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Winter Park-Maitland observer
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00204
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park FL
Publication Date: 03-15-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates: 28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID: UF00091444:00204

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407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC USPS 00-6186 Publisher statement on page 4. Thursday, March 15, 2012 50+ tax wpmobserver.comSubscribe now!Visit wpmobserver.com With what they forecast to be a stormy budget season brewing on the horizon, Maitland City Council members say now, more than ever, every dollar spent or received counts. So when a decision on wheth er to raise the salaries of the city manager and city clerk was pre sented in front of the Council on Monday, March 12, the members had to decide where to draw a line between thanking their staff with words or dollars. If we could afford it, I'd approve the same increase we gave the rest of the city staff, Councilman Phil Bonus said, referring to the 2 percent merit-based raise approved for city staffers in the 2012 budget passed last September. But Councilman Ivan Valdes pointed out that though the city clerk and manager do a great job, the city, in fact, might not be able to afford any extra dollars toward bumping salaries come the next few months leading to budget season. I don't think it's in our best interest that just because it was budgeted in there we should do it. its our responsibility to the city and residents, whose money we're spending, to be wary that every time we turn around our revenue is being cut, he said. Valdes said that if the raise were given, the money would likely eventually have to be made budget. Sometimes the people at the top have to suffer a little bit so that the people at the bottom don't, he said. I want to protect the people beneath them who can least afford to take a cut. In the past three years, city staffers salaries have remained Brian Jones said the last meritFor nearly half a century Louis Roney was known around the world for his operatic Hall of Fame on March 21. It didnt take much of a movement to see him nominated for the award. The longtime Winter Park resident already had some very powerful friends. Speaking at the podium of the U.S. House of Representatives on Jan. 24, Rep. John Mica did all the talking for him. He and his career have had a deep and profound impact on our community, state and nation, Mica said. world, in opera houses as near as Orlando and as far as Vienna. He toured Europe play ing Faust for Monacos Prince Rainier, and tory of Italys largest opera festival. But while he toured the world serving as never forgot his hometown. My memories of Winter Park, having grown up in this little town, which it was when I graduated from grammar school in I spent many happy years here, which I on a warship, Roney said. I did not forget it when I was in Europe singing that Winter Park was waiting here for me to come back some day. It was Winter Parks charm that had lured his wife, Joy, into a new home that would soon be the duos base for starting the Or known as the Orlando Festival of Orchestras) and teaching music to local students. I met Joy in New Yorkand when we came down here on our honeymoon she fell in love with it, Roney said. We looked around a bit, and the next day we bought a house on a lake. This would be their home for the rest of their lives, Roney said. They established a scholarship fund for student singers. He taught as distinguished professor of music for 19 years at the University of Central Flor ida, even as he continued to win praise for his voice. Monday afternoon, March 12, the acco lades kept coming for Roney, who was given honor his achievements. writer and teacher preceded him to the po dium at the Rachel Murrah Civic Center. If you read his column in the Observer you know hes a very humble man, Mayor Ken Bradley said jokingly. Roneys column, Play On!, has been pub lishing for 31 years. Its never missed a week, The best thing we can do is support the local businesses we care for so much by frequenting them.Page 18Letters to the editor Healthy Living The Work Well Winter Park program ofcially launches April 4. Its not too late to get your business involved.Page 12 LifestylesHelp send Winter Park High Schools all-girl a cappella group Take 7 to the nals in New York City next month. Page 10 Calendar Anne Sebba will discuss her new book That Woman, a biography of the late Duchess of Windsor.Page 8 TAX DEFERREDFIXED ANNUITY RATE FOR 5 YEARS.Bob Adams 407-644-6646THE NATIONAL 5 YEAR CD RATE IS 1.34%3.35% 451 Maitland Ave, Altamonte Springs, FL 32701NEW Dermatology Ofce!407-599-SKIN (7546)*Waive co-payment up to $25 No referral needed Accepting all insurances Dr. John CottamDr. Ross Wheeler Please see RONEY on page 5Council gets cautious about compensationMaitland City Council is wary of current and future spending in lieu of looming budget season SARAhH WIlsLSON Observer Staff PhotoHOTO ByY IsSAAcC BABcCOcCK thTHE oOBsSERvVER Louis RRoney, 91, and wife Joy are introduced by Winter Park Mayor Ken BBradley at Mondays Commission meeting. Please see cCOUNcCIlL on page 2Fame comes home for Roney IsISAAcC BBABcCOcCK Observer Staff Louis RRoney, along with other distinguished Floridians, will be honored at the Florida Heritage Month awards at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, March 21, at the Florida State Conference Center in Tallahassee. The event is free and open to the public.

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Page 2 Thursday, March 15, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer SaleDOWNTOWN WINTER PARK sidewalk Park Avenue and Hannibal Square stores offering merchandise from 50-75% OFF For more information, visit winterpark.org or call 407.644.8281Please see participating stores for details.Thursday, March15th through Sunday, March18th earnable raise was offered for 3 percent in 2009. He said the city budgeted $200,000 for this years 2 percent raises, with the actual are issued throughout the year on hiring anniversaries. If any increase was to be given to the city manager and clerk, in stead of a raise in salary, Valdes proposed a 1 percent one-time lump-sum bonus be awarded instead, to save the city money in the long run that is associated with an overall salary raise, from increased pension, unemployment and paid vacation. Council woman Linda Frosch countered his proposal by bumping it up to a 2 percent one-time bonus, to which the Council members, aside from Valdes, agreed. We need to really show our people love, and not just a pat on the back, Mayor Howard Schieferdecker said. We need to seal the deal. But the Council members all agreed that any and all money spent going into budget season needs to be spent wisely. Every dollar counts, Councilman Phil Bonus said. We know this up coming budget season is going to be rough. Jones said the Council was right to be cautious. From possible cuts in funding from both the state and county level, he said, There's just a lot of uncertainty out there right now. cCOUNcCIlL | C ONTINUEED FRROM fFRontONT paPAGE AA great orchestra plays great music to great effect An evening dedicated to the memory of David and Libby RRoberts LOUIOUIS RONEYRONEY Observer StaffSince the days of my wifes and my founding of the Festival of Orchestras, a local public hungry for great symphonic music has often waited for such a night as was March 9, when the Orlando Philharmonic presented the Minnesota On March 9, conductor Osmo Vnsk provided solid proof that his Yes, this is the same Osmo Vnsk who jumped in, in Orlando, and tras date at the last moment. Osmo Vnsk and the Iceland Symphony prevented a catastrophe with a sizzling performance of the Sibeius Sym phony No. 2. This time on March 9, Vnsk and his Minnesotans opened with a beau tifully played Johannes Brahms' Variations on Theme by Haydn. Then the orchestra put their hooks into bigger things with the Sibelius Violin Concerto played by the international virtuoso Midori. Midori was adchallenging moments seem to be childs play. The evening's pice de rsistance came after intermission with the Beethoven Fifth Symphony, a piece which has been played to death without altering the fact that it is an all-time musical masterpiece. I had not heard the Fifth tuality, and its overwhelming logic. The Fifth has originality, courage, ahead-of-its-time musical ideas and enormous melodic beauty. Had Beethoven written nothing else but this piece, he would be acknowledged as a supreme genius. Vnsk and his forces played as a single awesome musical intelligence. The cheering audience gave voluble thanks to the programs sponsors, The Edyth Bush Charitable Foundation Inc., plus one generous anonymous donor.

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IMPORTANT NOTICEIf you or your loved one is or was a resident atMANOR CARE NURSING AND REHABILITATION CENTERThis facility has been cited for multiple deficiencies including:FAILURE to give residents proper treatment to prevent new bed (pressure) sores or heal existing bed sores.[3/19/2010]FAILURE to provide social services for related medical problems to help each resident achieve the highest possible quality of life.[5/09/2011]FAILURE to make sure that each resident who enters the nursing home without a catheter is not given a catheter, unless it is necessary.[10/06/2011]FAILURE to develop a complete care plan that meets all of a resident's needs, with timetables and actions that can be measured.[10/06/2011]FAILURE to provide enough notice before discharging or transferring a resident.[5/09/2011]FAILURE to let residents give themselves their drugs if they are able.[5/16/2011]FAILURE to properly mark drugs and other similar products.[5/09/2011, 3/19/2010]FAILURE to make sure that residents who take drugs are not given too many doses or for too long; make sure that the use of drugs is carefully watched; or stop or change drugs that cause unwanted effects.[10/06/2011, 3/19/2010]FAILURE to keep accurate and appropriate medical records.[10/06/2011, 3/19/2010]FAILURE to make sure that residents who cannot care for themselves receive help with eating/drinking, grooming and hygiene.[1/06/2011]FAILURE to make a complete assessment that covers all questions for areas that are listed in official regulations.[3/19/2010]FAILURE to develop a complete care plan within 7 days of each resident's admission; prepare a care plan with the care team, including the primary nurse, doctor, resident or resident's family or representative; or check and update the care plan.[1/06/2011]FAILURE to provide care in a way that keeps or builds each resident's dignity and self respect.[1/06/2011, 3/19/2010]FAILURE to have a program to keep infection from spreading.[1/06/2011, 3/19/2010]FAILURE to make sure that a working call system is available in each resident's room or bathroom and bathing area.[1/06/2011]FAILURE to provide at least one room to use as a dining room and for activities, that is a good size, with good lighting, airflow and furniture.[1/06/2011]FAILURE to develop/implement required procedures for the administration of mmunizations.[3/19/2010]FAILURE to give each resident enough fluids to keep them healthy and prevent dehydration.[3/19/2010]FAILURE to give professional services that follow each resident's written care plan.[3/19/2010]FAILURE to make sure that each resident who enters the nursing home without a catheter is not given a catheter, unless it is necessary.[3/19/2010]FAILURE to keep each resident's personal and medical records private and confidential.[3/19/2010]FAILURE to store, cook, and give out food in a safe and clean way.[3/19/2010]THIS IS AN ADVERTISEMENT If you or someone you love is or has been in the past a resident of Manor Care Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, call the law firm of Wilkes & McHugh, P.A. for a free consultation.800.255.5070www.wilkesmchugh.comPOOR CARE CAN LEAD TOBEDSORES, BROKEN BONES...EVEN DEATH. *Deficiencies were obtained from past federal inspection results available on Medicare.gov.

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Page 4 Thursday, March 15, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer USPS 00-6186 ISSN 1064-36131500 Park Center Drive OOrlando, FL 32835-5705 Member of: Chamber of CommercePublisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor. Submission does not guarantee publication. Columnists opinions are made independently of the newspaper. All rights reserved. Winter Park / Maitland Observer 2012 EEstablished in 1989 by GGerhard J.W. Munster www.wpmobserver.com | Phone: 407-563-7000 | Fax: 407-563-7099 | editor@observernewspapers.com P.OO BBox 2426 Winter Park, FL 32790 Published Thursday, March 15, 2012 CONONTA ACTS Volume 24, IIssue NNumber 11 PUBBLISHERER Tracy Craft 407-515-2605 tcraft@observernewspapers.com manaMANAGinING EEDITORR Jenny AAndreasson 407-563-7026 editor@observernewspapers.com DEESIGGNERER Jonathan Gallagher 407-563-7054 jgallagher@observernewspapers.com REREPORR TERERS Jenny AAndreasson 407-563-7026 editor@observernewspapers.com IIsaac BBabcock 407-563-7023 isaacb@observernewspapers.com LEGalsALS | ClassifiLASSIFIEdsDS AAshley McBBride legal@FLAlegals.com classieds@observernewspapers.com COPY EEDITORRS IIsaac BBabcock isaacb@observernewspapers.com Sarah Wilson COLUMNISTS Chris Jepson Jepson@MediAmerica.us Louis RRoney LRRoney@c.rr.com Josh Garrick joshgarrick9@gmail.com foFOR ADVERER TISINGG infoINFORmationMATION Tracy Craft 407-515-2605 tcraft@observernewspapers.com suSUBscSCRiptionsIPTIONS | ciCIRculationCULATION Jackie Candelaria 407-563-7013 intINTERnN AAndy Ceballos BBusiness BBriefs Community BBulletin Feb. 23 marked the ofcial opening of O One Senior Place at 715 Douglas Ave. in Alta monte Springs. The senior services complex will follow the February ribbon-cutting event with a Community Open House celebra tion from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m.  on Thursday, March 22. Visit OneSeniorPlace.com or call 407-949-6733. Insight Credit Union is pleased to announce the promotion of Cindy Morgan to the posi tion of executive vice president/CFO.  Jacob, Sherkman & A Associates LLC recently leased 2,250 square feet at 479 Montgomery Place in Altamonte Springs. Southern R Realty E Enterprises Inc. in Long wood represented the owners and tenants. Signage unveiling at the Maitland branch at 238 S. Orlando Ave. celebrated the local switch from RB RBC B Bank USA to PNNC B Bank. Marco Santoro, regional manager, from left, Phil Stark, Maitland branch manager, and Joe Meterchick, Florida West R Regional pres ident, struck a pose at 4:01 p.m. on Friday, March 2, as the Maitland RB RBC B Bank closed and new PNC BBank sign was revealed. Winter Park in NYNYT The New York Times featured Winter Park in its travel section on Sunday, March 11. In the short article titled Near Orlando, Fla., a Sophisticated Alternative to Disney, Times journalist E Erica Cerulo writes, Though businesses there (in Winter Park) have historically catered to the 9-iron set for ward-thinking shops and restaurants have started appearing along the two main thoroughfares, Park Avenue and New E England Avenue. A photo gallery, Winter Park, Fla.: An Old-Time R Resort Looks Ahead, featuring merchants such as the Winter Park Fish Company and Prato accompanied the article. Visit tinyurl.com/NYTWinterPark to view the piece.Student honorsThe following students were named to the Deans List of E Emory College, the undergraduate, Liberal Arts Col lege of E Emory University in Atlanta, GGa., for the 2011 fall semester. Stu dents must be in the top 20 percent of E Emory College or have about a 3.81 grade point average or higher to be named to the Deans List. daughter of Dr. Nelson Tabirian and Dr. Anna Tabirian Park, son of Dr. Pyoungho Choi and Misook Kang son of Mary Taussig of Winter Park, and Dr. Andrew Taussig of Winter Park daughter of R Robert B Brennan and Wendy BBrennan Join pet festivalThe 9th Annual Doggie Art Fes tival will be held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sunday, April 15. Artists and vendors are invited to partici pate. It will be taking over half of Park Avenue from Morse B Boulevard to Canton Avenue this year. E Email brian@bullsh.net or call The Dog gie Door at 407-644-2969 to sign up and arrange payment. E Every $50 helps another greyhound nd a new home. Friday, March 30, is the deadline.Pancake pandemoniumIn its seventh year, National Pan cake Day, IHOPs annual free ap jack fundraiser, shattered a fund raising record, raising more than $3 million in donations for Chil drens Miracle Network Hospitals and other local charities.  Fundraising volunteers needed Habitat for Humanity of G Greater Orlando Area is seeking women to fundraise and participate in Women BBuild Week Orlando from May 7 to May 12. Across all 50 states, more than 7,000 women are raising funds needed to build affordable homes at more than 300 Habitat for Humanity construction sites. Contact Lynn Ivanek at livanek@ habitat-orlando.org or call 407648-4567 ext. 404. Fundraising teams must sign up by March 30.Send submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com OOne Senior Place NNovelist visits On Feb. 23, Nigerian novelist Chiamanda Adichie, author of Half of a Yellow Sun and Purple Hibiscus, spoke to attendees of R Rol lins Colleges Winter With the Writers event. Throughout the event, renowned writers shared their work and expertise with students and the community. Math stars Massey Services recently rewarded three Killarney E Elementary School students with two VIP Massey Skybox suite tickets to an Orlando Magic G Game. The reward came as a result of the students top scores in a contest, Massey Math Miles, sponsored by Massey PrevenTech Commercial Services. The contest challenged students to improve their math skills over a three-month period. Transformations An opening reception was held on March 7 for Transformations, The Photography of B Betty Scott Owen at the Winter Park Library Community R Room, 460 E E. New E England Ave. in Winter Park. The ex hibit runs through March 31. Contact 757-343-0313 or ladyscott@ cox.com

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Page 5 Thursday, March 15, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Test-drive it online at seeprismtv.com or in store today:175 East Altamonte Dr., Altamonte Springs 3030 East Semoran Blvd., Apopka 260 Citrus Tower Blvd., Clermont 1359 East Vine St., Kissimmee 3244 North John Young Pkwy., Kissimmee Call 866.610.7768Espaol 866.960.7085Like us on Facebook facebook.com/CenturyLinkPrismTV CenturyLinkTM PrismTM. Interactive TV you control any show, any time, from any room. Its a combination of features that outshine cable and satellite. Now you have a better TV choice.[ CenturyLinkTM PrismTM paired with the perfect partner Internet or Voice. ] NO CONTRACT! FREE HD WHEN YOU PICK 2. FOR 12 MONTHS Prism Project Demonstrations are with non-Prism TV customers using basic CenturyLink Prism TV service with standard features in High Definition on an HD-ready television on 11/12/11 in Las Vegas, NV. Participants were not acting as professional actors, but were compensated by CenturyLink for their participation in the demonstration and this advertisement. Offer ends 5/31/12. Offer is available to new, first-time CenturyLink Prism TV residential customers only. The Pick Two bundle offer applies to a qualifying Prism TV programming package and choice of High-Speed Internet or a qualifying CenturyLink calling plan with no term commitment and free HD service for twelve (12) months. An $8.99 monthly DVR service fee applies when the Quad Play DVR is purchased with the Prism TV programming package. For High-Speed Internet, an additional monthly fee (including professional installation, if applicable) and shipping and handling fee will apply to customers modem or router. Promotional offer cannot be combined with any other Prism offers; Pick Two cannot be combined with any other offer. All prices, packages and programming are subject to change without notice. Taxes, fees, and surcharges will apply. Customer must cancel DVR and/or HD service by calling CenturyLink Customer Service before the end of the 3-month (or 12-month Pick Two offer) promotional period to avoid monthly charges or the standard monthly rate for each service will apply until service(s) are cancelled. Offers may be limited to specific locations. General Services and offers not available everywhere. CenturyLink may change, cancel, or substitute offers and services, or vary them by service area, at its sole discretion without notice. Requires credit approval and deposit may be required. Additional restrictions apply. Terms and Conditions All products and services listed are governed by tariffs, local terms of service, or terms and conditions posted at www.centurylink.com. 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Prism TV 30-Day Guarantee Advertised 30-day, money-back guarantee (TV Guarantee) applies only to installation charges, monthly recurring charges (i.e., base monthly service charges, premium service subscription charges), and applicable taxes incurred by customer for CenturyLink DTV residential service. The TV Guarantee does not apply to applicable charges for Video On Demand purchases, charges for Pay Per View purchases, and other usage-based charges, and customer will be invoiced for and responsible for payment of such fees and charges incurred. Customer must contact a CenturyLink customer service representative at 800.201.4099 within thirty (30) calendar days of the activation of customers CenturyLink DTV service in order to invoke TV Guarantee. Customer must also return any STBs as instructed by CenturyLink in order to invoke TV Guarantee. Charges subject to TV Guarantee will be credited or refunded, as applicable, on customers next bill cycle, as determined at CenturyLinks sole discretion. 2012 CenturyLink, Inc. All Rights Reserved. The name CenturyLink and the pathways logo are trademarks of CenturyLink, Inc. All other marks are the property of their respective owners. CNTL12-104G_7768_10.15_x_9_r1.indd 1 3/12/12 5:00 PM Roney said. recounted tales of his life in Winter Park and abroad, helping Winter Park High Schools football team to some of the to Harvard University and to war in the Navy. But his most famous achievements soared through opera houses worldwide. Thank you so much for blessing our city with so many good things, Bradley said.RONEY | C ONTINUEED FRROM fFRontONT paPAGE PhotoHOTO ByY IsSAAcC BABcCOcCK thTHE oOBsSERvVER Louis and Joy R Roney pose with the Winter Park City Commission after Louis accepted his proclamation. PhotoHOTO ByY IsSAAcC BABcCOcCK thTHE oOBsSERvVER Winter Park Girl Scouts and Citrus Council CEOEO Mary AAnn BBarry, left, pose with the City Commission on March 12 to commemorate the organizations 100th anniversary. Celebrating 100 years of scouting

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Page 6 Thursday, March 15, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer The UCF mens basketball between it was all Memphis on March 9. The Tigers would go on repeated scoring runs that bam boozled the Knights, leading the game by as many as 38 points before closing it out by a score of But in the process the Knights tional Invitational Tournament tory. few minutes of the game, leading Memphis offense regrouped and went on a long scoring run, the Knights found themselves strug gling to keep up for the remain der of the game. The Knights had one of their worst shooting games this sea son, connecting on only a third of their shots, and only 10 percent of their 3-point attempts. In a rare moment of offensive brilliance, center Josh Crittle, who normally plays a support position rather than attacking the basket, scored 9 points with the second most consistent shooting next to for ward Isaiah Sykes, who led the team with 11 points scored. missed all but one of his eight it with seven rebounds, three as sists and three steals. The loss knocked the Knights nament a game shy of the championship. The Knights had de the Knights had never defeated before this season. time. With a win the Knights could go on to the second round, with those game times yet to be announced. losing streak of the season with two straight dropped games on the baseball diamond started the end of a bad week, then a close for much of the way before the stretch. But Oviedo consistently found a way to match the Wildcats throughout the game. the Lions leapt ahead and didnt look back. For the Wildcats, back-to-back games could give them a commanding lead in those two games Wednesday night at press 20, matchup. EEdgewater rebounds win before last week. They were also win less in the district. Then they changed both all against the same team. game of a two-game series, coming from behind to win the game with a run in the bottom of the seventh. Two days later, the Eagles dealt the Panthers a blowout with a 14-2 win on a one-hit pitching masterpiece. 1, 0-0) in a district matchup at 4 p.m. Thursday. PhotosHOTOS ByY IsSAAcC BABcCOcCK thTHE oOBsSERvVER Winter Park found some offense early, taking the lead over OOviedo, but the Lions clawed their way back for the win with some late inning runs to go up 7-5 on March 8.Wildcats, EEagles rising IsISAAcC BBABcCOcCK Observer Staff PhotosHOTOS ByY IsSAAcC BABcCOcCK thTHE oOBsSERvVER Josh Crittle, above, has helped add energy when the Knights have suffered from lagging shooting. The Knights started in the rst round of the NCAAs National Invitational Tournament at press time Wednesday, hoping for a win to secure a second round bid. Knights lose, but make NIT bid IsISAAcC BBABcCOcCK Observer Staff

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Page 7 Thursday, March 15, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Crime is a topic that we fre quently hear about. We read about it in the paper, see it on the news and it is a frequent topic of Inter net chat. We are privileged to live in a city that has one of the lowest crime rates in Central Florida. Our crime rate is lower than every city in Orange/Osceola counties with the exception of the very small cities of Belle Isle, Windermere and Oakland. This low incident of crime is in spite of the fact that we have several major roadways traversing our city, including U.S. 4 corridor. We also have Maitland Center that is host to more than city has a drive-through population of more than 300,000 commuters per day. city, incidents of criminal activity do occur. The experts state, and our police department agrees, that crime prevention is one of the key components to ensuring we have a low crime rate. The most impor tant part of any crime prevention strategy is you. Without each of us taking an active role in preventing crime by calling the police department or utilizing proven crime prevention techniques, the criminals will continue to attempt to prey on an easy target. When you see something sus picious such as a car or a person in your neighborhood that you do not recognize, you should imme diately contact the police depart ment and provide them with a de scription of the car, a license plate number if available and a description of the person. No one knows your neighborhood like you do, and the information you provide to the police department will al cle has not been involved in crimi nal activity and/or the person is law abiding and not trying to commit a crime. This is very important during the daytime hours because most residential thefts and burglaries occur during the time when criminals think no one will be at home. The most frequent method of breaking into a home is through an unlocked door or un keep hedges and plants trimmed around windows and doors so they are not concealed. There are many components to making your home safe from intruders includ ing landscaping, lighting, alarms and other design features. In Maitland, we are fortunate to tense training on methods that may be used through home and landscaping design that will be helpful in preventing and reduc ing crime. overall comprehensive crime pre vention strategy is Neighborhood Watch. Maitland has many active Neighborhood Watch groups and the police department is always looking for more homeowners to get involved in the program. Those neighborhoods that have an active group frequently have lower incidents of crime. Neighborhood Watch programs orga nize homeowners to watch out for neighbors and to report susborhood Watch groups also are provided a Neighborhood Watch sign, which is paid for and erected on their street by the city. To re port suspicious activity, the police department recommends you call mation on how you may help pre vent crime or form a Neighbor hood Watch group by calling the Community Policing Section of 2832. Sergeant Louis Grindle will be happy to make an appointment to meet with any homeowner to discuss ways that they may im prove the security of their home. The police department will also meet with groups of people to present crime prevention strategies. By working together we can ensure that Maitland remains a safe and healthy community for many years to come. mentCity Council meeting of March 12The Maitland City Council the City Hall Council Chambers. Below is a synopsis of that meet ing. The next regular scheduled Council meeting will be held on Monday, March 26. Public Hearings: ing language governing the re-em interpretations of Florida Statutes Ordinance also provide either or verbiage additions that mirror existing Florida Statute language. Moved to continue the Public rezoning of properties within that cil meeting. Consent AAgenda: utes of Feb. 20. Passed a Resolution establish piggyback purposes. Southern Sewer Equipment Sales to purchase a Vac Con combination sewer cleaner in the amount of $249,800. contract with Wharton-Smith, adjusting the contract from mary CH2012-3 to the City Hall contract with Wharton-Smith, adjusting the contract from Decision: merit award for the city manager To listen to a recording of the meeting, visit itsmymaitland.com Winter Park City Talk BY RRANdD Y KKNIghtGHT CITY MANAGER Maitland City Talk BY HOwW ARdD SchCHIEfFERdDEcCKER MAYOR Crime prevention strategies On behalf of the City of Winter Park, we welcome all the atweekend to our city of culture and heritage!March 12 City Commission Meeting highlightsThere was a City Commission meeting held on March 12, at rah Civic Center. Below are a few highlights of decisions that were Mayors RReport sculpture project was given by Board chair. Louis Roney being inducted into was presented. was presented. Cynthia Bonham, city clerk, for achieving her Master Municipal Clerk designation. month of March as Purchasing Month was presented. NNon-AAction IItems 2012 was presented and accepted. Consent AAgenda The various purchases, bids complete list can be found at cityofwinterpark.org > Government Packets). The request to locate temporary modular classrooms and an administration building during construction of Bush Science Cen ter addition, subject to providing landscape buffer along both street frontages as depicted in exhibit provided and protection of shade trees, was approved. AAction IItems The Commission agreed to ap point a Wireless Task Force. Nom inations will be provided at the next Commission meeting.Public HearingsThe following decisions were made regarding the Equalization The resolution declaring that the city is to fund capital im provements for undergrounding with the cost to be paid by special assessments was approved. special assessments for the un facilities for properties adjacent to was approved. The requests of Windermere Winter Park Venture, LLC, result The second reading of the ordi nance amending the comprehensive plan, future land use map to change the designation of SingleFamily Residential to Mediumapproved. The second reading of the or zoning map to change the zon ing designation of Single-Family The second reading of the or dinance amending Ordinance No. 2840-11 Moratorium for Pain Man agement Clinics was approved. nance amending the historic pres velopment Code was tabled. Commission minutes will be avail at cityofwinterpark.org the week of March 26, pending approval by the City Commission. Get EEnergized about EEnergy Savings and win a KKindleFire The city of Winter Park cordially invites you to Get Energized about Energy Savings on Thurs day, March 29, at the Winter Park ergy, cost-cutting ideas and con cepts from proven energy and green-building professionals from the citys electric and water and wastewater utilities, Trane, Prog ress Energy and the Central Flor ida Chapter of the United States Green Building Council. Seating is limited so please RSVP no later than Friday, March 23, by calling Commercial customers usgbcfgc.org/WinterParkBiz Residential customers usgbcfgc.org/WinterParkHomes

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Page 8 Thursday, March 15, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer MARARCH 15 The Park Avenue Area Associations Spring Sidewalk Sale will be held Thursday, March 15, through Sunday, March 18, in conjunction with the Winter Park Sidewalk Art Festival.  The Orange Audubon Society presents RRedcockaded Woodpeckers: R Repopulating the Disney Wilderness Preserve by Jennifer Mi likowsky at 7 p.m. on Thursday, March 15, at Leu G Gardens, 1920 N. Forest Ave., in Orlando. The program is free. Call 407-637-2525 or visit orangeaudubon.org The B Bach Festival Society of Winter Park pres ents the Takcs Quartet and pianist Garrick OOhlsson at 8 p.m. on Thursday, March 15, at the Tiedtke Concert Hall, R Rollins College, at 1000 Holt Ave. in Winter Park. Tickets range from $30 to $40. Call 407-646-2182 or visit BBachFestivalFlorida.org The American Legion, Winter Park Memorial Post 112, will host an OOpen House event in celebration of the American Legions 93rd an niversary of its founding from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Thursday, March 15, at 4490 N. G Goldenrod RRoad, in Winter Park. Call 407-671-6404. MARARCH 16 The Annie R Russell Theatre and Department of Theatre and Dance presents RRollins Dance XXVII from 8-9:30 p.m. on March 16 and 17 at the Annie R Russell Theatre, R Rollins College, 1000 Holt Ave., in Winter Park. E Email annieboxofce@ rollins.edu or call 407.646.2145. The 53rd Winter Park Sidewalk A Art Festival will be held on March 16-18 in Central Park and along Park Avenue in Winter Park. There will also be a Festival Open House at Morse Mu seum. Visit wpsaf.org The next Cornerstone Hospice Volunteer Training will be held on from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. each day Friday, March 16 and Friday, March 23, at 8009 S. Orange Ave. in Orlando. Pre-register by calling 800-503-5756. MARARCH 17 French Horn Day at R Rollins College Department of Music is 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Satur day, March 17. The event features Horn choirs, instructional classes and performances by professional horn players. All day tickets are $25 in advance, $35 day of event. Tickets for the 1 p.m. concert only are available $5.  Visit central oridahornworkshop.com Leu Gardens A Annual Plant Sale is at 9 a.m. on Saturday, March 17, and Sunday, March 18. BBring a wagon or plant cart for your purchases. Visit leugardens.org The Central Florida N Navy League 5KK R Run/ Walk/RRoll for B Building Homes For Heroes and The Lone Sailor Memorial Project will be at 8:30 a.m. on Saturday, March 17, at Lake B Baldwin. RRegistration begins at 7 a.m. Visit cfnl5k.org The Junior League of GGreater Orlandos BBargain BBox is holding its annual sidewalk sale from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on March 17th at 503 N. Vir ginia Ave. in Winter Park. News teams from WEESH 2, WFTV, Local 6, Central Florida News 13 and Fox 35 are bring ing their designer clothing, shoes, jewelry and purses to viewers at the AAnchors A A way Sale from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Winter Park Com munity Center. Proceeds benet scholarships and programming for the Central Florida Asso ciation of BBlack Journalists.   MARARCH 19 Four  BBusiness I Improvement District infor mation sessions are being held at 5:30 p.m. on Monday, March 19, and at 8:30 a.m., 1:30 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. on Tuesday, March 20, at the Winter Park Welcome Center & Chamber of Commerce. Call 407-599-3398. MARARCH 20 The University Club of Winter Park will host a debate titled Healthcare R ReformWhat Should the Supreme Court Do? at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, March 20. Debaters shall be My ron Fottler, Ph.D., Professor of Health Services Administration at UCF and Lynn Unruh, Ph.D., Professor of Health Services Administration at UCF. The event is free. Call 407-644-6149 or visit universityclubwinterpark.org In honor of NNational R Ravioli Day BR BRIO Tuscan GGrille will offer its most popular R Ravioli dishes at half price on Tuesday, March 20. R Reserva tions are strongly recommended. Call 407-6225611. Please join AARAARP Winter Park Chapter 1047 at 1:30 p.m. on Tuesday, March 20, at the R Rachel D. Murrah Center, 1015 Morse B Blvd. in Winter Park. Our program will be Visiting Angels  Senior Home Care presented by Jody Hampton. The event is free. Call 407-629-2565. Seminole County Music Together invites par ents or other caregivers and their infant, toddler, and preschool children to attend free sample classes  March  20 24.  Classes are offered at the Winter Park Wedding Chapel, 301 W. New EEngland Ave. in Winter Park. Call 407-844-4414 to reserve your spot. Winter Park Institute presents Anthony B Ban nons The Photograph A As I Icon: A A Powerful Way of Seeing at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, March 20 at R Rollins College, B Bush Science Center. Visit www.rollins.edu/wpi MARARCH 21 More than 80 million women suffer with premenstrual and menopausal symptoms such as hot ashes and night sweats. Are you con fused regarding available options and solu tions? If so, come to Maitland Public Library at 6:30 p.m. on March 21. R RSVP at 407-629-5333 or go to  gethealthyorlando.com Winter Park Institute presents Writing With Light: A An E Evening Conversation with B Billy Collins, A Anthony B Bannon and E Ed K Kashi at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, March 21, at R Rollins Col lege, B Bush Science Center. Its free. Visit rollins. edu/wpi MARARCH 22 Winter Park Institute presents photojournalist, lmmaker and educator E Ed K Kashi at 7 p.m. on Thursday, March 22, at R Rollins College, B Bush Science Center. Kashi will discuss his career, including the techniques, procedures and mo tivations behind his missions to such places as the Nigerian Delta, Kurdistan and Iraq. Its free. Visit rollins.edu/wpi The G Goldenrod Chamber of Commerce Presidents Luncheon yet is at the G Goldenrod Sta tion from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Thursday, March 22. Corporate tables are available for $200 and single tickets are on sale for $25 per person.  Call 407-677-5980. Join the head and neck cancer specialists from The E Ear, Nose, Throat and Plastic Surgery Asso ciates as they conduct free, quick and painless head and neck cancer risk assessments at the YMCA Crosby Wellness Center, 2005 Mizell Ave. in Winter Park. The event will be held from 1 to 4 p.m. on Thursday, March 22. The Jewish Community Center of greater Or lando will be hosting an event titled OOn The Catwalk 3 from 6 to 9 p.m. on March 22 at the Heaven E Event Center in Orlando. The cost is $60; $50 for JCC members; $36 for seniors/stu dents. Contact Julie Varkonyi at (407)387-5330 or at juliev@orlandojcc.orgVisit wpmobserver.com/events for more details. Send submissions to editor@observernewspapers. comCalendar 7:00 a.m. 2 Mile Fun Run/Walk 7:30 a.m. 10k (6.2 miles) 9:15 a.m. Healthy 100 Kids RunBenefiting the Meridian Club of Winter Park Scholarship Fund Running and walking is a great way to enjoy our beautiful surroundings, reach a goal and support important community causes. The fitness enthusiasts at Zimmerman, Kiser & Sutcliffe, P.A., invite you to celebrate 35 years of running right where it all began on Park Avenue in beautiful Winter Park! 10k runners & walkers will receive: 2 Milers receive the commemorative tech tee and $5 Track Shack Cash! Register Today... Wine tasting Hannibal Square Wine Tasting: The Fine Art of Wine is 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Thursday, March 15, at 425 W. New EEngland Ave. Call 407-644-8281 or visit winterpark.org Duchess tales Acclaimed  biographer, lecturer, and jour nalist  Anne Sebba will discuss her new book That Woman, a biography of Wal lis Simpson, the late Duchess of Windsor, at a meeting of The E English-Speaking Union at The University Club of Winter Park at 4 p.m. on Monday, March 19.

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Page 9 Thursday, March 15, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Lifestyles In June of 1978, former Orlando resident Dave Reinhart took to the pavement and ran in a newly minted local race meant to raise money for a scholarship fund. At 26 years old, he won that race and would go on to win again in 1979. Now pushing 60, he hopes to return to take on the race once again, just before his birthday. Reinhart is one of potentially 3,500 racers expected at the Zim merman Kiser Sutcliffe 35th Annual Winter Park 10k Road Race & 2 mile James C. Barnett, M.D. Me morial Run on March 24. When he stepped up to the starting line 34 years ago, he was training for something much bigger. I was training at that time for the Olympic Trials in 1980, and being a track man in college and trying to keep my running career going, it was just another good event on the schedule, he said. Though he still doesnt know for sure if hell be able to toe that line again, hes hoping to make a comeback, and to help raise money for needy students in the process. The event is being put on by Track Shack, an organization that promotes athletics through its Or lando retail store, events compa ny and foundation that provides funding for charitable causes, par and youth athletics. The race was started by the Me ridian Club of Winter Park, a lo been involved with many service projects in the community for the last 35 years. Proceeds of the event will ben John Hughes, co-owner of Track Shack and this years race direc tor, said he got involved with the event as a means to promote his retail store and his products. But once he got started he saw the po tential for something more. As we did that, we realized that this was a great way to raise money for charities as well, he said. Al Loudermilk, member of the Meridian Club of Winter Park, said last year the club gave away between $12,500 and $15,000 to ship fund, which helps local students attend college. from either Orange or Seminole County, and we base it on need and on their grades, and we give them an unrestricted scholarship or check, he said. And the rea son we do that is we dont want to interfere with any other aid they may be receiving. The event is also held to honor Dr. James C. Barnett. Barnett was a Winter Park resident and physi cian at Jewett Orthopedic Clinic for 20 years. He was also a team physician for the Orlando Magic. He was an avid runner who pro exercise in improving the quality of life of his patients. This years event is being pre sented by Florida Hospital, one of the events corporate sponsors. David Cassidy, assistant di rector of marketing and business development for Florida Hospital Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation, said they normally offer some services at the events, such as free body fat screenings, as well as having primary care physicians or other guest physicians on hand. He said they will not be of fering these services for this race their tent is a food and recre ational tent. We changed our tent for that particular race as a reward to our employees to get out there and get Saturday, March 24, 2012 1 5 p.m. Winter Park Civic Center 1050 Morse Blvd. Winter Park, FL 32789 Tickets $5 ADVANCE Or$7 DOOR $5 SENIORS (AT DOOR) (Children Under 3 FREE) JOIN US FOR: Create Your Own Sundae, Ice Cream Floats, Italian Ice, Celebrity Servers, Face Painting, Cake Walk, Games, Silent Auction, Door Prizes and more! 250 North Orlando Avenue Winter Park, Florida 32789 407.677.9777 A Premier Flooring Source nCARPETOODTONE TILELAMINATE AREA RUGINDO TREATMENT Featuring Exquisite Products for Residential & Commercial Projects Custom Design and Quality Installationn ARCHIVE PHotoOTO BY AMANDA GEORGI tTHE oOBSERVER The Zimmerman Kiser Sutcliffe Winter Park R Road R Race 10k & 2 mile James C. Barnett, M M.DD M Memorial R Run is S Saturday, March 24, in downtown Winter Park. Jay Lumpkins, pictured here, won the 10k with a clock time of 31:36 in 2011. The race proceeds, usually between $12,500 and $15,000, go to the Meridian CClub of Winter Park to fund local college scholarships. Road race celebrates its 35th yearProceeds to benet local scholarship fund AANDY CEbBAllLLOsS Observer SStaff Event information The Winter Park 10k RRoad RRace will take place on SSaturday, March 24, at 251 SS. Park A Ave., in Winter Park. The two-mile run will begin at 7 a.m. and the 10k race will begin at 7:30 a.m. The entry fee for the 10k race will be $35 until March 23. The two-mile race will cost $20 through March 17, and $25 through March 23. V Visit http://www.trackshack.com to register.

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Page 10 Thursday, March 15, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer FamilyCalendar There was much screaming and shouting, applauding and whistling not to mention jumping up and down at the ICHSA Regionals in Tampa on Feb. 4 when Winter Park High Schools all-girl a cappella group won the Southeast title. And the winner of the International Competition of High School A Cap pella Regionals and the group City is Take 7! And the crowd went wild. I know; I caught the mayhem on my camera through my mamma tears. But even though we knew the girls had tal ent, one question remained: did we have the funds to send them I can tell you this much, the 11 girls in Take 7 are serious about their music and dedicated to per forming a good show. Any given chorus room at Winter Park High working on music, showmanship and choreography; many of them take voice lessons and each of them sings in at least one other choir at Winter Park High School. So you can imagine the girls excitement when their hard work paid off with such a big win. Every judge had placed Take was higher than any score our directors had ever seen when most winning scores are between 350-400, our girls had scored an unimaginable 434 out of 465! But as the girls excitement grew, we began to wonder, How Our choral department, students and families had already done multiple fundraisers for our chorus trip to Washington, D.C., in March; there were no more resources for the $7,000 it would take to send 11 girls and chaper And so we began to scheme. We had meetings and sent emails to family and friends; we asked for corporate sponsors and even sang at Publix for cash. We raised $5,000 to go. Then a germ of an idea began concert! Take 7 will sing, as will Naughty Scotty and the Octapel la, our all-boy a cappella group. We will ask the select ensembles from Glenridge Middle and Maitland Middle to join us, and all of the choral directors. Our A Cappella Showcase will feature not only our kids, but our directors Matthew Swope and Joseph Kemper along with Maitland Middles director, Dr. Lori Lovell, and Glenridge Middles director, Matthew Begale. In short, March 20 will be an unprecedented performance of students and directors to raise money to send They say, It takes a village to raise a child. Well, in our case, It takes a village to send a choral come in; we have performers, an auditorium and even tickets, but we need an audience! So come to Winter Park High School at 7:30 p.m. on March 20 for an evening of great music and inspiring spirit. Tickets will be sold at the door for $8 and additional dona tions will be accepted all evening. Finally, I think Swope said it best: Were so proud of Take 7, and we dont want anything to stand in the way of this incredible stage as one of the 10 best high school a cappella groups in the country. Tom Carey SundewGardens@gmail.comEvery home should have a garden Experience homegrown gardening: Greg StakeCommercial Realty of Central Florida Commercial Realty of Central Florida Have a commercial real estate question?Call for your free property analysis 407.797.3580 NNeal Hayes is the new Fellowship of C Christian A Athletes represen tative in the area. H He is hosting an event at 7 p.m. on Thursday, March 15, at the R RDVV in Maitland to introduce himself and introduce you to the new strategy that FCACA is launching to help its communities, athletes and athletic programs. Just B Between Friends C Central Florida (JBBF) spring community consignment event is March 16 through March 18 at the A Altamon te S Springs H Hilton, 350 S S. Northlake BBlvd., in A Altamonte S Springs. A Ad mission is $2 until 4 p.m. only on Friday and S Saturday. V Visit central orida.jbfsale.com Orange C County Public S Schools (OCCPSS) students, local chefs, food service staff and community leaders invite you to the Second AAnnual Chefs M Move to Schools initiative showcase event from 10 a.m. to noon on Friday, March 16, at the E Evans H High S School A Au ditorium, 4949 S Silver S Star R Road in Orlando. RSV RSVP to lora.gilbert@ cocps.net The Florida S Symphony Y Y outh Or chestra will hold its Spring Concert at the B Bob C Carr Performing AArts C Center at 4 p.m. on S Sunday, March 18, featuring all four FSYSYO orchestras, including the pre-pro fessional S Symphonic Orchestra, the concert is to feature the Finale from Dvoraks S Symphony No. 9, and S Strauss famed Til E Eulenspie gel. Tickets range from $8 to $30. Please visit redchairproject.com HHelp send Winter Park H High SSchools all-girl a cappella group Take 7 to the nals in New Y Y ork CCity. A Attend the A A Capella Showcase benet concert at the school at 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, March 20. Tickets are $8 and ad ditional donations will be accepted all evening. For more information on how you can contribute, con tact Matthew S Swope at matthew. swope@ocps.net The A Art & H History Museums Maitland (AA&HH), is pleased to announce that the exhibition, Borders of Paradise: The N New World in the E Eyes of the E Explor ers, has been extended through May 6. C Call 407-539-2181 or visit AArtandHHistory.org The A Art and H History Museums Maitland presents its S Spring S Se ries of AArt Classes, beginning on AA pril 2. Participants can choose from an array of creative classes, all instructed by professional art ists and educators. R Register at AArtandHHistory.org or 407-5392181 extension 265, or in person. AAt 10:30 a.m. each Tuesday, the Maitland Public Library hosts preschool story and craft time. AAt 10:30 a.m. each Thursday, it hosts baby time stories and ac tivity. A At 4 p.m. each Thursday, it hosts R Reading B Buddies. C Call 407647-7700. SSend submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com HHelp send Winter Park HHigh SSchools all-girl a cappella group Take 7 to the nals in New Y Y ork CCity. A Attend the AA CCappella SShowcase benet concert at the school at 7:30 p.m. on March 20. Tickets are $8 and additional donations will be accepted all evening. For information on how you can contribute, contact Matthew SSwope at matthew.swope@ocps.net PHotoOTOS CoOURt TESY ofOF wWINtTER pP ARkK hHIGhH schSCHOOlL Winter Park High Schools all-girl a capella group, Take 7, needs to raise $7,000 to attend the national nals in New Y Y ork CCity in A A pril. Take 7 hopes to take on NYNYC StT AcCY BARt TON Guest Writer

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Page 11 Thursday, March 15, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer MMarch 17 Fossil Fest at the Science Center day event at the Orlando Science Center as OSC hosts Fossil Fest 6 a celebration of dinosaurs from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Unearth your inner paleontologist as you experience presentations from fossil experts, bones on display Larson, founder of Black Hills Institute of Geological Research in South Dakota, will conduct a seminar via Skype on extinction theories about what killed the dinosaurs 65 million Florida  Fossil Hunters, who will share specimens of huge bones and teeth from mega-beasts that thrived here during the ice ages, and participate in a new handson activity called the Jr. Paleontologist program. Call  407-5142000  or visit  osc.org MM arch 17 M M ayor D D yer hosts NNeighborhood Summit Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer invites all Orlando residents to attend the 7th Annual Neigh borhood & Community Summit from 7:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, March 17, at the DoubleTree hotel, near Universal Orlando, at 5780 Major Blvd. The Summit brings together neighborhood, arts and cultural, civic, community and faith-based leaders to share information on community partnerships while offering the opportunity to learn about city programs. Some of the many workshops include: Safety Connection; Mayors Matching Grants; and Creating a 501(c)(3). A $10 registration fee includes workshops, continental breakfast, lunch and conference materials. Call 407-246-2500 or visit  cityoforlando.net/summit   MM arch 16, 18, and 20 OO pera at UCF  UCF Opera has been expanding its program, including adding three performances of Otto Nicolais  Merry Wives of Windsor  this month.  The performances are free and open performances will take place at 7 p.m. on Friday, March 16, and 3 p.m. on Sunday, March 18, in the Pegasus Ballroom in UCFs Student Union Building. The third performance will be at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, March 20, at the Resurrection Catholic Church in Winter Garden.  Under the direction of Thomas Potter, UCF Opera will perform a musical adaptation of the Shakespearean comedy with themes of love, marriage, jealousy and revenge as one of Shakespeares most famous comic characters Fal staff simultaneously courts two married women and gets caught. The opera will be sung in English, and will feature the UCF Chamber Orchestra under the direction of Dr. Laszlo Marosi. Call 407-823-2869  or visit  music. ucf.edu MM arch 21 to A A pril 22 Seeing RRed The Orlando Shakespeare Festival presents the 2010 Tonyaward-winning play Red, a seductive and often disturbing look at painter Mark Rothko, from March 21 to April 22 in Loch Haven Park. Written by John Logan, who was nominated for Oscars for writing Avatar and Gladiator, Rothko is seen struggling to create new works as he nears the end of his career. The plays two characters, the angry and impassioned Rothko thoughts and philosophy around the stage like the random drops on a Jackson Pollock painting. In 90 short minutes, the venomous Rothko embodies the will to create that drives great artists while timid Ken blooms into someone In the end, the audience sees through the psychobabble to understand a defensive artist struggling with his pride, his legacy and his will to create. Call 407-447-1700 or visit orlandoshakes.org MM arch 24 pAR AR Ticipation at the A A rt & History M M useums MMaitland Step up and be amazed!  The Art & History Museums Mai tland will dazzle you at its upcoming fundraiser called  pAR Ticipation, Circus of the Sur real, at 5:30 p.m. on Saturday, March 24, at the A&Hs Maitland Center, 231 W. Packwood Ave. This evening of art, dining and diversions  begins with cocktails and performers in the Mayan Courtyard, where guests will mingle with acclaimed artists.  The ringmaster then parades the crowd into the main garden, where the artistic hosts will each create a table that expresses their artwork. In addition to an artistic dining experience, guests will enjoy performances featuring the Empty Spaces Theatre Co., directed by John DiDonna.  The of decadent desserts, libations and performances, and a  si lent auction of art  created and donated by the host-artists.  Call 407-539-2181, extension 262, or visit artandhistory.orgJosh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. H H e is a member of the C C uratorial C C ouncil for the Museum of Florida A A rt. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906. Its TAX time. Appointments Available 7 Days a Week!Tax Form Processing LLC2400 N Forsyth Rd., Suite 101 Orlando, FL 32807Tel: (407) 657-6336www.TaxFormProcessing.com Proudly Serving the Orlando Area for 17 years! Scan QR Code This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH O RLANDO A VE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.E NZIAN.ORG Academy Award Winner! A SEPARATION Fri Sun 3:30 6:30 9:30 Mon, Tue, Thurs 6:30 9:30 Wed 9:30 Only FilmSlam Sun 1:00Coming Soon:21st Annual Florida Film FestivalApril 13-22 Josh Garrick Culture worthy of your calendarUnearth your inner scientist MMayor DDyers summit Fossil Fest

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Page 12 Thursday, March 15, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Healthy Living For the 12 years hes worked for the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce, when monthly staff meetings rolled around, Jay Rupert could always be counted on to bring at least one thing to the with warm, gooey doughnuts. It was tradition, said Marisa Carroll, senior director of Cham ber initiatives and events. But with the 2012 new year, out went the tradition and up went a sign. No sweets it reads, hang ing next to the door of the Cham bers conference room, with a pic ture of a doughnut crossed out. It wasnt spurred by a new years resolution or corporate crackdown, but by a workroom discussion, too-tight sport coat and the Chambers desire to make Winter Park workers living and working healthier. With the help of a $225,000 grant from the Winter Park Health Foundation, the Chamber is working to launch its Work Well Winter Park initiative to help do just that on Wednesday, April 4. But like with many things, Chamber employees knew that the journey to health has to begin internally. Since January, Chamber President Patrick Chapin says, Chamber staff has been learning to walk the walk before they talk the talk to its member businesses on how to implement healthy liv ing policies in the workplace. Step 1, the staff decided: no more sodas or sweets in the of Rupert, fueled by both the Work Well talk and a collection of sport coats that would no longer button, willingly swapped out his doughnut tradition for a fresh fruit bowl. Its amazing how you can change habits when stuff like this is on your mind, he said. Tradition now is the Monday morning Rupert Report in which he weighs in and reports his weekly weight loss. He says hes gone from the doughnut guy to Work Well poster boy, losing 18 pounds since January. We want to do this with and for employees, Carroll said, not to them. Once you get your insides fu eled better, its time to get physical. The Chambers step 2: getting up and active during the work day. Another sign hangs next to the door to the Chambers stairwell Change happens one step at a time. Take the stairs. Chapin said through encourag ing people to take the stairs, and by implementing Sneaker Fri day with a midday walk through Winter Park, the Chamber is fur ther helping its employees feel good inside and out. Were not trying to all become marathon runners, were just tryliving healthier, he said. And since the sign was hung to hear the elevator ding 75-80 percent of the time anyone came up stairs, he now hears the stair well door slam. This isnt just about a pro gram, he said. Its about chang ing policies to change workplace culture and make long-term change. Thats a change he hopes will take hold not only in the environ ment at the Chamber, but also in its community members. Though the Work Well Winter Park project month, he said the Chamber is al ready working with 10 to 15 community businesses to start assess ing each ones health and wellness policies and needs, to see how best Work Well can help them. Each company, by joining the effort, will be given access to resources in the area regarding all aspects of overall health, from nu ment and sleep evaluations. Chapin said that the Work Well project is all about bringing all members of the Winter Park community together to encour age them to live healthier, happier lives by in the end increasing accessibility to make the healthy choice the easy choice. Were not necessarily changing the world but if we can just move that needle a little bit to ward a healthier community, we are changing peoples lives, he said. Hours: M-F 8am to 4:30pm 2315 Lee Road Winter Park, Florida 32789 Your Guiding Beacon for Quality Healthcare Harbour Private Duty Nursing, LLCSkilled Nursing Physical Therapy Occupational Therapy Companionship Home Health Aid Homemaking Flexible Schedules Free RN Assessments The Services of Harbour Private Duty Nursing provide peace of mind to loved ones, trust ofcers, guardians and physicians. Our professional team prides itself on making your life easier. We also provide in-hospital private duty care, which offers close, personal attention and reassurance in an unfamiliar and often frightening environment. Our ofce hours are Monday through Friday, 8:00 am to 4:30 pm. Our professional team is available 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. During hours when the ofce is closed and during the weekends and holidays, the on-call coordinator is available by telephone 24 hours per day.www.HarbourPrivateDutyNursing.com License # 299991382phone (407) 895-8188 fax 407-895-9339 Its not just about getting you back on your feet. Its about getting you back to your life. HCR Healthcare, LLC Rehabilitation and Skilled Nursing PHotoOTOS BY IsSAAcC bBAbcBCOckCK tTHE oOBSERVER Winter Park Chamber President Patrick Chapin and events director Marisa CCarroll choose to take the stairs instead of using the elevator. Sweets out, sweat in CChamber promotes healthier workplace policy with Work Well Winter Park SARAhH WIlsLSON Observer SStaff Weekly walks, eliminating sweets and encouraging employees to take the stairs are just a few of the ways the Winter Park CChamber is working to help its employees live more healthily. The Work Well Winter Park program ofcially launches on A A pril 4 National Walking Day at 8:30 a.m. at the CCentral Park stage. VVisit WorkWellWinterPark.org for information on how to get involved.

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Page 13 Thursday, March 15, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer My name is Paula McCor mick. I am a loving wife and proud mother of four wonderful children: Breanna, 17, Nicholas, 15, Megan, 9, and Cameron, 7. I would say my life is very full and rewarding. I work full time of Seacoast National Bank and that brings another sense of with the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. Its not hard to guess why so many people are passionate about raising money to support this wonderful cause. Statistics show that you know someone in your life, if not yourself, that has, is or will be touched by a blood cancer. Every four minutes some one is diagnosed with a blood cancer, and every 10 minutes, someone loses his or her battle. My story started in 2009 when I was diagnosed with lymphoma. While I was undergoing diagnostic measures to determine the degree and type of lymphoma, to give back. I reached out to the Leukemia and Lymphoma Soci help. The Disney Half Marathon with Team in Training fundraiser was just about to kick off, and I said I would attend the orientation. Running is not a friend of mine, but after hearing about the program I knew I could do it with the support of family and friends. In the end I raised $3,300 and completed a half marathon in March 2010, despite having a heart attack while undergoing radiation. My second event was Light the Night, and if youve never witnessed the beauty of the illuminated balloons that everyone carries during this night walk, you must plan on attending next year. I am now on my third event to raise money for LLS as a candidate for the paign every dollar raised equates into one vote. There are so many stories with great outcomes, but unfortunately there are many with sad ones. For this reason I am committed to helping LLS blood cancers. Over the past decade, Society-funded research has made possible new multiple-drug therapies, the development of stem cell transplantation, the tions that cause particular blood cancers, and the drugs Gleevec, Velcade, Revlamid and Rituxan. These new-targeted drugs have for chronic myelogenous leukemia, non-Hodgkin lymphoma and myeloma patients, and have dramatically improved the quala little to support such a great cause. My link for donations is mccormick or you may visit LLS. org Paula McC C ormick is assistant branch manager at the Maitland ofce of SSeacoast National BBank. SShe lives in AAvalon Park. Lack of Desire or Low Energy? George Carroll, M.D., has over 20 years ex perience in sexual medicine, and is actively involved in the following: 407-894-9959 Please join us for a cocktail reception and fashion show from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, A A pril 19, at Wearable A Art by SScott Laurent,  340 N. Park A Ave., in Winter Park. Twenty percent of all proceeds will go to the Leukemia and Lymphoma SSociety. Cancer survivor gives back PAulULA McMCCORMIckCK Guest Writer Paula MMcCormick

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Page 14 Thursday, March 15, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Joann Tyson plugs her washing machine into a small monitor plugged into the out let of her Winter Park home, and casually counts the kilowatts as they accumulate slowly to $14 a year. I think its fun to use, and I think it would be a really good tool to use with children, to show them how much electric ity costs, Tyson said. I also think it would be very good to use if you were thinking of changing out an appliance. Tyson is referring to a small electric us age monitor, donated by the city of Winter Park to the Winter Park Public Library for residents to check out and monitor the us age of their own appliances. The city donated 10 electric usage moni tors, called Kill-a-watt, to the library in February 2011, each costing $39. Just like a book or a DVD, patrons are able to check out the device for two-week periods to monitor much they are costing them. The device plugs into the wall, then the appliance plugs into the meter, some elec tricity price information is entered, and a reading is given for the cost of each appli ance to use for the week, month or year on its LCD monitor. Tyson learned her cell phone costs her $1.33 a year, and her laptop costs $21 a year. She agrees with city and library staff that the device is yet another great tool the li brary can offer Winter Park residents. Its yet another way for us to part ner with the city, and provide important services to the community, Winter Park Public Library communications relation coordinator Mary Gail Coffee said. Were really all about providing people with the information they need to empower them to make better or different decisions for them selves. The city is providing these monitors to help show its utilities customers the areas cient and reduce energy costs. This is part of the citys overall effort to encourage en ergy conservation among its residents. Winter Parks director of electric utilities, Jerry Warren, said it puts the customers in a position to use appliances more sensibly. Our take is that Electric Utility has a re sponsibility to its customers to help them use our product more wisely, so that was the incentive to do this, Warren said. The sole purpose is to help our customers un derstand the cost of various devices they use. Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com PHotoOTO BY IsSAAcC bBAbcBCOckCK tTHE oOBSERVER Winter Park resident Joann Tyson used the electric usage monitor to log how much money is spent on applicances such as her blender, above, each year. HHer cell phone costs about $1 and her laptop costs about $21 for a year. Winter Park Public Library has 10 electric usage monitors available to its members to measure energy costs at home KRIstSTY VIckCKERY Observer SStaff There will be an energy conservation program hosted by Winter Park on Thursday, March 29. The event will offer two sessions: one for commercial customers from 9 to 11:30 a.m., and one for residential customers from 5:30 to 8 p.m. The event is free to Winter Park utility customers, but attendees must register by Friday, March 23. To register call 407-599-3285, or visit usgbcfgc.org/WinterParkBBiz (commercial customers) or usgbc-fgc.org/WinterParkHHomes (residential customers). Saving watts The Kill-a-watt monitors are available for checkout for a two-week period at the Winter Park Public Library located at 460 EE. NNew EEngland AA ve. For more information on electric usage monitors, call 407-623-3300.

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Page 15 Thursday, March 15, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer I am not jealous or in a com petition with any of my garden ing compatriots. In an occupation as rewarding as food gardening, the more the mer rier. When a neophyte has glar ing success entertaining a crop with which I struggle, my practiced tact kicks in to not blurt out axioms related to beginners luck. This lack of accumulated pests and diseases in a recently developed plot encourages the newbie to continue his endeavors, honing his skills for when troubles ar rive. And after a short appren ticeship, the now-experienced gardener can teach me a trick or two. Starting with Mel Bartholom ews book Square Foot Gar dening and then graduating to John Jeavons tome How to Grow More Vegetables is the beacon of a maturing dedication. In the early stages, simply germinating seeds is enough to feed the soul when looking for any success. My original goal was to merely consume something from the garden on a daily basis. After a couple of growing seasons, expectations to assuage the rumbly tummy emanate from the household as attention is drawn away from other honey-do projects. Time to submit results more substantial than complimenting a bagged-salad mix with a few homegrown nasturtium (edible) Productivity from the garden as a measure of quan tity will ultimately be derived from available growing space cultivated over time. A familys farm of a single growing bed 4 feet on a side produces enough green beans for a couple of meals, to the exclusion of most other crops. And then the whole garden needs to be started over from scratch. Time to dig up the grass, dedicate a germination space, rededicate the irrigation system and free up hours in a hectic schedule. Linking the foursquare plots into a lengthy growing bed is what were talk ing about. When enough plants are germinating, surviving, same time, produce purchases at the grocery will become a memory of the past. Finally, a managed risk resulting in a return on our own investment! Properly choosing crops, knowing that we have the luxury of spatial quantity, produces a quality all its own. Selecting to grow stalwart green scallion onions that produce year-round rations requires minimal space and they are universally consumed. Allow room for promised producers such as collard greens, kohlrabi, turnips and radishes to tender repetitive provisions. Harvest, repatriate the soil and customarily grow what will be eaten. and again. Once the routine of dependably feeding the famesteem unbeknownst to most food that we eat. Tom C C arey is the owner of S S undew Gardens, a you-pick gardening business in Oviedo. V Visit the SSundew Gar dens Facebook page.Women hold up half the sky and everyone else! Are you a woman who spends plenty of time and energy taking ty common. In fact, many women take care of everyone else and forget to care for themselves. For example, while every woman older than 40 should get a mammogram every one to two years, women in Florida older than 40 have not had a mammogram in the past two years. Are you that woman caring for others and just not getting around to taking others are less likely to get the care they need for themselves. A 2011 Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index shows that women ages 45 to 64 have the lowest well-being of any age group or gender, and are worse off than women a generation ago. and younger children, caring for everyone and getting to work on time being superwoman takes a toll. Care giving can be posi tive giving that all-important sense of purpose, meaning and connectedness but it also takes time and energy. This can often result in prioritizing caring for everyone else and neglecting your own care. Carve out time for yourself every day, even if it is in only me time. I know, easier said than done. Take good care of yourself with a healthy diet rich in veg etables, whole grains and low-fat dairy. Go get that check up you have been postponing. Add some exercise. I know, it might sound crazy to cope with exercise, but even 20 minutes a day can give you energy, release stress, build muscles and heart strength. Ask for help. Dont try to do it all. Maitland resident Nancy RRudner Lugo is a nurse practitioner and president of HHealth A Action, offering workplace health consulting and nurse coaching. V Visit www.healthaction.biz Superwoman could be healthier carve out some me time Visit us at www.workwellwinterpark.org. healthy the City of Wi nter Park 1887 2012thANNIVERSARY Work Well Winter Park Wednesday, April 4, 2012 8:30 a.m. Central Park Stage Dr. Nancy Rudner Lugo HHealth A Action Tom Carey From my garden to yoursProductivity food gardening

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Page 16 Thursday, March 15, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Bright House Networks Salutes the 53rd AnnualWinter Park Sidewalk Art FestivalOne Of The Nations Oldest, Largest And Most Prestigious Juried Outdoor Art Festivals www.brighthouse.com 53rd Winter Park Sidewalk Art Festival AABOOUT THEE POOSTERER ARAR TIIST ROROBERER T C. BEECK Robert C Beck is an American modern realist painter, printmaker, masters, Beck has developed a diverse knowledge of skills and media used is exhibited in museums, galleries and his BA from Rollins College in his hometown of Winter Park, where he studied printmaking, drawing Beck worked for a short time as Central Park along Park Avenue in Winter Park, March 16, 17 and 18, 2012 9 am-6 pm, Friday and Saturday; 9 am-5 pm, Sunday

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Page 17 Thursday, March 15, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer MMUSIIC ANDAND ENENTERER TAINMEN AINMENT AAll entertainment is free and presented on the main stage located in north CCentral Park. MMARchCH 16, FRIDAY 4:30-5:15 pP .mM. AAsh Jandga 5:45-7:00 pP .mM. RRich Walker Quartet w/ Linda CCole 7:30-9:00 pP .mM. Warren HHill MMARchCH 17, SAtu TURDAY 10:00-10:45 aA.mM. RRollins SString Quartet 11:00-12:00 pP .mM. BBeautiful Music Modern Quartet 12:301:30 pP .mM. Doug BBaileys Pop SShop IInc. 1:45-2:30 pP .mM. Davey RRocker BBarnyard Jam 2:45-3:45 pP .mM. Per and Tamara Danielsson 4:15-5:45 pP .mM. SSunnie Paxson MMARchCH 18, SuUNDAY 10:00-10:45 aA.mM. Three Flutes Only 11:15-12:00 pP .mM. Orlando BBrass Quintet 12:301:30 pP .mM. MakeSShift a cappella 2:00-3:00 pP .mM. Orlando CConcert BBand 3:30-5:00 pP .mM. Jazz Professors AAll music produced by S Sonny A Abelardo Production AABOOUT THEE FEESTIIVA AL The Winter Park Sidewalk Art Festival is one of the nations most prestigious outdoor art festivals, consistently rated among the top shows in the country. The festival is also one of the largest outdoor events held in Orange County drawing approximately 300,000 visitors during the three-day show. This year, more than 1,100 artists from around the world applied for entry. An independent panel of three judges selected the 225 artists exhibit ing their works in the festival. The National Endowment for the Arts, The White House, Congress and many others have lauded the festival over the years for promoting art and art education in Central Florida. An all-volunteer board of directors produces the annual festival, now celebrating its 53rd year. FAMI AMILY Y FUNN Girls and boys can create their own artwork at the Childrens Workshop Village. Easel painting is very popular, and local art centers and museums feature a variety of fun, hands-on art activities for children. Admission is free, and participants may take home their artistic creations. The Childrens Workshop Village hours are 10 am-4 pm on Fri day, Saturday and Sunday. Easel painting is from 10 am pm on Saturday and Sunday.

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Page 18 Thursday, March 15, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer OOpinions Kudos to staff I just want to applaud you for your staff opinion column today (Hacking and crimes of enlightenment published March 8). I have almost that actually seems to understand the important role of journalists in our society! Kudos!Pat Osborn SSt. Paul, Minn. Heres what readers on wpmobserver.com are writing about the M M arch 8 guest column Celebrate Winter Parks businesses by Clyde MMoore, owner of II LUV Winter Park, IInc.: Great Clyde, well done, we moved to Winter Park in I went to Glen ridge Middle School and the old Win ter Park High School, now the ninth ever since, although I moved away to go to college, overseas, and am now in Houston, I still get back to WP when I can. I still call WP my "hometown", still have many friends and classmates in WP and Maitland. Please keep up cal and with charm and grace, most important for all of us, thanks for all that you are doing! BBill Gottfried HHouston, Texas We have been in WP for 12 years, those around much longer than us say to seven years. We have seen several shops "transition", several of the chain stores we frequented left when Mall at Millenia opened; others like Wood Stone and Steel closed about the same time. There is a feeling that Park Ave nue is becoming more of a "restaurant row" but closings, Circa and Spice, may be countering openings. Landlords often get the top line in why a business is closing but most know the market well and will work to the extent they can to keep tenants; some times the business is just not strong enough to make the commitment. The best thing we can do is support the local businesses we care for so much by frequenting them. We remember doing much of our Christmas shop ping in downtown Winter Park 10-12 years ago those stores are gone. No value judgment perhaps we have transitioned and will continue to do so, and we will continue to miss the old favorites!Jack Miles Winter Park I love your article. My grandmom lived in Maitland forever until she passed away three weeks ago. My sister now lives in her home; my mom went to Winter Park High School and I have cousins who attend the same school now. Winter Park and Maitland hold wonderful memories for me. And now my sister, Jana Rice, has started Peak-Season-Pops in Winter Park and would love to get more involved in the festivals that your beautiful city has to offer. So for everyone who loves supporting local businesses, please check out Peak-Season-Pops coming to a sidewalk near you. (Hopefully) Jessica Lasky HHarmes AAcworth, Ga. Clyde, Thanks for a great article and for your work to highlight all our of what makes Winter Park a special community is shared by everyone I meet. We are indeed the best place to live, work and play. Circa and Spice will be missed! See you on the Avenue! CCarolyn CCooper Winter Park city commissioner What message are you sending out to potential tact matters. From the presentation of your resume to the acceptance of an offer, you are being judged on what you say and what you do when you are job searching. When people meet you, what is their impres receptionist and others around you while you wait for an interview, or do you sit on your cell phone Do you complain about your last employer or do you highlight what was good about your job some very interesting bosses, but I would never trash them in an interview. Do you look the interviewer in ly or do you stare at the walls or at dont ever do it againplease. Do you dress for an interview, a nightclub, or a Do you limit your interview answers to answer you ask questions at the end, or say you covered time and again, I get feedback from interviewers who share stories of what people did in the inter views or in other contact. Sometimes I share stories of things I have seen in the process. The more you become aware of your behaviors things that may be sabotaging your chances of get ting hired. Do you have any stories of bad interviewers information below. SS andi V V idal is the executive director for C C hristian HE HE LP and the CC entral Florida E E mployment C C ouncil. Please send questions to sandi@christianhelp.orgMars will have to wait, according to a budget proposal released by President Barack Obama. And it may have to wait a long time before we have question thats plagued us for decades. Before he ascended into super stardom as Ziggy Stardust while America was at the height of the space race in the early 1970s, David Bowie asked if there was life on Mars. Now on the verge of launching a program with the potential to make our greatest discoveries, were avoiding that question again while quietly if it goes as planned, will end in 2014. Times reported on a budget proposal from the White House that would call for a $1.2 billion cut in NASAs budget, all of which would come from robotic space exploration. It was an even more staggering blow for NASA, which has already withdrawn from joint missions with the European Space Agency in 2016 and 2018. That could push us back as far as the 2030s before we can explore Mars and beyond, the diSociety says. Considering our international reputation right now, cutting back on our more socially benwere being accused of pushing for war in Iran would seem a bad public relations move at best, and a betrayal of a peaceful future at worst. As a nation continually at war for the last decade, while endur ing a crushing recession in the latter half of it, weve found our selves in the unfortunate either/ or position of choosing ostensible defense over social betterment Weve experimented with the cost of reducing spending on our own peril. By necessity were constantly moving forward, looking for cures for new diseases and creating technology that moves people and information But in war we seem crippled by mistakes of hindsight and foresight. Our weapons are more powerful than ever, yet we situations compared to the war in Vietnam, yet with no bet ter answers on how to win. We already know the cost: more than a trillion dollars in Afghanistan and Iraq, plus the ongoing costs of interest on debt incurred to of caring for the wounded for decades to come. A joint ABC News and Washington Post poll released Monday showed that 60 percent of Americans believe the war in Afghanistan is not worth its cost. That cost is about $5.3 billion per month, a substantial discount compared to earlier last year when it exceeded $7 billion per month. The total cost of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars combined passed the $1 trillion barrier in November, representing a cost of more than $100 billion per year. All of those numbers are groups, including economists from Brown University consider a conservative estimate. They say $3.7 trillion. The entire NASA program, which has in its launches into space leapt us forward into the future we have today, has cost us about half that in all of its 54 years combined. In a July 2011 CBS poll, nearly two-thirds of responders said the recently canceled space shuttle program advancements weve arrived at thanks to NASA, weve decided wed rather not invest in the future when were busy doing what nearly two-thirds of Americans equate to throwing money on a Ten years after terrorists at tacked us on our own soil, were for fear that if we dont, it will imperil our way of life. But when a war with an uncertain conclusion, we already have. Its been 41 years since David Bowie asked if there was life on Mars. That was two years after wed landed on the moon. Though our ability to reach for the stars has grown tremendously in the ensuing four decades, we still cant seem to grasp the economics to get us off the launchpad. Our Observation Sandi Vidal AAsk SSandi King Features Weekly ServiceMarch 12, 2012 EEvery contact matters in your job searchCountry is at war with its own futureLetters to the editor SSend your thoughts (400 words or less) to Managing EEditor Jenny AAndreasson at editor@observernewspapers.com TWENt T Y-FOUR YEARS OF MARRIAGE, AND tT HIS St T ORE HAS KEPt T US IN BLING-BLING FROM HEAD tT O tT OE! H HAPPY WWIFE, HHAPPY LLIFE, HHAPPY HHUSBAND. THANKS tT O ALL OF YOU, PASt T AND PRESENt T! EELIN, MMAtt TT AND tT HE CREW... CCONGRAt T ULAt T IONS! SSEE YOU ALL SOON. CCARLA LLUBEt T Heres what a reader on wpmobserver.com wrote about the MM arch 8 article M M aitland store reopens its doors about the new MM aitland Jewelers:

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Page 19 Thursday, March 15, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Have you ever ridden down Park Avenue and wondered about the cream-colored build ing located on the corner of Park you have, you might have asked yourself, whats going on in something interesting and that it is! The distinguished building is the University Club of Winter Park, and whats going on inside is any number of the many intellectual, educational or cultural activities that serve its members. This unique club was founded in 1934 by a group of Winter Park pioneers, who, in a moment of jest remarked, It will hearing of our wives and tell each other how great we are. powwows and were intended as intellectual feasts for college professors, clergymen, lawyers, doctors and others of similar education and background. In time, the University Club of Win ter Park became known as the Athens of the South. Famous artists, musicians and opera stars, enticed by the beautiful winter weather, performed at the club and membership swelled to more than 900. Begun as an all-male establishment, the club charter was changed in 1977 to include women. Today, the University Club of Winter Park is run entirely by its members, dedicated volunteers who make the club a remarkable establishment of learning. As well as providing intellectual opportu nities for those interested in continuing to learn, the club assumes a philanthropic responsibility in the community. It offers scholar ships for worthy students, grants and provides services through The current goals and pur intentions of those original members. These are to promote education and to engage in literary pursuits, including the conduct of public discussion groups, forums, panels, lectures and similar programs. Some of todays most popular programs are philosophy, classical music with live virtuosos concerts, history, foreign affairs seminars, current events, book reviews, book discussion groups and foreign language classes. Many activities meet during the day, sometimes at luncheon programs, or in the evenings either at group meetings or at dinners in a more social setting with programs that educate and entertain. In an attempt to stay abreast of the expanding interests of its members, the club has broadened its focus to include arts and crafts, ballroom dancing, Trivia4U, bridge and mahjong. The club presently offers 38 different groups of interest to its members and the public. So the next time youre on the corner of Park and Webster that will pique your interest. Remember, youre never too old to learn. Linda L. Dunlap is a long-time member of UUniversity CClub of Winter Park and co-chairs the book review group. The club is located at 841 N. Park A Ave. V Visit www.uclubwp.org or call 407-629-2125 for more information and a schedule of groups. CChris Jepson Perspectives Why art? E Exactly because it is gnarly out there War, politics and other recollectionsLife is short, art is long. Hippocrates Its an all-too-brief slog. Life is. Read any amount of history and two overarching themes that jump out are how transitory life is as well as how human beings have attempted to understand (convey) our condition. Were conceived. We achieve consciousness. We die. In between we live. Concomitant is the fact that life is often brutal, violent and sor rowful. Art is the attempt to make sense of it all. To give meaning. To express what is (reality), what could be (inspirational). And at times, what was. Art informs every aspect of our lives, from how we live, to how we see, hear and learn. We are talking art pieces, human canvases (mobiles) in which we display who we are and why we exist. Art is an indi vidual or collaborative endeavor, but it is a collective, societal value requiring an awareness of, reverence for and support the human experience yet many take it for granted, much like the air we breathe. How do you justify art in a world of with their hands forever out, begging at the ramps to our interstates. What of all-too-regular violence (shootings) in our cities and suburbs. Pervasive poverty. Our forever wars. Mindless acts of brutality. School massacres. Diseases. Our cancer ous environment. Ad nauseum. How do you justify art in a world of in disrepair. Cuts in school funding. Teachers/cops furloughed. Crowded roadways. Disintegrating infrastructure. Unfunded federal and state mandates Why support culture (art and its the art museum, the philharmonic, local and insist that our government (local/ county/state/federal) fund the arts and minister recommended in Parliament during World War II that Britain cut arts funding to support the war effort. Alleg edly, Churchills response was, Then veracity of Churchills retort is questioned but the sentiment is timeless. of Canada, Jean Chretien, observed that, An important measure of a great civiliza tion, of a great society, is its contribution to humanity through the sciences and the arts, through its discoveries, its innovations, its cathedrals and canvasses, its stories and its music. tory of our species. Ours is a history you can easily wrap your mind around. Were a young species, writing for maybe 10,000 years, creating art for 40,000 years (see: the Venus of Hohle Fels). Many things surface (violence, war, famine, struggle) as one mentally chronicles our journey. But what stands out are our achievements in art. Whether it was the Greeks and their playwrights, Renaissance art, Elizabethan theater or French Impressionism, we measure ourselves and our culture by the art we create (foster). fering will still be with us tomorrow. The degradation and humiliation, the sorrow associated with being human is our con dition and our constant challenge. profound realization that true transcen dence (beauty and grace) is possible. Jepson is a 24-year resident of Florida. HHes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. RReach him at Jepson@MEEDIAIAmerica.USUS Louis RRoney Play On! It must be shocking to many straightforward Americans that President Obama resorts to obliquely dishonest euphemisms when referring to "the Global War on Terrorism." How can a man rightly act to protect our country when he curiously refers to the Global War on Terrorism as the war on a far-reaching network own mind clearly cannot face the fact of terrorism, something he has pledged to deal with in our favor.Soros = trouble?Cosmopolites have pointed out to me that Soros sounds curiously, but tsuris  i.e. trouble in River City Wise observationWhat difference does it make whether the women rule or the rulers are ruled by totlePolitics denedPolitics might well be called a systematic organization of hatreds.Fish and eggsIn the Depression my Winter Park school days we lived in Forest Hills near Lake Sue. Often at 6 a.m., I caught a few nice big bream from the lake, scaled them on the spot and took home boneless bacon fat. Alongside scrambled eggs those bream made a super breakfast. I can taste them now!Plain, old treatI remember from bygone college days,  my travels via automobile, and sometimes via my thumb, between Florida and Massachusetts. Along the way were welcome stops at diners for a cup of coffee and a doughnut. The latter cost all of a nickel and was made out of special dough (hence doughnut), and was lightly sprinkled with sugar and, per haps, a bit of cinnamon. Those dough nuts had a special simple good taste and went with coffee in an inimitable way. I now search  in vain for a plain ordinary doughnut of the kind that used to satisfy adequately, but not excessively. Today, even a local well-known  doughnut shop sells only doughnuts of a different kind of dough, and dolled up with a glaze that converts a simple taste into that of a dessert of sorts. I guess Im seeking a plain Tin Lizzie in these modern days, when the Chevrolet has become a complicated automatic chrome-plated behemoth. DDivorces when you can recall the days when an ordinary divorce caused a scandal in the neighborhood.Suckers and liarsAt this time Im glad that my two children are grown and that my grandson is 30. I would hate to bring up little kids in todays beclouded concepts of right and wrong. When Obama began a recent speech, my b.w. and I begin to count the lies as they slipped lightly off his tongue. How do you get todays kids to believe the George Washington story about the cherry tree they would think that George was a sucker because he told the truth, when an Obama lie would have so easily put the blame on someone else. What would you say if the head of your family, without any  increase in income, suddenly swelled your familys Well, our U.S. head, Barack Obama, has done just that! Next time around lets be sure that our national head is screwed For a long time I have had the feeling that our president feels no especial love for this unique country. AAbout RRoney: HHarvardDistinguished Prof, EEm.UCUCF 2004 Fla. A Alliance for the A Arts award (AAssisted by beautiful wife Joy RRoney) How do you justify art in a world of sorrow? Winter Park club oers 38 groups LINDA L. DuDUNlLApP Guest Writer Linda L. DDunlap

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407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC USPS 00-6186 Publisher statement on page 4. Thursday, March 15, 2012 50+ tax wpmobserver.com Subscribe now! Visit wpmobserver.com With what they forecast to be a stormy budget season brewing on the horizon, Maitland City Council members say now, more than ever, every dollar spent or received counts. So when a decision on wheth er to raise the salaries of the city manager and city clerk was pre sented in front of the Council on Monday, March 12, the members had to decide where to draw a line between thanking their staff with words or dollars. If we could afford it, I'd ap prove the same increase we gave the rest of the city staff, Coun cilman Phil Bonus said, referring to the 2 percent merit-based raise approved for city staffers in the 2012 budget passed last Septem ber. But Councilman Ivan Valdes pointed out that though the city clerk and manager do a great job, the city, in fact, might not be able to afford any extra dollars toward bumping salaries come the next few months leading to budget season. I don't think it's in our best interest that just because it was budgeted in there we should do it. its our responsibility to the city and residents, whose money we're spending, to be wary that every time we turn around our revenue is being cut, he said. Valdes said that if the raise were given, the money would likely eventually have to be made budget. Sometimes the people at the top have to suffer a little bit so that the people at the bottom don't, he said. I want to pro tect the people beneath them who can least afford to take a cut. In the past three years, city staffers salaries have remained Brian Jones said the last meritFor nearly half a century Louis Roney was known around the world for his operatic Hall of Fame on March 21. It didnt take much of a movement to see him nominated for the award. The longtime Winter Park resident already had some very powerful friends. Speaking at the podium of the U.S. House of Representatives on Jan. 24, Rep. John Mica did all the talking for him. He and his career have had a deep and profound impact on our community, state and nation, Mica said. world, in opera houses as near as Orlando and as far as Vienna. He toured Europe play ing Faust for Monacos Prince Rainier, and tory of Italys largest opera festival. But while he toured the world serving as never forgot his hometown. My memories of Winter Park, having grown up in this little town, which it was when I graduated from grammar school in I spent many happy years here, which I on a warship, Roney said. I did not forget it when I was in Europe singing that Winter Park was waiting here for me to come back some day. It was Winter Parks charm that had lured his wife, Joy, into a new home that would soon be the duos base for starting the Or known as the Orlando Festival of Orchestras) and teaching music to local students. I met Joy in New Yorkand when we came down here on our honeymoon she fell in love with it, Roney said. We looked around a bit, and the next day we bought a house on a lake. This would be their home for the rest of their lives, Roney said. They established a scholarship fund for student singers. He taught as distinguished professor of music for 19 years at the University of Central Flor ida, even as he continued to win praise for his voice. Monday afternoon, March 12, the acco lades kept coming for Roney, who was given honor his achievements. writer and teacher preceded him to the po dium at the Rachel Murrah Civic Center. If you read his column in the Observer you know hes a very humble man, Mayor Ken Bradley said jokingly. Roneys column, Play On!, has been pub lishing for 31 years. Its never missed a week, The best thing we can do is support the local businesses we care for so much by frequenting them. Page 18 Letters to the editor Healthy Living The Work Well Winter Park program ofcially launches April 4. Its not too late to get your business involved. Page 12 Lifestyles Help send Winter Park High Schools all-girl a cappella group Take 7 to the nals in New York City next month. Page 10 Calendar Anne Sebba will discuss her new book That Woman, a biography of the late Duchess of Windsor. Page 8 TAX DEFERREDFIXED ANNUITY RATE FOR 5 YEARS.Bob Adams 407-644-6646THE NATIONAL 5 YEAR CD RATE IS 1.34%3.35% 451 Maitland Ave, Altamonte Springs, FL 32701NEW Dermatology Ofce!407-599-SKIN (7546)*Waive co-payment up to $25 No referral needed Accepting all insurances Dr. John Cottam Dr. Ross Wheeler Please see RONEY on page 5 Council gets cautious about compensation Maitland City Council is wary of current and future spending in lieu of looming budget season SARAH WILSON Observer Staff PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Louis Roney, 91, and wife Joy are introduced by Winter Park Mayor Ken Bradley at Mondays Commission meeting. Please see COUNCIL on page 2 Fame comes home for Roney ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff Louis Roney, along with other distinguished Floridians, will be honored at the Florida Heritage Month awards at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, March 21, at the Florida State Conference Center in Tallahassee. The event is free and open to the public.

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Page 2 Thursday, March 15, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer SaleDOWNTOWN WINTER PARK sidewalk Park Avenue and Hannibal Square stores offering merchandise from 50-75% OFF For more information, visit winterpark.org or call 407.644.8281Please see participating stores for details.Thursday, March15th through Sunday, March18th earnable raise was offered for 3 percent in 2009. He said the city budgeted $200,000 for this years 2 percent raises, with the actual are issued throughout the year on hiring anniversaries. If any increase was to be given to the city manager and clerk, in stead of a raise in salary, Valdes proposed a 1 percent one-time lump-sum bonus be awarded instead, to save the city money in the long run that is associated with an overall salary raise, from increased pension, unemploy ment and paid vacation. Council woman Linda Frosch countered his proposal by bumping it up to a 2 percent one-time bonus, to which the Council members, aside from Valdes, agreed. We need to really show our people love, and not just a pat on the back, Mayor Howard Schief erdecker said. We need to seal the deal. But the Council members all agreed that any and all money spent going into budget season needs to be spent wisely. Every dollar counts, Councilman Phil Bonus said. We know this up coming budget season is going to be rough. Jones said the Council was right to be cautious. From possible cuts in funding from both the state and county level, he said, There's just a lot of uncertainty out there right now. COUNCIL | C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE A great orchestra plays great music to great effect An evening dedicated to the memory of David and Libby Roberts LOUIS RONEY Observer Staff S ince the days of my wifes and my founding of the Festival of Orchestras, a local public hungry for great symphonic music has often waited for such a night as was March 9, when the Orlando Philharmonic presented the Minnesota On March 9, conductor Osmo Vnsk provided solid proof that his Yes, this is the same Osmo Vnsk who jumped in, in Orlando, and tras date at the last moment. Osmo Vnsk and the Iceland Symphony prevented a catastrophe with a sizzling performance of the Sibeius Sym phony No. 2. This time on March 9, Vnsk and his Minnesotans opened with a beau tifully played Johannes Brahms' Variations on Theme by Haydn. Then the orchestra put their hooks into bigger things with the Sibelius Violin Concerto played by the international virtuoso Midori. Midori was ad challenging moments seem to be childs play. The evening's pice de rsistance came after intermission with the Beethoven Fifth Symphony, a piece which has been played to death without altering the fact that it is an all-time musical masterpiece. I had not heard the Fifth tuality, and its overwhelming logic. The Fifth has originality, courage, ahead-of-its-time musical ideas and enormous melodic beauty. Had Beethoven written nothing else but this piece, he would be acknowledged as a supreme genius. Vnsk and his forces played as a single awesome musical intelligence. The cheering audience gave voluble thanks to the programs sponsors, The Edyth Bush Charitable Foundation Inc., plus one generous anonymous donor.

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IMPORTANT NOTICEIf you or your loved one is or was a resident atMANOR CARE NURSING AND REHABILITATION CENTERThis facility has been cited for multiple deficiencies including:FAILURE to give residents proper treatment to prevent new bed (pressure) sores or heal existing bed sores.[3/19/2010]FAILURE to provide social services for related medical problems to help each resident achieve the highest possible quality of life.[5/09/2011]FAILURE to make sure that each resident who enters the nursing home without a catheter is not given a catheter, unless it is necessary.[10/06/2011]FAILURE to develop a complete care plan that meets all of a resident's needs, with timetables and actions that can be measured.[10/06/2011]FAILURE to provide enough notice before discharging or transferring a resident.[5/09/2011]FAILURE to let residents give themselves their drugs if they are able.[5/16/2011]FAILURE to properly mark drugs and other similar products.[5/09/2011, 3/19/2010]FAILURE to make sure that residents who take drugs are not given too many doses or for too long; make sure that the use of drugs is carefully watched; or stop or change drugs that cause unwanted effects.[10/06/2011, 3/19/2010]FAILURE to keep accurate and appropriate medical records.[10/06/2011, 3/19/2010]FAILURE to make sure that residents who cannot care for themselves receive help with eating/drinking, grooming and hygiene.[1/06/2011]FAILURE to make a complete assessment that covers all questions for areas that are listed in official regulations.[3/19/2010]FAILURE to develop a complete care plan within 7 days of each resident's admission; prepare a care plan with the care team, including the primary nurse, doctor, resident or resident's family or representative; or check and update the care plan.[1/06/2011]FAILURE to provide care in a way that keeps or builds each resident's dignity and self respect.[1/06/2011, 3/19/2010]FAILURE to have a program to keep infection from spreading.[1/06/2011, 3/19/2010]FAILURE to make sure that a working call system is available in each resident's room or bathroom and bathing area.[1/06/2011]FAILURE to provide at least one room to use as a dining room and for activities, that is a good size, with good lighting, airflow and furniture.[1/06/2011]FAILURE to develop/implement required procedures for the administration of mmunizations.[3/19/2010]FAILURE to give each resident enough fluids to keep them healthy and prevent dehydration.[3/19/2010]FAILURE to give professional services that follow each resident's written care plan.[3/19/2010]FAILURE to make sure that each resident who enters the nursing home without a catheter is not given a catheter, unless it is necessary.[3/19/2010]FAILURE to keep each resident's personal and medical records private and confidential.[3/19/2010]FAILURE to store, cook, and give out food in a safe and clean way.[3/19/2010]THIS IS AN ADVERTISEMENT If you or someone you love is or has been in the past a resident of Manor Care Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, call the law firm of Wilkes & McHugh, P.A. for a free consultation.800.255.5070www.wilkesmchugh.comPOOR CARE CAN LEAD TOBEDSORES, BROKEN BONES...EVEN DEATH. *Deficiencies were obtained from past federal inspection results available on Medicare.gov.

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Page 4 Thursday, March 15, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer USPS 00-6186 ISSN 1064-3613 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835-5705 Member of: Chamber of Commerce Publisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor. Submission does not guarantee publication. Columnists opinions are made independently of the newspaper. All rights reserved. Winter Park / Maitland Observer 2012 Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster www.wpmobserver.com | Phone: 407-563-7000 | Fax: 407-563-7099 | editor@observernewspapers.com P.O Box 2426 Winter Park, FL 32790 Published Thursday, March 15, 2012 CONT ACTS Volume 24, Issue Number 11 PUBLISHER Tracy Craft 407-515-2605 tcraft@observernewspapers.com MANAGING EDITOR Jenny Andreasson 407-563-7026 editor@observernewspapers.com DESIGNER Jonathan Gallagher 407-563-7054 jgallagher@observernewspapers.com REPOR TERS Jenny Andreasson 407-563-7026 editor@observernewspapers.com Isaac Babcock 407-563-7023 isaacb@observernewspapers.com LEGALS | CLASSIFIEDS Ashley McBride legal@FLAlegals.com classieds@observernewspapers.com COPY EDITORS Isaac Babcock isaacb@observernewspapers.com Sarah Wilson COLUMNISTS Chris Jepson Jepson@MediAmerica.us Louis Roney LRoney@c.rr.com Josh Garrick joshgarrick9@gmail.com FOR ADVER TISING INFORMATION Tracy Craft 407-515-2605 tcraft@observernewspapers.com SUBSCRIPTIONS | CIRCULATION Jackie Candelaria 407-563-7013 INTERN Andy Ceballos Business Briefs Community Bulletin Feb. 23 marked the ofcial opening of One Senior Place at 715 Douglas Ave. in Alta monte Springs. The senior services complex will follow the February ribbon-cutting event with a Community Open House celebra tion from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. on Thursday, March 22. Visit OneSeniorPlace.com or call 407-949-6733. Insight Credit Union is pleased to announce the promotion of Cindy Morgan to the posi tion of executive vice president/CFO. Jacob, Sherkman & Associates LLC re cently leased 2,250 square feet at 479 Montgomery Place in Altamonte Springs. Southern Realty Enterprises Inc. in Long wood represented the owners and tenants. Signage unveiling at the Maitland branch at 238 S. Orlando Ave. celebrated the local switch from RBC Bank USA to PNC Bank. Marco Santoro, regional manager, from left, Phil Stark, Maitland branch manager, and Joe Meterchick, Florida West Regional pres ident, struck a pose at 4:01 p.m. on Friday, March 2, as the Maitland RBC Bank closed and new PNC Bank sign was revealed. Winter Park in NYT The New York Times featured Winter Park in its travel section on Sunday, March 11. In the short article titled Near Orlando, Fla., a Sophisticated Alternative to Dis ney, Times journalist Erica Cerulo writes, Though businesses there (in Winter Park) have historically catered to the 9-iron set for ward-thinking shops and restau rants have started appearing along the two main thoroughfares, Park Avenue and New England Avenue. A photo gallery, Winter Park, Fla.: An Old-Time Resort Looks Ahead, featuring merchants such as the Winter Park Fish Company and Prato accompanied the article. Visit tinyurl.com/NYTWinterPark to view the piece. Student honors The following students were named to the Deans List of Emory College, the undergraduate, Liberal Arts Col lege of Emory University in Atlanta, Ga., for the 2011 fall semester. Stu dents must be in the top 20 percent of Emory College or have about a 3.81 grade point average or higher to be named to the Deans List. daughter of Dr. Nelson Tabirian and Dr. Anna Tabirian Park, son of Dr. Pyoungho Choi and Misook Kang son of Mary Taussig of Winter Park, and Dr. Andrew Taussig of Winter Park daughter of Robert Brennan and Wendy Brennan Join pet festival The 9th Annual Doggie Art Fes tival will be held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sunday, April 15. Artists and vendors are invited to partici pate. It will be taking over half of Park Avenue from Morse Boulevard to Canton Avenue this year. Email brian@bullsh.net or call The Dog gie Door at 407-644-2969 to sign up and arrange payment. Every $50 helps another greyhound nd a new home. Friday, March 30, is the deadline. Pancake pandemonium In its seventh year, National Pan cake Day, IHOPs annual free ap jack fundraiser, shattered a fund raising record, raising more than $3 million in donations for Chil drens Miracle Network Hospitals and other local charities. Fundraising volunteers needed Habitat for Humanity of Greater Orlando Area is seeking women to fundraise and participate in Women Build Week Orlando from May 7 to May 12. Across all 50 states, more than 7,000 women are raising funds needed to build affordable homes at more than 300 Habitat for Humanity construction sites. Contact Lynn Ivanek at livanek@ habitat-orlando.org or call 407648-4567 ext. 404. Fundraising teams must sign up by March 30. Send submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com One Senior Place Novelist visits On Feb. 23, Nigerian novelist Chiamanda Adichie, author of Half of a Yellow Sun and Purple Hibiscus, spoke to attendees of Rol lins Colleges Winter With the Writers event. Throughout the event, renowned writers shared their work and expertise with students and the community. Math stars Massey Services recently rewarded three Killarney Elementary School students with two VIP Massey Skybox suite tickets to an Orlando Magic Game. The reward came as a result of the students top scores in a contest, Massey Math Miles, sponsored by Massey PrevenTech Commercial Services. The contest challenged students to improve their math skills over a three-month period. Transformations An opening reception was held on March 7 for Transformations, The Photography of Betty Scott Owen at the Winter Park Library Community Room, 460 E. New England Ave. in Winter Park. The ex hibit runs through March 31. Contact 757-343-0313 or ladyscott@ cox.com

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Page 5 Thursday, March 15, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Test-drive it online at seeprismtv.com or in store today:175 East Altamonte Dr., Altamonte Springs 3030 East Semoran Blvd., Apopka 260 Citrus Tower Blvd., Clermont 1359 East Vine St., Kissimmee 3244 North John Young Pkwy., Kissimmee Call 866.610.7768Espaol 866.960.7085Like us on Facebook facebook.com/CenturyLinkPrismTV CenturyLinkTM PrismTM. Interactive TV you control any show, any time, from any room. Its a combination of features that outshine cable and satellite. Now you have a better TV choice.[ CenturyLinkTM PrismTM paired with the perfect partner Internet or Voice. ] NO CONTRACT! FREE HD WHEN YOU PICK 2. FOR 12 MONTHS Prism Project Demonstrations are with non-Prism TV customers using basic CenturyLink Prism TV service with standard features in High Definition on an HD-ready television on 11/12/11 in Las Vegas, NV. 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Taxes, fees, and surcharges will apply. Customer must cancel DVR and/or HD service by calling CenturyLink Customer Service before the end of the 3-month (or 12-month Pick Two offer) promotional period to avoid monthly charges or the standard monthly rate for each service will apply until service(s) are cancelled. Offers may be limited to specific locations. General Services and offers not available everywhere. CenturyLink may change, cancel, or substitute offers and services, or vary them by service area, at its sole discretion without notice. Requires credit approval and deposit may be required. Additional restrictions apply. Terms and Conditions All products and services listed are governed by tariffs, local terms of service, or terms and conditions posted at www.centurylink.com. 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Prism TV 30-Day Guarantee Advertised 30-day, money-back guarantee (TV Guarantee) applies only to installation charges, monthly recurring charges (i.e., base monthly service charges, premium service subscription charges), and applicable taxes incurred by customer for CenturyLink DTV residential service. The TV Guarantee does not apply to applicable charges for Video On Demand purchases, charges for Pay Per View purchases, and other usage-based charges, and customer will be invoiced for and responsible for payment of such fees and charges incurred. Customer must contact a CenturyLink customer service representative at 800.201.4099 within thirty (30) calendar days of the activation of customers CenturyLink DTV service in order to invoke TV Guarantee. Customer must also return any STBs as instructed by CenturyLink in order to invoke TV Guarantee. Charges subject to TV Guarantee will be credited or refunded, as applicable, on customers next bill cycle, as determined at CenturyLinks sole discretion. 2012 CenturyLink, Inc. All Rights Reserved. The name CenturyLink and the pathways logo are trademarks of CenturyLink, Inc. All other marks are the property of their respective owners. CNTL12-104G_7768_10.15_x_9_r1.indd 1 3/12/12 5:00 PM Roney said. recounted tales of his life in Winter Park and abroad, helping Winter Park High Schools football team to some of the to Harvard University and to war in the Navy. But his most famous achievements soared through opera houses worldwide. Thank you so much for blessing our city with so many good things, Bradley said. RONEY | C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Louis and Joy Roney pose with the Winter Park City Commission after Louis accepted his proclamation. PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Winter Park Girl Scouts and Citrus Council CEO Mary Ann Barry, left, pose with the City Commission on March 12 to commemorate the organizations 100th anniversary. Celebrating 100 years of scouting

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Page 6 Thursday, March 15, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer The UCF mens basketball between it was all Memphis on March 9. The Tigers would go on repeated scoring runs that bam boozled the Knights, leading the game by as many as 38 points before closing it out by a score of But in the process the Knights tional Invitational Tournament tory. few minutes of the game, leading Memphis offense regrouped and went on a long scoring run, the Knights found themselves strug gling to keep up for the remain der of the game. The Knights had one of their worst shooting games this sea son, connecting on only a third of their shots, and only 10 percent of their 3-point attempts. In a rare moment of offensive brilliance, center Josh Crittle, who normally plays a support position rather than attacking the basket, scored 9 points with the second most consistent shooting next to for ward Isaiah Sykes, who led the team with 11 points scored. missed all but one of his eight it with seven rebounds, three as sists and three steals. The loss knocked the Knights nament a game shy of the cham pionship. The Knights had de the Knights had never defeated before this season. time. With a win the Knights could go on to the second round, with those game times yet to be announced. losing streak of the season with two straight dropped games on the baseball diamond started the end of a bad week, then a close for much of the way before the stretch. But Oviedo consistently found a way to match the Wildcats throughout the game. the Lions leapt ahead and didnt look back. For the Wildcats, back-to-back games could give them a commanding lead in those two games Wednesday night at press 20, matchup. Edgewater rebounds win before last week. They were also win less in the district. Then they changed both all against the same team. game of a two-game series, coming from behind to win the game with a run in the bottom of the seventh. Two days later, the Eagles dealt the Pan thers a blowout with a 14-2 win on a one-hit pitching masterpiece. 1, 0-0) in a district matchup at 4 p.m. Thurs day. PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Winter Park found some offense early, taking the lead over Oviedo, but the Lions clawed their way back for the win with some late inning runs to go up 7-5 on March 8. Wildcats, Eagles rising ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Josh Crittle, above, has helped add energy when the Knights have suffered from lagging shooting. The Knights started in the rst round of the NCAAs National Invitational Tournament at press time Wednesday, hoping for a win to secure a second round bid. Knights lose, but make NIT bid ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff

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Page 7 Thursday, March 15, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Crime is a topic that we fre quently hear about. We read about it in the paper, see it on the news and it is a frequent topic of Inter net chat. We are privileged to live in a city that has one of the lowest crime rates in Central Florida. Our crime rate is lower than every city in Orange/Osceola counties with the exception of the very small cities of Belle Isle, Windermere and Oakland. This low incident of crime is in spite of the fact that we have several major roadways traversing our city, including U.S. 4 corridor. We also have Maitland Center that is host to more than city has a drive-through popula tion of more than 300,000 com muters per day. city, incidents of criminal activity do occur. The experts state, and our police department agrees, that crime prevention is one of the key components to ensuring we have a low crime rate. The most impor tant part of any crime prevention strategy is you. Without each of us taking an active role in preventing crime by calling the police depart ment or utilizing proven crime prevention techniques, the crimi nals will continue to attempt to prey on an easy target. When you see something sus picious such as a car or a person in your neighborhood that you do not recognize, you should imme diately contact the police depart ment and provide them with a de scription of the car, a license plate number if available and a descrip tion of the person. No one knows your neighborhood like you do, and the information you provide to the police department will al cle has not been involved in crimi nal activity and/or the person is law abiding and not trying to commit a crime. This is very im portant during the daytime hours because most residential thefts and burglaries occur during the time when criminals think no one will be at home. The most frequent method of breaking into a home is through an unlocked door or un keep hedges and plants trimmed around windows and doors so they are not concealed. There are many components to making your home safe from intruders includ ing landscaping, lighting, alarms and other design features. In Maitland, we are fortunate to tense training on methods that may be used through home and landscaping design that will be helpful in preventing and reduc ing crime. overall comprehensive crime pre vention strategy is Neighborhood Watch. Maitland has many active Neighborhood Watch groups and the police department is always looking for more homeowners to get involved in the program. Those neighborhoods that have an active group frequently have lower incidents of crime. Neigh borhood Watch programs orga nize homeowners to watch out for neighbors and to report sus borhood Watch groups also are provided a Neighborhood Watch sign, which is paid for and erected on their street by the city. To re port suspicious activity, the police department recommends you call mation on how you may help pre vent crime or form a Neighbor hood Watch group by calling the Community Policing Section of 2832. Sergeant Louis Grindle will be happy to make an appointment to meet with any homeowner to discuss ways that they may im prove the security of their home. The police department will also meet with groups of people to present crime prevention strate gies. By working together we can ensure that Maitland remains a safe and healthy community for many years to come. ment City Council meeting of March 12 The Maitland City Council the City Hall Council Chambers. Below is a synopsis of that meet ing. The next regular scheduled Council meeting will be held on Monday, March 26. Public Hearings: ing language governing the re-em interpretations of Florida Statutes Ordinance also provide either or verbiage additions that mirror existing Florida Statute language. Moved to continue the Public rezoning of properties within that cil meeting. Consent Agenda: utes of Feb. 20. Passed a Resolution establish piggyback purposes. Southern Sewer Equipment Sales to purchase a Vac Con combina tion sewer cleaner in the amount of $249,800. contract with Wharton-Smith, adjusting the contract from mary CH2012-3 to the City Hall contract with Wharton-Smith, adjusting the contract from Decision: merit award for the city manager To listen to a recording of the meeting, visit itsmymaitland.com Winter Park City Talk BY RAND Y KNIGHT CITY MANAGER Maitland City Talk BY HOW ARD SCHIEFERDECKER MAYOR Crime prevention strategies On behalf of the City of Win ter Park, we welcome all the at weekend to our city of culture and heritage! March 12 City Commission Meeting highlights There was a City Commission meeting held on March 12, at rah Civic Center. Below are a few highlights of decisions that were Mayors Report sculpture project was given by Board chair. Louis Roney being inducted into was presented. was presented. Cynthia Bonham, city clerk, for achieving her Master Municipal Clerk designation. month of March as Purchasing Month was presented. Non-Action Items 2012 was presented and accepted. Consent Agenda The various purchases, bids complete list can be found at cit yofwinterpark.org > Government Packets). The request to locate tempo rary modular classrooms and an administration building during construction of Bush Science Cen ter addition, subject to providing landscape buffer along both street frontages as depicted in exhibit provided and protection of shade trees, was approved. Action Items The Commission agreed to ap point a Wireless Task Force. Nom inations will be provided at the next Commission meeting. Public Hearings The following decisions were made regarding the Equalization The resolution declaring that the city is to fund capital im provements for undergrounding with the cost to be paid by special assessments was approved. special assessments for the un facilities for properties adjacent to was approved. The requests of Windermere Winter Park Venture, LLC, result The second reading of the ordi nance amending the comprehen sive plan, future land use map to change the designation of SingleFamily Residential to Mediumapproved. The second reading of the or zoning map to change the zon ing designation of Single-Family The second reading of the or dinance amending Ordinance No. 2840-11 Moratorium for Pain Man agement Clinics was approved. nance amending the historic pres velopment Code was tabled. Commission minutes will be avail at cityofwinterpark.org the week of March 26, pending approval by the City Commission. Get Energized about Energy Savings and win a KindleFire The city of Winter Park cordial ly invites you to Get Energized about Energy Savings on Thurs day, March 29, at the Winter Park ergy, cost-cutting ideas and con cepts from proven energy and green-building professionals from the citys electric and water and wastewater utilities, Trane, Prog ress Energy and the Central Flor ida Chapter of the United States Green Building Council. Seating is limited so please RSVP no later than Friday, March 23, by calling Commercial customers usgbcfgc.org/WinterParkBiz Residential customers usgbcfgc.org/WinterParkHomes

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Page 8 Thursday, March 15, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer MARCH 15 The Park Avenue Area Associations Spring Sidewalk Sale will be held Thursday, March 15, through Sunday, March 18, in conjunction with the Winter Park Sidewalk Art Festival. The Orange Audubon Society presents Redcockaded Woodpeckers: Repopulating the Disney Wilderness Preserve by Jennifer Mi likowsky at 7 p.m. on Thursday, March 15, at Leu Gardens, 1920 N. Forest Ave., in Orlando. The program is free. Call 407-637-2525 or visit orangeaudubon.org The Bach Festival Society of Winter Park pres ents the Takcs Quartet and pianist Garrick Ohlsson at 8 p.m. on Thursday, March 15, at the Tiedtke Concert Hall, Rollins College, at 1000 Holt Ave. in Winter Park. Tickets range from $30 to $40. Call 407-646-2182 or visit BachFestivalFlorida.org The American Legion, Winter Park Memorial Post 112, will host an Open House event in celebration of the American Legions 93rd an niversary of its founding from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Thursday, March 15, at 4490 N. Goldenrod Road, in Winter Park. Call 407-671-6404. MARCH 16 The Annie Russell Theatre and Department of Theatre and Dance presents Rollins Dance XXVI from 8-9:30 p.m. on March 16 and 17 at the Annie Russell Theatre, Rollins College, 1000 Holt Ave., in Winter Park. Email annieboxofce@ rollins.edu or call 407.646.2145. The 53rd Winter Park Sidewalk Art Festival will be held on March 16-18 in Central Park and along Park Avenue in Winter Park. There will also be a Festival Open House at Morse Mu seum. Visit wpsaf.org The next Cornerstone Hospice Volunteer Training will be held on from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. each day Friday, March 16 and Friday, March 23, at 8009 S. Orange Ave. in Orlando. Pre-register by calling 800-503-5756. MARCH 17 French Horn Day at Rollins College Department of Music is 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Satur day, March 17. The event features Horn choirs, instructional classes and performances by pro fessional horn players. All day tickets are $25 in advance, $35 day of event. Tickets for the 1 p.m. concert only are available $5. Visit central oridahornworkshop.com Leu Gardens Annual Plant Sale is at 9 a.m. on Saturday, March 17, and Sunday, March 18. Bring a wagon or plant cart for your purchases. Visit leugardens.org The Central Florida Navy League 5K Run/ Walk/Roll for Building Homes For Heroes and The Lone Sailor Memorial Project will be at 8:30 a.m. on Saturday, March 17, at Lake Baldwin. Registration begins at 7 a.m. Visit cfnl5k.org The Junior League of Greater Orlandos Bargain Box is holding its annual sidewalk sale from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on March 17th at 503 N. Vir ginia Ave. in Winter Park. News teams from WESH 2, WFTV, Local 6, Central Florida News 13 and Fox 35 are bring ing their designer clothing, shoes, jewelry and purses to viewers at the Anchors A way Sale from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Winter Park Com munity Center. Proceeds benet scholarships and programming for the Central Florida Asso ciation of Black Journalists. MARCH 19 Four Business Improvement District infor mation sessions are being held at 5:30 p.m. on Monday, March 19, and at 8:30 a.m., 1:30 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. on Tuesday, March 20, at the Winter Park Welcome Center & Chamber of Commerce. Call 407-599-3398. MARCH 20 The University Club of Winter Park will host a debate titled Healthcare ReformWhat Should the Supreme Court Do? at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, March 20. Debaters shall be My ron Fottler, Ph.D., Professor of Health Services Administration at UCF and Lynn Unruh, Ph.D., Professor of Health Services Administration at UCF. The event is free. Call 407-644-6149 or visit universityclubwinterpark.org In honor of National Ravioli Day BRIO Tuscan Grille will offer its most popular Ravioli dishes at half price on Tuesday, March 20. Reserva tions are strongly recommended. Call 407-6225611. Please join AARP Winter Park Chapter 1047 at 1:30 p.m. on Tuesday, March 20, at the Rachel D. Murrah Center, 1015 Morse Blvd. in Winter Park. Our program will be Visiting Angels Senior Home Care presented by Jody Hampton. The event is free. Call 407-629-2565. Seminole County Music Together invites par ents or other caregivers and their infant, toddler, and preschool children to attend free sample classes March 20 24. Classes are offered at the Winter Park Wedding Chapel, 301 W. New England Ave. in Winter Park. Call 407-844-4414 to reserve your spot. Winter Park Institute presents Anthony Ban nons The Photograph As Icon: A Powerful Way of Seeing at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, March 20 at Rollins College, Bush Science Center. Visit www.rollins.edu/wpi MARCH 21 More than 80 million women suffer with premenstrual and menopausal symptoms such as hot ashes and night sweats. Are you con fused regarding available options and solu tions? If so, come to Maitland Public Library at 6:30 p.m. on March 21. RSVP at 407-629-5333 or go to gethealthyorlando.com Winter Park Institute presents Writing With Light: An Evening Conversation with Billy Collins, Anthony Bannon and Ed Kashi at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, March 21, at Rollins Col lege, Bush Science Center. Its free. Visit rollins. edu/wpi MARCH 22 Winter Park Institute presents photojournalist, lmmaker and educator Ed Kashi at 7 p.m. on Thursday, March 22, at Rollins College, Bush Science Center. Kashi will discuss his career, including the techniques, procedures and mo tivations behind his missions to such places as the Nigerian Delta, Kurdistan and Iraq. Its free. Visit rollins.edu/wpi The Goldenrod Chamber of Commerce Presi dents Luncheon yet is at the Goldenrod Sta tion from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Thursday, March 22. Corporate tables are available for $200 and single tickets are on sale for $25 per person. Call 407-677-5980. Join the head and neck cancer specialists from The Ear, Nose, Throat and Plastic Surgery Asso ciates as they conduct free, quick and painless head and neck cancer risk assessments at the YMCA Crosby Wellness Center, 2005 Mizell Ave. in Winter Park. The event will be held from 1 to 4 p.m. on Thursday, March 22. The Jewish Community Center of greater Or lando will be hosting an event titled On The Catwalk 3 from 6 to 9 p.m. on March 22 at the Heaven Event Center in Orlando. The cost is $60; $50 for JCC members; $36 for seniors/stu dents. Contact Julie Varkonyi at (407)387-5330 or at juliev@orlandojcc.org Visit wpmobserver.com/events for more details. Send submissions to editor@observernewspapers. com Calendar 7:00 a.m. 2 Mile Fun Run/Walk 7:30 a.m. 10k (6.2 miles) 9:15 a.m. Healthy 100 Kids RunBenefiting the Meridian Club of Winter Park Scholarship Fund Running and walking is a great way to enjoy our beautiful surroundings, reach a goal and support important community causes. The fitness enthusiasts at Zimmerman, Kiser & Sutcliffe, P.A., invite you to celebrate 35 years of running right where it all began on Park Avenue in beautiful Winter Park! 10k runners & walkers will receive: 2 Milers receive the commemorative tech tee and $5 Track Shack Cash! Register Today... Wine tasting Hannibal Square Wine Tasting: The Fine Art of Wine is 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Thursday, March 15, at 425 W. New England Ave. Call 407-644-8281 or visit winterpark.org Duchess tales Acclaimed biographer, lecturer, and jour nalist Anne Sebba will discuss her new book That Woman, a biography of Wal lis Simpson, the late Duchess of Windsor, at a meeting of The English-Speaking Union at The University Club of Winter Park at 4 p.m. on Monday, March 19.

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Page 9 Thursday, March 15, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Lifestyles In June of 1978, former Orlan do resident Dave Reinhart took to the pavement and ran in a newly minted local race meant to raise money for a scholarship fund. At 26 years old, he won that race and would go on to win again in 1979. Now pushing 60, he hopes to return to take on the race once again, just before his birthday. Reinhart is one of potentially 3,500 racers expected at the Zim merman Kiser Sutcliffe 35th An nual Winter Park 10k Road Race & 2 mile James C. Barnett, M.D. Me morial Run on March 24. When he stepped up to the starting line 34 years ago, he was training for something much bigger. I was training at that time for the Olympic Trials in 1980, and being a track man in college and trying to keep my running career going, it was just another good event on the schedule, he said. Though he still doesnt know for sure if hell be able to toe that line again, hes hoping to make a comeback, and to help raise money for needy students in the process. The event is being put on by Track Shack, an organization that promotes athletics through its Or lando retail store, events compa ny and foundation that provides funding for charitable causes, par and youth athletics. The race was started by the Me ridian Club of Winter Park, a lo been involved with many service projects in the community for the last 35 years. Proceeds of the event will ben John Hughes, co-owner of Track Shack and this years race direc tor, said he got involved with the event as a means to promote his retail store and his products. But once he got started he saw the po tential for something more. As we did that, we realized that this was a great way to raise money for charities as well, he said. Al Loudermilk, member of the Meridian Club of Winter Park, said last year the club gave away between $12,500 and $15,000 to ship fund, which helps local stu dents attend college. from either Orange or Seminole County, and we base it on need and on their grades, and we give them an unrestricted scholarship or check, he said. And the rea son we do that is we dont want to interfere with any other aid they may be receiving. The event is also held to honor Dr. James C. Barnett. Barnett was a Winter Park resident and physi cian at Jewett Orthopedic Clinic for 20 years. He was also a team physician for the Orlando Magic. He was an avid runner who pro exercise in improving the quality of life of his patients. This years event is being pre sented by Florida Hospital, one of the events corporate sponsors. David Cassidy, assistant di rector of marketing and business development for Florida Hospital Sports Medicine and Rehabili tation, said they normally offer some services at the events, such as free body fat screenings, as well as having primary care physi cians or other guest physicians on hand. He said they will not be of fering these services for this race their tent is a food and recre ational tent. We changed our tent for that particular race as a reward to our employees to get out there and get Saturday, March 24, 2012 1 5 p.m. Winter Park Civic Center 1050 Morse Blvd. Winter Park, FL 32789 Tickets $5 ADVANCE Or$7 DOOR $5 SENIORS (AT DOOR) (Children Under 3 FREE) JOIN US FOR: Create Your Own Sundae, Ice Cream Floats, Italian Ice, Celebrity Servers, Face Painting, Cake Walk, Games, Silent Auction, Door Prizes and more! 250 North Orlando Avenue Winter Park, Florida 32789 407.677.9777 A Premier Flooring Source nCARPETOODTONE TILELAMINATE AREA RUGINDO TREATMENT Featuring Exquisite Products for Residential & Commercial Projects Custom Design and Quality Installationn ARCHIVE PHOTO BY AMANDA GEORGI THE OBSERVER The Zimmerman Kiser Sutcliffe Winter Park Road Race 10k & 2 mile James C. Barnett, M.D Memorial Run is Saturday, March 24, in downtown Winter Park. Jay Lumpkins, pictured here, won the 10k with a clock time of 31:36 in 2011. The race proceeds, usually between $12,500 and $15,000, go to the Meridian Club of Winter Park to fund local college scholarships. Road race celebrates its 35th year Proceeds to benet local scholarship fund ANDY CEBALLOS Observer Staff Event information The Winter Park 10k Road Race will take place on Saturday, March 24, at 251 S. Park Ave., in Winter Park. The two-mile run will begin at 7 a.m. and the 10k race will begin at 7:30 a.m. The entry fee for the 10k race will be $35 until March 23. The two-mile race will cost $20 through March 17, and $25 through March 23. Visit http://www.trackshack.com to register.

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Page 10 Thursday, March 15, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Family Calendar There was much screaming and shouting, applauding and whistling not to mention jumping up and down at the ICHSA Regionals in Tampa on Feb. 4 when Winter Park High Schools all-girl a cappella group won the Southeast title. And the winner of the International Com petition of High School A Cap pella Regionals and the group City is Take 7! And the crowd went wild. I know; I caught the mayhem on my camera through my mamma tears. But even though we knew the girls had tal ent, one question remained: did we have the funds to send them I can tell you this much, the 11 girls in Take 7 are serious about their music and dedicated to per forming a good show. Any given chorus room at Winter Park High working on music, showmanship and choreography; many of them take voice lessons and each of them sings in at least one other choir at Winter Park High School. So you can imagine the girls excitement when their hard work paid off with such a big win. Every judge had placed Take was higher than any score our directors had ever seen when most winning scores are between 350-400, our girls had scored an unimaginable 434 out of 465! But as the girls excitement grew, we began to wonder, How Our choral department, students and families had already done multiple fundraisers for our chorus trip to Washington, D.C., in March; there were no more resources for the $7,000 it would take to send 11 girls and chaper And so we began to scheme. We had meetings and sent emails to family and friends; we asked for corporate sponsors and even sang at Publix for cash. We raised $5,000 to go. Then a germ of an idea began concert! Take 7 will sing, as will Naughty Scotty and the Octapel la, our all-boy a cappella group. We will ask the select ensembles from Glenridge Middle and Maitland Middle to join us, and all of the choral directors. Our A Cappella Showcase will feature not only our kids, but our direc tors Matthew Swope and Joseph Kemper along with Maitland Middles director, Dr. Lori Lovell, and Glenridge Middles director, Matthew Begale. In short, March 20 will be an unprecedented performance of students and directors to raise money to send They say, It takes a village to raise a child. Well, in our case, It takes a village to send a choral come in; we have performers, an auditorium and even tickets, but we need an audience! So come to Winter Park High School at 7:30 p.m. on March 20 for an evening of great music and inspiring spirit. Tickets will be sold at the door for $8 and additional dona tions will be accepted all evening. Finally, I think Swope said it best: Were so proud of Take 7, and we dont want anything to stand in the way of this incredible stage as one of the 10 best high school a cappella groups in the country. Tom Carey SundewGardens@gmail.comEvery home should have a garden Experience homegrown gardening: Greg StakeCommercial Realty of Central Florida Commercial Realty of Central Florida Have a commercial real estate question?Call for your free property analysis 407.797.3580 Neal Hayes is the new Fellowship of Christian Athletes represen tative in the area. He is hosting an event at 7 p.m. on Thursday, March 15, at the RDV in Maitland to introduce himself and introduce you to the new strategy that FCA is launching to help its communities, athletes and athletic programs. Just Between Friends Central Florida (JBF) spring community consignment event is March 16 through March 18 at the Altamon te Springs Hilton, 350 S. Northlake Blvd., in Altamonte Springs. Ad mission is $2 until 4 p.m. only on Friday and Saturday. Visit central orida.jbfsale.com Orange County Public Schools (OCPS) students, local chefs, food service staff and community leaders invite you to the Second Annual Chefs Move to Schools initiative showcase event from 10 a.m. to noon on Friday, March 16, at the Evans High School Au ditorium, 4949 Silver Star Road in Orlando. RSVP to lora.gilbert@ cocps.net The Florida Symphony Y outh Or chestra will hold its Spring Con cert at the Bob Carr Performing Arts Center at 4 p.m. on Sunday, March 18, featuring all four FSYO orchestras, including the pre-pro fessional Symphonic Orchestra, the concert is to feature the Finale from Dvoraks Symphony No. 9, and Strauss famed Til Eulenspie gel. Tickets range from $8 to $30. Please visit redchairproject.com Help send Winter Park High Schools all-girl a cappella group Take 7 to the nals in New Y ork City. Attend the A Capella Showcase benet concert at the school at 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, March 20. Tickets are $8 and ad ditional donations will be accepted all evening. For more information on how you can contribute, con tact Matthew Swope at matthew. swope@ocps.net The Art & History Museums Maitland (A&H), is pleased to announce that the exhibition, Borders of Paradise: The New World in the Eyes of the Explor ers, has been extended through May 6. Call 407-539-2181 or visit ArtandHistory.org The Art and History Museums Maitland presents its Spring Se ries of Art Classes, beginning on A pril 2. Participants can choose from an array of creative classes, all instructed by professional art ists and educators. Register at ArtandHistory.org or 407-5392181 extension 265, or in person. At 10:30 a.m. each Tuesday, the Maitland Public Library hosts preschool story and craft time. At 10:30 a.m. each Thursday, it hosts baby time stories and ac tivity. At 4 p.m. each Thursday, it hosts Reading Buddies. Call 407647-7700. Send submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com Help send Winter Park High Schools all-girl a cappella group Take 7 to the nals in New Y ork City. Attend the A Cappella Showcase benet concert at the school at 7:30 p.m. on March 20. Tickets are $8 and additional donations will be accepted all evening. For information on how you can contribute, contact Matthew Swope at matthew.swope@ocps.net PHOTOS COUR TESY OF WINTER P ARK HIGH SCHOOL Winter Park High Schools all-girl a capella group, Take 7, needs to raise $7,000 to attend the national nals in New Y ork City in A pril. Take 7 hopes to take on NYC ST ACY BAR TON Guest Writer

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Page 11 Thursday, March 15, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer March 17 Fossil Fest at the Science Center day event at the Orlando Science Center as OSC hosts Fossil Fest 6 a celebration of dinosaurs from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Unearth your inner paleontologist as you experience presentations from fossil experts, bones on display Larson, founder of Black Hills Institute of Geological Research in South Dakota, will conduct a seminar via Skype on extinction theories about what killed the dinosaurs 65 million Florida Fossil Hunters, who will share specimens of huge bones and teeth from mega-beasts that thrived here during the ice ages, and participate in a new handson activity called the Jr. Paleon tologist program. Call 407-5142000 or visit osc.org M arch 17 M ayor D yer hosts Neighborhood Summit Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer invites all Orlando residents to attend the 7th Annual Neigh borhood & Community Sum mit from 7:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, March 17, at the DoubleTree hotel, near Universal Orlando, at 5780 Major Blvd. The Summit brings together neighborhood, arts and cultural, civic, community and faith-based leaders to share information on community partnerships while offering the opportunity to learn about city programs. Some of the many workshops include: Safety Connection; Mayors Matching Grants; and Creating a 501(c)(3). A $10 registration fee includes workshops, continental breakfast, lunch and conference materials. Call 407-246-2500 or visit cityoforlando.net/summit M arch 16, 18, and 20 O pera at UCF UCF Opera has been ex panding its program, including adding three performances of Otto Nicolais Merry Wives of Windsor this month. The performances are free and open performances will take place at 7 p.m. on Friday, March 16, and 3 p.m. on Sunday, March 18, in the Pegasus Ballroom in UCFs Student Union Building. The third performance will be at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, March 20, at the Resurrection Catholic Church in Winter Garden. Under the direction of Thomas Potter, UCF Opera will perform a musical adaptation of the Shakespearean comedy with themes of love, marriage, jealousy and revenge as one of Shakespeares most famous comic characters Fal staff simultaneously courts two married women and gets caught. The opera will be sung in English, and will feature the UCF Chamber Orchestra under the direction of Dr. Laszlo Marosi. Call 407-823-2869 or visit music. ucf.edu M arch 21 to A pril 22 Seeing Red The Orlando Shakespeare Festival presents the 2010 Tonyaward-winning play Red, a seductive and often disturbing look at painter Mark Rothko, from March 21 to April 22 in Loch Haven Park. Written by John Logan, who was nominated for Oscars for writing Avatar and Gladiator, Rothko is seen struggling to create new works as he nears the end of his career. The plays two characters, the angry and impassioned Rothko thoughts and philosophy around the stage like the random drops on a Jackson Pollock painting. In 90 short minutes, the venomous Rothko embodies the will to cre ate that drives great artists while timid Ken blooms into someone In the end, the audience sees through the psychobabble to understand a defensive artist struggling with his pride, his legacy and his will to create. Call 407-447-1700 or visit orland oshakes.org M arch 24 p AR Ticipation at the A rt & History M useums Maitland Step up and be amazed! The Art & History Museums Mai tland will dazzle you at its upcoming fundraiser called pAR Ticipation, Circus of the Sur real, at 5:30 p.m. on Saturday, March 24, at the A&Hs Maitland Center, 231 W. Packwood Ave. This evening of art, dining and diversions begins with cocktails and performers in the Mayan Courtyard, where guests will mingle with acclaimed art ists. The ringmaster then parades the crowd into the main garden, where the artistic hosts will each create a table that expresses their artwork. In addition to an artistic dining experience, guests will enjoy performances featuring the Empty Spaces Theatre Co., directed by John DiDonna. The of decadent desserts, libations and performances, and a si lent auction of art created and donated by the host-artists. Call 407-539-2181, extension 262, or visit artandhistory.org Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. H e is a member of the C uratorial C ouncil for the Museum of Florida A rt. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906. Its TAX time. Appointments Available 7 Days a Week!Tax Form Processing LLC2400 N Forsyth Rd., Suite 101 Orlando, FL 32807Tel: (407) 657-6336www.TaxFormProcessing.com Proudly Serving the Orlando Area for 17 years! Scan QR Code This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH O RLANDO A VE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.E NZIAN.ORG Academy A ward Winner! A SEP ARA TION Fri Sun 3:30 6:30 9:30 Mon, T ue, Thurs 6:30 9:30 Wed 9:30 Only FilmSlam Sun 1:00Coming Soon:21st Annual Florida Film FestivalApril 13-22 Josh Garrick Culture worthy of your calendar Unearth your inner scientist Mayor Dyers summit Fossil Fest

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Page 12 Thursday, March 15, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Healthy Living For the 12 years hes worked for the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce, when monthly staff meetings rolled around, Jay Ru pert could always be counted on to bring at least one thing to the with warm, gooey doughnuts. It was tradition, said Marisa Carroll, senior director of Cham ber initiatives and events. But with the 2012 new year, out went the tradition and up went a sign. No sweets it reads, hang ing next to the door of the Cham bers conference room, with a pic ture of a doughnut crossed out. It wasnt spurred by a new years resolution or corporate crackdown, but by a workroom discussion, too-tight sport coat and the Chambers desire to make Winter Park workers living and working healthier. With the help of a $225,000 grant from the Winter Park Health Foundation, the Chamber is work ing to launch its Work Well Winter Park initiative to help do just that on Wednesday, April 4. But like with many things, Chamber employees knew that the journey to health has to begin internally. Since January, Cham ber President Patrick Chapin says, Chamber staff has been learning to walk the walk before they talk the talk to its member businesses on how to implement healthy liv ing policies in the workplace. Step 1, the staff decided: no more sodas or sweets in the of Rupert, fueled by both the Work Well talk and a collection of sport coats that would no longer button, willingly swapped out his doughnut tradition for a fresh fruit bowl. Its amazing how you can change habits when stuff like this is on your mind, he said. Tradition now is the Mon day morning Rupert Report in which he weighs in and reports his weekly weight loss. He says hes gone from the doughnut guy to Work Well poster boy, losing 18 pounds since January. We want to do this with and for employees, Carroll said, not to them. Once you get your insides fu eled better, its time to get physi cal. The Chambers step 2: getting up and active during the work day. Another sign hangs next to the door to the Chambers stairwell Change happens one step at a time. Take the stairs. Chapin said through encourag ing people to take the stairs, and by implementing Sneaker Fri day with a midday walk through Winter Park, the Chamber is fur ther helping its employees feel good inside and out. Were not trying to all become marathon runners, were just try living healthier, he said. And since the sign was hung to hear the elevator ding 75-80 percent of the time anyone came up stairs, he now hears the stair well door slam. This isnt just about a pro gram, he said. Its about chang ing policies to change workplace culture and make long-term change. Thats a change he hopes will take hold not only in the environ ment at the Chamber, but also in its community members. Though the Work Well Winter Park project month, he said the Chamber is al ready working with 10 to 15 com munity businesses to start assess ing each ones health and wellness policies and needs, to see how best Work Well can help them. Each company, by joining the effort, will be given access to re sources in the area regarding all aspects of overall health, from nu ment and sleep evaluations. Chapin said that the Work Well project is all about bringing all members of the Winter Park community together to encour age them to live healthier, happier lives by in the end increasing accessibility to make the healthy choice the easy choice. Were not necessarily chang ing the world but if we can just move that needle a little bit to ward a healthier community, we are changing peoples lives, he said. Hours: M-F 8am to 4:30pm 2315 Lee Road Winter Park, Florida 32789 Your Guiding Beacon for Quality Healthcare Harbour Private Duty Nursing, LLCSkilled Nursing Physical Therapy Occupational Therapy Companionship Home Health Aid Homemaking Flexible Schedules Free RN Assessments The Services of Harbour Private Duty Nursing provide peace of mind to loved ones, trust ofcers, guardians and physicians. Our professional team prides itself on making your life easier. We also provide in-hospital private duty care, which offers close, personal attention and reassurance in an unfamiliar and often frightening environment. Our ofce hours are Monday through Friday, 8:00 am to 4:30 pm. Our professional team is available 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. During hours when the ofce is closed and during the weekends and holidays, the on-call coordinator is available by telephone 24 hours per day.www.HarbourPrivateDutyNursing.com License # 299991382phone (407) 895-8188 fax 407-895-9339 Its not just about getting you back on your feet. Its about getting you back to your life. HCR Healthcare, LLC Rehabilitation and Skilled Nursing PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Winter Park Chamber President Patrick Chapin and events director Marisa Carroll choose to take the stairs instead of using the elevator. Sweets out, sweat in Chamber promotes healthier workplace policy with Work Well Winter Park SARAH WILSON Observer Staff Weekly walks, eliminating sweets and encouraging employees to take the stairs are just a few of the ways the Winter Park Chamber is working to help its employees live more healthily. The Work Well Winter Park program ofcially launches on A pril 4 National Walking Day at 8:30 a.m. at the Central Park stage. Visit WorkWellWinterPark.org for information on how to get involved.

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Page 13 Thursday, March 15, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer My name is Paula McCor mick. I am a loving wife and proud mother of four wonderful children: Breanna, 17, Nicholas, 15, Megan, 9, and Cameron, 7. I would say my life is very full and rewarding. I work full time of Seacoast National Bank and that brings another sense of with the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. Its not hard to guess why so many people are passionate about raising money to support this wonderful cause. Statistics show that you know someone in your life, if not yourself, that has, is or will be touched by a blood cancer. Every four minutes some one is diagnosed with a blood cancer, and every 10 minutes, someone loses his or her battle. My story started in 2009 when I was diagnosed with lymphoma. While I was undergoing diag nostic measures to determine the degree and type of lymphoma, to give back. I reached out to the Leukemia and Lymphoma Soci help. The Disney Half Marathon with Team in Training fundraiser was just about to kick off, and I said I would attend the orienta tion. Running is not a friend of mine, but after hearing about the program I knew I could do it with the support of family and friends. In the end I raised $3,300 and completed a half marathon in March 2010, despite having a heart attack while undergoing radiation. My second event was Light the Night, and if youve never witnessed the beauty of the illuminated balloons that everyone carries during this night walk, you must plan on attending next year. I am now on my third event to raise money for LLS as a candidate for the paign every dollar raised equates into one vote. There are so many stories with great outcomes, but unfortunately there are many with sad ones. For this reason I am committed to helping LLS blood cancers. Over the past decade, Soci ety-funded research has made possible new multiple-drug therapies, the development of stem cell transplantation, the tions that cause particular blood cancers, and the drugs Gleevec, Velcade, Revlamid and Rituxan. These new-targeted drugs have for chronic myelogenous leuke mia, non-Hodgkin lymphoma and myeloma patients, and have dramatically improved the qual a little to support such a great cause. My link for donations is mccormick or you may visit LLS. org Paula Mc C ormick is assistant branch manager at the Maitland ofce of Seacoast National Bank. She lives in Avalon Park. Lack of Desire or Low Energy? George Carroll, M.D., has over 20 years ex perience in sexual medicine, and is actively involved in the following: 407-894-9959 Please join us for a cocktail reception and fashion show from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, A pril 19, at Wearable Art by Scott Laurent, 340 N. Park Ave., in Winter Park. Twenty percent of all proceeds will go to the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. Cancer survivor gives back PAULA MCCORMICK Guest Writer Paula McCormick

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Page 14 Thursday, March 15, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Joann Tyson plugs her washing machine into a small monitor plugged into the out let of her Winter Park home, and casually counts the kilowatts as they accumulate slowly to $14 a year. I think its fun to use, and I think it would be a really good tool to use with children, to show them how much electric ity costs, Tyson said. I also think it would be very good to use if you were thinking of changing out an appliance. Tyson is referring to a small electric us age monitor, donated by the city of Winter Park to the Winter Park Public Library for residents to check out and monitor the us age of their own appliances. The city donated 10 electric usage moni tors, called Kill-a-watt, to the library in Feb ruary 2011, each costing $39. Just like a book or a DVD, patrons are able to check out the device for two-week periods to monitor much they are costing them. The device plugs into the wall, then the appliance plugs into the meter, some elec tricity price information is entered, and a reading is given for the cost of each appli ance to use for the week, month or year on its LCD monitor. Tyson learned her cell phone costs her $1.33 a year, and her laptop costs $21 a year. She agrees with city and library staff that the device is yet another great tool the li brary can offer Winter Park residents. Its yet another way for us to part ner with the city, and provide important services to the community, Winter Park Public Library communications relation coordinator Mary Gail Coffee said. Were really all about providing people with the information they need to empower them to make better or different decisions for them selves. The city is providing these monitors to help show its utilities customers the areas cient and reduce energy costs. This is part of the citys overall effort to encourage en ergy conservation among its residents. Winter Parks director of electric utilities, Jerry Warren, said it puts the customers in a position to use appliances more sensibly. Our take is that Electric Utility has a re sponsibility to its customers to help them use our product more wisely, so that was the incentive to do this, Warren said. The sole purpose is to help our customers un derstand the cost of various devices they use. Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Winter Park resident Joann Tyson used the electric usage monitor to log how much money is spent on applicances such as her blender, above, each year. Her cell phone costs about $1 and her laptop costs about $21 for a year. Winter Park Public Library has 10 electric usage monitors available to its members to measure energy costs at home KRISTY VICKERY Observer Staff There will be an energy conservation program hosted by Winter Park on Thursday, March 29. The event will offer two sessions: one for commercial customers from 9 to 11:30 a.m., and one for residential customers from 5:30 to 8 p.m. The event is free to Winter Park utility customers, but attendees must register by Friday, March 23. To register call 407-599-3285, or visit usgbcfgc.org/WinterParkBiz (commercial customers) or usgbc-fgc.org/WinterParkHomes (residential customers). Saving watts The Kill-a-watt monitors are available for checkout for a two-week period at the Winter Park Public Library located at 460 E. New England A ve. For more information on electric usage monitors, call 407-623-3300.

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Page 15 Thursday, March 15, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer I am not jealous or in a com petition with any of my garden ing compatriots. In an occu pation as rewarding as food gardening, the more the mer rier. When a neophyte has glar ing success entertaining a crop with which I struggle, my practiced tact kicks in to not blurt out axioms related to beginners luck. This lack of accu mulated pests and diseases in a recently developed plot encourages the newbie to continue his endeavors, honing his skills for when troubles ar rive. And after a short appren ticeship, the now-experienced gardener can teach me a trick or two. Starting with Mel Bartholom ews book Square Foot Gar dening and then graduating to John Jeavons tome How to Grow More Vegetables is the beacon of a maturing dedica tion. In the early stages, simply germinating seeds is enough to feed the soul when looking for any success. My original goal was to merely consume something from the garden on a daily basis. After a couple of growing seasons, expectations to assuage the rumbly tummy emanate from the household as attention is drawn away from other honey-do projects. Time to submit results more substantial than complimenting a bagged-salad mix with a few homegrown nasturtium (edible) Productivity from the garden as a measure of quan tity will ultimately be derived from available growing space cultivated over time. A familys farm of a single growing bed 4 feet on a side produces enough green beans for a couple of meals, to the exclusion of most other crops. And then the whole garden needs to be started over from scratch. Time to dig up the grass, dedicate a germination space, rededicate the irrigation system and free up hours in a hectic schedule. Linking the foursquare plots into a lengthy growing bed is what were talk ing about. When enough plants are germinating, surviving, same time, produce purchases at the grocery will become a memory of the past. Finally, a managed risk resulting in a return on our own investment! Properly choosing crops, knowing that we have the luxury of spatial quantity, produces a quality all its own. Selecting to grow stalwart green scallion onions that produce year-round rations requires minimal space and they are universally consumed. Allow room for promised producers such as collard greens, kohlrabi, turnips and radishes to tender repetitive provisions. Harvest, repatriate the soil and custom arily grow what will be eaten. and again. Once the routine of dependably feeding the fam esteem unbeknownst to most food that we eat. Tom C arey is the owner of S undew Gardens, a you-pick gardening busi ness in Oviedo. Visit the Sundew Gar dens Facebook page. Women hold up half the sky and everyone else! Are you a woman who spends plenty of time and energy taking ty common. In fact, many women take care of everyone else and forget to care for themselves. For example, while every woman older than 40 should get a mammo gram every one to two years, women in Flori da older than 40 have not had a mammogram in the past two years. Are you that woman caring for others and just not getting around to taking others are less likely to get the care they need for themselves. A 2011 Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index shows that women ages 45 to 64 have the lowest well-being of any age group or gender, and are worse off than women a generation ago. and younger children, caring for everyone and getting to work on time being superwoman takes a toll. Care giving can be posi tive giving that all-important sense of purpose, meaning and connectedness but it also takes time and energy. This can often result in prioritizing caring for everyone else and neglecting your own care. Carve out time for yourself every day, even if it is in only me time. I know, easier said than done. Take good care of yourself with a healthy diet rich in veg etables, whole grains and low-fat dairy. Go get that check up you have been postponing. Add some exercise. I know, it might sound crazy to cope with exercise, but even 20 minutes a day can give you energy, release stress, build muscles and heart strength. Ask for help. Dont try to do it all. Maitland resident Nancy Rudner Lugo is a nurse practitioner and president of Health Action, offering workplace health consulting and nurse coaching. Visit www.healthaction.biz Superwoman could be healthier carve out some me time Visit us at www.workwellwinterpark.org. healthy the City of Wi nter Park 1887 2012thANNIVERSARY Work Well Winter Park Wednesday, April 4, 2012 8:30 a.m. Central Park Stage Dr. Nancy Rudner Lugo Health Action Tom Carey From my garden to yours Productivity food gardening

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Page 16 Thursday, March 15, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Bright House Networks Salutes the 53rd AnnualWinter Park Sidewalk Art FestivalOne Of The Nations Oldest, Largest And Most Prestigious Juried Outdoor Art Festivals www.brighthouse.com 53rd Winter Park Sidewalk Art Festival ABOUT THE POSTER AR TIST ROBER T C. BECK Robert C Beck is an American modern realist painter, printmaker, masters, Beck has developed a diverse knowledge of skills and media used is exhibited in museums, galleries and his BA from Rollins College in his hometown of Winter Park, where he studied printmaking, drawing Beck worked for a short time as Central Park along Park Avenue in Winter Park, March 16, 17 and 18, 2012 9 am-6 pm, Friday and Saturday; 9 am-5 pm, Sunday

PAGE 17

Page 17 Thursday, March 15, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer MUSIC AND ENTER T AINMENT All entertainment is free and presented on the main stage located in north Central Park. MARCH 16, FRIDAY 4:30-5:15 P .M. Ash Jandga 5:45-7:00 P .M. Rich Walker Quartet w/ Linda Cole 7:30-9:00 P .M. Warren Hill MARCH 17, SA TURDAY 10:00-10:45 A.M. Rollins String Quartet 11:00-12:00 P .M. Beautiful Music Modern Quartet 12:301:30 P .M. Doug Baileys Pop Shop Inc. 1:45-2:30 P .M. Davey Rocker Barnyard Jam 2:45-3:45 P .M. Per and Tamara Danielsson 4:15-5:45 P .M. Sunnie Paxson MARCH 18, SUNDAY 10:00-10:45 A.M. Three Flutes Only 11:15-12:00 P .M. Orlando Brass Quintet 12:301:30 P .M. MakeShift a cappella 2:00-3:00 P .M. Orlando Concert Band 3:30-5:00 P .M. Jazz Professors All music produced by Sonny Abelardo Production ABOUT THE FESTIV AL The Winter Park Sidewalk Art Festival is one of the nations most prestigious outdoor art festivals, consistently rated among the top shows in the country. The festival is also one of the largest outdoor events held in Orange County drawing approximately 300,000 visi tors during the three-day show. This year, more than 1,100 artists from around the world applied for entry. An independent panel of three judges selected the 225 artists exhibit ing their works in the festival. The National Endowment for the Arts, The White House, Congress and many others have lauded the festival over the years for promoting art and art education in Central Florida. An all-volunteer board of directors produces the annual festival, now celebrating its 53rd year. F AMIL Y FUN Girls and boys can create their own artwork at the Childrens Workshop Village. Easel painting is very popular, and local art centers and museums feature a variety of fun, hands-on art activities for children. Admission is free, and participants may take home their artistic creations. The Childrens Workshop Village hours are 10 am-4 pm on Fri day, Saturday and Sunday. Easel painting is from 10 am pm on Saturday and Sunday.

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Page 18 Thursday, March 15, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Opinions Kudos to staff I just want to applaud you for your staff opinion column today (Hack ing and crimes of enlightenment published March 8). I have almost that actually seems to understand the important role of journalists in our society! Kudos! Pat Osborn St. Paul, Minn. Heres what readers on wpmobserver.com are writing about the M arch 8 guest column Celebrate Winter Parks businesses by Clyde Moore, owner of I LUV Winter Park, Inc.: Great Clyde, well done, we moved to Winter Park in I went to Glen ridge Middle School and the old Win ter Park High School, now the ninth ever since, although I moved away to go to college, overseas, and am now in Houston, I still get back to WP when I can. I still call WP my "hometown", still have many friends and classmates in WP and Maitland. Please keep up cal and with charm and grace, most important for all of us, thanks for all that you are doing! Bill Gottfried Houston, Texas We have been in WP for 12 years, those around much longer than us say to seven years. We have seen several shops "transition", several of the chain stores we frequented left when Mall at Millenia opened; others like Wood Stone and Steel closed about the same time. There is a feeling that Park Ave nue is becoming more of a "restaurant row" but closings, Circa and Spice, may be countering openings. Land lords often get the top line in why a business is closing but most know the market well and will work to the extent they can to keep tenants; some times the business is just not strong enough to make the commitment. The best thing we can do is support the local businesses we care for so much by frequenting them. We remember doing much of our Christmas shop ping in downtown Winter Park 10-12 years ago those stores are gone. No value judgment perhaps we have transitioned and will continue to do so, and we will continue to miss the old favorites! Jack Miles Winter Park I love your article. My grandmom lived in Maitland forever until she passed away three weeks ago. My sister now lives in her home; my mom went to Winter Park High School and I have cousins who attend the same school now. Winter Park and Maitland hold wonderful memories for me. And now my sister, Jana Rice, has started Peak-Season-Pops in Winter Park and would love to get more involved in the festivals that your beautiful city has to offer. So for everyone who loves supporting local businesses, please check out Peak-Sea son-Pops coming to a sidewalk near you. (Hopefully) Jessica Lasky Harmes Acworth, Ga. Clyde, Thanks for a great article and for your work to highlight all our of what makes Winter Park a special community is shared by everyone I meet. We are indeed the best place to live, work and play. Circa and Spice will be missed! See you on the Avenue! Carolyn Cooper Winter Park city commissioner What message are you sending out to potential tact matters. From the presentation of your resume to the acceptance of an offer, you are being judged on what you say and what you do when you are job searching. When people meet you, what is their impres receptionist and others around you while you wait for an interview, or do you sit on your cell phone Do you complain about your last employer or do you highlight what was good about your job some very interesting bosses, but I would never trash them in an interview. Do you look the interviewer in ly or do you stare at the walls or at dont ever do it againplease. Do you dress for an interview, a nightclub, or a Do you limit your interview answers to answer you ask questions at the end, or say you covered time and again, I get feedback from interviewers who share stories of what people did in the inter views or in other contact. Sometimes I share stories of things I have seen in the process. The more you become aware of your behaviors things that may be sabotaging your chances of get ting hired. Do you have any stories of bad interviewers information below. S andi V idal is the executive director for C hristian HE LP and the C entral Florida E mployment C ouncil. Please send questions to sandi@christianhelp.org Mars will have to wait, ac cording to a budget proposal released by President Barack Obama. And it may have to wait a long time before we have question thats plagued us for decades. Before he ascended into super stardom as Ziggy Stardust while America was at the height of the space race in the early 1970s, David Bowie asked if there was life on Mars. Now on the verge of launching a program with the potential to make our greatest discoveries, were avoiding that question again while quietly if it goes as planned, will end in 2014. Times reported on a budget proposal from the White House that would call for a $1.2 bil lion cut in NASAs budget, all of which would come from robotic space exploration. It was an even more staggering blow for NASA, which has already withdrawn from joint missions with the European Space Agency in 2016 and 2018. That could push us back as far as the 2030s before we can explore Mars and beyond, the di Society says. Considering our international reputation right now, cutting back on our more socially ben were being accused of pushing for war in Iran would seem a bad public relations move at best, and a betrayal of a peaceful future at worst. As a nation continually at war for the last decade, while endur ing a crushing recession in the latter half of it, weve found our selves in the unfortunate either/ or position of choosing ostensible defense over social betterment Weve experimented with the cost of reducing spending on our own peril. By necessity were constantly moving forward, look ing for cures for new diseases and creating technology that moves people and information But in war we seem crippled by mistakes of hindsight and foresight. Our weapons are more powerful than ever, yet we situations compared to the war in Vietnam, yet with no bet ter answers on how to win. We already know the cost: more than a trillion dollars in Afghanistan and Iraq, plus the ongoing costs of interest on debt incurred to of caring for the wounded for decades to come. A joint ABC News and Washington Post poll released Monday showed that 60 percent of Americans believe the war in Afghanistan is not worth its cost. That cost is about $5.3 billion per month, a substantial discount compared to earlier last year when it exceeded $7 billion per month. The total cost of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars combined passed the $1 trillion barrier in November, representing a cost of more than $100 billion per year. All of those numbers are groups, including economists from Brown University consider a conservative estimate. They say $3.7 trillion. The entire NASA program, which has in its launches into space leapt us forward into the future we have today, has cost us about half that in all of its 54 years combined. In a July 2011 CBS poll, nearly two-thirds of responders said the recently canceled space shuttle program advancements weve arrived at thanks to NASA, weve decided wed rather not invest in the fu ture when were busy doing what nearly two-thirds of Americans equate to throwing money on a Ten years after terrorists at tacked us on our own soil, were for fear that if we dont, it will imperil our way of life. But when a war with an uncertain conclu sion, we already have. Its been 41 years since David Bowie asked if there was life on Mars. That was two years after wed landed on the moon. Though our ability to reach for the stars has grown tremendous ly in the ensuing four decades, we still cant seem to grasp the economics to get us off the launchpad. Our Observation Sandi Vidal Ask Sandi King Features Weekly ServiceMarch 12, 2012 Every contact matters in your job search Country is at war with its own future Letters to the editor Send your thoughts (400 words or less) to Managing Editor Jenny Andreasson at editor@observernewspapers.com TWEN T Y-FOUR YEARS OF MARRIAGE, AND T HIS S T ORE HAS KEP T US IN BLING-BLING FROM HEAD T O T OE! HAPPY WIFE, HAPPY LIFE, HAPPY HUSBAND. THANKS T O ALL OF YOU, PAS T AND PRESEN T! ELIN, MA TT AND T HE CREW... CONGRA T ULA T IONS! SEE YOU ALL SOON. CARLA LUBE T Heres what a reader on wpmobserver.com wrote about the M arch 8 article M aitland store reopens its doors about the new M aitland Jewelers:

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Page 19 Thursday, March 15, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Have you ever ridden down Park Avenue and wondered about the cream-colored build ing located on the corner of Park you have, you might have asked yourself, whats going on in something interesting and that it is! The distinguished building is the University Club of Winter Park, and whats going on inside is any number of the many intel lectual, educational or cultural activities that serve its members. This unique club was founded in 1934 by a group of Winter Park pioneers, who, in a mo ment of jest remarked, It will hearing of our wives and tell each other how great we are. powwows and were intended as intellectual feasts for college professors, clergymen, lawyers, doctors and others of similar education and background. In time, the University Club of Win ter Park became known as the Athens of the South. Famous artists, musicians and opera stars, enticed by the beautiful winter weather, performed at the club and membership swelled to more than 900. Begun as an all-male establishment, the club charter was changed in 1977 to include women. Today, the University Club of Winter Park is run entirely by its members, dedicated volunteers who make the club a remarkable establishment of learning. As well as providing intellectual opportu nities for those interested in con tinuing to learn, the club assumes a philanthropic responsibility in the community. It offers scholar ships for worthy students, grants and provides services through The current goals and pur intentions of those original members. These are to promote education and to engage in literary pursuits, including the conduct of public discussion groups, forums, panels, lectures and similar programs. Some of todays most popular programs are philosophy, classical music with live virtuosos concerts, history, foreign affairs seminars, current events, book reviews, book discussion groups and foreign language classes. Many activities meet during the day, sometimes at luncheon programs, or in the evenings either at group meetings or at dinners in a more social setting with programs that educate and entertain. In an attempt to stay abreast of the expanding interests of its members, the club has broad ened its focus to include arts and crafts, ballroom dancing, Trivi a4U, bridge and mahjong. The club presently offers 38 different groups of interest to its members and the public. So the next time youre on the corner of Park and Webster that will pique your interest. Remember, youre never too old to learn. Linda L. Dunlap is a long-time member of University Club of Winter Park and co-chairs the book review group. The club is located at 841 N. Park Ave. Visit www.uclubwp.org or call 407-629-2125 for more information and a schedule of groups. Chris Jepson Perspectives Why art? Exactly because it is gnarly out there War, politics and other recollections Life is short, art is long. Hippocrates Its an all-too-brief slog. Life is. Read any amount of history and two overarch ing themes that jump out are how transitory life is as well as how human beings have attempted to understand (convey) our condition. Were conceived. We achieve consciousness. We die. In between we live. Concomitant is the fact that life is often brutal, violent and sor rowful. Art is the attempt to make sense of it all. To give meaning. To express what is (reality), what could be (inspirational). And at times, what was. Art informs every aspect of our lives, from how we live, to how we see, hear and learn. We are talking art pieces, human canvases (mobiles) in which we display who we are and why we exist. Art is an indi vidual or collaborative endeavor, but it is a collective, societal value requiring an awareness of, reverence for and support the human experience yet many take it for granted, much like the air we breathe. How do you justify art in a world of with their hands forever out, begging at the ramps to our interstates. What of all-too-regular violence (shootings) in our cities and suburbs. Pervasive poverty. Our forever wars. Mindless acts of brutality. School massacres. Diseases. Our cancer ous environment. Ad nauseum. How do you justify art in a world of in disrepair. Cuts in school funding. Teachers/cops furloughed. Crowded roadways. Disintegrating infrastructure. Unfunded federal and state mandates Why support culture (art and its the art museum, the philharmonic, local and insist that our government (local/ county/state/federal) fund the arts and minister recommended in Parliament during World War II that Britain cut arts funding to support the war effort. Alleg edly, Churchills response was, Then veracity of Churchills retort is questioned but the sentiment is timeless. of Canada, Jean Chretien, observed that, An important measure of a great civiliza tion, of a great society, is its contribution to humanity through the sciences and the arts, through its discoveries, its innova tions, its cathedrals and canvasses, its stories and its music. tory of our species. Ours is a history you can easily wrap your mind around. Were a young species, writing for maybe 10,000 years, creating art for 40,000 years (see: the Venus of Hohle Fels). Many things surface (violence, war, famine, struggle) as one mentally chronicles our journey. But what stands out are our achievements in art. Whether it was the Greeks and their playwrights, Renaissance art, Eliza bethan theater or French Impressionism, we measure ourselves and our culture by the art we create (foster). fering will still be with us tomorrow. The degradation and humiliation, the sorrow associated with being human is our con dition and our constant challenge. profound realization that true transcen dence (beauty and grace) is possible. Jepson is a 24-year resident of Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.US Louis Roney Play On! It must be shocking to many straight forward Americans that President Obama resorts to obliquely dishonest euphe misms when referring to "the Global War on Terrorism." How can a man rightly act to protect our country when he curiously refers to the Global War on Terrorism as the war on a far-reaching network own mind clearly cannot face the fact of terrorism, something he has pledged to deal with in our favor. Soros = trouble? Cosmopolites have pointed out to me that Soros sounds curiously, but tsuris i.e. trouble in River City Wise observation What difference does it make whether the women rule or the rulers are ruled by totle Politics dened Politics might well be called a system atic organization of hatreds. Fish and eggs In the Depression my Winter Park school days we lived in Forest Hills near Lake Sue. Often at 6 a.m., I caught a few nice big bream from the lake, scaled them on the spot and took home boneless bacon fat. Alongside scrambled eggs those bream made a super breakfast. I can taste them now! Plain, old treat I remember from bygone college days, my travels via automobile, and sometimes via my thumb, between Florida and Massachusetts. Along the way were welcome stops at diners for a cup of coffee and a doughnut. The latter cost all of a nickel and was made out of special dough (hence doughnut), and was lightly sprinkled with sugar and, per haps, a bit of cinnamon. Those dough nuts had a special simple good taste and went with coffee in an inimitable way. I now search in vain for a plain ordinary doughnut of the kind that used to satisfy adequately, but not excessively. Today, even a local well-known doughnut shop sells only doughnuts of a different kind of dough, and dolled up with a glaze that converts a simple taste into that of a des sert of sorts. I guess Im seeking a plain Tin Lizzie in these modern days, when the Chevrolet has become a complicated automatic chrome-plated behemoth. Divorces when you can recall the days when an ordinary divorce caused a scandal in the neighborhood. Suckers and liars At this time Im glad that my two chil dren are grown and that my grandson is 30. I would hate to bring up little kids in todays beclouded concepts of right and wrong. When Obama began a recent speech, my b.w. and I begin to count the lies as they slipped lightly off his tongue. How do you get todays kids to believe the George Washington story about the cherry tree they would think that George was a sucker because he told the truth, when an Obama lie would have so easily put the blame on someone else. What would you say if the head of your family, without any increase in income, suddenly swelled your familys Well, our U.S. head, Barack Obama, has done just that! Next time around lets be sure that our national head is screwed For a long time I have had the feeling that our president feels no especial love for this unique country. About Roney: HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney) How do you justify art in a world of sorrow? Winter Park club oers 38 groups LINDA L. DUNLAP Guest Writer Linda L. Dunlap

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