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Winter Park-Maitland observer
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00203
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park FL
Publication Date: 03-08-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates: 28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID: UF00091444:00203

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407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC USPS 00-6186 Publisher statement on page 4. Thursday, March 8, 2012 50+ tax wpmobserver.comSubscribe now!Visit wpmobserver.com The directors of Art &History Museums Maitland want you to do more than just view the art they have on display at the annual Participation fundrais ing event, they want you to see, touch, hear, smell and even taste the best of what the local art community has to offer. Its local artists, local per formers, and local food in a ven ue thats a local treasure, A&H Director Andrea Bailey Cox said. Its really about everything great that the local community has to offer. Nearing the end of its inaugu ral year following the initial merger of the Maitland Historical Society and Maitland Art As sociation in May 2010 A&H is taking this time to look back at what theyve accomplished so far. Through the Participation event on March 24, it will work Diamonds are a girls best friend, and she can continue to look to Maitland Jewelers to quench her gem obsession. About 200 people attended Fridays grand reopening of the jewelry store formerly known as Jewelers of Maitland un der new ownership in the same storefront at 500 E. Horatio Ave. in Maitland. The store had been run for 26 years by the husband and wife team of Mark and Hedy Blinder man until they decided to retire. Hedys daughter Elin Shenk, who now owns the store with her husband, Matt Shenk, had worked in the store for 22 years, and spent the last 12 years in the store as a trained graduate gem ologist. She saw the closing as an opportunity to open a jewelry store of her own, and her hus band supported her decision. She hated to see it go, Matt said. We actually didnt The school is right, the roads are safer, but what happened to the students that walk or ride their bikes? Page 10Letters to the editor Lifestyles Mary Lane wears Lilly Pulitzer every day, no matter what, and she visits the Park Avenue store every week.Page 7 Josh GarrickOrlandos rst ever NotWedding an aptly named alternative bridal showcase arrives on March 15.Page 9 Calendar A&H presents Culture & Cocktails from 6 to 9 p.m. on Friday, March 9, featuring artist Parker Sketch.Page 8 TAX DEFERREDFIXED ANNUITY RATE FOR 5 YEARS.Bob Adams 407-644-6646THE NATIONAL 5 YEAR CD RATE IS 1.34%3.35% 451 Maitland Ave, Altamonte Springs, FL 32701NEW Dermatology Ofce!407-599-SKIN (7546)*Waive co-payment up to $25 No referral needed Accepting all insurances Dr. John CottamDr. Ross Wheeler PhotoHOTO BY ANDY cCEBAllLLOsS thTHE oOBsSERvVER Maitland City Council members Ivan Valdes, from left, Phil B Bonus and Howard Schief erdecker help new Maitland Jewelers owners Matt and EElin Shenk reopen the store. Please see jJEWElLERsS on page 3Maitland store reopens its doors AANDY CEBAllLLOsS Observer Staff PhotoHOTO BY IsSAAcC BABcCOcCK thTHE oOBsSERvVER DDirector A Andrea B Bailey Cox has led Art & History Museums Maitland since the merger of the Maitland Historical Society and Maitland Art Association in May 2010. PhotoHOTO BY IsSAAcC BABcCOcCK thTHE oOBsSERvVER IIrish pride made an early showing this year as the 33rd annual Winter Park St. Patricks Day Parade proceeded through the streets of downtown Winter Park on Sunday, March 4. Please see pP ARTIcCIpP ATION on page 2 AA&H grows programs in its inaugural year SARAhH WWIlsLSON Observer Staff SCAN HERE Use your smartphones QR R code reader app to view more photos or visit wpmobserver.com/ photos/galleries Green blooms

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Page 2 Thursday, March 8, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer to set the stage for what kinds of events and programs it hopes to host in the future. A&H will also be participating in a workshop with the Maitland City Council on Tuesday, March 13, to evaluate and discuss the status of its past, present and fu ture relationship with the city spurred by a request by Councilman Phil Bonus at a January City Council meeting. Its an opportunity for us to come in and give them any infor mation theyre looking for, and an opportunity for us to touch base with them on the progress of a lot of our shared goals, Cox said. We look forward to telling them about all the great things weve accomplished in such a small amount of time.Past, present, futureThe Maitland Art Center, origi nally an artist colony and research studio when it opened in 1937, has served as the hub of Maitlands artistic cultural core for genera tions. With the Maitland Art Associa tions merger with the neighbor ing Maitland Historical Society in May 2010 forming the Maitland Art and History Association now known as Art and History MuseumsMaitland Cox said it organization, a strengthened role in the community and more op portunities for both organizations to succeed. Weve been literal neighbors for many, many years, and this was an opportunity for both of us to improve how we work in our missions to promote arts and his tory in the Maitland community, she said. From physical facility improve ments, to upgraded programming, surpassing its fundraising goals, and with more renovations on the horizon, Cox said A&H is well on its way to a continued long, pros perous future. Pending the end of the oneyear trial period A&H signed onto with the city of Maitland, which will automatically renews for a 51-year lease in July if it passes review, Councilman Bonus proposed a workshop to examine A&H operations, scheduled for Tuesday, March 13. Bonus said he doesnt think the citizens of Maitland are getting enough value in the programs and services provided by A&H for the amount of money the city is putting into it. He says due to economic pressures he thinks the city would fare better running the art and historical centers itself, through its leisure services de partment. I think the meeting on the 13th will be instrumental in allow ing us to exchange information and draw the appropriate conclusions, he said. Cox, however, said A&H has been operating more programs than ever on less money from the city, from its two annual fundrais ers Participation and Evening in the Grove to its Culture and Cocktails and Artists in Action programs, making it an economic asset for the city. Mayor Howard Schieferdecker said he is looking forward to hearing presentations from both sides at the workshop, but says that aside from Bonus, in his own observations hes heard and seen nothing but positive things about A&Hs progress in the past year. The art center is a major part of Maitland history; its a very special part of our culture, he said. I wish nothing more than to do what we can to see it suc ceed. Hannibal Square Wine Tasting: The Fine Art of Wine KICK OFF ART FESTIVAL WEEKEND WITH THE Thursday, March 15 5:30 8 p.m. West New England Avenue Music by The Redcoats Wine & Beer Samples Hors doeuvres Visit www.winterpark.org or call 407.644.8281 Supported by: Featuring $20 Winter Park Chamber Members in advance $25 Non-Members & at the Door Tickets & Info Presented by: Hours: M-F 8am to 4:30pm 2315 Lee Road Winter Park, Florida 32789 Your Guiding Beacon for Quality Healthcare Harbour Private Duty Nursing, LLCSkilled Nursing Physical Therapy Occupational Therapy Companionship Home Health Aid Homemaking Flexible Schedules Free RN Assessments The Services of Harbour Private Duty Nursing provide peace of mind to loved ones, trust ofcers, guardians and physicians. Our professional team prides itself on making your life easier. We also provide in-hospital private duty care, which offers close, personal attention and reassurance in an unfamiliar and often frightening environment. Our ofce hours are Monday through Friday, 8:00 am to 4:30 pm. Our professional team is available 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. During hours when the ofce is closed and during the weekends and holidays, the on-call coordinator is available by telephone 24 hours per day.www.HarbourPrivateDutyNursing.com License # 299991382phone (407) 895-8188 fax 407-895-9339 Running and walking is a great way to enjoy our beautiful surroundings, reach a goal and support important community causes. The fitness enthusiasts at Zimmerman, Kiser & Sutcliffe, P.A., invite you to celebrate 35 years of running right where it all began on Park Avenue in beautiful Winter Park!Be part of the celebration and register today! Run to TrackShack.com7:00 a.m. 2 Mile Fun Run/Walk 7:30 a.m. 10k (6.2 miles) 9:15 a.m. Healthy 100 Kids Run 10k runners & walkers will receive: 2 Milers receive the commemorative tech tee and $5 Track Shack Cash! Benefiting the Meridian Club of Winter Park Scholarship Fund Register Today...Run to TrackShack.com pP ARTIcCIpP ATION | AA&H, city of Maitland will discuss their partnership at a workshop on March 13 C ONTINUEED FRROM fFRontONT paPAGE A&Hs annual Participation event will be held at 5:30 p.m. on Saturday, March 24, at the Maitland Art Center. This years theme is Circus of the Surreal. Tickets are $90 for A&H members and $100 for nonmembers. For more information, visit ArtandHistory.org A workshop between the Maitland City Council and A&H will take place at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, March 13, at the Maitland Council Chambers. PhotoHOTO BY IsSAAcC BABcCOcCK thTHE oOBsSERvVER TThe Maitland Historical Museum is one of the museums under the A&H umbrella.

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Page 3 Thursday, March 8, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer make up our mind until during the closing down sale, and she just said, I think I want to do it. The Shenks reopened the busi ness and renamed it Maitland Jewelers. Hedy said the store started out small and was originally more of a repair shop, and has since grown to a full-service jewelry store. She said she traveled at least once, sometimes twice a year, to Antwerp, Belgium, to purchase diamonds in person, which she viewed as critical to her work. I like to see what I buy, she said. You need to see it. Espe cially diamond that has a quality thats visual. The business has catered to many Maitland residents, includ ing its mayor, Howard Schiefer decker. He was on hand to cel ebrate the reopening. He said his wife have shopped there for many years, and he wants to do every thing he can to encourage entre preneurship in the city. We need business in Mait land, he said. Were open for business. Weve been working hard, weve streamlined our per mitting process to help this, were redoing our land development code, all for the purpose of enticing new businesses to come in. For many people, Maitland Jewelers is a place that shares part of the history of their lives. Phyllis Cragin has been shop ping there for 10 years. She said she discovered the store upon her many travels down Horatio Av enue. Cragin purchased her 25th wedding anniversary ring here. Though shes no longer married, she continues to wear the ring cause she enjoys the quality of the product. I loved the ring, and [Hedy] suggested I resize it, and I thought it was appropriate, she said. Cragin is one of many custom ers excited to see the return of this establishment. Its great to continue the busi ness here in Maitland. Its a strong presence, great quality, family at mosphere, she said. Rita Thomas has been shop ping at Maitland Jewelers for eight years. She said the original news of the closing took her by surprise. I remember driving down when I saw [Maitland Jewelers] closing. I was shocked. And so we started making the phone calls around. Did you know they were closing? Thomas said. She said she is glad they are back open for business. Thomas said that she and her husband will be resetting their wedding bands here to celebrate their 30th wed ding anniversary. She is drawn to the intimate relationship that a store like Maitland Jewelers can provide. Theres no other small oneon-one place. You can go to the chains, but you dont feel comfort able leaving your jewelry there, and you dont feel like theyre talking to you, she said. Theres a camaraderie that you have with a small, in-town shop that you dont get with the national chains. For her part, Hedy and her husband are looking forward to enjoying their retirement, with their legacy in good hands. We plan to travel the world. We traveled the world for business. Now we want to go back to some of those places. The Florida Blue center is brought to you by Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida, an Independent Licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. 73115-0212 FREE Health Fair FREE FREE Florida Blue(Located in Winter Park Village) Get Ready for Spring JEWElLERsS C ONTINUEED FRROM fFRontONT paPAGE FREE LECTURESMarch is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month, and wed like to invite you to attend one of our free lectures. Sam Atallah, MDColorectal Surgeon Colorectal cancer is a preventable disease. Colorectal surgeon Sam Atallah, MD, will discuss the importance of screenings in the prevention of colorectal cancer. Attend one of the lectures below to learn more about the risk factors, screenings and the latest colorectal cancer treatment options. Monday, March 12, 12 pm Winter Park YMCA 1201 North Lakemont Avenue Winter Park, FL 32792 Wednesday, March 21, 12 pm Oviedo YMCA 7900 Red Bug Lake Road Oviedo, FL 32765Lunch will be provided. To RSVP, call (407) 303-1700. Except at Florida Hospital Cancer Institute.A N J P Y X K M S K I N M D O N C V H B W G D E S U G X B L C F N O E W U G R J P K F C O L O N D M E F M U S N M Q Y F N E X R Z Q F C A N C E R S Y S R T S J E W S W Y A Y E U S V W L U R A Z I W Z H W Y U Z S L A K M Z C B C A N E G X B L E F N O E W U T R A N J K Y X K M S K A N M S J U W H I D E Y T U S T M E S N M Q Y F S E X R H L L U R A Z B O Z H W Y Y G X B L C F R O E W U G R D O N C V P B W G D E S O S J E A N Y W H E R E S I P A N C R E A T I C Y K D S V J E W S W Y S Y E U S Q A L Y M P H O M A T H R Florida Hospitals Gastroenterology Program is proud to be ranked nationally by U.S.News & World Report. WPMH-12-6760 WPMH-12-6760_R1.indd 1 3/6/12 4:37 PM

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Page 4 Thursday, March 8, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer USPS 00-6186 ISSN 1064-3613 1500 Park Center DDrive OOrlando, FL 32835-5705 Member of: Chamber of CommercePublisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor. Submission does not guarantee publication. Columnists opinions are made independently of the newspaper. All rights reserved. Winter Park / Maitland Observer 2012 EEstablished in 1989 by GGerhard J.W. Munster www.wpmobserver.com | Phone: 407-563-7000 | Fax: 407-563-7099 | editor@observernewspapers.com P.OO BBox 2426 WWinter Park, FL 32790 Published TThursday, March 1, 2012 CONTAONTACTTS Volume 24, IIssue NNumber 10 PUBBLISHERER TT racy Craft 407-515-2605 tcraft@observernewspapers.com manaMANAGinING EEDITORR Jenny AAndreasson 407-563-7026 editor@observernewspapers.com DEESIGGNERER Jonathan Gallagher 407-563-7054 jgallagher@observernewspapers.com REREPORR TERERS Jenny AAndreasson 407-563-7026 editor@observernewspapers.com IIsaac BBabcock 407-563-7023 isaacb@observernewspapers.com LEGalsALS | ClassifiLASSIFIEdsDS AAshley McBBride legal@FLAlegals.com classieds@observernewspapers.com COPYY EEDITORRS IIsaac BBabcock isaacb@observernewspapers.com Sarah WWilson COLUMNISTS Chris Jepson Jepson@MediAmerica.us Louis RRoney LRRoney@c.rr.com Josh Garrick joshgarrick9@gmail.com ADVERER TISINGG SALEES Linda Stern 407-563-7058 LStern@observernewspapers.com suSUBscSCRiptionsIPTIONS | ciCIRculationCULATION Jackie Candelaria 407-563-7013 intINTERnN AAndy Ceballos Its TAX time. Appointments Available 7 Days a Week!Tax Form Processing LLC2400 N Forsyth Rd., Suite 101 Orlando, FL 32807Tel: (407) 657-6336www.TaxFormProcessing.com Proudly Serving the Orlando Area for 17 years! Scan QR Code Community BBulletin Pat Metheny RRocks RRollins GGrammy Award-winning musician Pat Metheny visited the Winter Park Insti tute to discuss his 40-year music ca reer. More than 1,600 fans gathered at the Alfond Sports Center where he performed. Metheny gave budding musicians this advice: BBe the worst guy in every band youre in.Student honors Cornell Universitys R Raymond Pierson of Winter Park has been placed on the Deans List of the College of Arts and Sciences for E Excellence in Scholar ship for the Fall 2011 semester. BBryan BB. Danley, of Maitland, a junior, was named to the Presidents List of Mercer Universitys School of E Engi neering for the fall 2011 semester.Market on the growMaitlands Farmers Market is hav ing record attendance, with two more vendors starting this Sunday bring ing the total to 40.  Now you can buy homemade sausages and selected meats from the B Butchers Pantry and fresh herbs and vegetable plants from Lone Wolf G Growers.  Theres also a new food truck at Wednesdays Food Truck Caf event: Caf Cocoa Mo (http://www.cafecocoamo.com/).Call to artistsThe city of Winter Park and the Winter Park Public Art Advisory B Board an nounce a call to artists for Art on the G Green 2012, a juried exhibition of eight sculptures in Winter Park. It will run from Saturday, Sept. 1, through Friday, March 1. Visit cityofwinter park.org Send submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com Turnstile Media G Group publisher of Winter Park/Maitland Observer ap pointed T T racy Craft to the position of publisher on March 1. Craft, 43, whose media career spans more than a decade, has been a major player in the success of the com munity media division of Turnstile since joining the organization in 2008. Our newspa pers are deeply woven into the fabric of the communities they serve, and Im thrilled to be taking on the chal lenge of nding even more ways to strengthen those bonds, Craft said. On Feb. 16 two Winter Park busi nesses made their national debut on ABBCs G Good Morning America. Sprinkles Custom Cakes T The O Original CakeShooter, a mess-free push-up cake treat, and Peterbrooke Chocolatier of W Winter Parks Jami Shoo, an all-edible chocolate high heel, were featured with other products for Tory Johnsons Steals and Deals segment. IInsurance O Ofce of A America has assumed a three-year, ve-gure sponsorship as the Title Sponsor for Central Floridas largest ofce party and premiere evening run, the IOA Corporate 5K located at Lake EEola, scheduled for April 12.  NAINAI R Realvest negotiated a new lease agreement for 3,363 square feet of ofce space at 2200 Lucien Way in Maitland. The tenant, Willis Construc tion Consulting, Inc., is the largest estimating rm in Central Florida. Winter Park-based La Familia Pawn & Jewelrys 2011 revenue nearly tripled last year, due largely in part to new store openings, successful social media and new investors. EEmerson I International, which developed the CenterPointe Ofce at 220 E E. Central Parkway in Altamonte Springs, recently negotiated a major lease renewal there. Travel Holdings, Inc., owner of LastMinuteTravel.com renewed its lease for 28,540 square feet. BBusiness BBriefs Craft OOlympian stops by Lady Foot Locker recently brought U.S. Olympian Suzy Favor-Hamilton to R Rollins College to host a private run and breakfast Q&A with the young women of PACEE Orange Center for G Girls and the R Rollins College Cross Country team. Next week, the students should be getting sneakers and T-shirts from Lady Foot Locker and New BBalance. Photo by Harry Wilkins WW all of art On Thursday, Feb. 9, The Dr. Phillips Center unveiled a new construction fence, featuring more than 480 pieces of artwork created by students from Central Florida Schools. Winter Park-based Florida Symphony Y Y outh Or chestra members Vanessa and Stephen Huber Weber played in a duet on the violin and viola. Visit  www.fsyo.org

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Page 5 Thursday, March 8, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer March 12 City Commission Meeting topics of interestThere will be a City Commis sion meeting at 3:30 p.m. on Mon day, March 12, at the Rachel D. Murrah Civic Center located at 1050 W. Morse Blvd. Below are a few topics of interest: Mayors RReport Informational Update 20122013 Art on the Green sculpture project from Chele Hipp, Public Art Advisory Board Chair Proclamation Recognition of Louis Roney being inducted into the Florida Artists Hall of Fame. Proclamation Girl Scouts 100th anniversary Presentation to Cynthia Bon ham, City Clerk for achieving her Master Municipal Clerk designa tion Proclamation Purchasing Month Appointment of Wireless Task Force NNon-action IItems Financial Report January 2012 Consent AAgenda Approve the minutes of Feb. 27, 2012. Approve various purchases, bids and contracts (a complete list can be found at cityofwinterpark. org > Government > City Com mission > Agenda Packets). Approve the request to locate temporary modular classrooms and administration building dur ing construction of Bush Science Center addition, subject to pro viding landscape buffer along both street frontages as depicted in exhibit provided and protec tion of shade trees.Public HearingsEqualization Board Hearings: (To be held after 5 p.m.) Resolution declaring that the city is to fund capital improve ments for undergrounding electric/CATV facilities along Via with the cost to be paid by special assessments. cial assessments for the under grounding of electric/CATV facil ities for properties adjacent to Via Request of Windermere Winter Park Venture, LLC: Second reading of the ordi nance amending the comprehensive plan, future land use map to change the designation of Singlefamily Residential to MediumDensity Residential on the prop erty at 444 W. Swoope Ave. Second reading of the ordinance to change the zoning designation of Single-family Residential (R1A) District to Medium-Density Multi-family (R-3) District on the property at 444 W. Swoope Ave. Second reading of the ordi nance amending Ordinance No. 2840-11, Moratorium for Pain Management Clinics. First reading of the ordinance amending the historic preservation section of the Land Development Code. City Commission RReports Commissioner Leary Commissioner Sprinkel Commissioner Cooper Commissioner McMacken City Hall front yard Mayor Bradley full agenda and information on cityofwinterpark.org and by click ing on Government > City Com mission > Packets. OOrlando Philharmonic OOrchestra Spring Pops Concert The city of Winter Park will proudly host the Orlando Philhar monic Orchestra as they present Spring Pops Masters of the Movies at 7 p.m. on Sunday, March 11, in Central Park in downtown Winter Park. Bring your blankets and lawn chairs to enjoy an eve ning of heart-warming music un der the stars. This wonderful per formance is made possible by a generous grant from the Charlotte Julia Hollander Trust. The event is free and open to the public. Conductor Dirk Meyer will lead the Orlando Philharmonic in a program of music from movies on the big screen including Apoc alypse Now, The Godfather, Rocky Horror Picture Show, Grease and Star Wars. Dirk Meyer was appointed as sociate conductor of the Sarasota cessful seasons as assistant con ductor, during which he earned an outstanding reputation with musicians, audiences and crit ics alike. He also served as music director of the Sarasota Youth under his baton culminated in a 2008 Carnegie Hall performance in New York City. In addition to his duties with the Sarasota Orchestra, Meyers current season includes a debut with the Duluth Superior Sym phony Orchestra, as well as return engagements with the Naples Philharmonic Orchestra and Or lando Philharmonic Orchestra, leading 13 Young Peoples Concerts as well as their Pops pro grams. The Orlando Philharmonic is Central Floridas resident professional orchestra, appearing in more than 125 performances each year. The Philharmonic is current ly in its 19th anniversary season, led by Music Director Christopher Wilkins. To learn more please visit orlandophil.org or call the Phil0071. DDaylight Saving TT ime (DDSTT) begins Sunday, March 11Dont forget to spring your clocks forward on Sunday, March 11, and change your irrigation schedule to the following St. Johns River Water Management District DST requirements: Irrigation between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. is prohibited. Odd numbered addresses or properties with no addresses may water on Wednesday and Satur day between the hours of 4 p.m. and 10 a.m. Even numbered addresses may water on Thursday and Sunday between the hours of 4 p.m. and 10 a.m. Non-residential properties may water on Tuesday and Friday between the hours of 4 p.m. and 10 a.m. Properties with new lawns or landscaping are exempt from the Residents using private wells or pumps for irrigation, ground or surface water and water from public and private utilities, must comply with the St. Johns River Water Management Districts Re striction. Water only when necessary to meet landscaping needs and not between the hours of 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Water no more than one hour per zone, or inches per zone per day. Violation of these water restricenforcement action. For more information, please call 407-6594800 or toll-free 1-877-228-1658, or visit St. Johns River Water Man daswater.comVisit the citys ofcial website at cityof winterpark.org, nd us on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter. Saturday, March 24, 2012 1 5 p.m. Winter Park Civic Center 1050 Morse Blvd. Winter Park, FL 32789 Tickets $5 ADVANCE Or$7 DOOR $5 SENIORS (AT DOOR) (Children Under 3 FREE) JOIN US FOR: Create Your Own Sundae, Ice Cream Floats, Italian Ice, Celebrity Servers, Face Painting, Cake Walk, Games, Silent Auction, Door Prizes and more! Hurry! Sale E nds Soon! Design Pro Screens Longwood, FL 32750 Toll Free: 1-888-724-9868 Ext. 71232 71232 Winter Park City Talk BY RRANDY KKNIghGHT CITY MANAGER Plan your weekend with The Weekender!Visit wpmobserver.com and click "Subscribe to NNewsletter"

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Page 6 Thursday, March 8, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer March and Aprils springtime weather sets the stage for city wide events and activities in Mai tland. With something for every one, all you have to do is get out your calendar and make plans to experience great events for the en tire family. Step right up and get ready to be amazed! The Art & History Museums Maitland (A&H) is prepared to dazzle you at their upcoming fundraising event, Participation: Circus of the Sur real, held at 5:30 p.m. on Satur day, March 24, at the A&Hs Mait land Art Center, 231 W. Packwood Ave. Not your ordinary fundraising event, this wonderful and strange evening of art, dining and diver sions, is an interactive and sur real experience that guests will not soon forget. The evening fea tures an opportunity for guests to dine at themed tables created and hosted by celebrated local artists, in addition to an array of perfor mances designed to engage and enthrall. Acclaimed Director John DiDonna serves as entertainment director, bringing his imagination and talents to the event. Di Donna brings with him entertain ers from Empty Spaces Theatre Co(llaboration) to make the event even more exciting. To purchase tickets for friends and corporate tables, visit ArtandHistory.org or call 407-539-2181, extension 262. The city of Maitland Farmers Market is open Sundays from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the shores of beautiful Lake Lily Park. The Farmers Market will be closed on April 8 in observance of the Eas ter holiday and on April 15 for the Spring Arts Festival. Maitlands Food Truck Caf is at Lake Lily Park every Wednesday from 6 to 9 p.m. From April 13-15, the Maitland Chamber of Commerce will pres ent the 24th Annual Spring Arts Festival at Lake Lily Park. With artists from around the nation, this festival promises to be a weekend to remember for all. On Saturday, April 21, Mait lands Movie in the Park at 8 p.m. will feature Hugo. Bring your blanket and chair! Reminder movie will be shown at Quinn Strong Park, 345 S. Maitland Ave. On April 22, the Friends of First Response will host their annual Kickball Tournament at the Maitland Baseball Complex. Funds raised at this event will provide emergency and crisis funding to lies, and provide opportunities for interact with area residents and get to know one another as neigh bors. For more information on these and other events throughout the year, contact the Maitland Art and History Association at 407-5396281, the Maitland Public Library at 407-539-7700, the Performing Arts of Maitland at pamaitland. org, or the city of Maitland Lei sure Services Department at 407539-6247. Mayor to take ofceOn Monday, April 23, Mayor Howard A. Schieferdecker will be The inaugural ceremony will take place at 6:30 p.m. on Mon day, April 23, in the Maitland City Hall Council Chambers. The pub lic is invited to attend this event. For additional information, please 407-539-6219. Mari Smith, EEvent Coordinator, Leisure Services Department City Council AAgenda of March 12City Council meets the second and fourth Mondays of the month at 6:30 p.m. The next meeting is scheduled for March 12 in the Council Chambers, 1776 Indepen dence Lane. Below is the agenda for that meeting. Public Hearings:Ordinance Police/Fire Pension Amendments Ordinance Creating the Downtown Maitland Zoning Dis trict Ordinance Rezone Properties within the Downtown Maitland Zoning District Consent AAgenda Approve Council Minutes of Feb. 27 Approve Council Workshop Minutes of Feb. 20 Resolution Cooperative Pur chasing Program Equipment Purchase Vacuum Truck DDecision IItem: Evaluation/Compensation City Manager & City ClerkFor updates, please visit website at itsmy maitland.com Lack of Desire or Low Energy? George Carroll, M.D., has over 20 years ex perience in sexual medicine, and is actively involved in the following: 407-894-9959 www.gulfstatescu.org 407-831-8844A Refreshing Alternative to Conventional Banking.9405 S. Highway 17-92 Maitland, FL 32751 Maitland City Talk BY HOWARD SchCHIEfFERDEcCKER MAYOR Upcoming events Plan your weekend with The Weekender!This weekly newsletter keeps you up to date on events happening in Central Florida's cities, including Winter Park, Maitland, Oviedo, Winter Springs, Avalon Park and Waterford Lakes.Visit wpmobserver.com and click "Subscribe to NNewsletter"

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Page 7 Thursday, March 8, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Lifestyles One step into Mary Lanes closet and its ing, the closet which is more like the size of a small bedroom is a sea of vibrant green and pure pink, the signature colors of clothing brand Lilly Pulitzer. Lilly-themed paintings, Lilly stuffed animals, rows and rows of Lilly shoes and enough pink sweaters and patterned sundresses for every day of the year pop out from each inch of the room. I wear exclusively Lilly every day, Lane said. This is my niche. And she isnt kidding. She said 98 per cent of her clothing collection is the Lilly her home, not counting the items she keeps in storage. She never has, and said she never will, give up a Lilly piece. Shes even has a custom Lilly golf cart and bike, and has named her little cocker spaniel puppy Lilly, whom she dresses in only Lilly-looking sweaters, of course. Lanes been wearing the line since she was a little girl, and in the last 10 years has amassed a collection large enough to never utter the common words hated by hus bands and boyfriends everywhere, I have nothing to wear! Lane, who is a Longwood resident, said she loves the preppy chic vibe of the clothes, but also the history behind them. Socialite Lilly Pulitzer started the brand, which of fers a very Florida-resort-appropriate seseahorses and palm trees, in 1959 in Palm Beach. Pulitzer wanted a dress made to hide all the juice stains she got while serv ing at her little juice stand in her husbands citrus groves. Since then, its been a brand that follows the trends, but stays true to its roots, and offers clothing for every age and occasion a woman needs, Lane said. It was a brand made for women by a woman. Lilly in general has a very devout fol lowing, Meredith Gardner, manager at the Park Avenue Lilly store, said. People who love Lilly are passionate about it. AA Lilly ambassador Lane stops in the Park Avenue store at least once a week, sometimes four, to check out the new merchandise and to just visit her Lilly family. Gardner has known her for 15 years, and said whenever a new ship ment comes in, Lane is happy to stop by and unpack boxes with her to get a glimpse of the new styles and individually artistmade patterns. When shes in the store, Lanes self-pro claimed Lilly ambassador title she even has business cards kicks in. Shes quick to show off a new print she loves to a shop per, or to tell someone they look wonder ful in the little sundress theyre trying on. Her love and friendliness gets her mistaken for an employee all the time, and she plays along. Lane just exudes the Lilly philoso phy. Mary is a very positive, bright upbeat person they compliment each other very well, Gardner said. Those at the headquarters of the brand think so, too. She is the perfect Lilly lover, said Jack Allred, whos in customer service for Lilly Pulitzer. We love that spirit, print and pattern designer Rebecca Allred agreed.Part of the brandShes taken that love for the brand to the next level by organizing and hosting events for them. Its not uncommon for designers such as Rebecca to get feedback from Lane about what she likes about the clothes and inspiration for new prints. They all know herself has Lane over to her home in Palm Beach from time to time. She even threw Pulitzer an 80th birthday party on Nov. 12. She is a very recognizable piece of the brand, Jack said. Shes become an iconic customer. Lane said it isnt hard to live up to the that embodies spring and sunshine. It gives you an immediate lift, Lane said. 88141 PRAD WPO 3/2012W Winter Pa rk's Distinctive Retirement Community www.themayf lower .com 1620 Mayower Court Winter Park, FL 32792When you consider moving to a continuing care retirement community, what are you looking for? Luxury amenities? Spectacular buildings and grounds? A pool and tness center? Superb dining? Certainly. But, thats just the beginning. Because if youre thinking about a CCRC, youre really looking for long-term care. For life. In a facility that meets the highest standards. With the most competent, caring staff. And a longstanding track record of satisfaction. In short . a community like The Mayower. Here, you have the freedom and exibility to customize your home and your retirement lifestyle to make them uniquely yours. All with the assurance of guaranteed pre-funded assisted living and skilled nursing services in our Gold Seal Health Center. And, oh yes, theres a board-certied physician on staff in our Geriatric Outpatient Clinic to handle all your primary-care medical needs.Plus a Gold Seal Rated Health Center!Hows that for a long-term care plan? Call today, and lets talk about it: 407.672.1620. RESORT STYLE LIVING that comes with LONG TERM CARE [ guaranteed ] Mayower Clinic Director Jesus Lopez, M.D. LIMITED OPENINGS for Rehab or Long-Term Care in The Mayower Health Center. MAY 821 Dr. Lopez Ad WPO.indd 1 2/6/12 4:32 PM PhotosHOTOS BY IsSAAcC BABcCOcCK thTHE oOBsSERvVER Mary Lane poses with her puppy, Lilly, in one of her two closets, which showcase her afnity for everything Lilly Pulitzer. She earned the unofcial title of Lilly ambassador. BBRITTNI JOhHNsSON Observer Staff If Mary Lanes love for Lilly Pulitzer has sparked your interest in the brand, visit the Winter Park store at 118 N. Park Ave or www.lillypulitzer.com Lilly love Mary Lane wears Lilly Pulitzer every day, no matter what SCAN HERE Use your smartphones QR R code reader app to view more photos or visit wpmobserver.com/ photos/galleries

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Page 8 Thursday, March 8, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer FamilyCalendar MARARCH 8 Sunshine, B Booze, and Monkeys: TThe A Anthropology of Florida T T our ism by Jason Wenzel, professor of Anthropology at Valencia College is at 7-8:30 p.m. on March 8 at Harry P. Leu GGardens. Its free. The R Rollins MBBA invites job seekers to TT ake Control of Y Y our Career and Y Y our Life from 5:30-7:30 p.m. on March 8 at the B Busch Science Center at R Rollins College, 1000 Holt Ave., in Winter Park. Its free. Visit ti nyurl.com/your-career-and-life MARARCH 9 Morse Museum presents Celtic Crossings live from 5 to 8 p.m. on Friday, March 9. There will be a free evening curator tour of the New Tiffany Wing at 7 p.m. The Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra presents violinist Midori in perfor mance with the Minnesota Orchestra at 8 p.m. on Friday, March 9 at the BBob Carr Performing Arts Centre. Visit www.OrlandoPhil.org  Victoria Lynn Schultz harpist, plays at 11:30 a.m. on March 9 at Univer sity Club of Winter Park. Call 407644-6149 or visit universityclubwinterpark.org MARARCH 10 The 2012 Food & W Wine Festival is from 6 to 9 p.m. on Saturday, March 10, at the B Baldwin Park Village Cen ter. Visit orlando.cff.org On March 10, the Maitland W W om ens Club will be holding its annual fashion show and luncheon at Maison & Jardin, 430 S. Wymore R Road, Altamonte Springs. Cost is $30 cash or check.  Call 407-539-0038 or 407830-6373. The Junior League of G Greater Orlan dos Hoops for Hunger Charity Gala will take place from 7-11 p.m. on Saturday, March 10. Cocktail attire is suggested. G Get tickets at jlgo.org for $75 per person. The Orlando/Winter Park B Branch of American Association Of University Women will host its AAnnual Spring Literary Luncheon featuring author Carol Frost, at 11:30 a.m. on Satur day, March 10, at The University Club of Winter Park, 841 N. Park Ave. in Winter Park. Visit aauworlwp.org MARARCH 11 The fourth Annual Sam Swope Char ity R Ride is Sunday, March 11, start ing at the B Bahia Shrine Temple, 2300 Pembrook Drive, Orlando, and ending at Seminole Harley Davidson, 620 Hickman Circle, Sanford. Sign-in is from 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. and its $30 to ride. Proceeds go to Shriners Hospitals for Children. An artist reception featuring the OOr lando O Oriental B Brush Painting So ciety and honoring the many styles of Chinese painting is 2-4 p.m. on March 11 at the University Club of Winter Park. Its free. Call 407-644-6149 or visit universityclubwinterpark.org Winter Park will host the Orlando Phil harmonic Orchestra as they present Spring Pops Masters of the Movies at 7 p.m. on Sunday, March 11, in Central Park in Winter Park. Visit or landophil.org or call 407-770-0071. GGene Hawkins, husband of the late Sen. Paula Hawkins will host a tour of Villa Serena, her former home, as a benet for the Winter Park Public library. Its from 3 to 5 p.m. on Sunday, March 11. Admission is $75 per person or $125 per couple. Call 407623-3277 or visit wppl.org MARARCH 15 The Orange Audubon Society presents RRed-cockaded W W oodpeckers: R Re populating the D Disney W Wilderness Preserve by Jennifer Milikowsky at 7 p.m. on Thursday, March 15. Its free at Leu G Gardens. Call 407-6372525 or visit orangeaudubon.org Hannibal Square W Wine T T asting: TThe Fine A Art of W Wine is from 5:30 to 8 p.m. on Thursday, March 15, at the Winter Park Farmers Market. Call at 407-644-8281 or visit winterpark. org The B Bach Festival Society of Winter Park presents the TT akcs Quar tet and pianist G Garrick Ohlsson at 8 p.m. on Thursday, March 15, at the Tiedtke Concert Hall, R Rollins College. Call 407-646-2182 or visit B BachFes tivalFlorida.org The American Legion, Winter Park Memorial Post 112, will host an OOpen House event in celebra tion of the American Legions 93rd anniversary of its founding, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thursday, March 15, at 4490 N. G Goldenrod R Road, Winter Park. Call 407-671-6404.Visit wpmobserver.com/events for more details. Send submissions to editor@ observernewspapers.com Calendar EEnzians Popcorn Flicks in Cen tral Park is at 7 p.m. on Thursday, March 8,  featuring TThe Man W Who KKnew T T oo Much at the Central Park Main Stage in Winter Park. On Friday, March 9, Trinity Preps biennial E Ethel S. Danhof Fine Arts Series will feature Vox A Audio in concert at Trinity Prep.  Visit ti nyurl.com/tpvox. The TT rack Shack Smile Mile is at 8 a.m. on Saturday, March 10, at BBlue Jacket Park. Join Miles and his friends for a morning of fun and tness, consisting of a onemile childrens race open to all students between the ages of 5 and 11. Visit tinyurl.com/7dhrur3. Thanks to last years success, Creald School of Art will host its Second Annual Family Festival a preview of Crealds Summer AArtCamp that will run from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, March 10, at the Creald campus located at 600 Saint Andrews B Blvd. in Win ter Park. The event and workshops are free. Contact 407-671-1886 or  visit crealde.org. On Saturday, March 10, the Or lando Science Center hosts the 14th annual Science Challenge. The participants are the rst place winners in the physical science competitions for middle and high schools for the eight surrounding counties.  The public can review entries from 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Call 407-514-2000 or visit osc. org. At 3 p.m. on Saturday, March 11, celebrate St. Patricks Day early by coming to the Maitland Public Library to be entertained by WW at ters School of I Irish D Dancers. Learn about the culture and see some fantastic costumes. Pollo Tropical is hoping to  collect 2,000 phones from 10:30 a.m. to close at all company-owned Florida restaurants on Wednesday, March 14, for Women In Dis tress  by offering  customers a free Shrimp or Chicken Quesadilla WWrap for each phone donated. The  phones do not have to be in working order. Visit  pollotropical. com. Just B Between Friends Central Florida (JBBF) spring community consignment event is March 16 through March 18 at the Altamon te Springs Hilton, 350 S. Northlake BBlvd., in Altamonte Springs. Ad mission is $2 until 4 p.m. only on Friday and Saturday. Visit central orida.jbfsale.com At 10:30 a.m. each Tuesday, the Maitland Public Library hosts preschool story and craft time. At 10:30 a.m. each Thursday, it hosts baby time stories and activity. At 4 p.m. each Thursday, it hosts RReading B Buddies for kindergarten through fth-grade. No registra tion necessary. Call 407-6477700.Send submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com Parker Sketch Culture & Cocktails is from 6 to 9 p.m. on Friday, March 9, at the A&Hs GGermaine Marvel B Building, 210 W. Packwood Ave., in Maitland featuring artist Parker Sketch. His paintings depict a variety of subjects ranging from popular culture to an ever-growing personal iconography. 

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Page 9 Thursday, March 8, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Now through April 29 Presses and Prints at OMABack in 1974, when Congress allowed the National Endowment for the Arts to actually help the arts in our country, the Orlando Museum of Art (OMA) received a grant from which 27 works were purchased. That collection is a prime example of why enlightened governments help the arts, as the collection has increased tenfold to include more than 270 works by major artists including Jasper Johns, James Rosenquist, Louise Nevelson and Elizabeth Peyton. Now OMA presents  Presses, Publishers and Prints:  Selections from the Contemporary American Graphics Collection,  running through OMA's lithographs, silk-screens, etchings, woodblocks and works on paper, this is the strongest group of works within the Museum's holdings. Call  407-8964231  or visit  omart.org   March 9 Parker Sketch at Culture & Cocktails Hes the hottest young painter in Central Florida, and his contributions to the arts community include museum shows, gifts, silent auctions and a free discussion group about Fine Art, of course that continues to grow and grow. He is Parker Sketch, and if you havent seen his work, its time to check it out this Friday, March 9, at the always-fun Art & History Museums Mait land  (A&H)s monthly Culture & Cocktails event. C&C takes place the second Friday of every month from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at 210 W. Packwood Ave. in Maitland.  The evenings activities include music by Cure for Caska, poetry read ings, works by A&Hs Sketch Club and food from  Fork in the Road  Food Truck. Admission is $5, which includes one drink ticket. Visit ArtandHistory.org  or call 407-539-2181.March 14 Kathy Ireland Entrepreneur, philanthro pist and supermodel Kathy Ireland will headline Heart of Florida United Ways 5th  Annual Womens Leadership Luncheon on Wednesday, March 14. Co-chaired by Helen Donegan and Karen Dee, The Womens Leadership Council raises awareness, funds and volunteer support for  women and children dealing with  domestic violence and poverty. A heartbreaking 65 percent of clients served by United Way partner agencies are women. Ireland is the CEO of a $1.9 billion design empire, and works diligently to improve education, reduce poverty and help families prosper. The luncheon will take place at the Hilton Or lando Convention Center at 6001 Destination Parkway. Tickets are available at hfuw.org or by  call ing  407-429-2111. March 15 If he likes it then he oughta put a ring on itThe Heaven Event Center is the perfect home for Orlandos aptly named alternative bridal show that takes the form of a big, fake wedding. Complete with emotional ceremony, dinner and dance-party reception, brides-tobe are offered a unique way to see wedding vendors in action. The goal is to inspire brides and promote local businesses while having a great time. This is Not and the event is scheduled for March 15. With engagement season in full swing, if your hand is sporting some shiny new bling, you can visit and buy your ticket at TheNotWedding.comMarch 16 to April 1 The ForeignerThe Jester Theater Company makes its second home at the beautiful Garden Theatre in Winter Garden, where they will produce the comedy  The For eigner from March 16 to April 1.  In this  comedy, Charlie Baker considers himself to be the worlds dullest man, but his friend Sgt. Froggy LeSueur has a plan to change all that. Froggy takes his friend on a vacation where the scheme includes making Charlie appear as a foreigner who cant speak English. Their share with Charlie their deepest secrets and most sinister plans. The act will star Keith Smith as the foreigner and Bill War riner as his friend Froggy. The theater is in the heart of historic downtown Winter Garden. Call  407-877-GRDN (4736)  or  visit gardentheatre.org March 16 Lord of the DanceSixteen years after Michael Flatley created Lord of the Dance, it is selling out arenas as the worlds highest-grossing dance show. We can join the 60 million people who have already seen this hit show when the tour arrives in Orlando on Friday, March 16, at the Bob Carr PAC for two performances only.  Visit OrlandoBroadway.com or call  1-800-982-2787 or 407-7046116.Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906. Josh Garrick Culture worthy of your calendar Hot off the press This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH O RLANDO A VE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.E NZIAN.ORG A SEPARATION Fri Sun 3:30 6:30 9:30 Mon, Wed, Thurs 6:30 9:30 Tues 6:30 Only Held Over by Popular Demand! TIM & ERICS BILLION DOLLAR MOVIE Fri and Sat 12 Midnight Saturday Matinee Classics ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST Sat 11:00AM Cult Classics THE MAN WHO FELL TO E ARTH Tues 9:30

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Page 10 Thursday, March 8, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Opinions Though he started his career as a computer hacker, Julian Asjournalist of our time. He also might be the most dangerous terrorist since 9/11. It depends on whom you ask: If its the U.S. the answer would be the latter. In a recent development with broad-reaching implica tions for freedom of the press in the United States and abroad, Assange may have discovered how arbitrarily the U.S. government decides who is and is not a journalist, and how the government is privatizing information legitimate journalists to report on government activities. Mix in an accusation of a global insidertion of journalism becomes as transparent as a well-organized spy ring. Precisely what the founder of the website WikiLeaks has done to deserve his U.S. Depart ment of Justice-sponsored leap from journalism to terrorist is far from clear. Ask an investiga tive reporter what they think about Assanges organization obtaining and releasing more than half a million reports from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, plus thousands more secret messages between U.S. and foreign diplomats, and chances are youd receive a sympathetic response. If keeping the government open and its doings accessible to the people is journalism, then Assange is a journalist. Ask the government the same question, and it will say he should be ar rested for it. On Feb. 27, Assange found out the intentions of U.S. prosecutors: They want to indict him. They may already have done so   dating as far back as December 2010, according to information from the Australian embassy in Washington, D.C. though that indictment has yet to be released sanges alleged secret indictment didnt come from the mouths of crusading journalists. It came from the hacker group Anony mous. Anonymous allegedly stole an email from the private research service Strategic Forecasting Inc., also known as Stratfor, that was sent by an Australian govern release of the email was reported upon by the Sydney Morning Herald on leap day, indicating that a sealed indictment had already been drawn up for As sange, though precisely what crime he would be charged with remains unclear. The company from which the email was stolen also has an interesting relationship with jour nalism. Stratfor publicly positions itself as a research and informapurposes, frequently contracting with the U.S. government. Considering the role of journalists as the fourth branch of government keeping the government in check through improving transparency having a media company under contract with the government would seem to be a WikiLeaks, partnering with 25 other media outlets across the globe, has been working to expose Stratfor as not a media outlet, but rather a spy corpora public activist groups. It may also be using inside connections to obtain information that it then uses to manipulate the stock market and currency markets, Assange said. It is using this paid infor mation from insiders in order to invest in what it calls a wide instruments, Assange said at a press conference on Feb. 27 in London. This makes News of the World look like kindergar ten. Assange said Stratfors type of relationship with the govern ment is becoming more common, pointing to recent moves by gov ernments to contract intelligence transparency. Intelligence organizations increasingly are privatized, and once privatized theyre taken out of the realm of the Freedom of Information Act, and of U.S. military law, so theyre often used by governments who want to conceal a particular activity, Assange said. The end result is a government that makes journalism, to a grave degree, illegal. Enter WikiLeaks and Anonymous again. Theyre accused of operating as illegal hacker groups, but they do journalistic work, which they release to the public for free. In America we are explicitly our own government, but tacitly at the governments mercy when we ask to know what its doing. WikiLeaks and Anonymous are being branded as terrorists for putting that information in the public spotlight. We should be far School should do more to ensure safetyI am a Winter Park High School student. In my opinion your article on the  Winter Park High School  roads published Feb. 23) was lacking. I feel like the only people interviewed for this article were adults and the school administers who only use cars to get to school. They do not know  anything about the students. And yes, the school is right the roads are safer, but what happened to the students that  walk or ride their bikes to school? Did they get safer routes?  The article also doesn't cover  the students or their tales of woe.  Many stories were not told and the readers did not get the entire story. For instance, I ride my bike to school   I rode my bike down Woodcrest and entered by way of the Bellwood Drive no news about accidents or possible ac cidents happening this year, or ever. Now that the entrance has been closed off, I leave my house 10 minutes earlier and go and  through the bus loop, which is  much more dangerous because I am in the road all the time with cars and buses because there are no sidewalks. Another tale  of woe is that of my  friend. She lives on Woodcrest Drive, which one would think would allow her to easily get to school. However, in reality she must  get a ride from her mom, go all the way around to   impossibly long  line of cars before arriv ing at  school.  Also, I  have heard of stories about kids jumping fences  to get to school or, in one case, a student who cut the fence to avoid going around to an  open entrance. Yes, people have begun to plan  ahead for the new policy, but there are still people who put themselves in the way of danger for the easier route. What  irritates me the most is that the school only blocked entrances. The state ment, "We're always doing all that we can to ensure student safety," is not  com pletely true. OK, so the school blocked off potentially dangerous entrances. What else did they do? Did they try putting in sidewalks to keep students off the road? No. Did they try  giving pedestrians and bike riders  new and safer entrances? No.  The school  did not try and help the students they  petition the city of Winter Park to  put in sidewalks for the safety of the students. If the school really wanted to do all they could, I think they could have done more than block entrances. Ainsley Shallcross Winter Park High School seniorPut a spring in your step this month with Walk MS: OrlandoWith the coming of spring, we all look forward to enjoying the outdoors the mild, but sunny weather, the aroma of us. tune our bodies after a sedentary winter and holiday feasting. What better way to get in shape and enjoy the new season than to participate in the plethora of out door charity walks available every spring to help those in our community who are in need? One such walk is in our backyard ida Chapter of the Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Society, is 8 a.m. on Saturday, March 10, at Lake Eola at Thornton Park. Walk MS is one of the National MS Societys signature fundraising events, drawing hundreds of thousands of participants each year to nearly 600 sites throughout the United States. The family-friendly event includes 1and 2.34-mile routes and is open to anyone families, teams or individuals. Participants in Walk MS: Orlando help raise funds for close to 73,000 people lo cally who are affected by this chronic dis ease, offering support services including educational programs, self-help groups, research, medical equipment and more. MS attacks the central nervous system, which is made up of the brain, spinal cord and optic nerves. Walk MS is our rallying point to help raise critical funds that support cuttingedge research and services to help people with MS move their lives forward. The MS Societys call-to-action, Join the Movement, is a reminder of the fact that MS robs people of the ability to move, disabling some and that action is needed to raise funds for research while improving the quality of life and independence of those living with MS. Join the movement toward a world free of MS by making donations or participating in one of the Walk MS events or Bike MS: The Citrus Tour 2012. There is no cost to register for Walk MS, although a minimum $20 donation is requested. Those who raise at least $125 receive a T-shirt. For details, visit MidFloridaMSWalks.org or call 407-478-8882, extension 28. Gaby Casado Development manager National Multiple Sclerosis Society, Mid Florida Chapter Our Observation Hacking and crimes of enlightenment King Features Weekly ServiceMarch 5, 2012 Letters to the editor Send your thoughts (400 words or less) to Managing Editor Jenny Andreasson at editor@observernewspapers.com When gearing up to participate in a walk, keep in mind these healthful tips from physical therapist, Patty Bobryk, at MS Comprehensive Care Center of Central Florida. Look for opportunities to be more active en throughout your day. Take the stairs instead of the elevator. Park at the far end of the parking lot. Walk the dog. Small changes will add up. Drink plenty of water. Hydrate before, during en and after your workout. A dehydrated body is unable to cool itself, which can cause heat exhaustion or heat stroke. It can also cause muscle fatigue. To get the most of your walk, stay well hydrated. Stretch before and after your walk. Stretching en before you exercise warms up your body and helps prevent injuries. Slow walking or stretching after you walk allows your heart rate and blood pressure to return to pre-exercise levels. Were always doing all that we can to ensure student safety, is not  completely true. Ainsley Shallcross If keeping the government open and its doings accessible to the people is journalism, then Julian Assange is a journalist.

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Page 11 Thursday, March 8, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer You are likely hearing a lot about local these days and may wonder whats behind it. Its nothing too complex or worthy of a Lifetime movie. Its all pretty simple. When someone talks about local, its simply recognition of the bening spending close to home with the businesses that make our commu nity vibrant. These businesses are owned by your friends, neighbors and possibly your own customers, if youre a business owner. They are a part of the fabric that makes our community what it is, and are integral to why we love it. Without them the events we look forward to every year, from next weeks Winter Park Sidewalk Arts Festival, to Dinner On The Avenue, to Christmas in the Park, simply couldnt exist at least not to the extent that they do. Earlier this week I heard that both Circa 1926 and Spice Modern Steakhouse on Park Avenue had closed. I posted my regrets on my ILUVWinterPark.com Facebook page and soon others were commiserating with me. Id eaten in both, been in them during Winter Park Sip events, and knew them to be a part of the Winter Park landscape I cherish. Such small businesses arent just facades on the street, not just places to eat or drink. They employ people who shop and eat at other local businesses, they help to make Winter Park what it is to day. Those businesses will change over time and change surely keeps things more interesting but when one is lost, the people who enjoyed and frequented surely will miss it. Last year I participated in organizing the wonderful new Park Avenue in the s & s exhibit at the museum for the Winter Park Historical Society if you havent been, youre missing out! I have only been in Winter Park for six years, but was working with many people who have lived here their entire lives. It was wonderful to hear their recollections, some funny, others sad. But what came through in their stories and in their writings for the exhibit, was the love they have for this community and the attachment they felt toward businesses long gone. What they wrote about them was often so amazingly descriptive, warm and funny, it made me feel like I knew those businesses myself. This made me want to know where each business had been and what was there now. It also made me wonder which existing businesses were in the process of leaving wasnt here during the s and s, most of us were not, but the stories I was told about the businesses these residents frequented, enjoyed and loved, gave me an idea of what it would have been like. Their recollections of those small businesses served as a window into that time in Winter Park. I had a good idea Winter Park was special even before we living in Fort Lauderdale and our neighbors were more than a little sarcastic about our leaving the beaches, palm trees and all that went along with them. But once I began stating our next home would be Winter Park, their cyni cism abated and each and every time I swear every person I told simply responded: Oh, I love Winter Park. Winter Park is a truly special community for so many reasons. es and the people who own them are no doubt two of them. Last year when I began my website, ILUVWinterPark.com, which I started to celebrate locality, I coined a phrase: Parkpreneur. A Parkpreneur is to me anyone, from business owner to artist to Winter Park Boat Tour captain, to any number of others, who helps to keep Winter Park special and unique, and the place I truly do love calling home. And when youve got our communitys version of local, often times to my other halfs chagrin, I think theres very little need to go anywhere else.Clyde V. Moore is the chief everything ofcer of I LUV Winter Park, Inc. Visit ILUVWinterPark.com Chris Jepson Perspectives Louis Roney Play On! Slugs, snails and puppy dog tales How did we arrive here?How many times come and go that leave their unique memories forever engraved in the back of ones mind? The childhood memories that, from out of nowhere, crystallize in an old noggin are often astonishingly clear. Im remembering that 6-foot-tall box at grandmothers in Atlanta until our cord ran out, snapped by a strong March gale, and the kite sailed off into a windy eternity. I remember an Armistice Day at 11 a.m. when we on the Winter Park High School football team stood at attention on the 50-yard line prior to playing another high school. A car drove up and a  guy jumped out, running to us and yelling, Albert is dead! Albert, a classmate, had died pulling a shotgun out of the back seat of a car, and the gun went off. I cant forget, in the s, the alligators we encountered lying lethargically on the lake bottom as we swam 10 feet underwater in Lake Virginia off the Rollins shore. I recall a night football game against Leesburg when I injured my hip in a way that still wont let me forget. I  remember watching from a tall dune in Daytona Beach as Sir Malcolm Camp bell broke the land speed record in his Blue Bird racing car. In 1928, when I was 7, my father took me with him on a business trip out of Atlanta. We crossed a bridge over the Savannah River and on the South Carolina side, saw a tri-motor Ford biplane at the end of an improvised red-clay runway. A sign read: Airplane Rides $1. Both dad and I were anxious not to let such an oppor tunity pass us by. The plane took off in a cloud of dust. We soared high above Augusta and several other smaller towns for some 15 to 20 minutes and then landed bumpily. When we got home and I told my mother what we had done, she was not at all happy at the risk she thought dad and I had taken. But the next morning in Spring Street School did I have a story to tell the other kids? You bet! Riding my bike at night in Winter Park was a scary proposition when I was a kid. When I rode from the scout hut on Lake Killarney to our house off Lake Sue, the streets were all paved with loose bricks. Rattlesnakes had the habit of coming out of the palmetto jungle and warming themselves at night on the lonely brick roads. I was ever on the lookout lest I run over a rattlesnake and throw him up around my neck as had happened to some bikers. Speaking of rattlesnakes, there was a butcher shop on the west side of Park Avenue at New England. Behind the store was a broad white fence on which people hung the biggest diamondback rattle snakes they had killed some were 6or 7-feet long! We were always careful to look out for coral snakes the small red, yellow and black-colored serpents that sometimes dropped out of local trees if you brushed a branch with your bike. A coral snake once fell out of a banana tree and into a canoe I was paddling in the canal between Lake Virginia and Lake Osceola. I set a speed record vacating that canoe thats why Im able to tell this tale!About Roney: HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney)Celebrate Winter Parks businesses ClL YdDE V. MooOORE Guest WriterSometimes I experience down-onmy-knees awe of our species. How so very far we have come in such a relatively short period of time. Out of Africa some 70,000 years ago, we have been capable of language, music and art for about 50,000 years. We left the planet 50 years ago (Apollo space program) and the upper end of our potential is, I think, limited only by our imaginations. Yet Yet, what numb chucks we are. My sister characterizes our species as nasty little monkeys. Were violent, aggres sive, territorial, fearful and superstitious. We breed much as a malignant cancer, largely indifferent to our collective impact on Earths environment. On one hand were artistic, creative, loving and generous. On the other were myopic, fearful and self-serving. Were a Manichaean, Janus-masked collection of competing emotions. The very qualities that make us Master of the Universe can just as easily launch an inquisition, justify a pogrom or require women in burkas. What genuinely has me down is the condition of America. How did we arrive here? Up to our neck in problems (of our own making) and operating under a political system conceived to be deliberately contentious. A three-branch democracy created to provide a check and balance against tyranny as well as revolutionary change. We are wholly dependent on an intelligent and informed electorate who in turn elect competent leaders. When the obit is written on the United States, historians will conclude America succumbed because its population failed its test of good citizenship. We did not smartly consider our intelligent options. We did not select appropriate solutions to the challenges confronting our republic (whether it be war, energy or education) nor did we elect the best leaders with the best ideas. This appears to be Americas condition, depressing as that may be. The popular idea that the average citizen will select the best candidate or best policy when they see it is being in creasingly challenged as false. According to research results conducted by Cornell University professor David Dunning, one conclusion suggests that democratic elec tions produce mediocre leadership and policies. Why, you might legitimately ask? Because most of our fellow citizens cannot adequately judge the competency of a public policy or a candidate. Very smart ideas are going to be hard for people to adopt, because most people dont have the sophistication to recognize how good an idea is," Dunning said. To a degree, this applies to all of us. Most of us are not experts, say, in foreign policy. To be able to then discern who is an expert and whose ideas make sense becomes the challenge. We lack the mental acumen to make those determina tions. And most of us lack the discipline to be an informed voter. Informed with accurate, intelligent information. We seemingly are incapable of making the right decisions when the evidence stares us in the face. Why? Because, "If you have gaps in your knowledge in a given area, then youre not in a position to assess your own gaps or the gaps of others," Dunning observed. I am reminded of the 1994 comedy Dumb and Dumber. Is America little more than the dumb dumbly electing the dumber? H.L. Mencken observed, Democracy is the theory that the common people know what they want and deserve it good and hard. Do we? Deserve it good and hard? Shall we put it to a vote? Whats that? We have. One election, one vote at a time.Jepson is a 24-year resident of Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.US People hung the biggest diamondback rattlesnakes they had killed some were 6or 7-feet long! on a broad white fence in West Winter Park. A Parkpreneur is to me anyone, from business owner to artist to Winter Park Boat Tour captain, to any number of others, who helps to keep Winter Park special and unique. Clyde V. Moore

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Page 12 Thursday, March 8, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer New development in MaitlandThere couldnt be a better time to develop land, according to Anthea Turner of Maitland. This comes as no surprise to Turners family, friends and community. Recognized as a leader of many Central Florida civic organizations and a patron of the arts, Turner is a forward-thinking woman with a vision for her beautiful parklike property. What started as a dream that she and Dr. Turner (now deceased) shared is taking shape. The property has been approved for seven custom premier home sites at the corner of Manor Road and Live Oak Street. The four existing homes are scheduled to be demolished to make way for new construction. Turners development team includes several established Central Florida businesses: R. Miller Architecture Bob Miller, FAIA Titan Properties David McDaniel, Broker Kamenoff, LLC Larry Kamenoff, Custom Home Builder The development team worked closely with Turner, her neighbors and the city of Maitland throughout the entitlement process. WPCC renovatedProcess Architecture announces the recently completed Winter Park Coun try Club Starters House renovation and addition. Originally tasked with providing restroom and locker facili ties within the existing structure, the architects seized on the opportunity to transform the facility into a viable community space in addition to serving the needs of the golf course.  This large space can serve multiple func tions ranging from a pro shop, golfers lounge or to hosting public and private events. With its renewed presence on the golf course and in the commu nity, the facility frames a moment of historic Winter Park, re-presenting it within a relevant public space.New design concept comes to Winter ParkDesign Studio 15 is relocating its Or lando ofce to a new space in Winter Parks Hannibal Square. The interior design rm, led by owner and design principal Shanna Bender, has signed a lease for a 1,200-square-foot store front at 433 W. New England Ave.  The new location will not only house the rms primary design of ces, but also an interactive furniture and design gallery. Design Studio 15 will feature furniture collections from the likes of Christopher Guy and Kartell, as well as custom designed reclaimed wood pieces from Blaire Sligar. Additionally, the showroom will boast eco-friendly smart replaces, European tile and bath selections and unique lighting xtures. Bender envisions more than just an ofce and run-of-the-mill gallery. We want Design Studio 15 to be a fun and interactive place for people to become a part of the design process, she said. We plan to host monthly social gatherings at our showroom, during which well have guest speak ers from the community talking about the latest in design trends and do-ityourself applications. Jeff ClarkColdwell Banker Residential407.733.0773j.clark@coldwellbanker.com www.BaldwinParkLiving.com HomesObserver Homes brought to you by: Fannie Hillman + AssociatesServing Central Florida for over 31 years! 407-644-1234 fanniehillman.com Classic Iron Beds AND Designer Linens 407-982-4319All iron & brass beds are made in the USA and guaranteed for 2 generations spent RReal EEstate Briefs Please see bBRiIEfsFS on page 13 Anthea Turner bulldozes Clubs new look

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Page 13 Thursday, March 8, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer The build-out of the new space has begun and Bender expects to move in some time in April. Design Studio 15 will announce the rst of their community socials on its website and Facebook page. For more information, please visit DesignStudio15.comTraugott joins Kelly PriceWinter Parks Kelly Price & Company has bolstered its real estate operations with the addition of longtime and multifaceted real estate professional and Broker-Associate, Mark Traugott. Traugott, a state certied general appraiser, is the newest addition to the downtown Winter Park residential real estate company, which posted nearly $130 million in property sales in 2011.Stirling Sothebys named sales agent for Alaqua homeStirling Sothebys International Realty has been named exclusive sales and marketing agents for a luxury golf course home at Alaqua Country Club in Longwood. Roger Soderstrom, founder and owner of Stirling Sothebys International Realty, said Jere Matheny, international luxury home specialist with the rms Heathrow Real Estate Gallery, is listing agent for the luxury home, which is priced at $1.95 million. The nearly 11,000-square-foot luxury home, situated on a landscaped two-acre golf course site, features ve bedrooms and seven baths. $100 to $500 OFFAny Servicewith this ad On Call 24 Hours A DayServing Central Florida Since the s Let Us Handle Your Emergency!Call Our Hotline 877-936-8998 www.EmergencyServices24.comServing Floridas Residential & Commercial Community Since 1990 IMMEDIAT E RESPONSE Whats Your Emergency?CBC057844 F lood l Leaks l Mold l F ire l Storm l Smoke l Roong Preparing to sell your home? Price it right bBRiIEfsFS | C ONTINUED FROM pagePAGE 12 Design Studio 15 Stirling Sothebys Alaqua home TraugottYouve made the decision. Youre Selling your home. Although youre not likely to get an hour-long special like LeBron when he decided to move, this choice is one of the most important you and your family will make. Now, the anxiety sets in. How much can we get? What about repairs? Is anything selling in this market? Theres good news for sellers in todays market. Price it right, put some marketing behind it and throw a competent Realtor in the mix and you have a recipe for success. I outline the ingredients to a succesful sale below.Get a sellers mindsetThe most important thing you can do s prepare mentally for the sale of your home. Try to take as much emotion out of the scenario as you can. Sometimes buyers begin negotiations with low offers, dont take it personally. Sellers are cautioned to keep the home in showing condition at all times. Put away those dishes, sweep the porch in the morning and keep the dirty laundry out of view. Does your home need touchup paint or have fraying carpet? Walk your home with your Realtor and outline potential value vampires. In the case of luxury homes you have more invested (read: more to lose) so its well worth your while to spring for bigger ticket items like landscaping, new appliances and cabinetry. At the least, clean your home top to bottom and keep it that way.Price it right the rst timeThis is one of the big ones. Consult with your Realtor regarding recent neighbor hood sales to see what the true current market value of your home actually is. I spoke with a seller recently and she informed me that she bought the home and added $50,000 in upgrades and to break even she would need to get at least $150,000. Unfortunately for her, the recent neighborhood sales were between $90,000 and $100,000. Her story is not unique. Just be aware that retail for upgrades in your home do not translate directly into resale dollars. An appraiser will have a value range for such upgrades. The best indication of value is the solds within the past three to six months in your direct area. If your home has unique features or is cusplay and your Realtor will be able to show you the market trends for your area. The good news is in many markets we are seeing values stabilize and often times multiple offers on homes that are priced well and marketed properly. Also, dont price it much more than market value or it may languish on the market and deter ready, willing and able buyers. Homes typically sell here around 96 percent of their original offer, and traditionally, sellers see lower priced offers as their homes remain on the market.Christina Rordam, Realtor, CSP, CNE, CDPE Exit Real Estate Results 407-928-8294 ChristinaSellsOrlando@gmail.com, www.ChristinaSellsOrlando.com

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Page 28 Thursday, March 8, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer FREEComplete Door Maintenance with any Service 407-780-1691 Orlando, FL Call now to diversify your advertising. 866.742.1373 www.Florida-Classifieds.com



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407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC USPS 00-6186 Publisher statement on page 4. Thursday, March 8, 2012 50+ tax wpmobserver.com Subscribe now! Visit wpmobserver.com The directors of Art &History Museums Maitland want you to do more than just view the art they have on display at the annual Participation fundrais ing event, they want you to see, touch, hear, smell and even taste the best of what the local art community has to offer. Its local artists, local per formers, and local food in a ven ue thats a local treasure, A&H Director Andrea Bailey Cox said. Its really about everything great that the local community has to offer. Nearing the end of its inaugu ral year following the initial merger of the Maitland Histori cal Society and Maitland Art As sociation in May 2010 A&H is taking this time to look back at what theyve accomplished so far. Through the Participation event on March 24, it will work Diamonds are a girls best friend, and she can continue to look to Maitland Jewelers to quench her gem obsession. About 200 people attended Fridays grand reopening of the jewelry store formerly known as Jewelers of Maitland un der new ownership in the same storefront at 500 E. Horatio Ave. in Maitland. The store had been run for 26 years by the husband and wife team of Mark and Hedy Blinder man until they decided to retire. Hedys daughter Elin Shenk, who now owns the store with her husband, Matt Shenk, had worked in the store for 22 years, and spent the last 12 years in the store as a trained graduate gem ologist. She saw the closing as an opportunity to open a jewel ry store of her own, and her hus band supported her decision. She hated to see it go, Matt said. We actually didnt The school is right, the roads are safer, but what happened to the students that walk or ride their bikes? Page 10 Letters to the editor Lifestyles Mary Lane wears Lilly Pulitzer every day, no matter what, and she visits the Park Avenue store every week. Page 7 Josh Garrick Orlandos rst ever NotWedding an aptly named alternative bridal showcase arrives on March 15. Page 9 Calendar A&H presents Culture & Cocktails from 6 to 9 p.m. on Friday, March 9, featuring artist Parker Sketch. Page 8 TAX DEFERREDFIXED ANNUITY RATE FOR 5 YEARS.Bob Adams 407-644-6646THE NATIONAL 5 YEAR CD RATE IS 1.34%3.35% 451 Maitland Ave, Altamonte Springs, FL 32701NEW Dermatology Ofce!407-599-SKIN (7546)*Waive co-payment up to $25 No referral needed Accepting all insurances Dr. John Cottam Dr. Ross Wheeler PHOTO BY ANDY CEBALLOS THE OBSERVER Maitland City Council members Ivan Valdes, from left, Phil Bonus and Howard Schief erdecker help new Maitland Jewelers owners Matt and Elin Shenk reopen the store. Please see JEWELERS on page 3 Maitland store reopens its doors ANDY CEBALLOS Observer Staff PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Director Andrea Bailey Cox has led Art & History Museums Maitland since the merger of the Maitland Historical Society and Maitland Art Association in May 2010. PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Irish pride made an early showing this year as the 33rd annual Winter Park St. Patricks Day Parade proceeded through the streets of downtown Winter Park on Sunday, March 4. Please see P ARTICIP ATION on page 2 A&H grows programs in its inaugural year SARAH WILSON Observer Staff SCAN HERE Use your smartphones Q R code reader app to view more photos or visit wpmobserver.com/ photos/galleries Green blooms

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Page 2 Thursday, March 8, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer to set the stage for what kinds of events and programs it hopes to host in the future. A&H will also be participating in a workshop with the Maitland City Council on Tuesday, March 13, to evaluate and discuss the status of its past, present and fu ture relationship with the city spurred by a request by Council man Phil Bonus at a January City Council meeting. Its an opportunity for us to come in and give them any infor mation theyre looking for, and an opportunity for us to touch base with them on the progress of a lot of our shared goals, Cox said. We look forward to telling them about all the great things weve accomplished in such a small amount of time. Past, present, future The Maitland Art Center, origi nally an artist colony and research studio when it opened in 1937, has served as the hub of Maitlands artistic cultural core for genera tions. With the Maitland Art Associa tions merger with the neighbor ing Maitland Historical Society in May 2010 forming the Maitland Art and History Association now known as Art and History MuseumsMaitland Cox said it organization, a strengthened role in the community and more op portunities for both organizations to succeed. Weve been literal neighbors for many, many years, and this was an opportunity for both of us to improve how we work in our missions to promote arts and his tory in the Maitland community, she said. From physical facility improve ments, to upgraded programming, surpassing its fundraising goals, and with more renovations on the horizon, Cox said A&H is well on its way to a continued long, pros perous future. Pending the end of the oneyear trial period A&H signed onto with the city of Maitland, which will automatically renews for a 51-year lease in July if it passes review, Councilman Bonus proposed a workshop to examine A&H operations, scheduled for Tuesday, March 13. Bonus said he doesnt think the citizens of Maitland are getting enough value in the programs and services provided by A&H for the amount of money the city is putting into it. He says due to economic pressures he thinks the city would fare better running the art and historical centers itself, through its leisure services de partment. I think the meeting on the 13th will be instrumental in allow ing us to exchange information and draw the appropriate conclu sions, he said. Cox, however, said A&H has been operating more programs than ever on less money from the city, from its two annual fundrais ers Participation and Evening in the Grove to its Culture and Cocktails and Artists in Action programs, making it an economic asset for the city. Mayor Howard Schieferdeck er said he is looking forward to hearing presentations from both sides at the workshop, but says that aside from Bonus, in his own observations hes heard and seen nothing but positive things about A&Hs progress in the past year. The art center is a major part of Maitland history; its a very special part of our culture, he said. I wish nothing more than to do what we can to see it suc ceed. Hannibal Square Wine Tasting: The Fine Art of Wine KICK OFF ART FESTIVAL WEEKEND WITH THE Thursday, March 15 5:30 8 p.m. West New England Avenue Music by The Redcoats Wine & Beer Samples Hors doeuvres Visit www.winterpark.org or call 407.644.8281 Supported by: Featuring $20 Winter Park Chamber Members in advance $25 Non-Members & at the Door Tickets & Info Presented by: Hours: M-F 8am to 4:30pm 2315 Lee Road Winter Park, Florida 32789 Your Guiding Beacon for Quality Healthcare Harbour Private Duty Nursing, LLCSkilled Nursing Physical Therapy Occupational Therapy Companionship Home Health Aid Homemaking Flexible Schedules Free RN Assessments The Services of Harbour Private Duty Nursing provide peace of mind to loved ones, trust ofcers, guardians and physicians. Our professional team prides itself on making your life easier. We also provide in-hospital private duty care, which offers close, personal attention and reassurance in an unfamiliar and often frightening environment. Our ofce hours are Monday through Friday, 8:00 am to 4:30 pm. Our professional team is available 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. During hours when the ofce is closed and during the weekends and holidays, the on-call coordinator is available by telephone 24 hours per day.www.HarbourPrivateDutyNursing.com License # 299991382phone (407) 895-8188 fax 407-895-9339 Running and walking is a great way to enjoy our beautiful surroundings, reach a goal and support important community causes. The fitness enthusiasts at Zimmerman, Kiser & Sutcliffe, P.A., invite you to celebrate 35 years of running right where it all began on Park Avenue in beautiful Winter Park!Be part of the celebration and register today! Run to TrackShack.com7:00 a.m. 2 Mile Fun Run/Walk 7:30 a.m. 10k (6.2 miles) 9:15 a.m. Healthy 100 Kids Run 10k runners & walkers will receive: 2 Milers receive the commemorative tech tee and $5 Track Shack Cash! Benefiting the Meridian Club of Winter Park Scholarship Fund Register Today...Run to TrackShack.com P ARTICIP ATION | A&H, city of Maitland will discuss their partnership at a workshop on March 13 C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE A&Hs annual Participation event will be held at 5:30 p.m. on Saturday, March 24, at the Maitland Art Center. This years theme is Circus of the Surreal. Tickets are $90 for A&H members and $100 for nonmembers. For more information, visit ArtandHistory.org A workshop between the Maitland City Council and A&H will take place at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, March 13, at the Maitland Council Chambers. PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER The Maitland Historical Museum is one of the museums under the A&H umbrella.

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Page 3 Thursday, March 8, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer make up our mind until during the closing down sale, and she just said, I think I want to do it. The Shenks reopened the busi ness and renamed it Maitland Jewelers. Hedy said the store started out small and was originally more of a repair shop, and has since grown to a full-service jewelry store. She said she traveled at least once, sometimes twice a year, to Antwerp, Belgium, to purchase diamonds in person, which she viewed as critical to her work. I like to see what I buy, she said. You need to see it. Espe cially diamond that has a quality thats visual. The business has catered to many Maitland residents, includ ing its mayor, Howard Schiefer decker. He was on hand to cel ebrate the reopening. He said his wife have shopped there for many years, and he wants to do every thing he can to encourage entre preneurship in the city. We need business in Mait land, he said. Were open for business. Weve been working hard, weve streamlined our per mitting process to help this, were redoing our land development code, all for the purpose of entic ing new businesses to come in. For many people, Maitland Jewelers is a place that shares part of the history of their lives. Phyllis Cragin has been shop ping there for 10 years. She said she discovered the store upon her many travels down Horatio Av enue. Cragin purchased her 25th wedding anniversary ring here. Though shes no longer married, she continues to wear the ring cause she enjoys the quality of the product. I loved the ring, and [Hedy] suggested I resize it, and I thought it was appropriate, she said. Cragin is one of many custom ers excited to see the return of this establishment. Its great to continue the busi ness here in Maitland. Its a strong presence, great quality, family at mosphere, she said. Rita Thomas has been shop ping at Maitland Jewelers for eight years. She said the original news of the closing took her by surprise. I remember driving down when I saw [Maitland Jewelers] closing. I was shocked. And so we started making the phone calls around. Did you know they were closing? Thomas said. She said she is glad they are back open for business. Thomas said that she and her husband will be resetting their wedding bands here to celebrate their 30th wed ding anniversary. She is drawn to the intimate relationship that a store like Maitland Jewelers can provide. Theres no other small oneon-one place. You can go to the chains, but you dont feel comfort able leaving your jewelry there, and you dont feel like theyre talking to you, she said. Theres a camaraderie that you have with a small, in-town shop that you dont get with the national chains. For her part, Hedy and her husband are looking forward to enjoying their retirement, with their legacy in good hands. We plan to travel the world. We traveled the world for busi ness. Now we want to go back to some of those places. The Florida Blue center is brought to you by Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida, an Independent Licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. 73115-0212 FREE Health Fair FREE FREE Florida Blue(Located in Winter Park Village) Get Ready for Spring JEWELERS C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE FREE LECTURESMarch is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month, and wed like to invite you to attend one of our free lectures. Sam Atallah, MDColorectal Surgeon Colorectal cancer is a preventable disease. Colorectal surgeon Sam Atallah, MD, will discuss the importance of screenings in the prevention of colorectal cancer. Attend one of the lectures below to learn more about the risk factors, screenings and the latest colorectal cancer treatment options. Monday, March 12, 12 pm Winter Park YMCA 1201 North Lakemont Avenue Winter Park, FL 32792 Wednesday, March 21, 12 pm Oviedo YMCA 7900 Red Bug Lake Road Oviedo, FL 32765Lunch will be provided. To RSVP, call (407) 303-1700. Except at Florida Hospital Cancer Institute.A N J P Y X K M S K I N M D O N C V H B W G D E S U G X B L C F N O E W U G R J P K F C O L O N D M E F M U S N M Q Y F N E X R Z Q F C A N C E R S Y S R T S J E W S W Y A Y E U S V W L U R A Z I W Z H W Y U Z S L A K M Z C B C A N E G X B L E F N O E W U T R A N J K Y X K M S K A N M S J U W H I D E Y T U S T M E S N M Q Y F S E X R H L L U R A Z B O Z H W Y Y G X B L C F R O E W U G R D O N C V P B W G D E S O S J E A N Y W H E R E S I P A N C R E A T I C Y K D S V J E W S W Y S Y E U S Q A L Y M P H O M A T H R Florida Hospitals Gastroenterology Program is proud to be ranked nationally by U.S.News & World Report. WPMH-12-6760 WPMH-12-6760_R1.indd 1 3/6/12 4:37 PM

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Page 4 Thursday, March 8, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer USPS 00-6186 ISSN 1064-3613 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835-5705 Member of: Chamber of Commerce Publisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor. Submission does not guarantee publication. Columnists opinions are made independently of the newspaper. All rights reserved. Winter Park / Maitland Observer 2012 Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster www.wpmobserver.com | Phone: 407-563-7000 | Fax: 407-563-7099 | editor@observernewspapers.com P.O Box 2426 Winter Park, FL 32790 Published Thursday, March 1, 2012 CONTACTS Volume 24, Issue Number 10 PUBLISHER T racy Craft 407-515-2605 tcraft@observernewspapers.com MANAGING EDITOR Jenny Andreasson 407-563-7026 editor@observernewspapers.com DESIGNER Jonathan Gallagher 407-563-7054 jgallagher@observernewspapers.com REPOR TERS Jenny Andreasson 407-563-7026 editor@observernewspapers.com Isaac Babcock 407-563-7023 isaacb@observernewspapers.com LEGALS | CLASSIFIEDS Ashley McBride legal@FLAlegals.com classieds@observernewspapers.com COPY EDITORS Isaac Babcock isaacb@observernewspapers.com Sarah Wilson COLUMNISTS Chris Jepson Jepson@MediAmerica.us Louis Roney LRoney@c.rr.com Josh Garrick joshgarrick9@gmail.com ADVER TISING SALES Linda Stern 407-563-7058 LStern@observernewspapers.com SUBSCRIPTIONS | CIRCULATION Jackie Candelaria 407-563-7013 INTERN Andy Ceballos Its TAX time. Appointments Available 7 Days a Week!Tax Form Processing LLC2400 N Forsyth Rd., Suite 101 Orlando, FL 32807Tel: (407) 657-6336www.TaxFormProcessing.com Proudly Serving the Orlando Area for 17 years! Scan QR Code Community Bulletin Pat Metheny Rocks Rollins Grammy Award-winning musician Pat Metheny visited the Winter Park Insti tute to discuss his 40-year music ca reer. More than 1,600 fans gathered at the Alfond Sports Center where he performed. Metheny gave budding musicians this advice: Be the worst guy in every band youre in. Student honors Cornell Universitys Raymond Pierson of Winter Park has been placed on the Deans List of the College of Arts and Sciences for Excellence in Scholar ship for the Fall 2011 semester. Bryan B. Danley, of Maitland, a junior, was named to the Presidents List of Mercer Universitys School of Engi neering for the fall 2011 semester. Market on the grow Maitlands Farmers Market is hav ing record attendance, with two more vendors starting this Sunday bring ing the total to 40. Now you can buy homemade sausages and selected meats from the Butchers Pantry and fresh herbs and vegetable plants from Lone Wolf Growers. Theres also a new food truck at Wednesdays Food Truck Caf event: Caf Cocoa Mo (http://www.cafecocoamo.com/). Call to artists The city of Winter Park and the Winter Park Public Art Advisory Board an nounce a call to artists for Art on the Green 2012, a juried exhibition of eight sculptures in Winter Park. It will run from Saturday, Sept. 1, through Friday, March 1. Visit cityofwinter park.org Send submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com Turnstile Media Group publisher of Winter Park/Maitland Observer ap pointed T racy Craft to the position of publisher on March 1. Craft, 43, whose media career spans more than a decade, has been a major player in the success of the com munity media division of Turnstile since joining the organization in 2008. Our newspa pers are deeply woven into the fabric of the communities they serve, and Im thrilled to be taking on the chal lenge of nding even more ways to strengthen those bonds, Craft said. On Feb. 16 two Winter Park busi nesses made their national debut on ABCs Good Morning America. Sprin kles Custom Cakes The Original CakeShooter, a mess-free push-up cake treat, and Peterbrooke Choco latier of Winter Parks Jami Shoo, an all-edible chocolate high heel, were featured with other products for Tory Johnsons Steals and Deals segment. Insurance Ofce of America has assumed a three-year, ve-gure sponsorship as the Title Sponsor for Central Floridas largest ofce party and premiere evening run, the IOA Corporate 5K located at Lake Eola, scheduled for April 12. NAI Realvest negotiated a new lease agreement for 3,363 square feet of ofce space at 2200 Lucien Way in Maitland. The tenant, Willis Construc tion Consulting, Inc., is the largest estimating rm in Central Florida. Winter Park-based La Familia Pawn & Jewelrys 2011 revenue nearly tripled last year, due largely in part to new store openings, successful social media and new investors. Emerson International, which de veloped the CenterPointe Ofce at 220 E. Central Parkway in Altamonte Springs, recently negotiated a major lease renewal there. Travel Holdings, Inc., owner of LastMinuteTravel.com renewed its lease for 28,540 square feet. Business Briefs Craft Olympian stops by Lady Foot Locker recently brought U.S. Olympian Suzy Favor-Hamilton to Rollins College to host a private run and breakfast Q&A with the young women of PACE Orange Center for Girls and the Rollins College Cross Country team. Next week, the students should be getting sneakers and T-shirts from Lady Foot Locker and New Balance. Photo by Harry Wilkins W all of art On Thursday, Feb. 9, The Dr. Phillips Center unveiled a new construction fence, featuring more than 480 pieces of artwork created by students from Central Florida Schools. Winter Park-based Florida Symphony Y outh Or chestra members Vanessa and Stephen Huber Weber played in a duet on the violin and viola. Visit www.fsyo.org

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Page 5 Thursday, March 8, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer March 12 City Commission Meeting topics of interest There will be a City Commis sion meeting at 3:30 p.m. on Mon day, March 12, at the Rachel D. Murrah Civic Center located at 1050 W. Morse Blvd. Below are a few topics of interest: Mayors Report Informational Update 20122013 Art on the Green sculpture project from Chele Hipp, Public Art Advisory Board Chair Proclamation Recognition of Louis Roney being inducted into the Florida Artists Hall of Fame. Proclamation Girl Scouts 100th anniversary Presentation to Cynthia Bon ham, City Clerk for achieving her Master Municipal Clerk designa tion Proclamation Purchasing Month Appointment of Wireless Task Force Non-action Items Financial Report January 2012 Consent Agenda Approve the minutes of Feb. 27, 2012. Approve various purchases, bids and contracts (a complete list can be found at cityofwinterpark. org > Government > City Com mission > Agenda Packets). Approve the request to locate temporary modular classrooms and administration building dur ing construction of Bush Science Center addition, subject to pro viding landscape buffer along both street frontages as depicted in exhibit provided and protec tion of shade trees. Public Hearings Equalization Board Hearings: (To be held after 5 p.m.) Resolution declaring that the city is to fund capital improve ments for undergrounding elec tric/CATV facilities along Via with the cost to be paid by special assessments. cial assessments for the under grounding of electric/CATV facil ities for properties adjacent to Via Request of Windermere Winter Park Venture, LLC: Second reading of the ordi nance amending the comprehen sive plan, future land use map to change the designation of Singlefamily Residential to MediumDensity Residential on the prop erty at 444 W. Swoope Ave. Second reading of the ordinance to change the zoning designation of Single-family Residential (R1A) District to Medium-Density Multi-family (R-3) District on the property at 444 W. Swoope Ave. Second reading of the ordi nance amending Ordinance No. 2840-11, Moratorium for Pain Management Clinics. First reading of the ordinance amending the historic preserva tion section of the Land Develop ment Code. City Commission Reports Commissioner Leary Commissioner Sprinkel Commissioner Cooper Commissioner McMacken City Hall front yard Mayor Bradley full agenda and information on cityofwinterpark.org and by click ing on Government > City Com mission > Packets. Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra Spring Pops Concert The city of Winter Park will proudly host the Orlando Philhar monic Orchestra as they present Spring Pops Masters of the Mov ies at 7 p.m. on Sunday, March 11, in Central Park in downtown Winter Park. Bring your blankets and lawn chairs to enjoy an eve ning of heart-warming music un der the stars. This wonderful per formance is made possible by a generous grant from the Charlotte Julia Hollander Trust. The event is free and open to the public. Conductor Dirk Meyer will lead the Orlando Philharmonic in a program of music from movies on the big screen including Apoc alypse Now, The Godfather, Rocky Horror Picture Show, Grease and Star Wars. Dirk Meyer was appointed as sociate conductor of the Sarasota cessful seasons as assistant con ductor, during which he earned an outstanding reputation with musicians, audiences and crit ics alike. He also served as mu sic director of the Sarasota Youth under his baton culminated in a 2008 Carnegie Hall performance in New York City. In addition to his duties with the Sarasota Orchestra, Meyers current season includes a debut with the Duluth Superior Sym phony Orchestra, as well as return engagements with the Naples Philharmonic Orchestra and Or lando Philharmonic Orchestra, leading 13 Young Peoples Con certs as well as their Pops pro grams. The Orlando Philharmonic is Central Floridas resident pro fessional orchestra, appearing in more than 125 performances each year. The Philharmonic is current ly in its 19th anniversary season, led by Music Director Christopher Wilkins. To learn more please visit orlandophil.org or call the Phil 0071. Daylight Saving T ime (DST) begins Sunday, March 11 Dont forget to spring your clocks forward on Sunday, March 11, and change your irrigation schedule to the following St. Johns River Water Management District DST requirements: Irrigation between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. is prohibited. Odd numbered addresses or properties with no addresses may water on Wednesday and Satur day between the hours of 4 p.m. and 10 a.m. Even numbered addresses may water on Thursday and Sunday between the hours of 4 p.m. and 10 a.m. Non-residential properties may water on Tuesday and Friday between the hours of 4 p.m. and 10 a.m. Properties with new lawns or landscaping are exempt from the Residents using private wells or pumps for irrigation, ground or surface water and water from public and private utilities, must comply with the St. Johns River Water Management Districts Re striction. Water only when necessary to meet landscaping needs and not between the hours of 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Water no more than one hour per zone, or inches per zone per day. Violation of these water restric enforcement action. For more information, please call 407-6594800 or toll-free 1-877-228-1658, or visit St. Johns River Water Man daswater.com Visit the citys ofcial website at cityof winterpark.org, nd us on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter. Saturday, March 24, 2012 1 5 p.m. Winter Park Civic Center 1050 Morse Blvd. Winter Park, FL 32789 Tickets $5 ADVANCE Or$7 DOOR $5 SENIORS (AT DOOR) (Children Under 3 FREE) JOIN US FOR: Create Your Own Sundae, Ice Cream Floats, Italian Ice, Celebrity Servers, Face Painting, Cake Walk, Games, Silent Auction, Door Prizes and more! Hurry! Sale E nds Soon! Design Pro Screens Longwood FL 32750 Toll Free: 1 888724 9868 Ext. 71232 71232 Winter Park City Talk BY RANDY KNIGHT CITY MANAGER Plan your weekend with The Weekender! Visit wpmobserver.com and click "Subscribe to Newsletter"

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Page 6 Thursday, March 8, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer March and Aprils springtime weather sets the stage for city wide events and activities in Mai tland. With something for every one, all you have to do is get out your calendar and make plans to experience great events for the en tire family. Step right up and get ready to be amazed! The Art & History Museums Maitland (A&H) is prepared to dazzle you at their upcoming fundraising event, Participation: Circus of the Sur real, held at 5:30 p.m. on Satur day, March 24, at the A&Hs Mait land Art Center, 231 W. Packwood Ave. Not your ordinary fundraising event, this wonderful and strange evening of art, dining and diver sions, is an interactive and sur real experience that guests will not soon forget. The evening fea tures an opportunity for guests to dine at themed tables created and hosted by celebrated local artists, in addition to an array of perfor mances designed to engage and enthrall. Acclaimed Director John DiDonna serves as entertainment director, bringing his imagina tion and talents to the event. Di Donna brings with him entertain ers from Empty Spaces Theatre Co(llaboration) to make the event even more exciting. To purchase tickets for friends and corporate tables, visit ArtandHistory.org or call 407-539-2181, extension 262. The city of Maitland Farm ers Market is open Sundays from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the shores of beautiful Lake Lily Park. The Farmers Market will be closed on April 8 in observance of the Eas ter holiday and on April 15 for the Spring Arts Festival. Maitlands Food Truck Caf is at Lake Lily Park every Wednesday from 6 to 9 p.m. From April 13-15, the Maitland Chamber of Commerce will pres ent the 24th Annual Spring Arts Festival at Lake Lily Park. With artists from around the nation, this festival promises to be a weekend to remember for all. On Saturday, April 21, Mait lands Movie in the Park at 8 p.m. will feature Hugo. Bring your blanket and chair! Reminder movie will be shown at Quinn Strong Park, 345 S. Maitland Ave. On April 22, the Friends of First Response will host their annual Kickball Tournament at the Mai tland Baseball Complex. Funds raised at this event will provide emergency and crisis funding to lies, and provide opportunities for interact with area residents and get to know one another as neigh bors. For more information on these and other events throughout the year, contact the Maitland Art and History Association at 407-5396281, the Maitland Public Library at 407-539-7700, the Performing Arts of Maitland at pamaitland. org, or the city of Maitland Lei sure Services Department at 407539-6247. Mayor to take ofce On Monday, April 23, Mayor Howard A. Schieferdecker will be The inaugural ceremony will take place at 6:30 p.m. on Mon day, April 23, in the Maitland City Hall Council Chambers. The pub lic is invited to attend this event. For additional information, please 407-539-6219. Mari Smith, Event Coordinator, Leisure Services Department City Council Agenda of March 12 City Council meets the second and fourth Mondays of the month at 6:30 p.m. The next meeting is scheduled for March 12 in the Council Chambers, 1776 Indepen dence Lane. Below is the agenda for that meeting. Public Hearings: Ordinance Police/Fire Pen sion Amendments Ordinance Creating the Downtown Maitland Zoning Dis trict Ordinance Rezone Properties within the Downtown Maitland Zoning District Consent Agenda Approve Council Minutes of Feb. 27 Approve Council Workshop Minutes of Feb. 20 Resolution Cooperative Pur chasing Program Equipment Purchase Vacuum Truck Decision Item: Evaluation/Compensation City Manager & City Clerk For updates, please visit website at itsmy maitland.com Lack of Desire or Low Energy? George Carroll, M.D., has over 20 years ex perience in sexual medicine, and is actively involved in the following: 407-894-9959 www.gulfstatescu.org 407-831-8844A Refreshing Alternative to Conventional Banking.9405 S. Highway 17-92 Maitland, FL 32751 Maitland City Talk BY HOWARD SCHIEFERDECKER MAYOR Upcoming events Plan your weekend with The Weekender! This weekly newsletter keeps you up to date on events happening in Central Florida's cities, including Winter Park, Maitland, Oviedo, Winter Springs, Avalon Park and Waterford Lakes. Visit wpmobserver.com and click "Subscribe to Newsletter"

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Page 7 Thursday, March 8, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Lifestyles One step into Mary Lanes closet and its ing, the closet which is more like the size of a small bedroom is a sea of vibrant green and pure pink, the signature colors of clothing brand Lilly Pulitzer. Lilly-themed paintings, Lilly stuffed animals, rows and rows of Lilly shoes and enough pink sweaters and patterned sun dresses for every day of the year pop out from each inch of the room. I wear exclusively Lilly every day, Lane said. This is my niche. And she isnt kidding. She said 98 per cent of her clothing collection is the Lilly her home, not counting the items she keeps in storage. She never has, and said she nev er will, give up a Lilly piece. Shes even has a custom Lilly golf cart and bike, and has named her little cocker spaniel puppy Lilly, whom she dresses in only Lilly-looking sweaters, of course. Lanes been wearing the line since she was a little girl, and in the last 10 years has amassed a collection large enough to never utter the common words hated by hus bands and boyfriends everywhere, I have nothing to wear! Lane, who is a Longwood resident, said she loves the preppy chic vibe of the clothes, but also the history behind them. Socialite Lilly Pulitzer started the brand, which of fers a very Florida-resort-appropriate se seahorses and palm trees, in 1959 in Palm Beach. Pulitzer wanted a dress made to hide all the juice stains she got while serv ing at her little juice stand in her husbands citrus groves. Since then, its been a brand that follows the trends, but stays true to its roots, and offers clothing for every age and occasion a woman needs, Lane said. It was a brand made for women by a woman. Lilly in general has a very devout fol lowing, Meredith Gardner, manager at the Park Avenue Lilly store, said. People who love Lilly are passionate about it. A Lilly ambassador Lane stops in the Park Avenue store at least once a week, sometimes four, to check out the new merchandise and to just visit her Lilly family. Gardner has known her for 15 years, and said whenever a new ship ment comes in, Lane is happy to stop by and unpack boxes with her to get a glimpse of the new styles and individually artistmade patterns. When shes in the store, Lanes self-pro claimed Lilly ambassador title she even has business cards kicks in. Shes quick to show off a new print she loves to a shop per, or to tell someone they look wonder ful in the little sundress theyre trying on. Her love and friendliness gets her mistaken for an employee all the time, and she plays along. Lane just exudes the Lilly philoso phy. Mary is a very positive, bright upbeat person they compliment each other very well, Gardner said. Those at the headquarters of the brand think so, too. She is the perfect Lilly lover, said Jack Allred, whos in customer service for Lilly Pulitzer. We love that spirit, print and pattern designer Rebecca Allred agreed. Part of the brand Shes taken that love for the brand to the next level by organizing and hosting events for them. Its not uncommon for designers such as Rebecca to get feedback from Lane about what she likes about the clothes and inspiration for new prints. They all know herself has Lane over to her home in Palm Beach from time to time. She even threw Pulitzer an 80th birthday party on Nov. 12. She is a very recognizable piece of the brand, Jack said. Shes become an iconic customer. Lane said it isnt hard to live up to the that embodies spring and sunshine. It gives you an immediate lift, Lane said. 8 8 1 4 1 P R AD WPO 3/2012W Winter Pa rk's Distinctive R etir ement Community www.themayf lower .com 1620 Mayower Court Winter Park, FL 32792When you consider moving to a continuing care retirement community, what are you looking for? Luxury amenities? Spectacular buildings and grounds? A pool and tness center? Superb dining? Certainly. But, thats just the beginning. Because if youre thinking about a CCRC, youre really looking for long-term care. For life. In a facility that meets the highest standards. With the most competent, caring staff. And a longstanding track record of satisfaction. In short . a community like The Mayower. Here, you have the freedom and exibility to customize your home and your retirement lifestyle to make them uniquely yours. All with the assurance of guaranteed pre-funded assisted living and skilled nursing services in our Gold Seal Health Center. And, oh yes, theres a board-certied physician on staff in our Geriatric Outpatient Clinic to handle all your primary-care medical needs.Plus a Gold Seal Rated Health Center!Hows that for a long-term care plan? Call today, and lets talk about it: 407.672.1620. RESORT STYLE LIVING that comes with LONG TERM CARE [ guaranteed ] Mayower Clinic Director Jesus Lopez, M.D. LIMITED OPENINGS for Rehab or Long-Term Care in The Mayower Health Center. MAY 821 Dr. Lopez Ad WPO.indd 1 2/6/12 4:32 PM PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Mary Lane poses with her puppy, Lilly, in one of her two closets, which showcase her afnity for everything Lilly Pulitzer. She earned the unofcial title of Lilly ambassador. BRITTNI JOHNSON Observer Staff If Mary Lanes love for Lilly Pulitzer has sparked your interest in the brand, visit the Winter Park store at 118 N. Park Ave or www.lillypulitzer.com Lilly love Mary Lane wears Lilly Pulitzer every day, no matter what SCAN HERE Use your smartphones Q R code reader app to view more photos or visit wpmobserver.com/ photos/galleries

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Page 8 Thursday, March 8, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Family Calendar MARCH 8 Sunshine, Booze, and Monkeys: The Anthropology of Florida T our ism by Jason Wenzel, professor of Anthropology at Valencia College is at 7-8:30 p.m. on March 8 at Harry P. Leu Gardens. Its free. The Rollins MBA invites job seekers to T ake Control of Y our Career and Y our Life from 5:30-7:30 p.m. on March 8 at the Busch Science Center at Rollins College, 1000 Holt Ave., in Winter Park. Its free. Visit ti nyurl.com/your-career-and-life MARCH 9 Morse Museum presents Celtic Crossings live from 5 to 8 p.m. on Friday, March 9. There will be a free evening curator tour of the New Tif fany Wing at 7 p.m. The Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra presents violinist Midori in perfor mance with the Minnesota Orchestra at 8 p.m. on Friday, March 9 at the Bob Carr Performing Arts Centre. Visit www.OrlandoPhil.org Victoria Lynn Schultz harpist, plays at 11:30 a.m. on March 9 at Univer sity Club of Winter Park. Call 407644-6149 or visit universityclubwin terpark.org MARCH 10 The 2012 Food & Wine Festival is from 6 to 9 p.m. on Saturday, March 10, at the Baldwin Park Village Cen ter. Visit orlando.cff.org On March 10, the Maitland W om ens Club will be holding its annual fashion show and luncheon at Mai son & Jardin, 430 S. Wymore Road, Altamonte Springs. Cost is $30 cash or check. Call 407-539-0038 or 407830-6373. The Junior League of Greater Orlan dos Hoops for Hunger Charity Gala will take place from 7-11 p.m. on Saturday, March 10. Cocktail attire is suggested. Get tickets at jlgo.org for $75 per person. The Orlando/Winter Park Branch of American Association Of University Women will host its Annual Spring Literary Luncheon featuring author Carol Frost, at 11:30 a.m. on Satur day, March 10, at The University Club of Winter Park, 841 N. Park Ave. in Winter Park. Visit aauworlwp.org MARCH 11 The fourth Annual Sam Swope Char ity Ride is Sunday, March 11, start ing at the Bahia Shrine Temple, 2300 Pembrook Drive, Orlando, and ending at Seminole Harley Davidson, 620 Hickman Circle, Sanford. Sign-in is from 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. and its $30 to ride. Proceeds go to Shriners Hospitals for Children. An artist reception featuring the Or lando Oriental Brush Painting So ciety and honoring the many styles of Chinese painting is 2-4 p.m. on March 11 at the University Club of Winter Park. Its free. Call 407-644-6149 or visit universityclubwinterpark.org Winter Park will host the Orlando Phil harmonic Orchestra as they present Spring Pops Masters of the Mov ies at 7 p.m. on Sunday, March 11, in Central Park in Winter Park. Visit or landophil.org or call 407-770-0071. Gene Hawkins, husband of the late Sen. Paula Hawkins will host a tour of Villa Serena, her former home, as a benet for the Winter Park Public library. Its from 3 to 5 p.m. on Sun day, March 11. Admission is $75 per person or $125 per couple. Call 407623-3277 or visit wppl.org MARCH 15 The Orange Audubon Society presents Red-cockaded W oodpeckers: Re populating the Disney Wilderness Preserve by Jennifer Milikowsky at 7 p.m. on Thursday, March 15. Its free at Leu Gardens. Call 407-6372525 or visit orangeaudubon.org Hannibal Square Wine T asting: The Fine Art of Wine is from 5:30 to 8 p.m. on Thursday, March 15, at the Winter Park Farmers Market. Call at 407-644-8281 or visit winterpark. org The Bach Festival Society of Winter Park presents the T akcs Quar tet and pianist Garrick Ohlsson at 8 p.m. on Thursday, March 15, at the Tiedtke Concert Hall, Rollins College. Call 407-646-2182 or visit BachFes tivalFlorida.org The American Legion, Winter Park Memorial Post 112, will host an Open House event in celebra tion of the American Legions 93rd anniversary of its founding, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thursday, March 15, at 4490 N. Goldenrod Road, Winter Park. Call 407-671-6404. Visit wpmobserver.com/events for more details. Send submissions to editor@ observernewspapers.com Calendar Enzians Popcorn Flicks in Cen tral Park is at 7 p.m. on Thursday, March 8, featuring The Man Who Knew T oo Much at the Central Park Main Stage in Winter Park. On Friday, March 9, Trinity Preps biennial Ethel S. Danhof Fine Arts Series will feature Vox Audio in concert at Trinity Prep. Visit ti nyurl.com/tpvox. The T rack Shack Smile Mile is at 8 a.m. on Saturday, March 10, at Blue Jacket Park. Join Miles and his friends for a morning of fun and tness, consisting of a onemile childrens race open to all students between the ages of 5 and 11. Visit tinyurl.com/7dhrur3. Thanks to last years success, Creald School of Art will host its Second Annual Family Festival a preview of Crealds Summer ArtCamp that will run from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, March 10, at the Creald campus located at 600 Saint Andrews Blvd. in Win ter Park. The event and workshops are free. Contact 407-671-1886 or visit crealde.org. On Saturday, March 10, the Or lando Science Center hosts the 14th annual Science Challenge. The participants are the rst place winners in the physical science competitions for middle and high schools for the eight surrounding counties. The public can review entries from 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Call 407-514-2000 or visit osc. org. At 3 p.m. on Saturday, March 11, celebrate St. Patricks Day early by coming to the Maitland Public Library to be entertained by W at ters School of Irish Dancers. Learn about the culture and see some fantastic costumes. Pollo Tropical is hoping to collect 2,000 phones from 10:30 a.m. to close at all company-owned Florida restaurants on Wednes day, March 14, for Women In Dis tress by offering customers a free Shrimp or Chicken Quesadilla Wrap for each phone donated. The phones do not have to be in working order. Visit pollotropical. com. Just Between Friends Central Florida (JBF) spring community consignment event is March 16 through March 18 at the Altamon te Springs Hilton, 350 S. Northlake Blvd., in Altamonte Springs. Ad mission is $2 until 4 p.m. only on Friday and Saturday. Visit central orida.jbfsale.com At 10:30 a.m. each Tuesday, the Maitland Public Library hosts pre school story and craft time. At 10:30 a.m. each Thursday, it hosts baby time stories and activity. At 4 p.m. each Thursday, it hosts Reading Buddies for kindergarten through fth-grade. No registra tion necessary. Call 407-6477700. Send submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com Parker Sketch Culture & Cocktails is from 6 to 9 p.m. on Friday, March 9, at the A&Hs Germaine Marvel Building, 210 W. Packwood Ave., in Maitland featuring artist Parker Sketch His paintings depict a variety of subjects ranging from popular culture to an ever-growing personal iconography.

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Page 9 Thursday, March 8, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Now through April 29 Presses and Prints at OMA Back in 1974, when Congress allowed the National Endow ment for the Arts to actually help the arts in our country, the Orlando Museum of Art (OMA) received a grant from which 27 works were purchased. That collection is a prime example of why enlightened governments help the arts, as the collection has increased tenfold to include more than 270 works by major artists including Jasper Johns, James Rosenquist, Louise Nevelson and Elizabeth Peyton. Now OMA presents Presses, Publishers and Prints: Selections from the Contemporary American Graph ics Collection, running through OMA's lithographs, silk-screens, etchings, woodblocks and works on paper, this is the strongest group of works within the Museum's holdings. Call 407-8964231 or visit omart.org March 9 Parker Sketch at Culture & Cocktails Hes the hottest young painter in Central Florida, and his con tributions to the arts community include museum shows, gifts, silent auctions and a free discus sion group about Fine Art, of course that continues to grow and grow. He is Parker Sketch, and if you havent seen his work, its time to check it out this Fri day, March 9, at the always-fun Art & History Museums Mait land (A&H)s monthly Culture & Cocktails event. C&C takes place the second Friday of every month from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at 210 W. Packwood Ave. in Maitland. The evenings activities include music by Cure for Caska, poetry read ings, works by A&Hs Sketch Club and food from Fork in the Road Food Truck. Admission is $5, which includes one drink ticket. Visit ArtandHistory.org or call 407-539-2181. March 14 Kathy Ireland Entrepreneur, philanthro pist and supermodel Kathy Ireland will headline Heart of Florida United Ways 5th Annual Womens Leadership Luncheon on Wednesday, March 14. Co-chaired by Helen Donegan and Karen Dee, The Womens Leadership Council raises awareness, funds and volunteer support for women and children dealing with domestic violence and poverty. A heartbreaking 65 percent of clients served by United Way partner agencies are women. Ireland is the CEO of a $1.9 billion design empire, and works diligently to improve edu cation, reduce poverty and help families prosper. The luncheon will take place at the Hilton Or lando Convention Center at 6001 Destination Parkway. Tickets are available at hfuw.org or by call ing 407-429-2111. March 15 If he likes it then he oughta put a ring on it The Heaven Event Center is the perfect home for Orlandos aptly named alternative bridal show that takes the form of a big, fake wedding. Complete with emotional ceremony, dinner and dance-party reception, brides-tobe are offered a unique way to see wedding vendors in action. The goal is to inspire brides and promote local businesses while having a great time. This is Not and the event is scheduled for March 15. With engagement season in full swing, if your hand is sporting some shiny new bling, you can visit and buy your ticket at TheNotWedding.com March 16 to April 1 The Foreigner The Jester Theater Company makes its second home at the beautiful Garden Theatre in Winter Garden, where they will produce the comedy The For eigner from March 16 to April 1. In this comedy, Charlie Baker considers himself to be the worlds dullest man, but his friend Sgt. Froggy LeSueur has a plan to change all that. Froggy takes his friend on a vacation where the scheme includes mak ing Charlie appear as a foreigner who cant speak English. Their share with Charlie their deepest secrets and most sinister plans. The act will star Keith Smith as the foreigner and Bill War riner as his friend Froggy. The theater is in the heart of his toric downtown Winter Garden. Call 407-877-GRDN (4736) or visit gardentheatre.org March 16 Lord of the Dance Sixteen years after Michael Flatley created Lord of the Dance, it is selling out arenas as the worlds highest-grossing dance show. We can join the 60 million people who have already seen this hit show when the tour arrives in Orlando on Friday, March 16, at the Bob Carr PAC for two performances only. Visit OrlandoBroadway.com or call 1-800-982-2787 or 407-7046116. Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906. Josh Garrick Culture worthy of your calendar Hot off the press This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH O RLANDO A VE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.E NZIAN.ORG A SEP ARA TION Fri Sun 3:30 6:30 9:30 Mon, Wed, Thurs 6:30 9:30 T ues 6:30 Only Held Over by Popular Demand! TIM & ERICS BILLION DOLLAR MOVIE Fri and Sat 12 Midnight Saturday Matinee Classics ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST Sat 11:00AM Cult Classics THE MAN WHO FELL TO E AR TH T ues 9:30

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Page 10 Thursday, March 8, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Opinions Though he started his career as a computer hacker, Julian As journalist of our time. He also might be the most dangerous terrorist since 9/11. It depends on whom you ask: If its the U.S. the answer would be the latter. In a recent development with broad-reaching implica tions for freedom of the press in the United States and abroad, Assange may have discovered how arbitrarily the U.S. govern ment decides who is and is not a journalist, and how the govern ment is privatizing information legitimate journalists to report on government activities. Mix in an accusation of a global insidertion of journalism becomes as transparent as a well-organized spy ring. Precisely what the founder of the website WikiLeaks has done to deserve his U.S. Depart ment of Justice-sponsored leap from journalism to terrorist is far from clear. Ask an investiga tive reporter what they think about Assanges organization obtaining and releasing more than half a million reports from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, plus thousands more secret mes sages between U.S. and foreign diplomats, and chances are youd receive a sympathetic response. If keeping the government open and its doings accessible to the people is journalism, then Assange is a journalist. Ask the government the same question, and it will say he should be ar rested for it. On Feb. 27, Assange found out the intentions of U.S. prosecu tors: They want to indict him. They may already have done so dating as far back as December 2010, according to information from the Australian embassy in Washington, D.C. though that indictment has yet to be released sanges alleged secret indictment didnt come from the mouths of crusading journalists. It came from the hacker group Anony mous. Anonymous allegedly stole an email from the private research service Strategic Forecasting Inc., also known as Stratfor, that was sent by an Australian govern release of the email was reported upon by the Sydney Morning Herald on leap day, indicating that a sealed indictment had already been drawn up for As sange, though precisely what crime he would be charged with remains unclear. The company from which the email was stolen also has an interesting relationship with jour nalism. Stratfor publicly positions itself as a research and informa purposes, frequently contracting with the U.S. government. Con sidering the role of journalists as the fourth branch of govern ment keeping the government in check through improving transparency having a media company under contract with the government would seem to be a WikiLeaks, partnering with 25 other media outlets across the globe, has been working to expose Stratfor as not a media outlet, but rather a spy corpora public activist groups. It may also be using inside connections to ob tain information that it then uses to manipulate the stock market and currency markets, Assange said. It is using this paid infor mation from insiders in order to invest in what it calls a wide instruments, Assange said at a press conference on Feb. 27 in London. This makes News of the World look like kindergar ten. Assange said Stratfors type of relationship with the govern ment is becoming more common, pointing to recent moves by gov ernments to contract intelligence transparency. Intelligence organizations increasingly are privatized, and once privatized theyre taken out of the realm of the Freedom of Information Act, and of U.S. military law, so theyre often used by governments who want to conceal a particular activity, Assange said. The end result is a government that makes journalism, to a grave degree, illegal. Enter WikiLeaks and Anonymous again. Theyre accused of operating as illegal hacker groups, but they do journalistic work, which they release to the public for free. In America we are explicitly our own government, but tacitly at the governments mercy when we ask to know what its doing. WikiLeaks and Anonymous are being branded as terrorists for putting that information in the public spotlight. We should be far School should do more to ensure safety I am a Winter Park High School student. In my opinion your article on the Winter Park High School roads published Feb. 23) was lacking. I feel like the only people interviewed for this article were adults and the school administers who only use cars to get to school. They do not know anything about the students. And yes, the school is right the roads are safer, but what happened to the students that walk or ride their bikes to school? Did they get safer routes? The article also doesn't cover the students or their tales of woe. Many stories were not told and the readers did not get the entire story. For instance, I ride my bike to school I rode my bike down Woodcrest and entered by way of the Bellwood Drive no news about accidents or possible ac cidents happening this year, or ever. Now that the entrance has been closed off, I leave my house 10 minutes earlier and go and through the bus loop, which is much more dangerous because I am in the road all the time with cars and buses because there are no sidewalks. Another tale of woe is that of my friend. She lives on Woodcrest Drive, which one would think would allow her to easily get to school. However, in reality she must get a ride from her mom, go all the way around to impossibly long line of cars before arriv ing at school. Also, I have heard of stories about kids jumping fences to get to school or, in one case, a student who cut the fence to avoid going around to an open entrance. Yes, people have begun to plan ahead for the new policy, but there are still people who put themselves in the way of danger for the easier route. What irritates me the most is that the school only blocked entrances. The state ment, "We're always doing all that we can to ensure student safety," is not com pletely true. OK, so the school blocked off potentially dangerous entrances. What else did they do? Did they try putting in side walks to keep students off the road? No. Did they try giving pedestrians and bike riders new and safer entrances? No. The school did not try and help the students they petition the city of Winter Park to put in sidewalks for the safety of the students. If the school really wanted to do all they could, I think they could have done more than block entrances. Ainsley Shallcross Winter Park High School senior Put a spring in your step this month with Walk MS: Orlando With the coming of spring, we all look forward to enjoying the outdoors the mild, but sunny weather, the aroma of us. tune our bodies after a sedentary winter and holiday feasting. What better way to get in shape and enjoy the new season than to participate in the plethora of out door charity walks available every spring to help those in our community who are in need? One such walk is in our backyard ida Chapter of the Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Society, is 8 a.m. on Saturday, March 10, at Lake Eola at Thornton Park. Walk MS is one of the National MS Societys signature fundraising events, drawing hundreds of thousands of participants each year to nearly 600 sites throughout the United States. The family-friendly event includes 1and 2.34-mile routes and is open to any one families, teams or individuals. Participants in Walk MS: Orlando help raise funds for close to 73,000 people lo cally who are affected by this chronic dis ease, offering support services including educational programs, self-help groups, research, medical equipment and more. MS attacks the central nervous system, which is made up of the brain, spinal cord and optic nerves. Walk MS is our rallying point to help raise critical funds that support cuttingedge research and services to help people with MS move their lives forward. The MS Societys call-to-action, Join the Movement, is a reminder of the fact that MS robs people of the ability to move, disabling some and that action is needed to raise funds for research while improv ing the quality of life and independence of those living with MS. Join the movement toward a world free of MS by making donations or participat ing in one of the Walk MS events or Bike MS: The Citrus Tour 2012. There is no cost to register for Walk MS, although a minimum $20 donation is requested. Those who raise at least $125 receive a T-shirt. For details, visit Mid FloridaMSWalks.org or call 407-478-8882, extension 28. Gaby Casado Development manager National Multiple Sclerosis Society, Mid Florida Chapter Our Observation Hacking and crimes of enlightenment King Features Weekly ServiceMarch 5, 2012 Letters to the editor Send your thoughts (400 words or less) to Managing Editor Jenny Andreasson at editor@observernewspapers.com When gearing up to participate in a walk, keep in mind these healthful tips from physical therapist, Patty Bobryk, at MS Comprehensive Care Center of Central Florida. Look for opportunities to be more active throughout your day. Take the stairs instead of the elevator. Park at the far end of the parking lot. Walk the dog. Small changes will add up. Drink plenty of water. Hydrate before, during and after your workout. A dehydrated body is unable to cool itself, which can cause heat exhaustion or heat stroke. It can also cause muscle fatigue. To get the most of your walk, stay well hydrated. Stretch before and after your walk. Stretching before you exercise warms up your body and helps prevent injuries. Slow walking or stretching after you walk allows your heart rate and blood pressure to return to pre-exercise levels. Were always doing all that we can to ensure student safety, is not completely true. Ainsley Shallcross If keeping the government open and its doings accessible to the people is journalism, then Julian Assange is a journalist.

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Page 11 Thursday, March 8, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer You are likely hearing a lot about local these days and may wonder whats behind it. Its nothing too complex or worthy of a Lifetime movie. Its all pretty simple. When someone talks about local, its simply recognition of the ben ing spending close to home with the business es that make our commu nity vibrant. These businesses are owned by your friends, neighbors and possibly your own customers, if youre a business owner. They are a part of the fabric that makes our community what it is, and are integral to why we love it. Without them the events we look forward to every year, from next weeks Winter Park Sidewalk Arts Festival, to Dinner On The Avenue, to Christmas in the Park, simply couldnt exist at least not to the extent that they do. Earlier this week I heard that both Circa 1926 and Spice Mod ern Steakhouse on Park Avenue had closed. I posted my regrets on my ILUVWinterPark.com Facebook page and soon others were commiserating with me. Id eaten in both, been in them during Winter Park Sip events, and knew them to be a part of the Winter Park landscape I cherish. Such small businesses arent just facades on the street, not just places to eat or drink. They em ploy people who shop and eat at other local businesses, they help to make Winter Park what it is to day. Those businesses will change over time and change surely keeps things more interesting but when one is lost, the people who enjoyed and frequented surely will miss it. Last year I participated in organizing the wonderful new Park Avenue in the s & s exhibit at the museum for the Winter Park Historical Society if you havent been, youre missing out! I have only been in Winter Park for six years, but was working with many people who have lived here their entire lives. It was wonderful to hear their recollections, some funny, others sad. But what came through in their stories and in their writings for the exhibit, was the love they have for this community and the attachment they felt toward businesses long gone. What they wrote about them was often so amazingly descriptive, warm and funny, it made me feel like I knew those businesses myself. This made me want to know where each business had been and what was there now. It also made me wonder which existing business es were in the process of leaving wasnt here during the s and s, most of us were not, but the stories I was told about the busi nesses these residents frequented, enjoyed and loved, gave me an idea of what it would have been like. Their recollections of those small businesses served as a window into that time in Winter Park. I had a good idea Winter Park was special even before we living in Fort Lauderdale and our neighbors were more than a little sarcastic about our leaving the beaches, palm trees and all that went along with them. But once I began stating our next home would be Winter Park, their cyni cism abated and each and every time I swear every person I told simply responded: Oh, I love Winter Park. Winter Park is a truly special community for so many reasons. es and the people who own them are no doubt two of them. Last year when I began my website, ILUVWinterPark.com, which I started to celebrate locality, I coined a phrase: Parkpreneur. A Parkpreneur is to me anyone, from business owner to artist to Winter Park Boat Tour captain, to any number of others, who helps to keep Winter Park special and unique, and the place I truly do love calling home. And when youve got our communitys version of local, often times to my other halfs chagrin, I think theres very little need to go anywhere else. Clyde V. Moore is the chief everything ofcer of I LUV Winter Park, Inc. Visit ILUVWinterPark.com Chris Jepson Perspectives Louis Roney Play On! Slugs, snails and puppy dog tales How did we arrive here? How many times come and go that leave their unique memories forever engraved in the back of ones mind? The childhood memories that, from out of nowhere, crystallize in an old noggin are often astonishingly clear. Im remembering that 6-foot-tall box at grandmothers in Atlanta until our cord ran out, snapped by a strong March gale, and the kite sailed off into a windy eternity. I remember an Armistice Day at 11 a.m. when we on the Winter Park High School football team stood at attention on the 50-yard line prior to playing another high school. A car drove up and a guy jumped out, running to us and yelling, Albert is dead! Albert, a classmate, had died pulling a shotgun out of the back seat of a car, and the gun went off. I cant forget, in the s, the alligators we encountered lying lethargically on the lake bottom as we swam 10 feet underwa ter in Lake Virginia off the Rollins shore. I recall a night football game against Leesburg when I injured my hip in a way that still wont let me forget. I remember watching from a tall dune in Daytona Beach as Sir Malcolm Camp bell broke the land speed record in his Blue Bird racing car. In 1928, when I was 7, my father took me with him on a business trip out of At lanta. We crossed a bridge over the Savan nah River and on the South Carolina side, saw a tri-motor Ford biplane at the end of an improvised red-clay runway. A sign read: Airplane Rides $1. Both dad and I were anxious not to let such an oppor tunity pass us by. The plane took off in a cloud of dust. We soared high above Au gusta and several other smaller towns for some 15 to 20 minutes and then landed bumpily. When we got home and I told my mother what we had done, she was not at all happy at the risk she thought dad and I had taken. But the next morn ing in Spring Street School did I have a story to tell the other kids? You bet! Riding my bike at night in Winter Park was a scary proposition when I was a kid. When I rode from the scout hut on Lake Killarney to our house off Lake Sue, the streets were all paved with loose bricks. Rattlesnakes had the habit of coming out of the palmetto jungle and warming themselves at night on the lonely brick roads. I was ever on the lookout lest I run over a rattlesnake and throw him up around my neck as had happened to some bikers. Speaking of rattlesnakes, there was a butcher shop on the west side of Park Avenue at New England. Behind the store was a broad white fence on which people hung the biggest diamondback rattle snakes they had killed some were 6or 7-feet long! We were always careful to look out for coral snakes the small red, yellow and black-colored serpents that some times dropped out of local trees if you brushed a branch with your bike. A coral snake once fell out of a banana tree and into a canoe I was paddling in the canal between Lake Virginia and Lake Osceola. I set a speed record vacating that canoe thats why Im able to tell this tale! About Roney: HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney) Celebrate Winter Parks businesses CL YDE V. MOORE Guest Writer Sometimes I experience down-onmy-knees awe of our species. How so very far we have come in such a rela tively short period of time. Out of Africa some 70,000 years ago, we have been capable of language, music and art for about 50,000 years. We left the planet 50 years ago (Apollo space program) and the upper end of our potential is, I think, limited only by our imaginations. Yet Yet, what numb chucks we are. My sister characterizes our species as nasty little monkeys. Were violent, aggres sive, territorial, fearful and superstitious. We breed much as a malignant cancer, largely indifferent to our collective impact on Earths environment. On one hand were artistic, creative, loving and generous. On the other were myopic, fearful and self-serving. Were a Man ichaean, Janus-masked collection of competing emotions. The very qualities that make us Master of the Universe can just as easily launch an inquisition, justify a pogrom or require women in burkas. What genuinely has me down is the condition of America. How did we arrive here? Up to our neck in problems (of our own making) and operating under a po litical system conceived to be deliberately contentious. A three-branch democracy created to provide a check and balance against tyranny as well as revolutionary change. We are wholly dependent on an intelligent and informed electorate who in turn elect competent leaders. When the obit is written on the United States, historians will conclude America succumbed because its population failed its test of good citizenship. We did not smartly consider our intelligent options. We did not select appropriate solutions to the challenges confronting our republic (whether it be war, energy or education) nor did we elect the best leaders with the best ideas. This appears to be Ameri cas condition, depressing as that may be. The popular idea that the average citizen will select the best candidate or best policy when they see it is being in creasingly challenged as false. According to research results conducted by Cornell University professor David Dunning, one conclusion suggests that democratic elec tions produce mediocre leadership and policies. Why, you might legitimately ask? Because most of our fellow citizens cannot adequately judge the competency of a public policy or a candidate. Very smart ideas are going to be hard for people to adopt, because most people dont have the sophistication to recognize how good an idea is," Dunning said. To a degree, this applies to all of us. Most of us are not experts, say, in foreign policy. To be able to then discern who is an expert and whose ideas make sense becomes the challenge. We lack the mental acumen to make those determina tions. And most of us lack the discipline to be an informed voter. Informed with accurate, intelligent information. We seemingly are incapable of making the right decisions when the evidence stares us in the face. Why? Because, "If you have gaps in your knowledge in a given area, then youre not in a position to assess your own gaps or the gaps of others," Dunning observed. I am reminded of the 1994 comedy Dumb and Dumber. Is America little more than the dumb dumbly electing the dumber? H.L. Mencken observed, Democracy is the theory that the common people know what they want and deserve it good and hard. Do we? Deserve it good and hard? Shall we put it to a vote? Whats that? We have. One election, one vote at a time. Jepson is a 24-year resident of Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.US People hung the biggest diamondback rattlesnakes they had killed some were 6or 7-feet long! on a broad white fence in West Winter Park. A Parkpreneur is to me anyone, from business owner to artist to Winter Park Boat Tour captain, to any number of others, who helps to keep Winter Park special and unique. Clyde V. Moore

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Page 12 Thursday, March 8, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer New development in Maitland There couldnt be a better time to develop land, according to Anthea Turner of Maitland. This comes as no surprise to Turners family, friends and community. Recognized as a leader of many Central Florida civic organizations and a patron of the arts, Turner is a forward-thinking woman with a vision for her beautiful parklike property. What started as a dream that she and Dr. Turner (now deceased) shared is taking shape. The property has been approved for seven custom premier home sites at the corner of Manor Road and Live Oak Street. The four existing homes are scheduled to be demolished to make way for new construction. Turners development team in cludes several established Central Florida businesses: R. Miller Architecture Bob Miller, FAIA Titan Properties David McDaniel, Broker Kamenoff, LLC Larry Kamenoff, Custom Home Builder The development team worked closely with Turner, her neighbors and the city of Maitland throughout the entitlement process. WPCC renovated Process Architecture announces the recently completed Winter Park Coun try Club Starters House renovation and addition. Originally tasked with providing restroom and locker facili ties within the existing structure, the architects seized on the opportunity to transform the facility into a viable community space in addition to serv ing the needs of the golf course. This large space can serve multiple func tions ranging from a pro shop, golfers lounge or to hosting public and private events. With its renewed presence on the golf course and in the commu nity, the facility frames a moment of historic Winter Park, re-presenting it within a relevant public space. New design concept comes to Winter Park Design Studio 15 is relocating its Or lando ofce to a new space in Winter Parks Hannibal Square. The interior design rm, led by owner and design principal Shanna Bender, has signed a lease for a 1,200-square-foot store front at 433 W. New England Ave. The new location will not only house the rms primary design of ces, but also an interactive furniture and design gallery. Design Studio 15 will feature furniture collections from the likes of Christopher Guy and Kartell, as well as custom designed reclaimed wood pieces from Blaire Sligar. Additionally, the showroom will boast eco-friendly smart replaces, European tile and bath selections and unique lighting xtures. Bender envisions more than just an ofce and run-of-the-mill gallery. We want Design Studio 15 to be a fun and interactive place for people to become a part of the design process, she said. We plan to host monthly social gatherings at our showroom, during which well have guest speak ers from the community talking about the latest in design trends and do-ityourself applications. Jeff ClarkColdwell Banker Residential407.733.0773j.clark@coldwellbanker.com www.BaldwinParkLiving.com Homes Observer Homes brought to you by: Fannie Hillman + Associates Serving Central Florida for over 31 years! 407-644-1234 fanniehillman.com Classic Iron Beds AND Designer Linens 407-982-4319All iron & brass beds are made in the USA and guaranteed for 2 generations spent Real Estate Briefs Please see BRIEFS on page 13 Anthea Turner bulldozes Clubs new look

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Page 13 Thursday, March 8, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer The build-out of the new space has begun and Bender expects to move in some time in April. Design Studio 15 will announce the rst of their community socials on its website and Facebook page. For more information, please visit DesignStudio15.com Traugott joins Kelly Price Winter Parks Kelly Price & Company has bolstered its real estate operations with the addition of longtime and multifaceted real estate professional and Bro ker-Associate, Mark Traugott. Traugott, a state certied general appraiser, is the newest addition to the downtown Winter Park residen tial real estate company, which posted nearly $130 million in property sales in 2011. Stirling Sothebys named sales agent for Alaqua home Stirling Sothebys International Realty has been named exclusive sales and marketing agents for a luxury golf course home at Alaqua Country Club in Longwood. Roger Soderstrom, founder and owner of Stirling Sothebys International Realty, said Jere Matheny, international luxury home specialist with the rms Heathrow Real Estate Gallery, is listing agent for the luxury home, which is priced at $1.95 million. The nearly 11,000-square-foot luxury home, situated on a landscaped two-acre golf course site, features ve bedrooms and seven baths. $100 to $500 OFFAny Servicewith this ad On Call 24 Hours A DayServing Central Florida Since the s Let Us Handle Your Emergency!Call Our Hotline 877-936-8998 www.EmergencyServices24.comServing Floridas Residential & Commercial Community Since 1990 IMMEDIAT E RESPONSE Whats Your Emergency?CBC057844 F lood l Leaks l Mold l F ire l Storm l Smoke l Roong Preparing to sell your home? Price it right BRIEFS | C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 12 Design Studio 15 Stirling Sothebys Alaqua home Traugott Youve made the decision. Youre Sell ing your home. Although youre not likely to get an hour-long special like LeBron when he decided to move, this choice is one of the most important you and your family will make. Now, the anxiety sets in. How much can we get? What about repairs? Is anything selling in this market? Theres good news for sellers in todays market. Price it right, put some marketing behind it and throw a competent Realtor in the mix and you have a recipe for success. I outline the ingredients to a succesful sale below. Get a sellers mindset The most important thing you can do s prepare mentally for the sale of your home. Try to take as much emotion out of the scenario as you can. Sometimes buyers begin negotiations with low offers, dont take it personally. Sellers are cautioned to keep the home in showing condition at all times. Put away those dishes, sweep the porch in the morning and keep the dirty laundry out of view. Does your home need touchup paint or have fraying carpet? Walk your home with your Realtor and outline potential value vampires. In the case of luxury homes you have more invested (read: more to lose) so its well worth your while to spring for bigger ticket items like landscaping, new appliances and cabin etry. At the least, clean your home top to bottom and keep it that way. Price it right the rst time This is one of the big ones. Consult with your Realtor regarding recent neighbor hood sales to see what the true current market value of your home actually is. I spoke with a seller recently and she informed me that she bought the home and added $50,000 in upgrades and to break even she would need to get at least $150,000. Unfortunately for her, the recent neighborhood sales were between $90,000 and $100,000. Her story is not unique. Just be aware that retail for upgrades in your home do not translate directly into resale dollars. An appraiser will have a value range for such upgrades. The best indica tion of value is the solds within the past three to six months in your direct area. If your home has unique features or is cus play and your Realtor will be able to show you the market trends for your area. The good news is in many markets we are see ing values stabilize and often times mul tiple offers on homes that are priced well and marketed properly. Also, dont price it much more than market value or it may languish on the market and deter ready, willing and able buyers. Homes typically sell here around 96 percent of their original offer, and traditionally, sellers see lower priced offers as their homes remain on the market. Christina Rordam, Realtor, CSP, CNE, CDPE Exit Real Estate Results 407-928-8294 ChristinaSellsOrlando@gmail.com, www.ChristinaSellsOrlando.com

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Page 28 Thursday, March 8, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer FREEComplete Door Maintenance with any Service 407-780-1691 Orlando, FL Call now to diversify your advertising. 866.742.1373 www.Florida-Classifieds.com