and physicians. Our professional team prides itself on making your life easier. We also provide in-hospital private duty care, which offers close, personal attention and reassurance in an unfamiliar and often frightening environment. Our ofce hours are Monday through Friday, 8:00 am to 4:30 pm. Our professional team is available 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. During hours when the ofce is closed and during the weekends and holidays, the on-call coordinator is available by telephone 24 hours per day.www.HarbourPrivateDutyNursing.com License # 299991382phone (407) 895-8188 fax 407-895-9339 BBusiness BBriefs Community BBulletin The Mid-Florida H Home B Builders Foundation, the charitable arm of the H Home Builders Association of Metro Orlando, donated $7,000 to Mollie E E. Ray E Elementary S School. T The funding completes a decade-long nancial and volunteer commitment to the school that many within the school credit with helping bring its overall grade from an F to an A. TThe University Club of Winter Park proudly announces its 2012 Board of Directors. T The members are President Charles E E. K Kulmann, Vice President of Programs Joseph Rizzo, Vice President of Development Michael J. A Anderson, Vice President of Membership Linda L. Dunlap, Vice President of Finance Clayton Swain, Vice President of Intellectual Activities Paul E Enchel mayer, Vice President of H House and Grounds Diana Secor, S Secretary Maxine Reed, TT reasurer Judy B Beck, Assistant T T reasurer EElizabeth Conk lin and directors EErich C. B Blossey, C. Martin Stickley and James B B. KKnapp. Junior Achievement of Central Flor ida recently appointed three new members to its board of directors for a three-year term: Reagan Rick, president and CEEO of Fifth T Third Bank Central and North Florida Afliate, Roman V V ega, vice president of Brand Management of the Orlando Magic, and Josef G Ghosn, senior vice president and chief strat egy ofcer of Florida HHospital TThe O Orange County Public Schools website scored an A+ transpar ency grade, meeting all 10 requirements to win a 2012 SSunny Award sponsored by the SSunshine Review. Winter Park resident H Heidi W. I Isen hart, a partner with the law rm of S ShufeldLowman was recently named president of the charitable or ganization SShare the Care for 2012.  NAINAI Realvest recently negotiated a long-term renewal lease agreement for 1,067 square feet of ofce space at S Suite 1, 541 E E. H Horatio Ave.  in Mai tland. T The tenant, E Edward D. Jones and Company L.P. d/b/a E Edward Jones, has been located at this address for over 20 years and has re newed for an additional ve years. Reagan Rick Shakespeare winners TThe annual SShakespeare Competition, sponsored by T The EEnglish-SSpeaking Union of Central Florida, was held at T The University Club of Winter Park. E Each student, who is a winner from his or her own school, memorized and presented a SShakespearian sonnet and also a 20-line passage from one of his plays. TThe winners are: First place: Alison SSigalow, Lake HHighland Preparatory SSchool SSecond place: Cheyenne EEverhart, SSeminole HHigh SSchool TThird place: Joseph Reece White, Winter Park HHigh SSchool Alison received an all-expense paid trip to New York to compete in the National EE-SSU SShakespeare Competition at Lincoln Center.

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Page 5 TThursday, March 29, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Hurry! Sale E nds Soon! Design Pro Screens Longwood, FL 32750 Toll Free: 1-888-724-9868 Ext. 71232 71232 healthy the City of Winter Park 1887 2012thANNIVERSARY Wednesday, April 4, 2012 8:30 a.m. Central Park Stage But as current city law stands, he wouldnt be allowed to do so if We can't break our own laws, Mayor Ken Bradley said, adding, I for one would not like to see the debris burn. Thats when Bellows informed the Commission of how much it would cost to pursue the al ternative, hauling off the brush that would have otherwise been burned. We're talking almost a million dollars to haul this stuff off, Bel lows said. You set up this air cur tain, it's clean and there's almost no smoke.Resident concernsCommissioner Carolyn Cooper said she was worried that the rights of nearby property owners werent being respected in terms of impact to their properties and businesses by the large development. She said that in parts of the agreement, retail buildings are al lowed to be built much closer to homes than normally permitted. You're asking for me to vote on this agreement, in order for me to do this, I want to know that they're comfortable with the property rights, Cooper said. Bellows said that those busi ness and homeowners had been involved in the process from the start and had agreed to the terms. They're not waiving their rights they signed consent, Bellows said. Bradley said that the annexation into Winter Park and subse quent development would be a boon to those property owners, not a detriment. To me, joining the city of Winter Park is a good thing, Bradley said. I don't see anybody who's losing by coming into Winter Park. rRAVAUdD AGE | Commissioner concerned about property rights C ONTTINUEED FROM fronFRONT pagPAGE Lake Avenue Lee RoadRavaudage Park Lake Lake Gem 92 17 PHoOToO byBY IsSAAcC BABcCOcCK THE obOBSErvRVErR The IIce Cream Social to benet Ronald McDonald HHouse Charities of Central Florida was held March 24 at the Winter Park Civic Center. IIce cream for charity

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Page 6 TThursday, March 29, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Due to the continued reduction of state revenues being received by Florida cities and counties over the past few years, on Feb. 22 and 23 of this year, the Florida League of Mayors (League) again orga nized a special trip called May ors Mean Business to go to Tal lahassee to lobby for legislation for our cities. Like last year, each mayor was asked to bring a prom inent businessperson from his or her city to help express the needs of their respective cities. Because Bill Randolph did such a great job last year expressing those needs to our legislators, I asked Bill to accompany me again. Bill is a longtime resident of our city, has been involved as a volunteer for many years on numerous city and county boards, and is one of the most knowledgeable people on Maitland that I know. He, along with his wife, Joan, owns a very successful land planning and Consulting), which has been in business for 17 years. Bill, again, graciously accepted my invitation, and we began preparing for our trip to Tallahassee. We decided to expand the trip, arriving at the capitol earlier in the day on Feb. 22, working with our lobbyist, Louis Rotundo, and meeting as many of our legislators as possible before the scheduled meetings of the League began that evening. The League again did a great job of organizing this special trip beginning with a Mayors Recep tion the evening of Feb. 22, where we got to share the concerns fac ing our cities with our fellow mayors and their business representatives. The morning of the Feb. 23, we started with a Mayors Breakfast, where we discussed and organized our legislative agenda for the day before return ing to the capitol to continue visit ing with our legislators. We then had a scheduled lunch where several keynote speakers updated us on Floridas present economic and business climate, along with a special appearance by Gov. Rick Scott, who gave us a legislative update and answered questions. Upon the completion of our luncheon, we again returned to the capitol to continue meeting with our legislators before leaving for home late that afternoon. Spending as much time as pos sible meeting with our legislators we felt was very important, as there are a number of legisla tive bills again this year being proposed that we were very con cerned about. The following were the major ones: Repeal of red light cameras (oppose): allowing red-light runners to continue causing T-bone ing serious injuries and in some cases death. This bill did not pass. Communications service tax (oppose): reducing revenues to cities by exempting more compa nies from paying communication service fees. This bill did pass, re ducing the annual revenue to our city by an undetermined amount, but is believed to be substantial. Alternate local business tax ex emption (oppose): exempts real estate broker associates from pay ing local business taxes. This bill did pass, again reducing revenue to our city. Numeric nutrients bill (sup port): allows Florida to override federal water pollution require threshold standard. This bill did pass. If the bill had not passed, the cost to our city was estimated to have been in the millions of dollars. Fertilizer ban repeal (oppose): would have removed Maitlands more restrictive fertilizer control standards allowing more pollu tion in our lakes. This bill did not pass. Pension reform bill (support): would have allowed local govern ments to work out provisions that were mutually acceptable to both sides of an issue. This bill did not pass. Renewable energy bill (sup port): encourages renewable en ergy development in Florida by offering tax incentives. This bill did pass. In past years, due to a prospering Florida, we were not as involved in our state government as we need to be today. Because nancial condition of our state and the economy, it is imperative that we become very involved and stay involved with our state legislators to preserve as much as pos sible, our right to home rule and our fair share of state revenues. The future prosperity of our city largely depends upon it. Meeting of March 26The Maitland City Council met on March 26 at 6:30 p.m. in the City Hall Council Chambers. Below is a synopsis of that meet ing. The next regular scheduled Council meeting will be held on Monday, April 9. Public HHearings: Moved to continue the Public Hearings creating the Downtown Maitland Zoning District and the rezoning of properties within that district until the April 9 Council meeting. Community Redevelopment AAgency Decision IItem: A resolution amending the Community Redevelopment Agency operating budget for FY 2012 to complete the Adoption Phase of the Downtown Develop ment Standards.Decisions:Authorized funding to expand the scope of the contract with Lit tlejohn Engineering to complete the adoption phase of the Mait land CRA Development Standards for the Maitland Downtown To listen to a recording of the meeting, visit itsmymaitland.com WINTER PARK A world traveler and legend of the Winter Park community scene recently observed her 100th birthday surrounded by family and her entire care team from nonprot Cornerstone Hospice. Helen R. Kirk, a pioneer of Winter Parks art galleries, womens clubs and church activities of decades ago, cut a huge chocolate cake assisted by her daughter Susan Dotson who made the trip from Michigan for the occasion and her son Robin Kirk of Oviedo. Born in Winchester, Kentucky in March, 1912, Helen spent most of her childhood in Richmond, attended Madison County High School also in Richmond, and later Eastern Kentucky State College, now Eastern Kentucky University. Helen married her husband Raymond Lynn Kirk, a veteran of the U.S. Army in 1944, one year before the end of WWII. The young couple had three children, one is deceased. After Raymonds retirement, Helen and Raymond took several cruises in the Caribbean, Bermuda, one freighter cruise to Yugoslavia, another to northern Africa and another to Beirut, Lebanon at a time of considerable unrest there. While on the northern Africa cruise they went to Egypt, visited the pyramids and traveled by camel. There was very little Helen wouldnt do, she was always at the ready to try anything. The family relocated to Florida during the early fties and Helen worked for the Florida State Department of Public Welfare where she advanced from caseworker to supervisor, concluding her career in administration. After Raymonds passing in 1976, Helen traveled the world with friends including trips to Alaska, Hong Kong, Japan, Great Britain and France, mostly as part of the Elder Hostel travel programs. She also traveled to Central America, visiting in Honduras a farm connected to her church. Her last trip was a barge trip throughout several rivers in France. Given her age, Helen is under the care of the Cornerstone Hospice care team made up of Ann Harr RN, regional team manager; Andrea Hart RN; Suzanne Jackowski, LPN; Yvonne Pierre, CNA; Vanessa Hall, CNA; Nathalie Valcarcel, social worker and Geren Baird, chaplain. Cornerstone Hospice nurse Andrea Hart RN, says "Helen has truly been a joy to know and care for! She is not only the highlight of my day but also to the staff at The Commons of Orlando Lutheran Towers where we care for her. Although her memory is failing, she still shares many parts of her life in an amusing way. Helen always greets me with her --Well, Hello Honey!-Helen has truly been a blessing to my life and all those that know her! Having made Winter Park the familys home, Helen remained extremely active until late in life. She played golf, bridge, volunteered at the Morse Gallery in Winter Park, was active in the Winter Park Womens Club and at All Saints Episcopal Church of Winter Park. A daring driver, she thought nothing of driving from Florida to Michigan until she was well into her seventies. Since 1984, Cornerstone Hospice and Palliative Care, a nonprot community-based healthcare organization, has provided care and services to central Florida residents experiencing life-limiting illnesses. Our Cornerstone Inpatient Suites located within Winter Park Towers on South Lakemont Avenue is available to care for Winter Park and Orange county residents in general. To learn more, call (407)206-2273 or toll-free (800)679-6088 or visit www.cornerstonehospice.org as well as www.SeriousIllness.org/CornerstoneSurrounded by family and her Cornerstone Hospice care team, Winter Park scion Helen R. Kirk (front, center) is about ready to cut her cake and happily observe her 100th birthday! Front left, her son Robin Kirk of Oviedo; front right, her daughter Susan Dotson who made the trip from Michigan. Standing (l to r) Yvonne Pierre CNA; Sandy Yochem, clinical liaison; Andrea Hart RN; Suzanne Jackowski LPN and Geren Baird, chaplain. World traveler, Winter Park community legend Helen R. Kirk observes 100th birthday! Maitland City Talk BY HHOwW ArdRD ScCHIEfFErdRDEcCKErR MAYOR Mayors mean business goes to Tallahassee

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Page 7 TThursday, March 29, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer March 26 Commission highlights There was a Commission meeting held on March 26 at 3:30 p.m. Below are the highlights of decisions made: Consent AAgenda The minutes of March 12 purchases and contracts were approved. The amendment of the development agreement and re-execution of the air space agreement for the 444 W. New England and 362 S. Pennsylvania avenues buildings was approved. The budget adjustment for the police departments participation in the ICE Task Force was approved. The budget adjustment to appropriate approved. AAction IItems The fee waiver request for Crealdes an The four objectives designed to set the agenda for the Central Florida ULI Techni cal Assistance Panel two-day workshop for the West Fairbanks area were approved. Public HHearings The new fee schedule effective April 1 was approved. The request of Winter Park Town Center LTD for Conditional Use approval to build a bank and new restaurant with drive-thru as a redevelopment of the former Winter Park Village Borders was approved. The resolution executing a Public Trans portation JPA with the State of FDOT for artwork at the Winter Park train station/ Amtrak station was approved. amending Chapter 22 to incorporate the Florida Building Code with administrative and technical amendments was approved A copy of the March 26 minutes will be available the week of April 9.Strategic Planning Session The City Commission will have a Stra tegic Planning Session from 9:15 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Wednesday, April 4, at the Winter Park Community Center located at 721 W. New England Ave. The public is invited, however no comment will be taken.Pro shop ribbon-cutting ceremony The city will host a ribbon-cutting cere mony for the newly renovated Winter Park Country Club Pro Shop located at 761 Old England Ave., at 10 a.m. on Friday, April 6. The character, charm and history of the old starter house were carefully maintained, the original chimney and wood was sal vaged, changing rooms and restrooms were installed, and the golf club storage area was renovated. Now the space that was being used in the clubhouse is available once again for event rentals. HHop on over! The city is hosting the 58th annual Easter Egg Hunt on Saturday, April 7, in beautiful Central Park West Meadow. The hunt for more than 10,000 eggs will begin promptly at 10 a.m. Children with special needs are also encouraged to join in the fun. For more information about the citys oldest event, call 407-599-3275.Pool grand opening A pool grand opening will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, April 7, at the Winter Park Community Center located at 721 W. New England Ave. The cool fun is at the multipurpose pool, which includes a zero-depth entry, lap lanes, spray play and changing rooms. Festivities include a childrens free un derwater egg hunt. Swimmers should ar rive early to sign up for the hunt and regis ter for a recreation I.D. Call 407-599-3275. Construction begins As part of the East Morse Boulevard Improvement Project, construction on the stormwater treatment phase to eliminate pollutants from entering Lake Osceola will begin Monday, April 9. Weather permitting, expected completion is Saturday, April 28. During construction (deep excavation and a large crane operation), parking will be limited at the end of East Morse Boule vard and limited access to the Winter Park Scenic Boat Tour. Call 407-599-3242. MLKK Task Force meetings In October, the Commission unanimous ly appointed a Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., (MLK) Task Force to recommend an ap propriate naming opportunity in honor of Dr. King. The MLK Task Force will host a public meeting from 6 to 7:30 p.m. on Tues day, April 10, at the Winter Park Commu nity Center located at 721 W. New England Ave. ing will be presented at a second public input meeting being held from 7 to 8 p.m. on Tuesday, April 24, at Mount Moriah Missionary Baptist Church located at 421 S. Pennsylvania Ave. The suggested criteria for this naming opportunity include: The street, park or venue should have No street, park or venue already named after one of the founding or other promi nent families should be renamed. If a street is selected, the number of businesses/residences that will have to incur the inconvenience and cost of an address change should be minimized. If a street is selected for renaming, it should either be the whole street or at least start at one end of the street. This would avoid potential public safety challenges created when a street has its current name at one end, a different name in the middle, and then returns to the current name at the other end. The public is encouraged to at tend. ONE HOURMASSAGE$3995*A $79.95 VA LUE! ONE HOURFACIAL$4995*A $79.95 VA LUE! MASSAGE | FACIALS | WAXING MASSAGE AND FACIAL SPA Open 7 days | Walk-ins Welcome Extended Hourshandandstone.comHand & Stone Massage and Facial Spa consistently delivers professional massage & facial services at affordable prices 7 days a week. WINTER PARK | 407-622-0227 480 N Orlando Ave l Winter Park Village Grand Opening!*Introductory offers valid for first time visit only. Not valid for gift cards. Sessions include time for consultation and dressing. Rates and services may vary by location. Offers may not be combined. MM22195/CE9988346 Hand & Stone Franchise Corp. Franchises Available. Independently Owned & Operated. A fun afternoon of golf, food, friends and charity! Proceeds benefit the Coalition for the Homeless of Central Florida. Golf Registration Deadline April 6 $400 per foursome / $100 per individualIncludes box lunch, beverages, snacks, BBQ dinner and social, goodie bag and cart and greens fees. Helicopter Ball Drop Contest $500 Prize! $10 per entry or 3/$20A helicopter will drop golf balls over one hole and the first ball in the hole (or closest to the pin) wins the prize! Entry open to the public. Must not be present to win. or call (407) 644-8281 Working on rails PHoOToO byBY IsSAAcC BABcCOcCK THE obOBSErvRVErR FDOO T made its second delivery of nearly 13 miles of rail for the Central Florida Commuter Rail Corridor the line on which SSunRail trains will run in 2014 last week. EEach rail section was 1,650 feet long and weighed 31 tons. Winter Park City Talk BY RANdD Y KKNIGHtT CITY MANAGER

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Page 8 TThursday, March 29, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer New spring inventory has arrived including mens Camp shirts, shorts, pants, swimwear, and much more from sizes Small to XX Large. 57th ANNUAL SPRING ORCHID SHOWFooling Around with Orchids Central Florida Orchid Society------NEW LOCATION----Maitland Civic Center 641 South Maitland Ave., Maitland, FL 32751 Mar 31 & Apr 1, 2012 9am to 5pm each day Exhibits, Sales, Lectures, Door Prizes, Etc. Admission $5 at door (Bring ad-save $2) www.corchidsociety.org PHoOToOS byBY IsSAAcC BABcCOcCK THE obOBSErvRVErR BBike from Park to Park participants rode through Lake Island Park to Mead Botanical Garden, by Azalea Lane Recreation Center, and back to Central Park on Friday, March 23.Lady Tars fall in seminals IsISAAcC BBABcCOcCK Observer SStaff A narrow win over Lander propelled the Rollins womens basketball team deeper into the NCAA tournament than theyd ever treaded, but a meeting with Shaw ended their miracle run a game shy of the championship. Rollins (28-6) fell to Shaw in the NCAA Division II Tourna ment semifinals 87-71 on March 21. They were in the Final Four. The Tars had watched the Lady Bears rip out a quick lead in the game, one that they would never relinquish. But the Tars had moments of brilliance as they attempted to cut into a lead that at one point in the game bal looned to 22 points. They nearly cut the lead to single digits mid way through the second half, but allowed the Lady Bears to go on repeated scoring streaks to keep the game out of reach. I think we needed to set tle down a little, guard Paris Moore said at a press confer ence after the game. We had the NCAA jitters. Moore led the way for the Tars, shooting 13 points and grabbing five boards in the game, nearly matched by Ashley Jones with 13 points and four rebounds. Rebounds were a particularly telling tally for the Tars, who grabbed 38 to the Bears 61. They really hurt us on the boards, Head Coach Glenn Wil kes Jr. said at the press confer ence. Its very unusual for us to be out-rebounded. But theres a reason Shaws only lost one game since Christmas. Theyre very tough to handle in the post. While the Tars spread the rebounding duties around, the Bears had three rebounders in double digits. Out of the 10 Bears who would play that night on March 21, the top three re bounders had as many boards as the entire Tars team. The Tars made a comeback at tempt in the second half, shoot ing significantly better than the Bears, but the rift proved too wide. Sometimes you come up short, Moore said. Take your bike

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Page 9 Thursday, March 29, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Lifestyles Prato >>Located at 124. N. Park Ave., Prato features Italian cuisine. The restaurant has indoor and outdoor seating, and has two wood-burning ovens from Naples, Italy. Tim Noelke, co-owner of Prato, said his restaurants cuisine draws its inspiration from many regions of Italy. Our cuisine is Italian, he said. It is kind of northern Italian to Mediterranean cuisine. Were unique in that we do all of our pastas in-house here. The restaurant has been on the Avenue since Nov. 15. Visit pratowp.com<< Peter MillarLocated at 215 N. Park Ave., Peter Millar is a clothing store owned by H. Craig Delongy. owns one of three stores in the U.S. that carry the brand the other two are owned by Peter Millar himself. The Peter Millar brand features cashmere sweaters, sports shirts, sweaters, knit golf and polo shirts, footwear and outerwear. Delongy also owns John Craig Clothier, which he named after his grandfather, and Current, both on the Avenue. Visit petermillar.comWhen Park Avenue businesses shut their doors, its a shock. But it makes way for a new crop of businesses. In the last year, about a dozen new storefronts have joined the Avenue. I dont think that this year is any different than any other year, said Debra Hendrickson, vice president of the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce. I think that, having been on the avenue for 20 plus years, Ive seen a lot of businesses come and go, its very cyclical. Heres a look at some of the Avenues newest tenants: SAINT DOROTHY CATHOLIC COMMUNITY IS A PROGRESSIVE CATHOLIC COMMUNITY (Respectfully not associated with the Diocese of Orlando) WHERE ALL ARE WELCOME!We have continued the reformed true Catholic Tradition in the Spirit of Vatican Council II! Are you divorced, gay, a recovering Catholic, feeling disenfranchised by your present worshiping community of whatever denomination, looking for a small worshipping community where you are known and not lost in the crowd? Then you have found what you are looking for in St. Dorothy Catholic Community!St. Dorothy Catholic Community 301 West New England Avenue Winter Park, FL 32790 www.stdorothycatholiccommunity.org 407-610-5109 Holy Week ScheduleMarch 30 ... Penance Service ........8:00 PM April 1 ...... Palm Sunday ..... Mass 11:00am April 5 ...... Holy Thursday ...... Mass 7:30pm April 6 ...... Good Friday ......Liturgy 7:30pm April 7 ...... Holy Saturday ..... Mass 7:30pm April 8 ...... Easter Sunday .... Mass 11:00am Surge of new shops on Park ANDY CEBallALLOsS Observer Staff Visit wpmobserver.com for more information on these new businesses, the proposed business improvement district and photos. The Ancient OOlive Located at 324 N. Park Ave., the Ancient Olive sells olive oils imported from around the world and unique balsamic vinegars. The Olive opened in October and prides itself in being a tasting room where one can try products before buying them. Bryan Behling, co-owner of the Ancient Olive, said the business complements the existing Avenue business he co-owns, the Spice and Tea Exchange. We have the freshest olive oil available in the world, Behling said. any given time, our oils are only maybe three to fourth months old. Visit theancientolive.comCharyliLocated at 400 S. Park Ave. in Winter Park, Charyli is a womens Park. The store opened in November and features clothing, accessories and jewelry. Lisa West, owner of Charyli, said she wanted to open a business that could cater to a wide range of customers. That was kind of my thinking in opening this. I want college stu dents to be able to shop; I want high school kids to be able to shop, she said. Visit facebook.com/CharyliGrace ropean dinnerware, linens, pewter and gifts. It opened in November and shares a space with the Ancient Olive, with some of Grace owner Lael Dewahls artwork featured in that store. Were unique in that we specialize in more traditional art. Plein air, impressionism, still lifes, she said. Visit GraceWinterPark.comRosey Wrays RoostLocated at 515 N. Park Ave., this store features a variety of unique gifts and home dcor. The store opened in October and includes lamps, outdoor hanging mounts and seasonal replacements, dolls and furniture. Trina Spinelli, co-owner of Rosey Wrays Roost, said she and her mother got the idea for her store by traveling across the U.S. and other countries, and by visiting small towns to see how local businesses promoted their products. Inside, the store features a variety of rooms with different themes. Visit RoseyWraysRoost.comSweet Traditions >>Located at 212 N. Park Ave., Sweet Traditions Bakery and Caf features a range of traditional French bakery items, such as pastries and cookies. This location, which has been open since August, has a full menu for breakfast, lunch and dinner, and the caf features indoor and outdoor seating. Christine Chrocher, co-owner of Sweet Traditions, said she has had a great deal of experience running this type of busi ness. Crocher has owned bakeries in Paris, New Hampshire and Massachusetts. She co-owns one in Winter Garden. We provide a casual dining experience, she said. We use all natural ingredients. Its faster than a sit-down restaurant. Visit facebook.com/FrenchBakery

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Page 10 Thursday, March 29, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer FamilyCalendar Its TAX time. Appointments Available 7 Days a Week!Tax Form Processing LLC2400 N Forsyth Rd., Suite 101 Orlando, FL 32807Tel: (407) 657-6336www.TaxFormProcessing.com Proudly Serving the Orlando Area for 17 years! Scan QR Code Calendar Rollins College hosts its fth an nual Spring E Extravaganza from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, March 31, at the Colleges Mary Jean Plaza. It includes carnivalstyle booths, activities and games, as well as egg hunts, crafts, music and free food. This event is free. Complimentary Photos with the EEaster B Bunny will be held from noon to 4 p.m. on Sunday, April 1, at Peterbrooke Chocolatier of Winter Park, 300 S. Park Ave. Visit Peterbrookewp.com Story time at Leu Gardens is at 10 a.m. on Monday, April 2. The Orange County Library Systems storytelling program is the rst Monday of each month, excluding holidays. Visit leugardens.org The Art and History Museums Maitland presents its Spring Series of Art Classes, beginning on April 2. Participants can choose from an array of creative classes. Register at ArtandHistory.org, call 407-539-2181 extension 265 or register in person. At 10:30 a.m. each Tuesday, the Maitland Public Library hosts preschool story and craft time. At 10:30 a.m. each Thursday, it hosts baby time stories and activity. At 4 p.m. each Thursday, it hosts Reading Buddies for kindergarten through fth-grade. Call 407-6477700. Other library activities include the movie, Titanic, (1997) starring Leonardo DiCapro and Kate Wins let, being played at 10:30 a.m. on Saturday, March 31. Also included is the Womens Caucus for Art Reception and Poetry Reading. During the month of March, the Womens Caucus for Art is displaying its art, themed Literal Images in the Librarys gallery and lobby. The reception and poetry reading is open to all. At 1:30 p.m. on April 1, the library will play Ghosts of the Abyss, the 2003 documentary of James Camerons journey back to the site of his greatest inspiration: the legendary wreck of the Titanic. At 3 p.m. on April 1, the library will host the 100th Anniversary trib ute to the Titanic a local Ti tanic historian will tell the history of the Titanic and relive stories of the Titanic passengers. Tea and dessert will follow the discussion, and registration is required. At 2 p.m. on Tuesday, April 3, it will host PC Academy-Intro to Word Processing, part 1.   Reg istration is required. On Wednesday, April 4, two workshops of Creating Spring Cards & Gifts are being held at the Mai tland Public Library from 4 to 6 p.m., and from 6:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m.Send submissions to editor@observernewspapers.comMARCH 31The Festival of India, a vibrant celebration of culture, arts and cuisine, will be held from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday, March 31, at the HSCF Community Hall and Grounds, 1994 Lake Drive, Casselberry.  Entry is free and parking is $5. Call 407-6995277.APRIL 1 The documentary Miss Representation will be played from 6 to 8 p.m. on Sunday, April 1, at the First Presbyterian Church of Maitland, 31 N. Orlando Ave. The event is free. The lm, shown at the 2011 Sun dance Film Festival, exposes how mainstream media contribute to the under-representation of women.  Visit missrepresentation.org The Florida International Piano Competition hots the third Annual Symphony for the Arts at 6 p.m. on Sun day, April 1, at the Grand Bohemian Hotel, 325 S. Orange Ave. in Orlando. Tickets are $100 per person. Corpo rate Tables are available for $850.  Call 407-645-2525. The Central Florida Watercolor So ciety will hold its next monthly meet ing at 1:30 p.m. on Sunday, April 1, in the Marvel Building at the Maitland Art Center, 231 W. Packwood Ave. in Maitland. The program will feature a demonstration titled Watercolor Outside the Lines by watercolorist Peggy Furlin. The meeting is open to all, but the society requests an admis sion fee of $10 of non-members due to limited space. Call 407-415-0594. Each Saturday morning, during the month of April, the Orange Audubon Society will conduct free guided bird walks in Mead Botanical Garden. Free loaner binoculars will be avail able. The walks will begin at 8 a.m. and will be two to three hours long. Mead Botanical Garden is located at 1300 S. Denning Drive. Call Dick Smith at 407-257-7361.APRIL 2State Rep. Bryan Nelson (R-Apopka) will host a post-session Town Hall on Monday, April 2, from 6-7 p.m. at Maitland City Hall to meet, discuss and answer questions about the 2012 Legislative Session. Topics include the 2012 redistricting process, the scal year 2012-2013 state budget and the septic tank issue. Call 407884-2023.APRIL 3The Tarower Chapter of the Flori da N Native Plant Society will meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 3, at Harry P. Leu Gardens, 1920 N. Forest Ave. in Orlando. Dr. Walter Taylor, author of several wildower books, will present a program titled Wildower Seasons of Florida. This meeting is free and open to the public. Mark your calendars for exciting trivial pursuit games from 7 to 8:30 p.m. April 4 and April 18 at the University Club of Winter Park. The event is free but donations are accepted. Visit uni versityclubwinterpark.org On Wednesday, April 4, from 2 to 6 p.m., Centura Institute is hosting an open house. Get a VIP tour of the fa cilities, win door prizes and talk with faculty and current students about a career in the health care eld. The campus is located at 6359 Edgewater Drive. Call 407-275-9696.APRIL 5The OOrange County Retired E Educa tors Association will meet at 10 a.m. on Thursday, April 5, at College Park United Methodist Church, located at 644 W. Princeton St. in Orlando. En joy a program by weatherman Glenn Richards. Visit ocrea-.org or call 407-677-0446.Visit wpmobserver.com/events for more details. Send submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com EEnergy program There will be an energy conser vation program hosted by Win ter Park on Thursday, March 29. There are two sessions: one from 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. for com mercial customers, and one from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. for residential customers. The event is free to Winter Park utility customers. To register, call 407-599-3285. The Last 5 YY ears The Breakthrough Theatre will present the Jason Robert Brown musical, The Last 5 Years, from March 30-April 23. It is a contemporary song-cycle musical that chronicles the ve-year life of a marriage. Show times are at 8 p.m. on Mondays, Fridays, and Saturdays, and at 3 p.m. on Sundays. Call 407-9204034 or visit breakthroughtheatre.com Film festivalThe Chenrezig Project of Cen tral Florida has announced the line-up of lms selected for its third annual Florida Dharma Film Festival, to take place over two weekends in late March. The fes tival is at the First Congregational Church of Winter Park on March 30-31. Visit chenrezigproject.org/ FLharma2012.pdf or e-mail lm fest@chenrezigproject.org Charles Ritchie lectureCharles Ritchie: Drawing the Limits of Vision is a lecture by artist Charles Ritchie that will explore the many ways the artist investigates the limits of the visual world at 6 p.m. Tuesday, April 3, at the Cornell Fine Arts Museum. Pictured is Charles Ritchie, Lights in Three Panels, 2010-2011, water color, graphite and cont crayon on Fabriano paper sheet/image: 4 x 9 7/8, collection of the artist.

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Page 11 Thursday, March 29, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Through April 8 The EEarl family is troubledActor/director John DiDonna keeps us on the edge of our theater seats with plays that are described as visceral, explosive and brutal. His latest effort is Christopher Humbles tragiccomedy "The Flight of the Earls", in which violence and betrayal rip through the Earl family for the sake of Ireland. "The Earls" will be performed for two weeks only through Sunday, April 8, at the Shakespeare Center.  For reser vations, call  407-328-9005. Tickets are cash only at door; for preor ders, visit redchairproject.com   March 30-April 29 NNoel Cowards Private Lives An evening of sophisticated one-liners and witty comebacks make up Noel Cowards best play. "Private Lives" is scandalous and as sparkling as chilled champagne. "Private Lives" opens March 30 at the Mad Cow Theatre in downtown Orlando with Jennifer Christa Palmer as Amanda and Philip Nolen as Elyot. This glamorous and tempestuous couple haven't seen years ago when they meet again by chance on a hotel balcony. Their passion reignites, but they happen to be on their respective honeymoons! Call 407-297-8788 or visit madcowtheatre.comMarch 30-April 23 The Last 5 YY ears a musical The Jason Brown musical The Last 5 Years ingeniously a marriage from meeting to breakup. This personal look at the relationship between two characters will be presented with a unique twist by Director Wade Hair at the Breakthrough Theatre of Winter Park as the musical will have four different casts with each cast performing one weekend of the four-week run. The casts are: Erynn Hair and Rob Guest (March 30-April 2); Sarah Ross and Justin Nickerson (April 6-9); Krystal Gillette and Sage Starkey (April 13-16); and Jolie Hart and Adam McCabe (April 20-23). Call 407-920-4034 or visit breakthroughtheatre.comMarch 31 McRae Art Studios OOpen House In Winter Park is a studio Florida. Their work is seen in mu seums and prestigious collections both locally and throughout the country. Twice a year, they invite the public to meet them, see their workspaces, and most importantly offer us bargains portunity to purchase new work while supporting local artists. The open house is from 5 to 9 p.m. on Saturday, March 31, and admission is free. The space is called McRae  Art Studios, located at 904 Railroad Ave. in Winter Park. Call 407-599-9956  or visit mcraeartstudios.comApril 7-30 Parker SketchParker Sketch is the busiest artist on the Central Florida art scene with his contemporary take on pop art. In his new exhibit "Biography" we view a personal side of Parker Sketch in his most sophisticated collection to date. The work tells of Parker's experiences growing up in the poverty of the projects of Chicago, his early exposure to alcohol, living on the streets and discovering his sexual identity. "Biography" will be on display in Gallery Q at The Center at 946 N. Mills Ave. in Orlando. A free reception will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. on Saturday, April 7. Call 321-287-5634 or visit thecenterorlando.orgApril 7 Carousel I highly recommend the Or lando Philharmonics opera/mu sical stagings with the orchestra on-stage and the performers in front of the Orchestra. Rodgers & Hammersteins "Carousel," con ducted by Christopher Wilkins, will be performed at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. on Saturday, April 7, at Bob Carr Performing Arts Center. Both performances feature an allstar cast. Named the best musical of the 20th century by Time Magazine, "Carousel" follows the story of Billy Bigelow, a swagger ing carnival barker, who marries nave mill worker Julie Jordan. Michelle Knight, Todd S. Mum mert and Andrea Canny are just a few of the talented singing-actors you will recognize in this produc tion. Call 407-770-0071 or visit orlandophil.orgJosh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906. 23rd Annual 23rd Annual 27th Annual Presented by Use the small-space stacked logo ONLY when it is less than 1 inch widePRIMARY SMALL-SPACE Wednesday, April 18, 2012 from 5-8 p.m. Winter Park Farmers Market Featuring 40 local restaurants and caterers, unlimited food and beverage samples and live entertainment in downtown Winter Park. Tickets and information at www.winterpark.org or call 407-644-8281. 6TH ANNUAL SHRED EVENT This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH O RLANDO A VE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.E NZIAN.ORG Greg Kinnear and Alan Arkin THIN ICE Fri Sun 4:00 6:30 9:00 Mon Thurs 6:30 9:00 Wednesday Night Pitcher Show CHASING AMY 8PM FREE Coming Soon:21st Annual Florida Film Festival April 13-22 Josh Garrick Culture worthy of your calendarTragedy + comedy Private Lives

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Page 12 Thursday, March 29, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer OOpinions Orange blossom sounds like a song. But just as Orange Blossom Trail does not always live up to the bucolic beauty the name suggests, orange blossom time may not be the best time of year for you either. In fact, it can make you pretty miserable. If the green dust everywhere has you sneezing, you are not defenseless. The art of reducing the battle against your bodys reaction to the dust and minimizing your green dust exposure. Symptoms of orange blossom pollen allergy are runny nose with teary and swollen eyes, cough, headache and sneezing. Your immune system launches an attack on the pollen, releasing histamine and other chemicals. The lining of your nose gets and secrete mucous, triggering coughing and sneezing. A teaspoon of local (check the label!) honey a day during pollen season is said to reduce your bodys reaction. Unless you need to avoid honey for other medical reasons, it might be worth a try. You can purchase honey at the farmers market or local bee farm. Medications for pollen al lergies attempt to reduce the immune response or its effects. Antihistamine pills and sprays block histamine, the chemical your body releases as part of an allergic reaction. Decongestants attempt to dry up the congestion your body creates in response to pollen. Nasal corticosteroids sprayed into your nose reduce passages, but can irritate the nose and alter your sense of smell and taste. Many antihistamines and decongestants are available without a prescription; nasal cor ticosteroids and other treatments require a prescription. Remember that most medica tions, including over-the-counter and herbal treatments, can have side effects and should be used with caution and in consultation with your health care provider. Honey can raise your blood sugar. Some antihistamines can make you drowsy. Decongestants can increase your blood pressure, worsen glaucoma, increase insomnia and make you irritable. Decongestant sprays for more than a few days can be counterproductive your body can have a rebound reaction, creating more secretions. You can also reduce your exposure to pollen by making your home a haven from the green dust. Keep your windows closed. Use the air conditioning if it is not hot, to clear up the air. frequently. Wash the curtains and wipe the blinds. Wash bed sheets frequently in hot water. Remove area rugs. If you have carpeting, vacuum frequently. If you can, replace rugs with terrazzo, tiles or wood laminate. If your house is older, consider having one of the local duct cleaning companies remove years of dust in the air system. Check the pollen forecast on the local weather websites. Go outside when the pollen counts are lower, typically after a strong rain has cleared the air, when the humidity is high and when the temperature is up the typi cal Florida hot, humid and hazy forecast. Pollen counts rise on those crisp clear days of cooler temperatures and low humidity. If your allergic symptoms persist, drive you crazy or are making you sick, consult your nurse practitioner or physician. The persistent irritation and mucous production can be a perfect environment for a sinus infection could be signs of other problems. If it is orange blossom time that gets you, remember it will be over soon. Maitland resident Nancy Rudner Lugo is a nurse practitioner and president of Health Action, offering workplace health consulting and nurse coaching. Visit www.healthaction.bizThis week lawmakers examined President Barack Obamas health care reform, which would make it mandatory for all Americans to purchase health care at a reasonable cost. U.S. Supreme Court Justices questioned whether its constitutional to force people to buy anything. If Obamas health care over haul is upheld, more than 30 million Americans will be forced to purchase health care insurance from private companies or from the government. If they refuse, forbids insurance companies from denying coverage to people with pre-existing conditions or charging a higher premium to people over a certain age. But this is not the only insur ance we as Americans are forced to buy. Those of us who operate vehicles must, by law, purchase motor vehicle insurance. It can be argued that no one is forced to drive and therefore not forced to purchase insurance, but is that really a fair argument? Many of us, especially in the Or lando area, do not have access to public transportation and daily, long commutes to work have become commonplace. A 2009 National Household Travel Sur vey said that the average person in the U.S. drove 38 vehicle miles per day. So for some, owning and operating a personal vehicle is not a choice, but rather a necessity. If the argument that driv ing is a choice persists, then it can at least be said that the reasoning behind mandatory auto insurance and mandatory health insurance is similar: If something bad happens, theres a mechanism in place to cover the costs. Right now, if an uninsured person has to be rushed to the emergency room for surgery and later they cannot pay the bill, American taxpayers are on the hook. Although the bill states that insurance will be available at a reasonable cost, many people, especially in these trying economic times, are struggling so severely that paying for health insurance is unfathomable. But then is it fair that because those people cannot pay, others must cover those costs for them? A more structured plan must be in place for those who cannot afford insurance. For those who qualify, Obamas plan also expands the Medicaid program, which provides health care coverage for low-income citizens. reform have already been real ized even though the bill would not go into full effect until 2014. For instance, nearly 75 percent of young adults are now covered by health insurance, prescription costs have been reduced for millions of seniors nationwide, and lifetime caps on health insurance are becoming more and more a thing of the past. Americas health care system was broken. Theres no argu ing against that. Theres a plan in place to start repairing it and many people are still balking at the change. People are forced to pay for things they dont want to pay for all the time its a fact of life. What makes it worth it is that the product they receive in them and society as a whole. Our Observation Letters to the editor Send your thoughts (400 words or less) to Managing Editor Jenny Andreasson at editor@observernewspapers.com BBeing forced to buy insurance isnt new BBanks got themselves in this mess I have two complaints about your lead article (Balancing local banking pub lished March 22) telling us how Community banks in Winter Park and Mait land struggle to meet increasing federal the article suggest in any way what actual regulations were burdensome. Its just da gubbamint. The second was that the article provided no perspective on the conduct of banking recently that might have caused additional regulation to be needed and proposed. Like loan-to-deposit ratio regu lations? Like baseline home mortgage loan standards and appraisals? Like requiring banks to retain some risk on the mortgage loans they make so they have some skin in the game? 2000s, the banks had everything going their way and they made a bundle. Now that the real estate bubble has burst, foreclosure, tank and banking standards to prevent the abuses the banks  perpetrated on the economy and on their customers from happening again. Dont blame it on the gubbamint.William Paton MaitlandPolice step up seat belt enforcementThe Winter Park Police Department has joined state and local law enforce ment agencies and highway safety groups in supporting an aggressive statewide Click It or Ticket seat belt enforcement campaign. Stepped-up law enforcement activities will be conducted during the 2012 Click It or Ticket mobilization period efforts toward unbelted vehicle occupants around the clock, both night and day, dur ing this campaign. Seat belts clearly save lives. Regular seat belt use is the single most effective way to protect people and reduce fatalities in motor vehicle crashes. In 2009 seat belts saved 12,713 lives nationwide. When worn correctly, seat belts have been proven to reduce the risk of fatal injury to front-seat passenger car occupants by 45 percent, and by 60 percent in pickup trucks, SUVs Americans still fails to wear a seat belt when driving or riding in a motor vehicle. Safety Administration, 61 percent of the deaths attributable to not wearing a seat belt in a passenger vehicle in 2010 occurred between the nighttime hours of 6 caused from not being properly restrained during a motor vehicle crash were at 42 percent. More regrettably, seat belt discussions too often revolve around adults in the front seats of vehicles and child safety seats are often overlooked. Kids have to be buckled up too. Your child seat can be Winter Park Police Department by calling 407-599-3562 for an appointment. This is a long-time service that weve been providing for years at no cost to the public. The Winter Park Police Department encourages everyone to wear their seatbelts and use proper child safety equipment at all times, but is asking drivers to have a heightened sense of awareness during the enforcement campaign. Our agency is encouraging compliance in lieu of having to issue citations as costly reminders of a law that everyone should be following every time that they are in a vehicle. Lt. Randy Durkee Special Operations Winter Park Police Department Dr. Nancy Rudner LugoHealth Action The green dust everywhere: N Nursing allergies King Features Weekly ServiceMarch 26, 2012

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Page 13 Thursday, March 29, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer This new FM station at Rollins College can help to speed and advance the great ideas which keep men and women free. Whether the ideas come from the great music or poetry or other literature of the past, or from people of our country who are listening in will be richer. Sixty years ago, the then-presi dent-elect Dwight D. Eisenhower welcomed the listeners of 91.5 WPRK-FM with this inspiring statement. While our program ming and leadership has changed over the decades, our dedica tion to serving the interests of the local community has never wavered. It is due to our loyal listeners from the past 60 years that 91.5 WPRK-FM still lives on, and to celebrate our 60th birthday with a weeklong extravaganza to thank all of our supporters. During the week of April 1, WPRK is launching a funda-thon to broadcast Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. During this time, a couple WPRK DJs will be on-air hosting while listeners are able to call in and donate to the station. Every day at 5 p.m. and 8 p.m., a band will be playing live in our studio, and a variety of members will stop by. The fund-a-thon should be really cool, said Programming Director KC Korge, who played a huge role in organizing the fund-a-thon schedule. Its like a reunion for everyone in the community, and a nice way to bring everyone into the station. We are always promoting venues, restau rants and other businesses so this is a great way for people to give back to the station. Professional Affairs Director Amanda Roche added, WPRK has barely had any updates or equipment repairs since our founding in 1952. We are look ing for any kind of small support or donation from everyone who wants to help WPRK continue for another 60 years! The week will end with a huge free concert on Rollins Colleges campus on Saturday, April 7, from noon to 10 p.m. There will be two stages for musical guests, which include The London Souls, Beebs and Her Money Makers, Hundred Waters, SKIP, Saskatchewan, KG Omulo and many more. The event also will have a beer garden sponsored by Ship yards Brew Pub, as well as many local vendors selling arts and crafts and other miscellaneous items and services. This anniversary is not only lege and local radio worldwide. Our station is one of the few left in a shrinking radio community that runs on FM (not just Internet streaming), 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and is completely run by Rollins College students and volunteers from the community. You matter when you work at WPRK, Korge said. You have a real responsibility to the listeners, and its great that Rollins gives students these opportunities to really count in our community. Station Manager Clark Sprinkel grew up listening to WPRK and has been involved since his undergraduate days in 2001. In 60 years I hope WPRK is still bringing alternative program ming to the Winter Park com munity. Ill be 89, and hopefully Ill still be around and part of WPRK, he said. WPRK epitomizes the endur ing medium of radio, as well as the importance of local radio sta tions in the community. Heres to 60 more years as WPRK 91.5-FM, Winter Park, Florida, The Best in Basement Radio, and The Voice of Rollins College!Lauren Silvestri is public relations coordinator for WPRK 91.5-FM. Theres a maxim when studying history that goes: You have to judge a people by the context of their times. This means that to apply modern sensibilities when judging how folks long ago dealt with an issue is unfair. Accordingly, we (today) have the cumulative advantage of years in which human beings have cally). This has always been an interesting question to me: How do we judge our ancestors? Our Founding Fathers, white funny. Slaves could not vote, were deemed to have no rights, yet Southerners insisted they be counted nonetheless. into our Constitution the complete mar ginalization of African-Americans. Americas democracy, imperfect as it is, was compromised from the beginning. Without this compromise, it is argued, America may not have become the United States. The take-away: it was necessary for the existence of the United States to unequivocally marginalize black Americans (slaves) in our original found ing document, the U.S. Constitution. That for all intents and purposes, a black man Auspicious beginnings. How should we judge our Founding Fathers today in this regard? By contemporary standards, this is clearly racism. But what was it in 1787? In 1783, Quakers in England formed because it is important to understand that voices opposing slavery were actually raising objections internationally and in America. It is one thing to operate in a vacuum (slavery is an historical fact, normal and sanctioned by society) and another to become aware that some found slavery an abomination and should be outlawed. Interestingly, most abolitionists, while opposing slavery, did not consider Afri cans as equal to white men, let alone have them live next door. But the conver sation for justice had begun. Its clarion message had not yet reached a crescendo; that would take another 180 years. Americas Civil War was more about the Union, less about slavery. After the Civil War, the Jim Crow laws were put in place in the South, and to varying degrees throughout the North. It wasnt until the post WWII period that civil rights for Americas black citizens ac tually began to seriously trouble (agitate) white America. The Civil Rights Movement that took place in the 1960s was just the beginning of the quest for black freedom and justice. Slavery/Jim Crow had been a continuous part of the American fabric since the establishment of the Spanish colony of St. Augustine in 1565. That is 400 years of unmitigated terror and oppression of African-Americans. It is less than 50 years since the Civil Rights Act of 1965 400 years of slavery and oppression, 50 years at making amends/corrections. The question on the table is what will Americans generations from now make of us? How will we be judged regarding race? What will be the context of our times? The line most quoted in the justreleased hit movie The Hunger Games is, May the odds be ever in your favor. Its ludicrous. Twenty-four children are where only one survives. Some odds, huh? Speaking of which, when I heard that line I immediately thought of Americas young black men. The odds sadly never seem in their favor. Why is that? What does Trayvon Martins death say about you? And America in 2012?Jepson is a 24-year resident of Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.USLouis Roney Play On! Chris Jepson Perspectives The odds are stacked TidbitsThe FifthOnce again I witness people taking the Fifth on television. The Fifth gives us all a right that we may rarely, or never, use in our lives and may be a right that we do not always trust and respect in oth ers, perhaps with reason. The schoolboy who is asked brusquely by his teacher the Fifth as a way to get out of answering. Of course, there are things that should not be asked: A lady certainly may rightfully take the Fifth if you crudely ask her birth year. But we best know the Fifth publi cally and primarily as a means used by law-breakers to dodge having to reveal their heretofore-unadmitted misdeeds. The law doesnt require you to tattle on yourself, therefore God knows the number of sins that the human race car ries to its grave. One of the stranger hu man qualities is the irrepressible urge to confess publically to imaginary sins. For reasons that are weird and psychological ly driven, all manner of factual personal information is frequently disclosed. Often people tell true things about themselves that no third party could be motivated to invent. Using the Fifth to prevent selfincrimination can often, by implication, be as damning as blabbing out the naked truth. The characters of many fascinating are all the more attractive for their eternal secrecy. Remember Greta Garbo and her constant, I want to be alone? What Greta was hiding no one knew except maybe John Gilbert and he died!U.S. logicWe need oil, but we dont drill our own copious underground oil. We send money to Brazil so that they can drill oil. Then we borrow 44 percent of the money at high interest to pay them for their oil! Our oil stays underground! Quite logical, nicht wahr?Miracle elixirA Saturday morning occurrence I wonder if you have shared: Two guys are on the radio chatting away. One is telling the other about a magical medi cine to order from some place out West. The other guy asks him all about what this wondrous product does. The stuff is remarkable all right it cures anything from sore muscles to all kind of diseases I order one bottle right away, theyll send me a second one free. I guess that long ago I should have ordered some of this stuff, but Ive never gotten around to it. Its amazing that Ive stayed alive!Stage frightLast night I dreamed again a version nights. I am in my dressing room in a great opera house, costumed, made-up and all ready to go. The director is saying to me, Roney, dont worry about it. Youve done this role dozens of times. Yes, I say, but the last time was 50 years ago, and now I cant even remember the name of the piece. Oh! Itll all come back to you, he says, walking out jauntily and leaving the stage door wide open for me to go out and do my thingAbout Roney: HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney) Using the Fifth to prevent selfincrimination can often, by implication, be as damning as blabbing out the naked truth. WPRK will host a fund-a-thon Monday, April 2, to Friday, April 6, from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. The week will end with a huge free concert on Rollins Colleges campus on Saturday, April 7, from noon to 10 p.m. Visit www.rollins.edu/wprk/ for more information.Sixty years on air LaurAUREN SilIL VEstriSTRI Guest Writer WPRK staff

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Page 24 Thursday, March 29, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer 1-866-742-1373Get your business noticedOne Call One Order One Payment Almost 4 million readers statewide are waiting to see your advertising message. Dont make them wait any longer. Call us today! ank you to our media partners: WKMG Local 6 and Magic 107.7.



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407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC USPS 00-6186 Publisher statement on page 4. Thursday, March 29, 2012 50+ tax wpmobserver.com Subscribe now! Visit wpmobserver.com Community members weighed in Monday on how Mai tland should work to cut costs, but keep culture in as it moves forward with talks of who should manage the Maitland Art Center. On March 13, there was a workshop between the Maitland City Council and Art & History Museums Maitland (A&H) to address concerns raised by Councilman Phil Bonus as to the cost effectiveness of A&Hs management. At the March 26 City Council meeting, commu nity members provided their thoughts on the issue. Sixteen speakers taking up more than an hour of meeting time spoke about what they want to see happen regarding the management of A&H. Im trying to stir a dialogue with MAHA (A&Hs previous name) and the community at large as of how to best run and preserve the gem that it is, Bo nus said. Citizens reacted to Bonus initial proposal of taking the Maitland Art Center under con trol of the citys Leisure Services Department. This, he said, would give the city the ability to run the center in a more revenue-neutral manner to help balance the citys budget, instead of spending $425,000 to fund A&H and seeing no direct return on investment. I havent heard an idea that bad in a long time, resident Gus Bobes said, on the government getting involved with running the arts center. He said that arts and the city should always oper ate as separate entities. Others offered similar senti ments, saying that Maitland Art Center founder Andre Smith al ways intended for the center to be run for the art community by Andre Smith believed that art should be free and be ex plored; my concern is that if we gave control to the city, would we lose the elements of the arts that Andre Smith lived and died for? said Daniel Van Horn, a historian of Andre Smith. Before the government of fers to take the center over, one resident said Council members should instead pinpoint prob lems and allow A&H an oppor as bad as it is, maybe its time to hand the keys over to the artists that have it maybe its time for the art community to manage it on the city, resident Butch Char lan said. A&H Director Andrea Bailey pendent is the organizations ul timate goal. We are on this path toward The biggest question facing the Winter Park City Commis sion was not when or how a giant development would transform a with dead grass and empty plots it was whether to burn it all. At Mondays meeting the Commission held a preliminary meeting with Ravaudage devel of an annexation agreement in which Winter Park would swallow up 54 acres of the de velopment at the corner of U.S. Highway 17-92 and Lee Road. dinance will come at the April 9 City Commission meeting. Most of the agreement passed by without a whisper from the Commission, but then came the issue of what to do with the de bris that would be cleared after the development was leveled: haul it off or burn it? Bellows was requesting it be burned off in at least one con trolled burn so large that Fire Chief Jim White said it might not be allowed by the state. City code doesnt really allow burn ing garbage at all. But while the land still be longs to Orange County, they might have a chance to do it be fore it is annexed. In Orange County you can get a burn permit and it's only or ganic materials it's not build ing materials, Bellows said. In Winter Park you can't do this. White said a large-scale burn on county land could be a good precedent for whether the burn could happen without risk to any nearby buildings. They don't have the same additional level of restrictions that we do, White said of the county. If he burns and it's still in the county and he gets a divi sion of forestry permit, that's go ing to be a good heads up wheth er we'll be able to do this down the road. Bellows said that he would use an air curtain burner, which is a cleaner way to burn off the tons of brush that would be cut down on a piece of land the size burners resemble large semitrailer-sized dumpsters with an air blower attached to ventilate ash down. Your article provided no perspective on what caused a need for additional regulation in the banking sector. Page 12 Letters to the editor Lifestyles One of seven new faces on Park Avenue include Rosey Wrays Roost, a gift and home dcor store. Page 9 Restaurant review Food critic Josh Garrick stops in at Prato, created by Luma on Park executive chef Brandon McGlamery. Page 2 Calendar Check out the Florida Dharma Film Festival in Winter Park this weekend. All of the movie screenings are free. Page 10 TAX DEFERREDFIXED ANNUITY RATE FOR 5 YEARS.Bob Adams 407-644-6646THE NATIONAL 5 YEAR CD RATE IS 1.34%3.35% 451 Maitland Ave, Altamonte Springs, FL 32701NEW Dermatology Ofce!407-599-SKIN (7546)*Waive co-payment up to $25 No referral needed Accepting all insurances Dr. John Cottam Dr. Ross Wheeler PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Developer Dan Bellows, right, asked Winter Park City Commission to support his plans to burn off acres of brush that will be cleared for his Ravaudage project. As long as the land is still unincorporated Orange County, not part of Winter Park, Bellows plans may get the OK. Please see RAVAUD AGE on page 5 Burn 54 acres, save $1 million ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff Please see COUNCIL on page 2 City discusses taking over Art Center SARAH WILSON Observer Staff The last scheduled workshop regarding the creation and standards of the Downtown Maitland Zoning District will be held at 11:30 a.m. on Friday, March 30, in the Maitland City Council Chambers. The public is encouraged to attend to have their voices heard in what could be the nal work session on the issue. The zoning plans are slated to be voted on by the Council at its next meeting, April 9. The next workshop with the City Council and Art & History Museums Maitland will be held at 6:30 p.m. on T uesday, April 10, in the Maitland City Council Chambers.

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Page 2 Thursday, March 29, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer When foodies heard that Chef Brandon McGlamery, who has served as executive chef at Luma on Park since 2006, decided to open a new restaurant just up the street on Park Avenue, we sat up and took note. Creating a restaurant that feels upscale and down-home at the same time is almost impos sible unless youre Brandon McGlamery, and he has done it It begins with the service. As a lone diner, the hostess was ready to put me at a caf ta when I asked for a booth, she did not hesitate for a moment and seated this lone diner at a place set for four. This was followed by the ingenious water bottle of plain water that was placed on my table so subtly that I didnt even see it happen. It happens that I drink a lot of water, and no more. The simplicity of having that water on the table was a big hit with me. And that is what Prato exem and inspiration that can only come from a chef who is able to subdue his ego enough to see his restaurant through the eyes of the people who actually eat there. My pleasure continued when my waiter approached with a details of the menu. I ask a lot of questions, and Charles was thoroughly informed on every point. For example, I wanted to know about the English peas they show up in more than one dish and the distinction of this special kind of pea is truly worth it. The dcor plays a part in that homey upscale feeling with red brick and rough wood walls rising up around waiters in plaid shirts, blue jeans and long white aprons. The fact that there is a long bar (with televisions) run ning the length of the restaurant had me concerned with the po tential noise level, but even that is no problem. Is it possible that McGlamery is an acoustician too? With all that working so well, I am happy to say that the food lives up to the inspired simplic ity of the room. The menu is Italian-inspired, and the restau rant builds on Italys legendary cuisine by using only the freshest of ingredients, with a commit ment to local farms for seasonal and in most cases organic ingredients. McGlamerys handpicked chef di cucina, Matthew Cargo, is an Orlando native, started cooking at the age of 14, and graduated from Le Cordon Bleu Academy. And English peas be praised, he has inherited the best of McGlamerys fascination with mixing fresh produce. Dishes are made up of things such as ca perberries, celery hearts, shaved radishes, arugula and pickled red cabbage that are adventurous and wonderful. He has a light hand with the olive oil sprayed as if by some magic sprayer over the prosciutto; he knows exactly how much cheese to make the pizzas perfect; and he has a second sense about how much anchovyinfused vinaigrette is right for the Caesar salad. So what do I recommend? Ev erything I tasted was wonderful, but if you want that crazy inter esting fusion of tastes that weve come to expect from adventurous chefs, go for the Widow Maker Pizza and be ready to share. Named a "hidden gem" by Orlando SentinelBelly Dancing every Saturday 7:30pm 9:30pm10% o entire check with this adExpires 04/30/12 SUNDAY APRIL 15TH 2PM TO 6PM 1801 W. FAIRBANKS AVE. WINTER PARK, FL 32789 For over 27 years Marjorie Myers greeted diners at her Paco's Mexican Restaurant in Winter Park with a smile and great food. To honor her memory and her commitment to community service, Pacos hosts this annual fundraiser to support the Marjorie A. Myers Memorial Scholarship Fund. Join us for this event; enjo y a special menu of some of Marjs favorite dishes, live music, raffles, a limited time MARJarita; and help give back to the community. TICKETS: $20/PERSON $5/kids under 12 IN ADVANCE LIVE MUSIC Featuring B l u e S t o n e C i r c l e $2.00 MARJaritas MARJarita FIESTA4th Annual PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Restaurant critic Josh Garrick enjoys a meal at Prato recently. He recoomends the Widow Maker Pizza and says, be ready to share. Prato does upscale, down home JOSH GARRICK Observer Staff COUNCIL | C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE worked out in our initial lease with the city, but now with all of this, we are trying to be in novative to get to that path even quicker than we anticipated, she said. A&Hs lease agreement with the city, if no change is made, is set to automatically renew for 51 years on Oct. 1. Other citizens said that the community should hear out Bo nus proposal and realize that he is offering it up with the best in tentions. sue, and thats what we need to look into, resident John Peele said, and the city could be very helpful. At the Council and A&Hs second workshop, scheduled for April 10, both sides hope to ures to help sort out the best way to proceed. Councilwoman Bev Reponen said the Council needs more numbers and less emotion to make a sound decision. Mayor Howard Schiefer decker said he hopes the city and A&H will be able to reach a compromise that will make both sides happy. We want to preserve them need to be able to afford it, he said. Its going to be a hard year, but were going to be suc cessful and were going to make it work. Prato is at 124 N. Park Ave., serving lunch from Wednesday to Sunday from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. and dinner Monday through Saturday from 5:30 to 11 p.m. and Sunday from 5:30 to 10 p.m. Call 407-262-0050 or visit prato-wp.com From the Corner Table

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Page 4 Thursday, March 29, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer USPS 00-6186 ISSN 1064-3613 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835-5705 Member of: Chamber of Commerce Publisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor. Submission does not guarantee publication. Columnists opinions are made independently of the newspaper. All rights reserved. Winter Park / Maitland Observer 2012 Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster www.wpmobserver.com | Phone: 407-563-7000 | Fax: 407-563-7099 | editor@observernewspapers.com P.O Box 2426 Winter Park, FL 32790 Published Thursday, March 29, 2012 CONT ACTS V olume 24, Issue Number 13 PUBLISHER Tracy Craft 407-515-2605 tcraft@observernewspapers.com MANAGING EDITOR Jenny Andreasson 407-563-7026 editor@observernewspapers.com DESIGNER Jonathan Gallagher 407-563-7054 jgallagher@observernewspapers.com ASSOCIA TE EDITOR Isaac Babcock 407-563-7023 isaacb@observernewspapers.com LEGALS | CLASSIFIEDS Ashley McBride legal@FLAlegals.com classieds@observernewspapers.com ST AFF WRITERS Sarah Wilson Brittni Johnson Kristy V ickery COPY EDITOR Sarah Wilson COLUMNISTS Chris Jepson Jepson@MediAmerica.us Louis Roney LRoney@c.rr.com Josh Garrick joshgarrick9@gmail.com ADVER TISING SALES Linda Stern 407-563-7058 LStern@observernewspapers.com SUBSCRIPTIONS | CIRCULA TION Katie Reyes kreyes@turnstilemediagroup.com 407-563-7073 INTERN Andy Ceballos Backstage with Bach On March 1, the Honorary Consul of Germany in Orlando hosted Back stage with Bach in conjunction with the Consulate General of Germany in Miami, a sponsor of the performance of J.S. Bachs St. Matthew Passion at the 77th Annual Bach Festival. About 100 guests attended a preview of the St. Matthew Passion in rehearsal. Pic tured are J. Brock McClane, Honorary Consul of the Federal Republic of Ger many, Rev. Eric Ravndall III, president, Bach Festival Society of Winter Park, and Elizabeth (Betsy) Gwinn, execu tive director, Bach Festival Society of Winter Park. V ote for Casa Feliz Casa Feliz was nominated by the Florida Chapter of the American In stitute of Architects as one of the top 100 buildings in Florida. Cast your vote at aiatop100.org Resident in Readers Digest Winter Park resident Donna Gropper is featured this month in Readers Di gest, which selected her letter for its React section. Readers Digest re ceives about 8,600 letters to the edi tor each year and only 13 letters were chosen for publication in April. Donna wrote: Kudos to Andy Simmons for Funniest Moments of the Year. We get so bombarded with negativity and strife in the news that I didnt know I needed a good laugh until I read this piece and laughed out loud, re peatedly. Youre lucky to work with Andygive him a pat on the back! Model behavior Winter Park Day Nursery was one of ve early childhood programs in Flor ida selected to become state dem onstrations for the implementation of Positive Behavior Support (PBS). The PBS model promotes the social emotional competence of all children, prevents the development of behavior challenges, and ensures that young children with behavioral problems get effective intervention. Chili event raises $27K On Thursday, Feb. 23, the Rotary Club of Winter Park hosted the inaugural Chili for Charity. A dozen of the areas nest restaurants and caterers served chili to more than 450 attendees with more than $27,000 raised. SunRail survey UCF has partnered with the Florida Department of T ransportation to con duct a survey about Central Floridas new commuter rail system, SunRail. Let them know what you think by visiting tinyurl.com/SunRailsurvey Maitland Construction limits parking As part of the East Morse Boulevard Improvement Project, construction on the stormwater treatment phase to eliminate pollutants from entering Lake Osceola will begin Monday, April 9 and is expected to be complete by Saturday, April 28. During construc tion there will be limited parking at the end of East Morse Boulevard and limited access to the Winter Park Scenic Boat T our. Donations needed The Winter Park Benet Shop, a long time community thrift shop at 140 Ly man Ave., Winter Park, needs items to sell clothing, bedding, jewelry, kitchenware and bric-a-brac. They also need volunteers. Please call Elizabeth Comer at 407-647-8276. Proceeds support childrens pro grams and Blind Association Of Cen tral Florida. Send submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com Hours: M-F 8am to 4:30pm 2315 Lee Road Winter Park, Florida 32789 Your Guiding Beacon for Quality Healthcare Harbour Private Duty Nursing, LLCSkilled Nursing Physical Therapy Occupational Therapy Companionship Home Health Aid Homemaking Flexible Schedules Free RN Assessments The Services of Harbour Private Duty Nursing provide peace of mind to loved ones, trust ofcers, guardians and physicians. Our professional team prides itself on making your life easier. We also provide in-hospital private duty care, which offers close, personal attention and reassurance in an unfamiliar and often frightening environment. Our ofce hours are Monday through Friday, 8:00 am to 4:30 pm. Our professional team is available 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. During hours when the ofce is closed and during the weekends and holidays, the on-call coordinator is available by telephone 24 hours per day.www.HarbourPrivateDutyNursing.com License # 299991382phone (407) 895-8188 fax 407-895-9339 Business Briefs Community Bulletin The Mid-Florida Home Builders Foundation, the charitable arm of the Home Builders Association of Metro Orlando, donated $7,000 to Mollie E. Ray Elementary School. The funding completes a decade-long nancial and volunteer commitment to the school that many within the school credit with helping bring its overall grade from an F to an A. The University Club of Winter Park proudly announces its 2012 Board of Directors. The members are President Charles E. Kulmann, Vice President of Programs Joseph Rizzo, Vice President of Develop ment Michael J. Anderson, Vice President of Membership Linda L. Dunlap, Vice President of Finance Clayton Swain, Vice President of Intellectual Activities Paul Enchel mayer, Vice President of House and Grounds Diana Secor, Secretary Maxine Reed, T reasurer Judy Beck, Assistant T reasurer Elizabeth Conk lin and directors Erich C. Blossey, C. Martin Stickley and James B. Knapp. Junior Achievement of Central Flor ida recently appointed three new members to its board of directors for a three-year term: Reagan Rick, president and CEO of Fifth Third Bank Central and North Florida Afliate, Roman V ega, vice president of Brand Management of the Orlando Magic, and Josef Ghosn, senior vice president and chief strat egy ofcer of Florida Hospital The Orange County Public Schools website scored an A+ transpar ency grade, meeting all 10 require ments to win a 2012 Sunny Award sponsored by the Sunshine Review. Winter Park resident Heidi W. Isen hart, a partner with the law rm of ShufeldLowman was recently named president of the charitable or ganization Share the Care for 2012. NAI Realvest recently negotiated a long-term renewal lease agreement for 1,067 square feet of ofce space at Suite 1, 541 E. Horatio Ave. in Mai tland. The tenant, Edward D. Jones and Company L.P. d/b/a Edward Jones, has been located at this ad dress for over 20 years and has re newed for an additional ve years. Reagan Rick Shakespeare winners The annual Shakespeare Competition, sponsored by The English-Speaking Union of Central Florida, was held at The University Club of Winter Park. Each student, who is a winner from his or her own school, memorized and presented a Shakespearian sonnet and also a 20-line passage from one of his plays. The winners are: First place: Alison Sigalow, Lake Highland Preparatory School Second place: Cheyenne Everhart, Seminole High School Third place: Joseph Reece White, Winter Park High School Alison received an all-expense paid trip to New York to compete in the National E-SU Shakespeare Competition at Lincoln Center.

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Page 5 Thursday, March 29, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Hurry! Sale E nds Soon! Design Pro Screens Longwood FL 32750 Toll Free: 1 888724 9868 Ext. 71232 71232 healthy the City of Wi nter Park 1887 2012thANNIVERSARY Wednesday, April 4, 2012 8:30 a.m. Central Park Stage But as current city law stands, he wouldnt be allowed to do so if We can't break our own laws, Mayor Ken Bradley said, adding, I for one would not like to see the debris burn. Thats when Bellows informed the Commission of how much it would cost to pursue the al ternative, hauling off the brush that would have otherwise been burned. We're talking almost a million dollars to haul this stuff off, Bel lows said. You set up this air cur tain, it's clean and there's almost no smoke. Resident concerns Commissioner Carolyn Coo per said she was worried that the rights of nearby property owners werent being respected in terms of impact to their properties and businesses by the large develop ment. She said that in parts of the agreement, retail buildings are al lowed to be built much closer to homes than normally permitted. You're asking for me to vote on this agreement, in order for me to do this, I want to know that they're comfortable with the prop erty rights, Cooper said. Bellows said that those busi ness and homeowners had been involved in the process from the start and had agreed to the terms. They're not waiving their rights they signed consent, Bellows said. Bradley said that the annexa tion into Winter Park and subse quent development would be a boon to those property owners, not a detriment. To me, joining the city of Win ter Park is a good thing, Bradley said. I don't see anybody who's losing by coming into Winter Park. RAVAUD AGE | Commissioner concerned about property rights C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE Lake Avenue Lee Road Ravaudage Park Lake Lake Gem 92 17 PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER The Ice Cream Social to benet Ronald McDonald House Charities of Central Florida was held March 24 at the Winter Park Civic Center. Ice cream for charity

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Page 6 Thursday, March 29, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Due to the continued reduction of state revenues being received by Florida cities and counties over the past few years, on Feb. 22 and 23 of this year, the Florida League of Mayors (League) again orga nized a special trip called May ors Mean Business to go to Tal lahassee to lobby for legislation for our cities. Like last year, each mayor was asked to bring a prom inent businessperson from his or her city to help express the needs of their respective cities. Because Bill Randolph did such a great job last year expressing those needs to our legislators, I asked Bill to accompany me again. Bill is a longtime resident of our city, has been involved as a volunteer for many years on numerous city and county boards, and is one of the most knowledgeable people on Maitland that I know. He, along with his wife, Joan, owns a very successful land planning and Consulting), which has been in business for 17 years. Bill, again, graciously accepted my invitation, and we began preparing for our trip to Tallahassee. We decided to expand the trip, arriving at the capitol earlier in the day on Feb. 22, working with our lobbyist, Louis Rotundo, and meeting as many of our legislators as possible before the scheduled meetings of the League began that evening. The League again did a great job of organizing this special trip beginning with a Mayors Recep tion the evening of Feb. 22, where we got to share the concerns fac ing our cities with our fellow mayors and their business rep resentatives. The morning of the Feb. 23, we started with a Mayors Breakfast, where we discussed and organized our legislative agenda for the day before return ing to the capitol to continue visit ing with our legislators. We then had a scheduled lunch where several keynote speakers updated us on Floridas present economic and business climate, along with a special appearance by Gov. Rick Scott, who gave us a legislative update and answered questions. Upon the completion of our lun cheon, we again returned to the capitol to continue meeting with our legislators before leaving for home late that afternoon. Spending as much time as pos sible meeting with our legisla tors we felt was very important, as there are a number of legisla tive bills again this year being proposed that we were very con cerned about. The following were the major ones: Repeal of red light cameras (oppose): allowing red-light run ners to continue causing T-bone ing serious injuries and in some cases death. This bill did not pass. Communications service tax (oppose): reducing revenues to cities by exempting more compa nies from paying communication service fees. This bill did pass, re ducing the annual revenue to our city by an undetermined amount, but is believed to be substantial. Alternate local business tax ex emption (oppose): exempts real estate broker associates from pay ing local business taxes. This bill did pass, again reducing revenue to our city. Numeric nutrients bill (sup port): allows Florida to override federal water pollution require threshold standard. This bill did pass. If the bill had not passed, the cost to our city was estimated to have been in the millions of dol lars. Fertilizer ban repeal (oppose): would have removed Maitlands more restrictive fertilizer control standards allowing more pollu tion in our lakes. This bill did not pass. Pension reform bill (support): would have allowed local govern ments to work out provisions that were mutually acceptable to both sides of an issue. This bill did not pass. Renewable energy bill (sup port): encourages renewable en ergy development in Florida by offering tax incentives. This bill did pass. In past years, due to a pros pering Florida, we were not as involved in our state government as we need to be today. Because nancial condition of our state and the economy, it is imperative that we become very involved and stay involved with our state legis lators to preserve as much as pos sible, our right to home rule and our fair share of state revenues. The future prosperity of our city largely depends upon it. Meeting of March 26 The Maitland City Council met on March 26 at 6:30 p.m. in the City Hall Council Chambers. Below is a synopsis of that meet ing. The next regular scheduled Council meeting will be held on Monday, April 9. Public Hearings: Moved to continue the Public Hearings creating the Downtown Maitland Zoning District and the rezoning of properties within that district until the April 9 Council meeting. Community Redevelopment Agency Decision Item: A resolution amending the Community Redevelopment Agency operating budget for FY 2012 to complete the Adoption Phase of the Downtown Develop ment Standards. Decisions: Authorized funding to expand the scope of the contract with Lit tlejohn Engineering to complete the adoption phase of the Mait land CRA Development Standards for the Maitland Downtown To listen to a recording of the meeting, visit itsmymaitland.com WINTER PARK A world traveler and legend of the Winter Park community scene recently observed her 100th birthday surrounded by family and her entire care team from nonprot Cornerstone Hospice. Helen R. Kirk, a pioneer of Winter Parks art galleries, womens clubs and church activities of decades ago, cut a huge chocolate cake assisted by her daughter Susan Dotson who made the trip from Michigan for the occasion and her son Robin Kirk of Oviedo. Born in Winchester, Kentucky in March, 1912, Helen spent most of her childhood in Richmond, attended Madison County High School also in Richmond, and later Eastern Kentucky State College, now Eastern Kentucky University. Helen married her husband Raymond Lynn Kirk, a veteran of the U.S. Army in 1944, one year before the end of WWII. The young couple had three children, one is deceased. After Raymonds retirement, Helen and Raymond took several cruises in the Caribbean, Bermuda, one freighter cruise to Yugoslavia, another to northern Africa and another to Beirut, Lebanon at a time of considerable unrest there. While on the northern Africa cruise they went to Egypt, visited the pyramids and traveled by camel. There was very little Helen wouldnt do, she was always at the ready to try anything. The family relocated to Florida during the early fties and Helen worked for the Florida State Department of Public Welfare where she advanced from caseworker to supervisor, concluding her career in administration. After Raymonds passing in 1976, Helen traveled the world with friends including trips to Alaska, Hong Kong, Japan, Great Britain and France, mostly as part of the Elder Hostel travel programs. She also traveled to Central America, visiting in Honduras a farm connected to her church. Her last trip was a barge trip throughout several rivers in France. Given her age, Helen is under the care of the Cornerstone Hospice care team made up of Ann Harr RN, regional team manager; Andrea Hart RN; Suzanne Jackowski, LPN; Yvonne Pierre, CNA; Vanessa Hall, CNA; Nathalie Valcarcel, social worker and Geren Baird, chaplain. Cornerstone Hospice nurse Andrea Hart RN, says "Helen has truly been a joy to know and care for! She is not only the highlight of my day but also to the staff at The Commons of Orlando Lutheran Towers where we care for her. Although her memory is failing, she still shares many parts of her life in an amusing way. Helen always greets me with her --Well, Hello Honey!-Helen has truly been a blessing to my life and all those that know her! Having made Winter Park the familys home, Helen remained extremely active until late in life. She played golf, bridge, volunteered at the Morse Gallery in Winter Park, was active in the Winter Park Womens Club and at All Saints Episcopal Church of Winter Park. A daring driver, she thought nothing of driving from Florida to Michigan until she was well into her seventies. Since 1984, Cornerstone Hospice and Palliative Care, a nonprot community-based healthcare organization, has provided care and services to central Florida residents experiencing life-limiting illnesses. Our Cornerstone Inpatient Suites located within Winter Park Towers on South Lakemont Avenue is available to care for Winter Park and Orange county residents in general. To learn more, call (407)206-2273 or toll-free (800)679-6088 or visit www.cornerstonehospice.org as well as www.SeriousIllness.org/CornerstoneSurrounded by family and her Cornerstone Hospice care team, Winter Park scion Helen R. Kirk (front, center) is about ready to cut her cake and happily observe her 100th birthday! Front left, her son Robin Kirk of Oviedo; front right, her daughter Susan Dotson who made the trip from Michigan. Standing (l to r) Yvonne Pierre CNA; Sandy Yochem, clinical liaison; Andrea Hart RN; Suzanne Jackowski LPN and Geren Baird, chaplain. World traveler, Winter Park community legend Helen R. Kirk observes 100th birthday! Maitland City Talk BY HOW ARD SCHIEFERDECKER MAYOR Mayors mean business goes to Tallahassee

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Page 7 Thursday, March 29, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer March 26 Commission highlights There was a Commission meeting held on March 26 at 3:30 p.m. Below are the highlights of decisions made: Consent Agenda The minutes of March 12 purchases and contracts were approved. The amendment of the development agreement and re-execution of the air space agreement for the 444 W. New England and 362 S. Pennsylvania avenues buildings was approved. The budget adjustment for the police departments participation in the ICE Task Force was approved. The budget adjustment to appropriate approved. Action Items The fee waiver request for Crealdes an The four objectives designed to set the agenda for the Central Florida ULI Techni cal Assistance Panel two-day workshop for the West Fairbanks area were approved. Public Hearings The new fee schedule effective April 1 was approved. The request of Winter Park Town Center LTD for Conditional Use approval to build a bank and new restaurant with drive-thru as a redevelopment of the former Winter Park Village Borders was approved. The resolution executing a Public Trans portation JPA with the State of FDOT for artwork at the Winter Park train station/ Amtrak station was approved. amending Chapter 22 to incorporate the Florida Building Code with administrative and technical amendments was approved A copy of the March 26 minutes will be available the week of April 9. Strategic Planning Session The City Commission will have a Stra tegic Planning Session from 9:15 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Wednesday, April 4, at the Winter Park Community Center located at 721 W. New England Ave. The public is invited, however no comment will be taken. Pro shop ribbon-cutting ceremony The city will host a ribbon-cutting cere mony for the newly renovated Winter Park Country Club Pro Shop located at 761 Old England Ave., at 10 a.m. on Friday, April 6. The character, charm and history of the old starter house were carefully maintained, the original chimney and wood was sal vaged, changing rooms and restrooms were installed, and the golf club storage area was renovated. Now the space that was being used in the clubhouse is available once again for event rentals. Hop on over! The city is hosting the 58th annual Easter Egg Hunt on Saturday, April 7, in beautiful Central Park West Meadow. The hunt for more than 10,000 eggs will begin promptly at 10 a.m. Children with special needs are also encouraged to join in the fun. For more information about the citys oldest event, call 407-599-3275. Pool grand opening A pool grand opening will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, April 7, at the Winter Park Community Center located at 721 W. New England Ave. The cool fun is at the multipurpose pool, which includes a zero-depth entry, lap lanes, spray play and changing rooms. Festivities include a childrens free un derwater egg hunt. Swimmers should ar rive early to sign up for the hunt and regis ter for a recreation I.D. Call 407-599-3275. Construction begins As part of the East Morse Boulevard Improvement Project, construction on the stormwater treatment phase to eliminate pollutants from entering Lake Osceola will begin Monday, April 9. Weather permitting, expected completion is Saturday, April 28. During construction (deep excavation and a large crane operation), parking will be limited at the end of East Morse Boule vard and limited access to the Winter Park Scenic Boat Tour. Call 407-599-3242. MLK Task Force meetings In October, the Commission unanimous ly appointed a Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., (MLK) Task Force to recommend an ap propriate naming opportunity in honor of Dr. King. The MLK Task Force will host a public meeting from 6 to 7:30 p.m. on Tues day, April 10, at the Winter Park Commu nity Center located at 721 W. New England Ave. ing will be presented at a second public input meeting being held from 7 to 8 p.m. on Tuesday, April 24, at Mount Moriah Missionary Baptist Church located at 421 S. Pennsylvania Ave. The suggested criteria for this naming opportunity include: The street, park or venue should have No street, park or venue already named after one of the founding or other promi nent families should be renamed. If a street is selected, the number of busi nesses/residences that will have to incur the inconvenience and cost of an address change should be minimized. If a street is selected for renaming, it should either be the whole street or at least start at one end of the street. This would avoid potential public safety challenges created when a street has its current name at one end, a different name in the middle, and then returns to the current name at the other end. The public is encouraged to at tend. ONE HOURMASSAGE$3995*A $79.95 V A LUE! ONE HOURFACIAL$4995*A $79.95 V A LUE! MASSAGE | FACIALS | WAXING MASSAGE AND FACIAL SPA Open 7 days | Walk-ins Welcome Extended Hourshandandstone.comHand & Stone Massage and Facial Spa consistently delivers professional massage & facial services at affordable prices 7 days a week. WINTER PARK | 407-622-0227 480 N Orlando Ave l Winter Park Village Grand Opening!*Introductory offers valid for first time visit only. Not valid for gift cards. Sessions include time for consultation and dressing. Rates and services may vary by location. Offers may not be combined. MM22195/CE9988346 Hand & Stone Franchise Corp. Franchises Available. Independently Owned & Operated. A fun afternoon of golf, food, friends and charity! Proceeds benefit the Coalition for the Homeless of Central Florida. Golf Registration Deadline April 6 $400 per foursome / $100 per individualIncludes box lunch, beverages, snacks, BBQ dinner and social, goodie bag and cart and greens fees. Helicopter Ball Drop Contest $500 Prize! $10 per entry or 3/$20A helicopter will drop golf balls over one hole and the first ball in the hole (or closest to the pin) wins the prize! Entry open to the public. Must not be present to win. or call (407) 644 8281 Working on rails PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER FDO T made its second delivery of nearly 13 miles of rail for the Central Florida Commuter Rail Corridor the line on which SunRail trains will run in 2014 last week. Each rail section was 1,650 feet long and weighed 31 tons. Winter Park City Talk BY RAND Y KNIGHT CITY MANAGER

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Page 8 Thursday, March 29, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer New spring inventory has arrived including mens Camp shirts, shorts, pants, swimwear, and much more from sizes Small to XX Large. 57th ANNUAL SPRING ORCHID SHOWFooling Around with Orchids Central Florida Orchid Society------NEW LOCATION----Maitland Civic Center 641 South Maitland Ave., Maitland, FL 32751 Mar 31 & Apr 1, 2012 9am to 5pm each day Exhibits, Sales, Lectures, Door Prizes, Etc. Admission $5 at door (Bring ad-save $2) www.corchidsociety.org PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Bike from Park to Park participants rode through Lake Island Park to Mead Botanical Garden, by Azalea Lane Recreation Center, and back to Central Park on Friday, March 23. Lady Tars fall in seminals ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff A narrow win over Lander propelled the Rollins womens basketball team deeper into the NCAA tournament than theyd ever treaded, but a meeting with Shaw ended their miracle run a game shy of the championship. Rollins (28-6) fell to Shaw in the NCAA Division II Tourna ment semifinals 87-71 on March 21. They were in the Final Four. The Tars had watched the Lady Bears rip out a quick lead in the game, one that they would never relinquish. But the Tars had moments of brilliance as they attempted to cut into a lead that at one point in the game bal looned to 22 points. They nearly cut the lead to single digits mid way through the second half, but allowed the Lady Bears to go on repeated scoring streaks to keep the game out of reach. I think we needed to set tle down a little, guard Paris Moore said at a press confer ence after the game. We had the NCAA jitters. Moore led the way for the Tars, shooting 13 points and grabbing five boards in the game, nearly matched by Ashley Jones with 13 points and four rebounds. Rebounds were a particularly telling tally for the Tars, who grabbed 38 to the Bears 61. They really hurt us on the boards, Head Coach Glenn Wil kes Jr. said at the press confer ence. Its very unusual for us to be out-rebounded. But theres a reason Shaws only lost one game since Christmas. Theyre very tough to handle in the post. While the Tars spread the rebounding duties around, the Bears had three rebounders in double digits. Out of the 10 Bears who would play that night on March 21, the top three re bounders had as many boards as the entire Tars team. The Tars made a comeback at tempt in the second half, shoot ing significantly better than the Bears, but the rift proved too wide. Sometimes you come up short, Moore said. Take your bike

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Page 9 Thursday, March 29, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Lifestyles Prato >> Located at 124. N. Park Ave., Prato features Italian cuisine. The restaurant has indoor and outdoor seating, and has two wood-burning ovens from Na ples, Italy. Tim Noelke, co-owner of Prato, said his restaurants cuisine draws its inspiration from many regions of Italy. Our cuisine is Italian, he said. It is kind of northern Ital ian to Mediterranean cuisine. Were unique in that we do all of our pastas in-house here. The restaurant has been on the Avenue since Nov. 15. Visit pratowp.com << Peter Millar Located at 215 N. Park Ave., Peter Millar is a clothing store owned by H. Craig Delongy. owns one of three stores in the U.S. that carry the brand the other two are owned by Peter Millar himself. The Peter Millar brand features cashmere sweaters, sports shirts, sweaters, knit golf and polo shirts, footwear and outerwear. Delongy also owns John Craig Clothier, which he named after his grandfather, and Current, both on the Avenue. Visit petermillar.com When Park Avenue businesses shut their doors, its a shock. But it makes way for a new crop of businesses. In the last year, about a dozen new storefronts have joined the Avenue. I dont think that this year is any different than any other year, said Debra Hendrickson, vice president of the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce. I think that, having been on the avenue for 20 plus years, Ive seen a lot of businesses come and go, its very cyclical. Heres a look at some of the Avenues newest tenants: SAINT DOROTHY CATHOLIC COMMUNITY IS A PROGRESSIVE CATHOLIC COMMUNITY (Respectfully not associated with the Diocese of Orlando) WHERE ALL ARE WELCOME!We have continued the reformed true Catholic Tradition in the Spirit of Vatican Council II! Are you divorced, gay, a recovering Catholic, feeling disenfranchised by your present worshiping community of whatever denomination, looking for a small worshipping community where you are known and not lost in the crowd? Then you have found what you are looking for in St. Dorothy Catholic Community!St. Dorothy Catholic Community 301 West New England Avenue Winter Park, FL 32790 www.stdorothycatholiccommunity.org 407-610-5109 Holy Week ScheduleMarch 30 ... Penance Service ........ 8:00 PM April 1 ...... Palm Sunday ..... Mass 11:00am April 5 ...... Holy Thursday ...... Mass 7:30pm April 6 ...... Good Friday ...... Liturgy 7:30pm April 7 ...... Holy Saturday ..... Mass 7:30pm April 8 ...... Easter Sunday .... Mass 11:00am Surge of new shops on Park ANDY CEBALLOS Observer Staff Visit wpmobserver.com for more information on these new businesses, the proposed business improvement district and photos. The Ancient Olive Located at 324 N. Park Ave., the Ancient Olive sells olive oils imported from around the world and unique balsamic vinegars. The Olive opened in October and prides itself in being a tasting room where one can try products before buying them. Bryan Behling, co-owner of the Ancient Olive, said the business complements the existing Avenue business he co-owns, the Spice and Tea Exchange. We have the freshest olive oil available in the world, Behling said. any given time, our oils are only maybe three to fourth months old. Visit theancientolive.com Charyli Located at 400 S. Park Ave. in Winter Park, Charyli is a womens Park. The store opened in November and features clothing, accesso ries and jewelry. Lisa West, owner of Charyli, said she wanted to open a business that could cater to a wide range of customers. That was kind of my thinking in opening this. I want college stu dents to be able to shop; I want high school kids to be able to shop, she said. Visit facebook.com/Charyli Grace ropean dinnerware, linens, pewter and gifts. It opened in November and shares a space with the Ancient Olive, with some of Grace owner Lael Dewahls artwork featured in that store. Were unique in that we specialize in more traditional art. Plein air, impressionism, still lifes, she said. Visit GraceWinterPark.com Rosey Wrays Roost Located at 515 N. Park Ave., this store features a variety of unique gifts and home dcor. The store opened in October and includes lamps, out door hanging mounts and seasonal replacements, dolls and furniture. Trina Spinelli, co-owner of Rosey Wrays Roost, said she and her mother got the idea for her store by traveling across the U.S. and other countries, and by visiting small towns to see how local businesses promoted their products. Inside, the store features a variety of rooms with different themes. Visit RoseyWraysRoost.com Sweet Traditions >> Located at 212 N. Park Ave., Sweet Traditions Bakery and Caf features a range of traditional French bakery items, such as pastries and cookies. This location, which has been open since August, has a full menu for breakfast, lunch and dinner, and the caf features indoor and outdoor seating. Christine Chrocher, co-owner of Sweet Traditions, said she has had a great deal of experience running this type of busi ness. Crocher has owned bakeries in Paris, New Hampshire and Massachusetts. She co-owns one in Winter Garden. We provide a casual dining experience, she said. We use all natural ingredients. Its faster than a sit-down restaurant. Visit facebook.com/FrenchBakery

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Page 10 Thursday, March 29, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Family Calendar Its TAX time. Appointments Available 7 Days a Week!Tax Form Processing LLC2400 N Forsyth Rd., Suite 101 Orlando, FL 32807Tel: (407) 657-6336www.TaxFormProcessing.com Proudly Serving the Orlando Area for 17 years! Scan QR Code Calendar Rollins College hosts its fth an nual Spring Extravaganza from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, March 31, at the Colleges Mary Jean Plaza. It includes carnivalstyle booths, activities and games, as well as egg hunts, crafts, music and free food. This event is free. Complimentary Photos with the Easter Bunny will be held from noon to 4 p.m. on Sunday, April 1, at Peterbrooke Chocolatier of Winter Park, 300 S. Park Ave. Visit Peterbrookewp.com Story time at Leu Gardens is at 10 a.m. on Monday, April 2. The Orange County Library Systems storytelling program is the rst Monday of each month, excluding holidays. Visit leugardens.org The Art and History Museums Maitland presents its Spring Se ries of Art Classes, beginning on April 2. Participants can choose from an array of creative classes. Register at ArtandHistory.org, call 407-539-2181 extension 265 or register in person. At 10:30 a.m. each Tuesday, the Maitland Public Library hosts pre school story and craft time. At 10:30 a.m. each Thursday, it hosts baby time stories and activity. At 4 p.m. each Thursday, it hosts Reading Buddies for kindergarten through fth-grade. Call 407-6477700. Other library activities include the movie, Titanic, (1997) starring Leonardo DiCapro and Kate Wins let, being played at 10:30 a.m. on Saturday, March 31. Also included is the Womens Caucus for Art Reception and Poetry Reading. During the month of March, the Womens Caucus for Art is displaying its art, themed Literal Images in the Librarys gallery and lobby. The reception and poetry reading is open to all. At 1:30 p.m. on April 1, the library will play Ghosts of the Abyss, the 2003 documentary of James Camerons journey back to the site of his greatest inspiration: the legendary wreck of the Titanic. At 3 p.m. on April 1, the library will host the 100th Anniversary trib ute to the Titanic a local Ti tanic historian will tell the history of the Titanic and relive stories of the Titanic passengers. Tea and dessert will follow the discussion, and registration is required. At 2 p.m. on Tuesday, April 3, it will host PC Academy-Intro to Word Processing, part 1. Reg istration is required. On Wednesday, April 4, two work shops of Creating Spring Cards & Gifts are being held at the Mai tland Public Library from 4 to 6 p.m., and from 6:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Send submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com MARCH 31 The Festival of India a vibrant cel ebration of culture, arts and cuisine, will be held from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday, March 31, at the HSCF Community Hall and Grounds, 1994 Lake Drive, Casselberry. Entry is free and parking is $5. Call 407-6995277. APRIL 1 The documentary Miss Represen tation will be played from 6 to 8 p.m. on Sunday, April 1, at the First Presbyterian Church of Maitland, 31 N. Orlando Ave. The event is free. The lm, shown at the 2011 Sun dance Film Festival, exposes how mainstream media contribute to the under-representation of women. Visit missrepresentation.org The Florida International Piano Com petition hots the third Annual Sym phony for the Arts at 6 p.m. on Sun day, April 1, at the Grand Bohemian Hotel, 325 S. Orange Ave. in Orlando. Tickets are $100 per person. Corpo rate Tables are available for $850. Call 407-645-2525. The Central Florida Watercolor So ciety will hold its next monthly meet ing at 1:30 p.m. on Sunday, April 1, in the Marvel Building at the Maitland Art Center, 231 W. Packwood Ave. in Maitland. The program will feature a demonstration titled Watercolor Outside the Lines by watercolorist Peggy Furlin. The meeting is open to all, but the society requests an admis sion fee of $10 of non-members due to limited space. Call 407-415-0594. Each Saturday morning, during the month of April, the Orange Audubon Society will conduct free guided bird walks in Mead Botanical Garden. Free loaner binoculars will be avail able. The walks will begin at 8 a.m. and will be two to three hours long. Mead Botanical Garden is located at 1300 S. Denning Drive. Call Dick Smith at 407-257-7361. APRIL 2 State Rep. Bryan Nelson (R-Apopka) will host a post-session Town Hall on Monday, April 2, from 6-7 p.m. at Maitland City Hall to meet, discuss and answer questions about the 2012 Legislative Session. Topics include the 2012 redistricting process, the scal year 2012-2013 state budget and the septic tank issue. Call 407884-2023. APRIL 3 The Tarower Chapter of the Flori da Native Plant Society will meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 3, at Harry P. Leu Gardens, 1920 N. Forest Ave. in Orlando. Dr. Walter Taylor, author of several wildower books, will present a program titled Wildower Seasons of Florida. This meeting is free and open to the public. Mark your calendars for exciting trivi al pursuit games from 7 to 8:30 p.m. April 4 and April 18 at the University Club of Winter Park. The event is free but donations are accepted. Visit uni versityclubwinterpark.org On Wednesday, April 4, from 2 to 6 p.m., Centura Institute is hosting an open house. Get a VIP tour of the fa cilities, win door prizes and talk with faculty and current students about a career in the health care eld. The campus is located at 6359 Edgewater Drive. Call 407-275-9696. APRIL 5 The Orange County Retired Educa tors Association will meet at 10 a.m. on Thursday, April 5, at College Park United Methodist Church, located at 644 W. Princeton St. in Orlando. En joy a program by weatherman Glenn Richards. Visit ocrea-.org or call 407-677-0446. Visit wpmobserver.com/events for more details. Send submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com Energy program There will be an energy conser vation program hosted by Win ter Park on Thursday, March 29. There are two sessions: one from 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. for com mercial customers, and one from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. for residential customers. The event is free to Winter Park utility customers. To register, call 407-599-3285. The Last 5 Y ears The Breakthrough Theatre will present the Jason Robert Brown musical, The Last 5 Years, from March 30-April 23. It is a contemporary song-cycle musical that chronicles the ve-year life of a marriage. Show times are at 8 p.m. on Mondays, Fridays, and Saturdays, and at 3 p.m. on Sundays. Call 407-9204034 or visit breakthroughtheatre.com Film festival The Chenrezig Project of Cen tral Florida has announced the line-up of lms selected for its third annual Florida Dharma Film Festival, to take place over two weekends in late March. The fes tival is at the First Congregational Church of Winter Park on March 30-31. Visit chenrezigproject.org/ FLharma2012.pdf or e-mail lm fest@chenrezigproject.org Charles Ritchie lecture Charles Ritchie: Drawing the Limits of Vision is a lecture by artist Charles Ritchie that will explore the many ways the artist investigates the limits of the visual world at 6 p.m. Tuesday, April 3, at the Cornell Fine Arts Museum. Pictured is Charles Ritchie, Lights in Three Panels, 2010-2011, water color, graphite and cont crayon on Fabriano paper sheet/image: 4 x 9 7/8, collection of the artist.

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Page 11 Thursday, March 29, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Through April 8 The Earl family is troubled Actor/director John DiDonna keeps us on the edge of our theater seats with plays that are described as visceral, explosive and brutal. His latest effort is Christopher Humbles tragiccomedy "The Flight of the Earls", in which violence and betrayal rip through the Earl family for the sake of Ireland. "The Earls" will be performed for two weeks only through Sunday, April 8, at the Shakespeare Center. For reser vations, call 407-328-9005. Tickets are cash only at door; for preor ders, visit redchairproject.com March 30-April 29 Noel Cowards Private Lives An evening of sophisticated one-liners and witty comebacks make up Noel Cowards best play. "Private Lives" is scandal ous and as sparkling as chilled champagne. "Private Lives" opens March 30 at the Mad Cow Theatre in downtown Orlando with Jennifer Christa Palmer as Amanda and Philip Nolen as Elyot. This glamorous and tempestuous couple haven't seen years ago when they meet again by chance on a hotel balcony. Their passion reignites, but they happen to be on their respective honeymoons! Call 407-297-8788 or visit madcowtheatre.com March 30-April 23 The Last 5 Y ears a musical The Jason Brown musical The Last 5 Years ingeniously a marriage from meeting to breakup. This personal look at the relationship between two characters will be presented with a unique twist by Director Wade Hair at the Breakthrough Theatre of Winter Park as the musical will have four different casts with each cast performing one week end of the four-week run. The casts are: Erynn Hair and Rob Guest (March 30-April 2); Sarah Ross and Justin Nickerson (April 6-9); Krystal Gillette and Sage Starkey (April 13-16); and Jolie Hart and Adam McCabe (April 20-23). Call 407-920-4034 or visit breakthroughtheatre.com March 31 McRae Art Studios Open House In Winter Park is a studio Florida. Their work is seen in mu seums and prestigious collections both locally and throughout the country. Twice a year, they invite the public to meet them, see their workspaces, and most importantly offer us bargains portunity to purchase new work while supporting local artists. The open house is from 5 to 9 p.m. on Saturday, March 31, and admission is free. The space is called McRae Art Studios, located at 904 Railroad Ave. in Winter Park. Call 407-599-9956 or visit mcraeartstudios.com April 7-30 Parker Sketch Parker Sketch is the busiest artist on the Central Florida art scene with his contemporary take on pop art. In his new exhibit "Biography" we view a personal side of Parker Sketch in his most sophisticated collection to date. The work tells of Parker's experi ences growing up in the poverty of the projects of Chicago, his early exposure to alcohol, living on the streets and discovering his sexual identity. "Biography" will be on display in Gallery Q at The Center at 946 N. Mills Ave. in Orlando. A free reception will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. on Saturday, April 7. Call 321-287-5634 or visit thecenterorlando.org April 7 Carousel I highly recommend the Or lando Philharmonics opera/mu sical stagings with the orchestra on-stage and the performers in front of the Orchestra. Rodgers & Hammersteins "Carousel," con ducted by Christopher Wilkins, will be performed at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. on Saturday, April 7, at Bob Carr Performing Arts Center. Both performances feature an allstar cast. Named the best musi cal of the 20th century by Time Magazine, "Carousel" follows the story of Billy Bigelow, a swagger ing carnival barker, who marries nave mill worker Julie Jordan. Michelle Knight, Todd S. Mum mert and Andrea Canny are just a few of the talented singing-actors you will recognize in this produc tion. Call 407-770-0071 or visit orlandophil.org Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906. 23rd Annual 23rd Annual 27th Annual Presented by Use the small-space stacked logo ONL Y when it is less than 1 inch widePRIMARY SMALL-SPACE Wednesday, April 18, 2012 from 5-8 p.m. Winter Park Farmers Market Featuring 40 local restaurants and caterers, unlimited food and beverage samples and live entertainment in downtown Winter Park. Tickets and information at www.winterpark.org or call 407-644-8281. 6TH ANNUAL SHRED EVENT This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH O RLANDO A VE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.E NZIAN.ORG Greg Kinnear and Alan Arkin THIN ICE Fri Sun 4:00 6:30 9:00 Mon Thurs 6:30 9:00 Wednesday Night Pitcher Show CHASING AMY 8PM FREE Coming Soon:21st Annual Florida Film Festival April 13-22 Josh Garrick Culture worthy of your calendar Tragedy + comedy Private Lives

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Page 12 Thursday, March 29, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Opinions Orange blossom sounds like a song. But just as Orange Blos som Trail does not always live up to the bucolic beauty the name suggests, orange blossom time may not be the best time of year for you either. In fact, it can make you pretty miserable. If the green dust everywhere has you sneez ing, you are not defenseless. The art of reducing the battle against your bodys reaction to the dust and minimiz ing your green dust exposure. Symptoms of orange blossom pollen allergy are runny nose with teary and swollen eyes, cough, headache and sneezing. Your immune system launches an attack on the pollen, releasing histamine and other chemicals. The lining of your nose gets and secrete mucous, triggering coughing and sneezing. A teaspoon of local (check the label!) honey a day during pollen season is said to reduce your bodys reaction. Unless you need to avoid honey for other medical reasons, it might be worth a try. You can purchase honey at the farmers market or local bee farm. Medications for pollen al lergies attempt to reduce the immune response or its effects. Antihistamine pills and sprays block histamine, the chemical your body releases as part of an allergic reaction. Decongestants attempt to dry up the congestion your body creates in response to pollen. Nasal corticosteroids sprayed into your nose reduce passages, but can irritate the nose and alter your sense of smell and taste. Many antihistamines and decongestants are available without a prescription; nasal cor ticosteroids and other treatments require a prescription. Remember that most medica tions, including over-the-counter and herbal treatments, can have side effects and should be used with caution and in consultation with your health care provider. Honey can raise your blood sugar. Some antihistamines can make you drowsy. Decongestants can increase your blood pres sure, worsen glaucoma, increase insomnia and make you irritable. Decongestant sprays for more than a few days can be coun terproductive your body can have a rebound reaction, creating more secretions. You can also reduce your exposure to pollen by making your home a haven from the green dust. Keep your windows closed. Use the air conditioning if it is not hot, to clear up the air. frequently. Wash the curtains and wipe the blinds. Wash bed sheets frequently in hot water. Remove area rugs. If you have carpeting, vacuum frequently. If you can, replace rugs with terrazzo, tiles or wood laminate. If your house is older, consider having one of the local duct cleaning companies remove years of dust in the air system. Check the pollen forecast on the local weather websites. Go outside when the pollen counts are lower, typically after a strong rain has cleared the air, when the humidity is high and when the temperature is up the typi cal Florida hot, humid and hazy forecast. Pollen counts rise on those crisp clear days of cooler temperatures and low humidity. If your allergic symptoms persist, drive you crazy or are making you sick, consult your nurse practitioner or physician. The persistent irritation and mu cous production can be a perfect environment for a sinus infection could be signs of other problems. If it is orange blossom time that gets you, remember it will be over soon. Maitland resident Nancy Rudner Lugo is a nurse practitioner and president of Health Action, offering workplace health consulting and nurse coaching. Visit www.healthaction.biz This week lawmakers exam ined President Barack Obamas health care reform, which would make it mandatory for all Ameri cans to purchase health care at a reasonable cost. U.S. Su preme Court Justices questioned whether its constitutional to force people to buy anything. If Obamas health care over haul is upheld, more than 30 million Americans will be forced to purchase health care insurance from private companies or from the government. If they refuse, forbids insurance companies from denying coverage to people with pre-existing conditions or charging a higher premium to people over a certain age. But this is not the only insur ance we as Americans are forced to buy. Those of us who operate vehicles must, by law, purchase motor vehicle insurance. It can be argued that no one is forced to drive and therefore not forced to purchase insurance, but is that really a fair argument? Many of us, especially in the Or lando area, do not have access to public transportation and daily, long commutes to work have become commonplace. A 2009 National Household Travel Sur vey said that the average person in the U.S. drove 38 vehicle miles per day. So for some, owning and operating a personal vehicle is not a choice, but rather a neces sity. If the argument that driv ing is a choice persists, then it can at least be said that the reasoning behind mandatory auto insurance and mandatory health insurance is similar: If something bad happens, theres a mechanism in place to cover the costs. Right now, if an uninsured person has to be rushed to the emergency room for surgery and later they cannot pay the bill, American taxpayers are on the hook. Although the bill states that insurance will be available at a reasonable cost, many people, especially in these trying eco nomic times, are struggling so severely that paying for health insurance is unfathomable. But then is it fair that because those people cannot pay, others must cover those costs for them? A more structured plan must be in place for those who cannot afford insurance. For those who qualify, Obamas plan also expands the Medicaid program, which pro vides health care coverage for low-income citizens. reform have already been real ized even though the bill would not go into full effect until 2014. For instance, nearly 75 percent of young adults are now covered by health insurance, prescription costs have been reduced for mil lions of seniors nationwide, and lifetime caps on health insurance are becoming more and more a thing of the past. Americas health care system was broken. Theres no argu ing against that. Theres a plan in place to start repairing it and many people are still balking at the change. People are forced to pay for things they dont want to pay for all the time its a fact of life. What makes it worth it is that the product they receive in them and society as a whole. Our Observation Letters to the editor Send your thoughts (400 words or less) to Managing Editor Jenny Andreasson at editor@observernewspapers.com Being forced to buy insurance isnt new Banks got themselves in this mess I have two complaints about your lead article (Balancing local banking pub lished March 22) telling us how Com munity banks in Winter Park and Mait land struggle to meet increasing federal the article suggest in any way what actual regulations were burdensome. Its just da gubbamint. The second was that the article pro vided no perspective on the conduct of banking recently that might have caused additional regulation to be needed and proposed. Like loan-to-deposit ratio regu lations? Like baseline home mortgage loan standards and appraisals? Like requiring banks to retain some risk on the mortgage loans they make so they have some skin in the game? 2000s, the banks had everything going their way and they made a bundle. Now that the real estate bubble has burst, foreclosure, tank and banking standards to prevent the abuses the banks perpetrated on the economy and on their customers from happening again. Dont blame it on the gubbamint. William Paton Maitland Police step up seat belt enforcement The Winter Park Police Department has joined state and local law enforce ment agencies and highway safety groups in supporting an aggressive statewide Click It or Ticket seat belt enforcement campaign. Stepped-up law enforcement activities will be conducted during the 2012 Click It or Ticket mobilization period efforts toward unbelted vehicle occupants around the clock, both night and day, dur ing this campaign. Seat belts clearly save lives. Regular seat belt use is the single most effective way to protect people and reduce fatalities in motor vehicle crashes. In 2009 seat belts saved 12,713 lives nationwide. When worn correctly, seat belts have been proven to reduce the risk of fatal injury to front-seat passenger car occupants by 45 percent, and by 60 percent in pickup trucks, SUVs Americans still fails to wear a seat belt when driving or riding in a motor vehicle. Safety Administration, 61 percent of the deaths attributable to not wearing a seat belt in a passenger vehicle in 2010 oc curred between the nighttime hours of 6 caused from not being properly restrained during a motor vehicle crash were at 42 percent. More regrettably, seat belt discussions too often revolve around adults in the front seats of vehicles and child safety seats are often overlooked. Kids have to be buckled up too. Your child seat can be Winter Park Police Department by calling 407-599-3562 for an appointment. This is a long-time service that weve been provid ing for years at no cost to the public. The Winter Park Police Department en courages everyone to wear their seatbelts and use proper child safety equipment at all times, but is asking drivers to have a heightened sense of awareness during the enforcement campaign. Our agency is en couraging compliance in lieu of having to issue citations as costly reminders of a law that everyone should be following every time that they are in a vehicle. Lt. Randy Durkee Special Operations Winter Park Police Department Dr. Nancy Rudner Lugo Health Action The green dust everywhere: Nursing allergies King Features Weekly ServiceMarch 26, 2012

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Page 13 Thursday, March 29, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer This new FM station at Rollins College can help to speed and ad vance the great ideas which keep men and women free. Whether the ideas come from the great music or poetry or other literature of the past, or from people of our country who are listen ing in will be richer. Sixty years ago, the then-presi dent-elect Dwight D. Eisenhower welcomed the listeners of 91.5 WPRK-FM with this inspiring statement. While our program ming and leadership has changed over the decades, our dedica tion to serving the interests of the local community has never wavered. It is due to our loyal lis teners from the past 60 years that 91.5 WPRK-FM still lives on, and to celebrate our 60th birthday with a weeklong extravaganza to thank all of our supporters. During the week of April 1, WPRK is launching a funda-thon to broadcast Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. During this time, a couple WPRK DJs will be on-air hosting while listeners are able to call in and donate to the station. Every day at 5 p.m. and 8 p.m., a band will be playing live in our studio, and a variety of members will stop by. The fund-a-thon should be really cool, said Programming Director KC Korge, who played a huge role in organizing the fund-a-thon schedule. Its like a reunion for everyone in the com munity, and a nice way to bring everyone into the station. We are always promoting venues, restau rants and other businesses so this is a great way for people to give back to the station. Professional Affairs Director Amanda Roche added, WPRK has barely had any updates or equipment repairs since our founding in 1952. We are look ing for any kind of small support or donation from everyone who wants to help WPRK continue for another 60 years! The week will end with a huge free concert on Rollins Colleges campus on Saturday, April 7, from noon to 10 p.m. There will be two stages for musical guests, which include The London Souls, Beebs and Her Money Makers, Hundred Waters, SKIP, Saskatch ewan, KG Omulo and many more. The event also will have a beer garden sponsored by Ship yards Brew Pub, as well as many local vendors selling arts and crafts and other miscellaneous items and services. This anniversary is not only lege and local radio worldwide. Our station is one of the few left in a shrinking radio community that runs on FM (not just Internet streaming), 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and is completely run by Rollins College students and volunteers from the community. You matter when you work at WPRK, Korge said. You have a real responsibility to the listeners, and its great that Rollins gives students these opportunities to really count in our community. Station Manager Clark Sprin kel grew up listening to WPRK and has been involved since his undergraduate days in 2001. In 60 years I hope WPRK is still bringing alternative program ming to the Winter Park com munity. Ill be 89, and hopefully Ill still be around and part of WPRK, he said. WPRK epitomizes the endur ing medium of radio, as well as the importance of local radio sta tions in the community. Heres to 60 more years as WPRK 91.5-FM, Winter Park, Florida, The Best in Basement Radio, and The Voice of Rollins College! Lauren Silvestri is public relations coordinator for WPRK 91.5-FM. Theres a maxim when studying his tory that goes: You have to judge a people by the context of their times. This means that to apply modern sensibilities when judging how folks long ago dealt with an issue is unfair. Accordingly, we (today) have the cumulative advantage of years in which human beings have cally). This has always been an interesting question to me: How do we judge our ancestors? Our Founding Fathers, white funny. Slaves could not vote, were deemed to have no rights, yet Southerners insisted they be counted nonetheless. into our Constitution the complete mar ginalization of African-Americans. Americas democracy, imperfect as it is, was compromised from the beginning. Without this compromise, it is argued, America may not have become the United States. The take-away: it was necessary for the existence of the United States to unequivocally marginalize black Americans (slaves) in our original found ing document, the U.S. Constitution. That for all intents and purposes, a black man Auspicious beginnings. How should we judge our Founding Fathers today in this regard? By contem porary standards, this is clearly racism. But what was it in 1787? In 1783, Quakers in England formed because it is important to understand that voices opposing slavery were actually raising objections internationally and in America. It is one thing to operate in a vacuum (slavery is an historical fact, normal and sanctioned by society) and another to become aware that some found slavery an abomination and should be outlawed. Interestingly, most abolitionists, while opposing slavery, did not consider Afri cans as equal to white men, let alone have them live next door. But the conver sation for justice had begun. Its clarion message had not yet reached a crescendo; that would take another 180 years. Americas Civil War was more about the Union, less about slavery. After the Civil War, the Jim Crow laws were put in place in the South, and to varying degrees throughout the North. It wasnt until the post WWII period that civil rights for Americas black citizens ac tually began to seriously trouble (agitate) white America. The Civil Rights Movement that took place in the 1960s was just the beginning of the quest for black freedom and justice. Slavery/Jim Crow had been a continu ous part of the American fabric since the establishment of the Spanish colony of St. Augustine in 1565. That is 400 years of unmitigated terror and oppression of African-Americans. It is less than 50 years since the Civil Rights Act of 1965 400 years of slavery and oppression, 50 years at making amends/corrections. The question on the table is what will Americans generations from now make of us? How will we be judged regard ing race? What will be the context of our times? The line most quoted in the justreleased hit movie The Hunger Games is, May the odds be ever in your favor. Its ludicrous. Twenty-four children are where only one survives. Some odds, huh? Speaking of which, when I heard that line I immediately thought of Americas young black men. The odds sadly never seem in their favor. Why is that? What does Trayvon Martins death say about you? And America in 2012? Jepson is a 24-year resident of Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.US Louis Roney Play On! Chris Jepson Perspectives The odds are stacked Tidbits The Fifth Once again I witness people taking the Fifth on television. The Fifth gives us all a right that we may rarely, or never, use in our lives and may be a right that we do not always trust and respect in oth ers, perhaps with reason. The schoolboy who is asked brusquely by his teacher the Fifth as a way to get out of answering. Of course, there are things that should not be asked: A lady certainly may rightfully take the Fifth if you crudely ask her birth year. But we best know the Fifth publi cally and primarily as a means used by law-breakers to dodge having to reveal their heretofore-unadmitted misdeeds. The law doesnt require you to tattle on yourself, therefore God knows the number of sins that the human race car ries to its grave. One of the stranger hu man qualities is the irrepressible urge to confess publically to imaginary sins. For reasons that are weird and psychological ly driven, all manner of factual personal information is frequently disclosed. Often people tell true things about themselves that no third party could be motivated to invent. Using the Fifth to prevent selfincrimination can often, by implication, be as damning as blabbing out the naked truth. The characters of many fascinating are all the more attractive for their eternal secrecy. Remember Greta Garbo and her constant, I want to be alone? What Greta was hiding no one knew except maybe John Gilbert and he died! U.S. logic We need oil, but we dont drill our own copious underground oil. We send money to Brazil so that they can drill oil. Then we borrow 44 percent of the money at high interest to pay them for their oil! Our oil stays underground! Quite logical, nicht wahr? Miracle elixir A Saturday morning occurrence I wonder if you have shared: Two guys are on the radio chatting away. One is telling the other about a magical medi cine to order from some place out West. The other guy asks him all about what this wondrous product does. The stuff is remarkable all right it cures anything from sore muscles to all kind of diseases I order one bottle right away, theyll send me a second one free. I guess that long ago I should have ordered some of this stuff, but Ive never gotten around to it. Its amazing that Ive stayed alive! Stage fright Last night I dreamed again a version nights. I am in my dressing room in a great opera house, costumed, made-up and all ready to go. The director is saying to me, Roney, dont worry about it. Youve done this role dozens of times. Yes, I say, but the last time was 50 years ago, and now I cant even remem ber the name of the piece. Oh! Itll all come back to you, he says, walking out jauntily and leaving the stage door wide open for me to go out and do my thing About Roney: HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney) Using the Fifth to prevent selfincrimination can often, by implication, be as damning as blabbing out the naked truth. WPRK will host a fund-a-thon Monday, April 2, to Friday, April 6, from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. The week will end with a huge free concert on Rollins Colleges campus on Saturday, April 7, from noon to 10 p.m. Visit www.rollins.edu/wprk/ for more information. Sixty years on air LAUREN SIL VESTRI Guest Writer WPRK staff

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Page 24 Thursday, March 29, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer 1-866-742-1373Get your business noticedOne Call One Order One Payment Almost 4 million readers statewide are waiting to see your advertising message. Dont make them wait any longer. Call us today! ank you to our media partners: WKMG Local 6 and Magic 107.7.