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Winter Park-Maitland observer
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00200
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park FL
Publication Date: 02-16-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates: 28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID: UF00091444:00200

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407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC USPS 00-6186 Publisher statement on page 4. Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012 50+ tax wpmobserver.com Subscribe now! Visit wpmobserver.com Will street performers get the ax in Winter Park? That ques tion was raised at Mondays City Commission meeting after some Park Avenue merchants com plained about a problem thats out of control. The Commission struck down the idea of immediately voting to propose an ordinance to regulate performers who use the side walks as their stage, sometimes playing for spare change. I dont want our citizens to feel panhandled or pressured to contribute, Commissioner Car olyn Cooper said. She proposed areas for musicians, or to poll merchants for what they would deem acceptable. Id rather say where you can do it rather than where you cant do it, she said. But for some the question wasnt of location, but of the quality of music itself. Pannul los restaurant co-owner Mike Schwartz, who is a musician himself, said he had gotten tired of the low-quality musicians in front of his restaurant. You cant come up to people and ask them for their credentials from Juilliard, Schwartz said. You cant identify good musi cians from bad musicians. The drunken trumpet player in front of the atrium at Bank of America that I had to ask to leave is not good for the avenue. Its out of control. But real estate owner Woody Woodall, who owns property on Park Avenue and also lives above the Christian Science Reading Room, said he hasnt noticed any nuisance at all along the avenue, where he estimated he dines 10 times per week. I make my living collecting rent from almost a dozen ten ants, Woodall said. Theyre all in favor of the musicians because it adds character to the avenue. Ive never seen a problem on the avenue. He did admit that some musi cians along the avenue are better than others, and that he had used his discretion to allow one group to play and sell CDs in front of his property. Mayor Ken Bradley said that hed prefer to hear input from the local merchants association and the city boards that regulate commerce. Right now Id have to vote no [on an ordinance regulating performers], Bradley said. I can certainly relate to what Mr. Schwartz is saying. I would hate to have 50 different bands play ing when I have people trying to enter my establishment. The Commission voted 5-0 to have city boards examine the issue and speak with merchants before bringing it back to a Com mission vote. In Lisa Rotenbergers Dommerich El ementary kindergarten class, no day is a boring one. There are the calming stretches before sitting on the reading mat, tracing tending to their garden, full of the ingredi ents needed to make most kids favorite food pizza. Shes not afraid to try something new, said Jason LeFebvre, a second-grade teacher at the school. And thats what makes Rotenberger spe cial. Special enough to be named the Mait land schools Teacher of the Year, and one of the Year. The winner will be announced Tuesday, Feb. 21, and will be a representative for the district. Rotenbergers philosophy is to give her students hands-on, real life learning op portunities. When they learn about how a For whatever reason, youve elected to take on a truly uphill battle in an attempt to make SunRail a success. Page 16 Letters to the editor Healthy Living Dr. Oz helped kick off the Healthy Central Florida initiative, focusing on Winter Park, Maitland and Eatonville. Page 12 Icon passes away Mark Wayne, half of the beloved Red Fox Lounge act Mark and Lorna, passed away Feb. 14. He was 82. Page 2 Calendar Little yellow rubber ducks will race through Mead Gardens pond on Saturday, Feb. 18, at the Duck Derby. Page 13 TAX DEFERREDFIXED ANNUITY RATE FOR 5 YEARS.Bob Adams 407-644-6646THE NATIONAL 5 YEAR CD RATE IS 1.34%3.35% 451 Maitland Ave, Altamonte Springs, FL 32701NEW Dermatology Ofce!407-599-SKIN (7546)*Waive co-payment up to $25 No referral needed Accepting all insurances Dr. John Cottam Dr. Ross Wheeler PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Dommerich Elementary kindergarten teacher Lisa Rotenburger reads to students. She is up for T eacher of the Y ear. Please see TEACHER on page 5 Teacher up for top honor Lisa Rotenberger, a kindergarten teacher from Dommerich Elementary, will nd out on T uesday if she is this years Orange County Public Schools T eacher of the Y ear BRITTNI JOHNSON Observer Staff Street musicians stay for now ARCHIVE PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER The Winter Park City Commission gave the go ahead for a trial run of on-street dining in Hannibal Square, but held back on deciding whether to regulate sidewalk performers. ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff

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Page 2 Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer The spotlight faded to black for Mark Wayne Tuesday morning, but not before a Fox Lounge at the Mt. Vernon Inn into the early morning hours Tuesday. He passed away later that morning of an apparent heart attack, found by wife and longtime friend and Red Fox Lounge co-worker Bet ty Lombardi said. Wayne had played in Las Vegas starting in the 1960s before eventually ending up in Winter Park. The pair, who had played at the Red Fox for more than 20 years, had gained wide fame. It grew so popular that it was rumored to be the inspiration for Will Fer Night Live skit about the Culps, an ener getic husband and wife lounge act. Wayne and Lambey played for standingroom only audiences in the small lounge since 1991, bringing an interactive, comedic style to their musical act that had fans from teens to nonagenarians. They entertained as a pair Tuesday night through Saturday. Maitland took another step come its new downtown district by moving forward with zoning regulations and standards for de velopment. The members of the Mait reading Monday, Feb. 13, the or dinance that will create a Down town Maitland Zoning District, and the building regulations and design standards it will be held to. The second reading is scheduled for Feb. 27. A public workshop with the Council as well as members of the Planning and Zoning Commis sion will be held at 6:30 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 20, at the Maitland City Hall Council Chambers to re view the ordinance further before The workshop on the 20th will be a biggie, said Dale Mc Donald, vice chairman of the Maitland Planning and Zoning Commission, during public com ment at the meeting. This, in my mind, could be the single most important ordinance you all work on in your Council terms. Zoning in The purpose of the ordinance, Verl Emrick, Community Rede velopment Agency director, said is to not only create the zoning district of downtown, but to es tablish standards as to what types of buildings and businesses commercial or residential can be built downtown, as well as reg ulations regarding incentives and bonuses, site layout, stormwater design and signage. Council members Phil Bonus and Bev Reponen opposed pass ing the ordinance forward to a second reading, in favor of recon sidering the document more fully before proceeding, but they were out-voted 3-2. When are we going to go back werent settled on in the last read ing? Bonus asked the Council. Its right of us to carefully de Mayor Howard Schieferdeck er and Councilman Ivan Valdes, however, argued that by pass ing the ordinance on to a second reading, they were not concretely approving or disapproving of the content of the document, but in stead taking the next logical step in its review process. The sooner we get a new stan dard on the books, Valdes said, the sooner we get a pattern of what we want for downtown. Moving forward Much will be decided in the coming months as to how the redevelopment project of down town Maitland will evolve, and the city is looking for input from Maitland residents and business owners as to what they envision for their city center. said. Do we do the sorts of longterm, 30-years-down-the-line planning to gratify the future of our grandkids, or do we look for revenue today and possibly cut our grandkids short? Valdes said it will be impor tant to look forward, but not for get about the present. None of us want a beautiful downtown of storefronts that are vacant, he said. But, he pointed out, its important to evaluate develop present, or they will seek devel opment elsewhere. Somewhere along the line there has to be a balance. A balance, the mayor wants the publics input on. Please come and participate in this because this is going to be your downtown, Schieferdeck er said. Its important that it is something we can be proud of. Our Town(407) 366-8696 Fax (407) 359-2118 P.O. Box 4548 Winter Park, FL 32793Insertions in editions and months as shown:____Waterford Lakes ____College Park/Orlando ____Winter Park/Maitland ____Sweetwater/Heathrow ____Tuscawilla/Winter Springs ____Oviedo ____Baldwin Park/E. Winter ParkPlease initial your agreement with the following:____ I approve this ad to appear in Our Town as shown here OR ____ I approve this ad with minor changes as clearly marked (How many changes are marked? _____) ____ Phone number and address are correct I understand that payment for this ad is due per initial agreement.Signed ____________________________________We appreciate your prompt response, as our deadline is approaching.*Colors represented on this proof may not be an exact match of the colors produced when printed on our offset press.X OCT 2009 407-644-7760 $100 to $500 OFFAny Servicewith this ad On Call 24 Hours A DayServing Central Florida Since the s Let Us Handle Your Emergency!Call Our Hotline 877-936-8998 www.EmergencyServices24.comServing Floridas Residential & Commercial Community Since 1990 IMMEDIAT E RESPONSE Whats Your Emergency?CBC057844 F lood l Leaks l Mold l F ire l Storm l Smoke l Roong Get the look you deserve ... Contact us at 4079146445 Were 100% mobile Car Wash & Wax $15* Insured Business For a limited time only. Restrictions ap ply due to size and condition of vehicle. Mark and Lornas Mark Wayne dies ARCHIVE PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Mark Wayne and Lorna Lambey play a packed Red Fox Lounge in December 2008. Mark passed away on Feb. 14. Council works to dene new downtown SARAH WILSON Observer Staff For more information on ordinances regarding the zoning of the Downtown Maitland Zoning District, go to itsmymaitland.com and look under Maitland News for the Downtown Maitland Future Land Use District Rezoning documents. T o voice your concerns and opinions on what you would like to see and not see developed in the new downtown Maitland, come out to the Planning and Zoning workshop at 6:30 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 20, at the Maitland City Hall Council Chambers. Maitland is seeking public input on Monday, Feb. 20, on how to dene the redevelopment of downtown core ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff

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Page 4 Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer USPS 00-6186 ISSN 1064-3613 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835-5705 Member of: Goldenrod Chamber of Commerce Publisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor. Submission does not guarantee publication. Columnists opinions are made independently of the newspaper. All rights reserved. Winter Park / Maitland Observer 2012 Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster www.wpmobserver.com | Phone: 407-563-7000 | Fax: 407-563-7099 | editor@observernewspapers.com P.O Box 2426 Winter Park, FL 32790 Published Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012 CONT ACTS Volume 24, Issue Number 7 PUBLISHER Kyle Taylor 407-563-7009 kyle@observernewspapers.com MANAGING EDITOR Jenny Andreasson 407-563-7026 editor@observernewspapers.com DESIGNER Jonathan Gallagher 407-563-7054 jgallagher@observernewspapers.com REPOR TERS Jenny Andreasson 407-563-7026 editor@observernewspapers.com Isaac Babcock 407-563-7023 isaacb@observernewspapers.com LEGALS | CLASSIFIEDS Ashley McBride legal@FLAlegals.com classieds@observernewspapers.com COPY EDITORS Isaac Babcock isaacb@observernewspapers.com Sarah Wilson COLUMNISTS Chris Jepson Jepson@MediAmerica.us Louis Roney LRoney@c.rr.com Josh Garrick joshgarrick9@gmail.com ADVER TISING SALES MANAGER Tracy Craft 407-515-2605 tcraft@observernewspapers.com SUBSCRIPTIONS | CIRCULATION Jackie Candelaria 407-563-7013 INTERN Andy Ceballos Business Briefs Community Bulletin On Jan. 25, the Park A venue Area Asso ciation hosted its annual member awards at the Meet & Greet. Members of the associa tion voted for various categories: Best A pparel MerchantTuni Best Beauty MemberGary Lambert Salon and Spa Best Cultural Attraction MemberCharles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art Best Restaurant/Specialty FoodThe An cient Olive Best Gift/Specialty StoreTen Thousand Villages Best Professional Service ProviderGrafton Wealth Management at Merrill Lynch Best Media/PublicationWinter Park Mag azine 2011 Committee Chairman of the Y earSarah Grafton DeVoe for Winter Park Sip & Stroll Volunteer of the Y earSarah Grafton De Voe The Edyth Bush Charitable Foundation elect ed Elizabeth Dvorak to its esteemed Board of Directors. Dvorak is chief executive ofcer and owner of Workscapes Inc. NAI Realvest recently negotiated a new lease agreement that includes an option for the tenant to buy the property at 2325 Clark St. in A popka. Jonathan Perry Shareholder in the Orlando ofce of Greenberg T raurig, was elected to serve on the Board of Directors for The Cen tral Florida Partnership. Daniel OKeefe Shareholder of Moore Ste phens Lovelace, has been elected to serve as chairman of the Board of Directors for the Seminole State College Foundation. Attorney Melody Lynch with Lowndes, Drosdick, Doster, Kantor & Reed, spoke about her Guardian Ad Litem (GAL) work in volving a pregnant runaway teenager during a program titled Practicing with Profession alism hosted by The Florida Bar. Susan Vernon-Devlin director of Public Relations at Massey Communications, has joined the Arts and Cultural Alliance of Cen tral Floridas board. Keep Winter Park Beautiful (KWPB) is now accepting Pocket Park Restoration Project grant applications. A pply for funds to sup port physical improvements. Complete de tails regarding the Pocket Park Restoration Project and grant applications can be found at www.kwpb.org under Projects. Garage sale The Maitland Mens Club is having its annual Garage Sale on March 2-3 in the former Winn-Dixie park ing lot in Maitland. The Club uses the proceeds to support Christ mas for Children. The Mens Club is accepting donations every Sat urday morning in the Royal Plaza shopping center parking lot from 8 a.m. to noon, and it has trucks and trailers available to schedule pickups. Call Phil Bonus at 407-6948737 for more information. State of the city CMF Public Media has posted Winter Park: State of the City Ad dress 2012. Hear the 2012 Win ter Park State of the City Address presented by Mayor Ken Bradley. In a separate segment, hear the pre sentation of the Employee of the Y ear Awards and remarks by the luncheon sponsors. Visit tinyurl. com/cmfwpaddress Student honors Grace G. McNair of Maitland has been named to the Deans List for the fall semester at Samford Uni versity. Jesse Carl Smith V of Winter Park has been named to the Deans List at Clemson University for the fall 2011 semester. Jonathan Hill, a resident of Maitland and a senior at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, is listed on the honor roll with distinction. Darian A. Welsh of Winter Park, a SUNY Canton Construction T ech nology Management major, made the Deans List. Send submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com Hiaasen drops in On Feb. 2, three-time Pulitzer Prize-nominee and best-selling novelist Carl Hiaasen kicked-off Rollins Col leges Winter With the Writers event. Throughout the event, renowned writers share their work and exper tise with students and the community. Visit rollins.edu/winterwiththewriters for an event schedule. Presidential scholars T rinity Preparatory School seniors Harry Pham of Win ter Park and Sam Savitz have been selected as can didates for the 2012 United States Presidential Scholars Program, one of the na tions highest honors for high school students, as a result of their outstanding perfor mance on the ACT or the College Board SAT They are among the 3,000 candidates recently invited to submit ap plications for the program competition. About 20 males and 20 females from each state are part of the program competition each year. False alarm at Wine Room On Saturday Jan. 28, at about 11:45 p.m., a white female activated the re alarm at the Wine Room located at 270 S Park Ave. in Winter Park. This is a photograph of the suspect. If you have any information that could lead to identifying her, please contact Crime line at 407-423-TIPS or the Win ter Park Police Department at 407-644-1313. Invention convention On Wednesday, Feb. 1, Jewish Academy of Orlando held its annual Rube Goldberg Invention Convention in the schools Multipurpose Room. Their challenge was to work in groups to create a machine, using at least 10 steps and no form of water or electricity to put a paper wad into a trash bin. They had to be able to t their contrap tions (unassembled) into two shoeboxes and then assemble the full machine in less than 10 minutes. Pictured are team members Max Reis, Elizabeth Gordon, and Sam Freed rejoicing when their inven tion, The Paper T osser 2000, successfully completed its task.

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Page 5 Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer apart and see whats inside. They get their hands dirty in their pizza garden. They greet each other, and guests, politely each morning. They sing and move, and learn. Principal Junella Handley said theres never been a time when shes entered Rotenbergers class and they werent doing something new and exciting. She brings learning to life, Handley said. Shes also great at following through on the idea of teaching the whole child, colleagues said. Rotenberger focuses on being healthy through incorporating movement into teaching, chal lenges and reaches each child at their level, and treats them with the caring shed give her own family. Rotenberger loves watch ing them make new friends, in cluding everyone in their play and watching them learn to care about each other. Shes the most giving teacher LeFebvre said hes ever met. They know that she cares about them; shes so patient and loving, said Rebekah Dooley, a theyre safe with her. Your goal is to love them and to help them to reach their fullest potential in one learning year, and to encourage them, Rotenberger said. Not only does she love seeing them grow as people, but as stu dents too. There are little magi cal moments that she gets to see, when what shes teaching clicks in their minds. She sees them becom ing mathematicians, deep think ers, problem solvers and readers. When youre teaching chil dren to write, to see those mo ments when all those skills that youve been teaching start to re ally come together and you see its just beautiful, she said. It is amazing. Its always a miracle to me every year to watch it hap pen. Rotenberger wasnt always a kindergarten teacher. Shes taught a few older grades, but when she had her own children who she said were her best teachers a passion was created for educating the tiniest students. And being a role model for her family is what has pushed her to stay so invest ed in her school and its learning community of teachers and par ents. She wants her three children to understand the importance of community involvement. Her husband and children all spent time on the schools community garden, planting and building. Rotenberger takes her commit ment to helping others further by being a role model for other teach ers, as well. Shes never resistant to sharing her ideas, teaching ex pertise or mentoring new teach ers. LeFebvre was one of three new kindergarten teachers when he started at Dommerich, and said she was always a welcoming ear for questions, and is still someone who is concerned with the success of the whole school, not just her own class. Her doors always open, her hearts always open, Handley said. New Construction!4 bed / 2.5 bath / 2190 sq ft $339,000 808 Hamilton Place Court Winter Park, FL 32789 Commerce Brokerage, LLC407-566-1636 250 North Orlando Avenue Winter Park, Florida 32789 407.677.9777 A Premier Flooring Source nCARPETOODTONE TILELAMINATE AREA RUGINDO TREATMENT Featuring Exquisite Products for Residential & Commercial Projects Custom Design and Quality Installationn ALL IN MINIATURE & ALL FOR SALE pm Present this ad for $1 off Sunday Adult AdmissionInformation & Directions: 407-351-3500 ext. 0 or www.mollycromwell.com2012 ORLANDO DOLLHOUSE MINIATURES FESTIVAL 6515 International Drive TEACHER | Rotenberger focuses on the idea of teaching the whole child, incorporating health initiatives C ONTINUED FROM FRONT P AGE Out of 188 nominees, Lisa Rotenberger from Dommerich Elementary is one of ve nalists for Orange County Public Schools Teacher of the Year. She will nd out if she won at a ceremony held on Feb. 21. Learn more PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Dommerich Elementary teacher Lisa Rotenburger tends the schools pizza garden.

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Page 6 Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer The Eagles boys basketball shocking turnaround over last season with a 70-59 throttling of Mainland to win their district championship on Feb. 11. The win was also sweet revenge for Edge water, whose only district loss had come at the hands of Mainland on Jan. 24. With the win the Eagles avenged one of the worst seasons in school history, when they went 1-25 last season. The Buccaneers will now host Palm Bay for the ping off at 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 16. Winter Park The momentum from a sur prise win over East River on Feb. 7 wasnt enough to carry the Wild cats to a second straight district victory against Timber Creek, as The loss quickly put the brakes on an improbable playoff run by who hadnt won a district game all season before unexpectedly shot at going deeper into the post season. they were in an equally tough po sition, facing one of the strongest teams in the district while facing elimination from the postseason altogether. With one more win, they could have been set for re gional action. But the Wildcats found them selves overwhelmed from the offense that put up 20 points in the more than kept pace in the second quarter, out-shooting the Wolves the second half. As their defense waned in the fourth quarter, the Wildcats let the Wolves again pile nal quarter. Its TAX time. Appointments Available 7 Days a Week!Tax Form Processing LLC2400 N Forsyth Rd., Suite 101 Orlando, FL 32807Tel: (407) 657-6336www.TaxFormProcessing.com Proudly Serving the Orlando Area for 17 years! Scan QR Code Sports Briefs Tomas Nido, a senior catcher at Or angewood Christian School in Mait land, has been named by the staff at Collegiate Baseball as a First T eam Pre-Season Louisville Slugger Base ball All-American. Nido is considered one of the top high school catchers in the country and has signed a National Letter of Intent to play baseball at Florida State University in the fall. In 2011, T omas broke the Central Florida single season homerun record with 17 homeruns, posted a .577 batting average and had 64 RBIs. He was in strumental in leading the 2011 Rams to a FHSAA 2A State Runner-up nish and his 17 homeruns led a team that broke the Florida High School homer un record for a single season with 83 homeruns. This past fall, T omas was chosen by the Puerto Rico Olympic Committee to participate in the Pan American Junior Baseball T ourna ment held in Cartagena, Colombia. David Lowrey, a senior wide receiver on the Orangewood Christian School in Maitland varsity football team, has chosen to play football next season at Elon University in Elon, N.C., as a pre ferred walk-on. Lowrey led Central Florida, in all eight FHSAA classica tions, with 14 touchdowns this sea son, was second in receiving yards with 954, and averaged 23.3 yards a catch. This season he had more than 1,700 all-purpose yards with a total of 22 touchdowns. For his career at Orangewood, David had 3,923 allpurpose yards and 52 touchdowns. Additionally, he carries above a 4.0 grade point average, is a member of the National Honor Society, and plays centereld on the Rams baseball team that were State Semi-Finalists in 2010 and State Runner-up in 2011. He is the son of Mark and Susan Low rey and has three brothers Mark, 21, Brian, 19, and John, 14. Orangewood Christian sophomore Forrest Wall was named by Colle giate Baseball as one of the top high school baseball players in Florida. In 2011, Wall had a .404 batting aver age with four homeruns and 22 RBI. This past fall, he was invited to the USA Baseball 16 and under trials in North Carolina and in 2012, he hopes to lead the Rams back to the FHSAA State Baseball Final Four. Alexis Prince of Edgewater High School has joined the ranks of high school basketballs elite with her selection to the 2012 McDonalds All-American High School Basketball Girls East T eam. Announcement of her selection came during a Feb. 9 selec tion show on ESPNU. The 11th Annual Girls Game will tip off at 6 p.m. Cen tral T ime on Wednesday, March 28, inside Chicagos United Center, and will broadcast live on ESPNU. Alexis Prince will join 23 other top female prep players throughout the country. As a member of the Edgewater Eagles team, she hit the 1,000-point mark by her sophomore year. Princes high school coach is Malcolm Lewis. She has signed with Baylor University. We couldnt be more excited about Alexis receiving this great honor, Orlando McDonalds Owner/Opera tor Jim Gilchrist, a former basketball player himself, said. She epitomizes what it means to be a student athlete. Not only is she setting records on the court, but she is making her mark in the classroom as well, as a National Honor Society scholar. Send sports news submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com PHOTO COUR TESY OF ORANGEWOOD CHRISTIAN SCHOOL David Lowrey sits with father Mark, brother John (eighth-grader at OCS), and mother Sue. PHOTO COUR TESY OF ORANGEWOOD CHRISTIAN SCHOOL Tomas Nido poses with Coach Scott Hilinski, left, and Assistant Coach Kevin Davidson. PHOTO COUR TESY OF MCDONALDS Alexis Prince of Edgewater poses with Orlando McDonalds Owner/Operator Jim Gilchrist. Eagles complete big turnaround ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff

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Page 7 Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer on how you can save money and conserve water by reducing the amount of water you give your thirsty lawn. Youve already heard from our Public Works Depart ment about how to implement the water wise tips (rain sensors and but there are other ways to reduce your water bill and prevent an un expectedly large water bill. There are some proactive steps you can take to be sure you are conserving as much as possible at home. Find good place to start. A leaky toilet or faucet can waste thousands of gallons of water each month, put ting a hefty dent in your wallet. water than you think. Installing can dramatically reduce your in door water consumption without reduced performance. Learning to read your water meter can pay off. Its easy to do, and a way to determine if you have a leak in your home. First, turn off all the water in your house. Remember to wait for the hot water heater and ice-cube tion of water softeners. Next, go to your water meter and jot down all the numbers you see. To check for slow leaks, read your water meter before and after a one-hour peri od when no water is being used. If the readings are different after the one-hour period, you have a leak. Some areas to check include toilets, faucets, malfunctioning water softeners, swimming pools, water heaters and faulty irrigation leaks, foundation leaks and leaks behind walls. These may require the assistance of a plumber to lo cate. Toilet leaks are often silent, al lowing loss of water to go unde tected for long periods of time. Some toilets may produce a run ning water sound that is easy to hear. Some leaks are visible as a small trickle running from the rim to the water in the bowl. The av erage leaky toilet can waste about 200 gallons of water per day. To detect silent leaks, remove the lid from the toilet tank, remove any clear water in the bowl, then add a few drops of food coloring to the tank. If the tank is leaking, color will appear in the bowl within 30 minutes. Flush as soon as the test is complete. To learn about other ways to conserve water in your home site sponsored by the Saint Johns River Management District. Roxanne Long, Utility Bill ing Supervisor, city of Maitland Council Meeting of Feb. 13 The Maitland City Council met on Feb. 13, at 6:30 p.m. in the City Hall Council Chambers. Below is a synopsis of that meeting. The next regular scheduled Council meeting will be held on Monday, Feb. 27. Public Hearings: Advanced to Second Reading an ordinance to establish a Down town Maitland Zoning District and table of permitted, accessory, conditional and prohibited uses within the DMZD. Advanced to Second Reading an ordinance to rezone properties within the Downtown Maitland Zoning District. Adopted an ordinance to amend Chapter 7.5 Land Devel opment Procedures, to create a process within the Maitland City Code for Amendments to Devel opment Agreements. Consent Agenda: Approved the Council Minutes of Jan. 23 and received various Advisory Board minutes. Accepted the results of the 2012 Municipal Election. Election results are posted on the citys web page. Awarded the city towing/ wrecker services contract to TriCounty Towing, the lowest bidder to respond to an RFB advertised on Nov. 23. Awarded a contract to R.W. Paul Construction Inc. in the amount of $135,393.66 for the in stallation of sidewalks and retain ing walls on Arapaho Trail from Algonquin Trail to Thunderbird Trail. Awarded a contract to Barra cuda Building Corporation in the Mohawk Trail. Approved the upgrade of Lift submersible station in lieu of Lift Station #3 in the FY 2012 Sanitary Sewer System Capital Improve ments Program. Decisions: Passed Resolutions to allow Use Agreement with the Florida Department of Transportation to facilitate the design, construction and maintenance of the Maitland Commuter Rail Station entryway, parking lot, and other station en Locally Funded Agreement with the Florida Department of Trans portation to provide funding to ward the Maitland Commuter Rail Station entryway, parking lot, canopies and other station en hancements. Authorized the execution of a Joint Participation Agreement with the Florida Department of Transportation for the Art in Tran sit Program, allowing for the city to participate in the program to art preferences. To listen to a recording of the meeting, visit www.itsmymait land.com Maitland Coin & Currency Show Sunday Feb. 199:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.Maitland Civic Center 641 South Maitland Avenue Maitland, FL 32751FREE ADMISSIONShow open to the public Buy Sell Trade AppraisalsFor more information call or visitOrlando Coin Exchange 6301 S. Orange Avenue Orlando, FL 32809www.MaitlandCoinShow.comorlandocoinexchange@gmail.com407-730-3116 and caterers, as well as beer, wine and desserts Maitland City Talk BY HOW ARD SCHIEFERDECKER MAYOR Water conservation tips The average leaky toilet can waste about 200 gallons of water per day.

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Page 8 Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Mayors Oath of Ofce Ceremony A reception was held at the Ra chel D. Murrah Civic Center on Feb. 13, celebrating the re-election of Mayor Kenneth Bradley. Imme diately following the reception, Mayor Bradley was sworn in by Clerk of the Courts, as he took his lations Mayor Bradley! Feb. 13 City Commission Meeting highlights There was a City Commis sion meeting held on Feb. 13, at 3:30 p.m., at the Rachel D. Mur rah Civic Center. Below are a few highlights of decisions that were made: Mayors Report The board appointments to the Code Enforcement Board and Board were approved. City Managers Report The City Commission Strategic Planning Session was scheduled for Wednesday, April 4. Non-action items The December 2011 Financial Report was presented and ac cepted. Consent Agenda The minutes of Jan. 23 meeting tion. The various purchases and contracts were approved (a com plete list can be found at www.cit yofwinterpark.org > Government > City Commission > Agenda The purchase of a Cisco Router necessary to enhance police de partment dispatch connectivity was approved. The purchase of computer soft ware required operating systems and four desktop computer work stations for the police department was approved. Free electric vehicle charging services for an initial promotion al/evaluation period with the fees to be reviewed semi-annually in accordance with the fee schedule was approved. The agreement for transfer of Wastewater Service for 2021 N. Goldenrod Road and authorize the mayor to execute the agree ment was approved. Action Items Requiring Discussion Street musicians and perform ers on Park Avenue were dis cussed and the issue was directed to be reviewed further by the CRA Advisory Board and the Park Area Avenue Task Force. The Urban Land Institute Tech nical Assistance Panel Program for West Fairbanks Redevelop ment Evaluation was approved. The proposed on-street din ing for Hannibal Square East was discussed and a trial period until April 29 for this request was ap proved and will be reviewed at the conclusion of the trial period need to be made. Public Hearings The following decisions were made on the request of Denning Partners, Ltd., for the property at nance changing the designation of Single-Family Residential to High Density Residential was denied. nance changing the designation of Single-Family Residential to Multi-Family was denied. The resolution calling for a public hearing ad valorem as sessment for properties abutting to fund the installation of under ground electrical/BHN facilities was approved. The resolution delegating au thority to the Code Enforcement Board and under emergency con ditions forward to the city manag er to negotiate code enforcement liens and to execute satisfactions or releases of code enforcement liens was approved with revi sions. nance establishing parking restric tions at electric charging stations was approved. The conditions of approval for extension of conditional use for the parking garage expansion at 655 W. Morse Blvd. pursuant to the settlement agreement was ap proved. A full copy of the Feb. 13 City Commission minutes will be avail at www.cityofwinterpark.org the week of Feb. 27, pending approval by the City Commission. Electric usage monitors Wondering how much electric TV you got for Christmas uses? Check out an electric usage moni tor at the Winter Park Public Li New England Ave. today. Citys website has gone mobile When any smart phone user entering www.cityofwinterpark. org, they will automatically be redirected to the new mobile ver sion of the citys site. The main purpose of this mobile version is to provide a more viewerand userfriendly version of the site via a smart phone. The mobile site provides easy access to the most popular web pages as viewed from a smart phone in addition to providing additional information regarding government meetings. Another unique feature is allowing smart phone users the ability to report a power outage directly from their smart phone under the utilities tab. Because the use of smartphones is growing and will continue to grow, the city is responding to this technological growth and of fering an easier way to access city information via this tool. Just in 2011 alone, about 51,500 mobile users visited our site using nine different operating systems with the iPhone, iPad and Android as the most frequent visitors. Visit the citys ofcial website at www. cityofwinterpark.org, nd us on Facebook, and follow us on T witter. Presented in partnership with Observe r Winter Park / Maitland 7:45 a.m. Rachel D. Murrah Civic Center 1050 W. Morse Blvd., Winter Park, FL 32789 Bill Seyfried, Professor of Economics Ronald Piccolo, Associate Professor of Management Craig McAllaster, Dean & Profe ssor of Management, Rollins MBA $25 Members (in advance) / $30 Non-members and at the door Reservations at www.winter park.org or call (407) 644-8281 Additional support provided by: Hosted by: Enter your chiliShowcase your business! Be a sponsor or a vendorVolunteers needed PROCEEDS TOBENEFITTHANK YOU TO SOME OF OUR SPONSORSPRESENTED BY Winter Park City Talk BY RANDY KNIGHT CITY MANAGER Bradley takes oath PHOTO COUR TESY OF WINTER P ARK Winter Park Mayor Ken Bradley takes the oath of ofce administered by Orange County Clerk Lydia Gardner, while his wife, Ruth, looks on. He won a second term on Jan. 31.

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Page 9 Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Lifestyles Hes hiked for miles to reach Costa Rican tribes in the jungle, felt his hotel shake as a bomb ex ploded blocks away and crossed paths taken by kidnappers days before, and hes done it all alone. Jorge Moreno, a Kissimmee resident and barber at Kennedys All American Barber Club in Win ter Park, has done all of this and more in the name of charity. In 20 years, hes gone on mis sion trips to 11 countries sharing his Christian beliefs, supplying clothing and medicine, building homes and churches, and most of all, inspiring hope. Theres so much need around the world, Moreno said. Driving around the world On March 1, Moreno plans to leave his home once again for what he hopes will be an aroundthe-world missionary trip, visit ing 17 countries, from Puerto Rico Hell do it all in a passenger and sink. He estimates the whole trip will cost more than $47,000. Hes only raised $18,000, but hes not worried a bit. Wherever my last dollar will take me, thats where my last des tination will be, he said. Most of that $12,000 has come out of Morenos own pocket, but to him, this mission is worth more than any material item. We get caught up in this soci etal pressure to acquire things, to be able to show the world that we have this and we have that, and yet we become slaves to the things we own, he said. When we go outside our comfort area, we real ize that there are people who need things that we have abundant here. I feel like this is just answering act, Cindy Miner, his friend and co-worker at Kennedys, said. Moreno has seen the need around the world through his pre vious mission trips, but hes also seen the humble happiness and giving hearts of people. When he visits a town, the people, who are lacking so much, open their homes to him. He said he spreads himself thin to the residents who demand a chance to show their gratitude for the clothing and medicine he brings. They make a meal of their best food even if that may be an iguana in the Costa Rican jungle; a preacher will offer his bed and hugs and smiles and excitement from children as he pulls out soc cer balls for them to play with. While they are gracious, he knows it will never be enough. You know they need more than what youve given them, he said. You have to be strong. You really develop a sense of appreciation for what you have and who you have around you, his daughter, Melissa Moreno, said. Defying danger But still, those moments are when its all worth it. Where Moreno travels is not always safe. Political turmoil can erupt at any moment; hes spent time walking ing military men, ridden in buses that were the scenes of kidnap pings and had bombs explode so near that the ground rumbled be neath him. Moreno said he must do it alone, because no one will take the risks and go to the lengths he does to help the people. Hes a true person, said Luis Soriano, a fellow barber at Ken nedys. While not many would go to the lengths he does, Moreno hopes that his trips and his story will inspire others to do something. Chuck Oliver, a friend and client at Kennedys, said Morenos mis sion has made him take a look at what he can do to step up his own level of giving back. He pushes me to be better, Oliver said. When he gets back, Moreno said theres always a period of ad justment. He cant forget the fami lies hes helped. Each story hes heard stays in his mind and in his heart, which just pushes him to continue. I dont want to change the world, Moreno said. I just want to make it better. Were back! Support the Healthy Lifestyle Initiatives of Dommerich Elementary School by participating in our 4th Annual 5K (3.1 mile) Run and 1-Mile Dash.REGISTER ONLINE AT ChiefsOnTheRun.comor download a registration form at www.des.ocps.netSA T URD A Y FEBRUARY 25, 20 1 2DOMMERICH ELEMENTARY PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Jorge Moreno, a Kissimmee resident and barber at Kennedys All American Barber Club, will set out on March 1 for what he hopes will be an around-the-world missionary trip. Seventeen countries, one mission A barber from Winter Parks own Kennedys Barber Club will embark on a voyage to bring hope to the needy BRITTNI JOHNSON Observer Staff T o learn more about Jorge Morenos trip, and to donate to his cause, visit http:// jmmisionmundial.com/Home_ Page.php Learn more

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Page 10 Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Family Calendar Porter Goss has worn many hats newspaper co-founder, mayor of a small island, congress man and most recently, CIA di rector. On Sunday, hell join the ranks of James Cagney, Edward R. Murrow and Arnold Palmer as a page in the Animated Maga zine. tors scheduled to present their submissions in person on Sunday, Feb. 19 at Winter Park Institutes Animated Magazine event at Rol lins College. Goss presentation, Brand USA in the World Today, focuses on how we see ourselves as Amer icans and how others view us in the global market. I think that many people called the last century the century of America, and some people have created this expectation that the next century will be the century of the globe, of globalization, Goss said. I think its worth taking a look at what our role is how we and how we go abroad in the world today as the worlds super power. began in December of 1926 when Holt, eighth president of Rollins College, met with Dr. Edwin Gro ver, newly appointed professor of books, to discuss the idea, ac cording to an article published by Wenxian Zhang, head of archives and special collections at Rollins. Zhang wrote that Grover ex pressed reluctance when remind advertising and the expense of printing, supplies and subscrip tions. Holt then explained to Gro ver that he didnt intend to create a print publication, but rather, something where contributors would present their content in issue of the Animated Magazine was published. such as Cordell Hull, secretary of state during the administra tion of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, and former FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover. Contributors came at their own expense and without compensation. The Winter Park Institute now provides for travel expenses, but speakers are not compensated for their contribu tions. Gail Sinclair, executive director of the Winter Park Institute, said last years event drew more than 500 subscribers, which is small relative to the thousands that once came. She said the ability to see originally why people came to this event. One of the main differences is seen on television, she said. The spectacle of it was something quite amazing. What other chance could people in this area have to ures that Hamilton Holt brought in? Sinclair said the process of selecting speakers has changed from the days of Holt, as he had a unique ability to draw big names to the event. We are working a little more locally than what Hamilton Holt did, because this is a differ ent world than what he was work ing in, she said. Other speakers at the Feb. 19 event will include Jim Evans, a former major league baseball umpire who will provide a be hind-the-scenes look at baseball, as well as Janice Aria, director of Animal Stewardship for Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey circus. Aria will discuss the role that the Ringling Bros. Center for Elephant Conservation plays in the future of the endangered Asian elephant. Billy Collins, editor of the Ani mated Magazine, describes the event as a live performance, where his job is to present the speakers and keep the pages of the maga zine turning. Holt was famous for having a huge blue pencil that he would use to cross people off if they ran over time. Collins said he has not had to do this yet. The more condensed the presentations, the more the per formance feels like a magazine, because the pages keep turning, and we move from one piece to another, he said. In the past, the magazine car ried some general themes to it. Jack Lane, professor emeritus of American history at Rollins, said that the theme would be some thing relevant to the current time period, such as international rela tions. He said Holt would balance heavier content with lighter mate rial. One year, there was a very famous snake expert here in Flor ida, Lane said, and he had him come down and display all the snakes that he collected over the years. Lenten Schedule February 22 Ash Wednesday Mass 7:30pm April 1 Palm Sunday Mass 11:00am April 5 Holy Thursday Mass 7:30pm April 6 Good Friday Liturgy 7:30pm April 7 Holy Saturday Mass 7:30pm April 8 Easter Sunday Mass 11:00am St. Dorothy Catholic Community301 West New England Avenue Winter Park, FL 32790 www.stdorothycatholiccommunity.org 407-610-5109Lenten Series ALL FAITHS WELCOMECHRIST IN THE STRANGEST PLACESWritten by seminary professor Dr. Reed LessingFridays of Lent: February 24; March 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 7:30 PM PHOTOS COUR TESY OF ROLLINS COLLEGE Rollins Colleges Animated Magazine event got its start in 1927. Coordinated by college President Hamilton Holt, the event would draw thousands of people to campus. Below, Animated Magazine Editor Billy Collins holds a huge blue pencil used to move the event along. Rollins recreates piece of history AND Y CEBALLOS Observer Staff Hamilton Holt and Dr. Edwin Grover created The Animated Magazine in December 1926. At its peak, eight to 10 thousand people gathered at Rollins to attend the annual gathering. Visit tinyurl. com/AnimatedMagazine Learn more The Holocaust Memorial Resource and Education Center presents How Children Become Up standers. This presentation will examine bystander behavior and identify ways to help children safely intervene when they wit ness bullying. The forum is at the Center at 6 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 16. The Great Duck Derby fea tures rubber duck races and free family activities on Saturday, Feb. 18. The little yellow rubber ducks will race in the Mead Garden pond at 12:15 and 1 p.m. The event is free. Please join the Maitland Public Library for our second Annual T ween/T een Mardi Gras Dance Party from 7-9 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 18. Its open to students in fth through eighth grade. Admis sion is free. It is located at 501 S. Maitland Ave. in Maitland. Call 407-647-7700 or email jdolce@ maitlandpubliclibrary.org The Maitland Public Library has several weekly events through February. Each Tuesday at 10:30 a.m. it hosts preschool story time & craft time. Each Thursday at 10:30 a.m. it hosts baby time sto ries & activity. Each Thursday at 4 p.m., it hosts Reading Buddies. Any kindergarten through fthgraders who want to enhance their reading skills are welcome to attend. No registration necessary. Call 407-647-7700. ArtsFest is Feb. 1-29. All events are free and open to the public, although some offerings have limited seating and capacity. Visit ArtsFestFL.com for more informa tion. The Winter Park Farmers Mar ket is held from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Saturday at 200 W. New England Ave. Visit CityofWinter Park.org The Maitland Farmers Market is from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. every Sunday. It is located at Lake Lily Park. For more information, visit ItsMyMaitland.com or call 407539-6268. Food T ruck Caf is from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. every Wednesday at Lake Lily Park in Maitland. The Winter Park Food T ruck Stop is located at 1127 N. Orlando Ave. in Winter Park, and is open for food trucks 24/7. Visit Facebook at http://tinyurl.com/FoodTruckStop Music at the Casa is a free week ly open house from noon to 3 p.m. on Sundays, featuring live perfor mances and tours of the historic Casa Feliz, at 656 N. Park Ave., in Winter Park. For more information, visit CasaFeliz.us or call 407-6288200 ext. 3. Upcoming perfor mances include: Peter Thatcher on Feb. 19, and Shannon Caine of Beautiful Music on Feb. 26. Send submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com

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Page 11 Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer FEATURING THE BACH FESTIVAL CHOIR AND ORCHESTRA AND BACH SCHOLAR DR. CHRISTOPH WOLFF JOHN V. SINCLAIR ARTISTIC DIRECTOR AND CONDUCTOR WED LIKE TO GIVE SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR 77TH ANNUAL FESTIVAL SPONSORS: This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH O RLANDO A VE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.E NZIAN.ORG Held Over! Final Week! THE AR TIST Fri Sun 3:45PM 6:30PM 9:15PM Mon, T ue, Thurs 6:30PM 9:15PM Wed 6:30pm FilmSlam Sunday 1PM Crispin Hellion Glovers Big Slide Show Part 2 Wed 9:30PM Wednesday Night Pitcher Show FRIDA Y 8PM FREE Feb. 18 Dyers BBQ Invite Mayor Buddy Dyer invites Central Florida residents to the sixth annual Blues B-Q, a free Blues Festival featuring headlin ers Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue and The Lee Boys. Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue has continued to grow their fan base since the release of their Grammy-nominated debut album, Backatown, in 2010. Local talent includes The Kevin Maines Band, CeCe Teneal and the BB King All Star Band. BBQ from Bubbalous Bodacious and Porkies Original will be avail able for purchase. The Blues B-Q will take place from 3 p.m. to 10 p.m. on Saturday, Feb.18, at the Church Street Plaza in front of Amway Center, 400 W. Church St. Visit cityoforlando.net/parking Feb. 21 Board Barristers (and drug-supplier) Friar Lau the part he played in the young lovers untimely deaths. The Orlando Shakespeare Theaters Board Barristers will present 21, at the Shakespeare Center. Based on the current produc tion of Romeo and Juliet, in which Prince Escalus declares: Some shall be pardoned, and some punished. (The PrinceDude is serious about justice.) Actors from Romeo and Juliet (running through March 17) will participate. Kimberly Ashby, a shareholder at Akerman Sen shareholder at Foley & Lardner, will serve as advocates for the parties. The evening begins at 5:30 p.m. with drinks and hors doeuvres. Tickets are $25 ($15 for students) and include one drink ticket. Call 407-447-1700 or visit orlandoshakes.org Feb. 22 Spam-A-Lot The funniest, silliest, most Vegas-like show of the season will slide into Daytona on its canned ham hiney for one-nightonly on Wednesday, Feb. 22, at the Peabody Auditorium. That show is Monty Python's Spamalot, a musical comedy Python and the Holy Grail, and two hours I have ever spent in irreverent parody of the legend of King Arthur, but with a decidedly Vegas-like appreciation for scant ily clad showgirls. The Broadway production opened in 2005 and won three Tony Awards includ ing Best Musical. I love recom mending performances, and I love it even more when I am sure that a performance is going to be special. Its only here for one night. Call 386-671-3460 or visit PeabodyAuditorium.org Feb. 23 Chili for Charity The Rotary Club of Winter Park is proud to present a new Winter Park tradition, Chili for Charity. Unlike traditional chili cook-offs, this event features creative chili with a "Winter Park attitude from 5:30 to 8 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 23, at the Winter Park Farmers' Market at 200 W. New England Ave. Local restau rants and caterers will compete for the coveted Peoples' Choice Award and have their dishes evaluated by a panel of judges. Live entertainment, drinks, des sert and a live auction will round the Rotary Club of Winter Park Charitable Foundation, which provides grants to more than 30 local charities each year. Partici pants will include Arthur's Cater ing, Classic Creations, Fleming's Steakhouse, Tolla's Italian Caf and Whole Foods Market and many others. Tickets are $25 in advance and can be purchased from Rotary Club of Winter Park members. Tickets are $30 at the door. Feb. 28-29 Michael Jackson The Immortal Consider a repertoire of the created by Michael Jackson, and that music is used for Cirque du Soleils newest full-length evening of performance magic. The must-see ticket of the season Michael Jackson The Immor tal will be performed in two performances only on Feb. 28 and 29 at the Amway Center in Or lando. This life-changing produc tion combines Michael Jacksons music with the choreography and athleticism of Cirque du Soleil to give fans a unique view into the spirit, passion and heart of the artistic genius who forever transformed global pop culture. The show is written and directed by Jamie King, who has chan neled Michaels love of music and dance, fairy tale magic and the fragility of nature into a show featuring more than 60 dancers, musicians and acrobats. Tickets are available at ticketmaster.com or 1-800-745-3000. Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906. Josh Garrick Culture worthy of your calendar BBQ with Buddy

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Page 12 Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Healthy Living Florida Hospital and the Win ter Park Health Foundation have partnered up with three local com munities and one well-known television doctor to launch an initiative to make Central Florida a healthier place to live. Healthy Central Florida (HCF), a community-based partnership starting in Winter Park, Maitland and Eatonville, aims to make Cen tral Florida the healthiest commu nity in the nation, said Executive Director Jill Hamilton Buss. The initiative, which had its formal launch Monday, Feb. 6 with a presentation at Full Sail University by Dr. Mehmet Oz, host of the daytime medical talk show, The Dr. Oz Show, focuses on getting people more active, eat ing healthier and more connected to their communities. reengineer movement and activ ity back into our lives as we live them at school, at work, church and in your neighborhood we want to make the healthy choice the easy choice in all settings, Buss said. With help from Florida Hospi tal, the Winter Park Health Foun dation and the mayors of each of aims to promote long-lasting en vironmental policy and social change to make Central Florida a healthier place to live, work and play, Buss said. Linking the community For two years, the Winter Park Health Foundation had been searching for community partners to start up an initiative focused on more healthy living practices in Central Florida, when they found Florida Hospital, said Patty Mad dox, president and CEO of the Winter Park Health Foundation. We started thinking about dif ferent things we could do to help a greater number of people than with just the different programs we were doing Maddox said. We realized we wanted to do something that would look at the health of the greater community as a whole. At Florida Hospital, Execu tive Vice President Brian Paradis said they too had been looking for more ways to get involved in mission of not only caring for peo ple in need, but also nurturing the community as a whole to reach its highest health potential hoping to help them before they need care from the hospital. We want to help people bet ter perform and to be able to live a better life, Paradis said. We need to better help our commu nity compete in a global world, and we think health is a big piece of that. In a world of widening waist bands and portion sizes, and less ening physical activity, Paradis said were leading our children down a long, costly road of un healthy living. The legacy were about to leave our children is a life ex pectancy shorter than our own, which is an unprecedented event in modern history, he said. We need to change that before it hap pens. The two organizations came together to form Healthy Central Florida, Buss said, so that they can make a change before its too late. What we need to do is cre ate more environmental cues and supports that help people main tain healthy behaviors, Buss said. Whether that is by putting parks in more places, adding more bike lanes to roads, or changing food options at school, work and home to healthier ones, she said, Small change and small steps add up. cant survey put out to each tar Savannah Court and CoeExcellence in Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation 1301 W. Maitland Blvd. Maitland, FL 32751407-645-3990www.SavannahCourtMaitland.comAssisted Living Facility License No. 8447 Skilled Nursing Facility License No. 1635096 Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above!A Senior Living Community where Hospitality is a Way of Life.Healthy Heart MonthThursday, Feb. 23, 2012 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.Helpful Hints to keep your heart healthy By: Vitas Healthy Snacks providedPLEASE RSVP Lack of Desire or Low Energy?Testosterone Lab Work for $35 (a $240 Value) Call today for a risk-free appointment: 407-894-9959 Testosterone Lab Work for $35 (a $240 Value)Recapture Your Sexual Vitality W i n t e r P a r k R e c o v e r y C e n t e r Executive Drug & Alcohol Treatment Services Suboxone Maintenance For Opioid Abuse Naltrexone Extinction for Alcohol If It s In Your Heart To Quit2056 Aloma Ave, Suite 100, Winter Park, FL 32792 www.YourLifeRecovery.com 407-629-0413 PHOTOS BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVER Dr. Mehmet Oz, left, of the The Dr. Oz Show introduces the Healthy Central Florida program at Full Sail University on Feb. 6. Below, Winter Park Mayor Ken Bradley, Eatonville Mayor Bruce Mount and Maitland Mayor Howard Schieferdecker listen to the presentation. Dr. Oz launches health initiative Healthy Central Florida program aims to make Central Florida a healthier place to live, work and play SARAH WILSON Observer Staff For more information on Healthy Central Florida, visit healthycentralorida.org. T o learn about different healthy living activities going on in your community, visit ndactivefun.org Learn more Please see OZ on page 14

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Page 13 Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer WINTER PARK -With deepest gratitude and well wishes, the staff of Cornerstone Hospice & Palliative Care today received announcement from President and CEO Pat Lehotsky of her plans to retire after 15 years of service. Cornerstone Hospice cares for Winter Park and Maitland patients and families facing a life-threatening illness, as well as patients throughout all Orange county and six other central Florida counties. So much has changed in our Central Florida service area in 15 years, and likewise, many changes have taken place in hospice, reected Lehotsky. I remember like it was yesterday, my rst days with the former Hospice of Lake & Sumter. We were serving about 120 patients and had a staff of 70, she added. As she gazes out her ofce windows, Lehotsky shares memories of so many key milestones. We opened our rst Polk County ofce in Haines City, September 2003. In 2004, the rst Hospice license plate was sold thanks to a bill sponsored by Sen. Carey Baker, while he was serving in the military in Iraq. Proceeds from the sale of this plate continue to provide funds to advance hospice care in Florida. In October 2004 as we celebrated our 20th Anniversary, we survived four hurricanes that was quite the year, she exclaimed. ln 2005 I was tremendously honored and humbled to win the Heart of Hospice Award Senior Executive from the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization (NHPCO) with headquarters near Washington DC. Over the next few years, we would experience much growth. We began serving patients from ofces in Orlando and Kissimmee and the Mike Conley Hospice House, Clermont, accepted our rst patient in October 2007. Cornerstone Inpatient Suites at Winter Park Towers, Orlando opened November 2010. Ms Lehotsky pauses and contemplates her journey. Today as I head into retirement and devote a little time to some personal interests, Cornerstone Hospice & Palliative Care serves over 4200 patients annually in seven counties, with over 600 employees, from four ofces, four hospice houses and one inpatient unit. New programming to better serve our communities include Serious Illness care-giving web resources, Pet Peace of Mind, Transitions Program, and a Cardiac Specialty Program as well as a planned Inpatient Unit in Polk County to name a few. With condence, I leave Cornerstone Hospice in the capable hands of its leaders and staff, who will continue to provide the best in end-of-life care to the communities we serve, Ms. Lehotsky concluded with a smile. Lehotsky retires after 15 years at Cornerstone Hospices helm Pat LehotskySince 1984, Cornerstone Hospice and Palliative Care, Inc., a not-forprot community-based healthcare organization, has provided care and services to central Florida residents experiencing life-limiting illnesses. To learn more, call (407)206-2273 or toll-free (800)679-6088 in Orange and Osceola counties or visit www.cornerstonehospice. org as well as www.SeriousIllness.org/Cornerstone Calendar FEB. 16 Poet and best-selling novelist Pau la McLain will speak at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 16, at the Bush Audi torium of Rollins College Auditorium. Visit rollins.edu/winterwiththewrit ers Balancing Hormones Naturally will be held at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, Feb.16, at the Maitland Public Li brary at 501 S. Maitland Avenue in Maitland. Call 407-644-7700. FEB. 17 Join Maitland Public Library Friday, Feb.17 at 10 a.m. the Library, in partnership with the Maitland Fire & Rescue, is offering free blood pres sure checks Arts S ake S tudios, 680 Clay S t. in Winter Park, will be hosting a staged reading of Play at the moment: The Road to Mecca by Athol Fu gard, starring Marty S tonerock at 8 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 17 and Satur day, Feb. 18. Call 407-339-3771. In a talk at Rollins College at 3 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 17, Dr. Mustafa T una a visiting scholar from Duke U niversity, will examine Turkeys recent transformation. The event is free. It will be held at the Faculty Club, 1000 Holt Ave. Contact eta tari@rollins.edu or 407-646-2183. FEB. 18 On S aturday, Feb. 18, there will be a Maitland Little League Parade and 50th Season Opening Day Cel ebration at Keller Fields. The parade begins at 9 a.m. at Maitland Middle School. The Opening Day ceremo nies will begin around 9:30 a.m. V isit www.maitlandlittleleague.us On Saturday, Feb. 18 at 7:30 a.m., the House of Hope Run Around the Pines 5k will be presented at S howalter Field, 2535 Cady Way in Winter Park. There will be a H ealthy 100 Kids R un at 8:45 a.m. and a 5k Award Ceremony at 9 a.m. The Hemophilia Foundation of Great er Florida is hosting the 10th Annual Evening on Broadway fundrais ing event on Feb. 18, featuring B illy E lliot the Musical at the B ob Carr Performing Arts Center, Orlando. Tickets are $135. Visit hemophilia orida.org FEB. 19 Join Maitland Public Library Sunday, Feb. 19, at 3 p.m. Cultural Cook Ha Roda will demonstrate a V ietnamese dessert. Free. Call 407-647-7700. Winter Park Institute presents Ani mated Magazine on at 3 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 19, at Rollins College, Mary Jean Mitchell Plaza. For more information, visit www.rollins.edu/ wpi CCH Weddings & Events and Michele Butler Events invite brides-to-be, their families and friends to the Win ter Park Bridal Stroll on Sunday, Feb. 19 on Park Avenue. Visit www. facebook.com/winterparkbridalstroll FEB. 20 Winter Park Institute presents Time ly Intelligence Matters with Porter Goss: Taking on National Security Challenges of the Global Century at 7 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 20, at the Bush Auditorium of Rollins College. Visit www.rollins.edu/wpi FEB. 21 Join Maitland Public Library at 2 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 21. LCC Social Networking for seniors is offering a workshop on searching the internet for job sites. Program is free but you must register. Call 407-647-7700. Please join us at 1:30 p.m. on Feb. 21 at the Rachel D. Murrah Center, 1015 Morse Blvd. in Winter Park. Our program will be Ballroom Danc ing by the Central Florida Chapter of USA Dance. The event is free. Call 407-629-2585. At 7 p.m. on Feb. 21, the University Club of Winter Park will host Athe ists Are Among Us, which is part of a Great Lecture Series. Call 407644-6149 or visit universityclubwin terpark.org FEB. 22 Join Maitland Public Library at 1 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 22. Contempo rary Authors Book Discussion group will meet to discuss the book by Doris Goodwin, Team of Rivals. The book club is open to new members. Martin Eidelberg author and profes sor emeritus of Art History at Rutgers University, speaks Wednesday, Feb. 22, at 2:30 p.m. at Morse Museum. The lecture is titled Laurelton Hall: A museum of Tiffanys Own. The event is free. On Wednesday, Feb. 22, the Winter Park Garden Club will host a demon stration by Betty Moore FFGC Flower Show Judge. It is located at 1300 S. Denning Drive in Winter Park. Cost is $10. Call 407-644-5770. On Feb. 22 at 5:30 p.m. and on Feb. 23 at 11:30 a.m., author Betsy Cov ington Smith speaks at Casa Feliz in Winter Park. Reservations are re quired. Contact museum@wphistory. org. FEB. 23 Chili for Charity is 5:30-8 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 23, at the Winter Park Farmers Market, located at 200 W. New England Ave. The cost is $25 in advance and $30 at the door. From 7 to 10 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 23, the Home Builders Association will host its Eighth Annual Bruce Gould Poker Invitational Visit www. orlandojcc.org Winn-Dixie will have an Open House Celebration event from 5:307 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 23, at 7800 S. Highway 17-92, Unit 160, in in Fern Park. Visit wpmobserver.com/events for more details. Send submissions to editor@ observernewspapers.com The Great Duck Derby The Great Duck Derby features rubber duck races and free family activi ties on Saturday, Feb. 18. The little yellow rubber ducks will race in the Mead Garden pond at 12:15 and 1 p.m. The event is free.

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Page 14 Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer When you are looking to buy a car, computer or coffeemaker, you can learn and shortcomings of a range of prod ucts through Consumer Reports, JD Power, and others. Now you can also get some information on nursing homes, home health agencies, hospitals and dialysis centers. Thanks to the health care reform law, more quality measures and transparency will be available. The measures of quality are not perfect in fact, some may argue that they are very imperfect but they give us more information about a facility or service, a peek under the covers. Dont be misled by nice furniture and pretty curtains. What matters in your care is how it af fects your health, but that can be impos sible for an individual to access without data. Selecting a nursing home for a parent or a hospital for your surgery can be a challenging, emotional decision. A visit to a nursing home will give you some information, but lovely dcor can istics. Medicare and the Florida Agency of Health Care Administration have put tips. Check out medicare.gov/qualityon how nursing homes, hospitals and other services compare. Put in your Central Florida ZIP code are the same. The Central Florida nurs ing home overall scores range from 1 (the lowest) to 5 stars (the best). The site also gives scores based on the onsite and nursing assistants available per resident, adjusted for the complexity of residents needs. The quality measures are a composite of 19 measures nursing homes report to Medicare each year. These include quality indicators such as the percent of patients with bedsores, depression, worsening health status and Central Florida nursing homes. You can also compare home health agencies at medicare.gov/homehealth compare/search.aspx. This will let you select three agencies at a time to compare. The site gives an overall score for the agency, along with Florida and national averages. It also gives informa tion on several indicators of care quality, such as the percent of patients who have an unplanned hospital admission, the percent of patients who improved, and whether or not the agency staff is likely to educate patients and their families on medications. On the Medicare website you can also compare hospital patient satisfac tion rates and outcomes, including readmission rates. The outcomes are compared to the national average, tell ing if the hospital is comparable, better or worse than average. The website also procedures, such as cardiac bypass sur geries, were done for Medicare patients at the hospital. Additionally, the Florida Agency for Health Care Administration oper to prescription, hospital, health plan, physician, hospice and nursing home information. You can check out prices for many common prescription drugs city and medication. Smaller commu nities, like Maitland and Winter Park, have fewer pharmacies and fewer drugs listed, so you may want to look in the Orlando information. While the quality measures have shortcomings, it is often said, what gets measured gets done. Hospitals, nursing homes and home health agen cies strive to be seen as the best place to get care. Now health care consumers have useful, practical information for making health care decisions. The nicest billboards or community event should not persuade you; get the facts on what really matters. Maitland resident Nancy Rudner Lugo is a nurse practitioner and president of Health Action, of fering workplace health consulting and nurse coaching. Visit www.healthaction.biz Dr. Nancy Rudner Lugo Health Action Health care quality: Looking under the sheets Congratulations to partner Healthy Central Florida on a successful launch!health y Join us, and all of Healthy Central Florida, in making Winter Park the healthiest place to work by taking the 3:30:3 Pledge. Get moving 3 times per week for 30 minutes each day for the next 3 months. Work Well Winter Park is a movement led by the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce to improve the health and wellbeing of the workforce in our community by creating lasting, cultural change. Visit us at www.workwellwinterpark.org geted community, with help from the University of Central Florida, Buss said HCF is working to city to help better organize future policy change with the hope of eventually moving the pro gram on to all of Central Florida. We decided we wanted to start small and be very focused she said. This is about behav ior change, and we really needed to roll up our sleeves to get this started. To be serious and fo cused, we needed to be focused geographically. Cities get t Each of the three targeted cities mayors have gotten involved with helping move the initiative along including passing smoking ban resolu tions for local parks and complete street reso lutions for making future streets more pedestrian and cyclist friendly, to working to offer healthier food choices in public facilities. The health of our citizens is probably the most important thing that we deal with on a day-today basis, Winter Park Mayor Ken Bradley said. Health is the base foundation of everything we bring to our community. Mayor Howard Schiferdecker of Maitland said he hopes to use the initiative to build not only healthy life lessons to citizens, but also a sense of honorable character in that they do the right thing and make the right choices in all aspects of their lives. When you dont feel good about yourself, you dont operate at your peak, he said. We want people to be living their lives in the best ways that they can, and these things are all part of it. Buss said the communities have all done a great job in spurring interest in the initiative in their communities, and hope to work more closely with them as their work continues to make Cen tral Florida the healthiest community it can be. Were all building this together, she said. This is just the beginning. OZ | Cities jump on board C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 12

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Page 15 Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Its not just about getting you back on your feet. Its about getting you back to your life. HCR Healthcare, LLC Rehabilitation and Skilled Nursing Hours: M-F 8am to 4:30pm 2315 Lee Road Winter Park, Florida 32789 Your Guiding Beacon for Quality Healthcare Harbour Private Duty Nursing, LLCSkilled Nursing Physical Therapy Occupational Therapy Companionship Home Health Aid Homemaking Flexible Schedules Free RN Assessments The Services of Harbour Private Duty Nursing provide peace of mind to loved ones, trust ofcers, guardians and physicians. Our professional team prides itself on making your life easier. We also provide in-hospital private duty care, which offers close, personal attention and reassurance in an unfamiliar and often frightening environment. Our ofce hours are Monday through Friday, 8:00 am to 4:30 pm. Our professional team is available 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. During hours when the ofce is closed and during the weekends and holidays, the on-call coordinator is available by telephone 24 hours per day.www.HarbourPrivateDutyNursing.com License # 299991382phone (407) 895-8188 fax 407-895-9339 Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. 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Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com Jewish Academy brings students of different faiths together PHOTO COUR TESY OF JEWISH ACADEMY OF ORLANDO The faith program taught students about the Torahs importance to the Jewish religion. PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER The Park A venue Area Association hosted a V alentine Concert in Central Park featuring Michael Andrew & Swingerhead on Feb. 12. DORI GERBER Guest Writer Jewish Academy of Orlando hosted two local schools in a program that helps build bridges between religion and ethnicity on Feb. 7 in conjunction with the Multifaith Education Project, which seeks to teach children how to become peace ambassa dors. Nearly 120 middle schoolers from Ge neva Christian School, a Christian classical school, and Leaders Preparatory School, an Islamic school, joined Jewish Acad emys middle schoolers for a morning of cooperative learning and connections. The program included a visit to The Holocaust Center in Maitland to view its new exhibit, BESA: A Code of Honor. The exhibit consists of photographs and text that tell the remarkable story of the Albanian people the majority of whom are Muslim who rescued their entire Jewish population. The Multifaith Education Program, directed by Louise Sheehy, is about mak ing friends and sustaining relationships between faiths. Hannah Schafer, an eighth-grader at Jewish Academy of Orlando in Maitland, wrote the following letter about her expe rience that day: The Multifaith Projects goal is to educate the youth about acceptance, particularly between the three Abrahamic faiths. Today in the world there is much tension between the extremists of these religions. Being a part of this project helps the relationships between Christianity, Islam and Judaism for tomorrow. As a 13-year-old Jew, I took this experience as an opportunity to make friends, no matter the religion. But along with being social, I was impacted on the similarities between our religions. During the event at my school, the Jewish Academy of Orlando, I learned about Muslims in the Holocaust; something I had never heard of before. I also saw impressive similarities in the places of worship and prayer services of the Abrahamic faiths. For my school to be a part of this program not only helps the Jewish Academy be involved in community events, but helps its students, like me, learn more about the diversity of the world in which we live. Hannah Schafer Eighth-grader Jewish Academy of Orlando Swinging in the park

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Page 16 Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Opinions A nightmare is igniting in Winter Parks public conscious ness just as the sun goes to sleep, full of loud noises and interloping minstrels from places unknown. Would rampaging exotically accented drunkards stumble screaming through Han nibal Square and into the night if we suddenly legalized Europeancaf-style on-street dining? What if we didnt ban sidewalk musi cians? Would they run rampant, bringing an ever more cacopho nous vibe shaking the concrete along Park Avenue? The answer is likely none of the above, though from the sounds of the debate inside the makeshift City Commission chambers at the Civic Center it could tear apart the conservative ly gilded silk of Winter Park. Winter Parks image is a cov eted one. Other cities outwardly look to emulate what Central Floridas most walkable city has cultivated over the course of more than a century. They use the city as an example in their coun cil and commission meetings. In a nation awash in all things new and fabulous, Winter Parks upscale fashion-forward image stands as an aspirational ideal. But still, the citys good ideas have to come from somewhere. Whats more trendy than Europe for the last 400 years or so? Enter the idea of the street caf, one borrowed like much of Winter Parks charm from the walkable, visitor-friendly streetscapes of Western European cities. At Mondays Commission meeting, the idea of closing the tiny road called Hannibal Square to cars between 5-11:30 p.m. for restaurant use was proposed for a trial run. Its an idea with so much precedent that it predates the car by more than 100 years. Who wouldnt want to eat out side when the weathers nice? Of course outside dining is already happening. Park and West New England avenues have become go-to promenades for a casual evening on the town, re plete with tables spilling out onto sidewalks for those who prefer more naturally conditioned air and a street-side ambiance. Such has been the case on both sides of Hannibal Square, along enthusiasts who choose to eat ever so close to the street, but not quite. But the cries of potential hor rors to befall the citys streets still rang out Monday, portending restless nights nearby in Han nibal Square neighborhoods. All of this was still perfectly possible before the road closed, since diners could still eat outside if they pleased. They could still make just as much noise, which in buttoned-down Winter Park has always been more hushed than the worst-case scenario of bustling downtown Orlando. It could be an issue of volume, both in customers and noise. The more table space that nearby restaurants could use, the more potential for noise on the street. But as has already been pointed out by city staff, the nearest home is 200 feet away. Mixing into the quiet ver sus quaintness argument at Mondays meeting, the fear of sidewalks overrun with street performers also caused a stir, amid more legitimate cause for concern over noise levels and the possibility of loud, panhandling musicians-cum-street urchins scaring off customers. Should there exist some vet ting or permitting mechanism for nighttime street performers along Park Avenue? Local musician John Holley already has one: ask the stores owner for permission to play out front. His answer has invariably been yes, though as was pointed out at the Com mission meeting, there is some accounting for taste. Is an accom plished, trained musician just as welcome as a paint bucket drum circle? That question remains to be answered, as the Commission passed the decision whether to regulate street performers back to city boards to come up with a concrete plan. Some play for the love of mu sic, or to get noticed, as has been the case with Holley. Playing for change brings with it a mixed bag of true musicians along with the occasional drunken trumpeter. Whether street dining and sidewalk musicians get to stay in Winter Park remains to be seen. The former seems likely. The lat ter may come down to a question of taste. Both have their pluses, but no one wants to see Winter Parks laid back but conservative image tarnished like well-worn brass. T ouched by the Van Son story The article you (Isaac Babcock) wrote in Thursdays paper (Waiting was so touching and has moved me to tears. What a tremendous story and reminder of what is truly important in our lives. My heart goes out to the Van Son family. I just cant imagine their journey. Its not often I read stories that pull at my heart strings, and your writ ing not only pulled, but nearly broke them what a meaningful story of unconditional love. Thank you. Clarissa Howard Director Winter Park Communications Department I just wanted to compliment you (Babcock) on your story featuring Jeff and Michele Van Son (Waiting to say written stories I have read anywhere in a very long time. The story is beauti fully written and incredibly moving. You have such a nice touch! Congratulations! I look forward to reading many more of your stories. Lynn Phillips Carolan Communications Specialist Winter Park Health Foundation Odds stacked against rail Im not a fanatic football or Super Bowl fan, but I caught parts, until my interest waned. My favorite com mercial was with Clint Eastwood for, ostensibly, Chrysler. Though it was sad to see that Jerry Seinfeld must both be broke and out of new material, shilling for Toyota. "This is halftime in America," Eastwood tersely rasps though tight lips. And, "The second half is about to begin." This is one of the many reasons I had put forth regarding the foolishness of SunRail. I would be all for it, includ ing subsidies, if people were really going to ride it in acceptable numbers. For whatever your reasons most ly grandiose you've elected to take on a truly uphill battle in an attempt to make SunRail a success. Our secretary of transportation stated recently and you have to read between the lines "This train has to be a success for the future of Florida." Italics added for emphasis. But the odds are so stacked against you it isn't funny. And now you have a win-at-all-costs defensive mentality. With a large part of your business plan being simply cheerleading, and suck ing in some developers. Good luck with that. We are just too entrenched in our dependence upon the private auto from its ostentation to convenience to the personal freedom it affords. Then there's the huge "machine" (a.k.a. our economy) that is dependent upon the auto: big oil, parts suppliers, distribu tors, railroads, retailers (from the cor ner gas station/convenience store to Borders), road builders, drive-throughs (that new Panera Bread on Aloma Avenue seems to be hopping), etc. The list goes on and on. The only silver lin ing for me is the huge number of people that are now shopping online, and the continued growth in that dis tribution industry might just save us from transit building insolvency. We still, at least for the time being, and here in Winter Park, will shop frequently for fresh foods at Whole Foods; take and pick up the kids from school, especially the private schools; get our hair done; go to school events, restaurants, the malls and the movies. We aint ever getting out of our cars. I don't know what you all were thinking, but it was clearly wishful, and probably more accurately, wistful. What would have happened if Orlando didn't build a parking garage at the new arena? I wonder how much parking Madison Square Garden provides. You know, we can't afford it both ways. Only fools rush in why don't we hold off on "investing" even more money in SunRail, re: silencing train whistles, until we see which way the wind is blowing. And in the interim, work the feds to change the whistle law. Train whistles are really ineffec tive anyway, because the hapless and the hopeless will continue to die under the wheels, regardless of inhibitors. And last but not least, Im sure you all are aware that we are to build a new Amtrak train station at Central Park with even more free federal money, but outside of SunRail costs. The real kicker is that U.S. Rep. John Mica is bringing the $950,000 bacon for the train station from the Federal Transit Administration's 2009 Bus and Bus Facility Allocations budget. Busi ness as usual? William Shallcross Winter Park Our Observation Sandi Vidal Ask Sandi Letters to the editor Send your thoughts (400 words or less) to Managing Editor Jenny Andreasson at editor@observernewspapers.com King Features Weekly ServiceFebruary 13, 2012 Street dining wont have any effect with their job search is that I come from a recruiting background. Fifteen plus years of recruiting and hiring gives me a solid background of the industry that I am able to pass on to job seekers. I recently interviewed Jonathan Ciampi, President of Preptel.com. His background prior to founding the company was working with applicant tracking systems, so he also has industry experi ence. He now concentrates on helping job seek ers optimize their resumes for applicant tracking systems. The services at Preptel are for a fee, but there is a free Resumeter, which will help you to see weak nesses in your resume with a 30-day trial period. Preptel has done quite a bit of due diligence and testing of their systems. Jonathan told me that more than 40 percent of resumes never get seen and that this is an acceptable amount for companies since they receive so many resumes. We also talked quite a bit about the way com puters read resumes. He said in 2007 the systems switched from a recruiter putting in the keywords they were looking for, to the computers picking up key phrases and looking for rare words that are unique to that job description. What this means for you is that you need to not only look for key words, but key phrases as well. I would encourage you to give Preptels 7-day free trial a run. If your resume is not getting you interviews, this may be a great tool to help in the process. The site will also look at your LinkedIn S andi V idal is the executive director for Christian HE LP and the Central Florida E mployment Council. Please send questions to sandi@christianhelp.org Identify your resume weaknesses

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Page 17 Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Farmers markets are a great way to get outside on a sunny Florida afternoon, but they are so much more than that. In fact, they are a small part of a much larger initiative: local agricultural sustainability. This means harvesting the crops grown by local farm ers and supporting our own local economy through community effort. At its core, the Ourlando Think Local First movement aims to change the way consumers eat, think and handle food. Local sustainability is critical to cultivating staples in the community in order to initiate a change that removes big business from the transaction and makes the relation ship between farmer and consumer para mount. With the information presented here, the conscientious consumer can gain a better un derstanding of the idea behind farm-to-fork in the Central Florida area. Even as a native of your community for years and years, the idea of getting involved in this eco-endeavor can seem puzzling. However, there are end less resources made available. Right here in Central Florida are the Simple Living Insti tute, Homegrown Cooperative, Ourlando, Center for Holistic Living and Slow Food Orlando. Each of these organizations offer free, educational alternatives to big busi nesses and gives members of the community the chance to delve in at the surface level and dig deeper and deeper as they become more involved. You may be surprised to learn that you may have already supported the Think Local First movement by simply dining out. There are dozens of Central Florida restaurants that source their food locally. If you have ever eaten at Winter Parks Hillstone Restaurant, you have enjoyed freshly grown herbs right from their backyard overlooking Lake Killar ney. If you have ever patronized The Rusty Spoon in downtown Orlando, you have sup ported locally raised produce and organic beef. These are just two of the great places to start and taste the difference from something To be sure, this movement is not a prod uct of the 21st century. In fact, the Think Local First movement is argued to date back to the 1980s in Rome. However, it is certainly a topic that has resurged with the imminence of the Occupy Wall Street protests in Zuccotti Park, N.Y., that condemn big business. With the protests acting as a catalyst, the local sustainability efforts gained momentum. The Think Local First movement is pivotal in making consumers aware of their impact on the environment. With constant solicitations and advertisements on televi sion and radio, it can be easy to ignore the local butcher, baker or cooperative in your own neighborhood. However, according to Shopcity.com, for every dollar spent at a local business, 45 cents is reinvested locally. Alternatively, for every dollar spent at a corporate chain, only 15 cents is reinvested locally. This is a simple example of a complex issue: by pumping money back into the local economy, the community will thrive and cre ate a symbiotic relationship. A relationship in which there is reciprocity and loyalty. No matter your age, geography or even gender, this is something that everyone can be a part of in Central Florida. For more information, visit ourlando.com Natalie Costa is a new media journalist who writes about sustainability in the Central Florida area. Visit backpackjourna.com The word wife is short, but the di mensions of its meanings approach the Every man should have a wife pref erably his own. The Bible says that God created man in his own image. But my b.w., Joy, is a lot more than an extra rib of mine! She is an extra heart, and an extra brain. My concept has always been that the complete human animal has two heads and four legs, and is made up of a woman and a man joined in matrimony. Not only the bodies but the minds of men and women complement each other. A females thinking is not identical to that of a man, and together they usually lead to sounder decisions than either one alone. In order for this positive harmony to work of course, the marriage must be a good one. The members must be not only lovers, but best friends they must genuinely like each other. Two things doth prolong my life: A quiet heart and a loving wife. Thomas Deloney (1595) Marriage is a good investment that interest. It is said that the true index of a mans character is visible in the disposition of his wife. Cyril Connolly Great American cynic Ambrose Bierce wrote: Marriage: the state of being a master, a mistress, and two slaves, adding up to two. Marriage must be a good time, but not shared by all. A good wife is one who sits up with you when you are ill and puts up with you when you are well! Anonymous I dont like every woman I meet and Im sure its better that way however, a day came that had no negatives. I parked my car in front of an apartment house on West 75th Street in Manhattan. I took my dog, and went into the lobby. There were no chairs, and an attractive young woman was standing waiting, a woman I was to marry, but I didnt know it yet. Id like to say that this person smiled at me and started up a lively intro ductory conversation about my beautiful dog, but she simply turned her back and waited until the elevator reached the lobby. My great pianist friend emerged from the elevator and we were joined within seconds by a fourth woman who walked into the lobby. I drove us four from New York City to Williamsport, Pa. There my pianist friend played while the other two ladies sang a gala luncheon concert for 600 women. Both singers were beautiful. One was married. The more beautiful one was not, so I married her not that day, of course. And that is how, after 32 years, my b.w. and I have become felicitous members of this Florida community. It could have worked out otherwise of course, but it didnt. After 32 years of marriage, I have concluded that no love affair between a man and a woman is as truly romantic as that between a man and his wife. I see only the virtues in my wife, because they have enriched my life and made years of happiness for me. I must say in all honesty that I am quite aware of my own negatives, but I assume that b.w. has evidently decided to overlook them. About Roney: HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney) Chris Jepson Perspectives Never going back! Shes a craze youd endorse, shes a power ful force Youre obliged to conform when theres no other course her Simply irresistible Simply irresistible Robert Palmer Shes a powerful force. That about sums it up. What is it about women that has men so afraid? And for so long? Seriously, if one were to dispassionately examine the history of our species, an unbiased observer might legitimately ask, Why do men treat women so poorly? And for so long, I might add thousands upon thousands of years. It should come as no historical surprise that weve institutionalized mens fear of women. Look at practically every religion going back thousands of years and a major tenet of nearly all is the subjugation and control of women. Why is that? I joke about lineage and fatherhood with No man knows for sure if the child that woman is bearing is his and its al ways good for a few yucks. Every woman knows unequivocally what is hers. Men could only wonder. Is that the historical basis for why men have unequivocally at tempted to control the lives of women? Limited access, limited mobility, limited rights, limited stature all in an attempt to limit sex? Is that it? Is there any more that of the cuckolded man? Raising an other mans genetic output. Too funny. Hmmm? Anthropologists speculate that there was a time when early human societies were more equal, some perhaps outright matriarchal. Some conjecture that once it became clear that sex and semen were necessary for propagation, that men began to elevate the status of their, uh, contribution to the process, and women became marginalized and considered as little more than brood cows for male impregnation. Understand that early humans had little comprehension of hu man biology. Something went in and voil, babies came out. Perhaps out of that misguided ignorance, our (male) preoccu pation with all things phallic began. We may never know the exact histori cal causes of male fear, but no reasonable individual will argue that women are not still on the receiving end of male bias. It masquerades this bias as sacred scripture, as religious dogma, as church doctrine, as political party platform planks, as con servative societal values. safe, affordable, accessible birth control for women. It was a game changer for women for humanity. Throw in the backseat of a modern automobile and thousands of years of male control van ished virtually overnight. (Why do the Saudis so not want their women driving?) The 1960s and s were banner years for the advancement of women. All the rules of an oppressive tradition were challenged and many were discarded like so many restrictive bras. Breasts, bodies and minds now free, and why not? Let the girls out! We should all advocate feminism. To argue otherwise, however, is somewhat predictable. I expect maledominated religions and churches to resist empowering women. Sexuality is frightening to some men. Oh, they argue, it isnt Gods way that women should control their fertility, manage their destinies (if and when to procreate) and because Father knows best, well, it shall be as it has always been. Ad nauseam. Wrong. In so many ways. This is one genie (Jeannie) that aint ever going back in the bottle. Jepson is a 24-year resident of Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.US Valentine thoughts Love lives on Louis Roney Play On! Two things doth prolong my life: A quiet heart and a loving wife. Thomas Deloney Its easy to invest in community NATALIE COSTA Guest Writer Natalie Costa AS VA LENTINES DA Y A PPRO A CHES, THIS IS A C A NT MISS, TOUCHING STORY A BOUT A V ERY SPECI A L WINTER PA RK COUPLE STILL IN LO V E A N D D E V OTE D TO ONE A NOTHER D ESPITE A V ERY TR A GIC SITU A TION. MICHELE, I A M SO PROU D OF YOU A N D W ISH YOU NOTHING BUT THE BEST ST A Y STRONG HA PPY VA LENTINES DA Y TO YOU A N D JEFF. DEBBIE HA RRIS WA TSON H eres what a reader on the web wrote about the article Waiting to say I love you published Feb. 9:

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Page 28 Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Call now to diversify your advertising. 866.742.1373 www.Florida-Classifieds.com THG-11909 FREEComplete Door Maintenance with any Service 407-780-1691 Orlando, FL Tom Carey SundewGardens@gmail.comCommunity supported agriculture. Experience homegrown gardening:



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407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC USPS 00-6186 Publisher statement on page 4. Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012 50+ tax wpmobserver.comSubscribe now!Visit wpmobserver.com Will street performers get the ax in Winter Park? That question was raised at Mondays City Commission meeting after some Park Avenue merchants complained about a problem thats out of control. The Commission struck down the idea of immediately voting to propose an ordinance to regulate performers who use the side walks as their stage, sometimes playing for spare change. I dont want our citizens to feel panhandled or pressured to contribute, Commissioner Car olyn Cooper said. She proposed areas for musicians, or to poll merchants for what they would deem acceptable. Id rather say where you can do it rather than where you cant do it, she said. But for some the question wasnt of location, but of the quality of music itself. Pannul los restaurant co-owner Mike Schwartz, who is a musician himself, said he had gotten tired of the low-quality musicians in front of his restaurant. You cant come up to people and ask them for their credentials from Juilliard, Schwartz said. You cant identify good musi cians from bad musicians. The drunken trumpet player in front of the atrium at Bank of America that I had to ask to leave is not good for the avenue. Its out of control. But real estate owner Woody Woodall, who owns property on Park Avenue and also lives above the Christian Science Reading Room, said he hasnt noticed any nuisance at all along the avenue, where he estimated he dines 10 times per week. I make my living collecting rent from almost a dozen tenants, Woodall said. Theyre all in favor of the musicians because it adds character to the avenue. Ive never seen a problem on the avenue. He did admit that some musi cians along the avenue are better than others, and that he had used his discretion to allow one group to play and sell CDs in front of his property. Mayor Ken Bradley said that hed prefer to hear input from the local merchants association and the city boards that regulate commerce. Right now Id have to vote no [on an ordinance regulating performers], Bradley said. I can certainly relate to what Mr. Schwartz is saying. I would hate to have 50 different bands play ing when I have people trying to enter my establishment. The Commission voted 5-0 to have city boards examine the issue and speak with merchants before bringing it back to a Com mission vote. In Lisa Rotenbergers Dommerich Elementary kindergarten class, no day is a boring one. There are the calming stretches before sitting on the reading mat, tracing tending to their garden, full of the ingredients needed to make most kids favorite food pizza. Shes not afraid to try something new, said Jason LeFebvre, a second-grade teacher at the school. And thats what makes Rotenberger spe cial. Special enough to be named the Mait land schools Teacher of the Year, and one of the Year. The winner will be announced Tuesday, Feb. 21, and will be a representative for the district. Rotenbergers philosophy is to give her students hands-on, real life learning op portunities. When they learn about how a For whatever reason, youve elected to take on a truly uphill battle in an attempt to make SunRail a success.Page 16Letters to the editor Healthy Living Dr. Oz helped kick off the Healthy Central Florida initiative, focusing on Winter Park, Maitland and Eatonville.Page 12 Icon passes awayMark Wayne, half of the beloved Red Fox Lounge act Mark and Lorna, passed away Feb. 14. He was 82.Page 2 Calendar Little yellow rubber ducks will race through Mead Gardens pond on Saturday, Feb. 18, at the Duck Derby.Page 13 TAX DEFERREDFIXED ANNUITY RATE FOR 5 YEARS.Bob Adams 407-644-6646THE NATIONAL 5 YEAR CD RATE IS 1.34%3.35% 451 Maitland Ave, Altamonte Springs, FL 32701NEW Dermatology Ofce!407-599-SKIN (7546)*Waive co-payment up to $25 No referral needed Accepting all insurances Dr. John CottamDr. Ross Wheeler PhoHOToO BY isISAAcC BABcCOcCK TheHE oOBserverSERVER Dommerich Elementary kindergarten teacher Lisa Rotenburger reads to students. She is up for T T eacher of the Y Y ear. Please see TeEAcherCHER on page 5Teacher up for top honorLisa Rotenberger, a kindergarten teacher from Dommerich Elementary, will nd out on T T uesday if she is this years Orange County Public Schools T T eacher of the Y Y ear BrittBRITTNiI JOhHNsSON Observer Staff Street musicians stay for now ArchRCHIveVE PhoHOToO BY isISAAcC BABcCOcCK TheHE oOBserverSERVER The Winter Park City Commission gave the go ahead for a trial run of on-street dining in Hannibal Square, but held back on deciding whether to regulate sidewalk performers. IsSAAcC BBABcCOcCK Observer Staff

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Page 2 TThursday, Feb. 16, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer The spotlight faded to black for Mark Wayne Tuesday morning, but not before a Fox Lounge at the Mt. Vernon Inn into the early morning hours Tuesday. He passed away later that morning of an apparent heart attack, found by wife and longtime friend and Red Fox Lounge co-worker Betty Lombardi said. Wayne had played in Las Vegas starting in the 1960s before eventually ending up in Winter Park. The pair, who had played at the Red Fox for more than 20 years, had gained wide fame. It grew so popular that it was rumored to be the inspiration for Will Fer Night Live skit about the Culps, an ener getic husband and wife lounge act. Wayne and Lambey played for standingroom only audiences in the small lounge since 1991, bringing an interactive, comedic style to their musical act that had fans from teens to nonagenarians. They entertained as a pair Tuesday night through Saturday. Maitland took another step come its new downtown district by moving forward with zoning regulations and standards for development. The members of the Maitreading Monday, Feb. 13, the or dinance that will create a Down town Maitland Zoning District, and the building regulations and design standards it will be held to. The second reading is scheduled for Feb. 27. A public workshop with the Council as well as members of the Planning and Zoning Commis sion will be held at 6:30 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 20, at the Maitland City Hall Council Chambers to re view the ordinance further before The workshop on the 20th will be a biggie, said Dale Mc Donald, vice chairman of the Maitland Planning and Zoning Commission, during public com ment at the meeting. This, in my mind, could be the single most important ordinance you all work on in your Council terms.Zoning inThe purpose of the ordinance, Verl Emrick, Community Redevelopment Agency director, said is to not only create the zoning district of downtown, but to es tablish standards as to what types of buildings and businesses commercial or residential can be built downtown, as well as reg ulations regarding incentives and bonuses, site layout, stormwater design and signage. Council members Phil Bonus and Bev Reponen opposed pass ing the ordinance forward to a second reading, in favor of recon sidering the document more fully before proceeding, but they were out-voted 3-2. When are we going to go back werent settled on in the last read ing? Bonus asked the Council. Its right of us to carefully de Mayor Howard Schieferdecker and Councilman Ivan Valdes, however, argued that by pass ing the ordinance on to a second reading, they were not concretely approving or disapproving of the content of the document, but in stead taking the next logical step in its review process. The sooner we get a new stan dard on the books, Valdes said, the sooner we get a pattern of what we want for downtown.Moving forwardMuch will be decided in the coming months as to how the redevelopment project of down town Maitland will evolve, and the city is looking for input from Maitland residents and business owners as to what they envision for their city center. said. Do we do the sorts of longterm, 30-years-down-the-line planning to gratify the future of our grandkids, or do we look for revenue today and possibly cut our grandkids short? Valdes said it will be impor tant to look forward, but not for get about the present. None of us want a beautiful downtown of storefronts that are vacant, he said. But, he pointed out, its important to evaluate develop present, or they will seek devel opment elsewhere. Somewhere along the line there has to be a balance. A balance, the mayor wants the publics input on. Please come and participate in this because this is going to be your downtown, Schieferdecker said. Its important that it is something we can be proud of. Our Town(407) 366-8696 Fax (407) 359-2118 P.O. Box 4548 Winter Park, FL 32793Insertions in editions and months as shown:____Waterford Lakes ____College Park/Orlando ____Winter Park/Maitland ____Sweetwater/Heathrow ____Tuscawilla/Winter Springs ____Oviedo ____Baldwin Park/E. Winter ParkPlease initial your agreement with the following:____ I approve this ad to appear in Our Town as shown here OR ____ I approve this ad with minor changes as clearly marked (How many changes are marked? _____) ____ Phone number and address are correct I understand that payment for this ad is due per initial agreement.Signed ____________________________________We appreciate your prompt response, as our deadline is approaching.*Colors represented on this proof may not be an exact match of the colors produced when printed on our offset press.X OCT 2009 407-644-7760 $100 to $500 OFFAny Servicewith this ad On Call 24 Hours A DayServing Central Florida Since the s Let Us Handle Your Emergency!Call Our Hotline 877-936-8998 www.EmergencyServices24.comServing Floridas Residential & Commercial Community Since 1990 IMMEDIAT E RESPONSE Whats Your Emergency?CBC057844 F lood l Leaks l Mold l F ire l Storm l Smoke l Roong Get the look you deserve... Contact us at 4079146445 Were 100% mobile Car Wash & Wax $15* Insured Business For a limited time only. Restrictions ap ply due to size and condition of vehicle. Mark and Lornas Mark Wayne dies ArchRCHIveVE PhoHOToO BY isISAAcC BABcCOcCK TheHE oOBserverSERVER Mark Wayne and Lorna Lambey play a packed Red Fox Lounge in December 2008. Mark passed away on Feb. 14.Council works to dene new downtown SArRAhH WilsILSON Observer Staff For more information on ordinances regarding the zoning of the Downtown Maitland Zoning District, go to itsmymaitland.com and look under Maitland News for the Downtown Maitland Future Land Use District Rezoning documents. TT o voice your concerns and opinions on what you would like to see and not see developed in the new downtown Maitland, come out to the Planning and Zoning workshop at 6:30 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 20, at the Maitland City Hall Council Chambers.Maitland is seeking public input on Monday, Feb. 20, on how to dene the redevelopment of downtown core IsSAAcC BBABcCOcCK Observer Staff

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Page 4 TThursday, Feb. 16, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer USPS 00-6186 ISSN 1064-36131500 Park Center Drive OOrlando, FL 32835-5705 Member of: Goldenrod Chamber of CommercePublisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor. Submission does not guarantee publication. Columnists opinions are made independently of the newspaper. All rights reserved. Winter Park / Maitland Observer 2012Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munsterwww.wpmobserver.com | Phone: 407-563-7000 | Fax: 407-563-7099 | editor@observernewspapers.com P.OO BBox 2426 Winter Park, FL 32790 Published Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012 CONONTA ACTS Volume 24, Issue NNumber 7 PUBBLIISHER KKyle Taylor 407-563-7009 kyle@observernewspapers.com mMAnNAgGIngNG EDITITOR Jenny AAndreasson 407-563-7026 editor@observernewspapers.com DESIIGNER Jonathan Gallagher 407-563-7054 jgallagher@observernewspapers.com REPORT TERS Jenny AAndreasson 407-563-7026 editor@observernewspapers.com Isaac BBabcock 407-563-7023 isaacb@observernewspapers.com LegEGAlsLS | ClLAssSSIfFIedsEDS AAshley McBBride legal@FLAAlegals.com classieds@observernewspapers.com COPYY EDITITORS Isaac BBabcock isaacb@observernewspapers.com Sarah Wilson COLUMNIISTTS Chris Jepson Jepson@MediAAmerica.us Louis Roney LRoney@c.rr.com Josh Garrick joshgarrick9@gmail.com AADVERTI TISIING SAALES MAnNAgerGER Tracy Craft 407-515-2605 tcraft@observernewspapers.com suSUBscrSCRIpPTIonsONS | cCIrculRCULATIonON Jackie Candelaria 407-563-7013 InNTernERN AAndy Ceballos BBusiness BBriefs Community BBulletin On Jan. 25, the Park A A venue A Area A Asso ciation hosted its annual member awards at the Meet & Greet. Members of the associa tion voted for various categories: BBest A A pparel MerchantTuni BBest B Beauty MemberGary Lambert Salon and Spa BBest Cultural A Attraction MemberCharles Hosmer Morse Museum of AAmerican AArt BBest Restaurant/Specialty FoodThe A An cient OOlive BBest Gift/Specialty StoreTen Thousand Villages BBest Professional Service ProviderGrafton Wealth Management at Merrill Lynch BBest Media/PublicationWinter Park Mag azine 2011 Committee Chairman of the Y Y earSarah Grafton DeVoe for Winter Park Sip & Stroll Volunteer of the Y Y earSarah Grafton De Voe TThe Edyth B Bush Charitable Foundation elect ed Elizabeth Dvorak to its esteemed B Board of Directors. Dvorak is chief executive ofcer and owner of Workscapes IInc. NANAI Realvest recently negotiated a new lease agreement that includes an option for the tenant to buy the property at 2325 Clark St. in A A popka. Jonathan Perry, Shareholder in the Orlando ofce of Greenberg T T raurig, was elected to serve on the B Board of Directors for T The Cen tral Florida Partnership. Daniel O OKKeefe Shareholder of Moore Stephens Lovelace, has been elected to serve as chairman of the B Board of Directors for the Seminole State College Foundation. AAttorney Melody Lynch with Lowndes, Drosdick, Doster, Kantor & Reed, spoke about her Guardian A Ad Litem (GAAL) work in volving a pregnant runaway teenager during a program titled Practicing with Profession alism hosted by T The Florida BBar. Susan Vernon-Devlin, director of Public Relations at Massey Communications, has joined the A Arts and Cultural A Alliance of Cen tral Floridas board. KKeep Winter Park B Beautiful (KWPBB) is now accepting Pocket Park Restoration Project grant applications. A A pply for funds to sup port physical improvements. Complete de tails regarding the Pocket Park Restoration Project and grant applications can be found at www.kwpb.org under Projects.Garage sale TThe Maitland Mens Club is having its annual Garage Sale on March 2-3 in the former Winn-Dixie park ing lot in Maitland. T The Club uses the proceeds to support Christ mas for Children. T The Mens Club is accepting donations every Saturday morning in the Royal Plaza shopping center parking lot from 8 a.m. to noon, and it has trucks and trailers available to schedule pickups. Call Phil B Bonus at 407-6948737 for more information.State of the cityCMF Public Media has posted Winter Park: State of the City A Ad dress 2012. Hear the 2012 Win ter Park State of the City A Address presented by Mayor Ken B Bradley. I In a separate segment, hear the pre sentation of the Employee of the YY ear A Awards and remarks by the luncheon sponsors. Visit tinyurl. com/cmfwpaddressStudent honorsGrace G. McNair of Maitland has been named to the Deans List for the fall semester at Samford Uni versity. Jesse Carl Smith V of Winter Park has been named to the Deans List at Clemson University for the fall 2011 semester. Jonathan Hill, a resident of Maitland and a senior at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, is listed on the honor roll with distinction. Darian A A. Welsh of Winter Park, a SUNYY Canton Construction T T ech nology Management major, made the Deans List.Send submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com Hiaasen drops in On Feb. 2, three-time Pulitzer Prize-nominee and best-selling novelist Carl Hiaasen kicked-off Rollins Col leges Winter With the Writers event. T Throughout the event, renowned writers share their work and exper tise with students and the community. Visit rollins.edu/winterwiththewriters for an event schedule. Presidential scholars TT rinity Preparatory School seniors Harry Pham of Win ter Park and Sam Savitz have been selected as candidates for the 2012 United States Presidential Scholars Program, one of the nations highest honors for high school students, as a result of their outstanding perfor mance on the A ACTT or the College B Board SATAT T They are among the 3,000 candidates recently invited to submit ap plications for the program competition. A About 20 males and 20 females from each state are part of the program competition each year. False alarm at Wine RoomOn Saturday Jan. 28, at about 11:45 p.m., a white female activated the re alarm at the Wine Room located at 270 S Park A Ave. in Winter Park. T This is a photograph of the suspect. IIf you have any information that could lead to identifying her, please contact Crime line at 407-423-TITIPS or the Win ter Park Police Department at 407-644-1313. Invention convention On Wednesday, Feb. 1, Jewish AAcademy of Orlando held its annual Rube Goldberg I Invention Convention in the schools Multipurpose Room. T Their challenge was to work in groups to create a machine, using at least 10 steps and no form of water or electricity to put a paper wad into a trash bin. T They had to be able to t their contrap tions (unassembled) into two shoeboxes and then assemble the full machine in less than 10 minutes. Pictured are team members Max Reis, Elizabeth Gordon, and Sam Freed rejoicing when their inven tion, TThe Paper T T osser 2000, successfully completed its task.

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Page 5 TThursday, Feb. 16, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer apart and see whats inside. They get their hands dirty in their pizza garden. They greet each other, and guests, politely each morning. They sing and move, and learn. Principal Junella Handley said theres never been a time when shes entered Rotenbergers class and they werent doing something new and exciting. She brings learning to life, Handley said. Shes also great at following through on the idea of teaching the whole child, colleagues said. Rotenberger focuses on being healthy through incorporating movement into teaching, challenges and reaches each child at their level, and treats them with the caring shed give her own family. Rotenberger loves watch ing them make new friends, in cluding everyone in their play and watching them learn to care about each other. Shes the most giving teacher LeFebvre said hes ever met. They know that she cares about them; shes so patient and loving, said Rebekah Dooley, a theyre safe with her. Your goal is to love them and to help them to reach their fullest potential in one learning year, and to encourage them, Rotenberger said. Not only does she love seeing them grow as people, but as students too. There are little magi cal moments that she gets to see, when what shes teaching clicks in their minds. She sees them becom ing mathematicians, deep thinkers, problem solvers and readers. When youre teaching children to write, to see those mo ments when all those skills that youve been teaching start to re ally come together and you see its just beautiful, she said. It is amazing. Its always a miracle to me every year to watch it hap pen. Rotenberger wasnt always a kindergarten teacher. Shes taught a few older grades, but when she had her own children who she said were her best teachers a passion was created for educating the tiniest students. And being a role model for her family is what has pushed her to stay so invest ed in her school and its learning community of teachers and par ents. She wants her three children to understand the importance of community involvement. Her husband and children all spent time on the schools community garden, planting and building. Rotenberger takes her commit ment to helping others further by being a role model for other teach ers, as well. Shes never resistant to sharing her ideas, teaching ex pertise or mentoring new teach ers. LeFebvre was one of three new kindergarten teachers when he started at Dommerich, and said she was always a welcoming ear for questions, and is still someone who is concerned with the success of the whole school, not just her own class. Her doors always open, her hearts always open, Handley said. New Construction!4 bed / 2.5 bath / 2190 sq ft $339,000 808 Hamilton Place Court Winter Park, FL 32789 Commerce Brokerage, LLC407-566-1636 250 North Orlando Avenue Winter Park, Florida 32789 407.677.9777 A Premier Flooring Source nCARPETOODTONE TILELAMINATE AREA RUGINDO TREATMENT Featuring Exquisite Products for Residential & Commercial Projects Custom Design and Quality Installationn ALL IN MINIATURE & ALL FOR SALE pm Present this ad for $1 off Sunday Adult AdmissionInformation & Directions: 407-351-3500 ext. 0 or www.mollycromwell.com2012 ORLANDO DOLLHOUSE MINIATURES FESTIVAL 6515 International Drive teTEAcherCHER | Rotenberger focuses on the idea of teaching the whole child, incorporating health initiatives C ONTITINUED FROM fronFRONT pP AgeGE OOut of 188 nominees, Lisa Rotenberger from Dommerich Elementary is one of ve nalists for OOrange County Public Schools Teacher of the Year. She will nd out if she won at a ceremony held on Feb. 21. Learn more PhoHOToO BY isISAAcC BABcCOcCK TheHE oOBserverSERVER Dommerich Elementary teacher Lisa Rotenburger tends the schools pizza garden.

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Page 6 TThursday, Feb. 16, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer The Eagles boys basketball shocking turnaround over last season with a 70-59 throttling of Mainland to win their district championship on Feb. 11. The win was also sweet revenge for Edge water, whose only district loss had come at the hands of Mainland on Jan. 24. With the win the Eagles avenged one of the worst seasons in school history, when they went 1-25 last season. The Buccaneers will now host Palm Bay for the ping off at 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 16.Winter ParkThe momentum from a sur prise win over East River on Feb. 7 wasnt enough to carry the Wildcats to a second straight district victory against Timber Creek, as The loss quickly put the brakes on an improbable playoff run by who hadnt won a district game all season before unexpectedly shot at going deeper into the post season. they were in an equally tough position, facing one of the strongest teams in the district while facing elimination from the postseason altogether. With one more win, they could have been set for re gional action. But the Wildcats found them selves overwhelmed from the offense that put up 20 points in the more than kept pace in the second quarter, out-shooting the Wolves the second half. As their defense waned in the fourth quarter, the Wildcats let the Wolves again pile nal quarter. Its TAX time. Appointments Available 7 Days a Week!Tax Form Processing LLC2400 N Forsyth Rd., Suite 101 Orlando, FL 32807Tel: (407) 657-6336www.TaxFormProcessing.com Proudly Serving the Orlando Area for 17 years! Scan QR Code Sports BBriefs Tomas N Nido, a senior catcher at Or angewood Christian School in Mait land, has been named by the staff at Collegiate B Baseball as a First T T eam Pre-Season Louisville Slugger B Base ball A All-AAmerican. Nido is considered one of the top high school catchers in the country and has signed a National Letter of I Intent to play baseball at Florida State University in the fall. I In 2011, T T omas broke the Central Florida single season homerun record with 17 homeruns, posted a .577 batting average and had 64 RBIBIs. He was in strumental in leading the 2011 Rams to a FHSAAAA 2AA State Runner-up nish and his 17 homeruns led a team that broke the Florida High School homer un record for a single season with 83 homeruns. T This past fall, T T omas was chosen by the Puerto Rico Olympic Committee to participate in the Pan AAmerican Junior B Baseball T T ourna ment held in Cartagena, Colombia. David Lowrey, a senior wide receiver on the Orangewood Christian School in Maitland varsity football team, has chosen to play football next season at Elon University in Elon, N.C., as a pre ferred walk-on. Lowrey led Central Florida, in all eight FHSAAAA classica tions, with 14 touchdowns this sea son, was second in receiving yards with 954, and averaged 23.3 yards a catch. T This season he had more than 1,700 all-purpose yards with a total of 22 touchdowns. For his career at Orangewood, David had 3,923 allpurpose yards and 52 touchdowns. AAdditionally, he carries above a 4.0 grade point average, is a member of the National Honor Society, and plays centereld on the Rams baseball team that were State Semi-Finalists in 2010 and State Runner-up in 2011. He is the son of Mark and Susan Lowrey and has three brothers Mark, 21, BBrian, 19, and John, 14. Orangewood Christian sophomore Forrest Wall was named by Colle giate B Baseball as one of the top high school baseball players in Florida. I In 2011, Wall had a .404 batting aver age with four homeruns and 22 RBIBI. TThis past fall, he was invited to the USAA B Baseball 16 and under trials in North Carolina and in 2012, he hopes to lead the Rams back to the FHSAAAA State BBaseball Final Four. AAlexis Prince of Edgewater High School has joined the ranks of high school basketballs elite with her selection to the 2012 McDonalds AAll-AAmerican High School B Basketball Girls East T T eam. A Announcement of her selection came during a Feb. 9 selection show on ESPNU. T The 11th A Annual Girls Game will tip off at 6 p.m. Cen tral T T ime on Wednesday, March 28, inside Chicagos United Center, and will broadcast live on ESPNU. AAlexis Prince will join 23 other top female prep players throughout the country. A As a member of the Edgewater Eagles team, she hit the 1,000-point mark by her sophomore year. Princes high school coach is Malcolm Lewis. She has signed with BBaylor University. We couldnt be more excited about AAlexis receiving this great honor, Orlando McDonalds Owner/Operator Jim Gilchrist, a former basketball player himself, said. She epitomizes what it means to be a student athlete. Not only is she setting records on the court, but she is making her mark in the classroom as well, as a National Honor Society scholar.Send sports news submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com PhoHOToO courCOUR TesESY ofOF OrRANgewGEWOOdD christiCHRISTIAN schSCHOOlL David Lowrey sits with father Mark, brother John (eighth-grader at OCS), and mother Sue. PhoHOToO courCOUR TesESY ofOF OrRANgewGEWOOdD christiCHRISTIAN schSCHOOlL Tomas NNido poses with Coach Scott Hilinski, left, and A Assistant Coach Kevin Davidson. PhoHOToO courCOUR TesESY ofOF mcdMCDONAldLDsS Alexis Prince of Edgewater poses with Orlando McDonalds Owner/Operator Jim Gilchrist.Eagles complete big turnaround IsSAAcC BBABcCOcCK Observer Staff

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Page 7 TThursday, Feb. 16, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer on how you can save money and conserve water by reducing the amount of water you give your thirsty lawn. Youve already heard from our Public Works Depart ment about how to implement the water wise tips (rain sensors and but there are other ways to reduce your water bill and prevent an un expectedly large water bill. There are some proactive steps you can take to be sure you are conserving as much as possible at home. Findgood place to start. A leaky toilet or faucet can waste thousands of gallons of water each month, put ting a hefty dent in your wallet. water than you think. Installing can dramatically reduce your in door water consumption without reduced performance. Learning to read your water meter can pay off. Its easy to do, and a way to determine if you have a leak in your home. First, turn off all the water in your house. Remember to wait for the hot water heater and ice-cube tion of water softeners. Next, go to your water meter and jot down all the numbers you see. To check for slow leaks, read your water meter before and after a one-hour peri od when no water is being used. If the readings are different after the one-hour period, you have a leak. Some areas to check include toilets, faucets, malfunctioning water softeners, swimming pools, water heaters and faulty irrigation leaks, foundation leaks and leaks behind walls. These may require the assistance of a plumber to lo cate. Toilet leaks are often silent, al lowing loss of water to go unde tected for long periods of time. Some toilets may produce a run ning water sound that is easy to hear. Some leaks are visible as a small trickle running from the rim to the water in the bowl. The av erage leaky toilet can waste about 200 gallons of water per day. To detect silent leaks, remove the lid from the toilet tank, remove any clear water in the bowl, then add a few drops of food coloring to the tank. If the tank is leaking, color will appear in the bowl within 30 minutes. Flush as soon as the test is complete. To learn about other ways to conserve water in your home site sponsored by the Saint Johns River Management District. Roxanne Long, Utility Billing Supervisor, city of MaitlandCouncil Meeting of Feb. 13The Maitland City Council met on Feb. 13, at 6:30 p.m. in the City Hall Council Chambers. Below is a synopsis of that meeting. The next regular scheduled Council meeting will be held on Monday, Feb. 27. Public Hearings:Advanced to Second Reading an ordinance to establish a Down town Maitland Zoning District and table of permitted, accessory, conditional and prohibited uses within the DMZD. Advanced to Second Reading an ordinance to rezone properties within the Downtown Maitland Zoning District. Adopted an ordinance to amend Chapter 7.5 Land Devel opment Procedures, to create a process within the Maitland City Code for Amendments to Devel opment Agreements. Consent AAgenda: Approved the Council Minutes of Jan. 23 and received various Advisory Board minutes. Accepted the results of the 2012 Municipal Election. Election results are posted on the citys web page. Awarded the city towing/ wrecker services contract to TriCounty Towing, the lowest bidder to respond to an RFB advertised on Nov. 23. Awarded a contract to R.W. Paul Construction Inc. in the amount of $135,393.66 for the installation of sidewalks and retain ing walls on Arapaho Trail from Algonquin Trail to Thunderbird Trail. Awarded a contract to Barra cuda Building Corporation in the Mohawk Trail. Approved the upgrade of Lift submersible station in lieu of Lift Station #3 in the FY 2012 Sanitary Sewer System Capital Improve ments Program.Decisions:Passed Resolutions to allow Use Agreement with the Florida Department of Transportation to facilitate the design, construction and maintenance of the Maitland Commuter Rail Station entryway, parking lot, and other station enLocally Funded Agreement with the Florida Department of Transportation to provide funding toward the Maitland Commuter Rail Station entryway, parking lot, canopies and other station en hancements. Authorized the execution of a Joint Participation Agreement with the Florida Department of Transportation for the Art in Tran sit Program, allowing for the city to participate in the program to art preferences. To listen to a recording of the meeting, visit www.itsmymaitland.com Maitland Coin & Currency Show Sunday Feb. 199:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.Maitland Civic Center 641 South Maitland Avenue Maitland, FL 32751FREE ADMISSIONShow open to the public Buy Sell Trade AppraisalsFor more information call or visitOrlando Coin Exchange 6301 S. Orange Avenue Orlando, FL 32809www.MaitlandCoinShow.comorlandocoinexchange@gmail.com407-730-3116 and caterers, as well as beer, wine and desserts Maitland City Talk ByY HOwW ArdRD SchieferdecCHIEFERDECKerER MAYOR Water conservation tips The average leaky toilet can waste about 200 gallons of water per day.

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Page 8 TThursday, Feb. 16, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Mayors OOath of OOfce CeremonyA reception was held at the Ra chel D. Murrah Civic Center on Feb. 13, celebrating the re-election of Mayor Kenneth Bradley. Imme diately following the reception, Mayor Bradley was sworn in by Clerk of the Courts, as he took his lations Mayor Bradley!Feb. 13 City Commission Meeting highlightsThere was a City Commis sion meeting held on Feb. 13, at 3:30 p.m., at the Rachel D. Mur rah Civic Center. Below are a few highlights of decisions that were made:Mayors ReportThe board appointments to the Code Enforcement Board and Board were approved.City Managers ReportThe City Commission Strategic Planning Session was scheduled for Wednesday, April 4. NNon-action items The December 2011 Financial Report was presented and ac cepted. Consent AAgenda The minutes of Jan. 23 meeting tion. The various purchases and contracts were approved (a com plete list can be found at www.cit yofwinterpark.org > Government > City Commission > Agenda The purchase of a Cisco Router necessary to enhance police de partment dispatch connectivity was approved. The purchase of computer soft ware required operating systems and four desktop computer work stations for the police department was approved. Free electric vehicle charging services for an initial promotional/evaluation period with the fees to be reviewed semi-annually in accordance with the fee schedule was approved. The agreement for transfer of Wastewater Service for 2021 N. Goldenrod Road and authorize the mayor to execute the agreement was approved. AAction Items Requiring DiscussionStreet musicians and perform ers on Park Avenue were dis cussed and the issue was directed to be reviewed further by the CRA Advisory Board and the Park Area Avenue Task Force. The Urban Land Institute Tech nical Assistance Panel Program for West Fairbanks Redevelopment Evaluation was approved. The proposed on-street dining for Hannibal Square East was discussed and a trial period until April 29 for this request was ap proved and will be reviewed at the conclusion of the trial period need to be made.Public HearingsThe following decisions were made on the request of Denning Partners, Ltd., for the property at nance changing the designation of Single-Family Residential to High Density Residential was denied. nance changing the designation of Single-Family Residential to Multi-Family was denied. The resolution calling for a public hearing ad valorem assessment for properties abutting to fund the installation of under ground electrical/BHN facilities was approved. The resolution delegating au thority to the Code Enforcement Board and under emergency conditions forward to the city manag er to negotiate code enforcement liens and to execute satisfactions or releases of code enforcement liens was approved with revi sions. nance establishing parking restrictions at electric charging stations was approved. The conditions of approval for extension of conditional use for the parking garage expansion at 655 W. Morse Blvd. pursuant to the settlement agreement was ap proved. A full copy of the Feb. 13 City Commission minutes will be avail at www.cityofwinterpark.org the week of Feb. 27, pending approval by the City Commission.Electric usage monitorsWondering how much electric TV you got for Christmas uses? Check out an electric usage moni tor at the Winter Park Public Li New England Ave. today.Citys website has gone mobileWhen any smart phone user entering www.cityofwinterpark. org, they will automatically be redirected to the new mobile ver sion of the citys site. The main purpose of this mobile version is to provide a more viewerand userfriendly version of the site via a smart phone. The mobile site provides easy access to the most popular web pages as viewed from a smart phone in addition to providing additional information regarding government meetings. Another unique feature is allowing smart phone users the ability to report a power outage directly from their smart phone under the utilities tab. Because the use of smartphones is growing and will continue to grow, the city is responding to this technological growth and of fering an easier way to access city information via this tool. Just in 2011 alone, about 51,500 mobile users visited our site using nine different operating systems with the iPhone, iPad and Android as the most frequent visitors.Visit the citys ofcial website at www. cityofwinterpark.org, nd us on Facebook, and follow us on T T witter. Presented in partnership with Observe r Winter Park / Maitland 7:45 a.m. Rachel D. Murrah Civic Center 1050 W. Morse Blvd., Winter Park, FL 32789 Bill Seyfried, Professor of Economics Ronald Piccolo, Associate Professor of Management Craig McAllaster, Dean & Profe ssor of Management, Rollins MBA $25 Members (in advance) / $30 Non-members and at the door Reservations at www.winterpark.org or call (407) 644-8281 Additional support provided by: Hosted by: Enter your chiliShowcase your business! Be a sponsor or a vendorVolunteers needed PROCEEDS TOBENEFITTHANK YOU TO SOME OF OUR SPONSORSPRESENTED BY Winter Park City Talk ByY RANdyDY KKNightIGHT CITY MANAGER BBradley takes oath PhoHOToO courCOUR TesESY ofOF wiWINterTER pP ArRK Winter Park Mayor K Ken B Bradley takes the oath of ofce administered by Orange County Clerk Lydia Gardner, while his wife, Ruth, looks on. He won a second term on Jan. 31.

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Page 9 Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Lifestyles Hes hiked for miles to reach Costa Rican tribes in the jungle, felt his hotel shake as a bomb ex ploded blocks away and crossed paths taken by kidnappers days before, and hes done it all alone. Jorge Moreno, a Kissimmee resident and barber at Kennedys All American Barber Club in Win ter Park, has done all of this and more in the name of charity. In 20 years, hes gone on mis sion trips to 11 countries sharing his Christian beliefs, supplying clothing and medicine, building homes and churches, and most of all, inspiring hope. Theres so much need around the world, Moreno said.Driving around the worldOn March 1, Moreno plans to leave his home once again for what he hopes will be an aroundthe-world missionary trip, visit ing 17 countries, from Puerto Rico Hell do it all in a passenger and sink. He estimates the whole trip will cost more than $47,000. Hes only raised $18,000, but hes not worried a bit. Wherever my last dollar will take me, thats where my last des tination will be, he said. Most of that $12,000 has come out of Morenos own pocket, but to him, this mission is worth more than any material item. We get caught up in this soci etal pressure to acquire things, to be able to show the world that we have this and we have that, and yet we become slaves to the things we own, he said. When we go outside our comfort area, we real ize that there are people who need things that we have abundant here. I feel like this is just answering act, Cindy Miner, his friend and co-worker at Kennedys, said. Moreno has seen the need around the world through his pre vious mission trips, but hes also seen the humble happiness and giving hearts of people. When he visits a town, the people, who are lacking so much, open their homes to him. He said he spreads himself thin to the residents who demand a chance to show their gratitude for the clothing and medicine he brings. They make a meal of their best food even if that may be an iguana in the Costa Rican jungle; a preacher will offer his bed and hugs and smiles and excitement from children as he pulls out soc cer balls for them to play with. While they are gracious, he knows it will never be enough. You know they need more than what youve given them, he said. You have to be strong. You really develop a sense of appreciation for what you have and who you have around you, his daughter, Melissa Moreno, said. Defying dangerBut still, those moments are when its all worth it. Where Moreno travels is not always safe. Political turmoil can erupt at any moment; hes spent time walking ing military men, ridden in buses that were the scenes of kidnappings and had bombs explode so near that the ground rumbled be neath him. Moreno said he must do it alone, because no one will take the risks and go to the lengths he does to help the people. Hes a true person, said Luis Soriano, a fellow barber at Kennedys. While not many would go to the lengths he does, Moreno hopes that his trips and his story will inspire others to do something. Chuck Oliver, a friend and client at Kennedys, said Morenos mission has made him take a look at what he can do to step up his own level of giving back. He pushes me to be better, Oliver said. When he gets back, Moreno said theres always a period of ad justment. He cant forget the fami lies hes helped. Each story hes heard stays in his mind and in his heart, which just pushes him to continue. I dont want to change the world, Moreno said. I just want to make it better. Were back! Support the Healthy Lifestyle Initiatives of Dommerich Elementary School by participating in our 4th Annual 5K (3.1 mile) Run and 1-Mile Dash.REGISTER ONLINE AT ChiefsOnTheRun.comor download a registration form at www.des.ocps.netSATURDAY FEBRUARY 25, 2012DOMMERICH ELEMENTARY PHotoOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK tTHE oOBSERVER Jorge Moreno, a KKissimmee resident and barber at KKennedys AAll AAmerican BBarber CClub, will set out on March 1 for what he hopes will be an around-the-world missionary trip. SSeventeen countries, one mission A barber from Winter Parks own Kennedys BBarber Club will embark on a voyage to bring hope to the needy BBRITTNI JOHNSON Observer SStaff TT o learn more about Jorge Morenos trip, and to donate to his cause, visit http:// jmmisionmundial.com/HHome_ Page.php Learn more

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Page 10 Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer FamilyCalendar Porter Goss has worn many hats newspaper co-founder, mayor of a small island, congress man and most recently, CIA di rector. On Sunday, hell join the ranks of James Cagney, Edward R. Murrow and Arnold Palmer as a page in the Animated Maga zine. tors scheduled to present their submissions in person on Sunday, Feb. 19 at Winter Park Institutes Animated Magazine event at Rol lins College. Goss presentation, Brand USA in the World Today, focuses on how we see ourselves as Amer icans and how others view us in the global market. I think that many people called the last century the century of America, and some people have created this expectation that the next century will be the century of the globe, of globalization, Goss said. I think its worth taking a look at what our role is how we and how we go abroad in the world today as the worlds super power. began in December of 1926 when Holt, eighth president of Rollins College, met with Dr. Edwin Gro ver, newly appointed professor of books, to discuss the idea, ac cording to an article published by Wenxian Zhang, head of archives and special collections at Rollins. Zhang wrote that Grover ex pressed reluctance when remind advertising and the expense of printing, supplies and subscrip tions. Holt then explained to Gro ver that he didnt intend to create a print publication, but rather, something where contributors would present their content in issue of the Animated Magazine was published. such as Cordell Hull, secretary of state during the administra tion of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, and former FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover. Contributors came at their own expense and without compensation. The Winter Park Institute now provides for travel expenses, but speakers are not compensated for their contribu tions. Gail Sinclair, executive director of the Winter Park Institute, said last years event drew more than 500 subscribers, which is small relative to the thousands that once came. She said the ability to see originally why people came to this event. One of the main differences is seen on television, she said. The spectacle of it was something quite amazing. What other chance could people in this area have to ures that Hamilton Holt brought in? Sinclair said the process of selecting speakers has changed from the days of Holt, as he had a unique ability to draw big names to the event. We are working a little more locally than what Hamilton Holt did, because this is a differ ent world than what he was work ing in, she said. Other speakers at the Feb. 19 event will include Jim Evans, a former major league baseball umpire who will provide a be hind-the-scenes look at baseball, as well as Janice Aria, director of Animal Stewardship for Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey circus. Aria will discuss the role that the Ringling Bros. Center for Elephant Conservation plays in the future of the endangered Asian elephant. Billy Collins, editor of the Ani mated Magazine, describes the event as a live performance, where his job is to present the speakers and keep the pages of the maga zine turning. Holt was famous for having a huge blue pencil that he would use to cross people off if they ran over time. Collins said he has not had to do this yet. The more condensed the presentations, the more the per formance feels like a magazine, because the pages keep turning, and we move from one piece to another, he said. In the past, the magazine car ried some general themes to it. Jack Lane, professor emeritus of American history at Rollins, said that the theme would be some thing relevant to the current time period, such as international rela tions. He said Holt would balance heavier content with lighter mate rial. One year, there was a very famous snake expert here in Flor ida, Lane said, and he had him come down and display all the snakes that he collected over the years. Lenten Schedule February 22 Ash Wednesday Mass 7:30pm April 1 Palm Sunday Mass 11:00am April 5 Holy Thursday Mass 7:30pm April 6 Good Friday Liturgy 7:30pm April 7 Holy Saturday Mass 7:30pm April 8 Easter Sunday Mass 11:00am St. Dorothy Catholic Community301 West New England Avenue Winter Park, FL 32790 www.stdorothycatholiccommunity.org 407-610-5109Lenten Series ALL FAITHS WELCOMECHRIST IN THE STRANGEST PLACESWritten by seminary professor Dr. Reed LessingFridays of Lent: February 24; March 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 7:30 PM PHotoOTOS coCOURt TESY ofOF ROllLLINS COllLLEGE RRollins C Colleges A Animated Magazine event got its start in 1927. Coordinated by college President H Hamilton H Holt, the event would draw thousands of people to campus. BBelow, Animated Magazine EEditor BBilly Collins holds a huge blue pencil used to move the event along. Rollins recreates piece of history AANdD Y CCEBAllLLOS Observer SStaff HHamilton HHolt and Dr. EEdwin GGrover created TThe AAnimated Magazine in December 1926. AAt its peak, eight to 10 thousand people gathered at RRollins to attend the annual gathering. Visit tinyurl. com/AAnimatedMagazine Learn more The H Holocaust Memorial R Resource and E Education Center presents HHow C Children B Become Up standers. This presentation will examine bystander behavior and identify ways to help children safely intervene when they witness bullying. The forum is at the Center at 6 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 16. TThe G Great Duck Derby features rubber duck races and free family activities on S Saturday, Feb. 18. The little yellow rubber ducks will race in the Mead Garden pond at 12:15 and 1 p.m. The event is free. Please join the Maitland Public Library for our second Annual TT ween/TT een Mardi G Gras Dance Party from 7-9 p.m. on S Saturday, Feb. 18. Its open to students in fth through eighth grade. Admis sion is free. It is located at 501 SS. Maitland Ave. in Maitland. Call 407-647-7700 or email jdolce@ maitlandpubliclibrary.org TThe Maitland Public Library has several weekly events through February. E Each Tuesday at 10:30 a.m. it hosts preschool story time & craft time. E Each Thursday at 10:30 a.m. it hosts baby time sto ries & activity. E Each Thursday at 4 p.m., it hosts R Reading B Buddies. Any kindergarten through fthgraders who want to enhance their reading skills are welcome to attend. No registration necessary. Call 407-647-7700. AArtsFest is Feb. 1-29. All events are free and open to the public, although some offerings have limited seating and capacity. V Visit ArtsFestFL.com for more informa tion. TThe Winter Park Farmers Mar ket is held from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. every S Saturday at 200 W. New EEngland Ave. V Visit CityofWinter Park.org TThe Maitland Farmers Market is from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. every SSunday. It is located at Lake Lily Park. For more information, visit ItsMyMaitland.com or call 407539-6268. Food T T ruck C Caf is from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. every Wednesday at Lake Lily Park in Maitland. TThe Winter Park Food T T ruck SStop is located at 1127 N. Orlando Ave. in Winter Park, and is open for food trucks 24/7. V Visit Facebook at http://tinyurl.com/FoodTruckSStop Music at the C Casa is a free weekly open house from noon to 3 p.m. on S Sundays, featuring live perfor mances and tours of the historic Casa Feliz, at 656 N. Park Ave., in Winter Park. For more information, visit CasaFeliz.us or call 407-6288200 ext. 3. U Upcoming perfor mances include: Peter Thatcher on Feb. 19, and S Shannon Caine of BBeautiful Music on Feb. 26. SSend submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com

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Page 11 Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer FEATURING THE BACH FESTIVAL CHOIR AND ORCHESTRA AND BACH SCHOLAR DR. CHRISTOPH WOLFF JOHN V. SINCLAIR ARTISTIC DIRECTOR AND CONDUCTOR WED LIKE TO GIVE SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR 77TH ANNUAL FESTIVAL SPONSORS: This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH O RLANDO A VE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.E NZIAN.ORG Held Over! Final Week! THE ARTIST Fri Sun 3:45PM 6:30PM 9:15PM Mon, Tue, Thurs 6:30PM 9:15PM Wed 6:30pm FilmSlam Sunday 1PM Crispin Hellion Glovers Big Slide Show Part 2 Wed 9:30PM Wednesday Night Pitcher Show FRIDAY 8PM FREE Feb. 18 Dyers BBBBQ IInvite Mayor Buddy Dyer invites Central Florida residents to the sixth annual Blues B-Q, a free Blues Festival featuring headliners Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue and The Lee Boys. Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue has continued to grow their fan base since the release of their Grammy-nominated debut album, Backatown, in 2010. Local talent includes The Kevin Maines Band, CeCe Teneal and the BB King All Star Band. BBQ from Bubbalous Bodacious and Porkies Original will be available for purchase. The Blues B-Q will take place from 3 p.m. to 10 p.m. on Saturday, Feb.18, at the Church Street Plaza in front of Amway Center, 400 W. Church St. Visit cityoforlando.net/parking Feb. 21 BBoard BBarristers (and drug-supplier) Friar Lauthe part he played in the young lovers untimely deaths. The Orlando Shakespeare Theaters Board Barristers will present 21, at the Shakespeare Center. Based on the current production of Romeo and Juliet, in which Prince Escalus declares: Some shall be pardoned, and some punished. (The PrinceDude is serious about justice.) Actors from Romeo and Juliet (running through March 17) will participate. Kimberly Ashby, a shareholder at Akerman Senshareholder at Foley & Lardner, will serve as advocates for the parties. The evening begins at 5:30 p.m. with drinks and hors doeuvres. Tickets are $25 ($15 for students) and include one drink ticket. Call 407-447-1700 or visit orlandoshakes.org Feb. 22 SSpam-AA-Lot The funniest, silliest, most Vegas-like show of the season will slide into Daytona on its canned ham hiney for one-nightonly on Wednesday, Feb. 22, at the Peabody Auditorium. That show is Monty Python's Spamalot, a musical comedy Python and the Holy Grail, and two hours I have ever spent in irreverent parody of the legend of King Arthur, but with a decidedly Vegas-like appreciation for scant ily clad showgirls. The Broadway production opened in 2005 and won three Tony Awards includ ing Best Musical. I love recom mending performances, and I love it even more when I am sure that a performance is going to be special. Its only here for one night. Call 386-671-3460 or visit PeabodyAuditorium.org Feb. 23 CChili for CCharity The Rotary Club of Winter Park is proud to present a new Winter Park tradition, Chili for Charity. Unlike traditional chili cook-offs, this event features creative chili with a "Winter Park attitude from 5:30 to 8 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 23, at the Winter Park Farmers' Market at 200 W. New England Ave. Local restaurants and caterers will compete for the coveted Peoples' Choice Award and have their dishes evaluated by a panel of judges. Live entertainment, drinks, dessert and a live auction will round the Rotary Club of Winter Park Charitable Foundation, which provides grants to more than 30 local charities each year. Participants will include Arthur's Cater ing, Classic Creations, Fleming's Steakhouse, Tolla's Italian Caf and Whole Foods Market and many others. Tickets are $25 in advance and can be purchased from Rotary Club of Winter Park members. Tickets are $30 at the door.Feb. 28-29 Michael Jackson TThe IImmortal Consider a repertoire of the created by Michael Jackson, and that music is used for Cirque du Soleils newest full-length evening of performance magic. The must-see ticket of the season Michael Jackson The Immor tal will be performed in two performances only on Feb. 28 and 29 at the Amway Center in Or lando. This life-changing production combines Michael Jacksons music with the choreography and athleticism of Cirque du Soleil to give fans a unique view into the spirit, passion and heart of the artistic genius who forever transformed global pop culture. The show is written and directed by Jamie King, who has channeled Michaels love of music and dance, fairy tale magic and the fragility of nature into a show featuring more than 60 dancers, musicians and acrobats. Tickets are available at ticketmaster.com or 1-800-745-3000.Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. HHe is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906.Josh Garrick Culture worthy of your calendar BBBBQ with BBuddy

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Page 12 Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer HHealthy Living Florida Hospital and the Winter Park Health Foundation have partnered up with three local com munities and one well-known television doctor to launch an initiative to make Central Florida a healthier place to live. Healthy Central Florida (HCF), a community-based partnership starting in Winter Park, Maitland and Eatonville, aims to make Cen tral Florida the healthiest commu nity in the nation, said Executive Director Jill Hamilton Buss. The initiative, which had its formal launch Monday, Feb. 6 with a presentation at Full Sail University by Dr. Mehmet Oz, host of the daytime medical talk show, The Dr. Oz Show, focuses on getting people more active, eat ing healthier and more connected to their communities. reengineer movement and activ ity back into our lives as we live them at school, at work, church and in your neighborhood we want to make the healthy choice the easy choice in all settings, Buss said. With help from Florida Hospi tal, the Winter Park Health Foun dation and the mayors of each of aims to promote long-lasting environmental policy and social change to make Central Florida a healthier place to live, work and play, Buss said.Linking the communityFor two years, the Winter Park Health Foundation had been searching for community partners to start up an initiative focused on more healthy living practices in Central Florida, when they found Florida Hospital, said Patty Mad dox, president and CEO of the Winter Park Health Foundation. We started thinking about dif ferent things we could do to help a greater number of people than with just the different programs we were doing Maddox said. We realized we wanted to do something that would look at the health of the greater community as a whole. At Florida Hospital, Executive Vice President Brian Paradis said they too had been looking for more ways to get involved in mission of not only caring for peo ple in need, but also nurturing the community as a whole to reach its highest health potential hoping to help them before they need care from the hospital. We want to help people bet ter perform and to be able to live a better life, Paradis said. We need to better help our community compete in a global world, and we think health is a big piece of that. In a world of widening waist bands and portion sizes, and less ening physical activity, Paradis said were leading our children down a long, costly road of un healthy living. The legacy were about to leave our children is a life ex pectancy shorter than our own, which is an unprecedented event in modern history, he said. We need to change that before it hap pens. The two organizations came together to form Healthy Central Florida, Buss said, so that they can make a change before its too late. What we need to do is cre ate more environmental cues and supports that help people main tain healthy behaviors, Buss said. Whether that is by putting parks in more places, adding more bike lanes to roads, or changing food options at school, work and home to healthier ones, she said, Small change and small steps add up. cant survey put out to each tar Savannah Court and CoeExcellence in Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation 1301 W. Maitland Blvd. Maitland, FL 32751407-645-3990www.SavannahCourtMaitland.comAssisted Living Facility License No. 8447 Skilled Nursing Facility License No. 1635096 Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above!A Senior Living Community where Hospitality is a Way of Life.Healthy Heart MonthThursday, Feb. 23, 2012 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.Helpful Hints to keep your heart healthy By: Vitas Healthy Snacks providedPLEASE RSVP Lack of Desire or Low Energy?Testosterone Lab Work for $35 (a $240 Value) Call today for a risk-free appointment: 407-894-9959 Testosterone Lab Work for $35 (a $240 Value)Recapture Your Sexual Vitality W i n t e r P a r k R e c o v e r y C e n t e r Executive Drug & Alcohol Treatment Services Suboxone Maintenance For Opioid Abuse Naltrexone Extinction for Alcohol If It s In Your Heart To Quit2056 Aloma Ave, Suite 100, Winter Park, FL 32792 www.YourLifeRecovery.com 407-629-0413 PHotoOTOS BY SARAH wWIlLSON tTHE oOBSERVER Dr. Mehmet O Oz, left, of the TThe Dr. O Oz S Show introduces the H Healthy Central Florida program at Full S Sail U University on Feb. 6. B Below, Winter Park Mayor Ken BBradley, EEatonville Mayor BBruce Mount and Maitland Mayor HHoward SSchieferdecker listen to the presentation. Dr. OOz launches health initiative HHealthy Central Florida program aims to make Central Florida a healthier place to live, work and play SSARAH WIlLSON Observer SStaff For more information on HHealthy CCentral Florida, visit healthycentralorida.org. TT o learn about different healthy living activities going on in your community, visit ndactivefun.org Learn more Please see OZ on page 14

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Page 13 Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer WINTER PARK -With deepest gratitude and well wishes, the staff of Cornerstone Hospice & Palliative Care today received announcement from President and CEO Pat Lehotsky of her plans to retire after 15 years of service. Cornerstone Hospice cares for Winter Park and Maitland patients and families facing a life-threatening illness, as well as patients throughout all Orange county and six other central Florida counties. So much has changed in our Central Florida service area in 15 years, and likewise, many changes have taken place in hospice, reected Lehotsky. I remember like it was yesterday, my rst days with the former Hospice of Lake & Sumter. We were serving about 120 patients and had a staff of 70, she added. As she gazes out her ofce windows, Lehotsky shares memories of so many key milestones. We opened our rst Polk County ofce in Haines City, September 2003. In 2004, the rst Hospice license plate was sold thanks to a bill sponsored by Sen. Carey Baker, while he was serving in the military in Iraq. Proceeds from the sale of this plate continue to provide funds to advance hospice care in Florida. In October 2004 as we celebrated our 20th Anniversary, we survived four hurricanes that was quite the year, she exclaimed. ln 2005 I was tremendously honored and humbled to win the Heart of Hospice Award Senior Executive from the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization (NHPCO) with headquarters near Washington DC. Over the next few years, we would experience much growth. We began serving patients from ofces in Orlando and Kissimmee and the Mike Conley Hospice House, Clermont, accepted our rst patient in October 2007. Cornerstone Inpatient Suites at Winter Park Towers, Orlando opened November 2010. Ms Lehotsky pauses and contemplates her journey. Today as I head into retirement and devote a little time to some personal interests, Cornerstone Hospice & Palliative Care serves over 4200 patients annually in seven counties, with over 600 employees, from four ofces, four hospice houses and one inpatient unit. New programming to better serve our communities include Serious Illness care-giving web resources, Pet Peace of Mind, Transitions Program, and a Cardiac Specialty Program as well as a planned Inpatient Unit in Polk County to name a few. With condence, I leave Cornerstone Hospice in the capable hands of its leaders and staff, who will continue to provide the best in end-of-life care to the communities we serve, Ms. Lehotsky concluded with a smile. Lehotsky retires after 15 years at Cornerstone Hospices helm Pat LehotskySince 1984, Cornerstone Hospice and Palliative Care, Inc., a not-forprot community-based healthcare organization, has provided care and services to central Florida residents experiencing life-limiting illnesses. To learn more, call (407)206-2273 or toll-free (800)679-6088 in Orange and Osceola counties or visit www.cornerstonehospice. org as well as www.SeriousIllness.org/Cornerstone CCalendar FEBEB. 16 Poet and best-selling novelist Pau la McLain will speak at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 16, at the B Bush Audi torium of R Rollins College Auditorium. VVisit rollins.edu/winterwiththewrit ers BBalancing H Hormones N Naturally will be held at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, Feb.16, at the Maitland Public Library at 501 S S. Maitland Avenue in Maitland. Call 407-644-7700. FEBEB. 17 Join Maitland Public Library Friday, Feb.17 at 10 a.m. the Library, in partnership with the Maitland Fire & RRescue, is offering free blood pressure checks. Arts S S ake S S tudios, 680 Clay S S t. in Winter Park, will be hosting a staged reading of Play at the moment: TThe R Road to Mecca by Athol Fu gard, starring Marty S S tonerock at 8 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 17 and S Satur day, Feb. 18. Call 407-339-3771. In a talk at R Rollins College at 3 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 17, Dr. Mustafa TT una a visiting scholar from Duke UU niversity, will examine Turkeys recent transformation. The event is free. It will be held at the Faculty Club, 1000 H Holt Ave. Contact eta tari@rollins.edu or 407-646-2183. FEBEB. 18 On S S aturday, Feb. 18, there will be a Maitland Little League Parade and 50th S Season O Opening Day C Cel ebration at Keller Fields. The parade begins at 9 a.m. at Maitland Middle SSchool. The Opening Day ceremo nies will begin around 9:30 a.m. V V isit www.maitlandlittleleague.us On S Saturday, Feb. 18 at 7:30 a.m., the H House of H Hope RRun A Around the Pines 5k will be presented at SS howalter Field, 2535 Cady Way in Winter Park. There will be a H H ealthy 100 Kids R R un at 8:45 a.m. and a 5k Award Ceremony at 9 a.m. The H Hemophilia Foundation of Great er Florida is hosting the 10th Annual EEvening on B Broadway fundraising event on Feb. 18, featuring B B illy EE lliot the Musical at the B B ob Carr Performing Arts Center, Orlando. Tickets are $135. V Visit hemophilia orida.org FEBEB. 19 Join Maitland Public Library S Sunday, Feb. 19, at 3 p.m. CCultural C Cook H Ha RRoda will demonstrate a V V ietnamese dessert. Free. Call 407-647-7700. Winter Park Institute presents AAni mated Magazine on at 3 p.m. on SSunday, Feb. 19, at R Rollins College, Mary Jean Mitchell Plaza. For more information, visit www.rollins.edu/ wpi CCHH Weddings & E Events and Michele BButler E Events invite brides-to-be, their families and friends to the Winter Park B Bridal S Stroll on S Sunday, Feb. 19 on Park Avenue. V Visit www. facebook.com/winterparkbridalstroll FEBEB. 20 Winter Park Institute presents Time ly Intelligence Matters with Porter GGoss: Taking on National S Security Challenges of the Global Century at 7 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 20, at the B Bush Auditorium of R Rollins College. V Visit www.rollins.edu/wpi FEBEB. 21 Join Maitland Public Library at 2 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 21. LCCCC S Social NNetworking for seniors is offering a workshop on searching the internet for job sites. Program is free but you must register. Call 407-647-7700. Please join us at 1:30 p.m. on Feb. 21 at the R Rachel D. Murrah Center, 1015 Morse B Blvd. in Winter Park. Our program will be BBallroom Danc ing by the Central Florida Chapter of US USA Dance. The event is free. Call 407-629-2585. At 7 p.m. on Feb. 21, the U University Club of Winter Park will host A Athe ists A Are A Among Us, which is part of a Great Lecture S Series. Call 407644-6149 or visit universityclubwinterpark.org FEBEB. 22 Join Maitland Public Library at 1 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 22. CContempo rary A Authors B Book Discussion group will meet to discuss the book by Doris Goodwin, Team of R Rivals. The book club is open to new members. Martin E Eidelberg author and profes sor emeritus of Art H History at R Rutgers UUniversity, speaks Wednesday, Feb. 22, at 2:30 p.m. at Morse Museum. The lecture is titled Laurelton H Hall: A museum of Tiffanys Own. The event is free. On Wednesday, Feb. 22, the Winter Park Garden Club will host a demonstration by BBetty Moore FFGC Flower SShow Judge. It is located at 1300 S S. Denning Drive in Winter Park. Cost is $10. Call 407-644-5770. On Feb. 22 at 5:30 p.m. and on Feb. 23 at 11:30 a.m., author BBetsy C Cov ington S Smith speaks at Casa Feliz in Winter Park. R Reservations are re quired. Contact museum@wphistory. org. FEBEB. 23 CChili for C Charity is 5:30-8 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 23, at the Winter Park Farmers Market, located at 200 W. New E England Ave. The cost is $25 in advance and $30 at the door. From 7 to 10 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 23, the H Home B Builders Association will host its EEighth A Annual B Bruce GGould Poker I Invitational V Visit www. orlandojcc.org Winn-Dixie will have an Open H House Celebration event from 5:307 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 23, at 7800 S S. HHighway 17-92, U Unit 160, in in Fern Park. VVisit wpmobserver.com/events for more details. SSend submissions to editor@ observernewspapers.com TThe GGreat Duck Derby The GGreat Duck Derby features rubber duck races and free family activi ties on S Saturday, Feb. 18. The little yellow rubber ducks will race in the Mead Garden pond at 12:15 and 1 p.m. The event is free.

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Page 14 Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer When you are looking to buy a car, computer or coffeemaker, you can learn and shortcomings of a range of products through Consumer Reports, JD Power, and others. Now you can also get some information on nursing homes, home health agencies, hospitals and dialysis centers. Thanks to the health care reform law, more quality measures and transparency will be available. The measures of quality are not perfect in fact, some may argue that they are very imperfect but they give us more information about a facility or service, a peek under the covers. Dont be misled by nice furniture and pretty curtains. What matters in your care is how it af fects your health, but that can be impos sible for an individual to access without data. Selecting a nursing home for a parent or a hospital for your surgery can be a challenging, emotional decision. A visit to a nursing home will give you some information, but lovely dcor can istics. Medicare and the Florida Agency of Health Care Administration have put tips. Check out medicare.gov/qualityon how nursing homes, hospitals and other services compare. Put in your Central Florida ZIP code are the same. The Central Florida nursing home overall scores range from 1 (the lowest) to 5 stars (the best). The site also gives scores based on the onsite and nursing assistants available per resident, adjusted for the complexity of residents needs. The quality measures are a composite of 19 measures nursing homes report to Medicare each year. These include quality indicators such as the percent of patients with bedsores, depression, worsening health status and Central Florida nursing homes. You can also compare home health agencies at medicare.gov/homehealthcompare/search.aspx. This will let you select three agencies at a time to compare. The site gives an overall score for the agency, along with Florida and national averages. It also gives information on several indicators of care quality, such as the percent of patients who have an unplanned hospital admission, the percent of patients who improved, and whether or not the agency staff is likely to educate patients and their families on medications. On the Medicare website you can also compare hospital patient satisfaction rates and outcomes, including readmission rates. The outcomes are compared to the national average, tell ing if the hospital is comparable, better or worse than average. The website also procedures, such as cardiac bypass sur geries, were done for Medicare patients at the hospital. Additionally, the Florida Agency for Health Care Administration oper to prescription, hospital, health plan, physician, hospice and nursing home information. You can check out prices for many common prescription drugs city and medication. Smaller commu nities, like Maitland and Winter Park, have fewer pharmacies and fewer drugs listed, so you may want to look in the Orlando information. While the quality measures have shortcomings, it is often said, what gets measured gets done. Hospitals, nursing homes and home health agencies strive to be seen as the best place to get care. Now health care consumers have useful, practical information for making health care decisions. The nicest billboards or community event should not persuade you; get the facts on what really matters. Maitland resident Nancy RRudner Lugo is a nurse practitioner and president of HHealth Action, of fering workplace health consulting and nurse coaching. V Visit www.healthaction.biz Dr. Nancy RRudner Lugo Health Action HHealth care quality: Looking under the sheets Congratulations to partner Healthy Central Florida on a successful launch!health y Join us, and all of Healthy Central Florida, in making Winter Park the healthiest place to work by taking the 3:30:3 Pledge. Get moving 3 times per week for 30 minutes each day for the next 3 months. Work Well Winter Park is a movement led by the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce to improve the health and wellbeing of the workforce in our community by creating lasting, cultural change. Visit us at www.workwellwinterpark.org geted community, with help from the University of Central Florida, Buss said HCF is working to city to help better organize future policy change with the hope of eventually moving the pro gram on to all of Central Florida. We decided we wanted to start small and be very focused she said. This is about behav ior change, and we really needed to roll up our sleeves to get this started. To be serious and fo cused, we needed to be focused geographically. CCities get t Each of the three targeted cities mayors have gotten involved with helping move the initiative along including passing smoking ban resolu tions for local parks and complete street reso lutions for making future streets more pedestrian and cyclist friendly, to working to offer healthier food choices in public facilities. The health of our citizens is probably the most important thing that we deal with on a day-today basis, Winter Park Mayor Ken Bradley said. Health is the base foundation of everything we bring to our community. Mayor Howard Schiferdecker of Maitland said he hopes to use the initiative to build not only healthy life lessons to citizens, but also a sense of honorable character in that they do the right thing and make the right choices in all aspects of their lives. When you dont feel good about yourself, you dont operate at your peak, he said. We want people to be living their lives in the best ways that they can, and these things are all part of it. Buss said the communities have all done a great job in spurring interest in the initiative in their communities, and hope to work more closely with them as their work continues to make Cen tral Florida the healthiest community it can be. Were all building this together, she said. This is just the beginning.OZ | CCities jump on board C ONTINUEUED FRROM pagPAGE 12

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Page 15 Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Its not just about getting you back on your feet. Its about getting you back to your life. HCR Healthcare, LLC Rehabilitation and Skilled Nursing Hours: M-F 8am to 4:30pm 2315 Lee Road Winter Park, Florida 32789 Your Guiding Beacon for Quality Healthcare Harbour Private Duty Nursing, LLCSkilled Nursing Physical Therapy Occupational Therapy Companionship Home Health Aid Homemaking Flexible Schedules Free RN Assessments The Services of Harbour Private Duty Nursing provide peace of mind to loved ones, trust ofcers, guardians and physicians. Our professional team prides itself on making your life easier. We also provide in-hospital private duty care, which offers close, personal attention and reassurance in an unfamiliar and often frightening environment. Our ofce hours are Monday through Friday, 8:00 am to 4:30 pm. Our professional team is available 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. During hours when the ofce is closed and during the weekends and holidays, the on-call coordinator is available by telephone 24 hours per day.www.HarbourPrivateDutyNursing.com License # 299991382phone (407) 895-8188 fax 407-895-9339 Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com Jewish AAcademy brings students of different faiths together PHotoOTO coCOURt TESY ofOF jJEwWISH ACAdDEmMY OfF ORlLANdDO TThe faith program taught students about the Torahs importance to the Jewish religion. PHotoOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK tTHE oOBSERVER TThe Park AA venue AArea AAssociation hosted a V V alentine Concert in Central Park featuring Michael Andrew & SSwingerhead on Feb. 12. DORI GGERBER Guest WriterJewish Academy of Orlando hosted two local schools in a program that helps build bridges between religion and ethnicity on Feb. 7 in conjunction with the Multifaith Education Project, which seeks to teach children how to become peace ambassadors. Nearly 120 middle schoolers from Ge neva Christian School, a Christian classical school, and Leaders Preparatory School, an Islamic school, joined Jewish Acad emys middle schoolers for a morning of cooperative learning and connections. The program included a visit to The Holocaust Center in Maitland to view its new exhibit, BESA: A Code of Honor. The exhibit consists of photographs and text that tell the remarkable story of the Albanian people the majority of whom are Muslim who rescued their entire Jewish population. The Multifaith Education Program, directed by Louise Sheehy, is about making friends and sustaining relationships between faiths. Hannah Schafer, an eighth-grader at Jewish Academy of Orlando in Maitland, wrote the following letter about her expe rience that day:The Multifaith Projects goal is to educate the youth about acceptance, particularly between the three Abrahamic faiths. Today in the world there is much tension between the extremists of these religions. Being a part of this project helps the relationships between Christianity, Islam and Judaism for tomorrow. As a 13-year-old Jew, I took this experience as an opportunity to make friends, no matter the religion. But along with being social, I was impacted on the similarities between our religions. During the event at my school, the Jewish Academy of Orlando, I learned about Muslims in the Holocaust; something I had never heard of before. I also saw impressive similarities in the places of worship and prayer services of the Abrahamic faiths. For my school to be a part of this program not only helps the Jewish Academy be involved in community events, but helps its students, like me, learn more about the diversity of the world in which we live. Hannah Schafer Eighth-grader Jewish Academy of Orlando Swinging in the park

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Page 16 Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer OOpinions A nightmare is igniting in Winter Parks public consciousness just as the sun goes to sleep, full of loud noises and interloping minstrels from places unknown. Would rampaging exotically accented drunkards stumble screaming through Han nibal Square and into the night if we suddenly legalized Europeancaf-style on-street dining? What if we didnt ban sidewalk musi cians? Would they run rampant, bringing an ever more cacophonous vibe shaking the concrete along Park Avenue? The answer is likely none of the above, though from the sounds of the debate inside the makeshift City Commission chambers at the Civic Center it could tear apart the conservatively gilded silk of Winter Park. Winter Parks image is a coveted one. Other cities outwardly look to emulate what Central Floridas most walkable city has cultivated over the course of more than a century. They use the city as an example in their council and commission meetings. In a nation awash in all things new and fabulous, Winter Parks upscale fashion-forward image stands as an aspirational ideal. But still, the citys good ideas have to come from somewhere. Whats more trendy than Europe for the last 400 years or so? Enter the idea of the street caf, one borrowed like much of Winter Parks charm from the walkable, visitor-friendly streetscapes of Western European cities. At Mondays Commission meeting, the idea of closing the tiny road called Hannibal Square to cars between 5-11:30 p.m. for restaurant use was proposed for a trial run. Its an idea with so much precedent that it predates the car by more than 100 years. Who wouldnt want to eat outside when the weathers nice? Of course outside dining is already happening. Park and West New England avenues have become go-to promenades for a casual evening on the town, replete with tables spilling out onto sidewalks for those who prefer more naturally conditioned air and a street-side ambiance. Such has been the case on both sides of Hannibal Square, along enthusiasts who choose to eat ever so close to the street, but not quite. But the cries of potential hor rors to befall the citys streets still rang out Monday, portending restless nights nearby in Han nibal Square neighborhoods. All of this was still perfectly possible before the road closed, since diners could still eat outside if they pleased. They could still make just as much noise, which in buttoned-down Winter Park has always been more hushed than the worst-case scenario of bustling downtown Orlando. It could be an issue of volume, both in customers and noise. The more table space that nearby restaurants could use, the more potential for noise on the street. But as has already been pointed out by city staff, the nearest home is 200 feet away. Mixing into the quiet ver sus quaintness argument at Mondays meeting, the fear of sidewalks overrun with street performers also caused a stir, amid more legitimate cause for concern over noise levels and the possibility of loud, panhandling musicians-cum-street urchins scaring off customers. Should there exist some vetting or permitting mechanism for nighttime street performers along Park Avenue? Local musician John Holley already has one: ask the stores owner for permission to play out front. His answer has invariably been yes, though as was pointed out at the Commission meeting, there is some accounting for taste. Is an accom plished, trained musician just as welcome as a paint bucket drum circle? That question remains to be answered, as the Commission passed the decision whether to regulate street performers back to city boards to come up with a concrete plan. Some play for the love of music, or to get noticed, as has been the case with Holley. Playing for change brings with it a mixed bag of true musicians along with the occasional drunken trumpeter. Whether street dining and sidewalk musicians get to stay in Winter Park remains to be seen. The former seems likely. The latter may come down to a question of taste. Both have their pluses, but no one wants to see Winter Parks laid back but conservative image tarnished like well-worn brass. TT ouched by the Van SSon story The article you (Isaac Babcock) wrote in Thursdays paper (Waiting was so touching and has moved me to tears. What a tremendous story and reminder of what is truly important in our lives. My heart goes out to the Van Son family. I just cant imagine their journey. Its not often I read stories that pull at my heart strings, and your writ ing not only pulled, but nearly broke them what a meaningful story of unconditional love. Thank you. Clarissa HHoward Director Winter Park Communications DepartmentI just wanted to compliment you (Babcock) on your story featuring Jeff and Michele Van Son (Waiting to say written stories I have read anywhere in a very long time. The story is beautifully written and incredibly moving. You have such a nice touch! Congratulations! I look forward to reading many more of your stories.Lynn Phillips Carolan Communications SSpecialist Winter Park HHealth Foundation OOdds stacked against rail Im not a fanatic football or Super Bowl fan, but I caught parts, until my interest waned. My favorite commercial was with Clint Eastwood for, ostensibly, Chrysler. Though it was sad to see that Jerry Seinfeld must both be broke and out of new material, shilling for Toyota. "This is halftime in America," Eastwood tersely rasps though tight lips. And, "The second half is about to begin." This is one of the many reasons I had put forth regarding the foolishness of SunRail. I would be all for it, including subsidies, if people were really going to ride it in acceptable numbers. For whatever your reasons mostly grandiose you've elected to take on a truly uphill battle in an attempt to make SunRail a success. Our secretary of transportation stated recently and you have to read between the lines "This train has to be a success for the future of Florida." Italics added for emphasis. But the odds are so stacked against you it isn't funny. And now you have a win-at-all-costs defensive mentality. With a large part of your business plan being simply cheerleading, and sucking in some developers. Good luck with that. We are just too entrenched in our dependence upon the private auto from its ostentation to convenience to the personal freedom it affords. Then there's the huge "machine" (a.k.a. our economy) that is dependent upon the auto: big oil, parts suppliers, distributors, railroads, retailers (from the cor ner gas station/convenience store to Borders), road builders, drive-throughs (that new Panera Bread on Aloma Avenue seems to be hopping), etc. The list goes on and on. The only silver lin ing for me is the huge number of people that are now shopping online, and the continued growth in that dis tribution industry might just save us from transit building insolvency. We still, at least for the time being, and here in Winter Park, will shop frequently for fresh foods at Whole Foods; take and pick up the kids from school, especially the private schools; get our hair done; go to school events, restaurants, the malls and the movies. We aint ever getting out of our cars. I don't know what you all were thinking, but it was clearly wishful, and probably more accurately, wistful. What would have happened if Orlando didn't build a parking garage at the new arena? I wonder how much parking Madison Square Garden provides. You know, we can't afford it both ways. Only fools rush in why don't we hold off on "investing" even more money in SunRail, re: silencing train whistles, until we see which way the wind is blowing. And in the interim, work the feds to change the whistle law. Train whistles are really ineffec tive anyway, because the hapless and the hopeless will continue to die under the wheels, regardless of inhibitors. And last but not least, Im sure you all are aware that we are to build a new Amtrak train station at Central Park with even more free federal money, but outside of SunRail costs. The real kicker is that U.S. Rep. John Mica is bringing the $950,000 bacon for the train station from the Federal Transit Administration's 2009 Bus and Bus Facility Allocations budget. Business as usual? William SShallcross Winter Park Our Observation SSandi VVidal Ask Sandi Letters to the editor SSend your thoughts (400 words or less) to Managing EEditor Jenny Andreasson at editor@observernewspapers.com King Features Weekly ServiceFebruary 13, 2012 SStreet dining wont have any effect with their job search is that I come from a recruiting background. Fifteen plus years of recruiting and hiring gives me a solid background of the industry that I am able to pass on to job seekers. I recently interviewed Jonathan Ciampi, President of Preptel.com. His background prior to founding the company was working with applicant tracking systems, so he also has industry experience. He now concentrates on helping job seekers optimize their resumes for applicant tracking systems. The services at Preptel are for a fee, but there is a free Resumeter, which will help you to see weaknesses in your resume with a 30-day trial period. Preptel has done quite a bit of due diligence and testing of their systems. Jonathan told me that more than 40 percent of resumes never get seen and that this is an acceptable amount for companies since they receive so many resumes. We also talked quite a bit about the way com puters read resumes. He said in 2007 the systems switched from a recruiter putting in the keywords they were looking for, to the computers picking up key phrases and looking for rare words that are unique to that job description. What this means for you is that you need to not only look for key words, but key phrases as well. I would encourage you to give Preptels 7-day free trial a run. If your resume is not getting you interviews, this may be a great tool to help in the process. The site will also look at your LinkedIn SS andi V V idal is the executive director for Christian HE HE LP and the Central Florida E E mployment Council. Please send questions to sandi@christianhelp.org IIdentify your resume weaknesses

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Page 17 Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Farmers markets are a great way to get outside on a sunny Florida afternoon, but they are so much more than that. In fact, they are a small part of a much larger initiative: local agricultural sustainability. This means harvesting the crops grown by local farm ers and supporting our own local economy through community effort. At its core, the Ourlando Think Local First movement aims to change the way consumers eat, think and handle food. Local sustainability is critical to cultivating staples in the community in order to initiate a change that removes big business from the transaction and makes the relation ship between farmer and consumer paramount. With the information presented here, the conscientious consumer can gain a better understanding of the idea behind farm-to-fork in the Central Florida area. Even as a native of your community for years and years, the idea of getting involved in this eco-endeavor can seem puzzling. However, there are end less resources made available. Right here in Central Florida are the Simple Living Insti tute, Homegrown Cooperative, Ourlando, Center for Holistic Living and Slow Food Orlando. Each of these organizations offer free, educational alternatives to big busi nesses and gives members of the community the chance to delve in at the surface level and dig deeper and deeper as they become more involved. You may be surprised to learn that you may have already supported the Think Local First movement by simply dining out. There are dozens of Central Florida restaurants that source their food locally. If you have ever eaten at Winter Parks Hillstone Restaurant, you have enjoyed freshly grown herbs right from their backyard overlooking Lake Killar ney. If you have ever patronized The Rusty Spoon in downtown Orlando, you have supported locally raised produce and organic beef. These are just two of the great places to start and taste the difference from something To be sure, this movement is not a product of the 21st century. In fact, the Think Local First movement is argued to date back to the 1980s in Rome. However, it is certainly a topic that has resurged with the imminence of the Occupy Wall Street protests in Zuccotti Park, N.Y., that condemn big business. With the protests acting as a catalyst, the local sustainability efforts gained momentum. The Think Local First movement is pivotal in making consumers aware of their impact on the environment. With constant solicitations and advertisements on televi sion and radio, it can be easy to ignore the local butcher, baker or cooperative in your own neighborhood. However, according to Shopcity.com, for every dollar spent at a local business, 45 cents is reinvested locally. Alternatively, for every dollar spent at a corporate chain, only 15 cents is reinvested locally. This is a simple example of a complex issue: by pumping money back into the local economy, the community will thrive and create a symbiotic relationship. A relationship in which there is reciprocity and loyalty. No matter your age, geography or even gender, this is something that everyone can be a part of in Central Florida. For more information, visit ourlando.comNatalie Costa is a new media journalist who writes about sustainability in the Central Florida area. V Visit backpackjourna.comThe word wife is short, but the dimensions of its meanings approach the Every man should have a wife preferably his own. The Bible says that God created man in his own image. But my b.w., Joy, is a lot more than an extra rib of mine! She is an extra heart, and an extra brain. My concept has always been that the complete human animal has two heads and four legs, and is made up of a woman and a man joined in matrimony. Not only the bodies but the minds of men and women complement each other. A females thinking is not identical to that of a man, and together they usually lead to sounder decisions than either one alone. In order for this positive harmony to work of course, the marriage must be a good one. The members must be not only lovers, but best friends they must genuinely like each other. Two things doth prolong my life: A quiet heart and a loving wife. Thomas Deloney (1595) Marriage is a good investment that interest. It is said that the true index of a mans character is visible in the disposition of his wife. Cyril Connolly Great American cynic Ambrose Bierce wrote: Marriage: the state of being a master, a mistress, and two slaves, adding up to two. Marriage must be a good time, but not shared by all. A good wife is one who sits up with you when you are ill and puts up with you when you are well! Anonymous I dont like every woman I meet and Im sure its better that way however, a day came that had no negatives. I parked my car in front of an apartment house on West 75th Street in Manhattan. I took my dog, and went into the lobby. There were no chairs, and an attractive young woman was standing waiting, a woman I was to marry, but I didnt know it yet. Id like to say that this person smiled at me and started up a lively introductory conversation about my beautiful dog, but she simply turned her back and waited until the elevator reached the lobby. My great pianist friend emerged from the elevator and we were joined within seconds by a fourth woman who walked into the lobby. I drove us four from New York City to Williamsport, Pa. There my pianist friend played while the other two ladies sang a gala luncheon concert for 600 women. Both singers were beautiful. One was married. The more beautiful one was not, so I married her not that day, of course. And that is how, after 32 years, my b.w. and I have become felicitous members of this Florida community. It could have worked out otherwise of course, but it didnt. After 32 years of marriage, I have concluded that no love affair between a man and a woman is as truly romantic as that between a man and his wife. I see only the virtues in my wife, because they have enriched my life and made years of happiness for me. I must say in all honesty that I am quite aware of my own negatives, but I assume that b.w. has evidently decided to overlook them. About RRoney: HHarvardDistinguished Prof, EEm.UUCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy RRoney) Chris Jepson Perspectives NNever going back! Shes a craze youd endorse, shes a power ful force Youre obliged to conform when theres no other course her Simply irresistible Simply irresistible Robert Palmer Shes a powerful force. That about sums it up. What is it about women that has men so afraid? And for so long? Seriously, if one were to dispassionately examine the history of our species, an unbiased observer might legitimately ask, Why do men treat women so poorly? And for so long, I might add thousands upon thousands of years. It should come as no historical surprise that weve institutionalized mens fear of women. Look at practically every religion going back thousands of years and a major tenet of nearly all is the subjugation and control of women. Why is that? I joke about lineage and fatherhood with No man knows for sure if the child that woman is bearing is his and its always good for a few yucks. Every woman knows unequivocally what is hers. Men could only wonder. Is that the historical basis for why men have unequivocally attempted to control the lives of women? Limited access, limited mobility, limited rights, limited stature all in an attempt to limit sex? Is that it? Is there any more that of the cuckolded man? Raising another mans genetic output. Too funny. Hmmm? Anthropologists speculate that there was a time when early human societies were more equal, some perhaps outright matriarchal. Some conjecture that once it became clear that sex and semen were necessary for propagation, that men began to elevate the status of their, uh, contribution to the process, and women became marginalized and considered as little more than brood cows for male impregnation. Understand that early humans had little comprehension of human biology. Something went in and voil, babies came out. Perhaps out of that misguided ignorance, our (male) preoccu pation with all things phallic began. We may never know the exact historical causes of male fear, but no reasonable individual will argue that women are not still on the receiving end of male bias. It masquerades this bias as sacred scripture, as religious dogma, as church doctrine, as political party platform planks, as conservative societal values. safe, affordable, accessible birth control for women. It was a game changer for women for humanity. Throw in the backseat of a modern automobile and thousands of years of male control van ished virtually overnight. (Why do the Saudis so not want their women driving?) The 1960s and s were banner years for the advancement of women. All the rules of an oppressive tradition were challenged and many were discarded like so many restrictive bras. Breasts, bodies and minds now free, and why not? Let the girls out! We should all advocate feminism. To argue otherwise, however, is somewhat predictable. I expect maledominated religions and churches to resist empowering women. Sexuality is frightening to some men. Oh, they argue, it isnt Gods way that women should control their fertility, manage their destinies (if and when to procreate) and because Father knows best, well, it shall be as it has always been. Ad nauseam. Wrong. In so many ways. This is one genie (Jeannie) that aint ever going back in the bottle. Jepson is a 24-year resident of Florida. HHes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. RReach him at Jepson@MEEDIAmerica.USUS Valentine thoughtsLove lives onLouis RRoney Play On! Two things doth prolong my life: A quiet heart and a loving wife. Thomas Deloney Its easy to invest in community NNATAlLIE CCOSTA Guest Writer NNatalie CCosta AS VaA LENTINES DaA Y aA PPROa A CHES, THIS IS aA Ca A NT MISS, TOUCHING STORY aA BOUT aA vV ERY SPECIa A L WINTER PPaA RK COUPLE STILL IN LOv V E aA Nd D dD Ev V OTEd D TO ONE aA NOTHER dD ESPITE aA vV ERY TRa A GIC SITUa A TION. MMICHELE, II aA M SO PROUd D OF YOU aA Nd D wW ISH YOU NOTHING BUT THE BEST STa A Y STRONG HHaA PPY VaA LENTINES DaA Y TO YOU aA Nd D JEFF. DEBBIE HHaA RRIS WaA TSON HH eres what a reader on the web wrote about the article Waiting to say I I love you published Feb. 9:

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Page 28 Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Call now to diversify your advertising. 866.742.1373 www.Florida-Classifieds.com THG-11909 FREEComplete Door Maintenance with any Service 407-780-1691 Orlando, FL Tom Carey SundewGardens@gmail.comCommunity supported agriculture. Experience homegrown gardening: