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Winter Park-Maitland observer
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00205
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park FL
Publication Date: 03-22-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates: 28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID: UF00091444:00205

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407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC USPS 00-6186 Publisher statement on page 4. Thursday, March 22, 2012 50+ tax wpmobserver.comSubscribe now!Visit wpmobserver.com A drive-through coffee shop and a new bank are looking to set up shop in the Winter Park Vil lage, replacing the Borders book store that closed in August. The big change to the north west corner of the Winter Park Vil lage was approved unanimously by the Planning and Zoning Com mittee and will be up for vote at the City Commission meeting on March 26. If it goes through, it would change the shape of the only empty big box store in the Village, Winter Park Chamber of Commerce President Patrick Chapin said. I think you constantly have to look into reinventing yourself, Chapin said about shopping centers dealing with vacancies, par ticularly large stores. That space over there is something that could sit vacant for many years. It seems unlikely somebody could come in and use it as it is. So many of these big box stores are failing and theyre going to have to get creative with the space. Winter Park Mayor Ken Bradley said that he was interested in seeing new tenants in the space, even in the wake of the death of the bookstore. Im excited about it, he said. I hated personally to see Borders Bankers say the success or failure of any community bank is the community in which it oper ates. The prosperity of the lo cal real estate market, business community and general work force, compared to the diversity to which each bank deals with each component, they say, usu ally combines to form a workable success/failure equation for the banks. But throw in 2,300 pages of reformed national banking regu lations, with the signing of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act in 2010 and its gradual implemen tation in 2012, along with the lo cal Central Florida economy still struggling in all three main areas, and the equation is not so clear. Community banks, much more than their national counnity Main Street rather than cor porate Wall Street, said Donald McGowan, president and CEO of BankFIRST in Winter Park. And right now a variety of pressures are starting to weigh on community banks forming a perfect storm. With increased focus having to shift from lending to regulatory compliance following increased government revisions of community banking practices, some fear the pressure will be too much for local banks to withstand. Community banks play a vital role in our economy, said Alex Sanchez, president of the Florida Bankers Association, and Im concerned that the bur den is going to keep increasing the federal government seems to be putting out more and more regulations every minute with no end in sight. Though they may be late to the banking crisis party of 2008 and 2009, community bank leaders say the effects of the recession What is it about Winter Park that makes you smile? Whatever it is, embrace and enjoy it!Page 12Letters to the editor Lifestyles A family hoping to get a diagnosis for their son volunteers for the MDA Muscle Walk in Maitland this month.Page 9 NewsThe countrys largest scooter ride winds through Orlando, Baldwin Park and Winter Park on Saturday.Page 2 Calendar Central Florida Ballet presents The Enchanted Garden at Trinity Preparatory School on Saturday.Page 8 TAX DEFERREDFIXED ANNUITY RATE FOR 5 YEARS.Bob Adams 407-644-6646THE NATIONAL 5 YEAR CD RATE IS 1.34%3.35% 451 Maitland Ave, Altamonte Springs, FL 32701NEW Dermatology Ofce!407-599-SKIN (7546)*Waive co-payment up to $25 No referral needed Accepting all insurances Dr. John CottamDr. Ross Wheeler PHotoOTO bBY sSARAH WIlsLSOnN tTHeE obseOBSERveVER Commerce National Bank & Trust in WWinter Park works to meet the criteria of the federal regulatory consent order issued on Jan. 24. aARcCHIveVE PHotoOTO bBY IsSAAcC bBAbcBCOcCK tTHeE obseOBSERveVER The Borders bookstore in the WWinter Park Village shut down in August of last year. Please see bBAnNKsS on page 3Balancing local bankingCommunity banks in Winter Park and Maitland struggle to meet increasing federal regulations SARAH WWIlsLSOnN Observer Staff Bank, cafe could replace Borders Please see cCOMMIssSSIOnN on page 6 IsISAAcC BAbcBCOcCK Observer Staff

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Page 2 Thursday, March 22, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer 4 against breast cancer in 2006, but this is not a sad story, even if her daughter does tear up when she tells it. Knowing my mother, Robin Maynard said, if she was sit ting with us right now and I said, Mom, if you die, 45 women will be saved and their children will have their mom, she would have chosen (death). Libby Maynard lived only six weeks after receiving her diagnosis of stage IV breast cancer, but that was enough time for her daughter to learn the challenges that women with breast cancer face. Stage IV, or metastatic breast cancer, is invasive breast cancer that has spread beyond the breast and nearby lymph nodes to other organs of the body, such as the lungs, distant lymph nodes, skin, bones, liver or brain. Treatment generally includes surgery, radiation, or both, depending on many individual factors. Chemotherapy is always recommended. There were a lot of insurance issues, Maynard said about her mother. She lost her job because of her cancer treatments, and just terrible things that had gone on. Watching what her mother went through was enough to help Maynard decide she wanted to help stage IV women, to advocate for them. So she started Libbys Legacy Breast Cancer Founda tion. Libbys Legacy provides com prehensive breast health care to the underserved Central Florida community through education, mammograms, follow-up diagnostics and Hope Coaches on the journey from diagnosis to treatment and beyond. The services provided by the foundation evolved as Maynard learned more about the needs of the community. They include the Cancer Screening Initiative / Mammogram Access Project, which provides free mammo grams and follow up breast health services to uninsured women in the Central Florida community. We are awareness with action, Maynard said. Theres no point in having awareness events if you are not going to do anything about it! What is the point of giv ing someone a free service if you are not going to help them with the rest of it? You have something abnormal. We cant help you now. That doesnt make any sense. Libbys Legacy has diagnosed 45 women and all are survivors. Im 45-0, baby! Maynard said. Im not easy to say no to. I me I dont get paid and my boss is in heaven. Libbys Legacy also helps stage IV breast cancer patients battling this disease by granting wishes in order to create cherished memories with loved ones through the LIVE BIG program. They assign a patient advocate and then send those stage IV patients on a weeklong trip on the Alaskan cruise that Libby and Robin Maynard had planned to take, but were unfortunately denied because of the aggressive nature of Libbys cancer. Funds for the Alaskan cruises are raised by Libbys Legacys sig nature event, Scooters 4 Hooters: Sixth Annual Breast Cancer Char ity Ride & Music Fest, which is March 24. The inaugural Scooters 4 Hooters ride took place in 2007. A goal was set for $5,000, but nearly $13,000 was raised. Since then more than $300,000 has been cancer patients on the Alaskan cruise memory trips with their families, and pay for more than 1,500 breast health services that have diagnosed breast cancers and saved lives. Ellen Stephenson, a friend of Libbys, was diagnosed in 2003 and has been through rounds and rounds of chemotherapy for the past eight years. Stephenson and the Alaska trip. That trip is such a powerful memory for me. It was something I never dreamed I would get to do, that I would get to experience something so awe inspiring, Ste phenson said. It brought me in touch with the beauty of life and helped me to go beyond my disease. For once I wasnt a woman in treatment; I wasnt a cancer patient. I was Ellen. Stephenson carried Libbys ashes with her on the cruise and spread them in a very beautiful place in Sitka, Alaska. Libby went with us, she said. SUNDAY APRIL 15TH 2PM TO 6PM 1801 W. FAIRBANKS AVE. WINTER PARK, FL 32789 For over 27 years Marjorie Myers greeted diners at her Paco's Mexican Restaurant in Winter Park with a smile and great food. To honor her memory and her commitment to community service, Pacos hosts this annual fundraiser to support the Marjorie A. Myers Memorial Scholarship Fund. Join us for this event; enjo y a special menu of some of Marjs favorite dishes, live music, raffles, a limited time MARJarita; and help give back to the community. TICKETS: $20/PERSON $5/kids under 12 IN ADVANCE LIVE MUSIC Featuring B l u e S t o n e C i r c l e $2.00 MARJaritas MARJarita FIESTA4th Annual Lack of Desire or Low Energy? George Carroll, M.D., has over 20 years ex perience in sexual medicine, and is actively involved in the following: 407-894-9959 For more information on Libbys Legacy Breast Cancer Foundation and Ellens Walk with the Angels, visit  libbyslegacy.org and angelwalk. org The Sixth Annual Breast Cancer Charity RRide & Music Fest is from noon to 6 p.m. on Saturday, March 24, with the countrys largest scooter ride. There is a $30 registration fee to participate in the police-escorted ride through downtown Orlando, Baldwin Park and Winter Park at 1 p.m. To register, visit scooters4hooters.com aboveABOVE PHotoOTO bBY sSHARI KInNG tTHeE obseOBSERveVER RRobin M Maynard poses with her pink scooter at Lake Baldwin in Baldwin Park. At right, RRobin poses with her late mother, Libby Maynard, to whom she dedicated Libbys Legacy Breast Cancer Foundation.Scooters SHARI KKInNG Observer StaffHootersThe countrys largest scooter ride winds through Winter Park on Saturday to ght breast cancer

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Page 3 Thursday, March 22, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Hours: M-F 8am to 4:30pm 2315 Lee Road Winter Park, Florida 32789 Your Guiding Beacon for Quality Healthcare Harbour Private Duty Nursing, LLCSkilled Nursing Physical Therapy Occupational Therapy Companionship Home Health Aid Homemaking Flexible Schedules Free RN Assessments The Services of Harbour Private Duty Nursing provide peace of mind to loved ones, trust ofcers, guardians and physicians. Our professional team prides itself on making your life easier. We also provide in-hospital private duty care, which offers close, personal attention and reassurance in an unfamiliar and often frightening environment. Our ofce hours are Monday through Friday, 8:00 am to 4:30 pm. Our professional team is available 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. During hours when the ofce is closed and during the weekends and holidays, the on-call coordinator is available by telephone 24 hours per day.www.HarbourPrivateDutyNursing.com License # 299991382phone (407) 895-8188 fax 407-895-9339 have trickled down and are hitting them at the local level. Whether the banks are trying to success fully navigate through the crisis on their own, or with forced in tervention and supervision of the U.S. Treasury, they say theyre do Comping complianceCommerce National Bank & Trust in Winter Park was issued a regulatory consent order by the on Jan. 24. President Ray Colado says the bank has been operating within guidelines provided by the government to assure it makes it successfully through the remain der of the recession. The order, he says, mandates a roadmap of instructions for his bank to follow to get in compli ance with federal credit regula tions. Issues with the real estate market and people increasingly walking away from their mort gages, slow judicial processes and the ever-changing and burden some regulations, he said, led his bank to the stage of governmental intervention. Thats a combination that fos ters issues and thats why youre seeing so many banks have prob lems, he said. This is mak ing us re-evaluate if the risk is worth the reward and investment in many instances we might not have second guessed before. Sanchez, with the Florida Banking Association, says these sorts of governmental orders have become more and more frequent in the last three years, as commu nity banks are struggling to com ply with regulations. Colado says his bank is on its way to satisfying all chapters of the issued consent order, includ Comptroller of the Currency to help them navigate regulations and guide the board of directors in management, as well as addi tional loan personnel to oversee tomers, he said, have been alerted to the additional governmental review but should see no change in their banking experience. This is something that bankers all over the state and the Southeast are dealing with, he its something we are going to be diligent about. Sanchez said by making banks like Colados focus on compliance over lending, though maybe with good intentions, the federal gov ernment is slowly sucking the life out of one of every communitys most important economic forces the community bank. The real job creators in any community are small businesses, and 40 percent of small business loans come from community banks these banks are out there reinvesting money back into the community, he said. But with thousands and thousands of pages of new regulations piling up, how could any small business, banking or not, survive that? Thats what a new system of checks and balances to the U.S. Currency was designed to address, Acting Comptroller John Walsh told the Independent Com munity Bankers of America. In a speech to the group in March of 2011, after the implementation of the Dodd-Frank banking reforms, he told bankers he was working with them, not against them. Given the extent of our com mitment to community banking, its a matter of great concern to me when I hear, as I sometimes do, that community bankers feel the business is no longer sustain able, or worse that regula tors, including the OCC, agree and are encouraging community banks to exit the business, Walsh said. This latter point is both completely untrue, and particu larly troubling I can assure you that we at the OCC believe very strongly in the future of community banks. To that end, Walsh said that his munication and feedback between banking regulators and individual banks to make the process less ob structive and more facilitative. I believe it will be important for all of us banking regulators and the consumer bureau to establish and maintain a construc tive dialogue, which we are al ready doing, Walsh said, adding that improving that communica tion will be an ongoing process that he admitted the government needs to work on. Bruce May, president and CEO of First Colony Bank of Florida headquartered in Maitland, said operations have been navigating through choppy waters since the bank opened in 2008. Since the burst of the housing bubble and the steadily sinking local economy, he said his bank has focused on conservative, they have been able to accom plish, with 2011 being their highest earnings year yet. But getting to this point hasnt been smooth sailing. Just like any small business right now, I think that there are some struggling more than oth ers theres a long way to go un til stable, he said. McGowan, with BankFIRST of Winter Park, said though his bank has faired well through the recession thus far, the timetable for total recovery, at least for com munity banking, keeps extending due to decreased loan growth, increasing government interfer ence in banking business, and the mounting pressure of new federal banking regulations. He estimates that many small community banks, in his calcula tions even up to a third of them, will be consolidated into larger ones in the next year unless some thing is done to help them deal with all of these issues, especially in monitoring the regulations. These three scenarios that are playing out right now are caus ing a lot of community banks to look at their individual viability right now, McGowan said. And a major factor theyre considering is whether they can keep up with compliance. WWine tasting in HHannibal Square sizzles bBAnNKsS | Comptroller defends banking reforms for community banks and mission to help, not hurt firms C ONTIINUED FRROM fFRontONT pagePAGE PHotosOTOS bBY IsSAAcC bBAbcBCOcCK tTHeE obseOBSERveVER Dexters staffers, above, hand out samples at the HHannibal Square Wine Tasting on March 15. At top right, Congressman John Mica, second from right, poses with friends. Chamber President Patrick Chapin poses with Magic dancers.

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Page 4 Thursday, March 22, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer USPS 00-6186 ISSN 1064-36131500 Park Center Drive OOrlando, FL 32835-5705 MMember of: Chamber of CommercePublisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor. Submission does not guarantee publication. Columnists opinions are made independently of the newspaper. All rights reserved. Winter Park / Maitland Observer 2012Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munsterwww.wpmobserver.com | Phone: 407-563-7000 | Fax: 407-563-7099 | editor@observernewspapers.com P.OO Box 2426 WWinter Park, FL 32790 Published Thursday, MMarch 22, 2012 COONTA ACTS Volume 24, IIssue Number 12 PUBLIISHHERR Tracy Craft 407-515-2605 tcraft@observernewspapers.com managMANAGIngNG EDIITORR Jenny AAndreasson 407-563-7026 editor@observernewspapers.com DESIIGNERR Jonathan GGallagher 407-563-7054 jgallagher@observernewspapers.com RREPORR TERRS Jenny AAndreasson 407-563-7026 editor@observernewspapers.com IIsaac Babcock 407-563-7023 isaacb@observernewspapers.com LegalsEGALS | ClassLASSIfFIedsEDS AAshley MMcBride legal@FLAlegals.com classieds@observernewspapers.com COPYY EDIITORRS IIsaac Babcock isaacb@observernewspapers.com Sarah WWilson COLUMNIISTS Chris Jepson Jepson@MediAmerica.us Louis RRoney LRRoney@c.rr.com Josh GGarrick joshgarrick9@gmail.com ADVERR TIISIING SALES Linda Stern 407-563-7058 LStern@observernewspapers.com subscSUBSCRIptPTIonsONS | cCIRculatCULATIonON Jackie Candelaria 407-563-7013 InteNTERnN AAndy Ceballos Business Briefs Community Bulletin AArtists MMelbourne installation United Arts of Central Florida awarded $32,099 in artist development grants and arts adminis trator grants recently. Winter Park artist Dawn RRoe will use her $2,500 UA grant to assist with completing a new three-channel video installation on the Goldelds region of Victoria that she will travel to Australia to install in the Melbourne gallery Screen Space in June. Visit dawnroe.comStudent honors Crystal Anderson, of Atlanta, daughter of R Rev erend H Hugh Anderson of Winter Park, received a Master of Divinity from the Candler School of Theology of Emory University in Atlanta on Dec. 17. Chase R Richey of Winter Park is spending the spring trimester abroad, studying art history, visual arts and I Italian language in Florence, IItaly. R Richey is a junior managerial economics major.Teachers go abroad The English-Speaking Union of  Central Florida recently awarded four scholarships to teachers to attend a two-week total immersion seminar in the British Universities Summer Scholars Program. The teachers awarded scholarships include Benjamin Fottler, who teaches English at Winter Park H High School. H He will attend Teach ing Shakespeare Through Performance at Shakespeares Globe Theater. Also included is Chelsea St. Clair, who teaches English language and composition and English I I honors at Lake H Howell H High School. She will attend the University of Ox fords English Literature Program. Trip to IItaly The R Rollins Evening program will have a 13-day travel experience to Venice and the Veneto on Oct. 16-28. Contact R Robert Lemon at rslemonjr@earthlink.net, 407-310-5378 or 407-628-8332.Join, sponsor a kickball team The Annual Friends of First R Response-Maitland Kickball Fundraiser is at 1 p.m. Sunday, April 22. Six teams will play at Keller Fields. A $10 t-shirt donation is required to play on a FFRR, RRotary, H Holy R Rollers or Little League team. Sponsors and auction items are needed. Con tact June Flowers at june@owerslabs.com Join RRelay for Life The American Cancer Societys R Relay for Life of Maitland is an  overnight relay-style walk ing event that will take place at Orangewood Presbyterian Church on April 27-28. Opening ceremonies will take place at 6 p.m. on Friday and closing ceremonies are at noon on Satur day. The event will also honor cancer survi vors with a special lap and survivor dinner on Friday night. Visit relayforlife.org/maitland or email maitland.relay@yahoo.comSend submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com HHoller Drivers Mart kicked off its fth year of hon oring community heroes by saluting the Christian Service Center at the Orlando Predators home opener. Led by Executive Director R Robert Stuart (pictured), the Center works tirelessly to combat homelessness and poverty and restore hope. Former O Orange County Commissioner Bill Se gal, of Winter Park, closed on the acquisition of 72 prime remaining residential lots in Martins Grove in Tavares from Centex/Pulte on March 7. Segal is also actively involved in a redevelopment project in College Park, as well as general real estate and private mortgage lending. Easter Seals received a $5,000 Quality of Life grant from the Christopher & Dana R Reeve Foun dation. Jacob, Sherkman & A Associates, LLC recently leased 2,250 square feet at 479 Montgomery Place in Altamonte Springs. Susan Aloisio PA and Frank Filippelli of Southern R Realty Enterprises I Inc. in Longwood represented the owners and tenants on the two-year lease. NAII R Realvest negotiated a new lease agreement for 2,000 square feet of industrial space at 631 Progress Way at Monroe CommerCenter South in Sanford. MMichael H Heidrich, a principal in the rm, brokered the transaction representing the landlord, Maitland-based COP-Monroe, LLC and the tenant H Half Full Coffee, I Inc. doing business as Twisted Cuban, a local mobile Cuban cuisine kitchen. Cuhaci & Peterson A Architects Engineers Plan ners, based in Orlandos Baldwin Park, completed design work to build 22 new Leslies Poolmart, IInc. interiors in 12 states. NAIAI R Realvest negotiated a new ofce lease agreement for 5,678 square feet at 2699 Lee RRoad in Winter Park for H HealthCare Scouts, I Inc., a nationwide recruiting rm specializing in per manent placement of licensed health care profes sionals. Sandals R Realty of North Orlando, LLC is proud to announce the addition of John Snyder to the team. John was formerly with Exit R Realty Pre ferred in Lake Mary. RRobert Stuart Festival winnersThe 2012 Best of Show, a $10,000 award, at the Winter Park Sidewalk Art Festival went to John Costin, of Tampa, (at right) for Large Florida Birds. The Morse Museum Award for a Distinguished Work of Art, $2,500, went to Jim and Shirl Par mentier, of Mars H Hill, N.C., for Greek Wall Vase. Four Winter Park artists won awards, including John Whipple for sculpture, Patricia Karnes for jewelry, Jeff League for mixed media and Edson Campos for drawing and graphics. Visit wpsaf.org Student excels RRollins College junior Lucas H Her nandez was awarded the Florida Campus Compacts 2011 Excel lence in Service Award. H He is cofounder of NextStep, a homeless advocacy organization, and has helped the Making Lives Better or ganization at R Rollins, which helps people in Nepal get clean drinking water, supplies, etc. AApp class Echo I Interaction Group a mobile application development and branding organization hosted 24 fourth-graders from the Jewish Academy of Or lando at its new ofce at The Plaza in downtown Orlando. Executives from Echo including CEO and founder Carlos Carbonell and project manager Jean Mastriano walked the students through the mobile application development process and answered questions about everything from who conceptualizes ideas for apps to Angry Birds. The kids tried out an Echo-developed game, Tilt Fishing, on iPads, and declared their intent to work for Echo when theyre grown up. Stop famineOn Feb. 24, 41 high school students at Trinity Preparatory School in Winter Park stopped eating to raise awareness about world hunger. The project, called the 30 HHour Famine, is a fast held by World Vision in which students around the country fast while raising money for food for the needy. The students spent the night on the oor of the schools gymnasium, and learned what it is like to really have nothing: no home, no food and only what can t in a backpack.

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Page 5 Thursday, March 22, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer The Lady Tars are making a name for themselves on the court in the NCAA Division II championships, entering the Elite Eight on a string of big wins. Out of 303 teams to start the sea son, the Tars have won their way into Speaking to Rollins Sports, Head Coach Glen Wilkes Jr. said that the Tars struggled in practice heading into the Elite Eight tournament, but that they were setting new goals to move higher than they ever have be fore. Our goal is the next game, Wilkes said. We put all our efforts into that and let it fall as it may. But the way the schedule has fallen this year, we feel like we can play with anybody. The last seven games have been a whirlwind, with the Tars blowing through teams to end the regular sea son, then through increasingly tough opponents in the Sunshine State Conference Tournament and the NCAA Division II South Region Tournament. Four of those games have been de cided by four points or less. The Tars won all of them. On March 20, in the regional cham pionship game, the Tars watched Val dosta State rip out a 7-point lead that Thats when the Tars went on a tear, helped by the unlikely hero Kourtnie Berry, who came off the bench to add 11 points during a rally that gave Rol lins the lead. By the second half the Tars were point gap to slip near the end. In the game Ashley Jones led with 14 points, though she only hit 23 percent of her Moore helped out with 10 points and The Tars faced Lander at press time on Tuesday night with hopes of a shot day. With two wins, they could be in the national championship game at 8 p.m. Friday. Check RollinsSports.com KKnights fall in NIIT After a string of ups and downs Invitational Tournament appearance, the Knights mens basketball team fell 81-56 at Drexel, ending their postsea son run. For the Knights, who were plagued by poor shooting compared to the Dragons, a low score again hampered their chances. Keith Clanton led the team with 12 points, which may be the lowest game high for any Knight this season. Meanwhile Drexel shot 50.9 percent overall, hitting nearly half of its 3-pointers. The loss ended the Knights sea son, and ended the career of charis matic team captain A.J. Rompza, who graduates as a senior. His longtime teammate P.J. Gaynor also graduates after the season. AGIS Florida Agency, LLC Arbors on Aragon Condominium Assoc. Bay Hill Jewelers on Park Bella Centra Care Copytronics Kendall & Kendall Laurence C. Hames, Esq. Levine Napier Insurance Lighten Up! Craig Ludin Mennello Museum of American Art P.F. Chang's China Bistro Joseph Regner See, Inc. Sodexo at Rollins College The Avenue Network, Inc. The Spice and Tea Exchange Your Orlando Mortgage Dean Cannon Center for Independent Living Blair J. Culpepper Eileen Fisher Hannibal Square Association, Inc. Latham, Shuker, Eden & Beaudine, LLP Betty Jo MacKenzie Matthew Roberts, Inc. Mears Transportation Group Orlando Ale House Winter Park Mary Rumberger S & W Kitchens, Inc. Shutts & Bowen, LLP The Westchester Assisted Living Residence The Winter Park Playhouse Track Shack of Orlando Vestal & Wiler, CPA's Winter Park Concours, LLC City Communications Commercial Business Finance Moore Stephens Lovelace, P.A. Panera Bread Paychex Sprinkles Cakes Absolute Photography Adventist Health System Brion Price Photography David Lundberg Building & Roofing Contractor Florida Frame House and Gallery Follett Bookstore at Rollins College Orange County Supervisor of Elections DownEast Orvis Martin M. Prague, CPA Park Maitland School Timothy's Gallery Regions Bank DexOne Florida Gas Transmission Co. Best Western Mt. Vernon Inn Denotes Park Avenue Area Association membership Wednesday, April 18 5:00 8:00 p.m. Winter Park Farmers Market 200 W. New England Ave. Enjoy unlimited food and beverage samples from more than 40 restaurants and caterers, plus live entertainment and more! All Inclusive Tickets: $40 Chamber Members (in advance) $45 Non-Members $45 Everyone at the door Order tickets at www.winterpark.org or call (407) 644-8281 WWildcats blast off IsISAAcC BAbcBCOcCK Observer StaffThe Wildcats are back to their winning ways after a pair of losses last week. They picked up two straight blowout wins against Colonial to stay atop the district ladder and give them momentum heading into a match up against Freedom at press time. Winter Park (10-4, 6-1) teed off on Colonials pitching March 16 on Colonials home diamond, blowing them out with 11 runs, while the Wildcats pitching shut them down with no runs allowed. Two days later, it was more of the same for the Wild cats, who took their two-game series against the Grena diers (3-9, 3-5) back home and again blew the game open quickly with a series of rallies. By the time the game was over, the Wildcats were up 9-1, thanks again to stellar pitching. After a showdown against Freedom at press time, the Wildcats will take the long trip to face Bartram Trail (3-8, 0-4) on March 27. The next day, theyll drive to Stanton (9-3, 2-2) in Jacksonville for what looks to be a much tougher showdown. The Blue Devils are undefeated at home, winning a recent game against First Coast Chris tian 18-1.Eagles groundedAfter a three-game win streak saw some hot bats for the Eagles, a pair of losses has cooled things down a bit. season against Seabreeze on March 15. Four days later theyd fallen to Ocoee in a narrow 3-2 defeat. They faced Lake Highland Prep at press time Wednes day, and will take on Freedom (310, 1-5) in a back-toback series, both at Freedom on Thursday and Friday.Saints shockedAfter opening the season with only one loss in the March 14 by a narrow 4-3 score. Now the Saints (11-2, 5-0) are looking to rebuild some momentum heading Theyll travel to Bishop Moore for a 7 p.m. Thursday start, then to the Foundation Academy for a 4:30 p.m. batter up Friday. PHotoOTO bBY jJIM HOGUeE RollOLLInsNS at ATHletLETIcsCS RRollins Colleges womens basketball team poses with the NCAA regional championship trophy.Lady Tars in Elite Eight IsISAAcC BAbcBCOcCK Observer Staff

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Page 6 Thursday, March 22, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer On March 15, under the aus pices of the Bach Festival Society Guest Artist Series, the Takcs Quartet plus a piano played a varied concert of Schubert, Ravel and Shostakovich in Tiedtke Hall at Rollins College. Opening with a familiar and amiable Schubert song melody, the quartet charmed the audience in the composers Quartettsatz in C minor, a one-movement work Maurice  Ravels String Quartet in F major provided an inventive workout in the pentatonic scale. Chordal beauty was present galore in this piece, which never ventures into high dramatics, but gives the hearer plenty of innova tive glimpses of delicate fancy along the way. The quartet was augmented in the concerts second half by rick Ohlsson, who played the keyboard part in Dmitri Shostak ovichs Piano Quintet in G minor. contains many references to Shostakovichs 5th Symphony, and is quite often a loud, bangy, ex clamation of simple high drama. is clearly evident in both the cate ornaments in the piece. The Shostakovich Quintet ended in a quiet, sweet, good-natured mood by tying all loose ends peacefully together in G major. The evenings playing, both from strings and piano, was little short of sensational, and left no doubt in the audiences mind that were cooperating to create an unforgettable occurrence. Its TAX time. Appointments Available 7 Days a Week!Tax Form Processing LLC2400 N Forsyth Rd., Suite 101 Orlando, FL 32807Tel: (407) 657-6336www.TaxFormProcessing.com Proudly Serving the Orlando Area for 17 years! Scan QR Code Upcoming concert: Bach Festival Society presents Chanticleer, known around the world as an orchestra of voices for the seamless blend of its 12 male voices, at the Knowles Memorial Chapel from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, April 15. Visit bachfestivalorida.org to purchase the tickets, which range from $20 to $40 a limited amount are available. Takcs Quartet plays at RRollins LOUIsS RROneNEY Observer Staff cCOMMIssSSIOnN | Coffee shop coming in may be Starbucks C ONTIINUED FRROM fFRontONT pagePAGE PHotoOTO bBY IsSAAcC bBAbcBCOcCK tTHeE obseOBSERveVER AArtist A Aaron H Hequembourg poses at the Winter Park Sidewalk Art Festival on March 18 with his work inspired by the relics of plantation farms on his familys property in Georgia. AA weekend of art leave, but I think itll be a great addition to the Vil WW eathering the storm Though the former Borders location has remained empty for nine months, Winter Park Com missioner Steven Leary said its more a sign of a struggling business model than harbinger of Winter Parks economy. The Village is pretty healthy overall but I think [book selling] was a business model that was the by Amazon, Leary said. The big booksellers are He said that Winter Park has weathered the retail downturn much better than most cities. I think from a regional perspective were probably in the best shape of anybody with regards to vacancies, Leary said. Our core business district is under 3 percent (vacancy rate), which is fantastic compared to our neighbors. MMinimal impact According to plans drafted by Planning Director Jeff Briggs, the proposed new businesses, which about the same footprint as the 25,000-square-foot Borders store. But they would also have less inter nal square feet, totaling 13,874 square feet, and giv ing a net gain of 44 required spaces compared to the Borders. Though the coffee restaurant hasnt been named, the proposed drive-through indicates that it could be a Starbucks. The Starbucks at 3011 E. Colonial Drive was used by Avcon Engineering to study trafThose two potential new tenants are contingent on the plans being approved by the Commission at the March 26 meeting and a subsequent vote. The vote would grant conditional-use approval to change the way the current property is used, paving the way for the new development. Chapin said that he looks forward to some new faces in the old space. I dont know of too many people who are for big empty eyesores, he said. PHotoOTO couCOURtes TESY ofOF EllenLLEN AppelAPPEL The Takcs Quartet plus a piano played a varied concert of Schubert, RRavel and Shostakovich in Tiedtke HHall at RRollins College March 15.

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Page 7 Thursday, March 22, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer MMarch 26 City Commission meeting topics of interestThere will be a City Commis sion meeting on Monday, March 26, at 3:30 p.m., at the Rachel D. Murrah Civic Center located at 1050 W. Morse Blvd. Below are a few topics of interest: MMayors RReport Appointment of Wired for Winter Park Task Force City MManagers RReport Strategic Planning Session agenda discussion Non-action IItems Annexation agreement for Ravaudage (Home Acres) Consent AAgenda Approve the minutes of March 12. Approve various purchases, bids and contracts (a complete list can be found at www.cityofwin terpark.org > Government > City Commission > Agenda Packets). Approve the amendment of the development agreement and reexecution of the air space agreement for the 444 W. New England Ave. and 362 S. Pennsylvania Ave. buildings. Approve the budget adjust ment of $15,000 to appropriate overtime reimbursement for po lice departments participation in the Immigration and Customs En forcement (ICE) Task Force. Approve the budget adjust ment of $6,000 to appropriate fees ing for that purpose. AAction IItems RRequiring DiscussionFee waiver request for the Cre Auction Approval of four objectives designed to set the agenda for the Central Florida Urban Land Institute Technical Assistance Panel (TAP) 2-day workshop for the West Fairbanks area Public HHearings Adoption of fee schedule effec tive Sunday, April 1 Request of Winter Park Town Center LTD: Conditional-use approval to build a bank and new restaurant with drive-thru as a redevelopment of the former Bor ders Books at the Winter Park Village, 500 N. Orlando Ave. QUASIJUDICIAL PROCEEDING Resolution Executing a Public Transportation Joint Participation Agreement with the state of Flor ida Department of Transporta tion for artwork that is procured, designed, manufactured and in stalled at the Winter Park Train Station/Amtrak Station Ordinance Amending Chap ter 22 to incorporate the Florida Building Code with certain ad ministrative and technical amendments (1) City Commission Reports Commissioner Leary Commissioner Sprinkel Commissioner Cooper Commissioner McMacken Landscape code enforcement Mayor Bradley Complete management plan review, including current con tracted services, etc. full agenda and information on www.cityofwinterpark.org and by clicking on Government > City Commission > Packets. Click IIt or Ticket Saving lives and increasing belt useThe Winter Park Police Depart ment is joining with other state and highway safety advocates across the country to help save more lives by strongly enforcing seat belt laws around the clock, but especially at night. The Click It or Ticket enforcement mobilization in Win ter Park began on Sunday, March 18, and will run through Saturday, March 31. Nationally, 61 percent of the 10,647 passenger vehicle occu pants who were killed in motor (6 p.m. to 5:59 a.m.) were not wearing their seat belts at the time of the fatal crash, compared to 42 percent during the daytime hours. Motorists should buckle up every time they go out, both day and night. Law enforcement agencies across the country are prepared to ticket anyone not buckled upno warnings and no excuses. Click It or Ticket.City celebrates Florida Bicycle MMonth with Bike from Park to ParkThe city of Winter Park sup ports March as Florida Bicycle Month and will celebrate by join ing the citys Pedestrian & Bicycle Advisory Board to host the th annual Bike from Park to Park on Friday, March 23, at 8 a.m. The scenic bike ride will begin at Central Park West Meadow located at the corner of Morse Boulevard and New York Avenue. The ride, which is about 3.5 miles, will take cyclists through Lake Island Park to Mead Botanical Garden, by Azalea Lane Recreation Center and back to Central Park West Meadow, where refreshments will be served. Bike from Park to Park supports the mission to promote a viable and safe pedes trianand bicycle-friendly infra structure. Millions of Americans engage in bicycling because it is a viable form of transportation, an excel vides quality family recreation. The city of Winter Parks Green Local Government initiative is an environmental action agenda designed to transform Winter Park into one of the most con servational cities in America by encouraging environmentally friendly lifestyles through alter native transportation modes, such as bicycling. Investing in road improve ments such as bicycle lanes, routes, off-road trails and parking to enable safe access for all us ers are all ways the city encour ages bicycling. Bike from Park to Park is an additional way to encourage and promote alternate forms of transportation. Those interested in participating in this exciting, green event are asked to please RSVP via email to trafficguy@cityofwinterpark.org or by calling 407-599-3233. 58th annual Easter Egg HHunt The City of Winter Parks 58th annual Easter Egg Hunt will be held on Saturday, April 7, in beautiful Central Park West Meadow. as much excitement and laughs for the adults as it will for the kids. The hunt will begin promptly ing signal. Children with special needs are also encouraged to join in the fun. More than 10,000 stuffed eggs will be placed throughout Central Park. As always, children who come up empty handed will still be able to enjoy special treats at the designated area. Winter Parks annual Easter Egg Hunt is the citys oldest com munity event. Grandparents are now bringing the third generation of children to hunt for eggs and fun is bound to be had by all.Visit www.cityofwinterpark.org, nd us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.Almost a year ago the U.S. En vironmental Protection Agency (EPA) adopted a law that established Numeric Nutrient Criteria (NNC) for all lakes and springs within the state of Florida. These criteria set very stringent phosphorous and nitrogen limits that all governing bodies would be required to meet by the spring of 2012 to comply with federal standards. Since the adoption of these rules, local public and private organizations have been racing to propose more practical replacement standards designed to achieve balanced water qual logistical strain. Earlier this month, the Florida Legislature approved proposed draft replacement standard from the Florida Department of Envi ronmental Protection (FDEP) de signed to override EPAs adopted criteria. The EPA is currently reviewing these rule changes to determine if FDEPs standards are an acceptable substitute. We tion from EPA will be made by the summer of 2012. To the average citizen living in Maitland, surface water quality may seem like a foreign concern that they have no tangible connec tion to. However, most readers will be surprised to know that Maitimpacted by those living upland than actual lakefront residents. Unlike sewer systems in the New England area that mix stormwater with sanitary waste for processing or disposal, Floridas stormwater infrastructure is completely independent and relies on gravity to carry rainwater to low points such as lakes and streams. Every single inlet or drain within the city, no matter how far away from natural water it may seem, will eventu ally drain to one of the Maitlands 22 lakes. While rainwater is not typically a source of pollutants, the materials that it collects on its journey downstream can cause lakes. Grease, garbage and even soil are common visual nuisances, but the most harmful element that the Stormwater and Lakes Management Division struggles to remove is excess nutrients. Unnaturally, increased dissolved phosphorous and nitrogen can turn a balanced and healthy lake into a water body ridden with al Now that we have explained how all residents contribute to the citys surface water quality, we need to understand the most effective ways to prevent the pol lutants from entering Maitlands stormwater infrastructure. There are numerous Best Management Practices (BMPs) that individual homeowners can adopt to become good aquatic stewards. The fol lowing is a quick list of dos and donts:  DONT dump old chemicals such as paint or solvents into storm drains. DONT blow leaves and grass clippings into the street. DONT use fertilizer contain ing phosphorous unless you meet the countys allotted exemptions. DO wash your vehicle in your yard instead of driveway to preing into a nearby storm drain. DO pick up after your pets when going for a walk. DO blow all yard debris and leaf litter into your yard for prop er collection and off-site disposal. The city of Maitland has adopted a number of local ordinances to enforce these BMPs, but if you do see someone violating any of these standards or if you would like guidance regarding addi tional BMPs that can be practiced, please contact Maitlands Storm water and Lakes Management Di vision at 407-539-6203. Marissa Williams, Stormwa ter and Lakes Management coor dinator City Council M M eeting of MMarch 26 City Council meets the second and fourth Mondays of the month at 6:30 p.m. in the Council Cham bers. The next meeting is sched uled for March 26 in the Council Chambers, 1776 Independence Lane. Below are items that will be addressed at that meeting.Special Presentations:Proclamation Sexual Assault Awareness Month Proclamation Maitland Pub lic Library Month Municipal Park Paula Rue, Vice Chair Parks & Recreation Advisory Board Enzian Florida Film Festi val Tallahassee Session Update Louis Rotundo Public HHearings: Ordinance Creating the Downtown Maitland Zoning District Ordinance Rezone Properties within the Downtown Maitland Zoning District Consent AAgenda: Approve Council Minutes of March 12 Approve Workshop Minutes of March 5 Receive Senior Advisory Board Minutes of Nov. 21 Contract Chippewa Trail Wa ter Main Joint Participation Agreement Sun Rail Station Art in Transit Decision IItems: Appointments Personnel Board (2) Request Additional Funding for Littlejohn Engineering Associ ates Additional Funding for Police Dept Chamber Art Festival Requested by Councilman Bonus Discussion IItems: Consideration for Preparation of a Mining Agreement & Proj ect Funding Schedule Council/Library Board Workshop Comments from the Commu nity March 13 Art & History As sociation Workshop Please visit www.itsmymaitland.com for the complete agenda and approved meeting minutes. www.gulfstatescu.org 407-831-8844A Refreshing Alternative to Conventional Banking.9405 S. Highway 17-92 Maitland, FL 32751 Maitland City Talk bBY HHOWARdD ScCHIefeEFERdecDECKeER MAYOR WWhy do we care about surface water quality? Winter Park City Talk bBY RRAndND Y KnKNIGHtT CITY MANAGER

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Page 8 Thursday, March 22, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer MARMARCHH 22 The Goldenrod Chambers Presidents Luncheon is at the Goldenrod Station from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Thursday, March 22. Single tickets are $25 each.  Call 407-677-5980. Winter Park I Institute presents photo journalist, lmmaker and educator Ed KKashi at 7 p.m. on Thursday, March 22, at R Rollins College, Bush Science Center. IIts free. Visit rollins.edu/wpi Join the head and neck cancer spe cialists from The Ear, Nose, Throat and Plastic Surgery Associates as they conduct free head and neck cancer risk assessments at the YYMCA Crosby Wellness Center, 2005 Mizell Ave. in Winter Park, from 1 to 4 p.m. on Thursday, March 22. Call 954-914-3950. The Jewish Community Center of Greater Orlando will be hosting an event titled OOn The Catwalk 3 from 6 to 9 p.m. on March 22 at the H Heaven Event Center. The cost is $60; $50 for JCC members; $36 for seniors/students. Contact Julie Varkonyi at 407-387-5330 or at ju liev@orlandojcc.org One Senior Place at 715 Douglas Ave. in Altamonte Springs will have a Community O Open H House celebration from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m.  on Thurs day, March 22. Visit www.OneSenior Place.com or call 407-949-6733. MARMARCHH 23 The next Cornerstone H Hospice Vol unteer Training will be held from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. each day Friday, March 23. This is a 16-hour certi cation, so plan to attend both train ing days. I It will be at the Cornerstone HHospice ofces, 8009 S. Orange Ave., in Orlando. Please pre-register by calling 1-800-503-5756. Susan Saladoff will discuss her docu mentary, HHot Coffee, at R Rollins College from 10 a.m. to noon on Fri day, March 23, at R Room 114 170 W. Fairbanks Bldg., R Rollins College. The documentary reveals what really hap pened to Stella Liebeck, the woman who spilled coffee on herself in 1992 and sued fast food chain McDonalds. The event is free. MARMARCHH 24 WWickets to Fair Trade: Croquet Tournament, a croquet fundraising event for Ten Thousand Villages of Winter Park, is Saturday, March 24, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.  in front of the Caza Feliz. Teams of two are allowed to compete. The event is free  with a contribution to Ten Thousand Villages and prizes will be given.  To register, please email Colin Meyers  at colin.s.myers@gmail.com  or visit the Fundrazr  tab on the Facebook Page. The Sixth A Annual Breast Cancer Charity R Ride & M Music Fest is from noon to 6 p.m. on Saturday, March 24, with the countrys largest scoot er ride through downtown Orlando, Baldwin Park and Winter Park starting at 1 p.m. at Lake Eola. There will be live music performances. Visit scoot ers4hooters.com She may be turning 110 on Saturday, March 24, but RRuth Leiber is young at heart. Easter Seals invites you to celebrate this momentous occasion with R Ruth on Friday at 2 p.m. with a birthday party at their adult day cen ter, Day Break, 2010 Mizell Avenue, in Winter Park. MARMARCHH 25 The Maitland Civic Center is hosting a family reunion from 2 to 6 p.m. on Sunday, March 25. I Its the 47th anni versary of the building. There will be live entertainment by Tir na Greine School of I Irish Dance and more. The MCC will provide burgers, hot dogs and fried chicken and drinks. Please bring a side dish to share with 20. A cash donation will be accepted in stead of a side dish. There will also be a best dessert contest. Call 407376-3915. MARMARCHH 27 The Judges of the Ninth Judicial Cir cuit will hold sessions for citizens wanting to learn about the judicial system. IInside the Courts is a se ries presented by judges that provides participants with a look at our judicial system and an opportunity to ask questions about our courts. The event will take place from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. on the following dates: Tuesday, March 27, Tuesday, April 3, Tuesday, April 10, Tuesday, April 17. I It will be held at the Jury Assembly R Room of the Orange County Courthouse, 425 N. Orange Ave., in Orlando. Seating is limited, so register online at NinthCir cuit.org or by calling 407-836-0517. MARMARCHH 28 On March 28, all area Jersey M Mikes restaurants will donate 50 per cent of the days sales to Give Kids The World.  Visit  tinyurl.com/Jerseymikes-subs MARMARCHH 29 There will be an energy conserva tion program hosted by Winter Park on Thursday, March 29. There are two sessions: one from 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. for commercial custom ers, and one from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. for residential customers. The event is free to Winter Park utility customers, but attendees must register by Fri day, March 23. Call 407-599-3285, or visit usgbc-fgc.org/WinterParkBiz (commercial customers) or usgbcfgc.org/WinterParkHHomes (residential customers).Visit wpmobserver.com/events for more details. Send submissions to editor@ observernewspapers.com Saturday, March 24, 2012 1 5 p.m. Winter Park Civic Center 1050 Morse Blvd. Winter Park, FL 32789 Tickets $5 ADVANCE Or$7 DOOR $5 SENIORS (AT DOOR) (Children Under 3 FREE) JOIN US FOR: Create Your Own Sundae, Ice Cream Floats, Italian Ice, Celebrity Servers, Face Painting, Cake Walk, Games, Silent Auction, Door Prizes and more! Calendar Circus of the Surreal The Art & H History Museums Maitland hosts Participation: Circus of the Surreal, at 5:30 p.m. on Saturday, March 24, at the A&HHs Maitland Art Center, 231 W. Packwood Ave. in Maitland.  Tickets are $90 for A&HH members and $100 for nonmembers. Visit ArtandHHistory.org Laurelton HHall talk Architectural historian R Richard Guy Wilson, one of todays most noted American scholars in the elds of architecture and deco rative arts, provides his insights into Laurelton H Hall at 2:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 28. Admission is free. I It is being held at in the Morse Museums Jeannette G. and H Hugh F. McKean Pavilion, 161 W. Canton Ave. in Winter Park. Enchanted balletAt 7 p.m. on Saturday, March 24, the Central Florida Ballet Studio Company presents The Enchanted Garden & Various Excerpts, a performance featuring the full-length ballet of Le Corsaire  among other ballet excerpts. Prices for ages 11 and older are $20 in advance and $25 regular price, and for ages 10 and younger are $8 in advance and $10 regular price. I It is being held at Trinity  Pre paratory School, 5700 Trinity Prep Lane, in Winter Park. Call 407-849-9948 or visit centraloridaballet.com New HHope fundraiserL & J Accessories will be hosting a jewelry fundraising event from noon to 4 p.m. on March 24 at  100 Candace Drive in Maitland. The proceeds benet New H Hope for Kids. Call 407-671-0111.

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Page 9 Thursday, March 22, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Lifestyles Jace Pitre is probably one of the sweetest 2-year-olds youll ever meet. No matter what hes doing, be it curiously going after a bit of paper his mom has left in his reach, petting his puppies or holding on to his favorite little yellow Frisbee, if he catches your eye the one thing you can count on him doing is offering up the biggest smile he can. For Jace, who has an undiagnosed muscle disease, this is the best way he can commu nicate and interact with the world around him. While he is 2 years old, his muscles arent strong enough to let him jet around the house, hop on a swing in the park or form words yet. If you ask his mom how hes like any other kid his age, shell tell you frankly that skill hes learned and mischievously and happily roll to whatever he wants to exam coos. Physically and mentally, he seems more like a baby than a toddler. boyfriend, James Pitre, experienced a com pletely normal pregnancy. But one month after Jace was born, they noticed he was torticollis, which is shortening of the neck muscles, and hypotonia, a lack of muscle ing has come up positive, and the family are like muscular dystrophy, but he doesnt have that disease. Pitre have learned to cope and move for ward so they can help Jace be the best he can be. I never thought this would happen, but its a road that were traveling and I dont have a problem traveling down it, Pitre said. I see a light at the end of the tunnel. Two years ago we looked at our son and want perfect, everybody wants perfect and now I look at my son two years later and I realized he is perfect; if anything hes opened up our eyes to what a real problem is and to what real true kindness is.Seeing kindnessness of strangers. People theyve never met have sent supplies and money to help Jace only because the family expressed need. Now the Altamonte Springs family is participating in the MDA Muscle Walk, which will be held at Lake Lily in Maitland. her role would get. Team Jace and the Jol ing money, with $3,921 as of March 20. For their family, this experience has been one that has changed their lives. Its put a little control back in their hands to make a differ ence, and to help Jace and others like him. It brought motivation to our family and All the money raised will go to local chairs and send kids to a special camp. for the time Jace can go to a summer camp made for him. Walk organizer Brandi Rice said Team Jace has inspired others to work harder. It means everything to these families, Rice said. Help from studentsJace has also received help from some college students. Liani Steenekamp, Jaces occupational therapist and Keiser Univer sity instructor, has had her students create a piece of equipment to help him get in the crawling position so he can learn to do it. to have her students build more learning and therapy tools for Jace. Steenekamp is also his occupational therapist and has helped him learn to hold his head up and gain strength in his core. She said Jace works so hard at therapy with ing will shorten and hell make noises be her keep hope for her son. That want to do things makes all of the please you. And even though it may not seem like much, the progress Jace has made is a seri ous achievement. A little step is actually a big thing for him, Steenekamp said. And all this help couldnt be more im portant to their family. Jace only gets about from what he needs and many kids get. But they just dont have the money, and insur ance only pays so much. res said. She lives her life for Jace, but she hopes for a time when he can get better, and she doesnt have to think and move and worry for him every moment of his life, when she can go back to school to be a nurse. She gets sad sometimes, but when she looks at Jace, it changes everything. If he is this happy, I dont have a right to be sad. The MDA Muscle Walk is 8 a.m. Saturday, March 31, at Lake Lily Park in Maitland. For more information and to sign up, scan the QR code with your smart phone or visit tinyurl.com/ MDAmusclewalklakelily. To help Team Jace and the Jollyhoppers click on their team name. Anyone is welcome to join the Jollyhoppers team on the walk. topTOP a ANdD BottomOTTOM PHotosOTOS BY IsSAAC BABCOCK tTHE oOBsSErRVErR rRIGHtT PHotoOTO BY BRITTNI JOhHNsSON tTHE oOBsSErRVErR CCourtney Gavares and her 2-year-old son, J Jace Pitre, laugh during a fundraising event Sunday. At right, Jace and Courtney pose with Jaces father, James Pitre.Hoping for a cureWhile an Altamonte Springs family hopes to get a diagnosis for their son, they raise money for a Maitland muscular dystrophy event BBRITTNI JJOhHNsSON Observer Staff

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Page 10 Thursday, March 22, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer FamilyCalendar Nicholas Toomey remembers a time when he would drop his pen nies into the Ronald McDonald bounce off the pile of change that would go toward a cause he really didnt know much about. I think about when I used to eat at McDonalds and play the little penny game, but I never re alized how it affected people to get that little bit and how much it counts, he said. So now its coming back to us, and it helps so much. Nicholas and his wife Jessica just how much that small change adds up, and how it helps those in need. The couple began staying at the ity program that provides a homeaway-from-home for families of children being treated at local hos pitals and medical facilities, after their 7-week-old son was born prematurely at 1 pound 8 ounces, and they could not afford a hotel We would not be able to keep our head above water if we did not have this opportunity, Nicholas said. Its amazing that its so close to the hospital they really dont leave you needing anything here, they pretty much meet our needs; we couldnt ask for more. Toomey, who is currently sta tioned on Patrick Air Force Base, has helped comfort them in many ways. Its hard enough to worry about the baby, he said. But if we had to worry about our hotel room every night and traveling to the hospital wed be in trou ble. 1,470 families last year, and with out help from the community and fundraisers, the charity would be unable to meet the needs of families such as the Toomeys. The charity is continuing the tradition of fun to raise money for event on Saturday, March 24, at Social are so important because 80 percent of the charitys budget comes from the community. Without the communitys support we wouldnt be able to partnering with the community to help give families the comfort they need during stressful times makes it all worth it. Im just convinced that when youre in a medical crisis your threshold of stress is maxed out, so to add any little bit to that, its the home that we can offer them that has the simple things in life that you need just alleviates all those little stresses that these families dont need. home is just one less thing the Toomeys now have to worry about as they wait patiently to bring their new baby home. They now know how much those small pennies can make a difference in someones life. Its one of those things where when you think about these events to raise money, Jessica said, before you probably wouldnt have given it a lot of thought. But once youre in this situa tion you realize that other people like us have this kind of help avail able when they need it. And you want to pass it along to whoevers going to come along next and be in your situation. Classic Iron Beds AND Designer Linens 407-982-4319All iron & brass beds are made in the USA and guaranteed for 2 generations The IIce Cream Social to benet Ronald McDonald HHouse Charities of Central Florida is Saturday, March 24, from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. at the Winter Park Civic Center, 1050 W. Morse BBlvd., Winter Park. The event includes creating your own sundae, celebrity servers, face painting, prizes, games and more. Tickets are $5 in advance, $7 at the door. For more information or to purchase tickets, visit www. rnhccf.org and click on Whats HHappening or call 407-677-1552. There are two Ronald McDonald HHouse locations in Orlando: 2201 Alden Road, Orlando, near Florida HHospital and 1630 Kuhl Ave., Orlando, near Orlando HHealth. Call 407-8986127 or 407-581-1289 respectively for more information. PHotosOTOS BY IsSAAC BABCOCK tTHE oOBsSErRVErR JJessica and N Nicholas T T oomey, at top, are staying in the Ronald McDonald H House while their premature baby receives care at nearby Florida HHospital. IIt helps so much, he said. A shelter during the storm KKRIsSTY VICKERY Observer Staff The fourth annual BBike from Park to Park at 8 a.m. on Friday, March 23, will begin at Central Park West Meadow, located at the corner of Morse B Boulevard and NNew Y Y ork Avenue. The ride, which is about 3.5 miles, will take cy clists through Lake I Island Park to Mead B Botanical G Garden, by Azalea Lane Recreation Center and back to Central Park West Meadow. Those interested in participating are asked to RSVVP via email to trafficguy@cityofwinterpark.org or by calling 407-599-3233. TThe 35th A Annual Winter Park RRoad R Race 10k & 2 Mile is Satur day, March 24, at 7 a.m. in down town Winter Park. V Visit trackshack. com or call 407-898-1313. An I Ice C Cream Social to benet Ronald McDonald H House Chari ties of Central Florida is 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, March 24, at Winter Park Civic Center, 1050 W. Morse B Blvd. in Winter Park. Tickets are $5 in advance; $7 at the door. VVisit www.rmhccf.org Seminole County Music Together invites parents or other care givers and their infant, toddler, and preschool children to attend free sample classes   March  2024.  Call 407-844-4414 to reserve your spot at 9:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. on Thursday at the Winter Park Wedding Chapel or 9:30 a.m. on Saturday at the University Per forming Arts Center, 160 Alexan dria BBlvd. in Oviedo. Story time at Leu Gardens is at 10 a.m. on Monday, April 2. The Orange County Library Systems storytelling program comes to Leu GGardens the rst Monday of each month, excluding holidays. V Visit leugardens.org The Art and H History Museums Maitland presents its Spring Series of A Art C Classes, beginning on April 2. Participants can choose from an array of creative classes, all instructed by professional art ists and educators. Register at ArtandHHistory.org. Y Y ou can also register by phone at 407-5392181 extension 265 or in person. At 10:30 a.m. each Tuesday, the Maitland Public Library hosts preschool story and craft time. At 10:30 a.m. each Thursday, it hosts baby time stories and activity. At 4 p.m. each Thursday, it hosts Reading B Buddies for kindergarten through fth-grade. N No registra tion necessary. Call 407-6477700. The Florida Symphony Y Y outh Or chestra announces auditions for the 2012 2013 C Concert Sea son. Praised as one of the top youth orchestras in the country, the FSYYO seeks dedicated, talent ed young musicians from around Central Florida to join one of their four orchestras. Auditions are to be held in late May. V Visit  fsyo.org/ auditions.htm  Send submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com

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Page 11 Thursday, March 22, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer OOrlando employees raise $445,695 for Florida charitiesThanks to the generosity of city of Orlando employees, Mayor Buddy Dyer made check presentations totaling $445,695 in donations to 464 charitable organizations. More than 1,200 Orlando city employees participated, surpassing the $400,000 goal.  Mayor Dyer said, I was extremely impressed by the dedi cated hard-working members of our city family. Through their monetary contributions, our employees are helping address some of the most critical issues facing included donations to Orlandos United Way, among others. March 21-AApril 22 RRed The 2010 Tony award-winning play for Red, an often-disart painter Mark Rothko, will be presented by the Orlando Shakespeare Festival on March 21 through April 22. Written by John Logan, nominated for Oscars for tor, Rothko is seen struggling to create new works. In 90 minutes, the venomous Rothko embodies the will to create that drives great artists, but in the end, the audi ence comes to understand him as a defensive artist struggling with his pride, legacy and will to orlandoshakes.orgMarch 24 Falletta conducts PhilharmonicThe Orlando Philharmonic phony No. 5 under the baton of guest conductor JoAnn Falletta, music director of both the Buffalo Philharmonic and the Virginia Symphony. Performed at the Bob the world premiere of Pulsar, a lahan. Acclaimed by The New conductors of her generation, Falletta is credited by The Wash ington Post as having Toscaninis tight control over ensemble, Walters affectionate balancing of inner voices, Stokowskis gutsy showmanship, and a controlled 407-770-0071 or visit orlandophil. org March 28 Golf CChallenge benets Science CCenter   turns for its 29th  year with proceeds supporting the educational programs at the Orlando and individual players will swing for science over 18 holes of best ball tournament play on two for achievements in longest drive, hole-in-one and closest to the hole. The event supports unique hands-on learning programs registration  includes lunch, din ner, cart rental and 18 holes of golf.  To register, contact Kathy Lopus at  407-514-2233  or  klopus@ osc.org or visit osc.org March 30-AApril 1 OOrlando BBallet presents black and white swansThe Orlando Ballets newest offering is  Swans: Black and sic Swan Lake.  Based on the tale of a princess transformed into a swan by a vengeful sor cerer,  this production explores the storys darker themes of impris graphed by Artistic Director Rob set to Tchaikovskys evocative us with an unexpected approach. Swan Princess  is March 31 at 11 a.m. in a one-hour performance for young audiences. Perfor on March 30 and March 31, and   1739  or visit  orlandoballet.org March 30-AApril 12 Flying Horse pressing on for art The unique opening for  Im Editions at the Mennello Museum of American Art will offer art printing. The exhibit features limited-edition art objects and   it. On opening night, from 6 to 8 p.m. on Friday, March 30, attendees will see one of the galleries transformed into a printmaking studio, where guests can create their own art. Visit mennellomuseum.com Josh GGarrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. HHe is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. GGarrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906. Josh GGarrick Culture worthy of your calendarStaff gives back This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH O RLANDO A VE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.E NZIAN.ORG Academy Award Winner! A SEPARATION Fri Sun 3:30 6:30 9:30 Mon, Wed, Thurs 6:30 9:30 Tue 6:30 Only Cult Classics: THE PRODUCERS Tue 9:30 Wednesday Night Pitcher Show: Bad Movie Night TROLL 2 8:30 FREE RRed Swans

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Page 12 Thursday, March 22, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer OOpinions merman shot and killed 17-yearold Trayvon Martin, a police dispatcher told him to stand his ground, but he said it in a differ ent way. Are you following him? the Sanford dispatcher asked. OK we dont need you to do that. to police that he shot the teen stand your ground self-defense law, police didnt arrest him, ostensibly accepting his claim and setting a potentially catastrophic precedent in the process. In this case, based on witness accounts and recorded calls to thing but stand his ground until the very last moment. already sounds labored during the phone call to police, placed during halftime of the NBA he seems to become exasperated based upon what he thinks will merman is following in his SUV, is about to commit a crime, any crime. Martin, who had his sweat shirt hood pulled over his head as he walked home from a San ford convenience store during a rainstorm, looked suspicious, dispatcher that there had been a recent string of break-ins in his neighborhood, a claim he made in many of the about 45 calls to police hed made in the past year, according to a report by the already have convicted Martin of a crime while he walked down the sidewalk. These a**holes, they always ing the call. Then at 2 minutes, 21 seconds into the call, he seems to say a racial slur, though the unsome distortion. words and demeanor during the call, he had no intention of standfollow Martin in his SUV, eventuand a death that he would claim was in self-defense. A 16-year-old friend spoke with Martin on the phone seconds before Martin was shot to death. During that call, Martin tells his friend that hes being followed, and she tells him that he should run away, the friend told life story, much less that police merman was in an SUV for much of his pursuit; Martin was on man was armed with a semiau tomatic handgun; Martin had he believed Martin might have killed him if he didnt shoot him. The law hes standing behind, passed in 2005, allows Floridians to kill someone in self-defense, even outside of their own home, if they feel threatened with death or great bodily harm to himself or herself or another or to prevent the commission of a forcible felony. It also says that the law is only applicable if the person who kills in self-defense was not commit ting a crime at the time. a gun or threatened Martin in already committed assault. An assault, by Florida law, is an intentional, unlawful threat by word or act to do violence to the person of another, coupled with an apparent ability to do so, and doing some act that creates a well-founded fear in such other person that such violence is im minent. Tuesday that a grand jury will investigate the case and decide whether Martins civil rights were violated. The U.S. Department of Justice will also review the case. In the mean time, investigators are poring over evidence to determine whether all of it was taken into account and whether Sanford police tampered with witness statements that would have contradicted shooting. Absent enough evidence to contradict his statements, unscathed. The Sanford police appear to have already made that of the potential crime involved, that level of callousness is terrifying. Thanks to a more thorough investigation, were about to discover what standing your ground really means in Florida. free, the precedent will be crystal clear. Well have the perfect blue print for blaming the dead. Our Observation TThe joys of our city Every time I drive by the the tiny, and many, joys of Win ter Park. What is it about Winter Park that makes you smile? Whatever it is, no matter how small, embrace and enjoy it!Patrick Chapin Winter Park Chamber of Commerce president RRe: TThe joys of our city This is an easy answer for me. I love seeing families hav most of all I love seeing chil drens faces light up when the train goes by. It reminds me of what a safe place were in and it makes me so thankful to work in this community! Andrea HHall Winter Park Chamber of Commerce events manager KKudos to Winter Park Standing ovation! We love Winter Park and everything it you name it. We are proud to be part of this community. Thank you to all of the "Parkpreneurs" who make Winter Park the place Moore, owner of I LUV Winter Park, Inc. published March 8). Kudos to Winter Park! BBloomsof WinterPark VVia Facebook Winter Park installs surveillance camerasIn recent weeks the city of Winter Park has installed several super high-tech, very expensive surveillance cameras on Park Avenue. There seems to be a growing number of government surveillance cameras in Winter Park, including the Park Avenue cams, the red-light cams  and the intersection cams. For people who like them, it gives them a false sense of security that the "camera will protect them". For people who do not, it is an invasion of privacy, over-the-top big brother government snoop ing on everything every citizen does, and scares good people from Winter Park because they think the city's surveillance cams mean that Winter Park is a high-crime area. The Park Avenue cams are placed about 10 feet above ground level and attached to poles except where indicated. The ones I noticed are at 1) Park Avenue and Fairbanks Avenue, southeast  corner; 2) Park Avenue and Lyman Av enue, northeast corner; 3) Park Avenue and Lyman Avenue off the ground); 4) Park Avenue and New England Avenue, northwest corner; 5) Park Avenue and Morse Blvd., southeast corner; 6) Park Avenue and Lincoln Avenue, southwest corner; Avenue, northwest corner. They have a glass ball underneath with the camera inside that can move around in many directions and a big black box near it that probably holds a computer and/or emergency generators. Readers need to know about this because it will affect their pri vacy, make them suspect or witness for crimes, and could keep their property values very low as high crime perception comes with the cameras and they scare people away. Thanks. Paul V V onder HHeide Winter Park Heres what readers on wpmobserver.com are writing about Sweets out, sweat in: Chamber promotes healthier workplace policy with Work Well Winter Park published on March 15: blazing the trail and walking the talk! Thanks for your efforts Park! Jill HHamilton exceptionally healthy!Maritza MartinezProud of all of your efforts. Leading by example.Marian Chase OOne mere sip of water The Biblical axiom for whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap holds sway for most things in our lives. Our gardens are one of the best experiments to witness this direct return on our invest ment. Improperly managing natures catalyst, water, will not produce our expected bounty. A balance must be achieved, and with water, known as the poor farmers fertilizer, too little or too much results in an unappetizing dividend. As spring days get longer and warmer just as rainfall tapers off to a trivial memory, our gardens potential for productivity soars to unexpected heights. Simple quantities of irrigation, usually suggested at one inch each week, are easily determined with a rain gauge and observation. This simplicity ends when establishing transplants and directly seeded crops or applying fertilizer mixed with our irrigation water. The ratio of the size of plants to their containers and soil mixes may result can develop soft rotten spots if excessive moisture stagnates in upper layers of the soil. Most gardens will grow nicely when district water management rules for lawns and landscapes are followed. Overhead sprinklers run during morning hours will meet most crops growth needs. Drip and micro-irrigation systems complete their tasks almost invisibly. A timer at the hose bibb set for a schedule or on a manual timed period eases our management chores. While I may skip a manual soaking, this mechanized enforcer keeps my routine stable. settle the soil particles around the seeds and transplants. Then mulch exposed soil to restrict harsh conditions delivered by winds and sun. Follow up on a daily basis until the immature plants are established, with their roots becoming part of the strata. This rooting routine helps tiny carrot seeds begin their journey to our nutritional banquet. I use a few homemade tricks to juggle watering requirements of my gardens. A layer of newspaper under shredded mulch doubles their individual soil-protecting effectiveness and restricts weed ger zones. A dash of liquid fertilizer into the bucket simultaneously accomplishes similar goals. The volume of rain collected over the acre age of our roofs is stunning. Find alternatives to using drinking water for irrigation by catching our increasingly sporadic rainfall. We have all the resources necessary to grow much of our food; we just need to manage them in proximate time and space. Tom Carey From my garden to yoursState stands on dangerous ground Letters to the editor Send your thoughts (400 words or less) to Managing EEditor Jenny Andreasson at editor@observernewspapers.com King Features Weekly ServiceMarch 19, 2012 AA use for old newspapers: mulch

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Page 13 Thursday, March 22, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Film is a very effective me dium in which to communicate ideas both engaging and infor mative, and it is to this end that Buddhist study/practice/medita tion group, are once again pro ducing the annual Flor ida Dharma Film Festival which will take place March 23 and 24 in Eustis, and the following weekend, March 30 and 31, at of Winter Park. Florida audiences with an oppor municate and share the beauty of Tibetan Buddhist culture, spiri and methods that many people regardless of faith, philosophies or religion. In both venues, the festival is a free event; there is no charge screened. The history, personalities, culture, philosophies and practices are both beautiful and practi minds and hearts of the people of the West who are willing/able to listen to them. It is a great source of joy to see how interest in Tibetan Bud dhist ideas and meditations has and began teaching to various communities and groups here in Tibetan word for compassion.) We believe there is a simple, universal message of wisdom and compassion in Buddhism less of faith or background. We provide a safe atmosphere for people to gather, listen, discuss and learn these ancient, meaningful teachings. Participants are of all ages and come from throughout the area, representing diverse levels of meditation experience and religious/spiritual background; many are beginning medita tors and come with little or no knowledge of Buddhism. All are welcomed! It was three years ago that we be a core outreach activity of the are this year in two venues over for the community it is truly fantastic! on Friday, March 31, beginning at thieu Ricard, followed by the Sidney Lumet classic Angry true bodhisattva. ule including both weekends, please visit chenrezigproject. org/FLharma2012.pdf or send an ect.org. The website includes a link where tickets may be reserved; for capacity issues it would be helpful if you would reserve your seats if possible. Tickets for each weekend are organized are free. So come on down, expose yourself to these thought-pro humankinds richest spiritual traditions, and have fun while doing so. Bring a friend or make new ones -and please say hello, Ill be the guy hosting the betweenMark Winwood is the founder and resident teacher of the Chenrezig Project, which is based in Y Y alaha (Lake County). A frequent traveler to the Tibetan/BBuddhist communities of the IIndian sub-continent, he is an adjunct professor of BBuddhism at Lake-Sumter Community College and the HHindu University of America. Contact mwinwood@chenrezigproject.org. Chris Jepson Perspectives Life. Fun with a capital PH! TThe extra mile Ive been told all my life that I dont look my age. Or, that I look young for my age. Or, that I look good for my age. And, yes, more than a time or two, that I dont act my age. I am writing this column on my 63rd birthday wondering how a man my age might comport himself? I do not subscribe at all to the current hype that 60 is the new 40, or any other such age-related nonsense. Sixty is 60. Ive a lot of photographs of my father and I imagine a lot of readers have the same experience I do when looking at pictures of their once-young parents: Wow! They sure were pretty. But I also look at pho ous man with a serious streak of whimsy. Im more a whimsical man with a curious streak of serious. cognizant at a relatively young age that tion that I was immortal, well, I never had such illusions. Death became not a bosom companion through my days, but more of an accompanying shadow. A presence, a reality, the quiet guest, so to speak, always in the other room. I became aware, it became crystal clear that life is about moments and you damned well better be of the moment. I willingly describe myself as a short-term hedonist, yet I place a premium on long-term relationships. Ah, the best of all possible worlds. years when I was around the age of 20 or 21. My grandfather died at age 83, my father at age 81. I split the difference deter mining that give or take months I would die around 82. And I am so OK with that. I came to grips years ago with my mortality, eventually got over the unfairness of it and in doing so was liberated. too alive!) but neither do I dread it. It is. when one dies is important. Ive got the it becomes merely a matter of timing. My certain. I readily acknowledge the hubris associated with my plan. What is the adage? Theres many a slip twixt the cup and the lip. But I want to die as I lived. With intent. The question on the table is how does a man of my advancing years live? At this point in my life I do not have much choice in this regard. As the twig is bent so grows the tree. I will live as I have always on the important, shed the nonessential and parteeeee like its 1999! Ive passed on my genetic essence to successive generations thus participating in the purpose of my species. Meaning of life? It is strictly an individual human In relationships, love and affection. In passion. Language. Art. In whimsy. In a raison dtre. My father often spoke of fun. Big fun Jepson is a 24-year resident of Florida. HHes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEEDIIAmerica.US Louis Roney Play On! I came from a family where giving people a little more than they asked for was a moral duty. In World War II, I was sent back pital in New Orleans where the word lagniappe is part of the patois, the colloquial language. The good things one is endowed with, and can give away, and both the receiver and the giver are enriched in the transaction. A very handy way of seeing this deal in action is to be kind and attentive to a dog, and see how he repays you tenfold with the kind of love that is all a dog can give. In New Orleans, my mother used to buy from a local bakery where a dozen rolls included a 13th roll as lagniappe. Lagniappe carries an unspoken expression of good wishes that reach their mark in ways that make people come back for more. Its not the extra item that does it, but the item combined with the spirit behind it. A great many people of French ances try and with French names live in Louisiana. I have lived and sung in Paris for extended periods, but I never experienced the Louisiana French spirit in France. Its not that the French do anything espe cially wrong, its just that they dont have the habit of throwing in an extra bit of themselves, as do Louisianans. Teachers throw in lagniappe as a course, the moral dynamo that generates lagniappe, and carrying this spirit into ones daily doings makes life brighter for all. Lagniappe brings forth smiles and strong handshakes, and says things that word-shy individuals can never bring mile makes all human endeavors gain a dimension beyond expectation. The childs story of The Little Engine young mind the hidden potential in a human being. This hidden potential results in home runs, in touchdowns, in straight As, in world records and in intellectual triumphs. The person who accomplishes a major feat may say afterward, I didnt Somewhere in the back of his mind, he thought he could do it, or he couldnt have traversed the extra mile to make it come true. All of us certainly have within our selves the potential to reach more goals than we have ever reached, an extra reserve of imagination and mentality that hold the promise of new successes. The kids who sit in the stands today going the extra mile. During the major ity of our days, no one is going to sit over us and force us to reach our goals. Just as the little train thought, I think I can, the human being with will to win thinks, I can do it if I want it enough. Before we surprise anyone else, we must surprise what our own possibilities are! There are no prizes for could have or would have. There are only prizes for did and reached. The record books do not list missed chances or also rans. We enough to be winners?About Roney: HH arvard42Distinguished Prof, E E m.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney) I will continue to reflect on the important, shed the nonessential and parteeeee like its 1999! Third Annual Florida Dharma Film Festival March 23-24 WindHHorse Theater, 353 Plaza Drive, EEustis March 30-31 First Congregational Church of Winter Park, 225 S. IInterlachen Ave. VVisit lmfest@chenrezigproject.org Buddhist lm festival comes to Winter Park MARK WINwWOOD GGuest Writer Mark Winwood TThe Sun BBehind the CClouds lm

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Page 24 Thursday, March 22, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Adversing Networks of Florida Statewide advertisingone low price ank you to our media partners: WKMG Local 6 and Magic 107.7.



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407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC USPS 00-6186 Publisher statement on page 4. Thursday, March 22, 2012 50+ tax wpmobserver.com Subscribe now! Visit wpmobserver.com A drive-through coffee shop and a new bank are looking to set up shop in the Winter Park Vil lage, replacing the Borders book store that closed in August. The big change to the north west corner of the Winter Park Vil lage was approved unanimously by the Planning and Zoning Com mittee and will be up for vote at the City Commission meeting on March 26. If it goes through, it would change the shape of the only empty big box store in the Village, Winter Park Chamber of Com merce President Patrick Chapin said. I think you constantly have to look into reinventing yourself, Chapin said about shopping cen ters dealing with vacancies, par ticularly large stores. That space over there is something that could sit vacant for many years. It seems unlikely somebody could come in and use it as it is. So many of these big box stores are failing and theyre going to have to get creative with the space. Winter Park Mayor Ken Brad ley said that he was interested in seeing new tenants in the space, even in the wake of the death of the bookstore. Im excited about it, he said. I hated personally to see Borders Bankers say the success or failure of any community bank is the community in which it oper ates. The prosperity of the lo cal real estate market, business community and general work force, compared to the diversity to which each bank deals with each component, they say, usu ally combines to form a workable success/failure equation for the banks. But throw in 2,300 pages of reformed national banking regu lations, with the signing of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act in 2010 and its gradual implemen tation in 2012, along with the lo cal Central Florida economy still struggling in all three main areas, and the equation is not so clear. Community banks, much more than their national coun nity Main Street rather than cor porate Wall Street, said Donald McGowan, president and CEO of BankFIRST in Winter Park. And right now a variety of pressures are starting to weigh on community banks forming a perfect storm. With increased focus having to shift from lending to regulatory compliance following increased government revisions of commu nity banking practices, some fear the pressure will be too much for local banks to withstand. Community banks play a vital role in our economy, said Alex Sanchez, president of the Florida Bankers Association, and Im concerned that the bur den is going to keep increasing the federal government seems to be putting out more and more regulations every minute with no end in sight. Though they may be late to the banking crisis party of 2008 and 2009, community bank lead ers say the effects of the recession What is it about Winter Park that makes you smile? Whatever it is, embrace and enjoy it! Page 12 Letters to the editor Lifestyles A family hoping to get a diagnosis for their son volunteers for the MDA Muscle Walk in Maitland this month. Page 9 News The countrys largest scooter ride winds through Orlando, Baldwin Park and Winter Park on Saturday. Page 2 Calendar Central Florida Ballet presents The Enchanted Garden at Trinity Preparatory School on Saturday. Page 8 TAX DEFERREDFIXED ANNUITY RATE FOR 5 YEARS.Bob Adams 407-644-6646THE NATIONAL 5 YEAR CD RATE IS 1.34%3.35% 451 Maitland Ave, Altamonte Springs, FL 32701NEW Dermatology Ofce!407-599-SKIN (7546)*Waive co-payment up to $25 No referral needed Accepting all insurances Dr. John Cottam Dr. Ross Wheeler PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVER Commerce National Bank & Trust in Winter Park works to meet the criteria of the federal regulatory consent order issued on Jan. 24. ARCHIVE PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER The Borders bookstore in the Winter Park Village shut down in August of last year. Please see BANKS on page 3 Balancing local banking Community banks in Winter Park and Maitland struggle to meet increasing federal regulations SARAH WILSON Observer Staff Bank, cafe could replace Borders Please see COMMISSION on page 6 ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff

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Page 2 Thursday, March 22, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer 4 against breast cancer in 2006, but this is not a sad story, even if her daughter does tear up when she tells it. Knowing my mother, Robin Maynard said, if she was sit ting with us right now and I said, Mom, if you die, 45 women will be saved and their children will have their mom, she would have chosen (death). Libby Maynard lived only six weeks after receiving her diag nosis of stage IV breast cancer, but that was enough time for her daughter to learn the challenges that women with breast cancer face. Stage IV, or metastatic breast cancer, is invasive breast cancer that has spread beyond the breast and nearby lymph nodes to other organs of the body, such as the lungs, distant lymph nodes, skin, bones, liver or brain. Treatment generally includes surgery, radia tion, or both, depending on many individual factors. Chemotherapy is always recommended. There were a lot of insurance issues, Maynard said about her mother. She lost her job because of her cancer treatments, and just terrible things that had gone on. Watching what her mother went through was enough to help Maynard decide she wanted to help stage IV women, to advocate for them. So she started Libbys Legacy Breast Cancer Founda tion. Libbys Legacy provides com prehensive breast health care to the underserved Central Florida community through education, mammograms, follow-up diag nostics and Hope Coaches on the journey from diagnosis to treat ment and beyond. The services provided by the foundation evolved as Maynard learned more about the needs of the community. They include the Cancer Screening Initiative / Mammogram Access Project, which provides free mammo grams and follow up breast health services to uninsured women in the Central Florida community. We are awareness with ac tion, Maynard said. Theres no point in having awareness events if you are not going to do anything about it! What is the point of giv ing someone a free service if you are not going to help them with the rest of it? You have something abnormal. We cant help you now. That doesnt make any sense. Libbys Legacy has diagnosed 45 women and all are survivors. Im 45-0, baby! Maynard said. Im not easy to say no to. I me I dont get paid and my boss is in heaven. Libbys Legacy also helps stage IV breast cancer patients battling this disease by granting wishes in order to create cherished memo ries with loved ones through the LIVE BIG program. They assign a patient advocate and then send those stage IV patients on a weeklong trip on the Alaskan cruise that Libby and Robin Maynard had planned to take, but were unfortunately denied because of the aggressive nature of Libbys cancer. Funds for the Alaskan cruises are raised by Libbys Legacys sig nature event, Scooters 4 Hooters: Sixth Annual Breast Cancer Char ity Ride & Music Fest, which is March 24. The inaugural Scooters 4 Hooters ride took place in 2007. A goal was set for $5,000, but nearly $13,000 was raised. Since then more than $300,000 has been cancer patients on the Alaskan cruise memory trips with their families, and pay for more than 1,500 breast health services that have diagnosed breast cancers and saved lives. Ellen Stephenson, a friend of Libbys, was diagnosed in 2003 and has been through rounds and rounds of chemotherapy for the past eight years. Stephenson and the Alaska trip. That trip is such a powerful memory for me. It was something I never dreamed I would get to do, that I would get to experience something so awe inspiring, Ste phenson said. It brought me in touch with the beauty of life and helped me to go beyond my dis ease. For once I wasnt a woman in treatment; I wasnt a cancer pa tient. I was Ellen. Stephenson carried Libbys ashes with her on the cruise and spread them in a very beautiful place in Sitka, Alaska. Libby went with us, she said. SUNDAY APRIL 15TH 2PM TO 6PM 1801 W. FAIRBANKS AVE. WINTER PARK, FL 32789 For over 27 years Marjorie Myers greeted diners at her Paco's Mexican Restaurant in Winter Park with a smile and great food. To honor her memory and her commitment to community service, Pacos hosts this annual fundraiser to support the Marjorie A. Myers Memorial Scholarship Fund. Join us for this event; enjo y a special menu of some of Marjs favorite dishes, live music, raffles, a limited time MARJarita; and help give back to the community. TICKETS: $20/PERSON $5/kids under 12 IN ADVANCE LIVE MUSIC Featuring B l u e S t o n e C i r c l e $2.00 MARJaritas MARJarita FIESTA4th Annual Lack of Desire or Low Energy? George Carroll, M.D., has over 20 years ex perience in sexual medicine, and is actively involved in the following: 407-894-9959 For more information on Libbys Legacy Breast Cancer Foundation and Ellens Walk with the Angels, visit libbyslegacy.org and angelwalk. org The Sixth Annual Breast Cancer Charity Ride & Music Fest is from noon to 6 p.m. on Saturday, March 24, with the countrys largest scooter ride. There is a $30 registration fee to participate in the police-escorted ride through downtown Orlando, Baldwin Park and Winter Park at 1 p.m. To register, visit scooters4hooters.com ABOVE PHOTO BY SHARI KING THE OBSERVER Robin Maynard poses with her pink scooter at Lake Baldwin in Baldwin Park. At right, Robin poses with her late mother, Libby Maynard, to whom she dedicated Libbys Legacy Breast Cancer Foundation. Scooters SHARI KING Observer Staff Hooters The countrys largest scooter ride winds through Winter Park on Saturday to ght breast cancer

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Page 3 Thursday, March 22, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Hours: M-F 8am to 4:30pm 2315 Lee Road Winter Park, Florida 32789 Your Guiding Beacon for Quality Healthcare Harbour Private Duty Nursing, LLCSkilled Nursing Physical Therapy Occupational Therapy Companionship Home Health Aid Homemaking Flexible Schedules Free RN Assessments The Services of Harbour Private Duty Nursing provide peace of mind to loved ones, trust ofcers, guardians and physicians. Our professional team prides itself on making your life easier. We also provide in-hospital private duty care, which offers close, personal attention and reassurance in an unfamiliar and often frightening environment. Our ofce hours are Monday through Friday, 8:00 am to 4:30 pm. Our professional team is available 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. During hours when the ofce is closed and during the weekends and holidays, the on-call coordinator is available by telephone 24 hours per day.www.HarbourPrivateDutyNursing.com License # 299991382phone (407) 895-8188 fax 407-895-9339 have trickled down and are hitting them at the local level. Whether the banks are trying to success fully navigate through the crisis on their own, or with forced in tervention and supervision of the U.S. Treasury, they say theyre do Comping compliance Commerce National Bank & Trust in Winter Park was issued a regulatory consent order by the on Jan. 24. President Ray Colado says the bank has been operating within guidelines provided by the government to assure it makes it successfully through the remain der of the recession. The order, he says, mandates a roadmap of instructions for his bank to follow to get in compli ance with federal credit regula tions. Issues with the real estate market and people increasingly walking away from their mort gages, slow judicial processes and the ever-changing and burden some regulations, he said, led his bank to the stage of governmental intervention. Thats a combination that fos ters issues and thats why youre seeing so many banks have prob lems, he said. This is mak ing us re-evaluate if the risk is worth the reward and investment in many instances we might not have second guessed before. Sanchez, with the Florida Banking Association, says these sorts of governmental orders have become more and more frequent in the last three years, as commu nity banks are struggling to com ply with regulations. Colado says his bank is on its way to satisfying all chapters of the issued consent order, includ Comptroller of the Currency to help them navigate regulations and guide the board of directors in management, as well as addi tional loan personnel to oversee tomers, he said, have been alerted to the additional governmental review but should see no change in their banking experience. This is something that bank ers all over the state and the Southeast are dealing with, he its something we are going to be diligent about. Sanchez said by making banks like Colados focus on compliance over lending, though maybe with good intentions, the federal gov ernment is slowly sucking the life out of one of every communitys most important economic forces the community bank. The real job creators in any community are small businesses, and 40 percent of small business loans come from community banks these banks are out there reinvesting money back into the community, he said. But with thousands and thousands of pages of new regulations piling up, how could any small business, banking or not, survive that? Thats what a new system of checks and balances to the U.S. Currency was designed to ad dress, Acting Comptroller John Walsh told the Independent Com munity Bankers of America. In a speech to the group in March of 2011, after the implementation of the Dodd-Frank banking reforms, he told bankers he was working with them, not against them. Given the extent of our com mitment to community banking, its a matter of great concern to me when I hear, as I sometimes do, that community bankers feel the business is no longer sustain able, or worse that regula tors, including the OCC, agree and are encouraging community banks to exit the business, Walsh said. This latter point is both completely untrue, and particu larly troubling I can assure you that we at the OCC believe very strongly in the future of commu nity banks. To that end, Walsh said that his munication and feedback between banking regulators and individual banks to make the process less ob structive and more facilitative. I believe it will be important for all of us banking regulators and the consumer bureau to establish and maintain a construc tive dialogue, which we are al ready doing, Walsh said, adding that improving that communica tion will be an ongoing process that he admitted the government needs to work on. Bruce May, president and CEO of First Colony Bank of Florida headquartered in Maitland, said operations have been navigating through choppy waters since the bank opened in 2008. Since the burst of the housing bubble and the steadily sinking local economy, he said his bank has focused on conservative, they have been able to accom plish, with 2011 being their high est earnings year yet. But getting to this point hasnt been smooth sailing. Just like any small business right now, I think that there are some struggling more than oth ers theres a long way to go un til stable, he said. McGowan, with BankFIRST of Winter Park, said though his bank has faired well through the recession thus far, the timetable for total recovery, at least for com munity banking, keeps extending due to decreased loan growth, increasing government interfer ence in banking business, and the mounting pressure of new federal banking regulations. He estimates that many small community banks, in his calcula tions even up to a third of them, will be consolidated into larger ones in the next year unless some thing is done to help them deal with all of these issues, especially in monitoring the regulations. These three scenarios that are playing out right now are caus ing a lot of community banks to look at their individual viability right now, McGowan said. And a major factor theyre considering is whether they can keep up with compliance. Wine tasting in Hannibal Square sizzles BANKS | Comptroller defends banking reforms for community banks and mission to help, not hurt firms C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Dexters staffers, above, hand out samples at the Hannibal Square Wine Tasting on March 15. At top right, Congressman John Mica, second from right, poses with friends. Chamber President Patrick Chapin poses with Magic dancers.

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Page 4 Thursday, March 22, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer USPS 00-6186 ISSN 1064-3613 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835-5705 Member of: Chamber of Commerce Publisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor. Submission does not guarantee publication. Columnists opinions are made independently of the newspaper. All rights reserved. Winter Park / Maitland Observer 2012 Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster www.wpmobserver.com | Phone: 407-563-7000 | Fax: 407-563-7099 | editor@observernewspapers.com P.O Box 2426 Winter Park, FL 32790 Published Thursday, March 22, 2012 CONT ACTS Volume 24, Issue Number 12 PUBLISHER Tracy Craft 407-515-2605 tcraft@observernewspapers.com MANAGING EDITOR Jenny Andreasson 407-563-7026 editor@observernewspapers.com DESIGNER Jonathan Gallagher 407-563-7054 jgallagher@observernewspapers.com REPOR TERS Jenny Andreasson 407-563-7026 editor@observernewspapers.com Isaac Babcock 407-563-7023 isaacb@observernewspapers.com LEGALS | CLASSIFIEDS Ashley McBride legal@FLAlegals.com classieds@observernewspapers.com COPY EDITORS Isaac Babcock isaacb@observernewspapers.com Sarah Wilson COLUMNISTS Chris Jepson Jepson@MediAmerica.us Louis Roney LRoney@c.rr.com Josh Garrick joshgarrick9@gmail.com ADVER TISING SALES Linda Stern 407-563-7058 LStern@observernewspapers.com SUBSCRIPTIONS | CIRCULATION Jackie Candelaria 407-563-7013 INTERN Andy Ceballos Business Briefs Community Bulletin Artists Melbourne installation United Arts of Central Florida awarded $32,099 in artist development grants and arts adminis trator grants recently. Winter Park artist Dawn Roe will use her $2,500 UA grant to assist with completing a new three-channel video installation on the Goldelds region of Victoria that she will travel to Australia to install in the Melbourne gallery Screen Space in June. Visit dawnroe.com Student honors Crystal Anderson, of Atlanta, daughter of Rev erend Hugh Anderson of Winter Park, received a Master of Divinity from the Candler School of Theology of Emory University in Atlanta on Dec. 17. Chase Richey of Winter Park is spending the spring trimester abroad, studying art history, visual arts and Italian language in Florence, Italy. Richey is a junior managerial economics major. Teachers go abroad The English-Speaking Union of Central Florida recently awarded four scholarships to teachers to attend a two-week total immersion seminar in the British Universities Summer Scholars Program. The teachers awarded scholarships include Benjamin Fottler, who teaches English at Winter Park High School. He will attend Teach ing Shakespeare Through Performance at Shakespeares Globe Theater. Also included is Chelsea St. Clair, who teaches English language and composition and English I honors at Lake Howell High School. She will attend the University of Ox fords English Literature Program. Trip to Italy The Rollins Evening program will have a 13-day travel experience to Venice and the Veneto on Oct. 16-28. Contact Robert Lemon at rslemonjr@earthlink.net, 407-310-5378 or 407-628-8332. Join, sponsor a kickball team The Annual Friends of First Response-Maitland Kickball Fundraiser is at 1 p.m. Sunday, April 22. Six teams will play at Keller Fields. A $10 t-shirt donation is required to play on a FFR, Rotary, Holy Rollers or Little League team. Sponsors and auction items are needed. Con tact June Flowers at june@owerslabs.com Join Relay for Life The American Cancer Societys Relay for Life of Maitland is an overnight relay-style walk ing event that will take place at Orangewood Presbyterian Church on April 27-28. Opening ceremonies will take place at 6 p.m. on Friday and closing ceremonies are at noon on Satur day. The event will also honor cancer survi vors with a special lap and survivor dinner on Friday night. Visit relayforlife.org/maitland or email maitland.relay@yahoo.com Send submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com Holler Drivers Mart kicked off its fth year of hon oring community heroes by saluting the Christian Service Center at the Orlando Predators home opener. Led by Executive Director Robert Stuart (pictured), the Center works tirelessly to combat homelessness and poverty and restore hope. Former Orange County Commissioner Bill Se gal, of Winter Park, closed on the acquisition of 72 prime remaining residential lots in Martins Grove in Tavares from Centex/Pulte on March 7. Segal is also actively involved in a redevelopment project in College Park, as well as general real estate and private mortgage lending. Easter Seals received a $5,000 Quality of Life grant from the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foun dation. Jacob, Sherkman & Associates, LLC recently leased 2,250 square feet at 479 Montgomery Place in Altamonte Springs. Susan Aloisio PA and Frank Filippelli of Southern Realty Enterprises Inc. in Longwood represented the owners and tenants on the two-year lease. NAI Realvest negotiated a new lease agreement for 2,000 square feet of industrial space at 631 Progress Way at Monroe CommerCenter South in Sanford. Michael Heidrich, a principal in the rm, brokered the transaction representing the landlord, Maitland-based COP-Monroe, LLC and the tenant Half Full Coffee, Inc. doing business as Twisted Cuban, a local mobile Cuban cuisine kitchen. Cuhaci & Peterson Architects Engineers Plan ners, based in Orlandos Baldwin Park, completed design work to build 22 new Leslies Poolmart, Inc. interiors in 12 states. NAI Realvest negotiated a new ofce lease agreement for 5,678 square feet at 2699 Lee Road in Winter Park for HealthCare Scouts, Inc., a nationwide recruiting rm specializing in per manent placement of licensed health care profes sionals. Sandals Realty of North Orlando, LLC is proud to announce the addition of John Snyder to the team. John was formerly with Exit Realty Pre ferred in Lake Mary. Robert Stuart Festival winners The 2012 Best of Show, a $10,000 award, at the Winter Park Sidewalk Art Festival went to John Costin, of Tampa, (at right) for Large Florida Birds. The Morse Museum Award for a Distinguished Work of Art, $2,500, went to Jim and Shirl Par mentier, of Mars Hill, N.C., for Greek Wall Vase. Four Winter Park artists won awards, including John Whipple for sculpture, Patricia Karnes for jewelry, Jeff League for mixed me dia and Edson Campos for drawing and graphics. Visit wpsaf.org Student excels Rollins College junior Lucas Her nandez was awarded the Florida Campus Compacts 2011 Excel lence in Service Award. He is cofounder of NextStep, a homeless advocacy organization, and has helped the Making Lives Better or ganization at Rollins, which helps people in Nepal get clean drinking water, supplies, etc. App class Echo Interaction Group a mobile application development and branding organization hosted 24 fourth-graders from the Jewish Academy of Or lando at its new ofce at The Plaza in downtown Orlando. Executives from Echo including CEO and founder Carlos Carbonell and project manager Jean Mastriano walked the students through the mobile application development process and answered questions about everything from who conceptualizes ideas for apps to Angry Birds. The kids tried out an Echo-developed game, Tilt Fishing, on iPads, and declared their intent to work for Echo when theyre grown up. Stop famine On Feb. 24, 41 high school students at Trinity Preparatory School in Winter Park stopped eating to raise awareness about world hunger. The project, called the 30 Hour Famine, is a fast held by World Vision in which students around the country fast while raising money for food for the needy. The students spent the night on the oor of the schools gymnasium, and learned what it is like to really have nothing: no home, no food and only what can t in a backpack.

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Page 5 Thursday, March 22, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer The Lady Tars are making a name for themselves on the court in the NCAA Division II championships, entering the Elite Eight on a string of big wins. Out of 303 teams to start the sea son, the Tars have won their way into Speaking to Rollins Sports, Head Coach Glen Wilkes Jr. said that the Tars struggled in practice heading into the Elite Eight tournament, but that they were setting new goals to move higher than they ever have be fore. Our goal is the next game, Wilkes said. We put all our efforts into that and let it fall as it may. But the way the schedule has fallen this year, we feel like we can play with anybody. The last seven games have been a whirlwind, with the Tars blowing through teams to end the regular sea son, then through increasingly tough opponents in the Sunshine State Con ference Tournament and the NCAA Division II South Region Tournament. Four of those games have been de cided by four points or less. The Tars won all of them. On March 20, in the regional cham pionship game, the Tars watched Val dosta State rip out a 7-point lead that Thats when the Tars went on a tear, helped by the unlikely hero Kourtnie Berry, who came off the bench to add 11 points during a rally that gave Rol lins the lead. By the second half the Tars were point gap to slip near the end. In the game Ashley Jones led with 14 points, though she only hit 23 percent of her Moore helped out with 10 points and The Tars faced Lander at press time on Tuesday night with hopes of a shot day. With two wins, they could be in the national championship game at 8 p.m. Friday. Check RollinsSports.com Knights fall in NIT After a string of ups and downs Invitational Tournament appearance, the Knights mens basketball team fell 81-56 at Drexel, ending their postsea son run. For the Knights, who were plagued by poor shooting compared to the Dragons, a low score again hampered their chances. Keith Clanton led the team with 12 points, which may be the lowest game high for any Knight this season. Meanwhile Drexel shot 50.9 percent overall, hitting nearly half of its 3-pointers. The loss ended the Knights sea son, and ended the career of charis matic team captain A.J. Rompza, who graduates as a senior. His longtime teammate P.J. Gaynor also graduates after the season. AGIS Florida Agency, LLC Arbors on Aragon Condominium Assoc. Bay Hill Jewelers on Park Bella Centra Care Copytronics Kendall & Kendall Laurence C. Hames, Esq. Levine Napier Insurance Lighten Up! Craig Ludin Mennello Museum of American Art P.F. Chang's China Bistro Joseph Regner See, Inc. Sodexo at Rollins College The Avenue Network, Inc. The Spice and Tea Exchange Your Orlando Mortgage Dean Cannon Center for Independent Living Blair J. Culpepper Eileen Fisher Hannibal Square Association, Inc. Latham, Shuker, Eden & Beaudine, LLP Betty Jo MacKenzie Matthew Roberts, Inc. Mears Transportation Group Orlando Ale House Winter Park Mary Rumberger S & W Kitchens, Inc. Shutts & Bowen, LLP The Westchester Assisted Living Residence The Winter Park Playhouse Track Shack of Orlando Vestal & Wiler, CPA's Winter Park Concours, LLC City Communications Commercial Business Finance Moore Stephens Lovelace, P.A. Panera Bread Paychex Sprinkles Cakes Absolute Photography Adventist Health System Brion Price Photography David Lundberg Building & Roofing Contractor Florida Frame House and Gallery Follett Bookstore at Rollins College Orange County Supervisor of Elections DownEast Orvis Martin M. Prague, CPA Park Maitland School Timothy's Gallery Regions Bank DexOne Florida Gas Transmission Co. Best Western Mt. Vernon Inn Denotes Park Avenue Area Association membership Wednesday, April 18 5:00 8:00 p.m. Winter Park Farmers Market 200 W. New England Ave. Enjoy unlimited food and beverage samples from more than 40 restaurants and caterers, plus liv e entertainment and more! All Inclusive Tickets: $40 Chamber Members (in advance) $45 Non-Members $45 Everyone at the door Order tickets at www.winterpark.org or call (407) 644-8281 Wildcats blast off ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff The Wildcats are back to their winning ways after a pair of losses last week. They picked up two straight blowout wins against Colonial to stay atop the district ladder and give them momentum heading into a match up against Freedom at press time. Winter Park (10-4, 6-1) teed off on Colonials pitching March 16 on Colonials home diamond, blowing them out with 11 runs, while the Wildcats pitching shut them down with no runs allowed. Two days later, it was more of the same for the Wild cats, who took their two-game series against the Grena diers (3-9, 3-5) back home and again blew the game open quickly with a series of rallies. By the time the game was over, the Wildcats were up 9-1, thanks again to stellar pitching. After a showdown against Freedom at press time, the Wildcats will take the long trip to face Bartram Trail (3-8, 0-4) on March 27. The next day, theyll drive to Stanton (9-3, 2-2) in Jacksonville for what looks to be a much tougher showdown. The Blue Devils are undefeated at home, winning a recent game against First Coast Chris tian 18-1. Eagles grounded After a three-game win streak saw some hot bats for the Eagles, a pair of losses has cooled things down a bit. season against Seabreeze on March 15. Four days later theyd fallen to Ocoee in a narrow 3-2 defeat. They faced Lake Highland Prep at press time Wednes day, and will take on Freedom (310, 1-5) in a back-toback series, both at Freedom on Thursday and Friday. Saints shocked After opening the season with only one loss in the March 14 by a narrow 4-3 score. Now the Saints (11-2, 5-0) are looking to rebuild some momentum heading Theyll travel to Bishop Moore for a 7 p.m. Thursday start, then to the Foundation Academy for a 4:30 p.m. batter up Friday. PHOTO BY JIM HOGUE ROLLINS ATHLETICS Rollins Colleges womens basketball team poses with the NCAA regional championship trophy. Lady Tars in Elite Eight ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff

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Page 6 Thursday, March 22, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer On March 15, under the aus pices of the Bach Festival Society Guest Artist Series, the Takcs Quartet plus a piano played a varied concert of Schubert, Ravel and Shostakovich in Tiedtke Hall at Rollins College. Opening with a familiar and amiable Schubert song melody, the quartet charmed the audience in the composers Quartettsatz in C minor, a one-movement work Maurice Ravels String Quartet in F major provided an inventive workout in the pentatonic scale. Chordal beauty was present galore in this piece, which never ventures into high dramatics, but gives the hearer plenty of innova tive glimpses of delicate fancy along the way. The quartet was augmented in the concerts second half by rick Ohlsson, who played the keyboard part in Dmitri Shostak ovichs Piano Quintet in G minor. contains many references to Shos takovichs 5th Symphony, and is quite often a loud, bangy, ex clamation of simple high drama. is clearly evident in both the cate ornaments in the piece. The Shostakovich Quintet ended in a quiet, sweet, good-natured mood by tying all loose ends peacefully together in G major. The evenings playing, both from strings and piano, was little short of sensational, and left no doubt in the audiences mind that were cooperating to create an unforgettable occurrence. Its TAX time. Appointments Available 7 Days a Week!Tax Form Processing LLC2400 N Forsyth Rd., Suite 101 Orlando, FL 32807Tel: (407) 657-6336www.TaxFormProcessing.com Proudly Serving the Orlando Area for 17 years! Scan QR Code Upcoming concert: Bach Festival Society presents Chanticleer, known around the world as an orchestra of voices for the seamless blend of its 12 male voices, at the Knowles Memorial Chapel from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, April 15. Visit bachfestivalorida.org to purchase the tickets, which range from $20 to $40 a limited amount are available. Takcs Quartet plays at Rollins LOUIS RONEY Observer Staff COMMISSION | Coffee shop coming in may be Starbucks C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Artist Aaron Hequembourg poses at the Winter Park Sidewalk Art Festival on March 18 with his work inspired by the relics of plantation farms on his familys property in Georgia. A weekend of art leave, but I think itll be a great addition to the Vil W eathering the storm Though the former Borders location has re mained empty for nine months, Winter Park Com missioner Steven Leary said its more a sign of a struggling business model than harbinger of Winter Parks economy. The Village is pretty healthy overall but I think [book selling] was a business model that was the by Amazon, Leary said. The big booksellers are He said that Winter Park has weathered the retail downturn much better than most cities. I think from a regional perspective were prob ably in the best shape of anybody with regards to vacancies, Leary said. Our core business district is under 3 percent (vacancy rate), which is fantastic compared to our neighbors. Minimal impact According to plans drafted by Planning Direc tor Jeff Briggs, the proposed new businesses, which about the same footprint as the 25,000-square-foot Borders store. But they would also have less inter nal square feet, totaling 13,874 square feet, and giv ing a net gain of 44 required spaces compared to the Borders. Though the coffee restaurant hasnt been named, the proposed drive-through indicates that it could be a Starbucks. The Starbucks at 3011 E. Colonial Drive was used by Avcon Engineering to study traf Those two potential new tenants are contingent on the plans being approved by the Commission at the March 26 meeting and a subsequent vote. The vote would grant conditional-use approval to change the way the current property is used, paving the way for the new development. Chapin said that he looks forward to some new faces in the old space. I dont know of too many people who are for big empty eyesores, he said. PHOTO COUR TESY OF ELLEN APPEL The Takcs Quartet plus a piano played a varied concert of Schubert, Ravel and Shostakovich in Tiedtke Hall at Rollins College March 15.

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Page 7 Thursday, March 22, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer March 26 City Commission meeting topics of interest There will be a City Commis sion meeting on Monday, March 26, at 3:30 p.m., at the Rachel D. Murrah Civic Center located at 1050 W. Morse Blvd. Below are a few topics of interest: Mayors Report Appointment of Wired for Winter Park Task Force City Managers Report Strategic Planning Session agenda discussion Non-action Items Annexation agreement for Ravaudage (Home Acres) Consent Agenda Approve the minutes of March 12. Approve various purchases, bids and contracts (a complete list can be found at www.cityofwin terpark.org > Government > City Commission > Agenda Packets). Approve the amendment of the development agreement and reexecution of the air space agree ment for the 444 W. New England Ave. and 362 S. Pennsylvania Ave. buildings. Approve the budget adjust ment of $15,000 to appropriate overtime reimbursement for po lice departments participation in the Immigration and Customs En forcement (ICE) Task Force. Approve the budget adjust ment of $6,000 to appropriate fees ing for that purpose. Action Items Requiring Discussion Fee waiver request for the Cre Auction Approval of four objectives designed to set the agenda for the Central Florida Urban Land In stitute Technical Assistance Panel (TAP) 2-day workshop for the West Fairbanks area Public Hearings Adoption of fee schedule effec tive Sunday, April 1 Request of Winter Park Town Center LTD: Conditional-use ap proval to build a bank and new restaurant with drive-thru as a redevelopment of the former Bor ders Books at the Winter Park Vil lage, 500 N. Orlando Ave. QUASIJUDICIAL PROCEEDING Resolution Executing a Public Transportation Joint Participation Agreement with the state of Flor ida Department of Transporta tion for artwork that is procured, designed, manufactured and in stalled at the Winter Park Train Station/Amtrak Station Ordinance Amending Chap ter 22 to incorporate the Florida Building Code with certain ad ministrative and technical amend ments (1) City Commission Reports Commissioner Leary Commissioner Sprinkel Commissioner Cooper Commissioner McMacken Landscape code enforcement Mayor Bradley Complete management plan review, including current con tracted services, etc. full agenda and information on www.cityofwinterpark.org and by clicking on Government > City Commission > Packets. Click It or Ticket Saving lives and increasing belt use The Winter Park Police Depart ment is joining with other state and highway safety advocates across the country to help save more lives by strongly enforcing seat belt laws around the clock, but especially at night. The Click It or Ticket enforcement mobilization in Win ter Park began on Sunday, March 18, and will run through Saturday, March 31. Nationally, 61 percent of the 10,647 passenger vehicle occu pants who were killed in motor (6 p.m. to 5:59 a.m.) were not wearing their seat belts at the time of the fatal crash, compared to 42 percent during the daytime hours. Motorists should buckle up ev ery time they go out, both day and night. Law enforcement agencies across the country are prepared to ticket anyone not buckled upno warnings and no excuses. Click It or Ticket. City celebrates Florida Bicycle Month with Bike from Park to Park The city of Winter Park sup ports March as Florida Bicycle Month and will celebrate by join ing the citys Pedestrian & Bicycle Advisory Board to host the th annual Bike from Park to Park on Friday, March 23, at 8 a.m. The scenic bike ride will begin at Cen tral Park West Meadow located at the corner of Morse Boulevard and New York Avenue. The ride, which is about 3.5 miles, will take cyclists through Lake Island Park to Mead Botanical Garden, by Azalea Lane Recreation Center and back to Central Park West Meadow, where refreshments will be served. Bike from Park to Park supports the mission to promote a viable and safe pedes trianand bicycle-friendly infra structure. Millions of Americans engage in bicycling because it is a viable form of transportation, an excel vides quality family recreation. The city of Winter Parks Green Local Government initiative is an environmental action agenda designed to transform Winter Park into one of the most con servational cities in America by encouraging environmentally friendly lifestyles through alter native transportation modes, such as bicycling. Investing in road improve ments such as bicycle lanes, routes, off-road trails and parking to enable safe access for all us ers are all ways the city encour ages bicycling. Bike from Park to Park is an additional way to encourage and promote alternate forms of transportation. Those interested in participat ing in this exciting, green event are asked to please RSVP via email to trafficguy@cityofwinterpark.org or by calling 407-599-3233. 58th annual Easter Egg Hunt The City of Winter Parks 58th annual Easter Egg Hunt will be held on Saturday, April 7, in beau tiful Central Park West Meadow. as much excitement and laughs for the adults as it will for the kids. The hunt will begin promptly ing signal. Children with special needs are also encouraged to join in the fun. More than 10,000 stuffed eggs will be placed throughout Central Park. As always, children who come up empty handed will still be able to enjoy special treats at the designated area. Winter Parks annual Easter Egg Hunt is the citys oldest com munity event. Grandparents are now bringing the third generation of children to hunt for eggs and fun is bound to be had by all. Visit www.cityofwinterpark.org, nd us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter. Almost a year ago the U.S. En vironmental Protection Agency (EPA) adopted a law that estab lished Numeric Nutrient Criteria (NNC) for all lakes and springs within the state of Florida. These criteria set very stringent phos phorous and nitrogen limits that all governing bodies would be required to meet by the spring of 2012 to comply with federal standards. Since the adoption of these rules, local public and private organizations have been racing to propose more practical replacement standards designed to achieve balanced water qual logistical strain. Earlier this month, the Florida Legislature approved proposed draft replacement standard from the Florida Department of Envi ronmental Protection (FDEP) de signed to override EPAs adopted criteria. The EPA is currently reviewing these rule changes to determine if FDEPs standards are an acceptable substitute. We tion from EPA will be made by the summer of 2012. To the average citizen living in Maitland, surface water quality may seem like a foreign concern that they have no tangible connec tion to. However, most readers will be surprised to know that Mait impacted by those living upland than actual lakefront residents. Unlike sewer systems in the New England area that mix stormwater with sanitary waste for processing or disposal, Floridas stormwater infrastructure is completely inde pendent and relies on gravity to carry rainwater to low points such as lakes and streams. Every single inlet or drain within the city, no matter how far away from natural water it may seem, will eventu ally drain to one of the Maitlands 22 lakes. While rainwater is not typically a source of pollutants, the materials that it collects on its journey downstream can cause lakes. Grease, garbage and even soil are common visual nuisances, but the most harmful element that the Stormwater and Lakes Management Division struggles to remove is excess nutrients. Unnaturally, increased dissolved phosphorous and nitrogen can turn a balanced and healthy lake into a water body ridden with al Now that we have explained how all residents contribute to the citys surface water quality, we need to understand the most effective ways to prevent the pol lutants from entering Maitlands stormwater infrastructure. There are numerous Best Management Practices (BMPs) that individual homeowners can adopt to become good aquatic stewards. The fol lowing is a quick list of dos and donts: DONT dump old chemicals such as paint or solvents into storm drains. DONT blow leaves and grass clippings into the street. DONT use fertilizer contain ing phosphorous unless you meet the countys allotted exemptions. DO wash your vehicle in your yard instead of driveway to pre ing into a nearby storm drain. DO pick up after your pets when going for a walk. DO blow all yard debris and leaf litter into your yard for prop er collection and off-site disposal. The city of Maitland has adopt ed a number of local ordinances to enforce these BMPs, but if you do see someone violating any of these standards or if you would like guidance regarding addi tional BMPs that can be practiced, please contact Maitlands Storm water and Lakes Management Di vision at 407-539-6203. Marissa Williams, Stormwa ter and Lakes Management coor dinator City Council M eeting of March 26 City Council meets the second and fourth Mondays of the month at 6:30 p.m. in the Council Cham bers. The next meeting is sched uled for March 26 in the Council Chambers, 1776 Independence Lane. Below are items that will be addressed at that meeting. Special Presentations: Proclamation Sexual Assault Awareness Month Proclamation Maitland Pub lic Library Month Municipal Park Paula Rue, Vice Chair Parks & Recreation Advisory Board Enzian Florida Film Festi val Tallahassee Session Update Louis Rotundo Public Hearings: Ordinance Creating the Downtown Maitland Zoning Dis trict Ordinance Rezone Properties within the Downtown Maitland Zoning District Consent Agenda: Approve Council Minutes of March 12 Approve Workshop Minutes of March 5 Receive Senior Advisory Board Minutes of Nov. 21 Contract Chippewa Trail Wa ter Main Joint Participation Agreement Sun Rail Station Art in Transit Decision Items: Appointments Personnel Board (2) Request Additional Funding for Littlejohn Engineering Associ ates Additional Funding for Police Dept Chamber Art Festival Re quested by Councilman Bonus Discussion Items: Consideration for Preparation of a Mining Agreement & Proj ect Funding Schedule Council/Library Board Workshop Comments from the Commu nity March 13 Art & History As sociation Workshop Please visit www.itsmymait land.com for the complete agenda and approved meeting minutes. www.gulfstatescu.org 407-831-8844A Refreshing Alternative to Conventional Banking.9405 S. Highway 17-92 Maitland, FL 32751 Maitland City Talk BY HOWARD SCHIEFERDECKER MAYOR Why do we care about surface water quality? Winter Park City Talk BY RAND Y KNIGHT CITY MANAGER

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Page 8 Thursday, March 22, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer MARCH 22 The Goldenrod Chambers Presi dents Luncheon is at the Goldenrod Station from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Thursday, March 22. Single tickets are $25 each. Call 407-677-5980. Winter Park Institute presents photo journalist, lmmaker and educator Ed Kashi at 7 p.m. on Thursday, March 22, at Rollins College, Bush Science Center. Its free. Visit rollins.edu/wpi Join the head and neck cancer spe cialists from The Ear, Nose, Throat and Plastic Surgery Associates as they conduct free head and neck cancer risk assessments at the YMCA Crosby Wellness Center, 2005 Mizell Ave. in Winter Park, from 1 to 4 p.m. on Thursday, March 22. Call 954-914-3950. The Jewish Community Center of Greater Orlando will be hosting an event titled On The Catwalk 3 from 6 to 9 p.m. on March 22 at the Heaven Event Center. The cost is $60; $50 for JCC members; $36 for seniors/students. Contact Julie Varkonyi at 407-387-5330 or at ju liev@orlandojcc.org One Senior Place at 715 Douglas Ave. in Altamonte Springs will have a Community Open House celebration from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. on Thurs day, March 22. Visit www.OneSenior Place.com or call 407-949-6733. MARCH 23 The next Cornerstone Hospice Vol unteer Training will be held from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. each day Friday, March 23. This is a 16-hour certi cation, so plan to attend both train ing days. It will be at the Cornerstone Hospice ofces, 8009 S. Orange Ave., in Orlando. Please pre-register by calling 1-800-503-5756. Susan Saladoff will discuss her docu mentary, Hot Coffee, at Rollins College from 10 a.m. to noon on Fri day, March 23, at Room 114 170 W. Fairbanks Bldg., Rollins College. The documentary reveals what really hap pened to Stella Liebeck, the woman who spilled coffee on herself in 1992 and sued fast food chain McDonalds. The event is free. MARCH 24 Wickets to Fair Trade: Croquet Tournament a croquet fundraising event for Ten Thousand Villages of Winter Park, is Saturday, March 24, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of the Caza Feliz. Teams of two are allowed to compete. The event is free with a contribution to Ten Thousand Vil lages and prizes will be given. To register, please email Colin Meyers at colin.s.myers@gmail.com or visit the Fundrazr tab on the Facebook Page. The Sixth Annual Breast Cancer Charity Ride & Music Fest is from noon to 6 p.m. on Saturday, March 24, with the countrys largest scoot er ride through downtown Orlando, Baldwin Park and Winter Park starting at 1 p.m. at Lake Eola. There will be live music performances. Visit scoot ers4hooters.com She may be turning 110 on Saturday, March 24, but Ruth Leiber is young at heart. Easter Seals invites you to celebrate this momentous occasion with Ruth on Friday at 2 p.m. with a birthday party at their adult day cen ter, Day Break, 2010 Mizell Avenue, in Winter Park. MARCH 25 The Maitland Civic Center is hosting a family reunion from 2 to 6 p.m. on Sunday, March 25. Its the 47th anni versary of the building. There will be live entertainment by Tir na Greine School of Irish Dance and more. The MCC will provide burgers, hot dogs and fried chicken and drinks. Please bring a side dish to share with 20. A cash donation will be accepted in stead of a side dish. There will also be a best dessert contest. Call 407376-3915. MARCH 27 The Judges of the Ninth Judicial Cir cuit will hold sessions for citizens wanting to learn about the judicial system. Inside the Courts is a se ries presented by judges that provides participants with a look at our judicial system and an opportunity to ask questions about our courts. The event will take place from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. on the following dates: Tuesday, March 27, Tuesday, April 3, Tuesday, April 10, Tuesday, April 17. It will be held at the Jury Assembly Room of the Orange County Courthouse, 425 N. Orange Ave., in Orlando. Seating is limited, so register online at NinthCir cuit.org or by calling 407-836-0517. MARCH 28 On March 28, all area Jersey Mikes restaurants will donate 50 per cent of the days sales to Give Kids The World. Visit tinyurl.com/Jerseymikes-subs MARCH 29 There will be an energy conserva tion program hosted by Winter Park on Thursday, March 29. There are two sessions: one from 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. for commercial custom ers, and one from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. for residential customers. The event is free to Winter Park utility customers, but attendees must register by Fri day, March 23. Call 407-599-3285, or visit usgbc-fgc.org/WinterParkBiz (commercial customers) or usgbcfgc.org/WinterParkHomes (residential customers). Visit wpmobserver.com/events for more details. Send submissions to editor@ observernewspapers.com Saturday, March 24, 2012 1 5 p.m. Winter Park Civic Center 1050 Morse Blvd. Winter Park, FL 32789 Tickets $5 ADVANCE Or$7 DOOR $5 SENIORS (AT DOOR) (Children Under 3 FREE) JOIN US FOR: Create Your Own Sundae, Ice Cream Floats, Italian Ice, Celebrity Servers, Face Painting, Cake Walk, Games, Silent Auction, Door Prizes and more! Calendar Circus of the Surreal The Art & History Museums Maitland hosts Participation: Circus of the Surreal, at 5:30 p.m. on Saturday, March 24, at the A&Hs Maitland Art Center, 231 W. Packwood Ave. in Maitland. Tickets are $90 for A&H members and $100 for nonmembers. Visit ArtandHistory.org Laurelton Hall talk Architectural historian Richard Guy Wilson, one of todays most noted American scholars in the elds of architecture and deco rative arts, provides his insights into Laurelton Hall at 2:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 28. Admission is free. It is being held at in the Morse Museums Jeannette G. and Hugh F. McKean Pavilion, 161 W. Canton Ave. in Winter Park. Enchanted ballet At 7 p.m. on Saturday, March 24, the Central Florida Ballet Studio Company presents The Enchanted Garden & Various Excerpts, a performance featuring the full-length ballet of Le Corsaire among other ballet excerpts. Prices for ages 11 and older are $20 in advance and $25 regular price, and for ages 10 and younger are $8 in advance and $10 regular price. It is being held at Trinity Pre paratory School, 5700 Trinity Prep Lane, in Winter Park. Call 407-849-9948 or visit centraloridaballet.com New Hope fundraiser L & J Accessories will be hosting a jewelry fundraising event from noon to 4 p.m. on March 24 at 100 Candace Drive in Maitland. The proceeds benet New Hope for Kids. Call 407-671-0111.

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Page 9 Thursday, March 22, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Lifestyles Jace Pitre is probably one of the sweet est 2-year-olds youll ever meet. No matter what hes doing, be it curiously going after a bit of paper his mom has left in his reach, petting his puppies or holding on to his favorite little yellow Frisbee, if he catches your eye the one thing you can count on him doing is offering up the biggest smile he can. For Jace, who has an undiagnosed muscle disease, this is the best way he can commu nicate and interact with the world around him. While he is 2 years old, his muscles arent strong enough to let him jet around the house, hop on a swing in the park or form words yet. If you ask his mom how hes like any other kid his age, shell tell you frankly that skill hes learned and mischievously and happily roll to whatever he wants to exam coos. Physically and mentally, he seems more like a baby than a toddler. boyfriend, James Pitre, experienced a com pletely normal pregnancy. But one month after Jace was born, they noticed he was torticollis, which is shortening of the neck muscles, and hypotonia, a lack of muscle ing has come up positive, and the family are like muscular dystrophy, but he doesnt have that disease. Pitre have learned to cope and move for ward so they can help Jace be the best he can be. I never thought this would happen, but its a road that were traveling and I dont have a problem traveling down it, Pitre said. I see a light at the end of the tunnel. Two years ago we looked at our son and want perfect, everybody wants perfect and now I look at my son two years later and I realized he is perfect; if anything hes opened up our eyes to what a real problem is and to what real true kindness is. Seeing kindness ness of strangers. People theyve never met have sent supplies and money to help Jace only because the family expressed need. Now the Altamonte Springs family is participating in the MDA Muscle Walk, which will be held at Lake Lily in Maitland. her role would get. Team Jace and the Jol ing money, with $3,921 as of March 20. For their family, this experience has been one that has changed their lives. Its put a little control back in their hands to make a differ ence, and to help Jace and others like him. It brought motivation to our family and All the money raised will go to local chairs and send kids to a special camp. for the time Jace can go to a summer camp made for him. Walk organizer Brandi Rice said Team Jace has inspired others to work harder. It means everything to these families, Rice said. Help from students Jace has also received help from some college students. Liani Steenekamp, Jaces occupational therapist and Keiser Univer sity instructor, has had her students create a piece of equipment to help him get in the crawling position so he can learn to do it. to have her students build more learning and therapy tools for Jace. Steenekamp is also his occupational therapist and has helped him learn to hold his head up and gain strength in his core. She said Jace works so hard at therapy with ing will shorten and hell make noises be her keep hope for her son. That want to do things makes all of the please you. And even though it may not seem like much, the progress Jace has made is a seri ous achievement. A little step is actually a big thing for him, Steenekamp said. And all this help couldnt be more im portant to their family. Jace only gets about from what he needs and many kids get. But they just dont have the money, and insur ance only pays so much. res said. She lives her life for Jace, but she hopes for a time when he can get better, and she doesnt have to think and move and worry for him every moment of his life, when she can go back to school to be a nurse. She gets sad sometimes, but when she looks at Jace, it changes everything. If he is this happy, I dont have a right to be sad. The MDA Muscle Walk is 8 a.m. Saturday, March 31, at Lake Lily Park in Maitland. For more information and to sign up, scan the QR code with your smart phone or visit tinyurl.com/ MDAmusclewalklakelily. To help Team Jace and the Jollyhoppers click on their team name. Anyone is welcome to join the Jollyhoppers team on the walk. TOP AND BOTTOM PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER RIGHT PHOTO BY BRITTNI JOHNSON THE OBSERVER Courtney Gavares and her 2-year-old son, Jace Pitre, laugh during a fundraising event Sunday. At right, Jace and Courtney pose with Jaces father, James Pitre. Hoping for a cure While an Altamonte Springs family hopes to get a diagnosis for their son, they raise money for a Maitland muscular dystrophy event BRITTNI JOHNSON Observer Staff

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Page 10 Thursday, March 22, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Family Calendar Nicholas Toomey remembers a time when he would drop his pen nies into the Ronald McDonald bounce off the pile of change that would go toward a cause he really didnt know much about. I think about when I used to eat at McDonalds and play the little penny game, but I never re alized how it affected people to get that little bit and how much it counts, he said. So now its coming back to us, and it helps so much. Nicholas and his wife Jessica just how much that small change adds up, and how it helps those in need. The couple began staying at the ity program that provides a homeaway-from-home for families of children being treated at local hos pitals and medical facilities, after their 7-week-old son was born prematurely at 1 pound 8 ounces, and they could not afford a hotel We would not be able to keep our head above water if we did not have this opportunity, Nich olas said. Its amazing that its so close to the hospital they really dont leave you needing anything here, they pretty much meet our needs; we couldnt ask for more. Toomey, who is currently sta tioned on Patrick Air Force Base, has helped comfort them in many ways. Its hard enough to worry about the baby, he said. But if we had to worry about our hotel room every night and traveling to the hospital wed be in trou ble. 1,470 families last year, and with out help from the community and fundraisers, the charity would be unable to meet the needs of fami lies such as the Toomeys. The charity is continuing the tradition of fun to raise money for event on Saturday, March 24, at Social are so important because 80 percent of the charitys budget comes from the community. Without the communitys support we wouldnt be able to partnering with the community to help give families the comfort they need during stressful times makes it all worth it. Im just convinced that when youre in a medical crisis your threshold of stress is maxed out, so to add any little bit to that, its the home that we can offer them that has the simple things in life that you need just alleviates all those little stresses that these fam ilies dont need. home is just one less thing the Toomeys now have to worry about as they wait patiently to bring their new baby home. They now know how much those small pennies can make a difference in someones life. Its one of those things where when you think about these events to raise money, Jessica said, before you probably wouldnt have given it a lot of thought. But once youre in this situa tion you realize that other people like us have this kind of help avail able when they need it. And you want to pass it along to whoevers going to come along next and be in your situation. Classic Iron Beds AND Designer Linens 407-982-4319All iron & brass beds are made in the USA and guaranteed for 2 generations The Ice Cream Social to benet Ronald McDonald House Charities of Central Florida is Saturday, March 24, from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. at the Winter Park Civic Center, 1050 W. Morse Blvd., Winter Park. The event includes creating your own sundae, celebrity servers, face painting, prizes, games and more. Tickets are $5 in advance, $7 at the door. For more information or to purchase tickets, visit www. rnhccf.org and click on Whats Happening or call 407-677-1552. There are two Ronald McDonald House locations in Orlando: 2201 Alden Road, Orlando, near Florida Hospital and 1630 Kuhl Ave., Orlando, near Orlando Health. Call 407-8986127 or 407-581-1289 respectively for more information. PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Jessica and Nicholas T oomey, at top, are staying in the Ronald McDonald House while their premature baby receives care at nearby Florida Hospital. It helps so much, he said. A shelter during the storm KRISTY VICKERY Observer Staff The fourth annual Bike from Park to Park at 8 a.m. on Friday, March 23, will begin at Central Park West Meadow, located at the corner of Morse Boulevard and New Y ork Avenue. The ride, which is about 3.5 miles, will take cy clists through Lake Island Park to Mead Botanical Garden, by Azalea Lane Recreation Center and back to Central Park West Meadow. Those interested in participating are asked to RSVP via email to trafficguy@cityofwinterpark.org or by calling 407-599-3233. The 35th Annual Winter Park Road Race 10k & 2 Mile is Satur day, March 24, at 7 a.m. in down town Winter Park. Visit trackshack. com or call 407-898-1313. An Ice Cream Social to benet Ronald McDonald House Chari ties of Central Florida is 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, March 24, at Winter Park Civic Center, 1050 W. Morse Blvd. in Winter Park. Tickets are $5 in advance; $7 at the door. Visit www.rmhccf.org Seminole County Music Together invites parents or other care givers and their infant, toddler, and preschool children to attend free sample classes March 2024. Call 407-844-4414 to reserve your spot at 9:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. on Thursday at the Winter Park Wedding Chapel or 9:30 a.m. on Saturday at the University Per forming Arts Center, 160 Alexan dria Blvd. in Oviedo. Story time at Leu Gardens is at 10 a.m. on Monday, April 2. The Orange County Library Systems storytelling program comes to Leu Gardens the rst Monday of each month, excluding holidays. Visit leugardens.org The Art and History Museums Maitland presents its Spring Se ries of Art Classes, beginning on April 2. Participants can choose from an array of creative classes, all instructed by professional art ists and educators. Register at ArtandHistory.org. Y ou can also register by phone at 407-5392181 extension 265 or in person. At 10:30 a.m. each Tuesday, the Maitland Public Library hosts pre school story and craft time. At 10:30 a.m. each Thursday, it hosts baby time stories and activity. At 4 p.m. each Thursday, it hosts Reading Buddies for kindergarten through fth-grade. No registra tion necessary. Call 407-6477700. The Florida Symphony Y outh Or chestra announces auditions for the 2012 2013 Concert Sea son. Praised as one of the top youth orchestras in the country, the FSYO seeks dedicated, talent ed young musicians from around Central Florida to join one of their four orchestras. Auditions are to be held in late May. Visit fsyo.org/ auditions.htm Send submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com

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Page 11 Thursday, March 22, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Orlando employees raise $445,695 for Florida charities Thanks to the generosity of city of Orlando employees, Mayor Buddy Dyer made check presentations totaling $445,695 in donations to 464 charitable organizations. More than 1,200 Orlando city employees partici pated, surpassing the $400,000 goal. Mayor Dyer said, I was extremely impressed by the dedi cated hard-working members of our city family. Through their monetary contributions, our em ployees are helping address some of the most critical issues facing included donations to Orlandos United Way, among others. March 21-April 22 Red The 2010 Tony award-winning play for Red, an often-dis art painter Mark Rothko, will be presented by the Orlando Shakespeare Festival on March 21 through April 22. Written by John Logan, nominated for Oscars for tor, Rothko is seen struggling to create new works. In 90 minutes, the venomous Rothko embodies the will to create that drives great artists, but in the end, the audi ence comes to understand him as a defensive artist struggling with his pride, legacy and will to orlandoshakes.org March 24 Falletta conducts Philharmonic The Orlando Philharmonic phony No. 5 under the baton of guest conductor JoAnn Falletta, music director of both the Buffalo Philharmonic and the Virginia Symphony. Performed at the Bob the world premiere of Pulsar, a lahan. Acclaimed by The New conductors of her generation, Falletta is credited by The Wash ington Post as having Toscani nis tight control over ensemble, Walters affectionate balancing of inner voices, Stokowskis gutsy showmanship, and a controlled 407-770-0071 or visit orlandophil. org March 28 Golf Challenge benets Science Center turns for its 29th year with proceeds supporting the educa tional programs at the Orlando and individual players will swing for science over 18 holes of best ball tournament play on two for achievements in longest drive, hole-in-one and closest to the hole. The event supports unique hands-on learning programs registration includes lunch, din ner, cart rental and 18 holes of golf. To register, contact Kathy Lopus at 407-514-2233 or klopus@ osc.org or visit osc.org March 30-April 1 Orlando Ballet presents black and white swans The Orlando Ballets newest offering is Swans: Black and sic Swan Lake. Based on the tale of a princess transformed into a swan by a vengeful sor cerer, this production explores the storys darker themes of impris graphed by Artistic Director Rob set to Tchaikovskys evocative us with an unexpected approach. Swan Princess is March 31 at 11 a.m. in a one-hour performance for young audiences. Perfor on March 30 and March 31, and 1739 or visit orlandoballet.org March 30-April 12 Flying Horse pressing on for art The unique opening for Im Editions at the Mennello Mu seum of American Art will offer art printing. The exhibit features limited-edition art objects and it. On opening night, from 6 to 8 p.m. on Friday, March 30, attend ees will see one of the galleries transformed into a printmaking studio, where guests can create their own art. Visit mennellomu seum.com Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906. Josh Garrick Culture worthy of your calendar Staff gives back This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH O RLANDO A VE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.E NZIAN.ORG Academy A ward Winner! A SEP ARA TION Fri Sun 3:30 6:30 9:30 Mon, Wed, Thurs 6:30 9:30 T ue 6:30 Only Cult Classics: THE PRODUCERS T ue 9:30 Wednesday Night Pitcher Show: Bad Movie Night TROLL 2 8:30 FREE Red Swans

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Page 12 Thursday, March 22, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Opinions merman shot and killed 17-yearold Trayvon Martin, a police dispatcher told him to stand his ground, but he said it in a differ ent way. Are you following him? the Sanford dispatcher asked. OK we dont need you to do that. to police that he shot the teen stand your ground self-defense law, police didnt arrest him, os tensibly accepting his claim and setting a potentially catastrophic precedent in the process. In this case, based on witness accounts and recorded calls to thing but stand his ground until the very last moment. already sounds labored during the phone call to police, placed during halftime of the NBA he seems to become exasperated based upon what he thinks will merman is following in his SUV, is about to commit a crime, any crime. Martin, who had his sweat shirt hood pulled over his head as he walked home from a San ford convenience store during a rainstorm, looked suspicious, dispatcher that there had been a recent string of break-ins in his neighborhood, a claim he made in many of the about 45 calls to police hed made in the past year, according to a report by the already have convicted Martin of a crime while he walked down the sidewalk. These a**holes, they always ing the call. Then at 2 minutes, 21 seconds into the call, he seems to say a racial slur, though the un some distortion. words and demeanor during the call, he had no intention of stand follow Martin in his SUV, eventu and a death that he would claim was in self-defense. A 16-year-old friend spoke with Martin on the phone sec onds before Martin was shot to death. During that call, Martin tells his friend that hes being fol lowed, and she tells him that he should run away, the friend told life story, much less that police merman was in an SUV for much of his pursuit; Martin was on man was armed with a semiau tomatic handgun; Martin had he believed Martin might have killed him if he didnt shoot him. The law hes standing behind, passed in 2005, allows Floridians to kill someone in self-defense, even outside of their own home, if they feel threatened with death or great bodily harm to himself or herself or another or to prevent the commission of a forcible felony. It also says that the law is only applicable if the person who kills in self-defense was not commit ting a crime at the time. a gun or threatened Martin in already committed assault. An assault, by Florida law, is an intentional, unlawful threat by word or act to do violence to the person of another, coupled with an apparent ability to do so, and doing some act that creates a well-founded fear in such other person that such violence is im minent. Tuesday that a grand jury will investigate the case and decide whether Martins civil rights were violated. The U.S. Depart ment of Justice will also review the case. In the mean time, investigators are poring over evidence to determine whether all of it was taken into account and whether Sanford police tam pered with witness statements that would have contradicted shooting. Absent enough evidence to contradict his statements, unscathed. The Sanford police appear to have already made that of the potential crime involved, that level of callousness is terrify ing. Thanks to a more thorough investigation, were about to discover what standing your ground really means in Florida. free, the precedent will be crystal clear. Well have the perfect blue print for blaming the dead. Our Observation The joys of our city Every time I drive by the the tiny, and many, joys of Win ter Park. What is it about Winter Park that makes you smile? Whatever it is, no matter how small, embrace and enjoy it! Patrick Chapin Winter Park Chamber of Commerce president Re: The joys of our city This is an easy answer for me. I love seeing families hav most of all I love seeing chil drens faces light up when the train goes by. It reminds me of what a safe place were in and it makes me so thankful to work in this community! Andrea Hall Winter Park Chamber of Commerce events manager Kudos to Winter Park Standing ovation! We love Winter Park and everything it you name it. We are proud to be part of this community. Thank you to all of the "Parkpreneurs" who make Winter Park the place Moore, owner of I LUV Winter Park, Inc. published March 8). Kudos to Winter Park! Bloomsof WinterPark Via Facebook Winter Park installs surveillance cameras In recent weeks the city of Winter Park has installed several super high-tech, very expensive surveillance cameras on Park Avenue. There seems to be a growing number of government surveillance cameras in Winter Park, including the Park Avenue cams, the red-light cams and the intersection cams. For people who like them, it gives them a false sense of security that the "camera will protect them". For people who do not, it is an invasion of privacy, over-the-top big brother government snoop ing on everything every citizen does, and scares good people from Winter Park because they think the city's surveillance cams mean that Winter Park is a high-crime area. The Park Avenue cams are placed about 10 feet above ground level and attached to poles except where indicated. The ones I noticed are at 1) Park Avenue and Fairbanks Avenue, southeast corner; 2) Park Avenue and Lyman Av enue, northeast corner; 3) Park Avenue and Lyman Avenue off the ground); 4) Park Avenue and New England Avenue, northwest corner; 5) Park Av enue and Morse Blvd., southeast corner; 6) Park Avenue and Lin coln Avenue, southwest corner; Avenue, northwest corner. They have a glass ball underneath with the camera inside that can move around in many direc tions and a big black box near it that probably holds a computer and/or emergency generators. Readers need to know about this because it will affect their pri vacy, make them suspect or wit ness for crimes, and could keep their property values very low as high crime perception comes with the cameras and they scare people away. Thanks. Paul V onder Heide Winter Park Heres what readers on wpmobserver.com are writing about Sweets out, sweat in: Chamber promotes healthier workplace policy with Work Well Winter Park published on March 15: blazing the trail and walking the talk! Thanks for your efforts Park! Jill Hamilton exceptionally healthy! Maritza Martinez Proud of all of your efforts. Leading by example. Marian Chase One mere sip of water The Biblical axiom for whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap holds sway for most things in our lives. Our gardens are one of the best experiments to witness this direct return on our invest ment. Improperly managing natures catalyst, water, will not produce our expected bounty. A balance must be achieved, and with water, known as the poor farmers fertilizer, too little or too much results in an unappetizing dividend. As spring days get longer and warmer just as rainfall tapers off to a trivial memory, our gardens potential for productivity soars to unexpected heights. Simple quantities of irrigation, usually suggested at one inch each week, are easily determined with a rain gauge and observation. This simplicity ends when establishing transplants and directly seeded crops or applying fertilizer mixed with our irrigation water. The ratio of the size of plants to their containers and soil mixes may result can develop soft rotten spots if excessive moisture stagnates in upper layers of the soil. Most gardens will grow nicely when district wa ter management rules for lawns and landscapes are followed. Overhead sprinklers run during morning hours will meet most crops growth needs. Drip and micro-irrigation systems complete their tasks almost invisibly. A timer at the hose bibb set for a schedule or on a manual timed period eases our management chores. While I may skip a manual soaking, this mechanized enforcer keeps my routine stable. settle the soil particles around the seeds and transplants. Then mulch exposed soil to restrict harsh conditions delivered by winds and sun. Follow up on a daily basis until the immature plants are established, with their roots becoming part of the strata. This rooting routine helps tiny carrot seeds begin their journey to our nutritional banquet. I use a few homemade tricks to juggle watering requirements of my gardens. A layer of newspaper under shredded mulch doubles their individual soil-protecting effectiveness and restricts weed ger zones. A dash of liquid fertilizer into the bucket simultaneously ac complishes similar goals. The volume of rain collected over the acre age of our roofs is stunning. Find alternatives to using drinking water for irrigation by catching our increasingly sporadic rainfall. We have all the resources necessary to grow much of our food; we just need to manage them in proximate time and space. Tom Carey From my garden to yours State stands on dangerous ground Letters to the editor Send your thoughts (400 words or less) to Managing Editor Jenny Andreasson at editor@observernewspapers.com King Features Weekly ServiceMarch 19, 2012 A use for old newspapers: mulch

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Page 13 Thursday, March 22, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Film is a very effective me dium in which to communicate ideas both engaging and infor mative, and it is to this end that Buddhist study/practice/medita tion group, are once again pro ducing the annual Flor ida Dharma Film Festival which will take place March 23 and 24 in Eustis, and the follow ing weekend, March 30 and 31, at of Winter Park. Florida audiences with an oppor municate and share the beauty of Tibetan Buddhist culture, spiri and methods that many people regardless of faith, philosophies or religion. In both venues, the festival is a free event; there is no charge screened. The history, personalities, cul ture, philosophies and practices are both beautiful and practi minds and hearts of the people of the West who are willing/able to listen to them. It is a great source of joy to see how interest in Tibetan Bud dhist ideas and meditations has and began teaching to various communities and groups here in Tibetan word for compassion.) We believe there is a simple, universal message of wisdom and compassion in Buddhism less of faith or background. We provide a safe atmosphere for people to gather, listen, discuss and learn these ancient, meaning ful teachings. Participants are of all ages and come from throughout the area, representing diverse levels of meditation experience and religious/spiritual background; many are beginning medita tors and come with little or no knowledge of Buddhism. All are welcomed! It was three years ago that we be a core outreach activity of the are this year in two venues over for the community it is truly fantastic! on Friday, March 31, beginning at thieu Ricard, followed by the Sidney Lumet classic Angry true bodhisattva. ule including both weekends, please visit chenrezigproject. org/FLharma2012.pdf or send an ect.org. The website includes a link where tickets may be reserved; for capacity issues it would be helpful if you would reserve your seats if possible. Tickets for each weekend are organized are free. So come on down, expose yourself to these thought-pro humankinds richest spiritual tra ditions, and have fun while doing so. Bring a friend or make new ones -and please say hello, Ill be the guy hosting the betweenMark Winwood is the founder and resident teacher of the Chenrezig Project, which is based in Y alaha (Lake County). A frequent traveler to the Tibetan/Buddhist communities of the Indian sub-continent, he is an adjunct professor of Buddhism at Lake-Sumter Community College and the Hindu University of America. Contact mwinwood@chenrezigproject.org. Chris Jepson Perspectives Life. Fun with a capital PH! The extra mile Ive been told all my life that I dont look my age. Or, that I look young for my age. Or, that I look good for my age. And, yes, more than a time or two, that I dont act my age. I am writing this column on my 63rd birthday wondering how a man my age might comport himself? I do not subscribe at all to the current hype that 60 is the new 40, or any other such age-related nonsense. Sixty is 60. Ive a lot of photographs of my father and I imagine a lot of readers have the same experience I do when looking at pictures of their once-young parents: Wow! They sure were pretty. But I also look at pho ous man with a serious streak of whimsy. Im more a whimsical man with a curious streak of serious. cognizant at a relatively young age that tion that I was immortal, well, I never had such illusions. Death became not a bosom companion through my days, but more of an accompanying shadow. A presence, a reality, the quiet guest, so to speak, always in the other room. I became aware, it became crystal clear that life is about moments and you damned well better be of the moment. I willingly describe myself as a short-term hedonist, yet I place a premium on long-term relationships. Ah, the best of all possible worlds. years when I was around the age of 20 or 21. My grandfather died at age 83, my fa ther at age 81. I split the difference deter mining that give or take months I would die around 82. And I am so OK with that. I came to grips years ago with my mortal ity, eventually got over the unfairness of it and in doing so was liberated. too alive!) but neither do I dread it. It is. when one dies is important. Ive got the it becomes merely a matter of timing. My certain. I readily acknowledge the hubris associated with my plan. What is the adage? Theres many a slip twixt the cup and the lip. But I want to die as I lived. With intent. The question on the table is how does a man of my advancing years live? At this point in my life I do not have much choice in this regard. As the twig is bent so grows the tree. I will live as I have always on the important, shed the nonessential and parteeeee like its 1999! Ive passed on my genetic essence to successive generations thus participating in the purpose of my species. Meaning of life? It is strictly an individual human In relationships, love and affection. In passion. Language. Art. In whimsy. In a raison dtre. My father often spoke of fun. Big fun Jepson is a 24-year resident of Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.US Louis Roney Play On! I came from a family where giving people a little more than they asked for was a moral duty. In World War II, I was sent back pital in New Orleans where the word lagniappe is part of the patois, the colloquial language. The good things one is endowed with, and can give away, and both the receiver and the giver are enriched in the transaction. A very handy way of seeing this deal in action is to be kind and attentive to a dog, and see how he repays you tenfold with the kind of love that is all a dog can give. In New Orleans, my mother used to buy from a local bakery where a dozen rolls included a 13th roll as lagniappe. Lagniappe carries an unspoken ex pression of good wishes that reach their mark in ways that make people come back for more. Its not the extra item that does it, but the item combined with the spirit behind it. A great many people of French ances try and with French names live in Louisi ana. I have lived and sung in Paris for ex tended periods, but I never experienced the Louisiana French spirit in France. Its not that the French do anything espe cially wrong, its just that they dont have the habit of throwing in an extra bit of themselves, as do Louisianans. Teachers throw in lagniappe as a course, the moral dynamo that generates lagniappe, and carrying this spirit into ones daily doings makes life brighter for all. Lagniappe brings forth smiles and strong handshakes, and says things that word-shy individuals can never bring mile makes all human endeavors gain a dimension beyond expectation. The childs story of The Little Engine young mind the hidden potential in a hu man being. This hidden potential results in home runs, in touchdowns, in straight As, in world records and in intellectual triumphs. The person who accomplishes a major feat may say afterward, I didnt Somewhere in the back of his mind, he thought he could do it, or he couldnt have traversed the extra mile to make it come true. All of us certainly have within our selves the potential to reach more goals than we have ever reached, an extra reserve of imagination and mentality that hold the promise of new successes. The kids who sit in the stands today going the extra mile. During the major ity of our days, no one is going to sit over us and force us to reach our goals. Just as the little train thought, I think I can, the human being with will to win thinks, I can do it if I want it enough. Before we surprise anyone else, we must surprise what our own possibilities are! There are no prizes for could have or would have. There are only prizes for did and reached. The record books do not list missed chances or also rans. We enough to be winners? About Roney: H arvard42Distinguished Prof, E m.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney) I will continue to reflect on the important, shed the nonessential and parteeeee like its 1999! Third Annual Florida Dharma Film Festival March 23-24 WindHorse Theater, 353 Plaza Drive, Eustis March 30-31 First Congregational Church of Winter Park, 225 S. Interlachen Ave. Visit lmfest@chenrezigproject.org Buddhist lm festival comes to Winter Park MARK WINWOOD Guest Writer Mark Winwood The Sun Behind the Clouds lm

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Page 24 Thursday, March 22, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Adversing Networks of Florida Statewide advertisingone low price ank you to our media partners: WKMG Local 6 and Magic 107.7.