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Winter Park-Maitland observer
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00199
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park FL
Publication Date: 02-09-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates: 28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID: UF00091444:00199

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407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC USPS 00-6186 Publisher statement on page 4. Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012 50+ tax wpmobserver.com Subscribe now! Visit wpmobserver.com J eff Van Son doesnt know how many Valentines Days are ahead of him. He doesnt know if hell ever kiss his wife, Mi chele, on their anniversary again. He cant count how many times hell be able to watch their three children blow out the candles on their birthday cakes. Theres a box in the top of the closet in his bedroom at the familys Winter Park home. In it there are 39 birthday cards, one for each year for twin boys Josh and Nick and their younger sis ter, Lillian, until they all turn 18. by their daddy, waiting for a day that he gets to say I love you again. Jeff hasnt said I love you in more than six months. Now he cant speak at all, though he tells his wife he loves her in other ways, Michele said. Michele misses her husband terribly. Even as she holds his hand. Even as he presses his Theres a lot to be decided in the coming months for Maitland regarding the future redevelop ment of its downtown core, but many local business owners have decided not to wait. From dining to entertainment, to a mix of both, businesses have been popping up across the city bringing new amenities to Mait land. Folks are tired of moving around and having to go to Al tamonte Springs or Winter Park to get a good meal or buy this or that, Verl Emrick, director of the Maitland Community Rede velopment Agency, said. The community has been ready for quite a while now to get these amenities in place and available to them. With ongoing talks of redevel oping the citys entire downtown core, and the planned construc tion of the Maitland SunRail stop, local business owners said theyve decided to jump on the train early and open now so they can capitalize on business in the future. Coming soon Walking door to door in the Village Plaza at the corner of Lake and Orlando avenues in Maitland, across from the Village at Lake Lily, the sound of power drills and construction workers radios echoes off the concrete walls. In the last four months, the president of the propertys man the seven remaining vacancies in it 100 percent occupancy. All, he says, will have new businesses up and running in the next three I think the new business es will indicate, number one, to other property owners that weve turned a corner and that if Provide a venue for two-way communication and the archiving of opinions from all sides. Page 14 Letters to the editor Lifestyles Weve compiled a Valentines Day dining guide that features six Winter Park and Maitland restaurants. Page 11 Valentines Calendar Michael Andrew & Swingerhead plays a free Valentines Day concert on Sunday, Feb. 12, in Central Park. Page 10 Calendar Artists Cherie Dacko, Cake Marques and Tracy Burke are featured at A&Hs Culture & Cocktails on Friday. Page 10 TAX DEFERREDFIXED ANNUITY RATE FOR 5 YEARS.Bob Adams 407-644-6646THE NATIONAL 5 YEAR CD RATE IS 1.34%3.35% 451 Maitland Ave, Altamonte Springs, FL 32701NEW Dermatology Ofce!407-599-SKIN (7546)*Waive co-payment up to $25 No referral needed Accepting all insurances Dr. John Cottam Dr. Ross Wheeler PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Astrid Jean Paul stands inside her nearly completed Cafe Jean Paul in Maitland. The whole Lake Avenue plaza teems with new tenants. Please see CENTER on page 2 Bringing in the business Amid talks of downtown redevelopment, new businesses ock to Maitland SARAH WILSON Observer Staff SoNapa Grille 640 S. Orlando Ave., Maitland 407-637-2933 www.sonapa.com Jazz Tastings 164 Lake Ave., Maitland 407-661-1190 www.jazztastings.com Caf Jean-Paul 124 Lake Ave., Maitland 407-622-0331 www.cafejeanpaul.com The Silly Grape 1720 Fennell Road, Maitland 407-790-7999 www.thesillygrape.com Waiting to say I love you PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Jeff and Michele Van Son pause during a daily walk they take together in Maitland. Please see LOVE on page 5 A love story blooms despite a tragic prognosis ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff

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Page 2 Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer there are remaining vacancies that it wont be long until that vacancy is absorbed, indication to new developers that Maitland is a good market and its time to consider building new buildings and new develop ment at this time. In a unit in the back of the plaza, Rory Frazier pages through piles of design plans come to be Jazz Tastings, the areas newest wine and tapas bar. be stacked and covered with tarps in the middle of the dining area, but Frazier said that by February, the jazz bar should be up and running. The Maitland area is certainly grow ing, and we felt there was a certain eclectic crowd here that we could cater to, Frazier said. Hopefully were going to bring in something unique that Maitland doesnt have. Thats the goal. With a menu of Spanishand Cajun-in along with a live house jazz band, Frazier said he hopes to cater to an upscale audi ence looking to enjoy good jazz, wine and food. Next door to him, furniture is stacked wall-to-wall in what will soon open as an antique store, and down one more door is an open space soon to be taken over and reconstructed into a kosher deli. Down a few more doors there is more construction to be found. Astrid Jean Paul appears out of a cloud of construction dust to give a tour of what is to be her new juice bar and caf, Caf Jean Paul. Set to open by this weekend, with her at the stove, she said the caf will feature an array of salads, soups, chutneys and New bar with options that cater to diet restric tions from gluten-free to vegan. I call this a place of transition, she said. We have something for everyone, whether youre vegetarian, vegan, trying to lose weight, or just want to be exposed to healthier eating habits. We want to ex pose the Maitland community to healthy eating. In the middle of all the construction stands a pet health food store, Hounds & will bring to the plaza. Weve seen a lot of growth in this plaza in the last six months or so, she said. I hope once all the places open well all have one another. The Village Plaza isnt the only place adding new business the city is also in talks with developers over the construction of a new CVS Pharmacy, as well as a Dunkin Donuts opening next to ACE Hardware on Orlando Avenue. Now open A few months shy of a year ago, The Silly Grape the hybrid sports/wine bar opened off of Fennell Road in Maitland. Amid the company of Maitlands corporate corridor, owner Cesar Dacosta said the res taurant caters to the post-work day happyhour crowd. I felt like there was a need in Maitland for a place like this to service all the busi nesses in the area, Dacosta said. I wanted to make this a place where you can come after work in a suit and not feel out of place, With the success hes had in less than a year in Maitland, hes now hoping to fran chise and open more Silly Grape locations both in Maitland and beyond. SoNapa Grille, now open near the edge of what is to become downtown Maitland off Orlando Avenue, seems to be having similar success, owner Adam Barringer said, the wine bar and restaurant having been open for about a month. Our sales have been phenomenal since we opened, Barringer said. And the city of Maitland has certainly showed their sup port for us and the investment that weve made in the city. We hope were driving in more people from Winter Park and from surrounding cities to us and to other local businesses. Barringer said hes excited to see how the redevelopment plans for Maitland pan out, and the new business it could fuel in the future. ness owners in Maitland, he said. To take it a step further, if we get SunRail and the SunRail stop, it will all just further enhance the economic vitality of the city. SunRail stop, redevelopment talks Mayor Howard Schieferdecker said the city is currently accepting and screen ing plans submitted by developers to help make his dreams of a revitalized and rede veloped downtown Maitland a reality. The developers are working with us and were working with them to achieve both their goals and the citys goals to have a nice little downtown, he said. The proposed redevelopment, he said, can be broken down into three main cor ridors: the town center area, where the Winn-Dixie and Royal Plaza are currently; the area surrounding the Publix at the cor ner of George and North Orlando avenues; and the location of the proposed SunRail stop near the old Parker Lumber site to the north. Steve Brandon, with the development for redevelopment of the area around the future SunRail station. Having the SunRail stop, I think, will put Maitland on the map and have a uni fying effect on the community, Brandon said. As ridership increases, it will rein vigorate both retail and residential aspects of the city. Our Town(407) 366-8696 Fax (407) 359-2118 P.O. Box 4548 Winter Park, FL 32793Insertions in editions and months as shown:____Waterford Lakes ____College Park/Orlando ____Winter Park/Maitland ____Sweetwater/Heathrow ____Tuscawilla/Winter Springs ____Oviedo ____Baldwin Park/E. Winter ParkPlease initial your agreement with the following:____ I approve this ad to appear in Our Town as shown here OR ____ I approve this ad with minor changes as clearly marked (How many changes are marked? _____) ____ Phone number and address are correct I understand that payment for this ad is due per initial agreement.Signed ____________________________________We appreciate your prompt response, as our deadline is approaching.*Colors represented on this proof may not be an exact match of the colors produced when printed on our offset press.X OCT 2009 407-644-7760 $100 to $500 OFFAny Servicewith this ad On Call 24 Hours A DayServing Central Florida Since the s Let Us Handle Your Emergency!Call Our Hotline 877-936-8998 www.EmergencyServices24.comServing Floridas Residential & Commercial Community Since 1990 IMMEDIAT E RESPONSE Whats Your Emergency?CBC057844 F lood l Leaks l Mold l F ire l Storm l Smoke l Roong I cannot thank you enough for your support in our recent election. I was humbled by your tremendous vote of condence in the job I have done as Mayor and I look forward to serving you again. You have my pledge to continue to work every day to make Winter Park a better place for our families, businesses, and environment. We will continue our scal discipline in planning the City's nances and will look for opportunities to bring good jobs to our City. Together we will continue our work to keep Winter Park vibrant, scally sound and economically strong. Thank you for your faith and trust and I look forward to seeing all of you in our great City sometime soon. THANK YOU WINTER PARK! Paid political advertisement paid for and approved by Ken Bradley, non-partisan candidate for Mayor of Winter Park. CENTER | Newer restaurants in Maitland, including The Silly Grape and SoNapa Grille, are seeing success C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE

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Page 3 Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Tia Meer, compatriot gar dener and president of the Simple Living Institute, found a few spare moments to stop by my garden for a chat. Tia, along with her husband, Terry, grow their garden on the shores of the Econlockhatchee River at their Econ Farm east of Orlando. Simple Living Institute is the soring so many of our Central Florida community gardening projects. With a mission to cre ate opportunities for sustain ability in our community, how can we go wrong with neigh bors like these? Like many of us living in Central Florida, Tia has had the roots of her experience trans planted here. When I grew up in Pennsylvania, my grandma was a farmer, she said. Grow ing up as a kid on grandmas farm, Id pull up carrots and dig up potatoes treasure hunting for food raid the raspberry patch and pick strawberries, climb the cherry tree. Ive always had a love for being outside with nature, watching things grow. Thats a connection a lot of people have lost grow ing up in condos and apart ments or suburban houses. The productivity of Tias gar den is worthy of any gardeners envy. Our Econ Farm is mainly a self-sustainable project where most of the stuff we grow is for me and Terry to eat or share with family and friends, she said. We eat out of the garden every day. Were harvesting lots of carrots and cabbage and greens right now. The tomatoes in pots never froze this year. We make a different salad every day for dinner. Us gardeners are a creative lot, always looking for new projects. Im trying to integrate more permaculture into my annual bio-intensive vegetable garden, she said. Ill do that with sweet potatoes along the fence line of my vegetable garden. Other perennials Ive planted along the fence line are garlic chives and pineapples. Im planning a native plant restoration on top of my septic tank mound. Ill plant all native grasses, like wooly grass and purple love grass. And we have a little bat house, but I want a bat mansion to collect the bat guano. Think gardening is a relaxed way of life? Not for Tia! My life is very complicated from all the different hats I wear, she said. Im a volunteer with Simple Living and Im the president. With my own business I do garden consulting. Im get ting known as the community garden expert for a lot of the projects at churches and schools. One of the other projects Im most excited about is the Winter Park urban farm. When I asked Tia for some quick tips, she responded with the elegance of simplic ity, Compost is the answer to everything! Tom Carey is the owner of Sundew Gardens, a you-pick gardening business in Oviedo. Visit the Sundew Gardens Facebook page. Test-drive it online at seeprismtv.com or in store today:175 East Altamonte Dr., Altamonte Springs 3030 East Semoran Blvd., Apopka 260 Citrus Tower Blvd., Clermont 1359 East Vine St., Kissimmee 3244 North John Young Pkwy., Kissimmee Call 866.552.4971Espaol 866.960.7085Like us on Facebook facebook.com/CenturyLinkPrismTV CenturyLinkTM PrismTM. Interactive TV you control any show, any time, from any room. Its a combination of features that outshine cable and satellite. Now you have a better TV choice.[ CenturyLinkTM PrismTM paired with the perfect partner Internet or Voice. ] NO CONTRACT! FREE HD WHEN YOU PICK 2. FOR 12 MONTHS Prism Project Demonstrations are with non-Prism TV customers using basic CenturyLink Prism TV service with standard features in High Definition on an HD-ready television on 11/12/11 in Las Vegas, NV. Participants were not acting as professional actors, but were compensated by CenturyLink for their participation in the demonstration and this advertisement. 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Professional R eal E state Company LLC is proud to announce that the Village Plaza, a 23,000-square-foot retail center located in Maitland has been leased to 100 percent occu pancy. DP R Foundation has awarded a $35,000 grant for N ew H ope for Kids, a local nonprot working with children and families grieving the death of a loved one to support their Center for Grieving Children in Mai tland. For more information, please call 407-331-3059 or visit the web site www.newhopeforkids.org Rollins MBA announced that Gina Berko-Solomon is the recipient of this years Martin Bell Scholar ship. The Martin Bell Scholarship is awarded annually to a senior nonprot professional who demon strates outstanding leadership in the eld and is granted a full-ride to the Rollins Executive MBA program. Gina Berko-Solomon is the director of adult education for the Adult Lit eracy League and through her work, has shown exemplary commitment to the Central Florida community. Stacy J. Ford, formerly Stacy J. Broisov, has become a partner with the business boutique law rm of Pohl & Short, P.A., practicing in the areas of appellate law and commer cial litigation. O lde Town Brokers recently honored their Top Producers of 2011. Top Agents include: Vincent Scarlatos, Stephen DeCristo, Steve & E ileen Schiffer, Joan Cross, Shelby Nor wich Goodman, Greg E lliott, Lisa Shear, T roy Bryant, Pat Sprague, Patrick James, Craig Goralski, Bob Sanders, Andrew Davenport, Rob Gaudreau, John Abbott, Doug Prince and Dottie Kelley. Kimberly Sterling, president of Orlando-based Resource Consulting Group, was recently appointed to the national advisory board for Schwab Advisor Services.

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Page 4 Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer USPS 00-6186 ISSN 1064-3613 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835-5705 Member of: Goldenrod Chamber of Commerce Publisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor. Submission does not guarantee publication. Columnists opinions are made independently of the newspaper. All rights reserved. Winter Park / Maitland Observer 2012 Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster www.wpmobserver.com | Phone: 407-563-7000 | Fax: 407-563-7099 | editor@observernewspapers.com P.O Box 2426 Winter Park, FL 32790 Published Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012 CONTACTS Volume 24, Issue Number 6 PUBLISHER Kyle T aylor 407-563-7009 kyle@observernewspapers.com MANAGING EDITOR Jenny Andreasson 407-563-7026 editor@observernewspapers.com DESIGNER Jonathan Gallagher 407-563-7054 jgallagher@observernewspapers.com REPOR TERS Jenny Andreasson 407-563-7026 editor@observernewspapers.com Isaac Babcock 407-563-7023 isaacb@observernewspapers.com LEGALS | CLASSIFIEDS Ashley McBride legal@FLAlegals.com classieds@observernewspapers.com COPY EDITORS Isaac Babcock isaacb@observernewspapers.com Sarah Wilson COLUMNISTS Chris Jepson Jepson@MediAmerica.us Louis Roney LRoney@c.rr.com Josh Garrick joshgarrick9@gmail.com ADVER TISING SALES MANAGER T racy Craft 407-515-2605 tcraft@observernewspapers.com SUBSCRIPTIONS | CIRCULATION Amanda Rayno 407-563-7073 arayno@golfweek.com INTERN Andy Ceballos T HIS ESTATE PLAN LOOKS JUST LIKE A LUXURY RE SORT [ call it the best of both worlds ]8 8 1 4 1 P R AD WPO 2/2012 Winter Pa rk's Distinctive R etir ement Community www.themayf lower .com 1620 Mayf lower Court Winter Park, FL 32792 Whats your plan for the future? Call today, and lets talk about it: 407.672.1620. The Mayf lower. Smart. Secure. And Spectacular.Close your eyes and think continuing care retirement community for a second. What do you see? Park-like grounds and walking trails? A pool and f itness center? A formal dining room? Perhaps. But what about your own faux f ireplace? Hardwood f loors? Designer kitchen with granite countertops? Custom cabinetry and trim? Closet systems? At a retirement community . seriously? Seriously. At The Mayf lower, you have the freedom and f lexibility to customize your home and your retirement lifestyle to make them uniquely yours. And while youre having fun doing that, youll also have the guarantee of pre-funded long-term care in our Gold Seal Health Center. Thats what prompted residents like Shelby and Sylvia Reaves to plan ahead and proactively make the move . because they wanted to, not because they needed to. How about you?WINNER: ICAA INDUSTRY INNOVATOR AWARDFor The Mayf lower/Rollins College Lifelong Learning Program MAY 816 Ad_WPO Reaves.indd 1 1/5/12 12:31 PM Community Bulletin Artists get grants United Arts of Central Florida an nounced the 2012 Artist Development Grants & Arts Administrator Grants, awarding $32,099 to 24 grantees. Winter Park artists receiving grants were: $2,500 to photographer Dawn Roe to plan and exhibit a site-specic video installation in Australia, and $2,500 to photographer Rick Lang to photograph western Tennessee from Memphis to Nashville. Chamber members honored On Friday, Jan. 27, the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce celebrated the accomplishments of its mem bers. They included U.S. Rep. John Mica (R-Fla.) for Winter Park Citizen of the Y ear, Bob Milburn of Pre-Paid Legal Services for Ambassador of the Y ear, and Florida Blue for Business of the Y ear. Also honored were the Win ter Park/Maitland Observer for Small Business of the Y ear, Tom Kelly of CN LBank for Chairman of the Y ear, Kirk Munell for Volunteer of the Y ear, and Daris Eliott Gallagher of Winter Parks Parks & Recreation Department for Chamber Hero. Student honors Wofford College student Natalie Tuck er is studying abroad in Barcelona, Spain. Tucker is the child of John and Elizabeth Tucker of Winter Park. Power of Memory Mary Proctor held a workshop at the Hannibal Square Heritage Center on Saturday, Jan. 21. The Power of Memory was about using folk art methods and personal keepsakes to create art that showcases memories, heritage and culture. The Art of Missionary Mary Proctor is on display at the Heritage Center until Saturday, April 21. UCP donors Dr. Donald and Mrs. Cindy Diebel of Winter Park are the fourth recipients of the UCP of Central Floridas Jack ie Bailes Legacy Award. The Dieb els served as the primary sponsor of The Faces Behind the Miracles Fundraising Breakfast, one of UCPs events. They will be honored at An Evening at the Palace Gala on Sat urday, March 10. Tickets are avail able at www.ucpgala.com C-SP AN stops by Rollins College student Monique Hen ry, who is majoring in International Affairs & Music, visited the C-SPAN Campaign 2012 Bus during its visit to Rollins College. She joined the thou sands who toured the bus when it stopped in Orlando Jan. 27 to 28 on its Road to the White House tour.

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Page 5 Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer head against hers in a sweet em brace while they walk down the street in an afternoon breeze. Part of him is still here, she tells her children. The other part is already in heaven. She loves all of him anyway, she said, even as she's watched the old Jeff slowly fade away. Jeff the handyman. Jeff the problem solver. Jeff the athlete. Jeff the superhero dad. Jeff the ro mantic. In a few days it will be Valen tine's Day again, a day that's both all too special and not special at all for the Van Sons. They were mar ried on Feb. 23, so they celebrate both days at the same time, some where in between. We always had our plans or our dreams that we wanted to ful superceded any single day. They've been celebrating that way for 10 years. The two Jeffs But the last two years Michelle has spent saying goodbye to her husband, piece by piece. She still loves the tall, gentle man she leans over and kisses in the living room of his new home in an assisted living facility which she calls Jeffs house at the corner of Maitlands Derbyshire Lane knows hes not all in the room of the room while hes led to the dining room by hand, his mind lost in a daze. She talks of him in past and present tense. Today theres Jeff, proud in his red University of ively giggles as she tickles him, and who holds her in a quiet em brace as they stop to dance, just for a moment, on their way through the kitchen. But shes already said goodbye to the Jeff who knew her name. The Jeff who loved to cook her dinner. The Jeff who could walk into the room and set every one at ease. The perfect family There was never much strug gle to the Van Sons marriage, Mi chele said. They were meant for each other. Sweethearts-turneddevoted parents, they loved being at home. Working as a consultant for business software developer SAP, Jeff worked from a home across the country on business. When he was home, we had three meals a day together, Mi chele said. Ever the avid athlete and sports fan, hed teach his children, twins Josh and Nick, now 6 years old, and daughter Lillian, now 5, wrestling moves. Ask the twins what their dad was like and you wont hear about the business deals he saved or the big promotion he received. He was a good wrestler, said Josh, who has brown hair like his dads. Lilly says the same thing. Was daddy faking when he let his kids pin him? Nick giggles. May be, he said. Wearing his faded blue Boston Red Sox hat, Jeff would play catch with them in the yard. He built their jungle gym. He would have been their little league coach, Mi chele said. He could have been the boys scoutmaster. He had this wonderful way about him, she said. I think he loved being a dad more than any thing else. But he was also devoted to his marriage from the start, Michele said. Jeff and I have such a love sto ry, Michele said. I got so lucky. It sounds like the adventure book from the start of the DisneyPixar movie Up. They were their own adventure partners. They traveled for three weeks to go sailing in Thailand. They raced each other downhill on snow boards and on snowshoe hikes in Colorado. They worked at their marriage, they got out of hand. Instead of waiting for a big blowout argu ment, they went to couples coun seling early in their marriage, just in case. But in the last two years theyve faced something few could expect, yet hope to cope with. Slipping away The symptoms came slowly at solver with a keen memory, Jeff had no explanation for it when in the fall of 2009 he forgot his socks when packing for a business trip, or when he stopped winning his favorite card game, euchre, which he used to dominate. But after months of seemingly innocuous mental lapses culminated in him losing a recent promotion at his job at age 38, Michele knew some thing was wrong. After seeing a series of doctors who dismissed his symptoms as sis came on Dec. 2, 2009, what Michele calls their day that will live in infamy. Five days before the anniversary of the Pearl Har bor bombing, a bomb dropped on the Van Sons at Dr. Garrett Riggs cine. He spent three hours with us, Michele said. At the end of it he said this is not a 38-year-old brain. The diagnosis was frontotem poral dementia (FTD), a disease so rare it affects less than a tenth of a percent of the U.S. popula tion. Jeffs diagnosis was even more unlikely. Statistically the disease almost never strikes be fore age 45. Nurses assistant Sonia Ah mati, who has cared for dozens of dementia patients in Europe and America, said Jeff, the vital athlete who ran the Boston Marathon, was the youngest patient shes ever seen. So young as Jeff, never, Ah mati said. When I saw him here I thought he was a family member, not a patient. predictions for what it will take away and how long it will take to do it, Michele said, but the end result is the same. The frontal and temporal lobes of the brain, which control reasoning, personality, movement, speech, social graces, language and some aspects of memory, gradually disappear un til the victim loses nearly all brain function. The result is invariably terminal. When I asked the doctor whats next? he did this, Mi chele said, slowly shaking her head back and forth as her eyelash catches a tear before it rolls down her cheek. Thats when the tears came. Jeff had anywhere between two and 20 years, Riggs told them, but he couldnt predict how long Jeff would be able to talk, walk, eat or drink. In his own words, in a video in 2010 from The Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration, Jeff said hed learned to accept it. I could want life to be better, but it is what it is, he said. The best and worst year After the ball dropped to start 2010, the Van Sons set about mak ing a new years resolution to end all resolutions. They had no idea how long Jeff would be alive. So, sitting in a hotel room in Boston, they decided to plan everything as if there were no time left to lose. I wanted to do the work of dying so we could get on living, Michele said. Time was everything. I wasn't researching for a cure; I was looking at how do I maximize time with this man? Michele said. How do I realign Daddy's world? that after years of being the fam ilys accountant, hed hand the reins to Michele before he forgot how. They wrote a will. She asked him what his idea of heaven was like. Always devoted The Florida Blue center is brought to you by Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida, an Independent Licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. 73017-0112 FREE Health Fair FREE FREE Healthy Heart MonthFlorida Blue(Located in Winter Park Village) Get involved The Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration assists people living with frontotemporal degeneration and supports research to improve treatment, care and prevention. Visit theaftd.org for more information. LOVE | One neurologist told Jeff Van Sons family that he would have as few as two years left to live C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE Please see LOVE on page 8 PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Jeff Van Son and wife Michele still see each other almost daily, though he has a terminal illness thats left him unable to speak. He had this wonderful way about him. I think he loved being a dad more than anything else. Michele Van Son I could want life to be better, but it is what it is. Jeff Van Son

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Page 6 Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer They sleep in motels, shelters and cars, and live off free school breakfasts and lunches and donat ed groceries. Now more students who are homeless and hungry are talking to Orange County Public As of Thanksgiving, there were 3,241-recorded homeless students in Orange County. Homelessness and hunger are problems that go hand-in-hand as two of the biggest hurdles facing students living and learning in Orange County, Homeless Educa tion Liaison for OCPS Christina Savino said. To help these kids, she said, the county, along with individual schools and partnerships with lo cal businesses and organizations, have increased the number of ser vices they have available to help needy students get by and suc ceed. These students often fall be hind, and with education really being the focus and key of get ting out of poverty and homeless ness, she said, its important to wrap them around with as many services as possible to keep them on track for graduation. From corporate-sponsored food pantries and emergency stashes of granola bars kept in teacher draw ers, to stocks of surplus school supplies and an extra available jacket when its cold, Savino says every little thing helps. On a recent Friday afternoon, 26 students from Englewood El into an unassuming storage closet next to the schools auditorium. Their names were checked off a list complied by teachers and administrators as students listed as homeless or in great need, and theyre each handed a paper or plastic bag sometimes seem with six nonperishable food items to take home to feed their family over the weekend. Some of these kids during the week depend on our free break fast and lunch, but then come in again Monday after the weekend, and you know they may not have eaten since, Compliance Teach er Guadalupe Armenteros said. This way we can make sure they had food. Friday, Jan. 27, was opening day for Englewoods LOVE Food Pantry one of 30 to open in Or ange and Seminole public schools since the fall, coordinated by the Christian Service Center for Central Florida and half of its shelves are already empty. At Timber Creek High School, economics teacher Michael Rob bins and his students started their own food pantry out of a cupboard in his classroom last year, stocked with canned foods, soups, cereals and granola bars donated by the school community. Robbins says students can drop by whenever theyre in need, or students will be referred to as in need by a teacher or the schools homeless coordina tor, Jo Lynn Schall, and provided a bag of food to take with them to their families. We recognized that some stu dents at our school didnt have enough food at home and that times are tough, so we decided we wanted to provide a helping hand, Robbins said. Students 5900 Oleander Dr., Orlando, FL 32807Thursday, Feb. 16th5 p.m. 11 p.m.$15 all you can rideFriday, Feb. 17th5 p.m. 11 p.m.Good Shepherd School Pride Night$15 all you can ride Saturday, Feb. 18th12 p.m. 11 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 19th12 p.m. 6 p.m. and caterers, as well as beer, wine and desserts Hungry, homeless students get help Schools have launched a multitude of programs to help the hungry and homeless student population SARAH WILSON Observer Staff Please see HOMELESS on page 8 PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVER Bags of food await homeless or needy students at Englewood Elementary in East Orlando.

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Page 7 Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer bounced back on the court with two straight wins to counter two straight losses they suffered heading into February. Now with nothing but conference play left lar season, theyre looking for a string of wins to vault them back to the top of the Conference USA ladder. devastating Palm Beach Atlantic 84-69 on Jan. 31, in a game that was dominated by UCF from the a bit in the waning minutes, they saw strong scoring from some key starters, and another big game Guard Marcus Jordan was again on his game with a 17-point, three-assist performance in only 26 minutes on the court. But it was Wilson raising eyebrows with 15 20 minutes of off-the-bench work. double double with 12 points and 10 rebounds. But it was on Feb. 4 at Dal good to right their record, storm ing to a dramatic comeback to beat SMU 59-52. In that game Jordan again led the team with 17 points, plus four rebounds. Isaiah Sykes and Tristan Spurlock dropped 15 points each, with Sykes also grab bing eight boards. Following a Wednesday show down against Marshall at press for a second chance at Southern Miss tipping off 5 p.m. Saturday. Were back! Support the Healthy Lifestyle Initiatives of Dommerich Elementary School by participating in our 4th Annual 5K (3.1 mile) Run and 1-Mile Dash.REGISTER ONLINE AT ChiefsOnTheRun.comor download a registration form at www.des.ocps.netSA T URD A Y FEBRUARY 25, 20 1 2DOMMERICH ELEMENTARY Lack of Desire or Low Energy?Testosterone Lab Work for $35 (a $240 Value) Call today for a risk-free appointment: 407-894-9959 Testosterone Lab Work for $35 (a $240 Value)Recapture Your Sexual Vitality Individual & Family health plans For an Instant Quote or to apply, visit our website www.HealthInsuranceIBS.com407-831-5166 W i n t e r P a r k R e c o v e r y C e n t e r Executive Drug & Alcohol Treatment Services Suboxone Maintenance For Opioid Abuse Naltrexone Extinction for Alcohol If It s In Your Heart To Quit2056 Aloma Ave, Suite 100, Winter Park, FL 32792 www.YourLifeRecovery.com 407-629-0413 Knights back in the groove ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff I am often asked if I will meet with someone prior to an interview to help them polish up their skills. Many people are not comfortable with the interview process and second guess them selves when it comes to answer ing questions. Recently we interviewed for a position at Christian HELP and we were very fortunate to have several great candidates. The interviews all went very well and we actually had a When it came down to it there were a few factors that we looked at above and beyond their already in place, and the second was their long-term goals and how they saw themselves grow ing within the organization. One of the interviewees was someone I was already connected with so she felt comfortable in the interview. This was great for both of us, but she said she is not always that comfortable in inter views. As I gave her advice, I let her know that she had done great in the process and should always be like that in an interview. Practice sample interview questions with a friend or a coach prior to interviewing. If you have no one else, use a mirror. Listen to your answers as they come out. Answers to standard questions like Tell me about yourself and What are your strengths and what are your weaknesses, should just roll off your tongue. After you leave an interview record your impressions. This will help you to improve. Also use that time to write a thank you note and re-capture what you want to emphasize from the interview and anything that you would like the interviewer to know. Sandi Vidal is the executive director for Christian H E LP and the Central Florida E mployment Council. Please send questions to sandi@christianhelp.org Sandi Vidal Ask Sandi Feeling comfortable during the interview PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK OBSERVER STAFF Marcus Jordan has dominated in two big recent wins for UCF Knights basketball.

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Page 8 Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer cant learn if they dont know where their next meal will be coming from. In addition to food, Tim ber Creek as well as other lo cal schools, like East River High School, have clothes closets avail able to students who might need a jacket when its cold, or new pants or shoes if theirs get worn out. The schools also have stocks of school to students as needed. The whole idea is to keep them stable at school since their situation already is what it is at home, said Yolanda Dorta, a so cial worker for OCPS. Sponsoring change After CBS Minutes ran two specials on the prevalence of homelessness among students in Central Florida last year, Sarah Au, the senior specialist for Part ners in Education with OCPS, said the school board has seen an outpouring of support from local businesses and organizations to try to help students in need. It has had such a positive im pact in bringing together people who want to help and people who need help, she said. Were try ing to match up the businesses that want to help with the schools who need it. The LOVE Food Pantry in stalled at Englewood Elementary is an example of one of these ef forts. After viewing the specials, members of the First Baptist Church of Orlando pledged $5 million to go toward helping Cen tral Floridas hungry and home less students. Partnering with OCPS and the Christian Service Center of Central Florida, they decided the money would be best spent toward in stalling food pantries in schools in need, opening 13 in the fall of 2011. This spring, 17 more have opened across the county, each totally free to the schools they ser vice and restocked weekly. project doubled in size, Danny de Armas, senior associate pastor at First Baptist Church Orlando, said. It was not even by us giv ing any more money, but by other sponsors and businesses hear ing about it and wanting to fund more. Hours: M-F 8am to 4:30pm 2315 Lee Road Winter Park, Florida 32789 Your Guiding Beacon for Quality Healthcare Harbour Private Duty Nursing, LLCSkilled Nursing Physical Therapy Occupational Therapy Companionship Home Health Aid Homemaking Flexible Schedules Free RN Assessments The Services of Harbour Private Duty Nursing provide peace of mind to loved ones, trust ofcers, guardians and physicians. Our professional team prides itself on making your life easier. We also provide in-hospital private duty care, which offers close, personal attention and reassurance in an unfamiliar and often frightening environment. Our ofce hours are Monday through Friday, 8:00 am to 4:30 pm. Our professional team is available 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. During hours when the ofce is closed and during the weekends and holidays, the on-call coordinator is available by telephone 24 hours per day.www.HarbourPrivateDutyNursing.com License # 299991382phone (407) 895-8188 fax 407-895-9339 Classic Iron Beds AND Designer Linens 407-982-4319All iron & brass beds are made in the USA and guaranteed for 2 generations Savannah Court and CoeExcellence in Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation 1301 W. Maitland Blvd. Maitland, FL 32751407-645-3990www.SavannahCourtMaitland.comAssisted Living Facility License No. 8447 Skilled Nursing Facility License No. 1635096 Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above!A Senior Living Community where Hospitality is a Way of Life.Healthy Heart MonthThursday, Feb. 23, 2012 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.Helpful Hints to keep your heart healthy By: Vitas Healthy Snacks providedPLEASE RSVP For more information on different programs available for homeless and hungry students in Orange County, links to the CBS Minute specials, and how you can help, visit homeless.ocps.net Learn more HOMELESS | Community stands up C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 6 to his favorite baseball team, there was only one answer. He said, being at a Red Sox game in Fenway Park with my family and friends and a beer and a hotdog, she said. lose his ability to speak, they made videos for their children to watch when theyre older. On screen, Jeff would still be the smiling, doting father he always was, frozen in time. To them, he is still stronger, taller and faster than anyone on Earth, Michele wrote in a con tinuing diary of Jeffs condition. and I intend to help protect his identity as superhero as long as possible forever, I hope. They started daddy days at Disney, taking one child at a time to have one-on-one time with their dad in the happiest place on Earth. They went to the mountains and the beach, making as many memories as they could while they still had time. Jeffs parents sold the home hed grown up in, in Ithaca, New York, to move two doors down from their Golfside Drive home so he could move in there and they could take care of him, hosting daddy slumber parties alone with the kids. Jeff and Mi chelles parents hired a full-time babysitter, Ashley Midler, to pro vide stability and support around the house. A community rallies Quickly word spread about Jeffs condition, radiating out ward from Winter Parks First United Methodist Church, ing friends, coworkers and even strangers who wanted to make the family as happy as possible while Jeff could still share in it. Even in this dying process I've just been inundated by mir acle after miracle after miracle, Michele said. Friends helped throw parties for Jeff and the kids on their birth days, arriving by the dozens with food and presents. When a friend and former coworker learned about the familys hope to attend a Red Sox game, they reached out to a business client who happened to be an executive with the team. Within a month, the family was in Jeffs heaven, sitting a few rows behind home plate, the sun shining on their faces. A few days before Christmas in 2010, there was a knock at the door. Another family friend had dropped dozens of Christmas presents at their door. It was everything on our list, Michele said. They gave us our whole Christmas. to cook and cook for others, Mi chelle and Jeffs mom started or ganizing to rebuild the kitchen at Jeffs house. More than $3,000 has poured in so far to help the renovation, Michele said. The project started Wednesday. The kitchen where he smiled when he saw ice cream, where he danced with Michele, will be totally new. Saying goodbye In the months that followed into 2011, Jeff deteriorated rapid ly. Riggs told Michele that he lost in six months what usually takes two years. Ahmati agreed. This is the fastest Ive ever seen, Ahmati said. The human body is kind of strange. You nev er know. The last time Jeff said Mi cheles name was in the summer of 2011, though she said part of him remembers the people he loves. The Jeff she can hold says it in different ways. Every time he presses his face against hers. Ev ery time he smiles when he holds the teddy bear with recordings of his children telling him they love him. The last time his children saw him, when dozens of family and friends gathered in costumes outside his new house for Hal loween of 2011, they saw a man quietly smiling, proud, happy to be loved, Michele said. Thats the image of Jeff she wants them to re member the one who still loves them, no matter where he is. But they already know where that is, Nick said. Heaven. Its where the two Jeffs come back together again. Its in the photo in Jeffs room. They can see him there, sitting in the stands at Fenway Park, watching the game in the sunshine with his family and friends. Jeff the superhero dad. Jeff the romantic. Jeff, whos waiting to say I love you. LOVE | Diagnosis was terminal, so they lived one great year C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 5

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Page 9 Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer To all citizens of Maitland, a heartfelt thank you for giving me the privilege to continue serving as your mayor for the next three years. During my campaign, as I walked the neighborhoods and spoke with many of you, your main directive was clear: to con tinue working toward the devel opment of our new pedestrianfriendly downtown for all of us to enjoy. I commit to you that I will continue to work hard and do everything in my power to keep ing closely with our City Council, city boards, city staff and most im portantly, with you, our citizens to make our new pedestrian-friendly downtown a reality. four goals were clear to me. First, reunite our city Council and our citizens in order to enable us all to work together. Second, to stream line our permitting process in order to make it more attractive for development to occur in our ing of our Land Development Code (LDC) to ensure that high quality design standards were in place before development would begin. Finally, to standardize and upgrade the zoning of our down town properties to allow more city unity and streamline permit ting have been achieved and the second two goals of upgrading the LDC and the rezoning of our downtown will be completed by the end of February this year. With that said, in March of this year, our city will be Open for Business and ready to begin the welcomed opportunity to work with the development communi ty to achieve the realization of the our new downtown. The land area bordered by George Avenue to the north, Packwood Avenue to the south, U.S. Highway 17-92 to the east and Maitland Avenue to the west. Future phases from Pack wood Avenue south to Lake Lily development at this time. Since this is our new down town, it is very important that the evaluation process for the evolu tion of our downtown design and the ultimate decisions that will be made in the creation of our new downtown be a team effort in cluding citizen involvement. As conceptual plans come for ward, there will be open public workshops giving all citizens the opportunity to participate. As the tiple public meetings will be held by the Design Review Committee along with multiple public hear ings by the Planning and Zoning Commission and City Council giving further input opportunities nal design will be the result of a joint effort by all of us that we can be proud of. We have already had prelimi nary meetings with a number of developers but nothing has pro gressed to the point of scheduling any workshops as yet. As soon as the design concept or concepts are far enough along, we will begin announcing dates for the public workshop(s). This process will continue until we feel we have a consensus of agreement for the design of our new downtown. We will then start the public hearing process as stated above. With all the interest being shown by the development com munity, the future prospects look extremely bright. The present re duction in land prices and con struction costs affords our best opportunity in many years for re alizing the creation of our pedes trian-friendly new downtown. We need to take advantage of it now. With my experience in architec tural design, construction and de velopment, I am looking forward to guiding and protecting our city throughout the design and con struction process. Again, thank you for your vote City Council Agenda City Council meets the second and fourth Mondays of the month at 6:30 p.m. The next meeting is scheduled for Feb. 13 in the Coun cil Chambers, 1776 Independence Lane. Below is the agenda for that meeting. Special Presentations: Anniversary Seth Public Hearings: Downtown Maitland Zoning Dis trict ties within the Downtown Mait land Zoning District Agreement Amendment Process Consent Agenda Jan. 23 Commission Minutes of Dec. 8, Advisory Board Minutes of Nov. 2 and Dec. 7 tion Results tion tem CIP Decision Items: Agreement Rail Station Funded Agreement tion Joint Participation Agreement Discussion Items: quested by Councilwoman Re ponen cilman Bonus For updates, visit www.itsmy maitland.com Mayors Oath of Ofce Ceremony is Feb. 13 Please join us for a reception on Monday, Feb. 13, from 2:30 3:30 p.m. at the Rachel D. Mur rah Civic Center to congratulate Mayor Kenneth Bradley on his reelection. Following the reception, May for his second term as Winter Park mayor. Feb. 13 City Commission Meeting topics of interest There will be a City Commis sion meeting on Monday, Feb. 13, at 3:30 p.m., at the Rachel D. Mur W. Morse Blvd. Below are a few topics of interest: Mayors Report Board appointments to the Board City Managers Report Scheduling of the Strategic Planning Session Non-action items Presentation of the December 2011 Financial Report Consent Agenda Approve the minutes of Jan. 23. Approve various purchases and contracts (a complete list can be found at www.cityofwinter park.org > Government > City Commission > Agenda Packets). Approve the purchase of a Cisco Router necessary to en hance police department dispatch connectivity. Approve the purchase of com puter software required operating systems and four desktop com puter workstations for the police department. Approve free electric vehicle charging services for an initial with the fees to be reviewed semiannually in accordance with the fee schedule. Approve the agreement for transfer of Wastewater Service for 2021 N. Goldenrod Road and au thorize the mayor to execute the agreement. Action Items Requiring Discussion Regulation of street musicians and performers on Park Avenue Urban Land Institute Techni cal Assistance Panel Program for West Fairbanks Redevelopment Proposed on-street dining for Public Hearings Request of Denning Partners, Ltd., for the property at 861 W. Canton Ave.: QUASI JUDICIAL nance changing the designation of Single Family Residential to High Density Residential. changing the designation of Sin gle Family Residential to MultiFamily. Resolution Calling for a public hearing ad valorem as sessment for properties abutting to fund the installation of under Resolution Delegating au Board and under emergency con ditions forward to the city manag er to negotiate code enforcement liens and to execute satisfactions or releases of code enforcement liens. First reading of the ordinance establishing parking restrictions at electric charging stations. Revise the conditions of ap proval for extension of condi tional use for the parking garage pursuant to the settlement agree ment. QUASI-JUDICIAL PRO City Commission Reports Commissioner Leary Commissioner Sprinkel Commissioner Cooper Progress Point Commissioner McMacken Mayor Bradley full agenda and information on www.cityofwinterpark.org and by clicking on Government > City Commission > Packets. Make a date with your sweetheart! The merchants of Park Avenue are pleased to host the second an nual Valentine Concert featuring on Sunday, Feb. 12, from 4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., in Central Park. This free Valentine Concert is presented by Boyette, Cummins Winter Park. For more informa tion, please call 407-644-8281 or visit www.winterpark.org KWPB grants available Keep Winter Park Beautiful (KWPB) is now accepting Pocket Park Restoration Project grant applications. Winter Park neigh borhood and community-based groups are encouraged to apply for funds to support physical im provements such as plantings, restoration, community gardens in public spaces. This project is designed to help neighborhood organizations take ownership of their local en vironment and build a stronger community by developing and nurturing relationships among neighbors. Previous Pocket Park Restoration Projects completed in 2011 include Mead Community Garden, Laughlin Park in Hanni bal Square and Via Bella. Complete details regarding the Pocket Park Restoration Proj ect and grant applications can be found at www.kwpb.org under Projects > Pocket Park Restora tion Project. Applications will be accepted through Tuesday, May 1, For more information, please cityofwinterpark.org St. Pattys Day Parade The city of Winter Park and the tee are proud to present the 33rd Day Parade on Sunday, March 4, at 2 p.m., in downtown Win ter Park. Gather your family and friends and wear some green to parade in Central Florida. The pa rade will begin at the Winter Park Country Club and continue south down Park Avenue to City Hall. pate. The celebration will also fea ture Irish music and step-dancing at the main stage in Central Park with demonstrations by the Tir Na Greine School of Irish Dance and the Watters School of Irish Dance. Irish music will be provided by the Tommy Doyle Band. annual feast day to celebrate St. Patrick, the most commonly rec ognized patron saint of Ireland. According to Irish tradition, those who do not wear green on St. Pat fectionately pinched. This celebration is made pos sible by event sponsors including nity Redevelopment Agency, Fid the Irish American Cultural Soci ety of Central Florida and Florida Distributors Company. For more information, please Visit the citys ofcial website at www. cityofwinterpark.org, nd us on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter. www.gulfstatescu.org 407-831-8844A Refreshing Alternative to Conventional Banking.9405 S. Highway 17-92 Maitland, FL 32751 Maitland City Talk BY HOWARD SCHIEFERDECKER MAYOR Thank you, Maitland Winter Park City Talk BY RAND Y KNIGHT CITY MANAGER

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Page 10 Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer FEB. 9 The inaugural Sweet Wars is from 5-7 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 9, at In digo Palms at 740 N. Wymore Road in Maitland. Sample an array of delicious desserts and vote on the best. Tick ets are $10 and benet the American Heart Association in honor of National Heart Month. For more information, contact jen.pouliot@fundltc.com or 407-514-1330. The Maitland Public Library will hold Asthma and Allergies A Natural Approach, an informational work shop at 6:30 p.m. Thursdays, Feb. 9, March 8 and March 15. The Central Florida Anthropological Society presents The Evolution ary Antecedents of Obesity: Why We Are Fat Now by Dr. Leslie Sue Lieberman. It will be held at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 9, at Harry P. Leu Gardens at 1920 N. Forest Ave. in Or lando. It is free. Contact kagidusko@ hotmail.com or 321-948-3994. Winter With the Writers A Festival of the Literary Arts presents Romanian poet Mihaela Moscaliuc at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 9, at the Bush Auditorium of Rollins College, along with Poet Ilya Kaminsky. The event is free. Visit rollins.edu/winterwiththe writers The Breakthrough Theatre will pres ent its annual Best of Broadway musical revue from Feb. 9-20. Visit breakthroughtheatre.com FEB. 10 The historic Annie Russell Theatre at Rollins College produces Picasso at the Lapin Agile by Steve Martin, Feb. 10-18. Tickets are $20, or $10 with a student ID. Call 407-646-2145 or visit rollins.edu/annierusssell At noon on Friday, Feb. 10, there will be a brown bag matinee of Liquid Stone: Unlocking Gaudis Secrets at the Morse Museum, located at Hugh F. and Jeannette G. McKean Pavilion, at 161 W. Canton Ave. Admission is free. Later in the day, there will be a free ute and guitar performance by the Romanze Duo from 5 to 8 p.m. FEB. 11 From 10 a.m. 4 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 11, the Orlando Florida Blue Health Fair is offering attendees free health screenings at Florida Blue at Winter Park Village, located at 434 N. Orlando Ave. in Winter Park. FEB. 12 The University Club of Winter Park will be hosting a reception featuring artist Rich Franco from 12-4 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 12. Admission is free. Contact 407-644-6149. Calendar V a e n i n s a y a l n d r Get the look you deserve ... Contact us at 407 914 6445 Were 100% mobile Car Wash & Wax $15* Insured Business For a limited time only. Restrictions ap ply due to size and condition of vehicle. ALL IN MINIATURE & ALL FOR SALE pm Present this ad for $1 off Sunday Adult AdmissionInformation & Directions: 407-351-3500 ext. 0 or www.mollycromwell.com2012 ORLANDO DOLLHOUSE MINIATURES FESTIVAL 6515 International Drive Order on the web www.orlandobarbershopchorus.com OR order by phone (407)-831-6498 by 5 pm Feb. 12Nothing says I love you better than a Singing Valentine! greater Orlando area) and the Quartet will deliver on your message, and two beautiful songs: The Story Of The Rose (Heart Of My Heart) and Let Me Call You Sweetheart Learn from the pros about being a chocolate connoisseur at Peterbrooke Chocolatier of Winter Parks Choco late 101 class On Feb. 12. The 90-minute class is available for up to eight guests and can also be booked privately. The cost is $40 per person. To attend, RSVP to 407-644-3200. FEB. 10 First United Methodist Church of Win ter Park is presenting its fourth annu al Broadwaybound production a musical dinner theater event on Feb. 10 and 11. There will be selections from Mary Poppins, Cinderella, and George M. Visit www.fumcwp. org FEB. 11 On Saturday, Feb. 11, the Orlando Science Center will host its Bee My Valentine Holiday Workshop Par ents with children ages 3-5 are wel come to attend. It will be held from 10 a.m. to noon. The cost is $25 per parent and child. Please visit www. osc.org or call 407-514-2112. Singing valentines will be performed by a quartet from the Orlando chapter of the Barbershop Harmony Society in your home, ofce or business. To schedule, order online at orlandobar bershopchorus.com or call 407-8316498. FEB. 12 The Bach Festival Society is pleased to have 60 members of its Bach Fes tival Choir join Italian tenor Andrea Bocelli for his only Central Florida performance on Feb.12 at the Amway Center. The Orlando Concert Band will be performing a concert titled Concert From the Heart at Trinity Preparatory School from 3-4:30 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 12. It is located at 5700 Trinity Prep Lane in Winter Park. For more information, call 407-718-9333. FEB. 15 Ms. Jacqueline Jones will present her cabaret, What is This Thing Called Love, at 7:30 p.m. on Feb. 15 and 16 as part of the Winter Park Playhouse Spotlight Cabaret Series. Tickets are $20 with a drink included. Call 407-645-0145 or visit winter parkplayhouse.org Heinigke at the Morse Feb. 14 through Feb. 3, of next year, the Morse Museum will feature a presentation titled Watercolors of Otto Heinigke A Glass Artists Palette This selection of more than 30 watercolors, including Beach (pictured), from the Morse Museums collection of works by American glass designer and artist Otto Heinigke (1850-1915) includes serene scenes ranging from middle-Atlantic farms and forests to ocean and river shorelines. They have never before been exhibited. Burke at MAC A&Hs Culture & Cocktails is Fri day, Feb. 10, from 6 to 9 p.m., both inside and outside of the Museums Germaine Marvel Building, located at 210 W. Packwood Ave. in Mait land. Three talented artists, Cherie Dacko, Cake Marques, and Tracy Burke (work pictured), are featured at Februarys event. Admission is $5. Visit www.ArtandHistory.org or phone 407-539-2181. Valentine concert in Central Park The Park Avenue Area Association will host a Valentine Concert featuring Michael Andrew & Swingerhead from 4-6:30 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 12, at the Central Park stage, located at 151 N. Park Ave. Admission is free. Call 407-644-8281 or visit tinyurl.com/valentine-concert

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Page 11 Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Antonios Located 611 S. Orlando Ave. in Maitland, Antonio's fea a caf and market, which offers casual dining, and on the General Manager Les Callahan describes his restaurant as offering a unique culinary tour of Italy. of dishes from various regions of Italy, unlike some Italian restaurants that might focus on one area, Callahan said. He also added that all sauces are made from scratch. crowave in the build ing up or down, Callahan said. Day event will begin at 10 p.m. in the upstairs restaurant. smaller three-course menu, and the price of an entre will also cover the appetizer and dessert. Items featured include a wood-oven roasted cod, chicken marsala and a New York strip steak. For dessert, their selection includes Tiramisu and a walnut and golden raisin bread pud which entre is selected. Reservations are strongly recom mended. Visit antoniosonline.com Lifestyles valentine concert in Central Park Presented by:An Afternoon of Music and Romance with Michael Andrew and Swingerhead in Downtown Winter Park SPECIAL THANKS TO: Where to dine on Valentines Day Continued on page 12 AND Y CEBALLOS Observer Staff the corner, some Winter Park and Maitland restaurants are boasting spe cially crafted menus and specials to From French or Italian cuisine to Spanish paella, offerings from locally owned restaurants are going head-tohead with those of the bigger restau rant chains. The hope, owners say, is residents will opt stay close to home when treating their sweethearts to dinner this year. Park Avenue are giving residents even more incentive to stay local and dine The second annual Valentine Concert in Central Park featuring Michael Andrew and Swingerhead will be pre sented at 4 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 12. Day offers: Chez Vincent/Hannibal's on the Square Square are two unique restaurants: Chez Vincent and Hannibal's on the Square. Both restaurants, serviced by the same kitchen, are owned by Chef Vincent Gagliano and his wife, Teri. Both eateries offer traditional French cuisine, but offer its own ambiance and feel. Chez Vin cent offers formal dining, while a more casual, yet sophisticated experience. have to sit at the bar and have a full meal. They can just have some appetizers, Gagliano said. He also said his restaurant features live music from Wednesday to Saturday. cial menu available at either location on this day. The courses will consist of an appetizer, salad, entre mignon with Cognac sauce and rack of lamb with a blue cheese sauce. One appetizer included is a cream of but ternut squash soup with crispy bacon. The dessert will be a dark chocolate cake with an Anglais crme and a raspberry coulis. The price is $70 per person and reservations are strongly recommended. Visit chezvincent.com and han nibalslounge.com Pairing romance with food

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Page 12 Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Family Calendar Its TAX time. Appointments Available 7 Days a Week!Tax Form Processing LLC2400 N Forsyth Rd., Suite 101 Orlando, FL 32807Tel: (407) 657-6336www.TaxFormProcessing.com Proudly Serving the Orlando Area for 17 years! Scan QR Code mi Tomatina mi Tomatina Paella Bar offers a wide selection of paellas and tapas, as well as a selection of soups and salads. Paella is a type of rice dish from Spain that is cooked with a variety of ingredients. One example is the Paella Negra, which is cooked with chicken, shrimp, calamari, mussels and roasted pimentos. Tapas are appetizers that are unique to Spain. Stuart Kirban, co-owner of mi Tomatina, said all paellas are made from scratch with fresh ingredients and are cooked to order. He said they will use their normal menu this year, but will offer a free champagne toast. He chose to do this in order to stay true to what his restaurant is known for. Kirban said. And when we do a pre-set menu, people are kind of disappointed. They come here for those items be Prices for tapas range from $6 to $16, and the paella prices Reservations are not required but strongly recommended. Visit mitomatina.com Paris Bistro Located at 216 N. Park Ave., Paris Bistro features its own offerings of traditional French offer a four-course meal, including an appetizer, salad, entre and dessert. For the appetizer, customers may choose be tween baked Brie with apple compote or lobster brandy bisque. There will be a goat cheese, date and spinach salad with orange vinaigrette offered, and the entres including a honey-herb roasted Cornish game hen and a New Zealand Rack of Lamb with porcini sauce. Tatiana Cerruto, owner of Paris Bistro, said the rack of lamb is one of the lunch to dinner, Cerruto said. She also said enjoying wine along with the food can make the experience even more enjoyable. SoNapa Grille cation in Maitland offers a range of dining options, such as restaurant. in wines from Sonoma County and Napa Valley, Barringer said. The wine selection includes whites and reds, which can be ordered as half a glass, a full glass or the bottle. Barringer said they will serve off of their main menu for with a black cherry port wine reduction. They will also serve a heart-shaped ravioli dish, stuffed with buffalo moz zarella cheese and topped with an Alfredo cream sauce. Dinner specials will begin at 4 p.m. and end at 11 p.m. Although reservations are not required, Barringer recom mends them. Visit sonapa.com The Morse Museum will have a family tour at 5:15 p.m. on Fri day, Feb. 10. Learn about Louis Comfort Tiffany and American art of the late 19th and early 20th centuries in a docent-guided tour of the galleries. There will also be an Art Demonstration at 6 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 10, at the McKean Pa vilion of the Morse Museum. Glass artist Lee Taylor will demonstrate glassmaking techniques. Receive a free take-home art activity. The Childrens Art & History Festival is from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 11, at the A&Hs Maitland Art Center, located at 231 W. Packwood Ave. Meet Mr. Waterhouse, a one-man play that teaches about the life of William Waterhouse, will be held at 1 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 12, in front of the Waterhouse Residence Museum, located at 820 Lake Lily Drive. Visit artandhistory.org Touch-A-Truck is 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 11, at 1300 W. Maitland Blvd. in Maitland. Admission is $5 (Family pays a maximum of $20). Visit www.or angewood.org/touchatruck The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens will host an Open House event from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 11, and 1 to 3 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 12. It is located at 633 Osceola Ave. in Winter Park. Call 407-647-6294. The Florida Young Artists Orches tra will perform A Concert From the Heart at Trinity Preparatory School from 3 to 4:30 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 12. It is located at 5700 Trinity Prep Lane in Winter Park. Visit ArtsFestFl.com or call 407257-8886. The Great Duck Derby features a series of rubber duck races and free family activities on Saturday, Feb. 18. The Peabody Ducks will start with a march to the Amphi theater at 10 a.m. The little yellow rubber ducks will race in the Mead Garden pond off Howell Creek at 12:15 and 1 p.m. Admission and activities are free. Please join Maitland Public Library for our second Annual Tween/ Teen Mardi Gras Dance Party on Saturday, Feb. 18, from 7-9 p.m. Enjoy a live DJ, Wii gaming and electronic visualizations. Its open to students in fth through eight grade. Admission is free. Masks and costumes are encouraged but not mandatory. Call 407-6477700 or email jdolce@maitland publiclibrary.org The Crosby Observatory, atop the Orlando Science Center, is open for seasonal sky watching from 5 to 9 p.m. every rst and third Saturday until Feb. 18. Admission includes a live planetarium show. Tickets are $10. Call 407-5142000 or visit www.osc.org. Send submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com

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Page 13 Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Feb. 10 Culture & Cocktails 6 to 9 p.m. at 210 W. Packwood Ave. in Maitland. Three supertalented artists Cherie Dacko, Cake Marques, and Tracy Burke are featured at this event. Dacko works in what she calls bent realism, creating surreal subjects in three-dimensional scenes, while Marques paints very untraditional subjects in the very traditional method of oil on board. Burke works in two dimensions on canvas, using her own recipe of oil paints and additives. Music will be provided dHistory.org Feb. 10-12 Battle of the Sexes Director Robert Hill put Cen season when he created a series of sexy ballets for a program he called Battle of the Sexes. Working with bodies that stretch and exercise every day as part of their job, the idea was received with standing ovations with Hill bringing sexy back Florida presented by the Orlando Ballet, will take place Feb. 10-12 at the Bob Carr Performing Arts Center in Orlando. Call 407-426-1739 or orlandoballet.org Feb 11 Luv Sux The volunteers who make up the Orlando Circle of Friends and will produce their question ably tasteful annual fundraiser called Luv Sux III at 8 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 11. If your experience with love has left you confused, befuddled or just plain messed up, the Circle of Friends wants to make it even cabaret is made up of songs about the misfortunes of love, sung by the wrong people. Prepare to be strangely entertained as their mismatched singers bemoan the horrors of that fateful February day. The cabaret will take place at 398 West Amelia St. in Orlando. For tickets, visit ocofchorus.com Feb 12 Valentine Concert in Central Park The merchants of Winter easy (and free) to make a Valen tine date with your sweetheart by presenting the second annual Val entine Concert in Central Park. Sponsored by Boyette, Cummins super-talented Michael Andrew and Swingerhead in an outdoor concert at 4 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. and his better-than-Sinatra voice. Michael was the headline singer for two years at the Rain bow Room atop Rockefeller Cen ter in New York City. The Central in Winter Park. Feb 15 to 26 Billy Elliot the Musical who is training to be a boxer, because his hard-drinking father wants him to be something more than an out-of-work factory bloke. But Billy discovers and becomes obsessed with the world of ballet. While his family comes to terms with this strange (for them) career path, Billy gets a shot at a scholarship with a pres tigious dance school. The event is at the Bob Carr Performing Arts 26. Visit ticketmaster.com Feb 15 and 16 By popular demand, Ms. Jacqueline Jones She may be the best known and best-loved singer in all of Central Florida, and now the incomparable Ms. Jacque line Jones is back to present her cabaret act What is This Thing at 7:30 p.m., as part of the Winter Park Playhouse Cabaret Series. Patrons can't get enough of her fabulous voice, wit and charm, Director Heather Alexander said. Seating is limited, so reservations are recommended. Tickets are $20 and include one drink. Call playhouse.org Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906. FEATURING THE BACH FESTIVAL CHOIR AND ORCHESTRA AND BACH SCHOLAR DR. CHRISTOPH WOLFF JOHN V. SINCLAIR ARTISTIC DIRECTOR AND CONDUCTOR WED LIKE TO GIVE SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR 77TH ANNUAL FESTIVAL SPONSORS: 445 north park avenue winter park, orida 32789 (407) 645-5311follow us on www.morsemuseum.org The NewMorseat theTIFFANY WingFree Friday Nights 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.The Morse Museums new galleries feature 200 art and architectural objects from Louis Comfort Tiffanys Long Island estate, Laurelton Hall. Coming up February 10 Live Music 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Family Tour 5:15 p.m. Glassmaking Demonstration 6 p.m. Curator Tour 7 p.mNow Open This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH O RLANDO A VE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.E NZIAN.ORG Held Over! 10 Academy A ward Nominations! THE AR TIST Fri Sun 3:45PM 6:30PM 9:15PM Mon, Wed, Thurs 6:30PM 9:15PM T ue 6:30PM Saturday Matinee Classics ROMEO AND JULIET Sat 12 NOON V alentines Day Brunch & Film AN AFF AIR TO REMEMBER Sun 10:00AM Cult Classics EVER YTHING YOU AL WA YS WAN TED TO KNOW ABOUT SEX T ue 9:30PM Josh Garrick Culture worthy of your calendar Can your heart handle all the choices? Jacqueline Jones

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Page 14 Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Opinions a special dinner or movie date, or even just a card, most people Day-related purchase each year. Add it all up, and you have one very special day for retailers who cater to the holiday. What makes this even sweeter to those in the love business and the struggling economy is that according to a survey by the National Retail Federation, each American will spend an average of $123 on their Valentine this last year. Combined spending Happily for the economy, this spending trend the country has seen recently. A December NRF report said holiday season spending was expected to rise 3.8 percent from the previous year to $469 billion. Black Friday sales 2010. When people have more as much, which is good news for romantics everywhere. are shelling out the big bucks to While they do represent the bulk to spend an average of $74.12 on their other half up from $68.98 last year the average American dren, parents and other relatives, this year. Another good sign for the economy is that more people end stores to get their love loot. Discount stores are still expected ment stores, which is up from 30 percent last year. The usual suspects will likely purchases Godiva chocolate, that way. Those planning to go all out for their sweethearts should consider plunking some of that dough into the local economy a great way to show affection for a loved one and the hometown. So many small businesses are of fering unique gifts and experienc es that can satisfy any Valentine. but after so many years of eco nomic doom and gloom, a sign of light is lovely. Minority speaks out Congratulations to Ken Bradley and to everyone that voted for him. You have received a mandate to continue busi ness as usual. So when you see one more parcel of your land given away, zoning changes made and more density close to our treasured downtown, do not blame the minority that tried to make you see what is happening. Basically Florida Hospital and the Adventist Health System now own our willing to be informed and brave enough to step forward, our Winter Park will until it is too late. Sally Flynn Winter Park Push for two-way communication While I genuinely appreciated Ms. Miles sending out an email congratulat ing Mayor Bradley on his reelection, I in selecting the Winter Park Observer sentence published Feb. 2) and Letters listed in her thank you email piece sent Feb. 4 (especially the link in support of Newt Gingrich). Her statement that, they offer valuable insights into city govern ment and the electoral process, sounded a bit hollow given that she did not include cally the one by Ms. Heidrich (Commu nication strong published Jan. 11), which notes that the city of Winter Park offers more than 30 venues for public input and participation regarding city government issues. More importantly, if Ms. Miles is a lessons learned experience, I would offer the following advice: provide a venue for two-way communication and the archiving of opinions from all sides. In fact, I would suggest that she ask one of her most ardent supporters (a sitting Win ter Park commissioner) to do the same. Said commissioner currently sends out a monthly editorial email newsletter with a one-way direction of communication that, while offering the option to send in an opinion, does not provide archival capa bility, which would allow us full and open view from all sides now that would really be a great example of providing valuable insight into what the 70 percent who voted for Mayor Bradley were really Ed Sabori Winter Park New biz opens offer live jazz six days a week, has opened ing the air is that of splendid tapas Chef while the bouquet of our wine selections Rory and Cathy Frazier brought a little bit of the New York Jazz scene to our back Cindy Jeffers Manager, Jazz Tastings Learn how women fooled the doctor female education will produce mon thoughts and constipated bowels. Now in 2012 women have completed advanced education courses but they also have endured sexual discrimination and harass ment from that date even up to today. The American Association of Univer released Crossing the Line: Sexual Ha rassment at School in November. Within three weeks, this research was covered in more than 1,300 news outlets including The New York Times and The Washington Post, TV and radio appearances includ ing National Public Radio, CNN, CBS, ABC and PBS News. Time Magazine, U.S. Week also featured stories on the AAUW report focusing on sexual harassment and discrimination in how students are treated by other students and even by faculty, especially at the seventh grade through high school levels. The American Association of Univer sity Women has awarded eight LAF Cam pus Outreach Grants to colleges connected to AAUW branches across the country, Branch with the University of Central Florida, through a grant submitted by Dr. M.C. Santana, associate director of visual arts and designs. Come and learn what educated women do today: did you know women now Learn more at our breakfast meeting at the First Congregational Church Fellowship Avenue, in Winter Park, at 9 a.m. on Satur day, Feb. 11. Contact 407-282-1023 to make a reservation. Rosemary Vendena Finance/Treasurer AAUW Orlando/Winter Park Branch Investing in Americas youth Benjamin Franklin once said, An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Though he was originally offer youth. Numerous studies show that the coun ties in their youth, such as homelessness, abuse, drug and alcohol dependence, and poor academic achievement. By helping to guide youth away from these troubles and toward a better future, we stand a better chance of helping them avoid greater dif In 2011, Goodwill Industries of Central Florida paired 146 young people with mentors in the local area. These youth had the opportunity to learn career develop ment, job readiness training, commu nications and presentation skills, and GoodGuides youth mentoring program. states, all of which have a long history of work, are helping 12to 17-year-olds de velop the skills they will need to complete school and move into successful careers. In every community in which it oper ates, including here in Central Florida, Goodwill generates opportunities for people to achieve economic stability, and build strong families and vibrant commu nities by offering job training programs, employment placement services and other community-based programs for people who have disabilities, lack education or job experience, or face employment chal lenges. Through GoodGuides, Goodwill is enabling youth who are at-risk for delin life. Once enrolled in the program, youth are paired with trusted, caring volunteer tor provides a supportive ear and guid ance that can lead youth to opportunities and resources they need to prepare for post-secondary education and employ ment. In addition to four hours of monthly mentoring, young people take part in activities to build career awareness and development. The program serves young people who are least likely to have trusting relation ships with adults and peers due to a variety of risk factors, such as failure in school due to poor grades or low atten dance, prior juvenile delinquency, family violence and other challenges. Ultimately, the program offers these youth a pathway out of poverty and crime. The purpose of Goodwill GoodGuides is to make sure the vast majority of young people coming through the program do not offend or reyouth, if we can apply an ounce of pre of cure later. Just one hour a week to mentor a young person in our community can make all the difference. If you would like to be come a mentor or if you know of a youth Bill Oakley, CEO Goodwill Industries of Central Florida Our Observation King Features Weekly ServiceFebruary 6, 2012 Letters to the editor Send your thoughts (400 words or less) to Managing Editor Jenny Andreasson at editor@observernewspapers.com Love doesnt stink for merchants Those planning to go all out for their sweethearts should consider plunking some of that dough into the local economy a great way to show affection for a loved one and the hometown. Provide a venue for twoway communication and the archiving of opinions from all sides. Ed Sabori

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Page 15 Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer in the air and so is spending. Accord Saving Tracker, Americans will fork over 8 percent more than last year to celebrate of all consumers planning to purchase ers reign supreme as the No. 1 token of affection constituting 29 percent of all presents exchanged jewelry is the top retail item that consumers gift to loved ones each year. However, shopping for jewelry can be tricky and a little daunting. When faced with a case full of shiny baubles, high quality as they appear, or are grossly overpriced relative to their true value. Here are a few tips to help those of you planning to give your loved ones rings, necklaces and other items, to ensure that Understand the terminology and important facts. Before you walk into get confused and led astray by technical terminology that salespeople use. For example, when shopping for diamonds, a good rule of thumb is to follow all of the Cs carat, clarity, color and cut to determine the true quality of the stone. Websites for organizations like the Gemological Institute of America and the Jewelry Information Center pro vide information and tutorials that will empower you to make sound purchasing decisions and ensure that you leave the store with a high-quality piece. People often hesitate at the notion of buying pre-owned jewelry. However, all jewelry can be refurbished and returned to new condition. Best of all, buying a pre-owned piece in a store can save a of the original or new price without losing any of the value. For example, at carry several pre-owned rings, Rolexes and other high-end pieces in impeccable condition for a fraction of the prices that the same items cost brand new. And with precious metal prices skyrocketing, who Get written appraisals on all biga new home without an inspection, you without getting it appraised. A good rule of thumb is to visit an independent appraiser for any item that costs $1000 gemologists and appraisers through the website. Also, ensure that you complete the process within the time your seller allots for returns, just in case the item is not up to snuff. With just a little preparation and a few precautions, you can ensure that you walk out of a jewelry retailer with a love. And be sure to talk up the leg work involved it just may earn you some Lawrence Kahlden is the president and CEO of La Familia Pawn and Jewelry. Chris Jepson Perspectives If this is as you are Take your pick is a human construct. At some point in our development as a species, a distant ancestor took that gush of lung air and articulated a feeling, a thought, an expres sion. A warning perhaps. A rush of ex pressed pain. A rudimentary sentiment of emotion. Who knows the word(s) uttered. Lost in the ether. My third child skipped single words virginal mind and mouth. Does that not express the quintessential essence of hu manity? Anyone who ever experienced an older sibling gets the sentiment. It is through language that we build our world. It constructs our universe. It reveals the unknowable. It forms our jump of imagination it was when that distant evolutionary cousin so long ago introduced God into the human equation. How else to explain what was then unknowable, but to an unknowable super entity, God? And as our language grew, so did the attributes of our god(s). Powerful beyond description. Omnipotent. Omniscient. Omnipresent. All powerful. All knowing. All present. And that is the premise I can not buy. I recently saw a marvelous movie, Brad Pitt and Sean Penn star, but it is the female lead, Jessica Chastain, who rightly commands our attention. She is the mother of three boys and wrestles with meaning, but that should not prevent one from embracing its artistic pleasures, its humanity. A line softly uttered early in the movie goes to the heart of the human predica should heal. This is a statement question And it is a fundamental question we should all ask of God. The words attribut ed to God are Omnipotent. Omniscient. Omnipresent. If you are God, you know everything that will ever be, you cannot create a mountain you cannot lift and you are everywhere for all time. So why, if this is as you are, would you not ever so slightly tweak the human model? Knowing what you know? If you knew that on June 8, 1972 American pilots would open their bomb bay doors and rain napalm on sleeping Vietnamese peas from the arms of screaming innocence (children) as they ran from their burning huts why not tweak the model? Why not ever so slightly change that which you claim to so love? question masterfully, actually. Just look at the beauty of the universe. As life con sumes us all, in every sorrowful iteration, the universe displays its glory (beauty) in No, actually I do not see. The words we He deals deuces to some and aces to oth ers. A rigged game. Yet none of us get to sit it out. We either need a new croupier or a new vocabulary. I opt for words. Jepson is a 24-year resident of Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@ MEDIAmerica.US The excellent Minnesota Symphony Osmo Vanska and Midori violinist soloist, will play a special concert at 8 p.m. on Friday, March 9, at the Bob Carr Perform ing Arts Center. This performance will be dedicated to the memory of David and Libby Roberts. David, a classmate of mine at Harvard (1942), was founding director Charitable Foundation. Trip to fame Our neighbor and great pal Victor Mo rel will drive b.w. and me to Tallahassee in late March for the governor to induct me into the Florida Artists Hall of Fame. Such awards do not make one rich or famous perhaps, but they are vitamins for Winter Park ashback As a boy, I saw much of Winter Park from the water while paddling my canoe through the lakes and canals. Winter fourth dimension causes relic scenes of my childhood to speak to me in whispers from the past. Downtown Winter Park was a quaint a shoe repair shop and a watchmaker near the Baby Grand movie house. Movie theaters were quite different in the days before air-conditioning, but plenty of people stuck it out to see Betty Davis, Clark Gable, Jimmy Cagney, Norma Shearer and the rest. Without television one had to leave his house in order to be transported to faraway places, the way one can now do in his own living room. Wealthy Winter Parkers, often with visored chauffeurs, drove slowly around town in Cadillacs, Lincolns, PierceArrows, Franklins, Graham-Paiges, Hispano-Suizas, Auburns, Jordans, Cords, Rolls-Royces and other exotic autos. ing ailing cars. I graduated from grammar school on Park Avenue in 1932 and moved on to junior high and high school all in two buildings on Huntington Avenue where a giant school complex now stands. below the high school, and played our herd Field, which also housed big league football games were played on Tinker Field in Orlando, the name being taken Chance who were the most celebrated double-play combination in the history of baseball. The place where we all swam was ing from the shore of Lake Virginia. An occasional seaplane, with both wheels and pontoons, would take off or land on the lake. Rollins students were, for the most part, from well-off families up North, many having come to Rollins after be ing unsuccessful in entering Ivy League schools. For a long time, Rollins had the reputation true or not true of hav ing no examinations and no grades. I devoted much effort convincing guys I lived with at Harvard that Rollins was not a snap school, as some had heard. improved immensely, and the college is now highly respected everywhere. There were no food stamps or welfare in those days, and people were generous to those who needed help. Some Winter Park land, now invalu able, was going for as little as $10 an acre but who had $10? About Roney: HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney) Louis Roney Play On! Jewelry tips to keep the sparkle LAWRENCE KAHLDEN Guest Writer Lawrence Kahlden DELIGHTE D TO SEE THIS GROWTH IN MY COMMUNITY! CONGRATULATIONS AN D GOO D LUCK TO ALL OF THESE NEW BUSINESSES! LAURA CONNAUGHTON Heres what a reader on the web said about the article Maitland plaza hits 100 percent capacity published on wpmobserver.com on Feb. 1 and printed in this issue: Have an opinion? Send your thoughts (400 words or less) to Managing Editor Jenny Andreasson at editor@observernewspapers.com

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Page 16 Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Emergency Services 24Whats Your Emergency???2012 has started with a bang for local Orlando based Emergency Services 24 (ES24). With expansion into South Florida and the Tampa region ES24 has been steadily assisting property owners in their time of need after suffering unexpected water damage or re damages to their buildings. This is the season for building res but with the mild weather there has been a drop in house or commercial building res. The cold weather usually creates more hazards to buildings as replaces, space heaters and other electric overloads create the potential for unexpected res. We have been running around the clock eld supervisor Brian Honea states. The water losses to homes have been steady enough to keep all of trucks servicing properties 24/7. We can be at any property within 30 minutes in the metro area with crews to extract water, keep properties from further damage and get owners back to normal as quickly as possible. ES24 has ofces in Orlando, Boca Raton, and Tampa and is expanding into Naples/Fort Meyers and Jacksonville this year. ES24 also services the Atlanta metro area with ofces in Atlanta, Athens and Macon along with Birmingham Alabama. ES24 specializes in building loss recovery and stabilization due to any catastrophic event that can happen. Pipe Breaks, Floods, Fires or natural disasters never stop. Our new motto of Whats Your Emergency says it all. We will handle any building crisis, quickly, professionally and get any property back to normal as efciently as possible.Contact our 24 hour emergency number 877-936-8998 and visit our website today, http://www.waterdamage24.com 400 S PARK AVENUE, Suite 210 WINTER PARK, FL 32789 407-697-8796 CELL Glenda.massie@floridamoves.com HOME COMES WITH A ONE YEAR HOME WARRANTY Located on expansive 75x150 corner lot this same owner since 1973 home has been upgraded and meticulously maintained. Fabulous opportunity to live well in this quality constructed residence or bring plans to build in this most sought after neighborhood. 1738 Sq Ft plus 18x11 bonus space not in footage. Offered at $325,000 400 S PARK AVENUE, Suite 210 WINTER PARK, FL 32789 407-697-8796 CELL Glenda.massie@floridamoves.com HOME COMES WITH A ONE YEAR HOME WARRANTY Located on expansive 75x150 corner lot this same owner since 1973 home has been upgraded and meticulously maintained. Fabulous opportunity to live well in this quality constructed residence or bring plans to build in this most sought after neighborhood. 1738 Sq Ft plus 18x11 bonus space not in footage. Offered at $325,000 Homes Observer Homes brought to you by: Fannie Hillman + Associates Serving Central Florida for over 31 years! 407-644-1234 fanniehillman.com Exterior home replacement projects are worthy of investment With construction costs rising and the hassles associated with taking on a reno vation project, many homeowners can be reluctant to tackle certain projects when it comes to remodeling their home. How ever, according to the 2011-12 Remodeling Cost vs. Value Report, several inexpensive exterior replacement projects are not only also expected to recoup close to 70 percent of costs upon sale of the home. ously outperform other remodeling proj ects in terms of resale value, especially siding, window and door replacements, says Orlando Regional Realtor Associa Central Realty. These types of projects are considered essential to regular home maintenance so homeowners will need to implement them anyway to keep their house functioning properly. Many exterior replacement projects have the added bonus of instantly adding curb appeal, which is important to those looking to sell. The 2011-12 Remodeling Cost vs. Value Report compares construction costs with remodeling projects in 80 markets across the country. Realtors provided their insight into local markets and buyer home prefer ences within those markets. According to Baker, the desirability and resale value of different remodeling projects naturally varies by region and metropolitan area. There are regional dif ferences when it comes to the resale value of particular remodeling projects. Realtors can help homeowners decide what low-cost improvement investments will provide the most upon resale in their particular market. value is just one factor among many that homeowners must take into account when making a decision to remodel. Seven of the top 10 most cost-effective projects nationally in terms of value re couped are exterior replacement projects, in particular siding replacement, front entry door replacement, and garage door replacements. Three interior remodeling projects are also considered worthy invest ments: an attic bedroom remodel, a minor kitchen remodel, and the addition of a wood deck. To view the Orlando section of the 201112 Remodeling Cost vs. Value Report, go to www.orlrealtor.com and click on the For Home Sellers option under Consumers. ORRA

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Page 17 Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Cuchaci designs Trufes Cuhaci & Peterson Architects Engi neers Planners did the design work for the new Trufes Grill restaurant that recently opened at the Winter Park Village. Lonnie Peterson, chairman at Cu haci & Peterson Architects said the work included construction drawings for interior design and improvements for the 3,500 square foot restaurant. MLS service relocates to Maitland My Florida Regional MLS (MFRMLS), Floridas largest multiple listing ser vice, relocated its corporate head quarters from Orlando to Maitland on Feb. 6. This relocation marks a signi cant moment for MFRMLS, as our new location will offer enough space for onsite local Member training, as well as corporate growth, stated Bill Dryburgh, My Florida Regional MLS Board President. MFRMLS currently employs over thirty-ve employees who will occupy space at the new corporate head quarters while continuing to provide service to over 32,000 Members. Due to the relocation, the MFRMLS local phone and fax numbers will change: New address: 555 Winderley Place, Suite 320, Maitland, FL 32751 New phone: 407-960-5300 New fax: 407-960-5450 Toll free number: 800-686-7451 Fannie Hillman voted best Fannie Hillman + Associates con tinued to demonstrate why it was voted Central Floridas Best Resi dential Real Ofce in 2011 by Or lando Business Journal by posting 88 fourth quarter transactions for a vol ume of nearly $30.2 million, boost ing the Winter Park companys 2011 transactions of 374 for $139 million by 10.7 percent and 27.7 percent, re spectively, over 2010. Fourth quarter transactions and sales volume were up 10 percent and 9.5 percent, respectively, over the nal quarter last year, making it the companys eighth consecutive quar ter in which transactions and sales volume have been up over compa rable periods in previous years. It also was the third consecutive year the rm has seen its transactions and sales volume continue to improve. The way things were trending for the existing home market as we moved through 2011 gives us every reason for continued optimism in 2012. As long as interest rates remain low and the inventory of distressed properties continues to be reduced, we should see existing home prices appreciate in 2012, said Scott Hillman presi dent of the 31-year-old independent rm recognized as one of Central Floridas top residential real estate brokerages and a leader in the sale of luxury lakefront residences, primarily in Winter Park, Maitland and College Park. Fannie Hillmans 88 fourth quar ter transactions last year were high lighted by the sale of a $4.9 million home on Winter Parks Lake Osceola, and gave the company a total of 23 million-dollar-plus sales in Central Florida for the year. The companys average trans action for the fourth quarter was $342,700, while the average trans action for the year penciled out at $371,600, up 14.5 percent. For the year, 17 Fannie Hillman sales associates posted sales of more than $3 million, led by the team of Nancy Bagby, Sue Ann Rand and Julie Bagby Williams with sales of $25.7+ million. They were followed by the team of Mary Stuart Day and Megan Cross at $12.8+ million, Me lissa Woodman and Jerry Oller each at $5.5+ million, Katherine Borde lon $4.8+ million, Glad Messeroff $4.59+ million, Janis Fuller $4.54+ million, Shirley Jones $4.2+ million, Cathy Richey $3.7+ million, Meg Dolan $3.6+ million, Dawn Romance $3.58+ million, Maria Van Warner $3.54 million, Sharon Helsby $3.46+ million, Lisa Fleming $3.40 million, Kelly Maloney $3.2+ million, and Jeff Hall $3.0 million. Sodexo lease renewed Emerson International recently closed on a renewal lease for 18,212 square feet of ofce space at Lake side Ofce Park, 283 Cranes Roost Blvd. in Altamonte Springs. Sean Westcott, director of leasing at Em erson International, negotiated the renewal lease with Sodexo Opera tions, LLC. Mohl Partners participated in the lease negotiations representing Sodexo. Town homes on market Ashton Woods Homes in Maitland recently completed two models and started sales of 24 town homes priced from the $219,000 in the rst phase at Fountain Park, located off Rinehart Road in Lake Mary. Michael Roche, vice president of sales and marketing at Ashton Woods Homes, said the new three and four bedroom town homes at Fountain Park range in size from 2,067 square feet of living space to 2,504 square feet with two car garages and balco nies. Roche said six ready-to-move-in town homes will open in February. New Cuchaci team members Cuhaci & Peterson Architects LLC based in Orlandos Baldwin Park, ap pointed four professionals to its de sign and project teams. Tina Kennedy director of human resources at Cuhaci & Peterson, said Christian Paulo was appointed a CAD technician. Paulo earned his Associ ate of Science degree in computer drafting and design from ITT Tech nical Institute and has two years of experience. Jose Diaz, E.I. was named senior mechanical designer. Diaz earned is Bachelor of Science degree in me chanical engineering from the Uni versity of Puerto Rico in 2003 and has more than seven years of experi ence. Lee Murrah was appointed proj ect coordinator. Murrah, who at tended the University of Alabama, Seminole Community College and Brevard Community College, served in the U.S. Army Airborne Infantry in Iraq where he received awards for outstanding service and bravery. Jaison Moras was appointed electrical project manager. Moras earned his Bachelor of Science de gree in electrical engineering from the University of Kansas. Send submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com Jeff ClarkColdwell Banker Residential407.733.0773j.clark@coldwellbanker.com www.BaldwinParkLiving.com New Construction!4 bed / 2.5 bath / 2190 sq ft $339,000 808 Hamilton Place Court Winter Park, FL 32789 Commerce Brokerage, LLC407-566-1636 Real Estate Briefs The Festival and Trade Expo will bring homebuyers, builders, lenders, realtors, and industry support organizations together on one fun -filled afternoon in beautiful Maitland. The goal of this event is to sell lots of real estate, boost our local economy, and have fun doing it. The festival will have small business exhibitors from all over the greater Orlando area. The B2B and B2C networking opportunities at this event will be limitless. We anticipate 1000s of attendees from all segments of our community, but our primary focus is to attract individuals and families wanting and needing to purchase a home of their own. There will also be a huge number of local real estate professionals attending, trying to locate new home opportunities for their buyers. In addition, there will be a number of resources available to help foreclosure victims, defend and possibly WIN their foreclosure case. Everyone can take advantage of our delicious appetizers, graciously provided by a dozen local restaurants. We will also have hot dogs and hamburgers provided by FutureTech Financial. Also, FutureTech and our participating exhibitors will be giving away thousands of dollars in door prizes throughout the event: gift cards, products, services, and even free Bahamas cruises. Every individual attendee receives a free game of bowling at AMF Altamonte Lanes. Our event is being held on February 16, 2012 at the Home Builders Association of Metro Orlando, 544 Mayo Avenue, Maitland, Florida 32751. Festival hours are between 3:00pm and 7:00pm. For more information please visit: The Lets Buy a Home Festival and Trade Expo will bring homebuyers, builders, lenders, The B2B and B2C We anticipate 1000s of attendees from all segments of our community, but our primary focus is to There will also be a huge number of local real estate professionals attending, trying to locate new home opportunities Everyone can take advantage of our delicious appetizers, graciously provided by a dozen local restau and our participating exhibitors will be giving away thousands of dollars in door prizes throughout the For more information please visit: FutureTech Financial, Inc. 407-628-9888 or Trufes Grill

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Page 28 Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer FREEComplete Door Maintenance with any Service 407-780-1691 Orlando, FL Adversing Networks of Florida Statewide advertisingone low price THG-11909



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407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC USPS 00-6186 Publisher statement on page 4. Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012 50+ tax wpmobserver.comSubscribe now!Visit wpmobserver.com Jeff Van Son doesnt know how many Valentines Days are ahead of him. He doesnt know if hell ever kiss his wife, Mi chele, on their anniversary again. He cant count how many times hell be able to watch their three children blow out the candles on their birthday cakes. Theres a box in the top of the closet in his bedroom at the familys Winter Park home. In it there are 39 birthday cards, one for each year for twin boys Josh and Nick and their younger sis ter, Lillian, until they all turn 18. by their daddy, waiting for a day that he gets to say I love you again. Jeff hasnt said I love you in more than six months. Now he cant speak at all, though he tells his wife he loves her in other ways, Michele said. Michele misses her husband terribly. Even as she holds his hand. Even as he presses his Theres a lot to be decided in the coming months for Maitland regarding the future redevelop ment of its downtown core, but many local business owners have decided not to wait. From dining to entertainment, to a mix of both, businesses have been popping up across the city bringing new amenities to Maitland. Folks are tired of moving around and having to go to Al tamonte Springs or Winter Park to get a good meal or buy this or that, Verl Emrick, director of the Maitland Community Rede velopment Agency, said. The community has been ready for quite a while now to get these amenities in place and available to them. With ongoing talks of redevel oping the citys entire downtown core, and the planned construc tion of the Maitland SunRail stop, local business owners said theyve decided to jump on the train early and open now so they can capitalize on business in the future.Coming soonWalking door to door in the Village Plaza at the corner of Lake and Orlando avenues in Maitland, across from the Village at Lake Lily, the sound of power drills and construction workers radios echoes off the concrete walls. In the last four months, the president of the propertys manthe seven remaining vacancies in it 100 percent occupancy. All, he says, will have new businesses up and running in the next three I think the new business es will indicate, number one, to other property owners that weve turned a corner and that if Provide a venue for two-way communication and the archiving of opinions from all sides.Page 14Letters to the editor Lifestyles Weve compiled a Valentines Day dining guide that features six Winter Park and Maitland restaurants.Page 11 Valentines CalendarMichael Andrew & Swingerhead plays a free Valentines Day concert on Sunday, Feb. 12, in Central Park.Page 10 Calendar Artists Cherie Dacko, Cake Marques and Tracy Burke are featured at A&Hs Culture & Cocktails on Friday.Page 10 TAX DEFERREDFIXED ANNUITY RATE FOR 5 YEARS.Bob Adams 407-644-6646THE NATIONAL 5 YEAR CD RATE IS 1.34%3.35% 451 Maitland Ave, Altamonte Springs, FL 32701NEW Dermatology Ofce!407-599-SKIN (7546)*Waive co-payment up to $25 No referral needed Accepting all insurances Dr. John CottamDr. Ross Wheeler PhHOtTO bBY IsSAAcC BABcCOcCK thTHE ObsBSERvVER AAstrid Jean Paul stands inside her nearly completed Cafe Jean Paul in Maitland. The whole Lake Avenue plaza teems with new tenants. Please see cCENTER on page 2 BBringing in the business Amid talks of downtown redevelopment, new businesses ock to Maitland SARAH WIlsLSON OObserver Staff SoNapa Grille 640 S. OOrlando Ave., Maitland 407-637-2933 www.sonapa.com Jazz Tastings 164 Lake Ave., Maitland 407-661-1190 www.jazztastings.com Caf Jean-Paul 124 Lake Ave., Maitland 407-622-0331 www.cafejeanpaul.com The Silly Grape 1720 Fennell RRoad, Maitland 407-790-7999 www.thesillygrape.com Waiting to say I love you PhHOtTO bBY IsSAAcC BABcCOcCK thTHE ObsBSERvVER Jeff and Michele Van Son pause during a daily walk they take together in Maitland. Please see lLOvVE on page 5A love story blooms despite a tragic prognosis IsISAAcC BBABcCOcCK OObserver Staff

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Page 2 Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland OObserver there are remaining vacancies that it wont be long until that vacancy is absorbed, indication to new developers that Maitland is a good market and its time to consider building new buildings and new develop ment at this time. In a unit in the back of the plaza, Rory Frazier pages through piles of design plans come to be Jazz Tastings, the areas newest wine and tapas bar. be stacked and covered with tarps in the middle of the dining area, but Frazier said that by February, the jazz bar should be up and running. The Maitland area is certainly grow ing, and we felt there was a certain eclectic crowd here that we could cater to, Frazier said. Hopefully were going to bring in something unique that Maitland doesnt have. Thats the goal. With a menu of Spanishand Cajun-in along with a live house jazz band, Frazier said he hopes to cater to an upscale audience looking to enjoy good jazz, wine and food. Next door to him, furniture is stacked wall-to-wall in what will soon open as an antique store, and down one more door is an open space soon to be taken over and reconstructed into a kosher deli. Down a few more doors there is more construction to be found. Astrid Jean Paul appears out of a cloud of construction dust to give a tour of what is to be her new juice bar and caf, Caf Jean Paul. Set to open by this weekend, with her at the stove, she said the caf will feature an array of salads, soups, chutneys and New bar with options that cater to diet restric tions from gluten-free to vegan. I call this a place of transition, she said. We have something for everyone, whether youre vegetarian, vegan, trying to lose weight, or just want to be exposed to healthier eating habits. We want to expose the Maitland community to healthy eating. In the middle of all the construction stands a pet health food store, Hounds & will bring to the plaza. Weve seen a lot of growth in this plaza in the last six months or so, she said. I hope once all the places open well all have one another. The Village Plaza isnt the only place adding new business the city is also in talks with developers over the construction of a new CVS Pharmacy, as well as a Dunkin Donuts opening next to ACE Hardware on Orlando Avenue. NNow open A few months shy of a year ago, The Silly Grape the hybrid sports/wine bar opened off of Fennell Road in Maitland. Amid the company of Maitlands corporate corridor, owner Cesar Dacosta said the res taurant caters to the post-work day happyhour crowd. I felt like there was a need in Maitland for a place like this to service all the busi nesses in the area, Dacosta said. I wanted to make this a place where you can come after work in a suit and not feel out of place, With the success hes had in less than a year in Maitland, hes now hoping to fran chise and open more Silly Grape locations both in Maitland and beyond. SoNapa Grille, now open near the edge of what is to become downtown Maitland off Orlando Avenue, seems to be having similar success, owner Adam Barringer said, the wine bar and restaurant having been open for about a month. Our sales have been phenomenal since we opened, Barringer said. And the city of Maitland has certainly showed their sup port for us and the investment that weve made in the city. We hope were driving in more people from Winter Park and from surrounding cities to us and to other local businesses. Barringer said hes excited to see how the redevelopment plans for Maitland pan out, and the new business it could fuel in the future. ness owners in Maitland, he said. To take it a step further, if we get SunRail and the SunRail stop, it will all just further enhance the economic vitality of the city. SunRRail stop, redevelopment talks Mayor Howard Schieferdecker said the city is currently accepting and screen ing plans submitted by developers to help make his dreams of a revitalized and rede veloped downtown Maitland a reality. The developers are working with us and were working with them to achieve both their goals and the citys goals to have a nice little downtown, he said. The proposed redevelopment, he said, can be broken down into three main cor ridors: the town center area, where the Winn-Dixie and Royal Plaza are currently; the area surrounding the Publix at the cor ner of George and North Orlando avenues; and the location of the proposed SunRail stop near the old Parker Lumber site to the north. Steve Brandon, with the development for redevelopment of the area around the future SunRail station. Having the SunRail stop, I think, will put Maitland on the map and have a uni fying effect on the community, Brandon said. As ridership increases, it will rein vigorate both retail and residential aspects of the city. Our Town(407) 366-8696 Fax (407) 359-2118 P.O. Box 4548 Winter Park, FL 32793Insertions in editions and months as shown:____Waterford Lakes ____College Park/Orlando ____Winter Park/Maitland ____Sweetwater/Heathrow ____Tuscawilla/Winter Springs ____Oviedo ____Baldwin Park/E. Winter ParkPlease initial your agreement with the following:____ I approve this ad to appear in Our Town as shown here OR ____ I approve this ad with minor changes as clearly marked (How many changes are marked? _____) ____ Phone number and address are correct I understand that payment for this ad is due per initial agreement.Signed ____________________________________We appreciate your prompt response, as our deadline is approaching.*Colors represented on this proof may not be an exact match of the colors produced when printed on our offset press.X OCT 2009 407-644-7760 $100 to $500 OFFAny Servicewith this ad On Call 24 Hours A DayServing Central Florida Since the s Let Us Handle Your Emergency!Call Our Hotline 877-936-8998 www.EmergencyServices24.comServing Floridas Residential & Commercial Community Since 1990 IMMEDIAT E RESPONSE Whats Your Emergency?CBC057844 F lood l Leaks l Mold l F ire l Storm l Smoke l Roong I cannot thank you enough for your support in our recent election. I was humbled by your tremendous vote of condence in the job I have done as Mayor and I look forward to serving you again. You have my pledge to continue to work every day to make Winter Park a better place for our families, businesses, and environment. We will continue our scal discipline in planning the City's nances and will look for opportunities to bring good jobs to our City. Together we will continue our work to keep Winter Park vibrant, scally sound and economically strong. Thank you for your faith and trust and I look forward to seeing all of you in our great City sometime soon. THANK YOU WINTER PARK! Paid political advertisement paid for and approved by Ken Bradley, non-partisan candidate for Mayor of Winter Park. cCENTER | NNewer restaurants in Maitland, including TThe Silly Grape and SoNNapa Grille, are seeing success C OONTINUEED FROROM fFROntNT pagPAGE

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Page 3 Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland OObserver Tia Meer, compatriot gar dener and president of the Simple Living Institute, found a few spare moments to stop by my garden for a chat. Tia, along with her husband, Terry, grow their garden on the shores of the Econlockhatchee River at their Econ Farm east of Orlando. Simple Living Institute is the soring so many of our Central Florida community gardening projects. With a mission to create opportunities for sustainability in our community, how can we go wrong with neigh bors like these? Like many of us living in Central Florida, Tia has had the roots of her experience transplanted here. When I grew up in Pennsylvania, my grandma was a farmer, she said. Growing up as a kid on grandmas farm, Id pull up carrots and dig up potatoes treasure hunting for food raid the raspberry patch and pick strawberries, climb the cherry tree. Ive always had a love for being outside with nature, watching things grow. Thats a connection a lot of people have lost growing up in condos and apartments or suburban houses. The productivity of Tias gar den is worthy of any gardeners envy. Our Econ Farm is mainly a self-sustainable project where most of the stuff we grow is for me and Terry to eat or share with family and friends, she said. We eat out of the garden every day. Were harvesting lots of carrots and cabbage and greens right now. The tomatoes in pots never froze this year. We make a different salad every day for dinner. Us gardeners are a creative lot, always looking for new projects. Im trying to integrate more permaculture into my annual bio-intensive vegetable garden, she said. Ill do that with sweet potatoes along the fence line of my vegetable garden. Other perennials Ive planted along the fence line are garlic chives and pineapples. Im planning a native plant restoration on top of my septic tank mound. Ill plant all native grasses, like wooly grass and purple love grass. And we have a little bat house, but I want a bat mansion to collect the bat guano. Think gardening is a relaxed way of life? Not for Tia! My life is very complicated from all the different hats I wear, she said. Im a volunteer with Simple Living and Im the president. With my own business I do garden consulting. Im getting known as the community garden expert for a lot of the projects at churches and schools. One of the other projects Im most excited about is the Winter Park urban farm. When I asked Tia for some quick tips, she responded with the elegance of simplicity, Compost is the answer to everything!Tom Carey is the owner of Sundew Gardens, a you-pick gardening business in OOviedo. Visit the Sundew Gardens Facebook page. 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Charges subject to TV Guarantee will be credited or refunded, as applicable, on customers next bill cycle, as determined at CenturyLinks sole discretion. 2012 CenturyLink, Inc. All Rights Reserved. The name CenturyLink and the pathways logo are trademarks of CenturyLink, Inc. All other marks are the property of their respective owners. CNTL12-104G_10.15_x_9_r1.indd 1 1/26/12 5:10 PM Tom Carey From my garden to yours AA visit with TT ia Meer BBusiness BBriefs An upcoming episode of A&E E s TV Show Fix This Y Y ard will feature Winter Park Land Co. agent R Ryan Courech and a property in Win ter Park. The show will transform the ugliest home on the street to the envy of the neighborhood. New plantings, paint and decora tive stonework on the home will aid in the makeover. A weeklong blitz of sprucing at a top-secret location will culminate with the big reveal to be lmed soon. Look for the trans formation when the show airs this spring. Professional R R eal E E state Company LLC is proud to announce that the Village Plaza, a 23,000-square-foot retail center located in Maitland has been leased to 100 percent occu pancy. DPR R Foundation has awarded a $35,000 grant for NN ew H H ope for KKids, a local nonprot working with children and families grieving the death of a loved one to support their Center for Grieving Children in Mai tland. For more information, please call 407-331-3059 or visit the web site www.newhopeforkids.org RRollins MBA announced that Gina BBerko-Solomon is the recipient of this years Martin Bell Scholar ship. The Martin Bell Scholarship is awarded annually to a senior nonprot professional who demon strates outstanding leadership in the eld and is granted a full-ride to the R Rollins E Executive MBA program. Gina Berko-Solomon is the director of adult education for the Adult Literacy League and through her work, has shown exemplary commitment to the Central Florida community. Stacy J. Ford, formerly Stacy J. Broisov, has become a partner with the business boutique law rm of Pohl & Short, P.A., practicing in the areas of appellate law and commer cial litigation. OO lde Town Brokers recently honored their Top Producers of 2011. Top Agents include: Vincent Scarlatos, Stephen DeCristo, Steve & E E ileen Schiffer, Joan Cross, Shelby N Nor wich Goodman, Greg E E lliott, Lisa Shear, T T roy B Bryant, Pat Sprague, Patrick James, Craig Goralski, BBob Sanders, A Andrew Davenport, RRob Gaudreau, John A Abbott, Doug Prince and Dottie KKelley. KKimberly Sterling, president of OOrlando-based R Resource Consulting Group, was recently appointed to the national advisory board for Schwab Advisor Services.

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Page 4 Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland OObserver USPS 00-6186 ISSN 1064-36131500 Park Center Drive OOrlando, FL 32835-5705 Member of: Goldenrod Chamber of CommercePublisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor. Submission does not guarantee publication. Columnists opinions are made independently of the newspaper. All rights reserved. Winter Park / Maitland Observer 2012 EEstablished in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster www.wpmobserver.com | Phone: 407-563-7000 | Fax: 407-563-7099 | editor@observernewspapers.com P.OO BBox 2426 Winter Park, FL 32790 Published TThursday, Feb. 9, 2012 CONTAONTACTTS Volume 24, IIssue NNumber 6 PUBLISHERER KKyle TT aylor 407-563-7009 kyle@observernewspapers.com managingMANAGING EEDITOROR Jenny AAndreasson 407-563-7026 editor@observernewspapers.com DEESIGNERER Jonathan Gallagher 407-563-7054 jgallagher@observernewspapers.com REREPOROR TERERS Jenny AAndreasson 407-563-7026 editor@observernewspapers.com IIsaac BBabcock 407-563-7023 isaacb@observernewspapers.com LEgalsGALS | ClassifiLASSIFIEdsDS AAshley McBBride legal@FLAlegals.com classieds@observernewspapers.com COOPYY EEDITORORS IIsaac BBabcock isaacb@observernewspapers.com Sarah Wilson COOLUMNISTS Chris Jepson Jepson@MediAmerica.us Louis RRoney LRRoney@c.rr.com Josh Garrick joshgarrick9@gmail.com ADVERER TISING SALEES ManagANAGER TT racy Craft 407-515-2605 tcraft@observernewspapers.com subscSUBSCRiptiIPTIOnsNS | ciCIRculatiCULATIOnN AAmanda RRayno 407-563-7073 arayno@golfweek.com intINTERnN AAndy Ceballos T HIS ESTATE PLAN LOOKS JUST LIKE A LUXURY RE SORT [ call it the best of both worlds ]88141 PRAD WPO 2/2012 Winter Pa rk's Distinctive Retirement Community www.themayflower.com 1620 Mayflower Court Winter Park, FL 32792 Whats your plan for the future? Call today, and lets talk about it: 407.672.1620. The Mayf lower. Smart. Secure. And Spectacular.Close your eyes and think continuing care retirement community for a second. What do you see? Park-like grounds and walking trails? A pool and f itness center? A formal dining room? Perhaps. But what about your own faux f ireplace? Hardwood f loors? Designer kitchen with granite countertops? Custom cabinetry and trim? Closet systems? At a retirement community . seriously? Seriously. At The Mayf lower, you have the freedom and f lexibility to customize your home and your retirement lifestyle to make them uniquely yours. And while youre having fun doing that, youll also have the guarantee of pre-funded long-term care in our Gold Seal Health Center. Thats what prompted residents like Shelby and Sylvia Reaves to plan ahead and proactively make the move . because they wanted to, not because they needed to. How about you?WINNER: ICAA INDUSTRY INNOVATOR AWARDFor The Mayflower/Rollins College Lifelong Learning Program MAY 816 Ad_WPO Reaves.indd 1 1/5/12 12:31 PM Community BBulletin AArtists get grants United Arts of Central Florida an nounced the 2012 Artist Development Grants & Arts Administrator Grants, awarding $32,099 to 24 grantees. Winter Park artists receiving grants were: $2,500 to photographer Dawn RRoe to plan and exhibit a site-specic video installation in Australia, and $2,500 to photographer R Rick Lang to photograph western Tennessee from Memphis to Nashville.Chamber members honored OOn Friday, Jan. 27, the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce celebrated the accomplishments of its mem bers. They included U.S. R Rep. John Mica (RR-Fla.) for Winter Park Citizen of the Y Y ear, Bob Milburn of Pre-Paid Legal Services for Ambassador of the YY ear, and Florida Blue for Business of the Y Y ear. Also honored were the Win ter Park/Maitland O Observer for Small Business of the Y Y ear, Tom Kelly of CN LBank for Chairman of the Y Y ear, Kirk Munell for Volunteer of the Y Y ear, and Daris E Eliott Gallagher of Winter Parks Parks & R Recreation Department for Chamber Hero.Student honorsWofford College student Natalie Tuck er is studying abroad in Barcelona, Spain. Tucker is the child of John and EElizabeth Tucker of Winter Park. Power of Memory Mary Proctor held a workshop at the Hannibal Square Heritage Center on Saturday, Jan. 21. The Power of Memory was about using folk art methods and personal keepsakes to create art that showcases memories, heritage and culture. The Art of Missionary Mary Proctor is on display at the Heritage Center until Saturday, April 21. UCP donors Dr. Donald and Mrs. Cindy Diebel of Winter Park are the fourth recipients of the UCP of Central Floridas Jack ie Bailes Legacy Award. The Dieb els served as the primary sponsor of The Faces Behind the Miracles Fundraising Breakfast, one of UCPs events. They will be honored at An EEvening at the Palace Gala on Sat urday, March 10. Tickets are avail able at www.ucpgala.com C-SPAN AN stops by RRollins College student Monique Hen ry, who is majoring in International Affairs & Music, visited the C-SPAN Campaign 2012 Bus during its visit to RRollins College. She joined the thou sands who toured the bus when it stopped in O Orlando Jan. 27 to 28 on its RRoad to the White House tour.

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Page 5 Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland OObserver head against hers in a sweet em brace while they walk down the street in an afternoon breeze. Part of him is still here, she tells her children. The other part is already in heaven. She loves all of him anyway, she said, even as she's watched the old Jeff slowly fade away. Jeff the handyman. Jeff the problem solver. Jeff the athlete. Jeff the superhero dad. Jeff the ro mantic. In a few days it will be Valen tine's Day again, a day that's both all too special and not special at all for the Van Sons. They were mar ried on Feb. 23, so they celebrate both days at the same time, somewhere in between. We always had our plans or our dreams that we wanted to ful superceded any single day. They've been celebrating that way for 10 years. TThe two Jeffs But the last two years Michelle has spent saying goodbye to her husband, piece by piece. She still loves the tall, gentle man she leans over and kisses in the living room of his new home in an assisted living facility which she calls Jeffs house at the corner of Maitlands Derbyshire Lane knows hes not all in the room of the room while hes led to the dining room by hand, his mind lost in a daze. She talks of him in past and present tense. Today theres Jeff, proud in his red University of ively giggles as she tickles him, and who holds her in a quiet em brace as they stop to dance, just for a moment, on their way through the kitchen. But shes already said goodbye to the Jeff who knew her name. The Jeff who loved to cook her dinner. The Jeff who could walk into the room and set every one at ease. TThe perfect family There was never much strug gle to the Van Sons marriage, Mi chele said. They were meant for each other. Sweethearts-turneddevoted parents, they loved being at home. Working as a consultant for business software developer SAP, Jeff worked from a home across the country on business. When he was home, we had three meals a day together, Mi chele said. Ever the avid athlete and sports fan, hed teach his children, twins Josh and Nick, now 6 years old, and daughter Lillian, now 5, wrestling moves. Ask the twins what their dad was like and you wont hear about the business deals he saved or the big promotion he received. He was a good wrestler, said Josh, who has brown hair like his dads. Lilly says the same thing. Was daddy faking when he let his kids pin him? Nick giggles. May be, he said. Wearing his faded blue Boston Red Sox hat, Jeff would play catch with them in the yard. He built their jungle gym. He would have been their little league coach, Mi chele said. He could have been the boys scoutmaster. He had this wonderful way about him, she said. I think he loved being a dad more than any thing else. But he was also devoted to his marriage from the start, Michele said. Jeff and I have such a love sto ry, Michele said. I got so lucky. It sounds like the adventure book from the start of the DisneyPixar movie Up. They were their own adventure partners. They traveled for three weeks to go sailing in Thailand. They raced each other downhill on snowboards and on snowshoe hikes in Colorado. They worked at their marriage, they got out of hand. Instead of waiting for a big blowout argu ment, they went to couples coun seling early in their marriage, just in case. But in the last two years theyve faced something few could expect, yet hope to cope with. Slipping awayThe symptoms came slowly at solver with a keen memory, Jeff had no explanation for it when in the fall of 2009 he forgot his socks when packing for a business trip, or when he stopped winning his favorite card game, euchre, which he used to dominate. But after months of seemingly innocuous mental lapses culminated in him losing a recent promotion at his job at age 38, Michele knew something was wrong. After seeing a series of doctors who dismissed his symptoms as sis came on Dec. 2, 2009, what Michele calls their day that will live in infamy. Five days before the anniversary of the Pearl Har bor bombing, a bomb dropped on the Van Sons at Dr. Garrett Riggs cine. He spent three hours with us, Michele said. At the end of it he said this is not a 38-year-old brain. The diagnosis was frontotemporal dementia (FTD), a disease so rare it affects less than a tenth of a percent of the U.S. popula tion. Jeffs diagnosis was even more unlikely. Statistically the disease almost never strikes be fore age 45. Nurses assistant Sonia Ahmati, who has cared for dozens of dementia patients in Europe and America, said Jeff, the vital athlete who ran the Boston Marathon, was the youngest patient shes ever seen. So young as Jeff, never, Ah mati said. When I saw him here I thought he was a family member, not a patient. predictions for what it will take away and how long it will take to do it, Michele said, but the end result is the same. The frontal and temporal lobes of the brain, which control reasoning, personality, movement, speech, social graces, language and some aspects of memory, gradually disappear un til the victim loses nearly all brain function. The result is invariably terminal. When I asked the doctor whats next? he did this, Mi chele said, slowly shaking her head back and forth as her eyelash catches a tear before it rolls down her cheek. Thats when the tears came. Jeff had anywhere between two and 20 years, Riggs told them, but he couldnt predict how long Jeff would be able to talk, walk, eat or drink. In his own words, in a video in 2010 from The Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration, Jeff said hed learned to accept it. I could want life to be better, but it is what it is, he said. TThe best and worst year After the ball dropped to start 2010, the Van Sons set about mak ing a new years resolution to end all resolutions. They had no idea how long Jeff would be alive. So, sitting in a hotel room in Boston, they decided to plan everything as if there were no time left to lose. I wanted to do the work of dying so we could get on living, Michele said. Time was everything. I wasn't researching for a cure; I was looking at how do I maximize time with this man? Michele said. How do I realign Daddy's world? that after years of being the fam ilys accountant, hed hand the reins to Michele before he forgot how. They wrote a will. She asked him what his idea of heaven was like. Always devoted The Florida Blue center is brought to you by Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida, an Independent Licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. 73017-0112 FREE Health Fair FREE FREE Healthy Heart MonthFlorida Blue(Located in Winter Park Village) Get involvedThe Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration assists people living with frontotemporal degeneration and supports research to improve treatment, care and prevention. Visit theaftd.org for more information. lLOvVE | OOne neurologist told Jeff Van Sons family that he would have as few as two years left to live C OONTINUEED FROROM fFROntNT pagPAGE Please see lLOvVE on page 8 PhHOtTO bBY IsSAAcC BABcCOcCK thTHE ObsBSERvVER Jeff Van Son and wife Michele still see each other almost daily, though he has a terminal illness thats left him unable to speak. He had this wonderful way about him. I think he loved being a dad more than anything else. Michele Van Son I could want life to be better, but it is what it is. Jeff Van Son

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Page 6 Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland OObserver They sleep in motels, shelters and cars, and live off free school breakfasts and lunches and donat ed groceries. Now more students who are homeless and hungry are talking to Orange County Public As of Thanksgiving, there were 3,241-recorded homeless students in Orange County. Homelessness and hunger are problems that go hand-in-hand as two of the biggest hurdles facing students living and learning in Orange County, Homeless Educa tion Liaison for OCPS Christina Savino said. To help these kids, she said, the county, along with individual schools and partnerships with lo cal businesses and organizations, have increased the number of ser vices they have available to help needy students get by and suc ceed. These students often fall be hind, and with education really being the focus and key of get ting out of poverty and homeless ness, she said, its important to wrap them around with as many services as possible to keep them on track for graduation. From corporate-sponsored food pantries and emergency stashes of granola bars kept in teacher drawers, to stocks of surplus school supplies and an extra available jacket when its cold, Savino says every little thing helps. On a recent Friday afternoon, 26 students from Englewood El into an unassuming storage closet next to the schools auditorium. Their names were checked off a list complied by teachers and administrators as students listed as homeless or in great need, and theyre each handed a paper or plastic bag sometimes seem with six nonperishable food items to take home to feed their family over the weekend. Some of these kids during the week depend on our free break fast and lunch, but then come in again Monday after the weekend, and you know they may not have eaten since, Compliance Teacher Guadalupe Armenteros said. This way we can make sure they had food. Friday, Jan. 27, was opening day for Englewoods LOVE Food Pantry one of 30 to open in Or ange and Seminole public schools since the fall, coordinated by the Christian Service Center for Central Florida and half of its shelves are already empty. At Timber Creek High School, economics teacher Michael Rob bins and his students started their own food pantry out of a cupboard in his classroom last year, stocked with canned foods, soups, cereals and granola bars donated by the school community. Robbins says students can drop by whenever theyre in need, or students will be referred to as in need by a teacher or the schools homeless coordina tor, Jo Lynn Schall, and provided a bag of food to take with them to their families. We recognized that some students at our school didnt have enough food at home and that times are tough, so we decided we wanted to provide a helping hand, Robbins said. Students 5900 Oleander Dr., Orlando, FL 32807Thursday, Feb. 16th5 p.m. 11 p.m.$15 all you can rideFriday, Feb. 17th5 p.m. 11 p.m.Good Shepherd School Pride Night$15 all you can ride Saturday, Feb. 18th12 p.m. 11 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 19th12 p.m. 6 p.m. and caterers, as well as beer, wine and desserts Hungry, homeless students get helpSchools have launched a multitude of programs to help the hungry and homeless student population SARAH WIlsLSON OObserver Staff Please see HOmMElLEssSS on page 8 PhHOtTO bBY sSARAH wWIlsLSON thTHE ObsBSERvVER BBags of food await homeless or needy students at EEnglewood EElementary in EEast OOrlando.

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Page 7 Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland OObserver bounced back on the court with two straight wins to counter two straight losses they suffered heading into February. Now with nothing but conference play left lar season, theyre looking for a string of wins to vault them back to the top of the Conference USA ladder. devastating Palm Beach Atlantic 84-69 on Jan. 31, in a game that was dominated by UCF from the a bit in the waning minutes, they saw strong scoring from some key starters, and another big game Guard Marcus Jordan was again on his game with a 17-point, three-assist performance in only 26 minutes on the court. But it was Wilson raising eyebrows with 15 20 minutes of off-the-bench work. double double with 12 points and 10 rebounds. But it was on Feb. 4 at Dal good to right their record, storm ing to a dramatic comeback to beat SMU 59-52. In that game Jordan again led the team with 17 points, plus four rebounds. Isaiah Sykes and Tristan Spurlock dropped 15 points each, with Sykes also grab bing eight boards. Following a Wednesday showdown against Marshall at press for a second chance at Southern Miss tipping off 5 p.m. Saturday. Were back! Support the Healthy Lifestyle Initiatives of Dommerich Elementary School by participating in our 4th Annual 5K (3.1 mile) Run and 1-Mile Dash.REGISTER ONLINE AT ChiefsOnTheRun.comor download a registration form at www.des.ocps.netSATURDAY FEBRUARY 25, 2012DOMMERICH ELEMENTARY Lack of Desire or Low Energy?Testosterone Lab Work for $35 (a $240 Value) Call today for a risk-free appointment: 407-894-9959 Testosterone Lab Work for $35 (a $240 Value)Recapture Your Sexual Vitality Individual & Family health plans For an Instant Quote or to apply, visit our website www.HealthInsuranceIBS.com407-831-5166 W i n t e r P a r k R e c o v e r y C e n t e r Executive Drug & Alcohol Treatment Services Suboxone Maintenance For Opioid Abuse Naltrexone Extinction for Alcohol If It s In Your Heart To Quit2056 Aloma Ave, Suite 100, Winter Park, FL 32792 www.YourLifeRecovery.com 407-629-0413 Knights back in the groove IsISAAcC BBABcCOcCK OObserver Staff I am often asked if I will meet with someone prior to an interview to help them polish up their skills. Many people are not comfortable with the interview process and second guess them selves when it comes to answer ing questions. Recently we interviewed for a position at Christian HELP and we were very fortunate to have several great candidates. The interviews all went very well and we actually had a When it came down to it there were a few factors that we looked at above and beyond their already in place, and the second was their long-term goals and how they saw themselves growing within the organization. One of the interviewees was someone I was already connected with so she felt comfortable in the interview. This was great for both of us, but she said she is not always that comfortable in inter views. As I gave her advice, I let her know that she had done great in the process and should always be like that in an interview. Practice sample interview questions with a friend or a coach prior to interviewing. If you have no one else, use a mirror. Listen to your answers as they come out. Answers to standard questions like Tell me about yourself and What are your strengths and what are your weaknesses, should just roll off your tongue. After you leave an interview record your impressions. This will help you to improve. Also use that time to write a thank you note and re-capture what you want to emphasize from the interview and anything that you would like the interviewer to know.Sandi Vidal is the executive director for Christian HE E LP and the Central Florida EE mployment Council. Please send questions to sandi@christianhelp.org Sandi Vidal Ask SandiFeeling comfortable during the interview PhHOtTO bBY IsSAAcC BABcCOcCK ObsBSERvVER staffSTAFF Marcus Jordan has dominated in two big recent wins for UCF Knights basketball.

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Page 8 Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland OObserver cant learn if they dont know where their next meal will be coming from. In addition to food, Timber Creek as well as other local schools, like East River High School, have clothes closets available to students who might need a jacket when its cold, or new pants or shoes if theirs get worn out. The schools also have stocks of school to students as needed. The whole idea is to keep them stable at school since their situation already is what it is at home, said Yolanda Dorta, a so cial worker for OCPS.Sponsoring changeAfter CBS Minutes ran two specials on the prevalence of homelessness among students in Central Florida last year, Sarah Au, the senior specialist for Part ners in Education with OCPS, said the school board has seen an outpouring of support from local businesses and organizations to try to help students in need. It has had such a positive im pact in bringing together people who want to help and people who need help, she said. Were try ing to match up the businesses that want to help with the schools who need it. The LOVE Food Pantry installed at Englewood Elementary is an example of one of these ef forts. After viewing the specials, members of the First Baptist Church of Orlando pledged $5 million to go toward helping Cen tral Floridas hungry and home less students. Partnering with OCPS and the Christian Service Center of Central Florida, they decided the money would be best spent toward in stalling food pantries in schools in need, opening 13 in the fall of 2011. This spring, 17 more have opened across the county, each totally free to the schools they ser vice and restocked weekly. project doubled in size, Danny de Armas, senior associate pastor at First Baptist Church Orlando, said. It was not even by us giv ing any more money, but by other sponsors and businesses hear ing about it and wanting to fund more. Hours: M-F 8am to 4:30pm 2315 Lee Road Winter Park, Florida 32789 Your Guiding Beacon for Quality Healthcare Harbour Private Duty Nursing, LLCSkilled Nursing Physical Therapy Occupational Therapy Companionship Home Health Aid Homemaking Flexible Schedules Free RN Assessments The Services of Harbour Private Duty Nursing provide peace of mind to loved ones, trust ofcers, guardians and physicians. Our professional team prides itself on making your life easier. We also provide in-hospital private duty care, which offers close, personal attention and reassurance in an unfamiliar and often frightening environment. Our ofce hours are Monday through Friday, 8:00 am to 4:30 pm. Our professional team is available 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. During hours when the ofce is closed and during the weekends and holidays, the on-call coordinator is available by telephone 24 hours per day.www.HarbourPrivateDutyNursing.com License # 299991382phone (407) 895-8188 fax 407-895-9339 Classic Iron Beds AND Designer Linens 407-982-4319All iron & brass beds are made in the USA and guaranteed for 2 generations Savannah Court and CoeExcellence in Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation 1301 W. Maitland Blvd. Maitland, FL 32751407-645-3990www.SavannahCourtMaitland.comAssisted Living Facility License No. 8447 Skilled Nursing Facility License No. 1635096 Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above!A Senior Living Community where Hospitality is a Way of Life.Healthy Heart MonthThursday, Feb. 23, 2012 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.Helpful Hints to keep your heart healthy By: Vitas Healthy Snacks providedPLEASE RSVP For more information on different programs available for homeless and hungry students in OOrange County, links to the CBBS Minute specials, and how you can help, visit homeless.ocps.net Learn more HOmMElLEssSS | Community stands up C OONTINUEED FROROM pagPAGE 6 to his favorite baseball team, there was only one answer. He said, being at a Red Sox game in Fenway Park with my family and friends and a beer and a hotdog, she said. lose his ability to speak, they made videos for their children to watch when theyre older. On screen, Jeff would still be the smiling, doting father he always was, frozen in time. To them, he is still stronger, taller and faster than anyone on Earth, Michele wrote in a con tinuing diary of Jeffs condition. and I intend to help protect his identity as superhero as long as possible forever, I hope. They started daddy days at Disney, taking one child at a time to have one-on-one time with their dad in the happiest place on Earth. They went to the mountains and the beach, making as many memories as they could while they still had time. Jeffs parents sold the home hed grown up in, in Ithaca, New York, to move two doors down from their Golfside Drive home so he could move in there and they could take care of him, hosting daddy slumber parties alone with the kids. Jeff and Mi chelles parents hired a full-time babysitter, Ashley Midler, to pro vide stability and support around the house. AA community rallies Quickly word spread about Jeffs condition, radiating out ward from Winter Parks First United Methodist Church, ing friends, coworkers and even strangers who wanted to make the family as happy as possible while Jeff could still share in it. Even in this dying process I've just been inundated by mir acle after miracle after miracle, Michele said. Friends helped throw parties for Jeff and the kids on their birth days, arriving by the dozens with food and presents. When a friend and former coworker learned about the familys hope to attend a Red Sox game, they reached out to a business client who happened to be an executive with the team. Within a month, the family was in Jeffs heaven, sitting a few rows behind home plate, the sun shining on their faces. A few days before Christmas in 2010, there was a knock at the door. Another family friend had dropped dozens of Christmas presents at their door. It was everything on our list, Michele said. They gave us our whole Christmas. to cook and cook for others, Mi chelle and Jeffs mom started or ganizing to rebuild the kitchen at Jeffs house. More than $3,000 has poured in so far to help the renovation, Michele said. The project started Wednesday. The kitchen where he smiled when he saw ice cream, where he danced with Michele, will be totally new. Saying goodbyeIn the months that followed into 2011, Jeff deteriorated rapid ly. Riggs told Michele that he lost in six months what usually takes two years. Ahmati agreed. This is the fastest Ive ever seen, Ahmati said. The human body is kind of strange. You nev er know. The last time Jeff said Mi cheles name was in the summer of 2011, though she said part of him remembers the people he loves. The Jeff she can hold says it in different ways. Every time he presses his face against hers. Ev ery time he smiles when he holds the teddy bear with recordings of his children telling him they love him. The last time his children saw him, when dozens of family and friends gathered in costumes outside his new house for Hal loween of 2011, they saw a man quietly smiling, proud, happy to be loved, Michele said. Thats the image of Jeff she wants them to remember the one who still loves them, no matter where he is. But they already know where that is, Nick said. Heaven. Its where the two Jeffs come back together again. Its in the photo in Jeffs room. They can see him there, sitting in the stands at Fenway Park, watching the game in the sunshine with his family and friends. Jeff the superhero dad. Jeff the romantic. Jeff, whos waiting to say I love you. lLOvVE | Diagnosis was terminal, so they lived one great year C OONTINUEED FROROM pagPAGE 5

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Page 9 Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer To all citizens of Maitland, a heartfelt thank you for giving me the privilege to continue serving as your mayor for the next three years. During my campaign, as I walked the neighborhoods and spoke with many of you, your main directive was clear: to con tinue working toward the development of our new pedestrianfriendly downtown for all of us to enjoy. I commit to you that I will continue to work hard and do everything in my power to keep ing closely with our City Council, city boards, city staff and most im portantly, with you, our citizens to make our new pedestrian-friendly downtown a reality. four goals were clear to me. First, reunite our city Council and our citizens in order to enable us all to work together. Second, to stream line our permitting process in order to make it more attractive for development to occur in our ing of our Land Development Code (LDC) to ensure that high quality design standards were in place before development would begin. Finally, to standardize and upgrade the zoning of our down town properties to allow more city unity and streamline permitting have been achieved and the second two goals of upgrading the LDC and the rezoning of our downtown will be completed by the end of February this year. With that said, in March of this year, our city will be Open for Business and ready to begin the welcomed opportunity to work with the development community to achieve the realization of the our new downtown. The land area bordered by George Avenue to the north, Packwood Avenue to the south, U.S. Highway 17-92 to the east and Maitland Avenue to the west. Future phases from Pack wood Avenue south to Lake Lily development at this time. Since this is our new downtown, it is very important that the evaluation process for the evolution of our downtown design and the ultimate decisions that will be made in the creation of our new downtown be a team effort in cluding citizen involvement. As conceptual plans come for ward, there will be open public workshops giving all citizens the opportunity to participate. As the tiple public meetings will be held by the Design Review Committee along with multiple public hear ings by the Planning and Zoning Commission and City Council giving further input opportunities nal design will be the result of a joint effort by all of us that we can be proud of. We have already had prelimi nary meetings with a number of developers but nothing has progressed to the point of scheduling any workshops as yet. As soon as the design concept or concepts are far enough along, we will begin announcing dates for the public workshop(s). This process will continue until we feel we have a consensus of agreement for the design of our new downtown. We will then start the public hearing process as stated above. With all the interest being shown by the development community, the future prospects look extremely bright. The present re duction in land prices and con struction costs affords our best opportunity in many years for re alizing the creation of our pedes trian-friendly new downtown. We need to take advantage of it now. With my experience in architec tural design, construction and de velopment, I am looking forward to guiding and protecting our city throughout the design and con struction process. Again, thank you for your vote City Council AgendaCity Council meets the second and fourth Mondays of the month at 6:30 p.m. The next meeting is scheduled for Feb. 13 in the Coun cil Chambers, 1776 Independence Lane. Below is the agenda for that meeting. Special Presentations: Anniversary Seth Public Hearings: Downtown Maitland Zoning Dis trict ties within the Downtown Mait land Zoning District Agreement Amendment ProcessConsent Agenda Jan. 23 Commission Minutes of Dec. 8, Advisory Board Minutes of Nov. 2 and Dec. 7 tion Results tion tem CIP Decision Items: Agreement Rail Station Funded Agreement tion Joint Participation Agreement Discussion Items: quested by Councilwoman Reponen cilman Bonus For updates, visit www.itsmymaitland.comMayors Oath of Ofce Ceremony is Feb. 13Please join us for a reception on Monday, Feb. 13, from 2:30 3:30 p.m. at the Rachel D. Mur rah Civic Center to congratulate Mayor Kenneth Bradley on his reelection. Following the reception, May for his second term as Winter Park mayor. Feb. 13 City Commission Meeting topics of interestThere will be a City Commis sion meeting on Monday, Feb. 13, at 3:30 p.m., at the Rachel D. Mur W. Morse Blvd. Below are a few topics of interest:Mayors ReportBoard appointments to the BoardCity Managers ReportScheduling of the Strategic Planning SessionNon-action itemsPresentation of the December 2011 Financial ReportConsent AgendaApprove the minutes of Jan. 23. Approve various purchases and contracts (a complete list can be found at www.cityofwinter park.org > Government > City Commission > Agenda Packets). Approve the purchase of a Cisco Router necessary to enhance police department dispatch connectivity. Approve the purchase of com puter software required operating systems and four desktop com puter workstations for the police department. Approve free electric vehicle charging services for an initial with the fees to be reviewed semiannually in accordance with the fee schedule. Approve the agreement for transfer of Wastewater Service for 2021 N. Goldenrod Road and au thorize the mayor to execute the agreement.Action Items Requiring DiscussionRegulation of street musicians and performers on Park Avenue Urban Land Institute Techni cal Assistance Panel Program for West Fairbanks Redevelopment Proposed on-street dining for Public HearingsRequest of Denning Partners, Ltd., for the property at 861 W. Canton Ave.: QUASI JUDICIAL nance changing the designation of Single Family Residential to High Density Residential. changing the designation of Sin gle Family Residential to MultiFamily. Resolution Calling for a public hearing ad valorem assessment for properties abutting to fund the installation of under Resolution Delegating auBoard and under emergency conditions forward to the city manag er to negotiate code enforcement liens and to execute satisfactions or releases of code enforcement liens. First reading of the ordinance establishing parking restrictions at electric charging stations. Revise the conditions of ap proval for extension of condi tional use for the parking garage pursuant to the settlement agreement. QUASI-JUDICIAL PROCity Commission ReportsCommissioner Leary Commissioner Sprinkel Commissioner CooperProgress PointCommissioner McMacken Mayor Bradley full agenda and information on www.cityofwinterpark.org and by clicking on Government > City Commission > Packets.Make a date with your sweetheart! The merchants of Park Avenue are pleased to host the second an nual Valentine Concert featuring on Sunday, Feb. 12, from 4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., in Central Park. This free Valentine Concert is presented by Boyette, Cummins Winter Park. For more information, please call 407-644-8281 or visit www.winterpark.org KWPB grants availableKeep Winter Park Beautiful (KWPB) is now accepting Pocket Park Restoration Project grant applications. Winter Park neigh borhood and community-based groups are encouraged to apply for funds to support physical im provements such as plantings, restoration, community gardens in public spaces. This project is designed to help neighborhood organizations take ownership of their local en vironment and build a stronger community by developing and nurturing relationships among neighbors. Previous Pocket Park Restoration Projects completed in 2011 include Mead Community Garden, Laughlin Park in Hanni bal Square and Via Bella. Complete details regarding the Pocket Park Restoration Proj ect and grant applications can be found at www.kwpb.org under Projects > Pocket Park Restora tion Project. Applications will be accepted through Tuesday, May 1, For more information, please cityofwinterpark.org St. Pattys Day ParadeThe city of Winter Park and the tee are proud to present the 33rd Day Parade on Sunday, March 4, at 2 p.m., in downtown Win ter Park. Gather your family and friends and wear some green to parade in Central Florida. The pa rade will begin at the Winter Park Country Club and continue south down Park Avenue to City Hall. pate. The celebration will also fea ture Irish music and step-dancing at the main stage in Central Park with demonstrations by the Tir Na Greine School of Irish Dance and the Watters School of Irish Dance. Irish music will be provided by the Tommy Doyle Band. annual feast day to celebrate St. Patrick, the most commonly recognized patron saint of Ireland. According to Irish tradition, those who do not wear green on St. Pat fectionately pinched. This celebration is made possible by event sponsors including nity Redevelopment Agency, Fid the Irish American Cultural Society of Central Florida and Florida Distributors Company. For more information, please Visit the citys ofcial website at www. cityofwinterpark.org, nd us on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter. www.gulfstatescu.org 407-831-8844A Refreshing Alternative to Conventional Banking.9405 S. Highway 17-92 Maitland, FL 32751 Maitland City Talk bBY HowardOWARD SchiCHIEfFErdRDEckCKErR MAYOR Thank you, Maitland Winter Park City Talk bBY RandAND Y KniNIGhtHT CITY MANAGER

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Page 10 Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer FEEB. 9 The inaugural Sweet Wars is from 5-7 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 9, at Indigo Palms at 740 N. Wymore Road in Maitland. Sample an array of delicious desserts and vote on the best. Tick ets are $10 and benet the American Heart Association in honor of National Heart Month. For more information, contact jen.pouliot@fundltc.com or 407-514-1330. The Maitland Public Library will hold Asthma and Allergies A Natural Approach, an informational work shop at 6:30 p.m. Thursdays, Feb. 9, March 8 and March 15. The Central Florida Anthropological Society presents The E Evolution ary Antecedents of Obesity: Why We Are Fat Now by Dr. Leslie Sue Lieberman. It will be held at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 9, at Harry P. Leu Gardens at 1920 N. Forest Ave. in Or lando. It is free. Contact kagidusko@ hotmail.com or 321-948-3994. Winter With the Writers A Festival of the Literary Arts presents Romanian poet Mihaela Moscaliuc at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 9, at the Bush Auditorium of Rollins College, along with Poet Ilya Kaminsky. The event is free. Visit rollins.edu/winterwiththewriters The Breakthrough Theatre will present its annual Best of Broadway musical revue from Feb. 9-20. Visit breakthroughtheatre.com FEEB. 10 The historic Annie Russell Theatre at Rollins College produces Picasso at the Lapin Agile by Steve Martin, Feb. 10-18. Tickets are $20, or $10 with a student ID. Call 407-646-2145 or visit rollins.edu/annierusssell At noon on Friday, Feb. 10, there will be a brown bag matinee of Liquid Stone: Unlocking G Gaudis Secrets at the Morse Museum, located at Hugh F. and Jeannette G. McKean Pavilion, at 161 W. Canton Ave. Admission is free. Later in the day, there will be a free ute and guitar performance by the Romanze Duo from 5 to 8 p.m. FEEB. 11 From 10 a.m. 4 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 11, the Orlando Florida Blue Health Fair is offering attendees free health screenings at Florida Blue at Winter Park Village, located at 434 N. Orlando Ave. in Winter Park. FEEB. 12 The University Club of Winter Park will be hosting a reception featuring artist Rich Franco from 12-4 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 12. Admission is free. Contact 407-644-6149. Calendar V a e n i n s a y a l n d r Get the look you deserve... Contact us at 407 914 6445 Were 100% mobile Car Wash & Wax $15* Insured Business For a limited time only. Restrictions ap ply due to size and condition of vehicle. ALL IN MINIATURE & ALL FOR SALE pm Present this ad for $1 off Sunday Adult AdmissionInformation & Directions: 407-351-3500 ext. 0 or www.mollycromwell.com2012 ORLANDO DOLLHOUSE MINIATURES FESTIVAL 6515 International Drive Order on the web www.orlandobarbershopchorus.com OR order by phone (407)-831-6498 by 5 pm Feb. 12Nothing says I love you better than a Singing Valentine! greater Orlando area) and the Quartet will deliver on your message, and two beautiful songs: The Story Of The Rose (Heart Of My Heart) and Let Me Call You Sweetheart Learn from the pros about being a chocolate connoisseur at Peterbrooke Chocolatier of Winter Parks Chocolate 101 class On Feb. 12. The 90-minute class is available for up to eight guests and can also be booked privately. The cost is $40 per person. To attend, RSVP to 407-644-3200. FEEB. 10 First United Methodist Church of Win ter Park is presenting its fourth annual Broadwaybound production, a musical dinner theater event on Feb. 10 and 11. There will be selections from Mary Poppins, Cinderella, and George M. Visit www.fumcwp. org FEEB. 11 On Saturday, Feb. 11, the Orlando Science Center will host its Bee My Valentine Holiday Workshop Par ents with children ages 3-5 are wel come to attend. It will be held from 10 a.m. to noon. The cost is $25 per parent and child. Please visit www. osc.org or call 407-514-2112. Singing valentines will be performed by a quartet from the Orlando chapter of the Barbershop Harmony Society in your home, ofce or business. To schedule, order online at orlandobar bershopchorus.com or call 407-8316498. FEEB. 12 The Bach Festival Society is pleased to have 60 members of its Bach Fes tival Choir join Italian tenor Andrea Bocelli for his only Central Florida performance on Feb.12 at the Amway Center. The Orlando Concert Band will be performing a concert titled Concert From the Heart at Trinity Preparatory School from 3-4:30 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 12. It is located at 5700 Trinity Prep Lane in Winter Park. For more information, call 407-718-9333. FEEB. 15 Ms. Jacqueline Jones will present her cabaret, What is This Thing Called Love, at 7:30 p.m. on Feb. 15 and 16 as part of the Winter Park Playhouse Spotlight Cabaret Series. Tickets are $20 with a drink included. Call 407-645-0145 or visit winter parkplayhouse.org Heinigke at the Morse Feb. 14 through Feb. 3, of next year, the Morse Museum will feature a presentation titled Watercolors of Otto Heinigke A G Glass Artists Palette. This selection of more than 30 watercolors, including Beach (pictured), from the Morse Museums collection of works by American glass designer and artist Otto Heinigke (1850-1915) includes serene scenes ranging from middle-Atlantic farms and forests to ocean and river shorelines. They have never before been exhibited. Burke at MAC A&Hs Culture & Cocktails is Friday, Feb. 10, from 6 to 9 p.m., both inside and outside of the Museums Germaine Marvel Building, located at 210 W. Packwood Ave. in Mait land. Three talented artists, Cherie Dacko, Cake Marques, and Tracy Burke (work pictured), are featured at Februarys event. Admission is $5. Visit www.ArtandHistory.org or phone 407-539-2181. Valentine concert in Central Park The Park Avenue Area Association will host a Valentine Concert featuring Michael Andrew & Swingerhead from 4-6:30 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 12, at the Central Park stage, located at 151 N. Park Ave. Admission is free. Call 407-644-8281 or visit tinyurl.com/valentine-concert

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Page 11 Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Antonios Located 611 S. Orlando Ave. in Maitland, Antonio's feaa caf and market, which offers casual dining, and on the General Manager Les Callahan describes his restaurant as offering a unique culinary tour of Italy. of dishes from various regions of Italy, unlike some Italian restaurants that might focus on one area, Callahan said. He also added that all sauces are made from scratch. crowave in the building up or down, Callahan said. Day event will begin at 10 p.m. in the upstairs restaurant. smaller three-course menu, and the price of an entre will also cover the appetizer and dessert. Items featured include a wood-oven roasted cod, chicken marsala and a New York strip steak. For dessert, their selection includes Tiramisu and a walnut and golden raisin bread pudwhich entre is selected. Reservations are strongly recommended. Visit antoniosonline.comLifestyles valentine concert in Central Park Presented by:An Afternoon of Music and Romance with Michael Andrew and Swingerhead in Downtown Winter Park SPECIAL THANKS TO: Where to dine on Valentines DayContinued on page 12 AndND Y CEballosBALLOS Observer Staff the corner, some Winter Park and Maitland restaurants are boasting spe cially crafted menus and specials to From French or Italian cuisine to Spanish paella, offerings from locally owned restaurants are going head-tohead with those of the bigger restau rant chains. The hope, owners say, is residents will opt stay close to home when treating their sweethearts to dinner this year. Park Avenue are giving residents even more incentive to stay local and dine The second annual Valentine Concert in Central Park featuring Michael Andrew and Swingerhead will be pre sented at 4 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 12. Day offers: Chez Vincent/Hannibal's on the Square Square are two unique restaurants: Chez Vincent and Hannibal's on the Square. Both restaurants, serviced by the same kitchen, are owned by Chef Vincent Gagliano and his wife, Teri. Both eateries offer traditional French cuisine, but offer its own ambiance and feel. Chez Vin cent offers formal dining, while a more casual, yet sophisticated experience. have to sit at the bar and have a full meal. They can just have some appetizers, Gagliano said. He also said his restaurant features live music from Wednesday to Saturday. cial menu available at either location on this day. The courses will consist of an appetizer, salad, entre mignon with Cognac sauce and rack of lamb with a blue cheese sauce. One appetizer included is a cream of butternut squash soup with crispy bacon. The dessert will be a dark chocolate cake with an Anglais crme and a raspberry coulis. The price is $70 per person and reservations are strongly recommended. Visit chezvincent.com and hannibalslounge.com Pairing romance with food

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Page 12 Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer FamilyCalendar Its TAX time. Appointments Available 7 Days a Week!Tax Form Processing LLC2400 N Forsyth Rd., Suite 101 Orlando, FL 32807Tel: (407) 657-6336www.TaxFormProcessing.com Proudly Serving the Orlando Area for 17 years! Scan QR Code mi Tomatina mi Tomatina Paella Bar offers a wide selection of paellas and tapas, as well as a selection of soups and salads. Paella is a type of rice dish from Spain that is cooked with a variety of ingredients. One example is the Paella Negra, which is cooked with chicken, shrimp, calamari, mussels and roasted pimentos. Tapas are appetizers that are unique to Spain. Stuart Kirban, co-owner of mi Tomatina, said all paellas are made from scratch with fresh ingredients and are cooked to order. He said they will use their normal menu this year, but will offer a free champagne toast. He chose to do this in order to stay true to what his restaurant is known for. Kirban said. And when we do a pre-set menu, people are kind of disappointed. They come here for those items bePrices for tapas range from $6 to $16, and the paella prices Reservations are not required but strongly recommended. Visit mitomatina.comParis Bistro Located at 216 N. Park Ave., Paris Bistro features its own offerings of traditional French offer a four-course meal, including an appetizer, salad, entre and dessert. For the appetizer, customers may choose between baked Brie with apple compote or lobster brandy bisque. There will be a goat cheese, date and spinach salad with orange vinaigrette offered, and the entres including a honey-herb roasted Cornish game hen and a New Zealand Rack of Lamb with porcini sauce. Tatiana Cerruto, owner of Paris Bistro, said the rack of lamb is one of the lunch to dinner, Cerruto said. She also said enjoying wine along with the food can make the experience even more enjoyable. SoNapa GGrille cation in Maitland offers a range of dining options, such as restaurant. in wines from Sonoma County and Napa Valley, Barringer said. The wine selection includes whites and reds, which can be ordered as half a glass, a full glass or the bottle. Barringer said they will serve off of their main menu for with a black cherry port wine reduction. They will also serve a heart-shaped ravioli dish, stuffed with buffalo mozzarella cheese and topped with an Alfredo cream sauce. Dinner specials will begin at 4 p.m. and end at 11 p.m. Although reservations are not required, Barringer recom mends them. Visit sonapa.com The Morse Museum will have a family tour at 5:15 p.m. on Fri day, Feb. 10. Learn about Louis Comfort Tiffany and American art of the late 19th and early 20th centuries in a docent-guided tour of the galleries. There will also be an Art Demonstration at 6 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 10, at the McKean Pa vilion of the Morse Museum. Glass artist Lee Taylor will demonstrate glassmaking techniques. Receive a free take-home art activity. The Childrens Art & History Festival is from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 11, at the A&Hs Maitland Art Center, located at 231 W. Packwood Ave. Meet Mr. Waterhouse, a one-man play that teaches about the life of William Waterhouse, will be held at 1 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 12, in front of the Waterhouse Residence Museum, located at 820 Lake Lily Drive. Visit artandhistory.org Touch-A-Truck is 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 11, at 1300 W. Maitland Blvd. in Maitland. Admission is $5 (Family pays a maximum of $20). Visit www.or angewood.org/touchatruck The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens will host an Open House event from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 11, and 1 to 3 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 12. It is located at 633 Osceola Ave. in Winter Park. Call 407-647-6294. The Florida Young Artists Orches tra will perform A Concert From the Heart at Trinity Preparatory School from 3 to 4:30 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 12. It is located at 5700 Trinity Prep Lane in Winter Park. Visit ArtsFestFl.com or call 407257-8886. The G Great Duck Derby features a series of rubber duck races and free family activities on Saturday, Feb. 18. The Peabody Ducks will start with a march to the Amphi theater at 10 a.m. The little yellow rubber ducks will race in the Mead Garden pond off Howell Creek at 12:15 and 1 p.m. Admission and activities are free. Please join Maitland Public Library for our second Annual Tween/ Teen Mardi G Gras Dance Party on Saturday, Feb. 18, from 7-9 p.m. Enjoy a live DJ, Wii gaming and electronic visualizations. Its open to students in fth through eight grade. Admission is free. Masks and costumes are encouraged but not mandatory. Call 407-6477700 or email jdolce@maitland publiclibrary.org The Crosby Observatory, atop the Orlando Science Center, is open for seasonal sky watching from 5 to 9 p.m. every rst and third Saturday until Feb. 18. Admission includes a live planetarium show. Tickets are $10. Call 407-5142000 or visit www.osc.org.Send submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com

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Page 13 Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Feb. 10 Culture & Cocktails 6 to 9 p.m. at 210 W. Packwood Ave. in Maitland. Three supertalented artists Cherie Dacko, Cake Marques, and Tracy Burke are featured at this event. Dacko works in what she calls bent realism, creating surreal subjects in three-dimensional scenes, while Marques paints very untraditional subjects in the very traditional method of oil on board. Burke works in two dimensions on canvas, using her own recipe of oil paints and additives. Music will be provided dHistory.orgFeb. 10-12 Battle of the Sexes Director Robert Hill put Cen season when he created a series of sexy ballets for a program he called Battle of the Sexes. Working with bodies that stretch and exercise every day as part of their job, the idea was received with standing ovations with Hill bringing sexy back Florida presented by the Orlando Ballet, will take place Feb. 10-12 at the Bob Carr Performing Arts Center in Orlando. Call 407-426-1739 or orlandoballet.org Feb 11 Luv SuxThe volunteers who make up the Orlando Circle of Friends and will produce their questionably tasteful annual fundraiser called Luv Sux III at 8 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 11. If your experience with love has left you confused, befuddled or just plain messed up, the Circle of Friends wants to make it even cabaret is made up of songs about the misfortunes of love, sung by the wrong people. Prepare to be strangely entertained as their mismatched singers bemoan the horrors of that fateful February day. The cabaret will take place at 398 West Amelia St. in Orlando. For tickets, visit ocofchorus.com Feb 12 Valentine Concert in Central ParkThe merchants of Winter easy (and free) to make a Valen tine date with your sweetheart by presenting the second annual Val entine Concert in Central Park. Sponsored by Boyette, Cummins super-talented Michael Andrew and Swingerhead in an outdoor concert at 4 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. and his better-than-Sinatra voice. Michael was the headline singer for two years at the Rainbow Room atop Rockefeller Center in New York City. The Central in Winter Park. Feb 15 to 26 Billy EElliot the Musical who is training to be a boxer, because his hard-drinking father wants him to be something more than an out-of-work factory bloke. But Billy discovers and becomes obsessed with the world of ballet. While his family comes to terms with this strange (for them) career path, Billy gets a shot at a scholarship with a prestigious dance school. The event is at the Bob Carr Performing Arts 26. Visit ticketmaster.com Feb 15 and 16 By popular demand, Ms. Jacqueline Jones She may be the best known and best-loved singer in all of Central Florida, and now the incomparable Ms. Jacqueline Jones is back to present her cabaret act What is This Thing at 7:30 p.m., as part of the Winter Park Playhouse Cabaret Series. Patrons can't get enough of her fabulous voice, wit and charm, Director Heather Alexander said. Seating is limited, so reservations are recommended. Tickets are $20 and include one drink. Call playhouse.orgJosh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906. FEATURING THE BACH FESTIVAL CHOIR AND ORCHESTRA AND BACH SCHOLAR DR. CHRISTOPH WOLFF JOHN V. SINCLAIR ARTISTIC DIRECTOR AND CONDUCTOR WED LIKE TO GIVE SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR 77TH ANNUAL FESTIVAL SPONSORS: 445 north park avenue winter park, orida 32789 (407) 645-5311follow us on www.morsemuseum.org The NewMorseat theTIFFANY WingFree Friday Nights 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.The Morse Museums new galleries feature 200 art and architectural objects from Louis Comfort Tiffanys Long Island estate, Laurelton Hall. Coming up February 10 Live Music 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Family Tour 5:15 p.m. Glassmaking Demonstration 6 p.m. Curator Tour 7 p.mNow Open This week at Enzian1300 SOUTH O RLANDO A VE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.E NZIAN.ORG Held Over! 10 Academy Award Nominations! THE ARTIST Fri Sun 3:45PM 6:30PM 9:15PM Mon, Wed, Thurs 6:30PM 9:15PM Tue 6:30PM Saturday Matinee Classics ROMEO AND JULIET Sat 12 NOON Valentines Day Brunch & Film AN AFFAIR TO REMEMBER Sun 10:00AM Cult Classics EVERYTHING YOU AL WA YS WAN TED TO KNOW ABOUT SEX Tue 9:30PM Josh Garrick Culture worthy of your calendarCan your heart handle all the choices? Jacqueline Jones

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Page 14 Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Opinions a special dinner or movie date, or even just a card, most people Day-related purchase each year. Add it all up, and you have one very special day for retailers who cater to the holiday. What makes this even sweeter to those in the love business and the struggling economy is that according to a survey by the National Retail Federation, each American will spend an average of $123 on their Valentine this last year. Combined spending Happily for the economy, this spending trend the country has seen recently. A December NRF report said holiday season spending was expected to rise 3.8 percent from the previous year to $469 billion. Black Friday sales 2010. When people have more as much, which is good news for romantics everywhere. are shelling out the big bucks to While they do represent the bulk to spend an average of $74.12 on their other half up from $68.98 last year the average American dren, parents and other relatives, this year. Another good sign for the economy is that more people end stores to get their love loot. Discount stores are still expected ment stores, which is up from 30 percent last year. The usual suspects will likely purchases Godiva chocolate, that way. Those planning to go all out for their sweethearts should consider plunking some of that dough into the local economy a great way to show affection for a loved one and the hometown. So many small businesses are of fering unique gifts and experiences that can satisfy any Valentine. but after so many years of economic doom and gloom, a sign of light is lovely.Minority speaks outCongratulations to Ken Bradley and to everyone that voted for him. You have received a mandate to continue business as usual. So when you see one more parcel of your land given away, zoning changes made and more density close to our treasured downtown, do not blame the minority that tried to make you see what is happening. Basically Florida Hospital and the Adventist Health System now own our willing to be informed and brave enough to step forward, our Winter Park will until it is too late.Sally Flynn Winter Park Push for two-way communicationWhile I genuinely appreciated Ms. Miles sending out an email congratulating Mayor Bradley on his reelection, I in selecting the Winter Park Observer sentence published Feb. 2) and Letters listed in her thank you email piece sent Feb. 4 (especially the link in support of Newt Gingrich). Her statement that, they offer valuable insights into city govern ment and the electoral process, sounded a bit hollow given that she did not include cally the one by Ms. Heidrich (Commu nication strong published Jan. 11), which notes that the city of Winter Park offers more than 30 venues for public input and participation regarding city government issues. More importantly, if Ms. Miles is a lessons learned experience, I would offer the following advice: provide a venue for two-way communication and the archiving of opinions from all sides. In fact, I would suggest that she ask one of her most ardent supporters (a sitting Win ter Park commissioner) to do the same. Said commissioner currently sends out a monthly editorial email newsletter with a one-way direction of communication that, while offering the option to send in an opinion, does not provide archival capability, which would allow us full and open view from all sides now that would really be a great example of providing valuable insight into what the 70 percent who voted for Mayor Bradley were really Ed Sabori Winter ParkNew biz opens offer live jazz six days a week, has opened ing the air is that of splendid tapas Chef while the bouquet of our wine selections Rory and Cathy Frazier brought a little bit of the New York Jazz scene to our back Cindy Jeffers Manager, Jazz TastingsLearn how women fooled the doctor female education will produce mon thoughts and constipated bowels. Now in 2012 women have completed advanced education courses but they also have endured sexual discrimination and harass ment from that date even up to today. The American Association of Univer released Crossing the Line: Sexual Harassment at School in November. Within three weeks, this research was covered in more than 1,300 news outlets including The New York Times and The Washington Post, TV and radio appearances includ ing National Public Radio, CNN, CBS, ABC and PBS News. Time Magazine, U.S. Week also featured stories on the AAUW report focusing on sexual harassment and discrimination in how students are treated by other students and even by faculty, especially at the seventh grade through high school levels. The American Association of Univer sity Women has awarded eight LAF Campus Outreach Grants to colleges connected to AAUW branches across the country, Branch with the University of Central Florida, through a grant submitted by Dr. M.C. Santana, associate director of visual arts and designs. Come and learn what educated women do today: did you know women now Learn more at our breakfast meeting at the First Congregational Church Fellowship Avenue, in Winter Park, at 9 a.m. on Satur day, Feb. 11. Contact 407-282-1023 to make a reservation.Rosemary Vendena Finance/Treasurer AAUW Orlando/Winter Park BranchInvesting in Americas youthBenjamin Franklin once said, An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Though he was originally offer youth. Numerous studies show that the counties in their youth, such as homelessness, abuse, drug and alcohol dependence, and poor academic achievement. By helping to guide youth away from these troubles and toward a better future, we stand a better chance of helping them avoid greater difIn 2011, Goodwill Industries of Central Florida paired 146 young people with mentors in the local area. These youth had the opportunity to learn career develop ment, job readiness training, communications and presentation skills, and GoodGuides youth mentoring program. states, all of which have a long history of work, are helping 12to 17-year-olds de velop the skills they will need to complete school and move into successful careers. In every community in which it oper ates, including here in Central Florida, Goodwill generates opportunities for people to achieve economic stability, and build strong families and vibrant communities by offering job training programs, employment placement services and other community-based programs for people who have disabilities, lack education or job experience, or face employment chal lenges. Through GoodGuides, Goodwill is enabling youth who are at-risk for delin life. Once enrolled in the program, youth are paired with trusted, caring volunteer tor provides a supportive ear and guidance that can lead youth to opportunities and resources they need to prepare for post-secondary education and employ ment. In addition to four hours of monthly mentoring, young people take part in activities to build career awareness and development. The program serves young people who are least likely to have trusting relation ships with adults and peers due to a variety of risk factors, such as failure in school due to poor grades or low atten dance, prior juvenile delinquency, family violence and other challenges. Ultimately, the program offers these youth a pathway out of poverty and crime. The purpose of Goodwill GoodGuides is to make sure the vast majority of young people coming through the program do not offend or reyouth, if we can apply an ounce of preof cure later. Just one hour a week to mentor a young person in our community can make all the difference. If you would like to be come a mentor or if you know of a youth Bill Oakley, CEO Goodwill Industries of Central Florida Our Observation King Features Weekly ServiceFebruary 6, 2012 Letters to the editor Send your thoughts (400 words or less) to Managing Editor Jenny Andreasson at editor@observernewspapers.comLove doesnt stink for merchants Those planning to go all out for their sweethearts should consider plunking some of that dough into the local economy a great way to show affection for a loved one and the hometown. Provide a venue for twoway communication and the archiving of opinions from all sides. Ed Sabori

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Page 15 Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer in the air and so is spending. AccordSaving Tracker, Americans will fork over 8 percent more than last year to celebrate of all consumers planning to purchase ers reign supreme as the No. 1 token of affection constituting 29 percent of all presents exchanged jewelry is the top retail item that consumers gift to loved ones each year. However, shopping for jewelry can be tricky and a little daunting. When faced with a case full of shiny baubles, high quality as they appear, or are grossly overpriced relative to their true value. Here are a few tips to help those of you planning to give your loved ones rings, necklaces and other items, to ensure that Understand the terminology and important facts. Before you walk into get confused and led astray by technical terminology that salespeople use. For example, when shopping for diamonds, a good rule of thumb is to follow all of the Cs carat, clarity, color and cut to determine the true quality of the stone. Websites for organizations like the Gemological Institute of America and the Jewelry Information Center pro vide information and tutorials that will empower you to make sound purchasing decisions and ensure that you leave the store with a high-quality piece. People often hesitate at the notion of buying pre-owned jewelry. However, all jewelry can be refurbished and returned to new condition. Best of all, buying a pre-owned piece in a store can save a of the original or new price without losing any of the value. For example, at carry several pre-owned rings, Rolexes and other high-end pieces in impeccable condition for a fraction of the prices that the same items cost brand new. And with precious metal prices skyrocketing, who Get written appraisals on all biga new home without an inspection, you without getting it appraised. A good rule of thumb is to visit an independent appraiser for any item that costs $1000 gemologists and appraisers through the website. Also, ensure that you complete the process within the time your seller allots for returns, just in case the item is not up to snuff. With just a little preparation and a few precautions, you can ensure that you walk out of a jewelry retailer with a love. And be sure to talk up the leg work involved it just may earn you some Lawrence Kahlden is the president and CEO of La Familia Pawn and Jewelry. Chris Jepson Perspectives If this is as you are Take your pick is a human construct. At some point in our development as a species, a distant ancestor took that gush of lung air and articulated a feeling, a thought, an expres sion. A warning perhaps. A rush of ex pressed pain. A rudimentary sentiment of emotion. Who knows the word(s) uttered. Lost in the ether. My third child skipped single words virginal mind and mouth. Does that not express the quintessential essence of humanity? Anyone who ever experienced an older sibling gets the sentiment. It is through language that we build our world. It constructs our universe. It reveals the unknowable. It forms our jump of imagination it was when that distant evolutionary cousin so long ago introduced God into the human equation. How else to explain what was then unknowable, but to an unknowable super entity, God? And as our language grew, so did the attributes of our god(s). Powerful beyond description. Omnipotent. Omniscient. Omnipresent. All powerful. All knowing. All present. And that is the premise I can not buy. I recently saw a marvelous movie, Brad Pitt and Sean Penn star, but it is the female lead, Jessica Chastain, who rightly commands our attention. She is the mother of three boys and wrestles with meaning, but that should not prevent one from embracing its artistic pleasures, its humanity. A line softly uttered early in the movie goes to the heart of the human predica should heal. This is a statement questionAnd it is a fundamental question we should all ask of God. The words attributed to God are Omnipotent. Omniscient. Omnipresent. If you are God, you know everything that will ever be, you cannot create a mountain you cannot lift and you are everywhere for all time. So why, if this is as you are, would you not ever so slightly tweak the human model? Knowing what you know? If you knew that on June 8, 1972 American pilots would open their bomb bay doors and rain napalm on sleeping Vietnamese peasfrom the arms of screaming innocence (children) as they ran from their burning huts why not tweak the model? Why not ever so slightly change that which you claim to so love? question masterfully, actually. Just look at the beauty of the universe. As life con sumes us all, in every sorrowful iteration, the universe displays its glory (beauty) in No, actually I do not see. The words we He deals deuces to some and aces to oth ers. A rigged game. Yet none of us get to sit it out. We either need a new croupier or a new vocabulary. I opt for words.Jepson is a 24-year resident of Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@ MEDIAmerica.USThe excellent Minnesota Symphony Osmo Vanska and Midori violinist soloist, will play a special concert at 8 p.m. on Friday, March 9, at the Bob Carr Perform ing Arts Center. This performance will be dedicated to the memory of David and Libby Roberts. David, a classmate of mine at Harvard (1942), was founding director Charitable Foundation.Trip to fameOur neighbor and great pal Victor Mo rel will drive b.w. and me to Tallahassee in late March for the governor to induct me into the Florida Artists Hall of Fame. Such awards do not make one rich or famous perhaps, but they are vitamins for Winter Park ashbackAs a boy, I saw much of Winter Park from the water while paddling my canoe through the lakes and canals. Winter fourth dimension causes relic scenes of my childhood to speak to me in whispers from the past. Downtown Winter Park was a quaint a shoe repair shop and a watchmaker near the Baby Grand movie house. Movie theaters were quite different in the days before air-conditioning, but plenty of people stuck it out to see Betty Davis, Clark Gable, Jimmy Cagney, Norma Shearer and the rest. Without television one had to leave his house in order to be transported to faraway places, the way one can now do in his own living room. Wealthy Winter Parkers, often with visored chauffeurs, drove slowly around town in Cadillacs, Lincolns, PierceArrows, Franklins, Graham-Paiges, Hispano-Suizas, Auburns, Jordans, Cords, Rolls-Royces and other exotic autos. ing ailing cars. I graduated from grammar school on Park Avenue in 1932 and moved on to junior high and high school all in two buildings on Huntington Avenue where a giant school complex now stands. below the high school, and played our herd Field, which also housed big league football games were played on Tinker Field in Orlando, the name being taken Chance who were the most celebrated double-play combination in the history of baseball. The place where we all swam was ing from the shore of Lake Virginia. An occasional seaplane, with both wheels and pontoons, would take off or land on the lake. Rollins students were, for the most part, from well-off families up North, many having come to Rollins after being unsuccessful in entering Ivy League schools. For a long time, Rollins had the reputation true or not true of hav ing no examinations and no grades. I devoted much effort convincing guys I lived with at Harvard that Rollins was not a snap school, as some had heard. improved immensely, and the college is now highly respected everywhere. There were no food stamps or welfare in those days, and people were generous to those who needed help. Some Winter Park land, now invaluable, was going for as little as $10 an acre but who had $10?About Roney: HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney)Louis Roney Play On! Jewelry tips to keep the sparkle LawrAWREncNCE KahldAHLDEnN Guest Writer Lawrence Kahlden DELIGHTEd D TO SEE THIS GROWTH IN MY COMMUNITY! CCONGRATULATIONS ANd D GOOd D LUCK TO ALL OF THESE NEW BUSINESSES! LLAURA CCONNAUGHTON Heres what a reader on the web said about the article Maitland plaza hits 100 percent capacity published on wpmobserver.com on Feb. 1 and printed in this issue: Have an opinion? Send your thoughts (400 words or less) to Managing Editor Jenny Andreasson at editor@observernewspapers.com

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Page 16 Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Emergency Services 24Whats Your Emergency???2012 has started with a bang for local Orlando based Emergency Services 24 (ES24). With expansion into South Florida and the Tampa region ES24 has been steadily assisting property owners in their time of need after suffering unexpected water damage or re damages to their buildings. This is the season for building res but with the mild weather there has been a drop in house or commercial building res. The cold weather usually creates more hazards to buildings as replaces, space heaters and other electric overloads create the potential for unexpected res. We have been running around the clock eld supervisor Brian Honea states. The water losses to homes have been steady enough to keep all of trucks servicing properties 24/7. We can be at any property within 30 minutes in the metro area with crews to extract water, keep properties from further damage and get owners back to normal as quickly as possible. ES24 has ofces in Orlando, Boca Raton, and Tampa and is expanding into Naples/Fort Meyers and Jacksonville this year. ES24 also services the Atlanta metro area with ofces in Atlanta, Athens and Macon along with Birmingham Alabama. ES24 specializes in building loss recovery and stabilization due to any catastrophic event that can happen. Pipe Breaks, Floods, Fires or natural disasters never stop. Our new motto of Whats Your Emergency says it all. We will handle any building crisis, quickly, professionally and get any property back to normal as efciently as possible.Contact our 24 hour emergency number 877-936-8998 and visit our website today, http://www.waterdamage24.com 400 S PARK AVENUE, Suite 210 WINTER PARK, FL 32789 407-697-8796 CELL Glenda.massie@floridamoves.com HOME COMES WITH A ONE YEAR HOME WARRANTY Located on expansive 75x150 corner lot this same owner since 1973 home has been upgraded and meticulously maintained. Fabulous opportunity to live well in this quality constructed residence or bring plans to build in this most sought after neighborhood. 1738 Sq Ft plus 18x11 bonus space not in footage. Offered at $325,000 400 S PARK AVENUE, Suite 210 WINTER PARK, FL 32789 407-697-8796 CELL Glenda.massie@floridamoves.com HOME COMES WITH A ONE YEAR HOME WARRANTY Located on expansive 75x150 corner lot this same owner since 1973 home has been upgraded and meticulously maintained. Fabulous opportunity to live well in this quality constructed residence or bring plans to build in this most sought after neighborhood. 1738 Sq Ft plus 18x11 bonus space not in footage. Offered at $325,000 HomesObserver Homes brought to you by: Fannie Hillman + AssociatesServing Central Florida for over 31 years! 407-644-1234 fanniehillman.com EExterior home replacement projects are worthy of investment With construction costs rising and the hassles associated with taking on a reno vation project, many homeowners can be reluctant to tackle certain projects when it comes to remodeling their home. How ever, according to the 2011-12 Remodeling Cost vs. Value Report, several inexpensive exterior replacement projects are not only also expected to recoup close to 70 percent of costs upon sale of the home. ously outperform other remodeling proj ects in terms of resale value, especially siding, window and door replacements, says Orlando Regional Realtor AssociaCentral Realty. These types of projects are considered essential to regular home maintenance so homeowners will need to implement them anyway to keep their house functioning properly. Many exterior replacement projects have the added bonus of instantly adding curb appeal, which is important to those looking to sell. The 2011-12 Remodeling Cost vs. Value Report compares construction costs with remodeling projects in 80 markets across the country. Realtors provided their insight into local markets and buyer home prefer ences within those markets. According to Baker, the desirability and resale value of different remodeling projects naturally varies by region and metropolitan area. There are regional dif ferences when it comes to the resale value of particular remodeling projects. Realtors can help homeowners decide what low-cost improvement investments will provide the most upon resale in their particular market. value is just one factor among many that homeowners must take into account when making a decision to remodel. Seven of the top 10 most cost-effective projects nationally in terms of value re couped are exterior replacement projects, in particular siding replacement, front entry door replacement, and garage door replacements. Three interior remodeling projects are also considered worthy invest ments: an attic bedroom remodel, a minor kitchen remodel, and the addition of a wood deck. To view the Orlando section of the 201112 Remodeling Cost vs. Value Report, go to www.orlrealtor.com and click on the For Home Sellers option under Consumers. ORRA

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Page 17 Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Cuchaci designs Trufes Cuhaci & Peterson Architects Engi neers Planners did the design work for the new Trufes G Grill restaurant that recently opened at the Winter Park Village. Lonnie Peterson, chairman at Cu haci & Peterson Architects said the work included construction drawings for interior design and improvements for the 3,500 square foot restaurant. MLS service relocates to MaitlandMy Florida Regional MLS (MFRMLS), Floridas largest multiple listing ser vice, relocated its corporate head quarters from Orlando to Maitland on Feb. 6. This relocation marks a signi cant moment for MFRMLS, as our new location will offer enough space for onsite local Member training, as well as corporate growth, stated Bill Dryburgh, My Florida Regional MLS Board President. MFRMLS currently employs over thirty-ve employees who will occupy space at the new corporate headquarters while continuing to provide service to over 32,000 Members. Due to the relocation, the MFRMLS local phone and fax numbers will change: New address: 555 Winderley Place, Suite 320, Maitland, FL 32751 New phone: 407-960-5300 New fax: 407-960-5450 Toll free number: 800-686-7451Fannie Hillman voted bestFannie Hillman + Associates continued to demonstrate why it was voted Central Floridas Best Resi dential Real Ofce in 2011 by Or lando Business Journal by posting 88 fourth quarter transactions for a vol ume of nearly $30.2 million, boost ing the Winter Park companys 2011 transactions of 374 for $139 million by 10.7 percent and 27.7 percent, re spectively, over 2010. Fourth quarter transactions and sales volume were up 10 percent and 9.5 percent, respectively, over the nal quarter last year, making it the companys eighth consecutive quar ter in which transactions and sales volume have been up over compa rable periods in previous years. It also was the third consecutive year the rm has seen its transactions and sales volume continue to improve. The way things were trending for the existing home market as we moved through 2011 gives us every reason for continued optimism in 2012. As long as interest rates remain low and the inventory of distressed properties continues to be reduced, we should see existing home prices appreciate in 2012, said Scott Hillman, president of the 31-year-old independent rm recognized as one of Central Floridas top residential real estate brokerages and a leader in the sale of luxury lakefront residences, primarily in Winter Park, Maitland and College Park. Fannie Hillmans 88 fourth quar ter transactions last year were high lighted by the sale of a $4.9 million home on Winter Parks Lake Osceola, and gave the company a total of 23 million-dollar-plus sales in Central Florida for the year. The companys average trans action for the fourth quarter was $342,700, while the average trans action for the year penciled out at $371,600, up 14.5 percent. For the year, 17 Fannie Hillman sales associates posted sales of more than $3 million, led by the team of Nancy Bagby, Sue Ann Rand and Julie Bagby Williams with sales of $25.7+ million. They were followed by the team of Mary Stuart Day and Megan Cross at $12.8+ million, Me lissa Woodman and Jerry Oller each at $5.5+ million, Katherine Borde lon $4.8+ million, Glad Messeroff $4.59+ million, Janis Fuller $4.54+ million, Shirley Jones $4.2+ million, Cathy Richey $3.7+ million, Meg Dolan $3.6+ million, Dawn Romance $3.58+ million, Maria Van Warner $3.54 million, Sharon Helsby $3.46+ million, Lisa Fleming $3.40 million, Kelly Maloney $3.2+ million, and Jeff Hall $3.0 million.Sodexo lease renewed EEmerson International recently closed on a renewal lease for 18,212 square feet of ofce space at Lake side Ofce Park, 283 Cranes Roost Blvd. in Altamonte Springs. Sean Westcott, director of leasing at Em erson International, negotiated the renewal lease with Sodexo Operations, LLC. Mohl Partners participated in the lease negotiations representing Sodexo.Town homes on marketAshton Woods Homes in Maitland recently completed two models and started sales of 24 town homes priced from the $219,000 in the rst phase at Fountain Park, located off Rinehart Road in Lake Mary. Michael Roche, vice president of sales and marketing at Ashton Woods Homes, said the new three and four bedroom town homes at Fountain Park range in size from 2,067 square feet of living space to 2,504 square feet with two car garages and balco nies. Roche said six ready-to-move-in town homes will open in February. New Cuchaci team membersCuhaci & Peterson Architects LLC, based in Orlandos Baldwin Park, ap pointed four professionals to its design and project teams. Tina Kennedy, director of human resources at Cuhaci & Peterson, said Christian Paulo was appointed a CAD technician. Paulo earned his Associate of Science degree in computer drafting and design from ITT Tech nical Institute and has two years of experience. Jose Diaz, E E.I. was named senior mechanical designer. Diaz earned is Bachelor of Science degree in me chanical engineering from the Uni versity of Puerto Rico in 2003 and has more than seven years of experi ence. Lee Murrah was appointed proj ect coordinator. Murrah, who attended the University of Alabama, Seminole Community College and Brevard Community College, served in the U.S. Army Airborne Infantry in Iraq where he received awards for outstanding service and bravery. Jaison Moras was appointed electrical project manager. Moras earned his Bachelor of Science de gree in electrical engineering from the University of Kansas.Send submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com Jeff ClarkColdwell Banker Residential407.733.0773j.clark@coldwellbanker.com www.BaldwinParkLiving.com New Construction!4 bed / 2.5 bath / 2190 sq ft $339,000 808 Hamilton Place Court Winter Park, FL 32789 Commerce Brokerage, LLC407-566-1636 Real EEstate Briefs The Festival and Trade Expo will bring homebuyers, builders, lenders, realtors, and industry support organizations together on one fun -filled afternoon in beautiful Maitland. The goal of this event is to sell lots of real estate, boost our local economy, and have fun doing it. The festival will have small business exhibitors from all over the greater Orlando area. The B2B and B2C networking opportunities at this event will be limitless. We anticipate 1000s of attendees from all segments of our community, but our primary focus is to attract individuals and families wanting and needing to purchase a home of their own. There will also be a huge number of local real estate professionals attending, trying to locate new home opportunities for their buyers. In addition, there will be a number of resources available to help foreclosure victims, defend and possibly WIN their foreclosure case. Everyone can take advantage of our delicious appetizers, graciously provided by a dozen local restaurants. We will also have hot dogs and hamburgers provided by FutureTech Financial. Also, FutureTech and our participating exhibitors will be giving away thousands of dollars in door prizes throughout the event: gift cards, products, services, and even free Bahamas cruises. Every individual attendee receives a free game of bowling at AMF Altamonte Lanes. Our event is being held on February 16, 2012 at the Home Builders Association of Metro Orlando, 544 Mayo Avenue, Maitland, Florida 32751. Festival hours are between 3:00pm and 7:00pm. For more information please visit: The Lets Buy a Home Festival and Trade Expo will bring homebuyers, builders, lenders, The B2B and B2C We anticipate 1000s of attendees from all segments of our community, but our primary focus is to There will also be a huge number of local real estate professionals attending, trying to locate new home opportunities Everyone can take advantage of our delicious appetizers, graciously provided by a dozen local restauand our participating exhibitors will be giving away thousands of dollars in door prizes throughout the For more information please visit: FutureTech Financial, Inc. 407-628-9888 or Trufes GGrill

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Page 28 Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012 Winter Park / Maitland Observer FREEComplete Door Maintenance with any Service 407-780-1691 Orlando, FL Adversing Networks of Florida Statewide advertisingone low price THG-11909