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Winter Park-Maitland observer
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00201
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park FL
Publication Date: 02-23-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates: 28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID: UF00091444:00201

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407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC USPS 00-6186 Publisher statement on page 4. Thursday, Feb. 23, 2012 50+ tax wpmobserver.comSubscribe now!Visit wpmobserver.com Winter Parks roads may have gotten a little greener, thanks to a quiet move by the City Com mission on Feb. 13 that will make electric car charging stations free Were taking a leadership position on this, Commissioner Steven Leary said about the citys newest green program, which joins sustainable living programs and health programs the city al ready is pushing. Were trying to do things healthier in a lot of ways. On Jan. 10 the city unveiled six new charging stations throughout the city that will add to the about 300 electric charging stations already spread out throughout Central Florida. The difference with Winter Parks program, at least initially, is that it will con tinue to be free to use. Its an important experi ment, Mayor Ken Bradley said about the program. I think it encourages people to at least con sider buying an electric car. The rationale for the free pro gram, electric utility director Jerry Warren said, is that, aside from free charges enticing electric car buyers, the cost to set up a pay system for the charging sta tions would cost more than sim ply giving away free electricity. The city would only spend a few dollars per month at the current rate, he said. unveiled in January, the stations were already in use since late November, topping off batter ies at the Public Safety Building, Central Park, the public parkCity Hall parking lot, Hannibal lea Lane Tennis Center. With totals from December and January already in the books, city staff discovered that the stations had only charged cars 31 times so far, with an av erage use of 2.9 kilowatt hours. Thats about half the average charge consumption reported by cates where charging is available and tracks electric car use. The 10 charges that occurred in December averaged 3.5 kilo watt hours per charge. In January the number more than doubled to 21 charges, but the kilowatt hours per charge dropped to 2.7 per charge. need about 50 percent more users beyond the projected 50 charges per month before it would break even on the program. The city may reconsider charging drivers to top off their batteries in the future, at a rate of 12 cents per kilowatt hour, according to Warrens estimate. That would cost the average user of the system only 35 cents per charge. Until more drivers are enticed into buying electric cars, Bradley said that he thinks its worth giv ing away. If everybody was driving an electric car, Im sure we wouldnt be giving it away for free any more, Bradley said. But its kind of like a new business in town; maybe they give a few cookies away at the start.Louis Roney, I have tears in my eyes, knowing that all you write about your relationship with Joy is true.Page 12Letters to the editor From the Corner Table Restaurant critic Josh Garricks writes, You have to nd The Silly Grape, but the point is, its worth nding.Page 3 LifestylesThe New American Home for 2012, located in Winter Park, was designed and furnished by Winter Park rms. Page 9 Calendar Casa Feliz will host Bachs Lunch with the Bach Festival Society of Winter Park on Thursday, March 1. Page 6 TAX DEFERREDFIXED ANNUITY RATE FOR 5 YEARS.Bob Adams 407-644-6646THE NATIONAL 5 YEAR CD RATE IS 1.34%3.35% 451 Maitland Ave, Altamonte Springs, FL 32701NEW Dermatology Ofce!407-599-SKIN (7546)*Waive co-payment up to $25 No referral needed Accepting all insurances Dr. John CottamDr. Ross Wheeler PhHOtTO byBY IsSAAcC BABcCOcCK thTHE ObsBSErvRVErR The six electric car charging stations are free to use because it would cost Winter Park more money to require a usage fee.Electric drivers top off for free IsISAAcC BBABcCOcCK OObserver Staff City honors humanitarian PhHOtTO cCOUrtRTEsySY OfF cCItTY OfF WINteTER pP ARK WWinter Park city commissioners and ofcials dedicated the amphitheater of the new Winter Park Community Center in honor of Ruby Ball on Monday. Ruby Mae Roberts Ball was a longtime Winter Park resident, mother of six, educator and humanitarian. The event included the unveiling of an engraved plaque, above, honoring her many life accomplishments.

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Page 2 Thursday, Feb. 23, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland OObserver Schwinn Cruiser, resident William Schall cross regularly rides the citys streets and trails, jotting notes in his head on their ac cessibility, safety and ease of usage, which he then relays to city, county and school of In October, the roads led him to Winter Park High School, where his daughter is a student. Displeased with what he witnessed in drop-off and pick-up protocol and pe destrian safety, Shallcross set his sights on improving the process. I want to make the streets, especially those by our schools, safer, he said. and others safety concerns, one of the high schools four gated entrances, located on Bellewood Drive and the primary entrance for school buses, was closed to pedestrian students to share an entrance with bus traf Instead of viewing this as a small vic one problem, but made the rest worse. Boulevard and Greene Drive, and, he said, students into campus. But WPHS administrators, school board said that given the schools residentiallocked location, they do the best they can neighboring residents. Were surrounded by residential areas so we only have so many access points and Winter Park High School Principal Tim Smith said. Were always doing all that we can to ensure student safety. RRoad rules Board, said the city has done all it can to help WPHS, as well as all other Winter Park schools, to be as safely accessible as possi When you have a school and its morn ing drop-off time, theres 15 to 20 minutes where theres a lot of people and it can get to eliminate that we would, but its a school and this is what happens. renovations in 2006, it was made sure that every intended student entrance had a sidewalk entrance for those who walk or ride their bikes to enter the campus, Mar graf said. Park Police Department, said he has re ceived very few complaints on the WPHS areas safety, and has no recollection of any reported incidents in which students were reported in harms way. We believe the area is very safe, he said. Joie Cadle, school board representative for the district that includes WPHS, said due to its location in the heart of a residen tial neighborhood, the school has faced traf all involved are working to overcome these issues the best they can. We take the safety of children getting onto our campus as a very serious matter, all the four entrances are working the way they should. She said there are currently no plans pedestrian pathways, which William ShallI would just like the school to take responsibility for the problem and come up with a solution, he said.Public perception Up to a half-hour prior to the sounding of the dismissal bell at WPHS, the line of cars starts piling up. Its 1:45 p.m. when Jenny Collado drives parks her car out front to wait for her son. that stacks up, she said, glancing in her rear-view mirror at the line of cars, nearly 20-deep idling behind her, now just after 2 p.m. But then again I dont know if its any different at any other school. Sandy DeWoody, parked a few cars back and also waiting on her son, said she doesnt want to show up 25 minutes before the bell rings, but that its just the reality if Its not ideal, but Im not sure how the school could make it any better, she said. Collado said shes noticed a slight in wood Drive gate, but that the extra com mute time is worth it for student safety. Id rather have my son have security at school, and have people only coming in from one or two entrances, than have them come in from everywhere, she said. from the school since 1977, said that limit ing the number of entrances to the school of his street, and that its been a problem hes watched develop continuously as the school has grown. Its a problem, but its just one of those facts of life that you can just wish wasnt, he said. $100 to $500 OFFAny Servicewith this ad On Call 24 Hours A DayServing Central Florida Since the s Let Us Handle Your Emergency!Call Our Hotline 877-936-8998 www.EmergencyServices24.comServing Floridas Residential & Commercial Community Since 1990 IMMEDIAT E RESPONSE Whats Your Emergency?CBC057844 F lood l Leaks l Mold l F ire l Storm l Smoke l Roong Get the look you deserve... Contact us at 4079146445 Were 100% mobile Car Wash & Wax $15* Insured Business For a limited time only. Restrictions ap ply due to size and condition of vehicle. Our Town(407) 366-8696 Fax (407) 359-2118 P.O. Box 4548 Winter Park, FL 32793Insertions in editions and months as shown:____Waterford Lakes ____College Park/Orlando ____Winter Park/Maitland ____Sweetwater/Heathrow ____Tuscawilla/Winter Springs ____Oviedo ____Baldwin Park/E. Winter ParkPlease initial your agreement with the following:____ I approve this ad to appear in Our Town as shown here OR ____ I approve this ad with minor changes as clearly marked (How many changes are marked? _____) ____ Phone number and address are correct I understand that payment for this ad is due per initial agreement.Signed ____________________________________We appreciate your prompt response, as our deadline is approaching.*Colors represented on this proof may not be an exact match of the colors produced when printed on our offset press.X OCT 2009 407-644-7760 PhHOtTO cCOUrtRTEsySY OfF WIllLLIAM sSHAllcLLCROssSS WWinter Park H High students walk home from the schools Bellewood Drive gate, which was closed last month after father William Shallcross and others complained about walking students having to sharing the road with bus trafc. OOfcials: W WPHHS feeder roads are safe Residents, parents say congestion around Winter Park High School is something that theyve gotten used to SARAH WWIlsLSON OObserver Staff

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Page 3 Thursday, Feb. 23, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland OObserver The Silly Grape is the off spring that would be produced if your local, upscale wine bar got married to your favorite sports bar. Its big, its welcoming and you immediately feel comfortable, whether you are there to celebrate a birthday or you just want to watch the game with your best friend. The (liter ally) handmade creation of Cesar DaCosta who came to his parents from Portugal 30 years ago this restaurant and bar is DaCostas way to invite the Maitland community into his place. He is the epitome of the hands-on owner/proprietor. Whether hes tending bar, serving at the tables or handling the light ing for the live music that adds to the welcoming atmosphere, be sure you have enough to eat and youre having a good time. His personality is like meeting up with an old friend you havent seen in years. nominally retired are still in the kitchen every day making sure the food is as tasty and the portions as large as they once here is much better than good. hummus, loaded up with garlic, fresh cilantro and roasted bell peppers. Its freaky good so good that Cesar is currently in discussion with a distributor to potentially package and sell it, and good enough to make a healthy meal of it. The salsa is made fresh every day, and of the soup choices, the Portuguese kale sausage is perfect. The menu has two important distinctions: First, there are no items on the menu over $10 (Yay!), and the offerings are made from fresh food that is good for you! What a concept. The main course offerings are (each served with a bountiful side salad) and huge salad choices. bread, and it arrived at my table bubbling with jack cheese over the perfectly cut chunks of freshdaily chicken. Each offering has a healthy (in every sense) dose of olive oil, which in the case of the a sprinkling of balsamic vinegar for a Mediterranean blessing. I then tasted the roast beef panini, made with an abundance of sliced beef and served with pesto. I happily travel for good pasta with pesto, and now a bar/restaurant has given me yet another way to serve pesto, which makes me a happy man. The Silly Grape, but the point is, for all those businesses on Keller Grape also offers a pool table and TVs all around the room. Theres a happy hour Monday through Friday from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. with a variety of drink offerings and live music on most days. If youve read this far, Cesar wants to offer $1 drafts for the month of March when ordered with any menu item. Just tell your server (who could be the owner) one $1 draft for each menu item. Its a pleasure to highly recom mend The Silly Grape. Offer ends 1/31/2012. Offers are available to new, rst-time CenturyLink Prism TV residential customers only. Offers include Prism TV service bundled with Pure Broadband service and Prism TV bundled with CenturyLink Unlimited Calling. Standard monthly rates and fees apply to these services and required equipment. All prices, packages and programming are subject to change without notice. Customer must cancel DVR and/or HD service by calling CenturyLink Customer Service before the end of the three-month free promotional period to avoid monthly charges or the standard monthly rate for each service will apply until services are cancelled. Offers may be limited to specic locations. General Services and offers not available everywhere. CenturyLink may change, cancel, or substitute offers and services, or vary them by service area, at its sole discretion without notice. Requires credit approval and deposit may be required. Additional restrictions apply. Terms and Conditions All products and services listed are governed by tariffs, local terms of service, or terms and conditions posted at www.centurylink.com. CenturyLink Prism TV All plans require separate local phone service plan and include digital channels (including local channels), one (1) set-top box (STB), one (1) modem gateway, and up to four (4) standard direct video streams to residence. CenturyLink-provided STBs are required to view TV. Local channel availability varies by market. High Denition (HD) available on all TV plans, and up to two (2) of the up to four (4) video streams can be in HD. Customers location determines both HD availability and the maximum number of HD video streams (between 0 and 2 HD streams) a customer can view and record at any one time per residence, regardless of the number of STBs in the household. All non-HD video streams are provided in standard denition. Subscription to service precludes customer from purchasing high-speed Internet services from any third party. Additional charges will apply for additional programming packages, movie channel subscriptions (except for PrismTM Premium plan), Pay Per View movies and events, On Demand purchases, and premium services/subscriptions for all plans. Some subscription services, events, and broadcast network service may be blacked out in customers area. Vacation Program Offer available to residential customers only. Only certain CenturyLink services are eligible for the Vacation Program; third party services received through CenturyLink are not eligible. Offer may include a reduced monthly recurring charge for a predetermined number of months each year, retention of equipment and suspension of service, programming and agreement during Vacation Program activation. A zero balance for each applicable service is required for eligibility. If customer does not contact CenturyLink to resume full activation of applicable services before the end of six (6) consecutive month period, all applicable monthly charges, fees, surcharges, contractual obligations, etc., will resume automatically. Vacation Program services will have restrictions and limitations that will vary for each applicable service. Contact CenturyLink for details. Equipment Minimum equipment and CenturyLink professional installation are required. At initial installation, each customer receives: one (1) VDSL 2 modem; up to six (6) STBs (standard plan includes one (1) STB; additional STBs are available for an additional monthly rate, per STB); and one (1) remote control per STB installed. All equipment must be returned to designated CenturyLink retail store within thirty (30) days after service disconnection in an undamaged condition, or customer is charged for each equipment piece not returned or returned as damaged. Cars 2: 2011 Disney/Pixar. All Rights Reserved. 2012 CenturyLink, Inc. All Rights Reserved. The name CenturyLink and the pathways logo are property of CenturyLink, Inc. All other marks are property of their respective owners. BONUS!HEADING BACK NORTH? PLACE YOUR PRISM SERVICE ON HOLD WHILE YOURE AWAY. NO EXTRA CHARGE. NO HASSLES.CenturyLinkTM PrismTM paired with the perfect partner Internet or Voice. NO CONTRACT AND FREE HD WHEN YOU PICK 2 for 12 months175 East Altamonte Dr., Altamonte Springs 3030 East Semoran Blvd., Apopka 260 Citrus Tower Blvd., Clermont 1359 East Vine St., Kissimmee 3244 North John Young Pkwy., KissimmeeCall 866.552.4971Espaol 866.960.7085SEE THE DIFFERENCE FOR YOURSELF! Test-drive it online at seeprismtv.com or in store today: Like us on Facebook facebook.com/PrismTV CNTL11-1571D_9.042x9_r1.indd 1 12/28/11 5:38 PM Josh Garrick From the Corner TableGrape fuses wine, sports PhHOtTO byBY IsSAAcC BABcCOcCK thTHE ObsBSErvRVErR Cesar DeCosta, owner of The Silly Grape in MMaitland, pours a glass of wine for a patron. The Silly Grape is at 1720 Fennell St., between North Keller Road and Legacy Club Drive in Maitland. Its open 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Monday and Tuesday and 11 a.m. to 2 a.m. Wednesday through Sunday. Call 407-790-7999 or visit thesillygrape. com

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Page 4 Thursday, Feb. 23, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland OObserver USPS 00-6186 ISSN 1064-36131500 Park Center Drive OOrlando, FL 32835-5705 MMember of: Goldenrod Chamber of CommercePublisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor. Submission does not guarantee publication. Columnists opinions are made independently of the newspaper. All rights reserved. Winter Park / Maitland Observer 2012 EEstablished in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster www.wpmobserver.com | Phone: 407-563-7000 | Fax: 407-563-7099 | editor@observernewspapers.com P.OO BBox 2426 WWinter Park, FL 32790 Published Thursday, Feb. 23, 2012 CONONTA ACTS Volume 24, IIssue NNumber 8 PUUBLISHEER KKyle Taylor 407-563-7009 kyle@observernewspapers.com managingMANAGING EEDITOOR Jenny AAndreasson 407-563-7026 editor@observernewspapers.com DEESIGNEER Jonathan Gallagher 407-563-7054 jgallagher@observernewspapers.com REEPOORTEERS Jenny AAndreasson 407-563-7026 editor@observernewspapers.com IIsaac BBabcock 407-563-7023 isaacb@observernewspapers.com LEgalsGALS | ClassifiLASSIFIEdsDS AAshley MMcBBride legal@FLAlegals.com classieds@observernewspapers.com COOPY EEDITOORS IIsaac BBabcock isaacb@observernewspapers.com Sarah WWilson COOLUUMNISTS Chris Jepson Jepson@MediAmerica.us Louis RRoney LRoney@c.rr.com Josh Garrick joshgarrick9@gmail.com ADVEERTISING SALEES ManagANAGErR Tracy Craft 407-515-2605 tcraft@observernewspapers.com sSUbscriptiBSCRIPTIOnsNS | circCIRCUlatiLATIOnN Jackie Candelaria 407-563-7013 intINTErnRN AAndy Ceballos Greek trip with JoshAdventurous student-travelers from ages 16 to 80 may join O Observer Arts Columnist Josh Garrick as he leads a three-week college course for Americans who wish to immerse themselves in a Classical Greek experience. Whether you follow the course-work for 3 col lege credits or simply turn study-time into time on Greeces magnicent beaches, this small-group trip provides access to Greek sites and beaches that no bus-group could include. EEmail  studyabroad@sva.edu. Student honors Alexander Koepsel  of Winter Park has gradu ated from Marquette U University in Milwaukee, Wis, with a  Bachelor of Science  in E Electrical & EElectronic EEngineering. Berklee College of Music announces that  Drew Moore  of Winter Park has earned placement on the Deans List for the fall se mester of the 2011 academic year. Tax help Tax-Aide volunteers, trained and certied by the IRS, will provide free income tax as sistance at 17 sites throughout the O Orange and Seminole county area starting Wednes day, Feb. 1, through Tuesday, April 17. Sites include: The Winter Park Library, at 460 E E. New E Eng land Ave., from 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays from Feb. 1 through April 17. St. Mary Magdalen Church, located at 861 Maitland Ave., from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Thursdays from Feb. 2 through April 12. The Maitland Senior Center, at 345 S. Maitland Ave., from noon to 4 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays, Feb. 7 through April 17. For additional information visit www.aarp.org/ taxaideSend submissions to editor@observernewspa pers.com Dr. David R R.  Lach, DDS, MS, PA, Spe cialist in O Orthodon tics and Dentofacial O Orthopedics, was recently rec ognized as an E Elite Preferred Invisalign Specialist Provider, which is a distinction given to the top 1 percent of doctors nationally and internationally with the highest level of expe rience and expertise using Invisalign. Dr. Lach is a graduate of the U University of North Caro lina at Chapel Hill, School of Dentistry and has more than 20 years of private practice experi ence in the greater OOrlando area. The Central Florida R Regional Transporta tion A Authority (LYN YNX)  is inviting qualied non-prot organizations in O Orange, O Osceola and Seminole counties to register for a spot on the agencys coveted Public Service Bus. Visit golynx.com to enter. AAndrea M Massey-Farrell, president and CEOEO of Massey Communications, and Patrick Chapin, president and CEOEO of the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce, have been appointed to the Winter Park YMCA Board of Directors. NAI RNAI Realvest   negotiated three industrial lease agreements totaling 10,075 square feet at the Hanging Moss CommerCenter in O Or lando and at Carter CommerCenter in Winter Garden. Julie A A. B Baird, a shareholder with Moore Stephens Lovelace, P.A. (MSL), has been elected to serve as chair of the rms board of directors. Chefs James and Julie Petrakis of The Ravenous Pig present Cask & Larder, a Southern-inspired public house that will open this summer. The 6,000-square-foot, 150-seat restaurant and brewery will open at the old Harpers Tavern building on Fairbanks Av enue.  KKeep W Winter Park B Beautiful (KWKWPBB) is now accepting Pocket Park Restoration Project grant applications. Winter Park neighborhood and community-based groups are encour aged to apply for funds to support physical improvements such as plantings, restoration, community gardens and other beautication projects in public spaces. Complete details regarding the Pocket Park Restoration Project and grant applications are available at kwpb. org under Projects and then Pocket Park Res toration Project. BBusiness BBriefs Community BBulletin BBee winner Sana Saraf participated in the Glenridge Middle School Spelling Bee Contest on Feb. 8. She will be representing her school in the O Orange County Spelling Bee Contest on March 9. Jamming for peace During the week of Jan. 30, Trinity Preparatory Schools PeaceJam club planned a week full of informative activities to encourage students to learn more about the issue of starvation and hunger. Valentine Tree The Maitland Public Library is celebrating the month of February with its time-honored tradition of the Valentine Tree. With the Valentines Day theme, the Tree is an opportunity for residents to purchase a paper heart through a donation. This year, the proceeds will be used to pur chase three computers for the children in the Youth Services Department. The goal is $1,500. Gulf States Credit U Union will be matching the funds up to $750 toward the goal. Call 407-647-7700.

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Page 5 Thursday, Feb. 23, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland OObserver The Knights are just a week away from closing out the regu lar season on the basketball court, and theyre looking to do it with a bang after beating East Carolina That win returned the Knights after a stumble last week against Southern Miss. It also marked one of the big gest games of the season for senior down 11 points while grabbing other dominant all-around per formance came from Isaiah Sykes, who picked up nine points, six re bounds, four turnovers, three as sists, three blocks and two steals on the night, without committing any fouls. The team was led in scoring and rebounding by Keith Clan ton, who connected for 16 points and seven rebounds in the win. Marcus Jordan also had a strong night at the basket, shooting for formance from the free throw line, while forcing three turnovers. The Knights were a rebound ing machine against the Pirates, more rebounds on the night. That includes newcomer Kasey Wilson, who grabbed six boards to add to his 9 points on the night. But that rebounding was extremely lopsided, with the Knights picking up only 10 offensive rebounds to give themselves second chance shots. They were experts at snatching away second chances from the Pirates, grabbing 29 boards on the night. the Knights will be looking to close out the regular season with a series of wins. Owls in Houston at press time Wednesday night, but will return for their penultimate home game with a showdown against a surg ing UTEP (13-13, 6-6), tipping off Come Saturday, March 3, fans of him on the home court, tipping margin, one of the lowest scoring games in UCF mens basketball history. Savannah Court and CoeExcellence in Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation 1301 W. Maitland Blvd. Maitland, FL 32751407-645-3990www.SavannahCourtMaitland.comAssisted Living Facility License No. 8447 Skilled Nursing Facility License No. 1635096 The quality of care is outstanding. Our mother has made so many friends here. And she especially loves the hair salon! Peggy, her daughter Merrel & son DwightAssisted Living Rehabilitation and Skilled Nursing Care Variety of Apartment Suite Selections, some with Lake Views Restaurant Style Dining Laundry, Housekeeping, Maintenance Services Transportation to Outings and Medical Appointments Beautifully Landscaped Courtyard Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above. You are always welcome! A Senior Living Community where Hospitality is a Way of Life. Classic Iron Beds AND Designer Linens 407-982-4319All iron & brass beds are made in the USA and guaranteed for 2 generations New Construction!4 bed / 2.5 bath / 2190 sq ft $339,000 808 Hamilton Place Court Winter Park, FL 32789 Commerce Brokerage, LLC407-566-1636 PhHOtTO byBY ANdD Y ceCEBAllLLOsS thTHE ObsBSErvRVErR MMaitland Little League celebrated its 50th anniversary with a parade and ceremony on Saturday, Feb. 18, at the Keller Road ball elds. E Even Maitland City Council got involved. Pictured above are Councilman Ivan Valdes, left, and Mayor Howard Schieferdecker with the Rays team.Little League cheers 50 years BBig week for Eagles basketball, wrestling IsISAAcC BBABcCOcCK OObserver Staff With Winter Parks teams bowing out of the winter sports postseason, Edgewater has stolen the spotlight with some strong performances in the past week at the re gional and state levels. Both of the schools the state title this week, with dreams of glory in Lakeland. BBoys own the court Edgewaters boys basketball team propelled itself further into the postseason last week. est scoring game of the season on Feb. 16, selves into the regional championship game against Leesburg. That game tips off at 7 p.m. on Saturday at Edgewater. Lady Eagles soar Meanwhile Edgewaters girls basketball team was destroying the competition against Pensacola on Feb. 24 at the Lake land Center. In the three games of the postseason the girls (26-4) have won by a combined margin of 246-125, including their most re cent 94-61 blowout of Gainesville (24-4) on which has won an astonishing 11 games this season by 50 points or more. In a dis trict game against Mainland Dec. 6, they won 93-10. Prince has proven a dominant force at both ends of the court. She led the team with 31 points and eight blocks against Gaines ville. With their most recent route the girls Friday in the Lakeland Center. WWrestlers score Edgewaters Jerimiah Benson fought his win by pin in the third round.Knights slash Pirates, head to postseason IsISAAcC BBABcCOcCK OObserver Staff

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Page 6 Thursday, Feb. 23, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland OObserver FEBB. 23 Nigerian novelist Chimamanda AAdichie will speak at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 23, in the Bush Audi torium of Rollins College. Visit rollins. edu/winterwiththewriters. Chili for Charity is from 5:30 to 8 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 23, at the Winter Park Farmers Market, located at 200 W. New E England Ave. The cost is $25 in advance and $30 at the door. From 7 to 10 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 23, the Home Builders Association will host its E Eighth Annual Bruce Gould Poker I Invitational The cost is $125 for the Poker Invitational and $50 for the casino games. Visit or landojcc.org. Winter Park Towers (WPT) is proud to announce its Second Annual Chili Cook-OOff at 2 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 23, at 1111 S. Lakemont Ave. O Open to both staff and residents, this fun event allows everyone an equal opportunity to show off their culinary skills. FEBB. 24 Join the Goldenrod Chamber mem bership in a fun lled night of bowling from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., on Friday, Feb. 24, at Aloma Bowling Center at 2530 Aloma Ave. A ve-person team is $80 and a single player can join a team for $16 per person. Call 407677-5980. The Down Syndrome Association of Central Florida will host the sixth an nual Florida Down Syndrome Con ference at the U University of Central Florida on Feb. 24-25 at U UCFs Stu dent UUnion. Visit dsacf.org FEBB. 25 Habitat for Humanity of Winter ParkMaitland is holding its third annual nighttime fundraiser at the Winter Park Country Club on Saturday, Feb. 25. Tee-off time is 6 p.m. Contact Robbie Schultz at 407-462-8751 or robertschultz@nancialguide.com. FEBB. 26 WinterParkLostPets.com presents Cupcakes and Canines a fundraiser for Gold Coast Greyhound Adoptions of O Orlando, from 2 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 26 at The Flour Shop, northwest end of Kmart Shopping Plaza, U U.S. Highway 17-92 at Lee Road in Winter Park. Contact Judy@ winterparklostpets.com for details.   Dr. Jim Henry, Peter Lord and Dr. Tommy Vinson will be the featured speakers at First Baptist Winter Parks 40th M Mission Conference beginning Sunday, Feb. 26. Dr. Tommy Vinson, former senior pastor at Winter Park Baptist, will speak at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 26. Visit rstwinterpark.org. FEBB. 27 The AAnnual Shakespeare Compe tition for O Orange, Seminole and O Os ceola students in grades 9-12 spon sored by the E English-Speaking U Union of Central Florida will be held at The UUniversity Club of Winter Park at 4 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 27. At 1:15 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 27, there will be a physician-led educa tional seminar about post-shingles nerve pain, presented by Levi Zimmerman, M.D., at the JCC of Greater OOrlando, 851 N. Maitland Ave. Visit tinyurl.com/postshingle or call 1-800275-2767. The Big Red Bus will be holding a blood drive from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 27. The bus will be in the Bolick Clinic parking lot on Horatio Avenue and UU.S. Highway 17-92. FEBB. 28 John Crossman, president of Cross man & Company, will be a featured speaker at the Society for Marketing Professional Services (SMPS) Client RRoundtable Forum from 8 to 10 a.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 28, at Dubsdread Country Club in College Park. Cost to attend the Forum is $35 for SMPS members and $50 for non-members. Register at smpscentralorida.org. FEBB. 29 The Games Day Fundraiser for Winter Park Garden Club/UUCF E Endowed Scholarship Fund  will happen at 10 a.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 29, at the  Winter Park Garden Club, 1300 S. Denning Drive, in Winter Park. The cost is $20. Please pay by Feb. 24. Call 407-644-5770. At 7:45 a.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 29, there will be a presentation ti tled Economic Update B Breakfast : 2012 E Economic Climate & Business Management Trends presented in partnership with Rollins College at Rachel D. Murrah Civic Center, 1050 W. Morse Blvd., in Winter Park. Visit WinterPark.org MARMARCHH 1 Best-selling author Lisa See will mingle with guests and sign books at RReading B Between the W Wines presented by Bank of America starting at 6 p.m. on Thursday, March 1, at Doubletree by Hilton O Orlando Down town. Visit adultliteracyleague.org  or call 407-4221540. Hours: M-F 8am to 4:30pm 2315 Lee Road Winter Park, Florida 32789 Your Guiding Beacon for Quality Healthcare Harbour Private Duty Nursing, LLCSkilled Nursing Physical Therapy Occupational Therapy Companionship Home Health Aid Homemaking Flexible Schedules Free RN Assessments The Services of Harbour Private Duty Nursing provide peace of mind to loved ones, trust ofcers, guardians and physicians. Our professional team prides itself on making your life easier. We also provide in-hospital private duty care, which offers close, personal attention and reassurance in an unfamiliar and often frightening environment. Our ofce hours are Monday through Friday, 8:00 am to 4:30 pm. Our professional team is available 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. During hours when the ofce is closed and during the weekends and holidays, the on-call coordinator is available by telephone 24 hours per day.www.HarbourPrivateDutyNursing.com License # 299991382phone (407) 895-8188 fax 407-895-9339 Lack of Desire or Low Energy? George Carroll, M.D., has over 20 years ex perience in sexual medicine, and is actively involved in the following: 407-894-9959 Theyre magic beansTo sell something as valu able as the family livestock for a handful of beans would put any of us in either the nuthatch or poorhouse. But our friend Jack took the risk and then climbed his magic beanstalk to the gi ants realm. His adventures and rewards were worth the effort, resulting in riches and tales enduring to this day. If only our gardening adventures could be so fruitful, alas I am here to tell you they can be! The common edible vegetable, tagged taxonomically as Phaseolus vulgaris, has been cultivated by us humans, Homo sapiens, for thousands of years in both the old and new world. Coan early cruise to the Bahamas. growing beans, corn and squash as companion plants is called Three Sisters cropping. Vining pole beans have been a staple tinent. The recent development of the bush bean has motivated modern cultivation to reach an industrial scale. bean, we eat the immature seed along with the tender pods. This expedited harvest provides an earlier crop than letting the bean reach the shelling or dried stage. The varieties grown for green harvest are different from many other familiar storage types, such dening is the multiple harvests provided as beans continue to crop is hand picked. Green beans also come in yellow wax and The pole or vining types offer on the trellis and produce over a longer timeframe. To grow pole beans requires the construction of a suitable trellis of about 6-feettall that is able to withstand the vagaries of our erratic weather, especially wind. I created trellis rings of scrap fence 3 feet in diameter that are transportable and available for other climbing crops. Varieties of bush beans I have successfully grown include Provider, Contender, Top Crop and Blue Lake. Bush beans planted directly to garden soil and spaced about 4 to 6 inches apart produce Beans are leguminous, meaning they can produce their own with certain types of soil bacteria. Inoculating bacteria can be purchased to imbue this natural phenomenon to your gardening playbook. For a truly productive garden, we should follow Jacks example and plant the magical fruit. (You knew that was coming!)Tom Carey is the owner of Sundew Gardens, a you-pick gardening business in OOviedo. Visit the Sundew Gardens Facebook page. Tom Carey From my garden to yours Calendar BBach at Casa At noon Thursday, March 1, Casa Feliz hosts BBachs Lunch: The Three Sonatas for Viola da Gamba and HHarpsichord with the Bach Festival Society of Winter Park. Tick ets for the concert are $15. Reservations are required. Call 407-6462182.

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Page 7 Thursday, Feb. 23, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland OObserver Feb. 27 City Commission MMeeting topics of interest There will be a City Com mission meeting at 3:30 p.m. on Murrah Civic Center located at 1050 W. Morse Blvd. Below are a few topics of interest: MMayors RReport Presentation of checks from the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce to area schools from proceeds raised at the December 2011 pancake breakfast fundrais er. Sonya Baumstein, Winter Park High School graduate now with Team Epoch rowing team Presentation by Orange Coun ty School Board Member Joie Cadle regarding Brookshire El ementary City MManagers RReport 90-day plan NNon-action IItems parking recommendations Consent AAgenda 13. and contracts (a complete list can be found at cityofwinterpark.org > Government > City Commis es to the citys medical insurance programs to become effective Teladoc health care visits through phone or online video consulta tion; and health and dental in surance for domestic partners of employees. AA ction I I tems R R equiring Discussion One-way valet parking in downtown Selection of an architectural Station Public HHearings Second reading of the ordi nance establishing parking re strictions at electric charging sta tions. ter Park Venture LLC: First reading of the ordinance amending the comprehensive plan, future land-use map to change the designation of SingleFirst reading of the ordinance Conditional use approval to build a new two-story, 10-unit, residential condominium build ing at 434 and 444 W. Swoope First reading the ordinance annexing the property at 600 Lee state 4 contiguous to the property within the city of Winter Park at ter of Historic Places. First reading of the ordinance amending the historic preservation section of the Land Develop ment Code. First reading of the ordinance 11, Moratorium for Pain Manage ment Clinics. City Commission RReports Commissioner Leary Commissioner Sprinkel Commissioner Cooper Commissioner McMacken Mayor Bradley full agenda and information on cityofwinterpark.org and clicking on Government > City Commis sion > Packets. MM ead Garden B B otanical Garden public meetingPlease make plans to attend this public meeting at 10 a.m. on Saturday, March 3, at Mead Botanical Garden located at 1300 S. be taken at the proposed Lease Management and Operational Plans being presented to the City Commission on March 12 by the Mead Botanical Garden Inc. orgaThe meeting will also present the details of the proposed lease of a portion of the Mead Botani cal Garden property and the op erational agreement, which will transfer responsibility for some event and facility management from the city to the Mead Garden have the opportunity to view the proposed documents and cur rent plans of The Grove amphitheater, which will be under construction. Public input will be taken and presented to the City Commission as part of the Mead Botanical Garden, Inc. proposal during the March 12 City Com mission meeting. For more infor mation, please call 407-599-3277.St. Patricks Day ParadeThe city of Winter Park and the St. Patricks Day Parade com mittee are proud to present the 33rd annual Winter Park St. Pat ricks Day Parade at 2 p.m. on Sunday, March 4, in downtown Winter Park. Gather your family and friends and wear some green to enjoy the only St. Patricks Day parade in Central Florida. The pa rade will begin at the Winter Park Country Club and continue south will participate. The celebration will also feature Irish music and step dancing at the main stage in Central Park with demonstra tions by the Tir Na Greine School of Irish Dance and the Watters School of Irish Dance. Irish music will be provided by the Tommy Doyle Band. This is one event you wont want to miss! St. Patricks Day began as an annual feast day to celebrate St. Patrick, the most commonly recThe Irish have observed this day as a religious holiday for more than a thousand years and it is of many other ethnicities. The day is widely celebrated by wear ing green clothing and items such tradition, those who do not wear green on St. Patricks Day face the risk of being affectionately pinched. This celebration is made possible by the generous support of event sponsors including the city Green Irish Pub and Eatery, the of Central Florida and Florida Distributors Company. For more information regard ing the 33rd annual St. Patricks Day Parade, please call 407-222Visit the citys ofcial website at cityof winterpark.org, nd us on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter. www.gulfstatescu.org 407-831-8844A Refreshing Alternative to Conventional Banking.9405 S. Highway 17-92 Maitland, FL 32751 Maitland City Talk BY HHOWARdD ScCHIefeEFERdecDECKeER MAYOR OOpen for business The city of Maitland has histor ically enjoyed a solid tax base that has been strongly enhanced since Maitland Center, a nationally rec However, the unexpected economic downturn of recent years, along with costly tax reform measures enacted in Tallahassee, has been steadily eroding that solid tax base. Consequently, Mayor Schieferdecker initiated a process for the city of Maitland to take a hard self-examination of how it conducted business and whether or not we were competitive in the development and redevelopment marketplace, a market sector that was getting thinner and thinner as the economic downturn main tained its grasp on the nations economy. The frank answer after the re assessment was that there were many processes contained within our code where delays, repetition Most development processes in Maitland were more time consum ing (and therefore more expensive) than were those of many of our governmental neighbors and competitors. In good economic times, such a situation tended to be disguised by the rapid pace and aggressiveness of new devel opment activity. But when times much more ready to walk away from opportunities in Maitland if business climate in nearby jurisdictions. the city of Maitland completed a three-year overhaul of its growth management regulations. Th three main components consisted of the evaluation and appraisal report adopted in 2009, followed by revision of the Comprehensive Development Plan in 2010, and amendment of the land development regulations in 2011. development regulations is Chapter 7.5 Land Development Proce dures, containing the processes and procedures for obtaining de velopment approval. In an effort to streamline and update the land development procedures, modi procedures in Chapter 7.5. These effective review process, while maintaining the integrity of the code review process for the city. The city held numerous public meetings, including forums, work sessions and public hearings with the community development staff, the Planning and Zoning Commission and the Maitland City Council. These public meet ings provided an opportunity for participants to engage in an open dialogue with city representatives to discuss concerns and issues re garding the revisions and update of the city of Maitland land development procedures. In addition, a permit/procedure review group and a developer/user group were selected. They convened on sev eral occasions to review the pro cedures and provide additional insight to city staff on how to up grade and streamline the process. The combination of all this public and professional input provided the basis for many effective procedural code changes. Some of the overriding principles behind development of the revised procedures were to: make the processes simpler to use and understand; eliminate extraneous or overlapping steps; to the extent possible, move expensive committo a point in the approval process after conceptual approval is ob tained; allow options for abbrevi ated reviews for certain types of projects; and preserve the high standards for new development that the city has established over many years. the community development staff describing all of the new and re vised processes. In order to make the processes as transparent as possible, the manual also includes various procedures and options. ments were thoroughly vetted with the various ad hoc special review committees and stand lic comment and review, the new land development processes were adopted by the City Council on Oct. 24. ably proud of this accomplish ment. Local developers who have started to use it are impressed cost effectiveness. Consequently, Mayor Schieferdecker was asked to co-chair the Central Florida Partnerships Streamline Permit Group, which later was invited to the Central Florida Congress Work Groups new guidelines and recommendations were well received by the Central Florida Congress for their innovation and jurisdictions are now using those new guidelines and recommenda tions as a model to help them re vise their codes. Now that the economic malaise that has gripped all of us for several years is starting to ease off, Maitland stands ready to successfully compete in the marketplace for high-quality new development and redevelopment. This will pro tect and enhance the citys tax base and serve to help maintain our low tax rates for the future.Dick Wells, director, Community Development Department Council AAgenda of Feb. 27 City Council meets the sec ond and fourth Mondays of the month at 6:30 p.m. The next meet ing is scheduled for Feb. 27 in the Council Chambers, at 1776 Inde pendence Lane. Please check the citys web page at itsmymaitland. com for the complete agenda. Winter Park City Talk BY RRANdD Y KKNIgGHtT CITY MANAGER Maitland stands ready to successfully compete

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Page 8 Thursday, Feb. 23, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland OObserver Deloris (Dee) Burke Cocina 214 Coffee Counseling, Coaching & Consulting Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Fairwinds Credit Union Baldwin Park iLashWorks Kilwins Chocolates & Ice Cream PNC Wealth Management Ruth Rushing Sassafras Sweet Shoppe Shipyard Brew Pub The Doggie Door The Leary Group The Rawls Group Through the Looking Glass Beasley & Henley Interior Design Bosphorous Turkish Cuisine Eyes & Optics Frank A. Hamner, P.A. Great American Land Investment Co. Lamm & Company Partners Savannah Court & Savannah Cove Maitland Simmons Jewelers Ten Thousand Villages of Orlando The Wine Room on Park Avenue Threshold, Inc. Tolla's Italian Deli & Cafe UpTown Dog Workforce Central Florida Christian Science Reading Room CNLBank Fiddler's Green Irish Pub & Eatery Shoooz On Park Avenue Winter Park Garden Club Bebe's Classic Creations Catering St. Margaret Mary Catholic Church Winter Park Day Nursery, Inc. Winter Park Towers Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens Morse Museum of American Art The Keewin Real Property Company Walt Disney World Resort The Volvo Store Scearce, Satcher & Jung, P.A. Hubbard Construction Co. Lewis-Cobb Pest Control Miller's Hardware, Inc. Wayne Densch, Inc. Winter Park Land Company Denotes Park Avenue Area Association membership H a n n i b a l S q u a r e W i n e T a s t i n g T h e F i n e A r t o f W i n e T h u r s d a y M a r c h 1 5 5:30 8:00 p.m. West New England Avenue F e a t u r i n g T i c k e t s & I n f o MMardi Gras mania A tale of ducks PhHOtTOsS byBY ANdD Y ceCEBAllLLOsS thTHE ObsBSErvRVErR The Great Duck Derby featured rubber duck races and free family activities on Saturday at Mead Garden pond. PhHOtTOsS byBY IsSAAcC BABcCOcCK thTHE ObsBSErvRVErR MMiddle schoolers hit the oor at the Maitland Public Librarys second annual Mardi Gras dance party on Feb. 18.

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Page 9 Thursday, Feb. 23, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Lifestyles The latest innovative technolo gies and building products now have a Winter Park address. The National Association of Homebuilders International Shows New American Home for 2012, located at 229 Alexander Place, Winter Park, features a wide array of new technology designed to cater to comfort and serenity. This years architect and builder was Phil Kean of Phil Kean De signs Inc. based in Winter Park. Kean said one of his goals for the home was to conserve space. We did smart, small, Kean said. There are not a lot of hall ways in the house. He said the purpose of his de sign is to optimize the use of space in the home. The house is cur rently set up with two bedrooms, bedrooms if some rooms, like the workout room, are converted, Kean said. There is also a studio space that is set up with its own independent air conditioning sys tem. We sort of set it up so that if you were an artist or something, youd have a separate space to keep all the odors that you might [create] by painting, or doing any kind of crafts , he said. In keeping with space conser vation, equipment such as cable boxes and a Blu-ray player are kept in a separate room of the house. ZIO Group of Winter Park provided the technology in the home. Peter Shipp, principal with ZIO, said very little equipment is seen throughout the home. All of those sources are cen trally located in the mechanical room so theres no equipment throughout the house other than TVs, your remote and then builtin speakers, Shipp said. You dont see a lot of the tech nology in the house, but its there when you want to access it. There are seven televisions: television and one projection sys tem. Music lovers can enjoy their fa vorite tunes via three iPad control stations mounted on the walls, which can tune in to a range of music stations, such as Sirius XM Satellite Radio or Pandora. There crophone, which allows its music to be played throughout the entire house. To keep the house clean, the home has its own central vacuum inside a three-car garage, with inlets located throughout the house that suck up dust, dirt and small items when the vacuum is on. There are also outlets where someone can plug in a hose for more heavy-duty cleaning. An alarm system also comes with the house that can be armed or disarmed remotely. Rob Turner, interior designer for the project and principal of in terior design for PKD studio, said the vision for the house was to create a throwback feel. The house is an interpreta tion of classic modern architec ture, Turner said. It was more of a throwback and interpretive of modern design from the 50s and the 60s. One example of this is a chair signed by Eero Saarinen, a Finn ish architect who designed the TWA terminal at New Yorks John F. Kennedy International Airport. Turner also added his own per sonal touch by designing some of the items in the home, such as cocktail and dining tables, in conjunction with Robin Wade, a fur niture maker in Alabama. The home is also environmen tally friendly, which Turner says can be viewed as a design chal lenge to some. A lot of designers are intimi dated by that because they think in reality, when you design your own pieces and work with lo cal craftsmen and with people in your community, you actually have complete design freedom because you can make it however you want to, Turner said. Kean, who owns the home, es timates its market value to be $2.5 million. He is not planning to sell the home for at least two years, and will use it as his model home to showcase to potential clients. He said the home is designed with an individual in mind who wants to enjoy the suburban lifestyle. Its not a big family home. in this house, Kean said. But grown and they come and visit. Offer valid at the UCF Arena Box Ofce, by calling 800-745-3000 or online at Ticketmaster.comOffer Valid Thru 3/3/12. Only valid on $31 and $21 price levels. Minimum purchase of 3 tickets. Additional Fees may apply. Subject to availability. No double discounts. Sun., Mar. 4 2:00pm Special Family Value Pack! SAVE up to $7 on Tickets! Use promo code FAMILY Special Family Value Pack!SAVEup to $7 on Tickets! Use promo code FAMILY PHotoOTOS BY ANDY CEBAllLLOS tTHE oOBSERVER Phil Kean of Phil Kean DDesigns Inc. based in Winter Park shows off the New American HHome, located off Alexander Place in Winter Park. Kean says it will be used as his model home. CComfort, serenity focus of NNew home AANDY CCEBAllLLOS Observer SStaff The NNew AAmerican Home carries a series of green certications, such as the Florida Water SStar Gold certication, and the NNational Green BBuilding SStandard EEmerald certication, which is the highest of the four levels of achievement a home can attain. Learn more

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Page 10 Thursday, Feb. 23, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer FamilyCalendar Brownie Troop 2091 kicked off the new year by creating calendars that featured each girl dressed to represent a month of the year. For the girls, it was a fun activity and a chance to dress up and have their picture taken. For of the importance of 2012. Girl Scouts of the USA celebrates its 100th birthday in March. Founder Juliette Daisy adult volunteer members in all 50 states and Puerto Rico. I think Juliette would be incredibly proud led her daughters troop for four years. A girl can join a Daisy scout troop beginning in kindergarten. From there, she can continue dettes and Seniors, who are high school age. The 13 third-grade girls in troop 2091 at eton elementary schools, and Blankner and 2012 to highlight the anniversary, including ter, and a trip to the birthplace of the founder in October. But, in February, the girls are focused on cookies! Girl Scouts are probably best known for their cookies, especially the best-selling Thin Mints. Almost as old as the organization, the ties began as early as 1917. Yeilding said her daughters troop has sold more than 1,000 boxes in the past. She is excit ed, she said, that this year the troop will have a cookie booth at the Baldwin Park Publix, where they will have the opportunity to sell even more. were both Girl Scouts. They grew up in differ ent parts of the state but met in college. the Gold Award, an achievement equivalent to the Boy Scout Eagle Scout Award. Johnson, who is from South Florida, recent co-leader last year. I wanted to volunteer for something, Johnson said. It was their shared experience in scouting a Girl Scout, always a Girl Scout! I always tell my girls they will forever be sisters in scouting. The thing I love about scouting is that it is ing to play soccer. Its not just taking a quilting class its all of that. Its the whole girl. Diversity is what makes our troop so spe cial. They arent just campers, cookie sellers, athletes, musicians, artists or academics. They are Girl Scouts! So, if Juliette was participating in our friendship circle at meetings end, I believe she would scan each unique and beauti ful face and give a great big Brownie smile! Its TAX time. Appointments Available 7 Days a Week!Tax Form Processing LLC2400 N Forsyth Rd., Suite 101 Orlando, FL 32807Tel: (407) 657-6336www.TaxFormProcessing.com Proudly Serving the Orlando Area for 17 years! Scan QR Code Look for BBrownie Troop 2091 in front of the BBaldwin Park Publix from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. on SSaturday, Feb. 25. To learn more about Girl SScout of CCitrus anniversary activities, visit www. citrus-gs.org Learn moreThe Girl Scouts next door PHotoOTO BY iISAAC BABCOCkK tTHE oOBSERVER BBaldwin Park Publix manager Jordan Klarfeld, from left, poses with troop leader E Elizabeth Chick, and her daughter, S Saman tha; and cookie mom Mary Y Y eilding, with her daughter, Anne. The girls are selling cookies outside the store this month. Organization celebrates its 100th birthday on March 12 ShSHARiI KiINgG Observer SStaff The thing I love about scouting is that it is diverse. troop leader Elizabeth Chick Winn-Dixie will have an OOpen House C Celebration event from 5:30 to 7 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 23, at 7800 S S. H Highway 17-92, Unit 160, in Fern Park. Come and enjoy the stores new features and sample delicious cuisine. Please join the Maitland Public Li brary at 2 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 28. LCCCC S Social N Networking for seniors is offering a workshop on Y Y ouTube. Program is free but you must register. BBooks to D Die For! Mystery B Book C Club will also meet here at this time to discuss Carl H Hiaasens book, SStar Island. Call 407647-7700. IHHOP restaurants nationwide will offer each guest a free short stack of its famous buttermilk pancakes on National Pancake Day to raise funds for Childrens Miracle Network H Hospitals from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 28. V Visit ihoppancakeday.com Admission to the Maitland A Art CCenter is free from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. every S Sunday in February. It is located at 231 W. Packwood Ave. in Maitland. E Experience the beauty and wonder of this artist colony that was established in 1937 and see the work of painter and printmaker Molly Chism. Call 407-539-2181. AArtsFest is Feb. 1-29. All events are free and open to the public, although some offerings have limited seating and capacity. V Visit ArtsFestFL.com for more informa tion. EEnjoy  a free movie and popcorn on the lawn at 7 p.m. on S Satur day, March 3, as Orangewood Church and S School in Maitland invite the community for Puss in B Boots.  Admission is free. The event will be at Orangewood Field, 1300 W. Maitland B Blvd. V Visit  or angewoodmovienight.com. The fth annual Junior League of Greater Orlandos Kids in the Kitchen Fit-n-Fun Fest will fea ture more than 40 exhibitors, free giveaways and much more. The free event will take place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on S Saturday, March 3, in Central Park in Winter Park.  The 33rd annual Winter Park S St. Patricks D Day Parade is at 2 p.m. on S Sunday, March 4, in downtown Winter Park. For more information regarding the 33rd annual S St. Pat ricks Day Parade, call 407-2220645 or visit cityofwinterpark.org. EEach Tuesday at 10:30 a.m. the Maitland Public Library hosts preschool story and craft time. E Each Thursday at 10:30 a.m. it hosts baby time stories and activity. EEach Thursday at 4 p.m., it hosts RReading B Buddies. Any kindergar ten through fth-graders who want to enhance their reading skills are welcome to attend. No registration necessary. Call 407647-7700. SSend submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com

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Page 11 Thursday, Feb. 23, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer There is a princess and an evil derellas stepmother look like a caregiver), but this adult fairytale comes to us from Shakespeare beline  features one of Shake speare's most resourceful female line, secretly marries the worthy Posthumous. When the King discovers the secret marriage, he banishes Posthumous, and Imo gen sets off in search of him. The journey to the couple's reunion is an adventure populated with and sleeping potions. Directed by Artistic Director Jim Hels in repertory with Romeo and   Orlando Shakespeare Theater   oshakes.org Lyle the CCrocodile Based on the classic childrens by Bernard Waber, Orlando Rep children through March 25. When the Primm family moves into their new apartment, they hear a swish, swash and a splash only to discover a crocodile in their bathtub. But this crocodile has impeccable manners, dance moves and loves caviar. He charms every one, except for their neighbor, Mr. Grumps. The play teaches valuable lessons about not judging others by their appearance, but loving people (and crocodiles) for who they are. Wabers stories are generally deeper and wordier than a typical picture book, Di and parents have kept these sto ries relevant and popular because of the good-heartedness and fun tolerance. The Orlando Reper tory Theatre is a professional Park, and serves as the Univer Theatre for Young Audiences 7365 or visit orlandorep.comHedda GablerThe play Hedda Gabler was   wegian  playwright  Henrik Ibsen. Dealing with the unheard-of issue of womens liberation, the play was negatively reviewed at its premiere, but has over the past 100 years attained its rightful place as a classic of  world drama. Some consider the character of Hedda, one of the great dramatic roles in  theatre, the female  Hamlet, and like all great drama, the character can be portrayed in a number of ways. Whether you see her as an idealistic  heroine, a victim of her time, an early  feminist or a  manipula tive  villain, Hedda Gabler  is at 25. Ibsen's theatrical masterpiece married Hedda bound by the duties of marriage and the limits of by Eric Zivot, Melanie Whipple   Theatre at 105 S. Magnolia Ave.   com  NNew Morse Museum exhibits More than 30 watercolors Watercolors by Otto Heinigke A Glass Artists Palette as the Morse Museum of American Art opens two new exhibits.  At the 1915, Heinigke and his Brook  windows for institutions includ exhibit demonstrate a passion for detail no doubt inherited from his father, a German miniaturist who immigrated to the United States. The exhibition will be on view through Feb. 3, 2013. The second, and related, exhibit includes 20 paintings from the museums permanent collection drawn from the same time period including works by James Henry paintings present American life War and World War I, a period when the industrial revolution brought seismic changes to the lives of most Americans. The Ave. in Winter Park. Visit morse Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. HHe is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906. w w w R e n t F r o m B r i o c o m We have renovated rental homes in excellent condition. Two to four bedroom homes in the Winter Park Area. Check our website for upcoming availability, pictures and oor plans. Call (407) 405-3367 for an appointment.www.RentFromBrio.comCall Lee Nimkoff, CCIM, CPM (407) 405-33671870 Aloma Avenue, Suite 120, Winter Park, FL 32789 HOW TO PARTICIPATE Please read through this entire packet carefully. It contains everything you need to know about participating in the sale. When all of your items are properly tagged, please bring them along with your completed inventory sheet(s) to the Family Life Center during the designated drop off times. If you would like to donate your items, please bring your items to the Hannahs Closet Staff during the same designated drop off times. If you have any questions please contact us: C a ll Betsy Ryan 407 923 0566 or e mail us at hannahscloset@fumcwp.org WHATS IN THE SALE We will be accepting ANY SEASON infant and childrens c lothing up to size 14 (in good condition) baby equipment (high chairs, strollers, car seats, booster seats, play pens, baby monitors, etc.) furniture (cribs, dressers, changing tables, youth beds, desks, rocking chairs, table and chair sets, bookshelves) and toys (all toys, bikes, big wheels, kitchen play sets, riding toys, books, videos, etc. no stuffed animals ). Due to the limited space, we will not be accepting maternity clothes. Sale items must be in VERY GOOD CONDITION Think about what you would like to find at the sale yourself! I f you are unsure about an item, please bring it during the designated drop off times and we will be happy to help you. Some guidelines to help make the sale successful: Clothing must be clean and pressed ( no stains ) Clothing must be without holes, missing buttons, snaps or broken zippers Shoes must be clean and in good condition p lease use zip ties to keep pairs together Toys that require batteries must be operational (i.e. install fresh batteries) and all loose parts must be firmly attached to the toy (using strapping tape, string, Ziploc bags, etc.) Games must include all pieces Equipment must be clean, in good repair and without missing parts We reserve the right to refuse to display items improperly hung, tagged, or in poor condition DESIGNATED DROPOFF AND PICK UP TIMES Collection will begin Monday, March 2 and end Wednesday, March 4. Merchandise will NOT be accepted after Wednesday. There will be NO exceptions. Items may be brought to the Family Life Center located on Morse Blvd Monday Wednesday from 9:00 a.m. 12:00 p.m. and Wednesday evening from 6:00 p.m. 9:00 p.m. Please park in the parking lot or on the street during the day; we cannot block the preschool carpool lane. We will do our best to be outside to assist you. You will be responsible for any necessary assembly (i.e. cribs). Assembly must be complete by 9:00 p.m. Wednesday, March 4 All items, including furniture, that do not sell must be picked up between 2:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. on Saturday, March 7. ALL ITEMS NOT PICKED UP BY 3:00 P.M. WILL BE DONATED TO CHARITY No exceptions. SUPPLIES NEEDED TO TAG ITEMS Heavy card stock 3X5 (white, yellow, pink) construction paper tags will NOT be accepted coloring on the tags with markers, highlighters, or crayons (to make them pink or yellow) will NOT be accepted either safety pins (not the tiny gold pins please) Straight pins will NOT be accepted string and/or zip ties to hold items together strong tape packing tape works best just be sure not to tape over your information Ziploc bags 200 9 Hannahs Closet Packet est. 1997 Childrens Clothing, Toy s & Equipment Sale First United Methodist Church; 125 N. Interlachen Ave; Winter Park ***Family Life Center (Gymnasium)*** Friday, March 6 ~ 8:30 am 2:30 pm and 6:00 8:00 pm Saturday, March 7 ~ 8:00 am 12:00 pm Presale f or consignors, Thursday, Marc h 5 ~ 7:00 9:00 p m Hannahs Closet2012 Childrens Consignment SaleFriday, March 2: 8:30 a.m. 1:30 p.m. 6:00 p.m. 8:00 p.m. Saturday, March 3: 8:30 a.m. 12 p.m. Circle missions, focusing on women & children.First United Methodist Church of Winter Park 125 N. Interlachen Ave. Matthias Family Life Center (Gymnasium) Visitwww.fumcwp.org/hannahsclosetor email hannahscloset@Fumcwp.org for more information. High quality toys, clothes and furniture! This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH O RLANDO A VE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.E NZIAN.ORG SHAME Fri and Sat 3:45, 6:30, 9:15 Sun 2:30, 5:00 Mon, Wed, Thurs 6:30, 9:15 Tues 6:30 only BACH & FRIENDS Fri 12:30 FULL METAL ALCHEMIST: THE SACRED STAR OF MILOS Sat 12 Midnight Academy Awards Viewing Party Sun 7:00 FREE Cult Classics COFFY Tues 9:30 Wednesday Night Pitcher Show: Bad Movie Night GLITTER 8:00 FREE Josh Garrick Culture worthy of your calendar SShakespeares CCymbeline Lyle

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Page 12 Thursday, Feb. 23, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer OOpinions Schools announced its 2013 teacher of the year, lawmakers at the state level were working on slashing the higher education budget, introducing a school prayer bill and voting on a set of bills that would pit teachers and parents against each other. Bill 1191, called the Parent Empowerment Act, would give Parental Involvement and Accountability in the Public Schools Bill, lets teachers grade parents for their involvement. Both of those bills would in effect allow parents and teachers, formerly allied in PTA programs, to tattle on each other to higher authorities rather than to communicate openly. Rather than fostering an environment of cooperation, it would put parents and teachers in opposing camps blaming each other for failing students. As further diversion from solving the education problems now making its way through the house, would legalize inspirational messages at school events including, but not limited to, graduation ceremonies. Funny thing about the term inspirational messages: they already exist at graduation ceremo nies. Theyre called commence ment addresses. They happen every year at every high school in the country. So why would the state Senate, and now the House, spend more than six months working on a bill to legalize something thats already legal? A quick glance at the origi August, shows its original intent, legalizing organized prayer at public school events about waiting to happen as a bill can get. In the past four months that bills language has been watered down from allowing the formerly dubbed prayers of invocation and benediction (terms tied aland rechristens them as inspirational messages. If the bill passes as written, it still has the potential for causing a lawsuit for any school board that chooses to exercise its new would by law still be required to keep their hands off the organiza tion of any prayer service. But if the school board were to lose a lawsuit against a student, the board would have to pay the legal fees. Thats something few could afford these days, especially with loss in per-student funding in the last four years, according Policy Priorities. Gov. Rick Scotts proposed budget would add just $59 per student, though Senate and House versions would offer more. If those students manage to graduate and hear their more religiously themed commencement address, theyll be greeted by a higher education system thats been stripped even further of state funding. Even as college students are graduating with record levels of leges in the nation for graduating debt-riddled students are in the is mulling cuts to higher education of more than 20 percent. So lets cheer our teacher of ner, but lets not forget that while theyre winning in the classroom, battle at the state level. We need more focus on educating students and rewarding good teachers, not putting the education system on a permanent starvation diet while giving parents and teachers a venue to scapegoat each other. Our Observation RRe: Louis RRoneys Feb. 16 column Valentine thoughtsAbsolutely beautiful! Happy and blessed Valentines Day to you two! Hugs.Fonda McGowanYou are both jewels. Carol SSaviak You outdid yourself on this one. I sit here with tears in my eyes, knowing that all you write about your relationship with Joy is true, giving thanks for my own marriage and praying that Konrad and I will have the good fortune to grow old together. You are a brilliant man, but it is always your heart that shines most. With love,Pamela FilutowskiThis is so beautiful! Happy Valentine's Day! xoxoMary Palmer You have spread love and happiness far and wide. I hope it all comes back to you tenfold today! BBonnie  Trisman Happy Valentines Day to a wonderful love.Carolyn CooperHeart hormone helps shape fat metabolismIts well-known that exercising reduces body weight because it draws on fat stores that muscle can burn as fuel. But a new study at Sanford-Burnham Medi cal Research Institute (Sanford-Burnham) suggests that the heart also plays a role in breaking down fat. In their study, published Feb. 6 in the hormones released by the heart stimulate fat cell metabolism. These hormones turn on a molecular mechanism similar to whats activated when the body is exposed to cold and burns fat to generate heat. This study adds another dimension to our understanding of how the body regulates fat tissue and may someday lead to new ways of manipulating the process with drugs to reduce weight in obese patients, or maintain it in individuals who experience pathological weight loss dur ing chronic heart failure. Exercise is always going to raise your blood pressure some, so theres the potential that these heart hormones called cardiac natriuretic peptides are being released and contributing to the break in Orlando, and senior author of the study. Over a period of time, natriuretic peptides could also be leading to an increase in the numbers of brown fat cells, which we know are very important for protection against diet-induced obesity, at least in laboratory experiments. Brown fat cells, unlike white fat cells typically associated with body fat, not only store fat but also readily convert calo ries into energy a process that malfunctions in obesity. found that the metabolic effects caused by natriuretic peptides depend largely on the ratio of two different kinds of receptors message-receiving proteins on the surface of fat cells. One, called NPRA, is a signaling receptor and its presence helps boost brown fat cells and burn white fat. receptor and seems to prevent natriuretic peptides from activating NPRA, result ing in a greater accumulation of white fat cells. When exposed to cold in this study, mice had elevated amounts of natriuretic peptides in their circulatory system. They also showed increased levels of the NPRA clearance receptor, on fat cells. As a result, fatty acids were mobilized and the calorie-burning brown fat machinery was activated in these mice. Exactly what alters the levels of the different types of recep tors is still unknown. In the next phases of our work, we hope to not only more tightly link the physiology and genetics, but also under stand how these receptors are regulated, A progressive understanding of what therefore how natriuretic peptides control white fat cell mass, could lead to new therapeutic targets to manage obesity and metabolic disease. For example, blocking agents that favor binding NPRA, could help obese patients lose weight. More information about how this system works could also give hope to patients suffering from cardiac cachexia, a severe body wasting that can occur in chronic heart failure. High levels of natriuretic peptides are characteristic of heart failure and are used as diagnostic markers of the severity of the disease. One hypothesis is that the high levels of circulating natri uretic peptides seen in cardiac cachexia patients may be leading to abnormally high levels of brown fat production, ener gy expenditure and therefore weight loss. In these patients, suppressing the produc tion of the peptides might slow or halt this test this hypothesis in the lab. HHeather BBuschman, Ph.D. SSanford-BBurnham Medical RResearch Institute Letters to the editor SSend your thoughts (400 words or less) to Managing EEditor Jenny Andreasson at editor@observernewspapers.com SStarvation and the blame game We need more focus on educating students and rewarding good teachers. King Features Weekly ServiceFebruary 20, 2012 King Features Weekly ServiceFebruary 20, 2012

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Page 13 Thursday, Feb. 23, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Chris Jepson Perspectives The original BBurger BBoy Hero around my cornerIm downsizing. Yes, my size. Im the original Burger Boy. I could, anytime, slide into a Steak 'n Shake and order up a double steakburger with cheese, fries and a large chocolate shake. less. Or be driving by a McDonalds before 10:30 a.m. and coast through for a tasty tasty. McDonalds still has the best fries. How about a steak from The Outback? Dont need no stinkin Bloomin Onion, just a steak and the vegetable medley. Again, a hunk of bouff properly sea soned and prepared makes me salivate just thinking about it, still sizzling and smelling like meat ought to a T-bone perhaps, where you eagerly gnaw the remaining bits of meat off the bone. Suhweeeeet. Marbled with just the perfect amount of fat. Fat so tasty-scrumptious you willingly, brazenly devour rather than trimming and setting aside. I like pot roasts, pork roasts, barbeque beef, hamburgers, a beef brisket, beef for stew, stir-fry beef or a beef kabob. Id eagerly dine, too, on roasted chicken or pork chops. In my 20s, I ravished 20-ounce steaks like they were Hershey Almond Bars. And ask, Whats next? I dont require that amount of beef today. A Once-upon-a-time. Yes, once-upona-time I ate meat. Oh, did I mention ice cream? Publix has the best chocolate is. I grew up eating vast amounts of ice cream, by the half-gallon. Spoonful after delicious spoonful. I could consume a half-gallon watching Saturday morning cartoons. Easily. Before 11 a.m. As an adult, I quit having it in the house. I can, as they say, resist anything but temptation. When I do (have hours. I told my children that theres no good reason for not having ice cream for breakfast. I know! I know! Save the letters accusing me of child abuse. But trust me, every day. Pace yourself, fer gawds sake! Many of the foods that taste really, re ally good are, it turns out, not so good for you. Surprise of surprises, I have elevated cholesterol. I took a statin for several years but developed a statin side effect of excruciating leg cramps. My doctor got in my face in December about my course of treatment, and I said I am not looking to meds as the answer. vegan. Not a vegetarian, but a vegan. I dropped all meat and dairy cold turkey. Not one bite. Ive lost 12 pounds. Some times I go to bed hungry. I eat grains, veg twice. I have approximately 50 days to go before I retest my blood for the various cholesterol levels. My family and friends are somewhat bemused by my diet. Its just a test I tell them. If a vegan diet does not appreciably improve my cholesterol numbers, I may resume my old ways. Not true. I have become much more conscious of my diet. All I want is another healthy 20 years. Oh, and a steak and a malt and a cheeseburger and a And I didnt even mention bacon. Want proof of God? Mmmm Bacon. Jepson is a 24-year resident of Florida. HHes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. RReach him at Jepson@MEEDIAmerica.USS in a wonderful deli around the corner on Sixth Avenue. There I met the deli owner, Arno Hel ler, and we became very friendly neighbors. He and his wife, Ruth, heard me sing knew my profession. Arno and I, now both 91, were volunteers in World War II, but it was only recently that I learned that Arno was a true hero of the red, white and blue. I was just a Navy guy on a ship, but Arno was a one-man army! Any enemy of America who saw Arno coming would have been wise to take it on the lam. Just weeks ago Arno was given the Bronze Star Medal for heroism only some 70 years later than he should have received it. Arno was born in Hamburg, Germany and came to the U.S. as a lucky refugee in 1939. He volunteered for the U.S. Army that year after an FBI check to be sure he was not a spy. He received his basic Army training in Georgia and was then sent to North Africa. Arno says, When youre 21, and youve never been in combat, you think nothing will harm you because youve seen too many John Wayne movies. Be lieve me, nothing will shock you as much You realize this is real and can happen to you. I also was in the invasion of Sicily in for us, it was a piece of cake, even though we took a lot of casualties. In November, we were sent to England, where we trained hard for the invasion of France. The way we realized we were in a deadly war was the nightly blackouts and the overhead drone of the RAF bombers headed for their targets in Germany. In the daytime, we watched our own B17s keeping up the continuous Ger man destruction. Everyone was preparing for the invasion. A few days before D-Day, all leaves were canceled and we were consomething big was on the way. ampton, a southern British port. We kept our clothes on at all times, prepared to leave on a moments notice. On June 5, we suddenly heard and felt the ground vibration of the Nor mandy Invasion some 90 miles away. When our number was called a few hours later, we loaded on trucks, and rode to the ships, which were waiting to take us to the coast of Normandy In peacetime, I have since seen most of the places where Arno fought, and can only imagine the mayhem that went on there during the war. which is another story my story which has no place here. Arno is one of the friendliest guys youd ever want to meet. But I wouldnt want to meet him as an enemy with a gun in his hand. Arno and Ruth are spending their re tirement in Rego Park, Queens, N.Y., and About RRoney: HHarvardDistinguished Prof, EEm.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy RRoney) Louis RRoney Play On! Heres what wpmobserver.com readers are writing about the Feb. 16 article Teacher up for top honor, about DD ommerich EE lementary kindergarten teacher Lisa RR otenberger being nominated for OO range CC ounty Teacher of the YY ear. RR otenberger did not capture the top honor at Tuesdays ceremony but that didnt quell the praises on our site. THAt T ARt T ICLE CAPt T URES LLISA'S SPIRIt T! SSHE'S A GREAt T REPRESENt T At T IVE FOR OUR SCHOOL AND OCPSOCPS KAREN CCASt T OR DDENt T EL GGOOD LUCk K tT O LLISA, SHE IS A GREAt T tT EACHER AND A WONDERFUL PERSON. MY DAUGHt T ER USED tT O BABYSIt T FOR HER AND SHE IS A GREAt T mM Om M, tT OO. D DAWN HHALLIBURt T ON DDUNHAm M CCONGRAt T ULAt T IONS, LLISA! IItT WAS A JOY AND PRIVILEGE tT O WIt T NESS YOU IN ACt T ION AND tT O LEARN FROm M YOU DURING mM Y tT Im M E At T DDOmm MM ERICH. DDOmm MM ERICH IS tT HE RICHER FOR HAVING YOU tT HERE. JJOANNE TAYLOR LLISA, II 'mM SO GLAD YOU ARE BEING RECOGNIZED AND HONORED FOR BEING tT HE WONDERFUL tT EACHER YOU ARE. WWHAt T AN HONOR FOR DDOmm MM ERICH EELEm M ENt T ARY, tT OO. KAREN JJOWERS HHOWARD II Am M INSPIRED JUSt T READING ABOUt T tT HIS tT EACHER! WWHAt T A WONDERFUL St T ORY! THANk K S FOR SHARING tT HE ARt T ICLE ABOUt T HER, SSUSIE! RREBEk K AH RRICHEY LLISA, II 'mM SO GRAt T EFUL tT O HAVE HAD tT HE CHANCE tT O HEAR OF YOUR HEARt T FOR tT EACHING DURING OUR SOCCER CARPOOL RIDES. II kK NOW tT EACHING CHILDREN IS YOUR PASSION AND tT HE CHILDREN At T DDOmm MM ERICH AS WELL AS OUR COmm MM UNIt T Y REAP tT HE BENEFIt T S! JJULIE SStT ANAk K IS THE ARt T ICLE CAPt T URES tT HE ESSENCE OF LLISA'S PASSION AS AN EDUCAt T OR! CCONGRAt T ULAt T IONS ON A VERY mM UCH-DESERVED HONOR. II Am M FULL OF GRAt T It T UDE tT HAt T YOU ARE mM Y SISt T ER. SSALLY TERRELL AANDERSEN

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Page 14 Thursday, Feb. 23, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer FREEComplete Door Maintenance with any Service 407-780-1691 Orlando, FL Call now to diversify your advertising. 866.742.1373 www.Florida-Classifieds.com

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FEATURING THE BACH FESTIVAL CHOIR AND ORCHESTRA AND BACH SCHOLAR DR. CHRISTOPH WOLFF WED LIKE TO GIVE SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR 77TH ANNUAL FESTIVAL SPONSORS: JOHN V. SINCLAIR ARTISTIC DIRECTOR AND CONDUCTOR



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407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC USPS 00-6186 Publisher statement on page 4. Thursday, Feb. 23, 2012 50+ tax wpmobserver.com Subscribe now! Visit wpmobserver.com Winter Parks roads may have gotten a little greener, thanks to a quiet move by the City Com mission on Feb. 13 that will make electric car charging stations free Were taking a leadership position on this, Commissioner Steven Leary said about the citys newest green program, which joins sustainable living programs and health programs the city al ready is pushing. Were trying to do things healthier in a lot of ways. On Jan. 10 the city unveiled six new charging stations throughout the city that will add to the about 300 electric charging stations already spread out throughout Central Florida. The difference with Winter Parks program, at least initially, is that it will con tinue to be free to use. Its an important experi ment, Mayor Ken Bradley said about the program. I think it en courages people to at least con sider buying an electric car. The rationale for the free pro gram, electric utility director Jerry Warren said, is that, aside from free charges enticing elec tric car buyers, the cost to set up a pay system for the charging sta tions would cost more than sim ply giving away free electricity. The city would only spend a few dollars per month at the current rate, he said. unveiled in January, the stations were already in use since late November, topping off batter ies at the Public Safety Building, Central Park, the public park City Hall parking lot, Hannibal lea Lane Tennis Center. With totals from Decem ber and January already in the books, city staff discovered that the stations had only charged cars 31 times so far, with an av erage use of 2.9 kilowatt hours. Thats about half the average charge consumption reported by cates where charging is available and tracks electric car use. The 10 charges that occurred in December averaged 3.5 kilo watt hours per charge. In January the number more than doubled to 21 charges, but the kilowatt hours per charge dropped to 2.7 per charge. need about 50 percent more users beyond the projected 50 charges per month before it would break even on the program. The city may reconsider charging drivers to top off their batteries in the future, at a rate of 12 cents per kilowatt hour, according to Warrens estimate. That would cost the average user of the system only 35 cents per charge. Until more drivers are enticed into buying electric cars, Bradley said that he thinks its worth giv ing away. If everybody was driving an electric car, Im sure we wouldnt be giving it away for free any more, Bradley said. But its kind of like a new business in town; maybe they give a few cookies away at the start. Louis Roney, I have tears in my eyes, knowing that all you write about your relationship with Joy is true. Page 12 Letters to the editor From the Corner Table Restaurant critic Josh Garricks writes, You have to nd The Silly Grape, but the point is, its worth nding. Page 3 Lifestyles The New American Home for 2012, located in Winter Park, was designed and furnished by Winter Park rms. Page 9 Calendar Casa Feliz will host Bachs Lunch with the Bach Festival Society of Winter Park on Thursday, March 1. Page 6 TAX DEFERREDFIXED ANNUITY RATE FOR 5 YEARS.Bob Adams 407-644-6646THE NATIONAL 5 YEAR CD RATE IS 1.34%3.35% 451 Maitland Ave, Altamonte Springs, FL 32701NEW Dermatology Ofce!407-599-SKIN (7546)*Waive co-payment up to $25 No referral needed Accepting all insurances Dr. John Cottam Dr. Ross Wheeler PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER The six electric car charging stations are free to use because it would cost Winter Park more money to require a usage fee. Electric drivers top off for free ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff City honors humanitarian PHOTO COURTESY OF CITY OF WINTER P ARK Winter Park city commissioners and ofcials dedicated the amphitheater of the new Winter Park Community Center in honor of Ruby Ball on Monday. Ruby Mae Roberts Ball was a longtime Winter Park resident, mother of six, educator and humanitarian. The event included the unveiling of an engraved plaque, above, honoring her many life accomplishments.

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Page 2 Thursday, Feb. 23, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Schwinn Cruiser, resident William Schall cross regularly rides the citys streets and trails, jotting notes in his head on their ac cessibility, safety and ease of usage, which he then relays to city, county and school of In October, the roads led him to Winter Park High School, where his daughter is a student. Displeased with what he witnessed in drop-off and pick-up protocol and pe destrian safety, Shallcross set his sights on improving the process. I want to make the streets, especially those by our schools, safer, he said. and others safety concerns, one of the high schools four gated entrances, located on Bellewood Drive and the primary entrance for school buses, was closed to pedestrian students to share an entrance with bus traf Instead of viewing this as a small vic one problem, but made the rest worse. Boulevard and Greene Drive, and, he said, students into campus. But WPHS administrators, school board said that given the schools residentiallocked location, they do the best they can neighboring residents. Were surrounded by residential areas so we only have so many access points and Winter Park High School Principal Tim Smith said. Were always doing all that we can to ensure student safety. Road rules Board, said the city has done all it can to help WPHS, as well as all other Winter Park schools, to be as safely accessible as possi When you have a school and its morn ing drop-off time, theres 15 to 20 minutes where theres a lot of people and it can get to eliminate that we would, but its a school and this is what happens. renovations in 2006, it was made sure that every intended student entrance had a sidewalk entrance for those who walk or ride their bikes to enter the campus, Mar graf said. Park Police Department, said he has re ceived very few complaints on the WPHS areas safety, and has no recollection of any reported incidents in which students were reported in harms way. We believe the area is very safe, he said. Joie Cadle, school board representative for the district that includes WPHS, said due to its location in the heart of a residen tial neighborhood, the school has faced traf all involved are working to overcome these issues the best they can. We take the safety of children getting onto our campus as a very serious matter, all the four entrances are working the way they should. She said there are currently no plans pedestrian pathways, which William Shall I would just like the school to take re sponsibility for the problem and come up with a solution, he said. Public perception Up to a half-hour prior to the sounding of the dismissal bell at WPHS, the line of cars starts piling up. Its 1:45 p.m. when Jenny Collado drives parks her car out front to wait for her son. that stacks up, she said, glancing in her rear-view mirror at the line of cars, nearly 20-deep idling behind her, now just after 2 p.m. But then again I dont know if its any different at any other school. Sandy DeWoody, parked a few cars back and also waiting on her son, said she doesnt want to show up 25 minutes before the bell rings, but that its just the reality if Its not ideal, but Im not sure how the school could make it any better, she said. Collado said shes noticed a slight in wood Drive gate, but that the extra com mute time is worth it for student safety. Id rather have my son have security at school, and have people only coming in from one or two entrances, than have them come in from everywhere, she said. from the school since 1977, said that limit ing the number of entrances to the school of his street, and that its been a problem hes watched develop continuously as the school has grown. Its a problem, but its just one of those facts of life that you can just wish wasnt, he said. $100 to $500 OFFAny Servicewith this ad On Call 24 Hours A DayServing Central Florida Since the s Let Us Handle Your Emergency!Call Our Hotline 877-936-8998 www.EmergencyServices24.comServing Floridas Residential & Commercial Community Since 1990 IMMEDIAT E RESPONSE Whats Your Emergency?CBC057844 F lood l Leaks l Mold l F ire l Storm l Smoke l Roong Get the look you deserve ... Contact us at 4079146445 Were 100% mobile Car Wash & Wax $15* Insured Business For a limited time only. Restrictions ap ply due to size and condition of vehicle. Our Town(407) 366-8696 Fax (407) 359-2118 P.O. Box 4548 Winter Park, FL 32793Insertions in editions and months as shown:____Waterford Lakes ____College Park/Orlando ____Winter Park/Maitland ____Sweetwater/Heathrow ____Tuscawilla/Winter Springs ____Oviedo ____Baldwin Park/E. Winter ParkPlease initial your agreement with the following:____ I approve this ad to appear in Our Town as shown here OR ____ I approve this ad with minor changes as clearly marked (How many changes are marked? _____) ____ Phone number and address are correct I understand that payment for this ad is due per initial agreement.Signed ____________________________________We appreciate your prompt response, as our deadline is approaching.*Colors represented on this proof may not be an exact match of the colors produced when printed on our offset press.X OCT 2009 407-644-7760 PHOTO COURTESY OF WILLIAM SHALLCROSS Winter Park High students walk home from the schools Bellewood Drive gate, which was closed last month after father William Shallcross and others complained about walking students having to sharing the road with bus trafc. Ofcials: WPHS feeder roads are safe Residents, parents say congestion around Winter Park High School is something that theyve gotten used to SARAH WILSON Observer Staff

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Page 3 Thursday, Feb. 23, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer The Silly Grape is the off spring that would be produced if your local, upscale wine bar got married to your favorite sports bar. Its big, its welcoming and you immediately feel comfort able, whether you are there to celebrate a birthday or you just want to watch the game with your best friend. The (liter ally) handmade creation of Cesar DaCosta who came to his parents from Portugal 30 years ago this restaurant and bar is DaCostas way to invite the Maitland community into his place. He is the epitome of the hands-on owner/proprietor. Whether hes tending bar, serving at the tables or handling the light ing for the live music that adds to the welcoming atmosphere, be sure you have enough to eat and youre having a good time. His personality is like meeting up with an old friend you havent seen in years. nominally retired are still in the kitchen every day making sure the food is as tasty and the portions as large as they once here is much better than good. hummus, loaded up with garlic, fresh cilantro and roasted bell peppers. Its freaky good so good that Cesar is currently in discussion with a distributor to potentially package and sell it, and good enough to make a healthy meal of it. The salsa is made fresh every day, and of the soup choices, the Portuguese kale sausage is perfect. The menu has two important distinctions: First, there are no items on the menu over $10 (Yay!), and the offerings are made from fresh food that is good for you! What a concept. The main course offerings are (each served with a bountiful side salad) and huge salad choices. bread, and it arrived at my table bubbling with jack cheese over the perfectly cut chunks of freshdaily chicken. Each offering has a healthy (in every sense) dose of olive oil, which in the case of the a sprinkling of balsamic vinegar for a Mediterranean blessing. I then tasted the roast beef panini, made with an abundance of sliced beef and served with pesto. I happily travel for good pasta with pesto, and now a bar/res taurant has given me yet another way to serve pesto, which makes me a happy man. The Silly Grape, but the point is, for all those businesses on Keller Grape also offers a pool table and TVs all around the room. Theres a happy hour Monday through Friday from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. with a variety of drink offerings and live music on most days. If youve read this far, Cesar wants to offer $1 drafts for the month of March when ordered with any menu item. Just tell your server (who could be the owner) one $1 draft for each menu item. Its a pleasure to highly recom mend The Silly Grape. Offer ends 1/31/2012. Offers are available to new, rst-time CenturyLink Prism TV residential customers only. Offers include Prism TV service bundled with Pure Broadband service and Prism TV bundled with CenturyLink Unlimited Calling. Standard monthly rates and fees apply to these services and required equipment. All prices, packages and programming are subject to change without notice. Customer must cancel DVR and/or HD service by calling CenturyLink Customer Service before the end of the three-month free promotional period to avoid monthly charges or the standard monthly rate for each service will apply until services are cancelled. Offers may be limited to specic locations. General Services and offers not available everywhere. CenturyLink may change, cancel, or substitute offers and services, or vary them by service area, at its sole discretion without notice. Requires credit approval and deposit may be required. Additional restrictions apply. Terms and Conditions All products and services listed are governed by tariffs, local terms of service, or terms and conditions posted at www.centurylink.com. CenturyLink Prism TV All plans require separate local phone service plan and include digital channels (including local channels), one (1) set-top box (STB), one (1) modem gateway, and up to four (4) standard direct video streams to residence. CenturyLink-provided STBs are required to view TV. Local channel availability varies by market. High Denition (HD) available on all TV plans, and up to two (2) of the up to four (4) video streams can be in HD. Customers location determines both HD availability and the maximum number of HD video streams (between 0 and 2 HD streams) a customer can view and record at any one time per residence, regardless of the number of STBs in the household. All non-HD video streams are provided in standard denition. Subscription to service precludes customer from purchasing high-speed Internet services from any third party. Additional charges will apply for additional programming packages, movie channel subscriptions (except for PrismTM Premium plan), Pay Per View movies and events, On Demand purchases, and premium services/subscriptions for all plans. Some subscription services, events, and broadcast network service may be blacked out in customers area. Vacation Program Offer available to residential customers only. Only certain CenturyLink services are eligible for the Vacation Program; third party services received through CenturyLink are not eligible. Offer may include a reduced monthly recurring charge for a predetermined number of months each year, retention of equipment and suspension of service, programming and agreement during Vacation Program activation. A zero balance for each applicable service is required for eligibility. If customer does not contact CenturyLink to resume full activation of applicable services before the end of six (6) consecutive month period, all applicable monthly charges, fees, surcharges, contractual obligations, etc., will resume automatically. Vacation Program services will have restrictions and limitations that will vary for each applicable service. Contact CenturyLink for details. Equipment Minimum equipment and CenturyLink professional installation are required. At initial installation, each customer receives: one (1) VDSL 2 modem; up to six (6) STBs (standard plan includes one (1) STB; additional STBs are available for an additional monthly rate, per STB); and one (1) remote control per STB installed. All equipment must be returned to designated CenturyLink retail store within thirty (30) days after service disconnection in an undamaged condition, or customer is charged for each equipment piece not returned or returned as damaged. Cars 2: 2011 Disney/Pixar. All Rights Reserved. 2012 CenturyLink, Inc. All Rights Reserved. The name CenturyLink and the pathways logo are property of CenturyLink, Inc. All other marks are property of their respective owners. BONUS!HEADING BACK NORTH? PLACE YOUR PRISM SERVICE ON HOLD WHILE YOURE AWAY. NO EXTRA CHARGE. NO HASSLES.CenturyLinkTM PrismTM paired with the perfect partner Internet or Voice. NO CONTRACT AND FREE HD WHEN YOU PICK 2 for 12 months175 East Altamonte Dr., Altamonte Springs 3030 East Semoran Blvd., Apopka 260 Citrus Tower Blvd., Clermont 1359 East Vine St., Kissimmee 3244 North John Young Pkwy., KissimmeeCall 866.552.4971Espaol 866.960.7085SEE THE DIFFERENCE FOR YOURSELF! Test-drive it online at seeprismtv.com or in store today: Like us on Facebook facebook.com/PrismTV CNTL11-1571D_9.042x9_r1.indd 1 12/28/11 5:38 PM Josh Garrick From the Corner Table Grape fuses wine, sports PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Cesar DeCosta, owner of The Silly Grape in Maitland, pours a glass of wine for a patron. The Silly Grape is at 1720 Fennell St., between North Keller Road and Legacy Club Drive in Maitland. Its open 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Monday and Tuesday and 11 a.m. to 2 a.m. Wednesday through Sunday. Call 407-790-7999 or visit thesillygrape. com

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Page 4 Thursday, Feb. 23, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer USPS 00-6186 ISSN 1064-3613 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835-5705 Member of: Goldenrod Chamber of Commerce Publisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor. Submission does not guarantee publication. Columnists opinions are made independently of the newspaper. All rights reserved. Winter Park / Maitland Observer 2012 Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster www.wpmobserver.com | Phone: 407-563-7000 | Fax: 407-563-7099 | editor@observernewspapers.com P.O Box 2426 Winter Park, FL 32790 Published Thursday, Feb. 23, 2012 CONT ACTS Volume 24, Issue Number 8 PUBLISHER Kyle Taylor 407-563-7009 kyle@observernewspapers.com MANAGING EDITOR Jenny Andreasson 407-563-7026 editor@observernewspapers.com DESIGNER Jonathan Gallagher 407-563-7054 jgallagher@observernewspapers.com REPORTERS Jenny Andreasson 407-563-7026 editor@observernewspapers.com Isaac Babcock 407-563-7023 isaacb@observernewspapers.com LEGALS | CLASSIFIEDS Ashley McBride legal@FLAlegals.com classieds@observernewspapers.com COPY EDITORS Isaac Babcock isaacb@observernewspapers.com Sarah Wilson COLUMNISTS Chris Jepson Jepson@MediAmerica.us Louis Roney LRoney@c.rr.com Josh Garrick joshgarrick9@gmail.com ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Tracy Craft 407-515-2605 tcraft@observernewspapers.com SUBSCRIPTIONS | CIRCULATION Jackie Candelaria 407-563-7013 INTERN Andy Ceballos Greek trip with Josh Adventurous student-travelers from ages 16 to 80 may join Observer Arts Columnist Josh Garrick as he leads a three-week college course for Americans who wish to immerse themselves in a Classical Greek experience. Whether you follow the course-work for 3 col lege credits or simply turn study-time into time on Greeces magnicent beaches, this small-group trip provides access to Greek sites and beaches that no bus-group could include. Email studyabroad@sva.edu. Student honors Alexander Koepsel of Winter Park has gradu ated from Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wis, with a Bachelor of Science in Electrical & Electronic Engineering. Berklee College of Music announces that Drew Moore of Winter Park has earned placement on the Deans List for the fall se mester of the 2011 academic year. Tax help Tax-Aide volunteers, trained and certied by the IRS, will provide free income tax as sistance at 17 sites throughout the Orange and Seminole county area starting Wednes day, Feb. 1, through Tuesday, April 17. Sites include: The Winter Park Library, at 460 E. New Eng land Ave., from 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays from Feb. 1 through April 17. St. Mary Magdalen Church, located at 861 Maitland Ave., from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Thursdays from Feb. 2 through April 12. The Maitland Senior Center, at 345 S. Mait land Ave., from noon to 4 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays, Feb. 7 through April 17. For additional information visit www.aarp.org/ taxaide Send submissions to editor@observernewspa pers.com Dr. David R. Lach, DDS, MS, PA, Spe cialist in Orthodon tics and Dentofa cial Orthopedics, was recently rec ognized as an Elite Preferred Invis align Specialist Provider, which is a distinction given to the top 1 percent of doctors nationally and internationally with the highest level of expe rience and expertise using Invisalign. Dr. Lach is a graduate of the University of North Caro lina at Chapel Hill, School of Dentistry and has more than 20 years of private practice experi ence in the greater Orlando area. The Central Florida Regional Transporta tion Authority (L YNX) is inviting qualied non-prot organizations in Orange, Osceola and Seminole counties to register for a spot on the agencys coveted Public Service Bus. Visit golynx.com to enter. Andrea Massey-Farrell, president and CEO of Massey Communications, and Patrick Chapin, president and CEO of the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce, have been appointed to the Winter Park YMCA Board of Directors. NAI Realvest negotiated three industrial lease agreements totaling 10,075 square feet at the Hanging Moss CommerCenter in Or lando and at Carter CommerCenter in Winter Garden. Julie A. Baird, a shareholder with Moore Ste phens Lovelace, P.A. (MSL), has been elected to serve as chair of the rms board of direc tors. Chefs James and Julie Petrakis of The Rav enous Pig present Cask & Larder, a South ern-inspired public house that will open this summer. The 6,000-square-foot, 150-seat restaurant and brewery will open at the old Harpers Tavern building on Fairbanks Av enue. Keep Winter Park Beautiful (KWPB) is now accepting Pocket Park Restoration Project grant applications. Winter Park neighborhood and community-based groups are encour aged to apply for funds to support physical improvements such as plantings, restoration, community gardens and other beautication projects in public spaces. Complete details regarding the Pocket Park Restoration Project and grant applications are available at kwpb. org under Projects and then Pocket Park Res toration Project. Business Briefs Community Bulletin Bee winner Sana Saraf participated in the Glenridge Middle School Spelling Bee Contest on Feb. 8. She will be representing her school in the Orange County Spelling Bee Contest on March 9. Jamming for peace During the week of Jan. 30, Trinity Preparatory Schools PeaceJam club planned a week full of informative activities to encourage students to learn more about the issue of starvation and hunger. Valentine Tree The Maitland Public Library is celebrating the month of February with its time-hon ored tradition of the Valentine Tree. With the Valentines Day theme, the Tree is an opportunity for residents to purchase a paper heart through a donation. This year, the proceeds will be used to pur chase three computers for the children in the Youth Services Department. The goal is $1,500. Gulf States Credit Union will be matching the funds up to $750 toward the goal. Call 407-647-7700.

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Page 5 Thursday, Feb. 23, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer The Knights are just a week away from closing out the regu lar season on the basketball court, and theyre looking to do it with a bang after beating East Carolina That win returned the Knights after a stumble last week against Southern Miss. It also marked one of the big gest games of the season for senior down 11 points while grabbing other dominant all-around per formance came from Isaiah Sykes, who picked up nine points, six re bounds, four turnovers, three as sists, three blocks and two steals on the night, without committing any fouls. The team was led in scoring and rebounding by Keith Clan ton, who connected for 16 points and seven rebounds in the win. Marcus Jordan also had a strong night at the basket, shooting for formance from the free throw line, while forcing three turnovers. The Knights were a rebound ing machine against the Pirates, more rebounds on the night. That includes newcomer Kasey Wilson, who grabbed six boards to add to his 9 points on the night. But that rebounding was extremely lopsided, with the Knights picking up only 10 offen sive rebounds to give themselves second chance shots. They were experts at snatching away second chances from the Pirates, grabbing 29 boards on the night. the Knights will be looking to close out the regular season with a series of wins. Owls in Houston at press time Wednesday night, but will return for their penultimate home game with a showdown against a surg ing UTEP (13-13, 6-6), tipping off Come Saturday, March 3, fans of him on the home court, tipping margin, one of the lowest scoring games in UCF mens basketball history. Savannah Court and CoeExcellence in Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation 1301 W. Maitland Blvd. Maitland, FL 32751407-645-3990www.SavannahCourtMaitland.comAssisted Living Facility License No. 8447 Skilled Nursing Facility License No. 1635096 The quality of care is outstanding. Our mother has made so many friends here. And she especially loves the hair salon! Peggy, her daughter Merrel & son DwightAssisted Living Rehabilitation and Skilled Nursing Care Variety of Apartment Suite Selections, some with Lake Views Restaurant Style Dining Laundry, Housekeeping, Maintenance Services Transportation to Outings and Medical Appointments Beautifully Landscaped Courtyard Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above. You are always welcome! A Senior Living Community where Hospitality is a Way of Life. Classic Iron Beds AND Designer Linens 407-982-4319All iron & brass beds are made in the USA and guaranteed for 2 generations New Construction!4 bed / 2.5 bath / 2190 sq ft $339,000 808 Hamilton Place Court Winter Park, FL 32789 Commerce Brokerage, LLC407-566-1636 PHOTO BY AND Y CEBALLOS THE OBSERVER Maitland Little League celebrated its 50th anniversary with a parade and ceremony on Saturday, Feb. 18, at the Keller Road ball elds. Even Maitland City Council got involved. Pictured above are Councilman Ivan Valdes, left, and Mayor Howard Schieferdecker with the Rays team. Little League cheers 50 years Big week for Eagles basketball, wrestling ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff With Winter Parks teams bowing out of the winter sports postseason, Edgewater has stolen the spotlight with some strong performances in the past week at the re gional and state levels. Both of the schools the state title this week, with dreams of glory in Lakeland. Boys own the court Edgewaters boys basketball team pro pelled itself further into the postseason last week. est scoring game of the season on Feb. 16, selves into the regional championship game against Leesburg. That game tips off at 7 p.m. on Saturday at Edgewater. Lady Eagles soar Meanwhile Edgewaters girls basket ball team was destroying the competition against Pensacola on Feb. 24 at the Lake land Center. In the three games of the postseason the girls (26-4) have won by a combined margin of 246-125, including their most re cent 94-61 blowout of Gainesville (24-4) on which has won an astonishing 11 games this season by 50 points or more. In a dis trict game against Mainland Dec. 6, they won 93-10. Prince has proven a dominant force at both ends of the court. She led the team with 31 points and eight blocks against Gaines ville. With their most recent route the girls Friday in the Lakeland Center. Wrestlers score Edgewaters Jerimiah Benson fought his win by pin in the third round. Knights slash Pirates, head to postseason ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff

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Page 6 Thursday, Feb. 23, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer FEB. 23 Nigerian novelist Chimamanda Adichie will speak at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 23, in the Bush Audi torium of Rollins College. Visit rollins. edu/winterwiththewriters. Chili for Charity is from 5:30 to 8 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 23, at the Winter Park Farmers Market, located at 200 W. New England Ave. The cost is $25 in advance and $30 at the door. From 7 to 10 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 23, the Home Builders Association will host its Eighth Annual Bruce Gould Poker Invitational The cost is $125 for the Poker Invitational and $50 for the casino games. Visit or landojcc.org. Winter Park Towers (WPT) is proud to announce its Second Annual Chili Cook-Off at 2 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 23, at 1111 S. Lakemont Ave. Open to both staff and residents, this fun event allows everyone an equal opportunity to show off their culinary skills. FEB. 24 Join the Goldenrod Chamber mem bership in a fun lled night of bowl ing from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., on Friday, Feb. 24, at Aloma Bowling Center at 2530 Aloma Ave. A ve-person team is $80 and a single player can join a team for $16 per person. Call 407677-5980. The Down Syndrome Association of Central Florida will host the sixth an nual Florida Down Syndrome Con ference at the University of Central Florida on Feb. 24-25 at UCFs Stu dent Union. Visit dsacf.org FEB. 25 Habitat for Humanity of Winter ParkMaitland is holding its third annual nighttime fundraiser at the Winter Park Country Club on Saturday, Feb. 25. Tee-off time is 6 p.m. Contact Robbie Schultz at 407-462-8751 or robertschultz@nancialguide.com. FEB. 26 WinterParkLostPets.com presents Cupcakes and Canines a fundraiser for Gold Coast Greyhound Adoptions of Orlando, from 2 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 26 at The Flour Shop, northwest end of Kmart Shopping Plaza, U.S. Highway 17-92 at Lee Road in Winter Park. Contact Judy@ winterparklostpets.com for details. Dr. Jim Henry, Peter Lord and Dr. Tommy Vinson will be the featured speakers at First Baptist Winter Parks 40th Mission Conference beginning Sunday, Feb. 26. Dr. Tommy Vinson, former senior pastor at Winter Park Baptist, will speak at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 26. Visit rstwinterpark.org. FEB. 27 The Annual Shakespeare Compe tition for Orange, Seminole and Os ceola students in grades 9-12 spon sored by the English-Speaking Union of Central Florida will be held at The University Club of Winter Park at 4 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 27. At 1:15 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 27, there will be a physician-led educa tional seminar about post-shingles nerve pain presented by Levi Zim merman, M.D., at the JCC of Greater Orlando, 851 N. Maitland Ave. Visit tinyurl.com/postshingle or call 1-800275-2767. The Big Red Bus will be holding a blood drive from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 27. The bus will be in the Bolick Clinic parking lot on Horatio Avenue and U.S. Highway 17-92. FEB. 28 John Crossman, president of Cross man & Company, will be a featured speaker at the Society for Marketing Professional Services (SMPS) Client Roundtable Forum from 8 to 10 a.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 28, at Dubsdread Country Club in College Park. Cost to attend the Forum is $35 for SMPS members and $50 for non-members. Register at smpscentralorida.org. FEB. 29 The Games Day Fundraiser for Win ter Park Garden Club/UCF Endowed Scholarship Fund will happen at 10 a.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 29, at the Winter Park Garden Club, 1300 S. Denning Drive, in Winter Park. The cost is $20. Please pay by Feb. 24. Call 407-644-5770. At 7:45 a.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 29, there will be a presentation ti tled Economic Update Breakfast : 2012 Economic Climate & Business Management Trends presented in partnership with Rollins College at Rachel D. Murrah Civic Center, 1050 W. Morse Blvd., in Winter Park. Visit WinterPark.org MARCH 1 Best-selling author Lisa See will mingle with guests and sign books at Reading Between the Wines presented by Bank of America start ing at 6 p.m. on Thursday, March 1, at Doubletree by Hilton Orlando Down town. Visit adultliteracyleague.org or call 407-4221540. Hours: M-F 8am to 4:30pm 2315 Lee Road Winter Park, Florida 32789 Your Guiding Beacon for Quality Healthcare Harbour Private Duty Nursing, LLCSkilled Nursing Physical Therapy Occupational Therapy Companionship Home Health Aid Homemaking Flexible Schedules Free RN Assessments The Services of Harbour Private Duty Nursing provide peace of mind to loved ones, trust ofcers, guardians and physicians. Our professional team prides itself on making your life easier. We also provide in-hospital private duty care, which offers close, personal attention and reassurance in an unfamiliar and often frightening environment. Our ofce hours are Monday through Friday, 8:00 am to 4:30 pm. Our professional team is available 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. During hours when the ofce is closed and during the weekends and holidays, the on-call coordinator is available by telephone 24 hours per day.www.HarbourPrivateDutyNursing.com License # 299991382phone (407) 895-8188 fax 407-895-9339 Lack of Desire or Low Energy? George Carroll, M.D., has over 20 years ex perience in sexual medicine, and is actively involved in the following: 407-894-9959 Theyre magic beans To sell something as valu able as the family livestock for a handful of beans would put any of us in either the nuthatch or poorhouse. But our friend Jack took the risk and then climbed his magic beanstalk to the gi ants realm. His adventures and rewards were worth the effort, resulting in riches and tales enduring to this day. If only our gardening ad ventures could be so fruitful, alas I am here to tell you they can be! The common edible veg etable, tagged taxonomically as Phaseolus vulgaris, has been cultivated by us humans, Homo sapiens, for thousands of years in both the old and new world. Co an early cruise to the Bahamas. growing beans, corn and squash as companion plants is called Three Sisters cropping. Vining pole beans have been a staple tinent. The recent development of the bush bean has motivated modern cultivation to reach an industrial scale. bean, we eat the immature seed along with the tender pods. This expedited harvest provides an earlier crop than letting the bean reach the shelling or dried stage. The varieties grown for green harvest are different from many other familiar storage types, such dening is the multiple harvests provided as beans continue to crop is hand picked. Green beans also come in yellow wax and The pole or vining types offer on the trellis and produce over a longer timeframe. To grow pole beans requires the construction of a suitable trellis of about 6-feettall that is able to withstand the vagaries of our erratic weather, especially wind. I created trellis rings of scrap fence 3 feet in diameter that are transportable and available for other climbing crops. Varieties of bush beans I have successfully grown include Pro vider, Contender, Top Crop and Blue Lake. Bush beans planted directly to garden soil and spaced about 4 to 6 inches apart produce Beans are leguminous, mean ing they can produce their own with certain types of soil bacte ria. Inoculating bacteria can be purchased to imbue this natural phenomenon to your gardening playbook. For a truly productive garden, we should follow Jacks example and plant the magical fruit. (You knew that was com ing!) Tom Carey is the owner of Sundew Gardens, a you-pick gardening business in Oviedo. Visit the Sundew Gardens Facebook page. Tom Carey From my garden to yours Calendar Bach at Casa At noon Thursday, March 1, Casa Feliz hosts Bachs Lunch: The Three Sonatas for Viola da Gamba and Harpsichord with the Bach Festival Society of Winter Park. Tick ets for the concert are $15. Reservations are required. Call 407-6462182.

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Page 7 Thursday, Feb. 23, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Feb. 27 City Commission Meeting topics of interest There will be a City Com mission meeting at 3:30 p.m. on Murrah Civic Center located at 1050 W. Morse Blvd. Below are a few topics of interest: Mayors Report Presentation of checks from the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce to area schools from proceeds raised at the December 2011 pancake breakfast fundrais er. Sonya Baumstein, Winter Park High School graduate now with Team Epoch rowing team Presentation by Orange Coun ty School Board Member Joie Cadle regarding Brookshire El ementary City Managers Report 90-day plan Non-action Items parking recommendations Consent Agenda 13. and contracts (a complete list can be found at cityofwinterpark.org > Government > City Commis es to the citys medical insurance programs to become effective Teladoc health care visits through phone or online video consulta tion; and health and dental in surance for domestic partners of employees. A ction I tems R equiring Discussion One-way valet parking in downtown Selection of an architectural Station Public Hearings Second reading of the ordi nance establishing parking re strictions at electric charging sta tions. ter Park Venture LLC: First reading of the ordinance amending the comprehensive plan, future land-use map to change the designation of SingleFirst reading of the ordinance Conditional use approval to build a new two-story, 10-unit, residential condominium build ing at 434 and 444 W. Swoope First reading the ordinance annexing the property at 600 Lee state 4 contiguous to the property within the city of Winter Park at ter of Historic Places. First reading of the ordinance amending the historic preserva tion section of the Land Develop ment Code. First reading of the ordinance 11, Moratorium for Pain Manage ment Clinics. City Commission Reports Commissioner Leary Commissioner Sprinkel Commissioner Cooper Commissioner McMacken Mayor Bradley full agenda and information on cityofwinterpark.org and clicking on Government > City Commis sion > Packets. M ead Garden B otanical Garden public meeting Please make plans to attend this public meeting at 10 a.m. on Saturday, March 3, at Mead Bo tanical Garden located at 1300 S. be taken at the proposed Lease Management and Operational Plans being presented to the City Commission on March 12 by the Mead Botanical Garden Inc. orga The meeting will also present the details of the proposed lease of a portion of the Mead Botani cal Garden property and the op erational agreement, which will transfer responsibility for some event and facility management from the city to the Mead Garden have the opportunity to view the proposed documents and cur rent plans of The Grove am phitheater, which will be under construction. Public input will be taken and presented to the City Commission as part of the Mead Botanical Garden, Inc. proposal during the March 12 City Com mission meeting. For more infor mation, please call 407-599-3277. St. Patricks Day Parade The city of Winter Park and the St. Patricks Day Parade com mittee are proud to present the 33rd annual Winter Park St. Pat ricks Day Parade at 2 p.m. on Sunday, March 4, in downtown Winter Park. Gather your family and friends and wear some green to enjoy the only St. Patricks Day parade in Central Florida. The pa rade will begin at the Winter Park Country Club and continue south will participate. The celebration will also feature Irish music and step dancing at the main stage in Central Park with demonstra tions by the Tir Na Greine School of Irish Dance and the Watters School of Irish Dance. Irish music will be provided by the Tommy Doyle Band. This is one event you wont want to miss! St. Patricks Day began as an annual feast day to celebrate St. Patrick, the most commonly rec The Irish have observed this day as a religious holiday for more than a thousand years and it is of many other ethnicities. The day is widely celebrated by wear ing green clothing and items such tradition, those who do not wear green on St. Patricks Day face the risk of being affectionately pinched. This celebration is made pos sible by the generous support of event sponsors including the city Green Irish Pub and Eatery, the of Central Florida and Florida Distributors Company. For more information regard ing the 33rd annual St. Patricks Day Parade, please call 407-222Visit the citys ofcial website at cityof winterpark.org, nd us on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter. www.gulfstatescu.org 407-831-8844A Refreshing Alternative to Conventional Banking.9405 S. Highway 17-92 Maitland, FL 32751 Maitland City Talk BY HOWARD SCHIEFERDECKER MAYOR Open for business The city of Maitland has histor ically enjoyed a solid tax base that has been strongly enhanced since Maitland Center, a nationally rec However, the unexpected eco nomic downturn of recent years, along with costly tax reform mea sures enacted in Tallahassee, has been steadily eroding that solid tax base. Consequently, Mayor Schieferdecker initiated a process for the city of Maitland to take a hard self-examination of how it conducted business and whether or not we were competitive in the development and redevelopment marketplace, a market sector that was getting thinner and thinner as the economic downturn main tained its grasp on the nations economy. The frank answer after the re assessment was that there were many processes contained within our code where delays, repetition Most development processes in Maitland were more time consum ing (and therefore more expen sive) than were those of many of our governmental neighbors and competitors. In good economic times, such a situation tended to be disguised by the rapid pace and aggressiveness of new devel opment activity. But when times much more ready to walk away from opportunities in Maitland if business climate in nearby juris dictions. the city of Maitland completed a three-year overhaul of its growth management regulations. Th three main components consisted of the evaluation and appraisal report adopted in 2009, followed by revision of the Comprehensive Development Plan in 2010, and amendment of the land develop ment regulations in 2011. development regulations is Chap ter 7.5 Land Development Proce dures, containing the processes and procedures for obtaining de velopment approval. In an effort to streamline and update the land development procedures, modi procedures in Chapter 7.5. These effective review process, while maintaining the integrity of the code review process for the city. The city held numerous public meetings, including forums, work sessions and public hearings with the community development staff, the Planning and Zoning Commission and the Maitland City Council. These public meet ings provided an opportunity for participants to engage in an open dialogue with city representatives to discuss concerns and issues re garding the revisions and update of the city of Maitland land devel opment procedures. In addition, a permit/procedure review group and a developer/user group were selected. They convened on sev eral occasions to review the pro cedures and provide additional insight to city staff on how to up grade and streamline the process. The combination of all this public and professional input provided the basis for many effective proce dural code changes. Some of the overriding prin ciples behind development of the revised procedures were to: make the processes simpler to use and understand; eliminate extraneous or overlapping steps; to the extent possible, move expensive commit to a point in the approval process after conceptual approval is ob tained; allow options for abbrevi ated reviews for certain types of projects; and preserve the high standards for new development that the city has established over many years. the community development staff describing all of the new and re vised processes. In order to make the processes as transparent as possible, the manual also includes various procedures and options. ments were thoroughly vetted with the various ad hoc special review committees and stand lic comment and review, the new land development processes were adopted by the City Council on Oct. 24. ably proud of this accomplish ment. Local developers who have started to use it are impressed cost effectiveness. Consequently, Mayor Schieferdecker was asked to co-chair the Central Florida Partnerships Streamline Permit Group, which later was invited to the Central Florida Congress Work Groups new guidelines and recommendations were well received by the Central Florida Congress for their innovation and jurisdictions are now using those new guidelines and recommenda tions as a model to help them re vise their codes. Now that the economic malaise that has gripped all of us for sev eral years is starting to ease off, Maitland stands ready to success fully compete in the marketplace for high-quality new development and redevelopment. This will pro tect and enhance the citys tax base and serve to help maintain our low tax rates for the future. Dick Wells, director, Community Development Department Council Agenda of Feb. 27 City Council meets the sec ond and fourth Mondays of the month at 6:30 p.m. The next meet ing is scheduled for Feb. 27 in the Council Chambers, at 1776 Inde pendence Lane. Please check the citys web page at itsmymaitland. com for the complete agenda. Winter Park City Talk BY RAND Y KNIGHT CITY MANAGER Maitland stands ready to successfully compete

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Page 8 Thursday, Feb. 23, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Deloris (Dee) Burke Cocina 214 Coffee Counseling, Coaching & Consulting Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Fairwinds Credit Union Baldwin Park iLashWorks Kilwins Chocolates & Ice Cream PNC Wealth Management Ruth Rushing Sassafras Sweet Shoppe Shipyard Brew Pub The Doggie Door The Leary Group The Rawls Group Through the Looking Glass Beasley & Henley Interior Design Bosphorous Turkish Cuisine Eyes & Optics Frank A. Hamner, P.A. Great American Land Investment Co. Lamm & Company Partners Savannah Court & Savannah Cove Maitland Simmons Jewelers Ten Thousand Villages of Orlando The Wine Room on Park Avenue Threshold, Inc. Tolla's Italian Deli & Cafe UpTown Dog Workforce Central Florida Christian Science Reading Room CNLBank Fiddler's Green Irish Pub & Eatery Shoooz On Park Avenue Winter Park Garden Club Bebe's Classic Creations Catering St. Margaret Mary Catholic Church Winter Park Day Nursery, Inc. Winter Park Towers Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens Morse Museum of American Art The Keewin Real Property Company Walt Disney World Resort The Volvo Store Scearce, Satcher & Jung, P.A. Hubbard Construction Co. Lewis-Cobb Pest Control Miller's Hardware, Inc. Wayne Densch, Inc. Winter Park Land Company Denotes Park Avenue Area Association membership H a n n i b a l S q u a r e W i n e T a s t i n g T h e F i n e A r t o f W i n e T h u r s d a y M a r c h 1 5 5:30 8:00 p.m. West New England Avenue F e a t u r i n g T i c k e t s & I n f o Mardi Gras mania A tale of ducks PHOTOS BY AND Y CEBALLOS THE OBSERVER The Great Duck Derby featured rubber duck races and free family activities on Saturday at Mead Garden pond. PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Middle schoolers hit the oor at the Maitland Public Librarys second annual Mardi Gras dance party on Feb. 18.

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Page 9 Thursday, Feb. 23, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Lifestyles The latest innovative technolo gies and building products now have a Winter Park address. The National Association of Homebuilders International Shows New American Home for 2012, located at 229 Alexander Place, Winter Park, features a wide array of new technology designed to cater to comfort and serenity. This years architect and builder was Phil Kean of Phil Kean De signs Inc. based in Winter Park. Kean said one of his goals for the home was to conserve space. We did smart, small, Kean said. There are not a lot of hall ways in the house. He said the purpose of his de sign is to optimize the use of space in the home. The house is cur rently set up with two bedrooms, bedrooms if some rooms, like the workout room, are converted, Kean said. There is also a studio space that is set up with its own independent air conditioning sys tem. We sort of set it up so that if you were an artist or something, youd have a separate space to keep all the odors that you might [create] by painting, or doing any kind of crafts , he said. In keeping with space conser vation, equipment such as cable boxes and a Blu-ray player are kept in a separate room of the house. ZIO Group of Winter Park provided the technology in the home. Peter Shipp, principal with ZIO, said very little equipment is seen throughout the home. All of those sources are cen trally located in the mechanical room so theres no equipment throughout the house other than TVs, your remote and then builtin speakers, Shipp said. You dont see a lot of the tech nology in the house, but its there when you want to access it. There are seven televisions: television and one projection sys tem. Music lovers can enjoy their fa vorite tunes via three iPad control stations mounted on the walls, which can tune in to a range of music stations, such as Sirius XM Satellite Radio or Pandora. There crophone, which allows its music to be played throughout the entire house. To keep the house clean, the home has its own central vacuum inside a three-car garage, with inlets located throughout the house that suck up dust, dirt and small items when the vacuum is on. There are also outlets where someone can plug in a hose for more heavy-duty cleaning. An alarm system also comes with the house that can be armed or disarmed remotely. Rob Turner, interior designer for the project and principal of in terior design for PKD studio, said the vision for the house was to create a throwback feel. The house is an interpreta tion of classic modern architec ture, Turner said. It was more of a throwback and interpretive of modern design from the 50s and the 60s. One example of this is a chair signed by Eero Saarinen, a Finn ish architect who designed the TWA terminal at New Yorks John F. Kennedy International Airport. Turner also added his own per sonal touch by designing some of the items in the home, such as cocktail and dining tables, in con junction with Robin Wade, a fur niture maker in Alabama. The home is also environmen tally friendly, which Turner says can be viewed as a design chal lenge to some. A lot of designers are intimi dated by that because they think in reality, when you design your own pieces and work with lo cal craftsmen and with people in your community, you actually have complete design freedom because you can make it however you want to, Turner said. Kean, who owns the home, es timates its market value to be $2.5 million. He is not planning to sell the home for at least two years, and will use it as his model home to showcase to potential clients. He said the home is designed with an individual in mind who wants to enjoy the suburban lifestyle. Its not a big family home. in this house, Kean said. But grown and they come and visit. Offer valid at the UCF Arena Box Ofce, by calling 800-745-3000 or online at Ticketmaster.comOffer Valid Thru 3/3/12. Only valid on $31 and $21 price levels. Minimum purchase of 3 tickets. Additional Fees may apply. Subject to availability. No double discounts. Sun., Mar. 4 2:00pm Special Family Value Pack! SAVE up to $7 on Tickets! Use promo code FAMILY Special Family Value Pack!SAVEup to $7 on Tickets! Use promo code FAMILY PHOTOS BY ANDY CEBALLOS THE OBSERVER Phil Kean of Phil Kean Designs Inc. based in Winter Park shows off the New American Home, located off Alexander Place in Winter Park. Kean says it will be used as his model home. Comfort, serenity focus of New home ANDY CEBALLOS Observer Staff The New American Home carries a series of green certications, such as the Florida Water Star Gold certication, and the National Green Building Standard Emerald certication, which is the highest of the four levels of achievement a home can attain. Learn more

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Page 10 Thursday, Feb. 23, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Family Calendar Brownie Troop 2091 kicked off the new year by creating calendars that featured each girl dressed to represent a month of the year. For the girls, it was a fun activity and a chance to dress up and have their picture taken. For of the importance of 2012. Girl Scouts of the USA celebrates its 100th birthday in March. Founder Juliette Daisy adult volunteer members in all 50 states and Puerto Rico. I think Juliette would be incredibly proud led her daughters troop for four years. A girl can join a Daisy scout troop beginning in kindergarten. From there, she can continue dettes and Seniors, who are high school age. The 13 third-grade girls in troop 2091 at eton elementary schools, and Blankner and 2012 to highlight the anniversary, including ter, and a trip to the birthplace of the founder in October. But, in February, the girls are focused on cookies! Girl Scouts are probably best known for their cookies, especially the best-selling Thin Mints. Almost as old as the organization, the ties began as early as 1917. Yeilding said her daughters troop has sold more than 1,000 boxes in the past. She is excit ed, she said, that this year the troop will have a cookie booth at the Baldwin Park Publix, where they will have the opportunity to sell even more. were both Girl Scouts. They grew up in differ ent parts of the state but met in college. the Gold Award, an achievement equivalent to the Boy Scout Eagle Scout Award. Johnson, who is from South Florida, recent co-leader last year. I wanted to volunteer for something, Johnson said. It was their shared experience in scouting a Girl Scout, always a Girl Scout! I always tell my girls they will forever be sisters in scouting. The thing I love about scouting is that it is ing to play soccer. Its not just taking a quilting class its all of that. Its the whole girl. Diversity is what makes our troop so spe cial. They arent just campers, cookie sellers, athletes, musicians, artists or academics. They are Girl Scouts! So, if Juliette was participating in our friendship circle at meetings end, I be lieve she would scan each unique and beauti ful face and give a great big Brownie smile! Its TAX time. Appointments Available 7 Days a Week!Tax Form Processing LLC2400 N Forsyth Rd., Suite 101 Orlando, FL 32807Tel: (407) 657-6336www.TaxFormProcessing.com Proudly Serving the Orlando Area for 17 years! Scan QR Code Look for Brownie Troop 2091 in front of the Baldwin Park Publix from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 25. To learn more about Girl Scout of Citrus anniversary activities, visit www. citrus-gs.org Learn more The Girl Scouts next door PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Baldwin Park Publix manager Jordan Klarfeld, from left, poses with troop leader Elizabeth Chick, and her daughter, Saman tha; and cookie mom Mary Y eilding, with her daughter, Anne. The girls are selling cookies outside the store this month. Organization celebrates its 100th birthday on March 12 SHARI KING Observer Staff The thing I love about scouting is that it is diverse. troop leader Elizabeth Chick Winn-Dixie will have an Open House Celebration event from 5:30 to 7 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 23, at 7800 S. Highway 17-92, Unit 160, in Fern Park. Come and enjoy the stores new features and sample delicious cuisine. Please join the Maitland Public Li brary at 2 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 28. LCC Social Networking for seniors is offering a workshop on Y ouTube. Program is free but you must register. Books to Die For! Mystery Book Club will also meet here at this time to discuss Carl Hiaasens book, Star Island. Call 407647-7700. IHOP restaurants nationwide will offer each guest a free short stack of its famous buttermilk pancakes on National Pancake Day to raise funds for Childrens Miracle Network Hospitals from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 28. Visit ihoppancakeday.com Admission to the Maitland Art Center is free from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. every Sunday in February. It is located at 231 W. Packwood Ave. in Maitland. Experience the beauty and wonder of this artist colony that was established in 1937 and see the work of painter and printmaker Molly Chism. Call 407-539-2181. ArtsFest is Feb. 1-29. All events are free and open to the public, although some offerings have limited seating and capacity. Visit ArtsFestFL.com for more informa tion. Enjoy a free movie and popcorn on the lawn at 7 p.m. on Satur day, March 3, as Orangewood Church and School in Maitland invite the community for Puss in Boots. Admission is free. The event will be at Orangewood Field, 1300 W. Maitland Blvd. Visit or angewoodmovienight.com. The fth annual Junior League of Greater Orlandos Kids in the Kitchen Fit-n-Fun Fest will fea ture more than 40 exhibitors, free giveaways and much more. The free event will take place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, March 3, in Central Park in Winter Park. The 33rd annual Winter Park St. Patricks Day Parade is at 2 p.m. on Sunday, March 4, in downtown Winter Park. For more information regarding the 33rd annual St. Pat ricks Day Parade, call 407-2220645 or visit cityofwinterpark.org. Each Tuesday at 10:30 a.m. the Maitland Public Library hosts pre school story and craft time. Each Thursday at 10:30 a.m. it hosts baby time stories and activity. Each Thursday at 4 p.m., it hosts Reading Buddies. Any kindergar ten through fth-graders who want to enhance their reading skills are welcome to attend. No registration necessary. Call 407647-7700. Send submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com

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Page 11 Thursday, Feb. 23, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer There is a princess and an evil derellas stepmother look like a caregiver), but this adult fairytale comes to us from Shakespeare beline features one of Shake speare's most resourceful female line, secretly marries the worthy Posthumous. When the King discovers the secret marriage, he banishes Posthumous, and Imo gen sets off in search of him. The journey to the couple's reunion is an adventure populated with and sleeping potions. Directed by Artistic Director Jim Hels in repertory with Romeo and Orlando Shakespeare Theater oshakes.org Lyle the Crocodile Based on the classic childrens by Bernard Waber, Orlando Rep children through March 25. When the Primm family moves into their new apartment, they hear a swish, swash and a splash only to discover a crocodile in their bath tub. But this crocodile has impec cable manners, dance moves and loves caviar. He charms every one, except for their neighbor, Mr. Grumps. The play teaches valu able lessons about not judging others by their appearance, but loving people (and crocodiles) for who they are. Wabers stories are generally deeper and wordier than a typical picture book, Di and parents have kept these sto ries relevant and popular because of the good-heartedness and fun tolerance. The Orlando Reper tory Theatre is a professional Park, and serves as the Univer Theatre for Young Audiences 7365 or visit orlandorep.com Hedda Gabler The play Hedda Gabler was wegian playwright Henrik Ibsen. Dealing with the unheard-of issue of womens liberation, the play was negatively reviewed at its premiere, but has over the past 100 years attained its rightful place as a classic of world drama. Some consider the character of Hedda, one of the great dramatic roles in theatre, the female Hamlet, and like all great drama, the character can be portrayed in a number of ways. Whether you see her as an ideal istic heroine, a victim of her time, an early feminist or a manipula tive villain, Hedda Gabler is at 25. Ibsen's theatrical masterpiece married Hedda bound by the du ties of marriage and the limits of by Eric Zivot, Melanie Whipple Theatre at 105 S. Magnolia Ave. com New Morse Museum exhibits More than 30 watercolors Watercolors by Otto Heinigke A Glass Artists Palette as the Morse Museum of American Art opens two new exhibits. At the 1915, Heinigke and his Brook windows for institutions includ exhibit demonstrate a passion for detail no doubt inherited from his father, a German miniaturist who immigrated to the United States. The exhibition will be on view through Feb. 3, 2013. The second, and related, exhibit includes 20 paintings from the museums permanent collection drawn from the same time period including works by James Henry paintings present American life War and World War I, a period when the industrial revolution brought seismic changes to the lives of most Americans. The Ave. in Winter Park. Visit morse Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906. w w w R e n t F r o m B r i o c o m We have renovated rental homes in excellent condition. Two to four bedroom homes in the Winter Park Area. Check our website for upcoming availability, pictures and oor plans. Call (407) 405-3367 for an appointment.www.RentFromBrio.comCall Lee Nimkoff, CCIM, CPM (407) 405-33671870 Aloma Avenue, Suite 120, Winter Park, FL 32789 HOW TO PARTICIPATE Please read through this entire packet carefully. It contains everything you need to know about participating in the sale. When all of your items are properly tagged, please bring them along with your completed inventory sheet(s) to the Family Life Center during the designated drop off times. If you would like to donate your items, please bring your items to the Hannahs Closet Staff during the same designated drop off times. If you have any questions please contact us: C a ll Betsy Ryan 407 923 0566 or e mail us at hannahscloset@fumcwp.org WHATS IN THE SALE We will be accepting ANY SEASON infant and childrens c lothing up to size 14 (in good condition) baby equipmen t (high chairs, strollers, car seats, booster seats, play pens, baby monitors, etc.) furniture (cribs, dressers, changing tables, youth beds, desks, rocking chairs, table and chair sets, bookshelves) and toys (all toys, bikes, big wheels, kitchen play set s, riding toys, books, videos, etc. no stuffed animals ) Due to the limited space, we will not be accepting maternity clothes. Sale items must be in VERY GOOD CONDITION Think about what you would like to find at the sale yourself! I f you are unsure about an item, please bring it during the designated drop off times and we will be happy to help you. Some guidelines to help make the sale successful: Clothing must be clean and pressed ( no stains ) Clothing must be without holes, missing buttons, snaps or broken zippers Shoes must be clean and in good condition p lease use zip ties to keep pairs together Toys that require batteries must be operational (i.e. install fresh batteries) and all loose parts must be firmly attached to the toy (using strapping ta pe, string, Ziploc bags, etc.) Games must include all pieces Equipment must be clean, in good repair and without missing parts We reserve the right to refuse to display items improperly hung, tagged or in poor condition DESIGNATED DROPOFF AND PICK UP TIMES Collection will begin Monday, March 2 and end Wednesday, March 4 Merchandise will NOT be accepted after Wednesday. There will be NO exceptions. Items may be brought to the Family Life Center located on Morse Blvd Monday Wednesday from 9:00 a.m. 12:00 p.m. and Wednesday evening from 6:00 p.m. 9:00 p.m. Please park in the parking lot or on the street during the day; we cannot block the preschool carpool lane. We will do our best to be outside to assist you. You will be responsible for any necessary assembly (i.e cribs). Assembly must be complete by 9:00 p.m. Wednesday March 4 All items, including furniture, that do not sell must be picked up between 2:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. on Saturday, March 7 ALL ITEMS NOT PICKED UP BY 3:00 P.M. WILL BE DONATED TO CHARITY No exceptions. SUPPLIES NEEDED TO TAG ITEMS Heavy card stock 3X5 (white, yellow, pink) construction paper tags will NOT be accepted coloring on the tags with markers, highlighters, or crayons (to make them pink or yellow) will NOT be accepted either safety pins (not the tiny gold pins please) Straight pins will NOT be accepted string and/or zip ties to hold items together strong tape packing tape works best just be sure not to tape over your information Ziploc bags 200 9 Hannahs Closet Packet est. 1997 Childrens Clothing, Toy s & Equipment Sale First United Methodist Church; 125 N. Interlachen Ave; Winter Park ***Family Life Center (Gymnasium)*** Friday, March 6 ~ 8:30 am 2:30 pm and 6:00 8:00 pm Saturday, March 7 ~ 8:00 am 12:00 pm Presale f or consignors, Thursday, Marc h 5 ~ 7:00 9:00 p m Hannahs Closet2012 Childrens Consignment SaleFriday, March 2: 8:30 a.m. 1:30 p.m. 6:00 p.m. 8:00 p.m. Saturday, March 3: 8:30 a.m. 12 p.m. Circle missions, focusing on women & children.First United Methodist Church of Winter Park 125 N. Interlachen Ave. Matthias Family Life Center (Gymnasium) Visitwww.fumcwp.org/hannahsclosetor email hannahscloset@Fumcwp.org for more information. High quality toys, clothes and furniture! This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH O RLANDO A VE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.E NZIAN.ORG SHAME Fri and Sat 3:45, 6:30, 9:15 Sun 2:30, 5:00 Mon, Wed, Thurs 6:30, 9:15 T ues 6:30 only BACH & FRIENDS Fri 12:30 FULL MET AL ALCHEMIST: THE SACRED ST AR OF MILOS Sat 12 Midnight Academy A wards Viewing Party Sun 7:00 FREE Cult Classics COFFY T ues 9:30 Wednesday Night Pitcher Show: Bad Movie Night GLITTER 8:00 FREE Josh Garrick Culture worthy of your calendar Shakespeares Cymbeline Lyle

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Page 12 Thursday, Feb. 23, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Opinions Schools announced its 2013 teacher of the year, lawmakers at the state level were working on slashing the higher educa tion budget, introducing a school prayer bill and voting on a set of bills that would pit teachers and parents against each other. Bill 1191, called the Parent Empowerment Act, would give Parental Involvement and Ac countability in the Public Schools Bill, lets teachers grade parents for their involvement. Both of those bills would in effect allow parents and teachers, formerly allied in PTA programs, to tattle on each other to higher authorities rather than to com municate openly. Rather than fostering an environment of cooperation, it would put parents and teachers in opposing camps blaming each other for failing students. As further diversion from solving the education problems now making its way through the house, would legalize inspira tional messages at school events including, but not limited to, graduation ceremonies. Funny thing about the term inspirational messages: they al ready exist at graduation ceremo nies. Theyre called commence ment addresses. They happen every year at every high school in the country. So why would the state Senate, and now the House, spend more than six months working on a bill to legalize something thats already legal? A quick glance at the origi August, shows its original intent, legalizing organized prayer at public school events about waiting to happen as a bill can get. In the past four months that bills language has been watered down from allowing the formerly dubbed prayers of invocation and benediction (terms tied al and rechristens them as inspira tional messages. If the bill passes as written, it still has the potential for causing a lawsuit for any school board that chooses to exercise its new would by law still be required to keep their hands off the organiza tion of any prayer service. But if the school board were to lose a lawsuit against a student, the board would have to pay the legal fees. Thats something few could afford these days, especially with loss in per-student funding in the last four years, according Policy Priorities. Gov. Rick Scotts proposed budget would add just $59 per student, though Senate and House versions would offer more. If those students manage to graduate and hear their more religiously themed commence ment address, theyll be greeted by a higher education system thats been stripped even further of state funding. Even as college students are graduating with record levels of leges in the nation for graduating debt-riddled students are in the is mulling cuts to higher educa tion of more than 20 percent. So lets cheer our teacher of ner, but lets not forget that while theyre winning in the classroom, battle at the state level. We need more focus on educating students and rewarding good teachers, not putting the education system on a permanent starvation diet while giving parents and teachers a venue to scapegoat each other. Our Observation Re: Louis Roneys Feb. 16 column Valentine thoughts Absolutely beautiful! Happy and blessed Valentines Day to you two! Hugs. Fonda McGowan You are both jewels. Carol Saviak You outdid yourself on this one. I sit here with tears in my eyes, knowing that all you write about your relationship with Joy is true, giving thanks for my own marriage and praying that Konrad and I will have the good fortune to grow old together. You are a brilliant man, but it is always your heart that shines most. With love, Pamela Filutowski This is so beautiful! Happy Valentine's Day! xoxo Mary Palmer You have spread love and happiness far and wide. I hope it all comes back to you tenfold today! Bonnie Trisman Happy Valentines Day to a wonderful love. Carolyn Cooper Heart hormone helps shape fat metabolism Its well-known that exercising reduces body weight because it draws on fat stores that muscle can burn as fuel. But a new study at Sanford-Burnham Medi cal Research Institute (Sanford-Burnham) suggests that the heart also plays a role in breaking down fat. In their study, published Feb. 6 in the hormones released by the heart stimu late fat cell metabolism. These hormones turn on a molecular mechanism similar to whats activated when the body is exposed to cold and burns fat to generate heat. This study adds another dimension to our understanding of how the body regulates fat tissue and may someday lead to new ways of manipulating the process with drugs to reduce weight in obese patients, or maintain it in individuals who experience pathological weight loss dur ing chronic heart failure. Exercise is always going to raise your blood pressure some, so theres the poten tial that these heart hormones called cardiac natriuretic peptides are being released and contributing to the break in Orlando, and senior author of the study. Over a period of time, natriuretic pep tides could also be leading to an increase in the numbers of brown fat cells, which we know are very important for protection against diet-induced obesity, at least in laboratory experiments. Brown fat cells, unlike white fat cells typically associated with body fat, not only store fat but also readily convert calo ries into energy a process that malfunc tions in obesity. found that the metabolic effects caused by natriuretic peptides depend largely on the ratio of two different kinds of receptors message-receiving proteins on the surface of fat cells. One, called NPRA, is a signaling receptor and its presence helps boost brown fat cells and burn white fat. receptor and seems to prevent natriuretic peptides from activating NPRA, result ing in a greater accumulation of white fat cells. When exposed to cold in this study, mice had elevated amounts of natriuretic peptides in their circulatory system. They also showed increased levels of the NPRA clearance receptor, on fat cells. As a result, fatty acids were mobilized and the calorie-burning brown fat machinery was activated in these mice. Exactly what alters the levels of the different types of recep tors is still unknown. In the next phases of our work, we hope to not only more tightly link the physiology and genetics, but also under stand how these receptors are regulated, A progressive understanding of what therefore how natriuretic peptides control white fat cell mass, could lead to new therapeutic targets to manage obesity and metabolic disease. For example, blocking agents that favor binding NPRA, could help obese patients lose weight. More information about how this sys tem works could also give hope to patients suffering from cardiac cachexia, a severe body wasting that can occur in chronic heart failure. High levels of natriuretic peptides are characteristic of heart failure and are used as diagnostic markers of the severity of the disease. One hypothesis is that the high levels of circulating natri uretic peptides seen in cardiac cachexia patients may be leading to abnormally high levels of brown fat production, ener gy expenditure and therefore weight loss. In these patients, suppressing the produc tion of the peptides might slow or halt this test this hypothesis in the lab. Heather Buschman, Ph.D. Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute Letters to the editor Send your thoughts (400 words or less) to Managing Editor Jenny Andreasson at editor@observernewspapers.com Starvation and the blame game We need more focus on educating students and rewarding good teachers. King Features Weekly ServiceFebruary 20, 2012 King Features Weekly ServiceFebruary 20, 2012

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Page 13 Thursday, Feb. 23, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Chris Jepson Perspectives The original Burger Boy Hero around my corner Im downsizing. Yes, my size. Im the original Burger Boy. I could, anytime, slide into a Steak 'n Shake and order up a double steakburger with cheese, fries and a large chocolate shake. less. Or be driving by a McDonalds before 10:30 a.m. and coast through for a tasty tasty. McDonalds still has the best fries. How about a steak from The Outback? Dont need no stinkin Bloomin Onion, just a steak and the vegetable medley. Again, a hunk of bouff properly sea soned and prepared makes me salivate just thinking about it, still sizzling and smelling like meat ought to a T-bone perhaps, where you eagerly gnaw the remaining bits of meat off the bone. Suhweeeeet. Marbled with just the perfect amount of fat. Fat so tasty-scrumptious you willingly, brazenly devour rather than trimming and setting aside. I like pot roasts, pork roasts, barbeque beef, hamburgers, a beef brisket, beef for stew, stir-fry beef or a beef kabob. Id eagerly dine, too, on roasted chicken or pork chops. In my 20s, I ravished 20-ounce steaks like they were Hershey Almond Bars. And ask, Whats next? I dont require that amount of beef today. A Once-upon-a-time. Yes, once-upona-time I ate meat. Oh, did I mention ice cream? Publix has the best chocolate is. I grew up eating vast amounts of ice cream, by the half-gallon. Spoonful after delicious spoonful. I could consume a half-gallon watching Saturday morning cartoons. Easily. Before 11 a.m. As an adult, I quit having it in the house. I can, as they say, resist any thing but temptation. When I do (have hours. I told my children that theres no good reason for not having ice cream for breakfast. I know! I know! Save the letters accusing me of child abuse. But trust me, every day. Pace yourself, fer gawds sake! Many of the foods that taste really, re ally good are, it turns out, not so good for you. Surprise of surprises, I have elevated cholesterol. I took a statin for several years but developed a statin side effect of excruciating leg cramps. My doctor got in my face in December about my course of treatment, and I said I am not looking to meds as the answer. vegan. Not a vegetarian, but a vegan. I dropped all meat and dairy cold turkey. Not one bite. Ive lost 12 pounds. Some times I go to bed hungry. I eat grains, veg twice. I have approximately 50 days to go before I retest my blood for the various cholesterol levels. My family and friends are somewhat bemused by my diet. Its just a test I tell them. If a vegan diet does not appreciably improve my cholesterol numbers, I may resume my old ways. Not true. I have become much more conscious of my diet. All I want is another healthy 20 years. Oh, and a steak and a malt and a cheeseburger and a And I didnt even mention bacon. Want proof of God? Mmmm Bacon. Jepson is a 24-year resident of Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.US in a wonderful deli around the corner on Sixth Avenue. There I met the deli owner, Arno Hel ler, and we became very friendly neigh bors. He and his wife, Ruth, heard me sing knew my profession. Arno and I, now both 91, were vol unteers in World War II, but it was only recently that I learned that Arno was a true hero of the red, white and blue. I was just a Navy guy on a ship, but Arno was a one-man army! Any enemy of America who saw Arno coming would have been wise to take it on the lam. Just weeks ago Arno was given the Bronze Star Medal for heroism only some 70 years later than he should have received it. Arno was born in Hamburg, Germany and came to the U.S. as a lucky refugee in 1939. He volunteered for the U.S. Army that year after an FBI check to be sure he was not a spy. He received his basic Army training in Georgia and was then sent to North Africa. Arno says, When youre 21, and youve never been in combat, you think nothing will harm you because youve seen too many John Wayne movies. Be lieve me, nothing will shock you as much You realize this is real and can happen to you. I also was in the invasion of Sicily in for us, it was a piece of cake, even though we took a lot of casualties. In November, we were sent to England, where we trained hard for the invasion of France. The way we realized we were in a deadly war was the nightly blackouts and the overhead drone of the RAF bombers headed for their targets in Germany. In the daytime, we watched our own B17s keeping up the continuous Ger man destruction. Everyone was preparing for the invasion. A few days before D-Day, all leaves were canceled and we were con something big was on the way. ampton, a southern British port. We kept our clothes on at all times, prepared to leave on a moments notice. On June 5, we suddenly heard and felt the ground vibration of the Nor mandy Invasion some 90 miles away. When our number was called a few hours later, we loaded on trucks, and rode to the ships, which were waiting to take us to the coast of Normandy In peacetime, I have since seen most of the places where Arno fought, and can only imagine the mayhem that went on there during the war. which is another story my story which has no place here. Arno is one of the friendliest guys youd ever want to meet. But I wouldnt want to meet him as an enemy with a gun in his hand. Arno and Ruth are spending their re tirement in Rego Park, Queens, N.Y., and About Roney: HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney) Louis Roney Play On! Heres what wpmobserver.com readers are writing about the Feb. 16 article Teacher up for top honor, about D ommerich E lementary kindergarten teacher Lisa R otenberger being nominated for O range C ounty Teacher of the Y ear. R otenberger did not capture the top honor at Tuesdays ceremony but that didnt quell the praises on our site. THA T AR T ICLE CAP T URES LISA'S SPIRI T! SHE'S A GREA T REPRESEN T A T IVE FOR OUR SCHOOL AND OCPS KAREN CAS T OR DEN T EL GOOD LUC K T O LISA, SHE IS A GREA T T EACHER AND A WONDERFUL PERSON. MY DAUGH T ER USED T O BABYSI T FOR HER AND SHE IS A GREA T M O M, T OO. DAWN HALLIBUR T ON DUNHA M CONGRA T ULA T IONS, LISA! IT WAS A JOY AND PRIVILEGE T O WI T NESS YOU IN AC T ION AND T O LEARN FRO M YOU DURING M Y T I M E A T DO MM ERICH. DO MM ERICH IS T HE RICHER FOR HAVING YOU T HERE. JOANNE TAYLOR LISA, I 'M SO GLAD YOU ARE BEING RECOGNIZED AND HONORED FOR BEING T HE WONDERFUL T EACHER YOU ARE. WHA T AN HONOR FOR DO MM ERICH ELE M EN T ARY, T OO. KAREN JOWERS HOWARD I A M INSPIRED JUS T READING ABOU T T HIS T EACHER! WHA T A WONDERFUL S T ORY! THAN K S FOR SHARING T HE AR T ICLE ABOU T HER, SUSIE! REBE K AH RICHEY LISA, I 'M SO GRA T EFUL T O HAVE HAD T HE CHANCE T O HEAR OF YOUR HEAR T FOR T EACHING DURING OUR SOCCER CARPOOL RIDES. I K NOW T EACHING CHILDREN IS YOUR PASSION AND T HE CHILDREN A T DO MM ERICH AS WELL AS OUR CO MM UNI T Y REAP T HE BENEFI T S! JULIE ST ANA K IS THE AR T ICLE CAP T URES T HE ESSENCE OF LISA'S PASSION AS AN EDUCA T OR! CONGRA T ULA T IONS ON A VERY M UCH-DESERVED HONOR. I A M FULL OF GRA T I T UDE T HA T YOU ARE M Y SIS T ER. SALLY TERRELL ANDERSEN

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FEATURING THE BACH FESTIVAL CHOIR AND ORCHESTRA AND BACH SCHOLAR DR. CHRISTOPH WOLFF WED LIKE TO GIVE SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR 77TH ANNUAL FESTIVAL SPONSORS: JOHN V. SINCLAIR ARTISTIC DIRECTOR AND CONDUCTOR