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Winter Park-Maitland observer
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00190
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park FL
Publication Date: 12-08-2011
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates: 28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID: UF00091444:00190

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BUS_CARD 3.25 x 2 August 2010Grafton Wealth ManagementWilliam D. Grafton III, Sarah Grafton DeVoe William D. Grafton IV Financial Advisors (407) 646-6725 400 Park Avenue South Suite 300 Winter Park, FL 32789 Merrill Lynch Wealth Management makes available products and services offered by Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated (MLPF&S) and other subsidiaries of Bank of America Corporation. MLPF&S is a registered broker-dealer, member SIPC. Investment products: 2010 Bank of America Corporation. All rights reserved. Are Not FDIC InsuredAre Not Bank GuaranteedMay Lose Value 407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC USPS 00-6186 Publisher statement on page 4. Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011 50+ tax wpmobserver.comSubscribe now!Visit wpmobserver.com About 250 Winter Park resi Her vision Mom says thanks for helping her son collect 5,666 pounds of Halloween candy for our deployed soldiers.Page 18Opinions Lifestyles Winter Park Crew celebrates its 50th birthday with an alumni race for the community on Saturday, Dec. 17.Page 13 Culture CalendarBorders of Paradise: The New World in the Eyes of Explorers opens Friday at the Maitland Historical Museum.Page 17 Holiday Calendar The Winter Park Boat Parade & Festival of Lights includes a water ski show on Lake Virginia on Saturday.Page 15 Santa at the Casa PhHOtTO bBY JENNY ANDREAssoSSON theTHE ObseBSERveVER Christmas at the Casa was held on Thursday, Dec. 1, at Casa Feliz and featured hot cocoa, cookies and photos with Santa.See more photos from last weeks events on page 10. Cities aim to ban smoking IsSAAcC BAbcocBCOCK OObserver Staff Please see TobOBAccoCCO on page 7 PhHOtTO bBY JENNY ANDREAssoSSON theTHE ObseBSERveVER Winter Park mayoral candidate N Nancy Miles speaks with residents about her vision for the city at a campaign kickoff party at the Winter Park Community Center on Monday. Please see mMAYo OR on page 5Mayoral race kicks offMiles pledges to build consensus on dais JJENNY AANDREAssoSSON OObserver Staff More on page 5:Winter Park Mayor Ken Bradley discusses his mayoral re-election campaign.

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Page 2 Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland OObserver Individual & Family health plans For an Instant Quote or to apply, visit our website www.HealthInsuranceIBS.com407-831-5166 Tom Carey SundewGardens@gmail.comCommunity supported agriculture. Experience homegrown gardening: St. Dorothy Catholic Community Love Without Judgment 301 New England Avenue Post Office Box 485 Winter Park, FL 32790-0485 CHRISTMAS MIDNIGHT MASS DECEMBER 25 12:00 MIDNIGHTwww.stdorothycatholiccommunity.org407-610-5109(Respectfully not associated with the Diocese of Orlando)WHERE ALL ARE WELCOME!We have continued the reformed true Catholic Tradition in the Spirit of Vatican Council II! Are you divorced, gay, a recovering Catholic, feeling disenfranchised by your present worshiping community of whatever denomination, looking for a small worshipping community where you are known and not lost in the crowd? Then you have found what you are looking for in St. Dorothy Catholic Community! Letters to Santa contest winner The winner of Winter Park-Maitland OObservers inaugural Letters to Santa contest is 9-year-old Macie McCully from Winter Park. Macie rode in a convertible right in front of the oat carrying Santa Claus during Saturdays Winter Park Christmas parade. She also received Winter in the Park tickets and a Polar Express gift basket. Thanks to our contest sponsors, Maitland Public Library, Winter Park Chamber of Commerce and the city of Winter Park. TT o read more Letters to Santa contest submissions, visit wpmobserver.com. TThanks for participating and happy holidays! Dear Santa, The gift I most want to give is for orphans around the world to have a family that loves them and cares for them. The reason this is the gift I want to give the most is because there are many people who wish to simply love and provide for a child, and it is hard for them to do that given the amount of time and money it takes to adopt a child. Orphans simply wish to be loved and cared for, and I wish things could be a lot easier on them. All orphans deserve to be happy and lucky just like me!Macie McCully Age 9 Winter Park

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Page 4 Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland OObserver USPS 00-6186 ISSN 1064-3613 1500 Park Center DDrive Orlando, FL 32835-5705Member of: Goldenrod Chamber of CommercePublisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor. Submission does not guarantee publication. Columnists opinions are made independently of the newspaper. All rights reserved. Winter Park / Maitland Observer 2011Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munsterwww.wpmobserver.com | Phone: 407-563-7000 | Fax: 407-563-7099 | editor@observernewspapers.comP.O. Box 2426 Winter Park, FL 32790 Published TThursday, DDec. 8, 2011 CONTANTACTTS Volume 23, Issue NNumber 49 PUBLISHERR KKyle TT aylor 407-563-7009 kyle@observernewspapers.com maaI JJenny AAndreasson 407-563-7026 editor@observernewspapers.com DESIGNERR JJonathan Gallagher 407-563-7054 jgallagher@observernewspapers.com RREPOROR TERRS JJenny AAndreasson 407-563-7026 editor@observernewspapers.com Isaac Babcock 407-563-7023 isaacb@observernewspapers.com eallafed AAshley McBride classieds@observernewspapers.com COOPYY EDITORORS Isaac Babcock isaacb@observernewspapers.com Padrick Brewer COOLUMNISTS Chris JJepson Louis RRoney LRRoney@c.rr.com JJosh Garrick joshgarrick9@gmail.com ISINGSS aaer TT racy Craft 407-515-2605 tcraft@observernewspapers.com crptocrclato AAmanda RRayno 407-563-7073 arayno@golfweek.com tare obit@observernewspapers.com Business Briefs Because of inaccurate information provided to the OObserver, the Dec. 1 article ROROTCs tribute to veterans incorrectly identied the military branch in which Easter Seals Day Break member Don served. He is a former Navy serviceman. Correction AArtists in residence at MAAC S S xture at the institution for many years. In this second year of the programs reinvigoration, two new artists have been selected participate in the program, one starting this fall and the other in January. In the studios for 2010-11: IN Cicero Greathouse. In January, Trent Tomengo will join the group. Hours will be posted out side the studios and will be available in the museum ofces. For more information, please visit www.artandhistory.org, or phone 407539-2181.Morse in top 10The Morse Museum was included for the rst time in the U.S. News and World R Reports list know the Morse has always been a spectacular collection to see but I dont think we would have gotten this ranking without the new wing and all the accompanying publicity here and across the nation, Museum Director of Pub I thing for Winter Park as hopefully the Museum will continue to bring visitors here to discover the charms of this wonderful town. We are the only Winter Park attraction on the list. Visit travel.usnews.com. BETAETA s toy drive BG Drive runs through Monday, Dec. 12. The gift drive directly benets teen moms and their B agencys mission is to give children and fami lies the knowledge and support needed to be strong and healthy, with a focus on teen moms and at-risk families. For more information or Lisa Blackwelder, director of development, at lblackwelder@betacenter.org or 407-3986213. Drop off donations at any Sonnys or S Winter Park-based Handex Consulting & R Re mediation LLC was recently named to the Zweig Letter Hot Firm List for 2011. Members of the Orlando R Regional R Realtor A As sociation participated in the sales of 18.16 per cent more existing single-family homes in O Octo ber of this year than in O October 2010, which is the years greatest month-over-month increase in sales of this home type. O Orlandos overall home sales for O October have increased by 5.89 percent. Shaw Mechanical Services LLC has secured and started work on a $2.9 million contract for mechanical services for the new Westridge Mid dle School in OOrlando. DDan Moisand, certied nancial planner of Mai tland-based Moisand Fitzgerald Tamayo LLC, has ment category of Financial Planning magazines annual Inuencers awards. Lowndes, D Drosdick, D Doster, K Kantor & R Reed is pleased to announce that it has been honored with the Y Y our Honor runner-up award in the Social Media Initiative category by The Le S N to announce the inclusion of four new members to its board of directors: DDean Bosco, wealth management adviser, BB&T; DDuncan D DeWahl, district manager & CFP, Waddell & R Reed Finan cial Services; Sean Hall, U KKristine Wood, director of design, Urbanscape Properties Inc. NANAI R Realvest recently completed two new lease facilities in Maitland. Total Health Diabetes, a lo cal rm that provides diabetes education, sup port and referral services, leased suite 204 with N opment Planning & Financing Group Inc., busi in San Juan Capistrano, Calif., is the new tenant S 1060 Maitland Center Commons. The Central Florida ofce of Charles Perry Partners Inc. announced the rm received two BB B I Central Florida Chapter. Community Bulletin Club founder RRollins College Football Club founder Bill Caldwell poses after the teams rst game O Oct. 24. He donated $5,000 to get the club off the ground. TT earful reunion OOn Veterans Day, Maitland-based S S team leader Kelly Lofgren, with an unexpected at-work reunion. Sar ah and Kelly Lofgren had not seen each other for more than four months. Stationed at Fort Drum, N.YY ., the thousands of miles be tivEngage team leader had been hard on them. Were closer than sisters, said Sarah, still beaming from the surprise reunion. Were best friends and we tell each oth er everything. Keeping this secret from her was so hard. Maitlander wins silver B S petition, held on Saturday, Nov. 19. More than 45 entrants from around the state competed, with 12 prize-winning contestants advancing to the nalist round. Local winners include: Second-prize winner: Leah Hollingshead (below center), soprano, Maitland, singing OOther competition nalists include: David Brill, violin; OOrlando Gabriella Galletti, soprano; OOrlando David Gordon, piano; Lake Mary John Horzen, violin; OOrlando John Li, piano; OOviedo Enoch Wong, piano; OOrlando

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Page 5 Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland OObserver Winter Park is better off than it was in NOW YOU HAVE A BETTER TV CHOICE. CenturyLinkTM PrismTM paired with the perfect partner Internet or Voice175 East Altamonte Dr., Altamonte Springs 3030 East Semoran Blvd., Apopka 260 Citrus Tower Blvd., Clermont 1359 East Vine St., Kissimmee 3244 North John Young Pkwy., KissimmeeSEE THE DIFFERENCE FOR YOURSELF! Test-drive it online at seeprismtv.com or in store today: Call 866.552.4971Espaol 866.960.7085Offer ends 12/31/2011. Offers are available to new, rst-time CenturyLink Prism TV residential customers only. Offers include Prism TV service bundled with Pure Broadband service and Prism TV bundled with CenturyLink Unlimited Calling. Standard monthly rates and fees apply to these services and required equipment. All prices, packages and programming are subject to change without notice. Customer must cancel DVR and/or HD service by calling CenturyLink Customer Service before the end of the three-month-free promotional period to avoid monthly charges or the standard monthly rate for each service will apply until services are cancelled. Offers may be limited to specic locations. General Services and offers not available everywhere. CenturyLink may change, cancel, or substitute offers and services, or vary them by service area, at its sole discretion without notice. Requires credit approval and deposit may be required. Additional restrictions apply. Terms and Conditions All products and services listed are governed by tariffs, local terms of service, or terms and conditions posted at www.centurylink.com. CenturyLink Prism TV All plans require separate local phone service plan and include digital channels (including local channels), one (1) set-top box (STB), one (1) modem gateway, and up to four (4) standard direct video streams to residence. CenturyLink-provided STBs are required to view TV. Local channel availability varies by market. High Denition (HD) available on all TV plans, and up to two (2) of the up to four (4) video streams can be in HD. Customers location determines both HD availability and the maximum number of HD video streams (between 0 and 2 HD streams) a customer can view and record at any one time per residence, regardless of the number of STBs in the household. All non-HD video streams are provided in standard denition. Subscription to service precludes customer from purchasing high-speed Internet services from any third party. Additional charges will apply for additional programming packages, movie channel subscriptions (except for PrismTM Premium plan), Pay Per View movies and events, On Demand purchases, and premium services/subscriptions for all plans. Some subscription services, events, and broadcast network service may be blacked out in customers area. Vacation Program Offer available to residential customers only. Only certain CenturyLink services are eligible for the Vacation Program; third party services received through CenturyLink are not eligible. Offer may include a reduced monthly recurring charge for a predetermined number of months each year, retention of equipment and suspension of service, programming and agreement during Vacation Program activation. A zero balance for each applicable service is required for eligibility. If customer does not contact CenturyLink to resume full activation of applicable services before the end of six (6) consecutive month period, all applicable monthly charges, fees, surcharges, contractual obligations, etc., will resume automatically. Vacation Program services will have restrictions and limitations that will vary for each applicable service. Contact CenturyLink for details. Equipment Minimum equipment and CenturyLink professional installation are required. At initial installation, each customer receives: one (1) VDSL 2 modem; up to six (6) STBs (standard plan includes one (1) STB; additional STBs are available for an additional monthly rate, per STB); and one (1) remote control per STB installed. All equipment must be returned to designated CenturyLink retail store within thirty (30) days after service disconnection in an undamaged condition, or customer is charged for each equipment piece not returned or returned as damaged. Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides: 2011 Disney. All Rights Reserved. 2011 CenturyLink, Inc. All rights reserved. The name CenturyLink and the pathways logo are property of CenturyLink, Inc. All other marks are property of their respective owners. BONUS!PUT YOUR P RISMTM TV ON VACATION IF YOU ARE HEADING BACK NORTH NO CONTRACT A ND FREE H D WHEN YOU PICK 2. for 12 months CNTL11-1144H_10.15x9_r1.indd 1 11/3/11 5:19 PM Getting to know Miles Supporters weigh in what was best for Winter Park without Whirling campaign mMAYo OR | JJust seven weeks until EElection DDay C NINUfrotpae Visit nancyforwinterpark.org for more information on mayoral candidate NNancy Miles. DDates for meet and greets mayoral debates have not yet been set. Stay tuned to wpmobserver.com for more information. Learn moreBradley talks jobs, civility IsSAAcC BAbcocBCOCK OObserver Staff

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Page 6 Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland OObserver Savannah Court and CoeExcellence in Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation 1301 W. Maitland Blvd. Maitland, FL 32751407-645-3990www.SavannahCourtMaitland.comAssisted Living Facility License No. 8447 Skilled Nursing Facility License No. 1635096 The quality of care is outstanding. Our mother has made so many friends here. And she especially loves the hair salon! Peggy, her daughter Merrel & son DwightAssisted Living Rehabilitation and Skilled Nursing Care Variety of Apartment Suite Selections, some with Lake Views Restaurant Style Dining Laundry, Housekeeping, Maintenance Services Transportation to Outings and Medical Appointments Beautifully Landscaped Courtyard Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above. You are always welcome! A Senior Living Community where Hospitality is a Way of Life. Effective December 9, 2011T. Eugene Chambers, Jr., DO, will be moving his practice, South Semoran Family Care, from their current location at: 429 South Semoran Blvd., Ste 1 Orlando, FL 32807 to East Orlando Medical Group 900 S. Goldenrod Road, Ste B Orlando, FL 32822 407.281.6424 Patient medical records will be maintained at the new NOTICE TO PATIENTS fourth quarter before a shot in EEdgewater Cats drop tourney, look to rebound IsSAAcC BAbcocBCOCK OObserver Staff Tough competition at Winter Park RRotary Living for the art PhHOtTOsS bBY isISAAcC bBAbcocBCOCK theTHE ObseBSERveVER Winter Park Observers culture columnist, J Josh Garrick, above left, hosted a tour of his art-laden O Orlando home on Tuesday, Nov. 29. G

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Page 7 Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland OObserver TobOBAccoCCO | RRollins and UCF to implement bans C NINUfrotpae PhHOtTO bBY isISAAcC bBAbcocBCOCK theTHE ObseBSERveVER Winter Park has been pushing for the right to ban tobacco use since January. Maitland is also seeking that abillity. Knights bounce back IsSAAcC BAbcocBCOCK OObserver Staff PhHOtTO bBY isISAAcC bBAbcocBCOCK theTHE ObseBSERveVER UCF sophomore Isaiah Sykes has emerged as a dominant force on offense and defense in his second season.

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Page 8 Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland OObserver City Council AAgenda of DDec. 12 Special Presentation: Public Hearing: Consent AAgenda: DDecision Items: AAppointments DDiscussion Item: For updates, visit www.itsmymaitland.com Maitland City Talk bBY HowOW ARD SchiCHIEfFERDEcCKER MAYOR City pays tribute to its nest statesman Subscribe to Maitlands free weekly e-newsletter. Visit IndependenceLane.com and click subscribe today. Learn more PhHOtTO cCOuURtes TESY OfF ciCITY ofOF mMAiITlLAND Benches dedicated to former Maitland Mayor JJames G. Houser and his wife, Peggie, sit together in a city park.

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Page 9 Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer PLEASE NOTE: BEGINNING MONDAY, DEC. 12, THROUGH FEBRUARY 2012, CITY COM MISSION MEETINGS WILL BE HELD AT THE RACHEL D. MURRAH CIVIC CENTER (1050 W. MORSE BLVD.) DUE TO CITY HALL RENOVATIONS.City Commission Work SessionThere will be a City Commis sion Work Session held on Mon day, Dec. 12, from 2 p.m. 3:15 p.m., at the Rachel D. Murrah Civic Center located at 1050 W. Morse Blvd. to discuss Mead Garden. This meeting is open to the public, however, no public comment will be taken.Dec. 12 City Commission meeting topics of interestThere will be a City Commis sion meeting on Monday, Dec. 12, at 3:30 p.m., at the Rachel D. Murrah Civic Center located at 1050 W. Morse Blvd. Below are a few topics of interest:Mayors ReportThank you from Brookshire Elementary School for use of Cady Way pool Special citizen recognition by the Winter Park Fire-Rescue De partment Presentation of the Orlando Business Journals Central Floridas Healthiest Employer Award Board appointments: Winter Park Police Officers Pension Board Martin Luther King, Jr., Task Force members Reappointment to the Orange County Civic Facilities Board Non-action ItemsEconomic impact and re search analysis of the Winter Park Farmers Market presented by Rollins College Crummer Graduate School of Business students Downtown parking studyConsent AgendaApprove the minutes of Nov. 28. Approve the following contract and bids: Piggybacking the City of Denver/US Communities con tract with Kone Inc. for elevator maintenance and service and authorize the mayor to execute the piggyback contract. Pierce Manufacturing Inc. for purchase of aerial fire appara tus. Wesco Distribution for pur chase of circuit breakers. Approve the Historic Preser vation Faade Easement donation for 121 W. Garfield Ave., commonly known as the Kum mer-Kilbourne House, and authorize the mayor to execute the agreement.Action Items Requiring DiscussionRequest of the Tree Preserva tion Board to review the Tree Preservation OrdinancePublic HearingsSecond reading of the ordi nance regarding lakeshore pro tection Second reading of the ordi nance to vacate a portion of the city right-of-way located at 2525 Via Tuscany. Request of Rollins College: Final Conditional Use approval for the Alfond Inn, 112-room ho tel with a restaurant/bar, meet ing/ballroom space and on-site parking at 300 E. New England Ave. Resolution electing to use the uniform method of collect ing non-ad valorem special as sessments levied within the city to collect the costs for abatement of code violations.City Commission ReportsCommissioner Leary Commissioner Sprinkel Commissioner Cooper Affordable housing Commissioner McMacken Mayor Bradley You can find the Commis sions full agenda and informa tion on specific agenda items by logging on to the citys official website at www.cityofwinter park.org and by clicking on Government > City Commis sion > Packets.Correction on the Nov. 28 City Commission Meeting Highlights printed in the Dec. 1 Observer:The resolution determining that Affordable Housing devel opments should be given prior ity processing was referred to the Economic Development Ad visory Board and the Planning & Zoning Board. Come out and ice skate!Dont forget the citys Winter in the Park holiday ice skating rink in Central Park West Meadow is officially open! Come out and skate: Monday thru Thursday, 3 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday, 3 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sunday, Noon to 8 p.m. See website for extended school and holiday hours. Only $10 per skater including skate rental all day! For more information, please call 407599-3203 or visit our website at www.cityofwinterpark.orgSanta Claus is coming to townThe city of Winter Park is preparing to welcome Santa and Mrs. Claus to the city on the evenings of Monday, Dec. 12, through Monday, Dec. 19. Young and young-at-heart will have the chance to mingle with old St. Nick himself as he rides his sleigh through Winter Park neighborhoods. On Dasher, on Dancer and Donner and Blitzen! Santa and Mrs. Claus will make stops in local neigh borhoods according to the following schedule*: Monday, Dec. 12 6:30 p.m. Shady Park 6:45 p.m. Israel Simpson Court 7:30 p.m. Winter Park Country Club Tuesday, Dec. 13 6:30 p.m. Lake Knowles, east side 7:30 p.m. Phelps Park Wednesday, Dec. 14 6:15 p.m. Brookshire Elementary 7:15 p.m. Lakemont Fire Station 62 8 p.m. Genius and Mizell avenues Thursday, Dec. 15 6:45 p.m. Briarwood Drive 7:30 p.m. Harland Park on Blueridge Road 8 p.m. Chelton Circle Monday, Dec. 19 6:30 p.m. DePugh Nursing Center 7:30 p.m. Margaret Square Times are approximate and subject to change. In addition to welcoming Santa and Mrs. Claus this holi day season, the city of Winter Park has many holiday events planned for all ages to enjoy. Gather with friends, family and loved ones to experience Winter Parks holiday traditions. For complete details on each of the citys events, please visit the official website at www.cityof winterpark.orgPlease pardon our mess, were improving City HallDuring the months of De cember through February, the city will be working at making City Hall much more welcom ing, customer friendly and en ergy efficient. As a result, many of the services offered at City Hall will be temporarily offered at other locations, some within areas of City Hall and others off-site. The following is a list ing of the city services and their temporary locations during construction: City Management/Administration has moved to City Hall West Wing, 2nd Floor Building/Permitting has moved to City Hall West Wing, 2nd Floor Cashiers and Utility Billing Customer Service has moved to City Hall West Wing, 1st Floor Economic Development/ CRA Department has moved to the Welcome Center located at 151 W. Lyman Ave. Planning Department has moved to the Azalea Lane Recreation Center located at 1045 Azalea Lane Beginning Monday, Dec. 12 through February, City Com mission meetings will be held at the Rachel D. Murrah Civic Center located at 1050 W. Morse Blvd. For any city advisory board meetings temporary locations, please visit www.cityofwinter park.org > Government > Board & Public Meetings. We ask for your patience as we work toward improving your City Hall experience and becoming more energy efficient. Thank you!Visit the citys official website at www.cityofwinterpark.org, find us on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter. Lack of Desire or Low Energy? Testosterone Lab Work for $35 (a $240 Value) Call today for a risk-free appointment: 407-894-9959 PARKER LUMBER COMPANY, Inc.Building Supplies MAITLAND, FLORIDA 32751-4408Phone (407) 644-3600 December 5, 2011 851 N. Orlando A ve.Dear Friends and Neighbors, After over 100 years in business in Central Florida, Parker Lumber Company will be closing our lumber and hardware business. Our family would like to thank all of our loyal customers, vendors, employees and the community for supporting us throughout the years. Four generations of Parkers are very proud of what we have accomplished. We could not have succeeded without all of you. A heartfelt THANK YOU!!! Maitland wants a SunRail commuter station. Our property was selected as the best location. We have worked with the city of Maitland and the Florida Department of Transportation for the last four years to make Maitlands commuter the past and look to the future. As the saying goes, to everything there is a season, and our season is here. Our family believes it is time to say goodbye to the lumber and hardware business, and now concentrate on our rental property and the development of the remainder of our property. quarter of 2012. Please come in and see our great going-out-of-business sale on all of our inventory. The Parkers and our employees would like to shake your hand and say thanks for all the years of your support. Yours Truly, PAR KER LUM BER COMPANY AND EMP LO YEES Bud Parker Larry Parker David Parker Steven Parker Dottie Parker T eresa Burks Kevin Burks Paul Guimarin Michelle Ziesmer Winter Park City Talk BY RandAND Y KniNIGhHT CITY MANAGER

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Page 10 Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer contest CALLING ALL JUDGES !We need YOU for thePeoples Choice AwardCheck out the competition along Park Avenue, Morse Boulevard & New England Avenue, and choose your favorite holiday window display!participating merchantsMorse BoulevardGurtzberry Yogurt Things & Fashion BoutiqueNew England AvenueCapricci Ricci SalonSouth Park AvenueThread Siegels Clothing Company Taylors Pharmacy Tuni SynergyNorth Park AvenueThrough the Looking Glass Eileen Fisher Kilwins Winter Park DownEast Orvis Breakaway Bicycles Claret Cosmetics Absolute Dcor Bay Hill Jewelers on Park Simmons Jewelers Timothys Gallery The Collection Bridal Shoooz on Park Orchid Thai Cuisine The Spice & Tea Exchange Tugboat & the Bird Bella Unique Boutique The Doggie Door Rosie Wrays Roost The Paper ShopPick up your ballot at any participating merchant, the WinterPark Welcome Center, or the holiday ice skating rink. All ballots must be dropped off at the ice rink to be counted. You may also vote online at www.cityofwinterpark.org/WITP by clicking on the Window Contest tab. Contest begins Thursday, December 1, 2011. All ballots are due Sunday, January 8, 2012.Contest sponsored by the City of Winter Park Economic Development/CRA Department.HOLIDAY WINDOW WITP HolidayWindowContest Observer Ad 5x16_WITP HolidayWindowContest Observer Ad 5x16 11/29/11 4:58 PM Page 1 TT iffany glass delights Santa at Casa PHotoOTOS BY JEnnNNY andrANDREassonASSON tTHE oOBSERvVER Morse Museums 33rd Christmas in the Park on Dec. 1 featured eight Tiffany windows and BBach Festival Choir. PHotoOTO BY JEnnNNY andrANDREassonASSON tTHE oOBSERvVER Christmas at the Casa was held on Thursday, Dec. 1, at Casa Feliz and featured hot cocoa and SSanta photos.

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Page 11 Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Maitland plaza turns 25Parading on Park PHotoOTOS BY kKYLE Ta A YLorOR tTHE oOBSERvVER Park Avenue came to life at the 59th annual YY e Olde HHometown Christmas Parade on SSaturday, Dec. 3. PHotoOTOS BY kKYLE Ta A YLorOR tTHE oOBSERvVER TThe GGreat Maitland Muscle Car and Antique Auto Show was SSaturday, Dec. 3, at the SShoppes at Maitland Plaza.

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Page 12 Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer TTHURSDAY Y JFSS GGlow and G Golf fundraiser is 6 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 8, at Winter Park Country Club, 761 Old E England Ave., Winter Park. Individuals can register for $70 and teams of four for $260. A $5 discount on registration will be of fered to golfers donating toys. To reg ister, visit www.jfsorlando.org/#golf Newcomers of Central Florida holiday luncheon with musical entertain ment is 11:30 a.m. Thursday, Dec. 8, at Maison & Jardin, 430 S S. Wymore RRoad, Altamonte S Springs. Tickets are $23. Advance reservations are required. For information, visit new comersc.org TT raveling B Between Worlds: An Ar chaeological E Exploration of Complex SSocieties R Research B Based around HHousehold E Economies and Lithic SStudies by Lucas Martindale John son is the subject of the 7 p.m. Thurs day, Dec. 8, Central Florida Anthropo logical S Society meeting at H Harry P. Leu Gardens. Contact kagidusko@ hotmail.com or 321-948-3994. FRIDAY Y To help raise money for American Project, S StillWaters H Healing Center is hosting a Stress Reducing Community Acupuncture E Event from 5 p.m.-7 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 9, at 260 Lookout Place S Suite 209, Maitland. SSeating is limited; call 407-772-9243 for reservations. UCF Ice Hockey vs. USSF Ice H Hockey is 10:15 p.m. Friday, Dec. 9, at R RDV Ice Den. Its $5 for the general public and free with an UCF ID. SAT TURDAY Y Winter Park Florida B Blue centers free Health Fair is 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. SSaturday, Dec. 10. There will be free health screenings. Mayor H Howard Schieferdeckers re-election campaign kickoff is 4 p.m.-5:30 p.m. S Saturday, Dec. 10, at SSwoope S Studio, 142 S S. S Swoope Ave. in Maitland. Fresh Med S Spas is hosting a Holiday SPA-rty S Saturday, Dec. 10, from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. with holiday refresh ments, discounts and exclusives. Visit www.freshmedspas.com. MONDAY Y On Monday, Dec. 12, at 3:30 p.m., Chris Miles will speak on Accents of E English-Speaking People at a meeting of the E English-SSpeaking Union at the University Club of Win ter Park, 841 Park Ave. Contact 407365-4051 for more information. The Goldenrod Chambers Annual Holiday Party is Monday, Dec. 12, at the Goldenrod S Station from 5:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m. The event is free for all and will include heavy appetizers and cocktails. B Bring unwrapped toys. RSRSVP to 407-677-5980. TTUEESDAY Y The R Rollins College Center for Ad vanced E Entrepreneurship will host a forum at the Mills Memorial Center at R Rollins College in Winter Park on Tuesday, Dec. 13. To learn contact info@CEEONexus.com or 407-5906101. WEEDNEESDAY Y Playhouse favorites H Heather Alexan der & Laura H Hodos will bring holiday cheer to Central Florida one more time in the popular Winter Park Play house Spotlight Cabaret Series on Wednesday, Dec. 14, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $20 and include a drink. DEEC. 15 Orange Audubon S Society presents A YY ear in the L Life of a Park Ranger by Amy Conyers at 7 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 15. Its free and at Leu Gardens, 1920 N. Forest Ave., Orlando. Call 407-637-2525 or visit www.orangeaudubon.org ONGGOINGG The Winter Park Farmers Market is every S Saturday from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the old train depot, 200 W. New EEngland Ave. Visit CityofWinterPark. org. The Maitland Farmers Market is every S Sunday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Lake Lily Park. Visit ItsMyMatiland. com or call 407-539-6268. Mid-Century: A Photographic View of Three African-American Commu nities in Florida is at the H Hannibal SSquare H Heritage Center through Fri day, Dec. 30. Visit H HannibalSSquare HHeritageCenter.org. Food T T ruck Caf is every Wednes day from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Lake Lily Park in Maitland. Music at the Casa is a free week ly S Sunday open house featuring live performances and tours of the histor ic Casa Feliz, 656 N. Park Ave. Visit CasaFeliz.us or call 407-628-8200 ext. 3. BBallroom Dancing L Lessons are every Monday night except the rst Monday of the month at 7 p.m. at the University Club of Winter Park, 841 N. Park Ave. Line Dance Instruction is held on the rst Monday. Its $5 per lesson. Call 407-644-6149.Visit wpmobserver.com/events for more details. SSend submissions to editor@ observernewspapers.com Calendar HOLIDAY CALENDAR For more holiday event listings, see Page 15 or scan this code using the QR R reader app on your smartphone. BBorders of Paradise BBorders of Paradise: T The New World in the E Eyes of E Explorers begins on Friday, Dec. 9, and continues through Feb. 26 at the Maitland H Historical Museum, 221 W. Packwood Ave., Maitland. An opening reception will be held on Friday, Dec. 9, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. For more information, call 407-539-2181 or visit www. ArtandHHistory.org Fridays @ Morse Friday Nights at the Morse features free admission to the Morse Museum on Fridays from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. through April 27. Occasional programs include live music, art dem onstrations, curator tours and family tours. Visit MorseMuseum.org for details. Culture & Cocktails The UCF Print Collective takes center stage at this months Culture & Cocktails, held on Friday, Dec. 9, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. both inside and outside the A&HHs Germaine Marvel B Build ing.

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Page 13 Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer LLifestyles They all have that one story. Theyre way behind, the famed Winter Park Crew losing a race not a common sight. And then, somehow, the team pulls together. Their oars slice into the water in unison, arms pumping together, everything disappears but them and the water. Theres no hot sun beaming on them, no other team pushing past them, no single ath letes. Just one team. And then they win. All of a sudden the boat came together, John McCabe said about his race. It was like one person, one mind. Theres nothing else outside of that boat, said Matthew Cas caddan, a 2004 grad and the boys coach. Winning historyAnd while the alumni reminisced about their win after a struggle, those stories arent that common for the team. Winter Park High Schools boys and girls crew teams boast two of the best teams in the nation, with numerous na tional championships and medals from the Stotesbury Cup, the na tions oldest and highest regarded high school regatta. Its a tradition of winning thats been built over the course of decades. And for much of its most successful years the boys team was helmed by the same coach, Dan Bertossa, who af ter 21 years stepped down as head coach in October 2010. This month, Winter Park Crew celebrates 50 years full of success es with a party and alumni race. But it didnt start so glamorousa bulletin board post, said Jonathan Rich, a former president of the Winter Park Crew Boosters and father to two crew graduates. First crew member David Hoff man, class of 1962, said he jumped at the chance after hearing it over the PA system during his chemistry class. At a beanpole 115 pounds, his only chance at par ticipating in sports came with the experimental rowing team. The jocks never showed up because it was not a lettered sport yet, he said. They began as the Optimist Hustlers in honor of the North Orlando Optimist Club that spon sored the team. The Hustlers part, one teammate said in a let ter, doesnt have as clear an origin other than it might have sounded pretty fast and tough at the time. There were lots of questions when he wore his crew sweatshirt around, to say the least. Hoffman said they were inspired by the pool shark movie The Hustler. You had to hustle and learn how to keep up, Hoffman said. We probably worked harder than Rollins. Since then, theyve built a team known nationwide for its skill and speed. Paul Deatrick, a 1977 Win ter Park High School graduate and crew member, said its pretty great to be a part of that history and the present team, which now does all the work for the great reputation. And I get to take the credit for it, he joked. Were such a storied team, said Nathan Meeks, a 2004-06 rower and recent University of Central Florida graduate.A forever experienceThat history, and being a part of it, has the ability to change a person, said McCabe, a 1978-79 crew member. He said it took him beyond what he couldve imagined his limits were and helped Visit us in Winter Pa rk Pr em iu m Pe t Food s Fu ll & Se lf Se rv ic e Gr oo m St ylis h Acce ss orie s Holiday Photograph y Go ur me t Dog Trea ts Doggie Da yc ar eW oof Gang Bakery is an authorized dealer of the following premium pet foods, plus many more !918 Orange Ave., Winter Park, FL 32789 407.647.-9663 Dennis AllenOwner/ Administrator PHotoOTO BY BriRITTniNI JohnsonOHNSON tTHE oOBSERvVER Winter Park High School Crew alumni Nathan Meeks, from left, JJohn McCabe and Paul Deatrick pose in the Winter Park Crews McAllister BBoathouse. Although the three had never met, they chatted incessantly about the sport. Please see crCREwW on page 14 Winter Park Crew celebrates its 50th birthday with an alumni race and barbecue on SSaturday, Dec. 17 BriBRITTniNI JohnsonJOHNSON Observer SStaff Winter Park Crew is celebrating its 50th birthday with an alumni race and barbecue for the community on Saturday, Dec. 17, at the Winter Park Crew McAllister BBoathouse. TThe race begins at 10 a.m., and tickets are $15 for adults, $10 for kids 10 and younger. YY ou may purchase tickets at the event and in advance, but an RSVP is requested. For more information, email wpcrewalumni@gmail.com or call 407-414-2947. LLearn more Half a century on the water

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Page 14 Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Our Salad Bar features a complete buffet of over 40 items with cold and hot dishes, including Brazilian specialties. We serve 14 cuts of meat continuously, all you can eat table side service. Where you can choose from beef, pork, lamb or chicken, all served with our house specialty, oven-warm cheese bread. Nelore Steakhouse 115 E. Lyman Ave. Winter Park, FL 32789(407) 645-1112www.neloresteakhouse.com Authentic Brazilian Steak House lenged him. It really sort of transforms your outlook on life, he said. Theres really no sport like crew. Thats easy to see. These three men dont know each other, but its hard to get a word in edgewise. They wander the boat house Meeks looks up and touches the boats he practiced in as he walks by and talk crew shop. Like how certain old wooden boats whistle as they glide over the bubbles beneath them when the team is in sync and really moving. Or the less fond, but funny memories of crabbing, when your oar hits the water the wrong way and rowers get hurled out, which is Meeks one story of winning against the odds. While McCabe and Meeks have left their rowing days be hind them, theres still a visible pull to the memories. Its something youre always going to miss, Meeks said. Deatrick doesnt miss it, though. He still lives it, six days a week. Im 52, and this morning I did 20K, Ill do it forever, he said. But theyll all do it at the alumni race. Meeks will row for Maybe against my kids, said McCabe, whose two sons joined crew this year. crCREwW | Some alumni still row C ONTINUEED FRROM pagPAGE 13 aABovOVE a ARcCHivIVE PHotoOTOS BY isaacISAAC BaABcockCOCK tTHE oOBSERvVER TThe rst Winter Park Crew team, above left, was named the Optimist H Hustlers. That rst boat was donated by Y Y ale University and own down in a cargo aircraft, David H Hoffman said. The 2010-2011 Winter Park H High S School girls crew team, pictured at top with Coach Mike Vertullo, made history at the SStotesbury Cup. Dan BBertossa, above, has retired from his post as legendary Winter Park Crew coach. HHe has been replaced by his former student SStephen Freygang.

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Page 15 Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer H o l i r a d n e l a C d a y 2 p a r t DEEC. 10 Maitland Public Library proudly presents the second Annual Winter Wonderland on S Saturday, Dec. 10, from 2 p.m.-4 p.m. Call 407-647-7700 or visit MaitlandPublicLibrary.com. Join New H Hope for Kids on S Saturday, Dec. 10, for the ninth annual Holiday B Bicycle Ride where hundreds of bicycle riders cruise through nine miles of brightly lit Winter Park and Casselberry neighborhoods. R Regis tration and festivities begin at 4 p.m. with the ride starting promptly at 6 p.m. Anyone 10 years and older may ride solo. Cost is $10 in advance/$12 night of the event and includes music and refreshments. For more informa tion, visit www.newhopeforkids.org or call 407-331-3059 extension 10. DEEC. 11 A visit by S Santa and musical perfor mances by Orlando-area singers Jac queline Jones and Kathy Puzzo with music by Michael Kramer and Michael Lamy highlight the S Steinway S Society of Central Floridas holiday concert and piano gifting S Sunday, Dec. 11, at 2:30 p.m. at S Steinway Piano Galler ies at the R Renaissance Center, 303 E E. Altamonte Drive, Altamonte S Springs. HHosts are B Bob Frier, news anchor of FOX 35, and S Society founders Gary and Kathy Grimes. The event is free to the public; call 407-339-3771 for more information. Join the choirs of Winter Park and SSweetwater First B Baptist churches for TThe G Gift of Christmas on S Sunday, Dec. 11, at 6:30 p.m. at First B Baptist Church, 1021 N. New Y Y ork Ave. Call 407-644-3061. A free Christmas concert is 7 p.m. SSunday, Dec. 11, at Orangewood Presbyterian Church, 1300 W. Maitland B Blvd., Maitland. EEnjoy a holiday concert featuring Lori S Smith, classically trained musi cian and contemporary violinist. The nursery is provided for ages 4 and younger. Visit www.orangewood.org/ ChristmasEEvents. Its TT insel T T apestry time! The Mai tland S Symphony Orchestra, under the sponsorship of The Performing Arts of Maitland, will present a spar kling concert on S Sunday, Dec. 11, at 7:30 p.m. in the sanctuary of the First Presbyterian Church of Mait land. Program highlights will feature music from the beloved Nutcracker SSuite of Tchaikovsky, Leroy Ander son favorites, Deck the H Halls from the Mannheim S Steamroller collection, familiar Christmas melodies from Ir ving B Berlin, and a medley of festive HHanukkah folk tunes. The concert is free and is a celebration in music for all ages. DEEC. 17 Maitland residents should be on the look out for Santa Claus. The Maitland police will be escorting S Santa though the citys street on S Saturday, Dec. 17. For more details and times in your neighborhood, visit www.itsmymaitland.com EEnjoy the rich sounds of Christmas as tuba, euphonium, sousaphone and baritone players of all ages gather to perform a free concert from the main stage in Central Park beginning at 1 p.m., on S Saturday, Dec. 17. Win ter Parks 16th annual Merry T T uba Christmas has become a must see on the holiday list of things to do. For more information, please call 407599-3463. DEEC. 24 The Charles H Hosmer Morse Muse um of American Art will hold a free Christmas E Eve Open House on S Sat urday, Dec. 24, from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, please call 407-645-5311. DEEC. 25 Chabad of Greater Orlando will pres ent Hanukkah on the Park on S Sun day, Dec. 25, at 5 p.m. in Central Park. The evening will include singing performances, live music, dancers, face painting, jugglers and food. For more information, please call 407644-2500. DEEC. 29 To wrap up the holiday season with a bright red bow on top, the city of Winter Park will proudly host the fth annual Champs Sports B Bowl Parade of B Bands on Thursday, Dec. 29, at 11 a.m. As a prelude to the Champs SSports B Bowl game on Thursday eve ning at 5:30 p.m. at the Florida Citrus BBowl, school bands from the Atlantic Coast Conference and B Big E East cham pionship teams will march through downtown Winter Park and perform a BBandastic Game Day Preview in Central Park. For more information, please call 407-599-3463. ONGGOINGG In celebration of the holiday season, the Orlando Magic will host four holiday basketball camps at the Jewish Community Center Maitland campus and the R RDV S Sportsplex Athletic Club from Dec. 19 and Dec. 26. The camps, which run from 9 a.m.1 p.m. daily, are open to youth of all skill levels ages 7. To register or for more information, visit www.Or landoMagicCamps.com or call 216378-0932. The B Breakthrough Theatre of Winter Park presents the holiday play, Its A Wonderful L Life: A L Live Radio Play from Dec. 9-19. This beloved American holiday classic comes to captivating life as a live 1940s radio BBoat Parade On S Saturday, Dec. 10, the Albin Po lasek Museum & S Sculpture Gardens will become the ofcial judging and viewing site for the eighth annual Winter Park B Boat Parade & Festival of Lights including a water ski show on Lake Virginia near R Rollins College at 4 p.m. This free event will begin at dusk and parking fees will apply. For more information, please call 407-647-6294. BBach Christmas BBach Festival S Society of Winter Park presents A Classic Christmas at 7:30 p.m. S Saturday, Dec. 10, and 2 p.m. S Sunday, Dec. 11, at Knowles Memorial Chapel. This anticipated annual tradition features music arranged specically for the B Bach Choir and Or chestra, paired with selections from Tchaikovskys Nutcracker S Suite. Tickets range from $20 to $50. Visit www.BBachFestivalFlorida.org. Ice skating rink Winter in the Park ice-skating rink in Central Park West Mead ow is open through S Sunday, Jan. 8. For more information, visit Cit yOfWinterPark.org. Please see hoHOLidaIDA Y caCALEndarNDAR on page 16

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Page 16 Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer 145 West SR 46 Geneva, FL. 32732 407-349-2200 Focal Point Landscape Nursery & Gift Shop Garden Center Blow Out Sale!3 DAYS ONLY! Friday, December 9th through Sunday, December 11th30% Off ALL Trees, Fruit Trees & Plant Material! 20% Off ALL Perennials & Annuals 10% Off ALL Bagged Mulch 20% to 25% Off ALL Pottery Italian Clay, Chinese Glazed and Imported Pebble PotsLocated between the Geneva General Store and Subway Marathon at the corner of CR 426 & SR 46 And, Dont forget Our beautiful Gift Shop! All Christmas Dcor 20% to 30% Off! Patience Brewster Ornaments Hand-Crafted one-of-a-kind ornaments with personality!Monday Friday: 8am 6pm Saturday: 8am 5pm Sunday: 10am 5pmFancy Redneck Wine Glasses Corkcicle Wine Chiller 1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORGTHIS WEEK AT ENZIAN SENNA Fri-Sat 3:45PM, 6:30PM, 9:15PM Sun 1PM, 3:45PM, 6:30PM Mon 9:30PM Tue 6:30PM Wed & Thu 6:30PM, 9:15PM PEARL JAM TWENTY Fri & Sat 11:59PM RED STATE Sun 10PM 13th ANNUAL MANHATTAN SHORT FILM FESTIVAL Mon 6:30PM NETWORK Tue 9:30PM 1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORGTHIS WEEK AT ENZIAN SENNA Fri-Sat 3:45PM, 6:30PM, 9:15PM Sun 1PM, 3:45PM, 6:30PM Mon 9:30PM Tue 6:30PM Wed & Thu 6:30PM, 9:15PM PEARL JAM TWENTY Fri & Sat 11:59PM RED STATE Sun 10PM 13th ANNUAL MANHATTAN SHORT FILM FESTIVAL Mon 6:30PM NETWORK Tue 9:30PM YOUNG GOETHE IN LOVE Fri Sun: 3:45PM, 6:30PM, 9:15PM Mon, Wed, Thur: 6:30PM, 9:15PM Tues: 6:30PM Saturday Matinee Classics ITS A WONDERFUL LIFE Sat 12 NOON FilmSlam Sun 1:00PM Only $5 Cult Classics GOODFELLAS Tues 9:30PM Only $5 broadcast. With the help of an ensemble that brings a few dozen characters to the stage, the story of idealistic George B Bailey unfolds as he considers ending his life one fateful Christmas E Eve. Call 407-920-4034. The B Break through Theatre is located at 419A W. Fairbanks Ave. in Winter Park. The city of Winter Park is prepar ing to welcome Santa and Mrs. Claus to the city on the evenings of Monday, Dec. 12, through Monday, Dec. 19. Old S St. Nick himself will ride in his sleigh through Winter Park neighbor hoods. On Dasher, on Dancer and Donner and B Blitzen! Visit cityofwinterpark.org for a full schedule. Orlando Fashion S Square wel comes back Santa Claus for vis its and pictures with children this holiday season. S Santa photos will be taken daily through S Saturday, Dec. 24. Also, Fido and Fluffy can sit with S St. Nick on Pet Nights from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Mondays through Dec. 19. hoHOLidaIDA Y caCALEndarNDAR C ONTINUEED FRROM pagPAGE 15 Planet gazing A spot for tea PHotoOTO BY JEnnNNY andrANDREassonASSON tTHE oOBSERvVER Aspiring stargazers caught a glimpse of the night sky at the Maitland Public Librarys Viewing the Night SSky w/ Telescopes on Thursday, Dec. 1. PHotoOTO BY JEnnNNY andrANDREassonASSON tTHE oOBSERvVER Maitland Public L Librarys Circulation Supervisor Veronica Dailey pours a cup of tea at the second annual HHoliday Tea on SSunday, Dec. 4, at the Library.

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Page 17 Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer The Art & History Museums Maitland invites us to explore what our Florida peninsula was like before the European explor ers in its new exhibit Borders of Paradise: The New World in the Eyes of Explorers, beginning Friday, Dec. 9, and continuing through Feb. 26. Borders of Paradise includes watercolors, prints and maps that illustrate real (and exaggerated) versions of the New World, including works by artists who viewed the new Many of their portrayals were reproduced throughout Eu rope, shaping Europes skewed perception of the new lands well into the 19th century. Of special interest are the maps, which are often outrageously divergent from what we now recognize as geographical fact. The museum is at 221 W. Packwood Ave. in Maitland. An opening reception will be held Friday, Dec. 9, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. in the museum galleries. The Maitland Art Center galleries will also be open during the reception featuring the exhibit Dialogue: Camilo Velasquez. Call 407-539-2181 or visit ArtandHistory.orgMusic of a classic ChristmasThe superbly trained, 160-voice Bach Festival Choir and Bach Festival Orchestra invite the community to the Knowles Memorial Chapel (on the Rollins College campus) for their annual holiday concert. A tradition for generations of Central Florida families, the Bach Festival Society celebrates 77 years of musical offerings this season. One of the longest continuously operating Bach Festivals in the country, the choirs performances are of the highest caliber. Under conductor John Sinclair, the Christmas program will also feature the Festival Youth Choir as they perform holiday favorites and selections from Tchaikovskys Nutcracker Suite. Performances are Saturday, Dec. 10, at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, Dec. 11, at 2 p.m. at the Knowles Chapel. Call 407-6462182 or visit BachFestivalFlorida. orgFree holiday concert Tinsel Tapestry is the title given to the free program of holiday music being offered by the Maitland Symphony Orchestra on Sunday, Dec. 11, at 7:30 pm. The tinsel in the title is a major clue as to the music to be included in the concert, as the symphony, sponsored by the Per forming Arts of Maitland, offers the concert in the sanctuary of the First Presbyterian Church of Mai tland. Program highlights include the Nutcracker Suite by Tchaik ovsky, Leroy Anderson favorites, Deck the Halls from the Mannheim Steamroller collection, and Christmas melodies from Irving Berlin. The concert is free and is a celebration for all ages. The First Presbyterian Church is located at 340 N. Orlando Ave. No reservations are required. Winter Park BBoat Parade Rain or shine, the eighth annual Winter Park Holiday Boat Parade will take place Saturday, Dec. 10, on Lake Virginia and Lake Osceola. This communitywide water parade with holiday-themed (and lighted) boats along the shorelines is hosted by the Rotary Club of Winter Food, wine and beer are available for purchase, but admission to the very best viewing area the Gardens at the Polasek Museum is free. The event schedule includes: 3:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m., water ski show on Lake Virginia with viewing on the Rollins Colbegin at the Polasek Museum with a visit from Santa. (Bring p.m., the boat parade begins on the east shore of Lake Virginia and proceeds through the Palm Canal to Lake Osceola, where the parade will pass in front of judges at the Polasek Museum. Visit wpboatparade.com or call 407-647-6492. It is a wonderful life That beloved holiday movie Its a Wonderful Life has been turned into a play, and the Breakthrough Theatre of Winter Park will present "It's A Won derful Life: A Live Radio Play" through Monday, Dec. 19. This American classic comes to life as a 1940s radio broadcast with an ensemble that brings dozens of characters to the stage. The story of George Bailey unfolds as he considers ending his life one fateful Christmas Eve, and while it doesnt exactly spoil the story to say that this is not a tragedy, it is interesting to note that the plot includes the recipe for helping a fairy to earn his/her wings! Tom Larkin directs. The Breakthrough Theatre is located at 419A W. Fairbanks Ave. in Winter Park. Call 407920-4034.Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. HHe is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906. Josh Garrick CCulture worthy of your calendar TThe new world from the explorers perspective BBoat Parade is Saturday BBach Christmas

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Page 18 Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Opinions I would like to update you on Andrew Weinstock, Operation Gratitude and the Halloween candy collection. With your help, the help of more than 11 schools, neighborhoods, volunteers, the city of Winter Park, countless stores and businesses with candy collection boxes, the media and military personnel, Andrew collected 5,666 pounds of Halloween candy for our deployed soldiers. What a truly amazing accomplishment for a 15-year-old to do in just three weeks! The entire community of Central Florida helped and deserves to know what they helped him accomplish. So many stories have come out since the candy-packing day at our home. First, let me tell you that it was an amazing day. The Winter Park Fire Rescue Depart ment was here helping to pack the candy along with the Winter Park Mayor Ken Bradley, army reservists, enlisted men and women still on active duty and in full uniform asking Andrew what needed to be done and taking direction from him. There were children of all ages, teachers, a school principal, store owners, neighbors, total strangers and of course Andrew's family, all here to help pack carton after carton, pallet after pallet. They packed nine shipping pallets! It was the most organized chaos I have ever seen. Several of the army reservists brought their fami lies, which included very young children. These young children obviously knew the importance of the candy because there were thousands of pieces of chocolate candy bars, gummy bears, M&Ms and lollipops all around them yet not one child asked for a piece of candy, cried for a piece of candy or took a piece of candy and put it in their pocket! These children knew that their mission was to pack the candy and not to eat it! While I was packing a box, the man helping me told me a story about his experience with the Halloween candy. I stopped packing, looked up at the man who was dressed in full uniform and listened to his story. Tears sergeant, still on active duty and told me how the candy has saved not only his life but also the lives of the men and women in his pla toon. This is the story he told me: As we drive through a town on a mission, we see all the streets are empty. We know some thing is going down. I tell my soldiers to throw candy, throw it into the streets, like they do in a parade. Before we can blink, 300 children run into the streets to get the sweet treat. As soon as that happens we know we are safe and the snipers will not shoot. The snipers will not shoot if the children are in harms way, so we must keep the children running into the streets, running to get more and more candy. Our soldiers pass through the town unharmed. If we are on a mission and have little food, we have candy to hold us over. The candy is life-saving in so many ways! We can never have enough candy. It is one of the things we continually ask our families to send to us. The sergeant's voice was cracking, and I asked him to tell this story to the volunteers who were here packing the candy, the candy that saves lives. The sergeant didn't want to draw attention to himself, but I explained that his story is the reason Andrew collects the candy. The sergeant told his story to the volunteers, which brought a new sense of meaning to the Halloween candy collection, to Andrew's efforts and to what our deployed soldiers must be enduring each speaking there was not a dry eye in the crowd. The volunteers clapped for the sergeant who turned to Andrew. He then said, "The real hero is Andrew and his efforts to help the soldiers. It takes a hero to do what he has done!" On Tuesday the candy pallets were picked up to begin their long journey from Orlando to Operation Gratitude's headquar ters in Van Nuys, Calif., and to deployed in remote areas of the world, probably Afghani stan. In the meantime, Andrew has received many emails and phone calls thanking him for his efforts. He has even received a few donations from total strangers who want to help defer the shipping expense. Andrew also received an amazing gift and card from a young, local veteran who met Andrew and wanted to help collect candy for Operation Gratitude. Excerpting his comments, he said: "I just wanted to say thank you. What you have done with this candy collection and the support you show are the reasons why we serve and heroes for different reasons. I once was given this as a token for a heroic act. I now turn and give this to you, as in my eyes you are a true hero. Thank you for all you have done." This sergeant in the USMC gave Andrew his bronze star that he was awarded for his valor during his service in Iraq. Andrew tried to refuse it, but this soldier insisted. As Andrew's mother I am at a complete loss as to what to say. There are no words to describe this honor. I am telling you these stories because you helped give Anunsure if Andrew would meet his goal of collecting 5,000 pounds of candy. Andrew continually assured me he would, but I admit I was not as sure as he was. With your help and the help of hundreds if not thousands of total strangers participating in this project, people donated 5,666 pounds of Halloween candy! Andrew has been collecting Halloween candy since 2009 and has collected more then 10,900 pounds of candy! Thank you for and sore to new heights. The Orlando community not only helped Andrew but the men and women who serve our country and help to keep us safe.The Weinstock family lives in Winter Park. Visit operationgratitude.com for more in formation on Operation Gratitude.More than 5,000 pounds of candy on its way to soldiers JodiJODI WEinsINSTockOCK Guest Writer TThe camping ban and other forgotten laws Freedom of speech clashed with freedom to selectively enforce laws on Dec. 5, and that ing arrested just north of downtown Orlando. As a land founded on the rule itself debating how and when those laws can be justly applied. Take for example laws that have existed for decades and are rarely enforced but, as they are still law, can be wielded by police at will. In Florida, if you forget to use your turn signal to change lanes, you (and likely every other driver on the road) have broken the law. But thats childs play compared to some other rarely enforced laws. If you live and sleep with not married, you can be arrested for it. The legality of women skydiving on Sunday is contingent upon their marital status. But when was the last time you heard of somebody actually being arrested for living with his girlfriend? In Orlando, city code makes it illegal to camp out in a city park. For the past two months Occupy Orlando protestors have been doing just that, brandishing signs and slogans while camp ing out along the edge of Senator Beth Johnson Park as part of an extended protest, an offshoot of the Occupy Wall Street protest in New York City. But theyre not allowed to part. Though theyre exercising their right to protest, theyre still breaking a city ordinance. Le gally, police are allowed to make them remove their tents, and to arrest anybody who doesnt comply. But theyre also allowed to jail you for having sex if its not in the missionary position. Sick of the protestors using the park, Orlando decided that now was the time to get righteous about a code enforcement rule that prevents camping on city property. The law was designed to curb vagrancy, not freedom of speech, but in enforcing it against people who are obviously protesting, the effect is the same: quelling freedom of speech. In this instance, the occupation of the park itself is in a gray area Its an organized protest thats masse during the anti-war protests of the 1960s. cant end a peaceful protest, but they can do everything within their power to make protesting as cludes enforcing as many laws as necessary to keep protestors out of the public eye. Visibility is the protestors greatest weapon. In order for a be seen. In a country in love with capitalism, theyre simply leveraging the great location to do some free advertising for their grievances. Absent dedicated media coverage, visibility is all they have. Erecting a tent city within view of a well-traveled interstate freeway seems like a good start. ing that visibility away could be a King Features Weekly ServiceDecember 5, 2011 OOur OObservation

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Page 19 Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer The holidays are in full swing, and with them come joyous par ties with abundant spreads of food. Its hard to imagine how it would feel to go to bed hungry. Yet that is a real possibility for who struggle to afford enough food for themselves and their families. The CBS program Minthese individuals and families in a segment about homelessness in Central Florida, following up on a report that aired in March. The show featured regular people, accustomed to earning a wage and making their own way in life, who have found themselves with few options for sustainability following the Great Recession. At Second Harvest Food Bank of Central Florida, we often hear from people with similar stories typical image of poverty. Some are college-educated individuals who held high-powered jobs a year ago and now struggle to afford three meals a day. Others work long hours to provide for their families, yet their paychecks simply dont stretch far enough. Still others are seniors living on their essential medications, let alone food. Nearly all held out as long as they could, feeling the sting of shame as they realize they have nowhere else to go. And children suffer dispropor tionately. Last year, 47 percent of those receiving help from Second Harvests network of charitable feeding programs were children younger than 18. More than 246,000 kids in Central Florida are at risk for experiencing life long adverse physical, behavioral and mental health effects due to our hearts to see kids who are losing adult teeth because theyre malnourished, yet that is happening in our own backyard. These numbers can easily become overwhelming. Consider ing the magnitude of the crisis, is it possible to make a real differ ence? The answer is a resounding yes. Every dollar given to Second Harvest can provide up to $9 worth of grocery products for those who need it, and 96 percent of that dollar goes straight to programs that feed people. Last year, thanks to the gener osity of thousands of donors and volunteers, our network of agencies distributed nearly 33 million pounds of food, the equivalent of more than 22 million meals. Its not just canned products, either. We collect and store millions of pounds of fresh produce in our refrigerated facilities every year, ready for distribution to those who might otherwise be forced to eat a cheaper meal with less nutrition. This year, the need is even more critical than ever before especially during the holiday season, when even more people faith in Central Floridas giving community. Weve stepped up before, and we need to continue our efforts. Its unacceptable that anyone in our community should lack the basics of human life. way to help. You can learn how to get involved and make a differ ence by visiting www.feedhopenow.org Dave Krepcho is the president and CE E O of S S econd H H arvest Food B B ank of Central Florida.Chris Jepson Perspectives Louis RRoney Play OOn! Halfway to a place I dont wanna be AAADDIm not much of a fan of modern coun try western music. It just doesnt resonate. Much of it sounds like s bubblegum music with a twang. Big-thighed, thir tyish, balding white boys in black hats singing of love, for all I know, for their customized Ford F-150s. I prefer Patsy Cline and Johnny Cash. They sang of love and loss and sorrow, and you sensed they felt it because they actually lived it. Sometimes I write a line and I think, Damn, thatd make a great country western song! I thought I heard an individual once describe himself as halfway married when, in reality, he was actually claiming to be happily married. Haha! Quite a difference, and what a great open ing line for a song of regret. She thought we were happily married but I was only halfway married and . Invariably over the course of a day my mind will wander, depending on the prompt, from the state of the nation to Americas political leadership, environ mental issues, reproductive choice, health care access, poverty, Republican simpletons, Tea Party yahoos, spineless liberals, the perverse Israeli/American relationship, the nations many wars, American imperialism, our economy, elections in Russia or congressional ineptitude. During a recent particularly bleak day privately assessing Americas current position and prospects, I wrote, Im about halfway to a place I dont wanna be. I immediately scribbled underneath country western song. Its a good line and a valid determination of where a lot half a load on intellectually, then you cannot help but be alarmed at where the I have a relative who recently par ticipated in a surgery in a western U.S. hospital. A number of physicians were involved and over the course of the operation, the conversation between the doctors turned to whether bullets or gold would be more valuable (and tradable) if, heaven forbid, the center didnt hold and Americas government collapsed. Ive a call in to see what was the consensus of that esteemed, educated assemblage. Any student of history clearly under stands that what is or what was is no guarantee for what will be. No nation has Historically, simply persevering as a national entity has been success enough. Many nations, many empires that once were, simply do not exist today in any form. Let alone in a reduced state such as Great Britain or Russia. It is hard not to consider that America is inexorably moving to an Orwellian oligarchy predicated on (necessitating) a gullible electorate skillfully manipulated to voting against its own interests. There is a despair setting in, a growing feeling, a realization that the game is rigged that those who have the most will inevitably get the rest. long before such perception erodes what system? American exceptionalism is best summed up in two modern advertising slogans: Be all that you can be and Just do it. That is so American and, seemingly, so yesterday. We desperately need a new vision. A new order. A new song. As Walt Whitman commemorated in his poetic vision of the United States, I hear America singing, the varied carols I hear . Its about work. Life. America. Its about happiness and hope. All in short supply these days. Jepson is a 24-year resident of Florida. HHes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. RReach him at Jepson@MEEDIAmerica.USS I think Ive got age-activated attention Right now its Saturday morning: I decide to put things in order in our garage today. I get the garage-opener from the drawer in the front hall table. I start to go out the front door and notice some mail lying on the table. OK, Im going to straighten up the mail. I sit down at the desk in the library. I lay the garage-opener down on the desk. I see bills among lots of junk mail. While discarding junk mail I notice that the trash basket is full. OK, Ill just leave the bills on my desk and take the trash can out. But no, since Im going bills Now, where is my checkbook? Oops, theres only one check left. My extra checks are somewhere in the bottom of a desk drawer. Uh-oh, theres the can of Pepsi Lite I checks. of Pepsi farther from where Ill be writing. Even better, Ill put it in the fridge to keep it cold for a while. I head toward the kitchen and through the glass door, the potted plants on the porch catch my eye. They need watering. I set the Pepsi on the kitchen counter. There are my eyeglasses! Ive been looking all over for them. Id better put them on the desk in the and head for the plants. Oops! Someone left the big TV remote in the kitchen. Well never think to look in the kitchen tonight when we want to watch television, so Id better put it back in the living room where it belongs. I splash some water into the pots remote on a sofa cushion, and go back was I was going to do. Saturday, now 5 p.m.: The garage is not straightened up, the bills are unpaid, the Pepsi is sitting on the kitchen counter, the plants are half watered, the checkbook still has only one and I lost my eyeglasses again! got done today, Im nonplussed because Im tired from being so busy. email It seems to me that life is built on opposites, e.g., day and night, rich and poor, fat and thin, Republicans and Democrats, dumb and smart, mean and amicable, place in the scheme of things, youre not alive anymore, youre the opposite. Sage words: I predict future happiness for Ameri cans if they can prevent government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of taking care of them. Thomas Jefferson About RRoney: HHarvardDistinguished Prof, EEm.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy RRoney) I think Ive got age-activated attention deficit disorder, but Im not sure. Holiday season shines spotlight on the local ght against hunger Dav AVE KrREpchoPCHO Guest Writer Krepcho

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Page 20 Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Recently, President Obama announced a new plan to help nance to lower their monthly mortgage payments. Working with the Federal Housing Finance Agency, the president has revised Program, aiming to help 1 million homeowners who owe more than their homes are worth to avoid foreclosure. Realtors commend President Obama for pledging to help more struggling homeowners Mike McGraw, chairman of the Orlando Regional Realtor Association. When people lose homes to foreclosure, families, communities, the housing market and the economy all suffer. Helping even more families stay current on their mortgage and remain in their homes will help support the housing recovery. HARP was created in 2009 and their mortgages at lower rates without having to meet the typi cal requirement of having at least 20 percent of equity in their home to do so. Under previous guidelines, many homeowners have been ineligible for the program because their home values had to be no more than 25 percent below what they owed their lender and some were unable to afford the closing costs and appraisal fees. With the new rules, which took effect Dec. 1, some of the extra fees to participate in HARP have been waived and homeowners eligibility wont be contingent on how far the homes value has fallen. Homeowners with loans backed by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac, and who are current on their mortgages, may participate in the program. Realtors hope the recent changes to HARP will encour age other mortgage investors to help struggling homeowners some, the money saved is worth it, McGraw said. Realtors have been advocating for the government and lenders to take more aggressive steps to modify loans, as well as streamline the short sales process, another alternative for struggling homeowners. The National Association of Realtors is also calling upon Congress and the Obama administration to create policy solu tions that stimulate housing and economic recovery. In a recent outlined in part by NAR, lenders and the government are urged to take more aggressive steps to modify loans and approve short sales to help reduce high foreclo sure inventory levels. Realtors are hopeful that reduced fees programs such as HARP will help more struggling homeowners reduce their monthly mortgage payments and avoid losing their home to foreclosure. McGraw said the changes to HARP are just one step toward re housing market. We are begin ning to see early signs of stabilization in the housing market, but reduced and housing inventory reaches a more normal level, there can be no true recovery. HODGES BROTHERS INCROOFING & CONSTRUCTION Jeff ClarkColdwell Banker Residential407.733.0773j.clark@coldwellbanker.com www.BaldwinParkLiving.com New Construction!4 bed / 2.5 bath / 2190 sq ft $339,000 808 Hamilton Place Court Winter Park, FL 32789 Commerce Brokerage, LLC407-566-1636 HomesObserver Homes brought to you by: Fannie Hillman + AssociatesServing Central Florida for over 29 years! 407-644-1234 fanniehillman.com Orlando Realtors support renancing rules to reduce foreclosures

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Page 21 Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer PLEASE MARK YOUR RESPONSE HERE:Will you please review and respond as soon as possible? We are waiting for your approval. Please NOTE: this is NOT a second opportunity to design the ad. Redesign changes may result in additional charges. Thank you!1. Please circle A or B below: A: I approve this ad as shown here B: I approve this ad with changes as marked (How many changes are marked? _____)2. Please double check phone/address/names.Phone & address are correct (initials here) ________ With this signature, I signify my understanding that payment for this ad is due per Advertising Agreement.Signed ________________________________Since 1995(407) 366-8696 Fax (407) 359-2118 P.O. Box 4548 Winter Park, FL 32793FOR YOUR INFORMATIONThis ad will appear in these areas and months. ____Waterford Lakes__________________ ____College Park/Orlando______________ ____Winter Park/Maitland_______________ ____Sweetwater/Heathrow______________ ____Tuscawilla/Wntr Sprgs _____________ ____Oviedo__________________________ ____Baldwin/Winter Pk. East ____________X JUNE 2011 X JUNE 2011 A Better Plumber407-644-4000 X JUNE 2011 Sales of existing single-family homes jump 18 percent in OctoberMembers of the Orlando Regional Realtor Association participated in the sales of 18.16 more existing single-family homes in October of this year than in October of 2010, which is the years greatest month-overmonth increase in sales of this home type. In addition to the 18.16 per cent increase in existing singlefamily home sales, Orlandos overall home sales for October have increased by 5.89. since March that overall sales have indicated a month-overmonth improvement, said ORRA Chairman Mike McGraw, McGraw Real Estate Services, PL. This additional activity can be attributed to a multitude of local factors such as low inter est rates, a higher percentage of normal sales, and a steady incline in median price that are encouraging buyers to take advantage of today extraordinary market conditions. In addition to an increase in sales, the overall median price of all home sale types combined ($112,700) increased by 7.33 percent compared to the $105,000 median price in October 2010. Since January of this year, Orlandos median price has increased by 18.76 percent. The median price of normal sales closing in October 2011 was $153,000, and normal sales accounted for 41.30 percent of all transactions. These two steadily improving factors have been helping to keep overall median prices hovering above those recorded in 2010. But the lower median price of foreclosures and short sales (which combined account for 58.70 percent of all sales in October) does continue to negatively price. The median price for bankowned sales in October is $80,000 and the median price for short sales is $95,000. Sales of foreclosed homes de clined 38.50 percent in October of this year compared to last, while short sales and normal sales both increased (by 40.83 percent and 34.91 percent, respectively). Buyers who purchased an Orlando area home in October paid average interest rate of 4.21 percent, which is slightly above the 4.19 percent average inter est rate recorded for September. That rate was the lowest since the Orlando Regional Realtor Association began tracking the statistic in January of 1995. Homes of all types spent an average of 106 days on the mar ket before coming under contract in October 2011, and the average home sold for 94.66 percent of its listing price. In October 2010 those numbers were 91 days and 94.67 percent, respectively. At the current pace of sales, there is a 4.82-month supply of homes in Orlandos inventory. The number of homes available for purchase in the Orlando area increased in October by 42 homes and now rests at 9,973. Overall inventory is down 35.41 percent from October of last tory is down 33.52 percent while condo inventory is down 38.69 percent. Pending sales those under contract and awaiting closing are currently at 8,937. The num ber of pending sales in October 2011 is 1.36 percent greater than in October 2010. AffordabilityThe Orlando affordability in dex decreased to 254.94 percent in October. (An affordability index of 99 percent means that buyers earning the state-reported median income are 1 percent short of the income necessary to purchase a median-priced home. Conversely, an affordability index that is over 100 means that median-income earners make more than is necessary to qualify for a median-priced home.) Buyers who earn the reported median income of $54,017 can qualify to purchase one of 5,605 homes in Orange and Seminole counties currently listed in the local multiple listing service for $287,314 or less. First-time homebuyer afford ability in October decreased a bit to 181.29 percent from last months 181.81 percent. First-time buyers who earn the reported median income of $36,732 can qualify to purchase one of the 3,984 homes in Orange and Seminole counties currently listed in the local multiple listing service for $173,665 or less. ORRRRA

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Page 28 Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer ADVERTISING NETWORKS OF FLORIDA Donate A Boat sponsored by boat angel outreach centers STOP CRIMES AGAINST CHILDREN www.boatangel.com2-Night Free Vacation!or Car Today! 800 1 CAR L ANGE



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BUS_CARD 3.25 x 2 August 2010Grafton Wealth ManagementWilliam D. Grafton III, Sarah Grafton DeVoe William D. Grafton IV Financial Advisors (407) 646-6725 400 Park Avenue South Suite 300 Winter Park, FL 32789 Merrill Lynch Wealth Management makes available products and services offered by Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated (MLPF&S) and other subsidiaries of Bank of America Corporation. MLPF&S is a registered broker-dealer, member SIPC. Investment products: 2010 Bank of America Corporation. All rights reserved. Are Not FDIC Insured Are Not Bank Guaranteed May Lose Value 407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC USPS 00-6186 Publisher statement on page 4. Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011 50+ tax wpmobserver.com Subscribe now! Visit wpmobserver.com About 250 Winter Park resi Her vision Mom says thanks for helping her son collect 5,666 pounds of Halloween candy for our deployed soldiers. Page 18 Opinions Lifestyles Winter Park Crew celebrates its 50th birthday with an alumni race for the community on Saturday, Dec. 17. Page 13 Culture Calendar Borders of Paradise: The New World in the Eyes of Explorers opens Friday at the Maitland Historical Museum. Page 17 Holiday Calendar The Winter Park Boat Parade & Festival of Lights includes a water ski show on Lake Virginia on Saturday. Page 15 Santa at the Casa PHOTO BY JENNY ANDREASSON THE OBSERVER Christmas at the Casa was held on Thursday, Dec. 1, at Casa Feliz and featured hot cocoa, cookies and photos with Santa. See more photos from last weeks events on page 10. Cities aim to ban smoking ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff Please see TOBACCO on page 7 PHOTO BY JENNY ANDREASSON THE OBSERVER Winter Park mayoral candidate Nancy Miles speaks with residents about her vision for the city at a campaign kickoff party at the Winter Park Community Center on Monday. Please see MAY OR on page 5 Mayoral race kicks off Miles pledges to build consensus on dais JENNY ANDREASSON Observer Staff More on page 5: Winter Park Mayor Ken Bradley discusses his mayoral re-election campaign.

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Page 2 Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Individual & Family health plans For an Instant Quote or to apply, visit our website www.HealthInsuranceIBS.com407-831-5166 Tom Carey SundewGardens@gmail.comCommunity supported agriculture. Experience homegrown gardening: St. Dorothy Catholic Community Love Without Judgment 301 New England Avenue Post Office Box 485 Winter Park, FL 32790-0485 CHRISTMAS MIDNIGHT MASS DECEMBER 25 12:00 MIDNIGHTwww.stdorothycatholiccommunity.org407-610-5109(Respectfully not associated with the Diocese of Orlando)WHERE ALL ARE WELCOME!We have continued the reformed true Catholic Tradition in the Spirit of Vatican Council II! Are you divorced, gay, a recovering Catholic, feeling disenfranchised by your present worshiping community of whatever denomination, looking for a small worshipping community where you are known and not lost in the crowd? Then you have found what you are looking for in St. Dorothy Catholic Community! Letters to Santa contest winner The winner of Winter Park-Maitland Observers inaugural Letters to Santa contest is 9-year-old Macie McCully from Winter Park. Macie rode in a convertible right in front of the oat carrying Santa Claus during Saturdays Winter Park Christmas parade. She also received Winter in the Park tickets and a Polar Express gift basket. Thanks to our contest sponsors, Maitland Public Library, Winter Park Chamber of Commerce and the city of Winter Park. T o read more Letters to Santa contest submissions, visit wpmobserver.com. Thanks for participating and happy holidays! Dear Santa, The gift I most want to give is for orphans around the world to have a family that loves them and cares for them. The reason this is the gift I want to give the most is because there are many people who wish to simply love and provide for a child, and it is hard for them to do that given the amount of time and money it takes to adopt a child. Orphans simply wish to be loved and cared for, and I wish things could be a lot easier on them. All orphans deserve to be happy and lucky just like me! Macie McCully Age 9 Winter Park

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Page 4 Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer USPS 00-6186 ISSN 1064-3613 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835-5705 Member of: Goldenrod Chamber of Commerce Publisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor. Submission does not guarantee publication. Columnists opinions are made independently of the newspaper. All rights reserved. Winter Park / Maitland Observer 2011 Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster www.wpmobserver.com | Phone: 407-563-7000 | Fax: 407-563-7099 | editor@observernewspapers.com P.O. Box 2426 Winter Park, FL 32790 Published Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011 CONTACTS Volume 23, Issue Number 49 PUBLISHER Kyle T aylor 407-563-7009 kyle@observernewspapers.com Jenny Andreasson 407-563-7026 editor@observernewspapers.com DESIGNER Jonathan Gallagher 407-563-7054 jgallagher@observernewspapers.com REPOR TERS Jenny Andreasson 407-563-7026 editor@observernewspapers.com Isaac Babcock 407-563-7023 isaacb@observernewspapers.com Ashley McBride classieds@observernewspapers.com COPY EDITORS Isaac Babcock isaacb@observernewspapers.com Padrick Brewer COLUMNISTS Chris Jepson Louis Roney LRoney@c.rr.com Josh Garrick joshgarrick9@gmail.com T racy Craft 407-515-2605 tcraft@observernewspapers.com Amanda Rayno 407-563-7073 arayno@golfweek.com obit@observernewspapers.com Business Briefs Because of inaccurate information provided to the Observer, the Dec. 1 article ROTCs tribute to veterans incorrectly identied the military branch in which Easter Seals Day Break member Don served. He is a former Navy serviceman. Correction Artists in residence at MAC xture at the institution for many years. In this second year of the programs reinvigoration, two new artists have been selected participate in the program, one starting this fall and the other in January. In the studios for 2010-11: Cicero Greathouse. In January, Trent Tomengo will join the group. Hours will be posted out side the studios and will be available in the museum ofces. For more information, please visit www.artandhistory.org, or phone 407539-2181. Morse in top 10 The Morse Museum was included for the rst time in the U.S. News and World Reports list know the Morse has always been a spectacu lar collection to see but I dont think we would have gotten this ranking without the new wing and all the accompanying publicity here and across the nation, Museum Director of Pub thing for Winter Park as hopefully the Museum will continue to bring visitors here to discover the charms of this wonderful town. We are the only Winter Park attraction on the list. Visit travel.usnews.com. BETA s toy drive Drive runs through Monday, Dec. 12. The gift drive directly benets teen moms and their agencys mission is to give children and fami lies the knowledge and support needed to be strong and healthy, with a focus on teen moms and at-risk families. For more information or Lisa Blackwelder, director of development, at lblackwelder@betacenter.org or 407-3986213. Drop off donations at any Sonnys or Winter Park-based Handex Consulting & Re mediation LLC was recently named to the Zweig Letter Hot Firm List for 2011. Members of the Orlando Regional Realtor As sociation participated in the sales of 18.16 per cent more existing single-family homes in Octo ber of this year than in October 2010, which is the years greatest month-over-month increase in sales of this home type. Orlandos overall home sales for October have increased by 5.89 percent. Shaw Mechanical Services LLC has secured and started work on a $2.9 million contract for mechanical services for the new Westridge Mid dle School in Orlando. Dan Moisand, certied nancial planner of Mai tland-based Moisand Fitzgerald Tamayo LLC, has ment category of Financial Planning magazines annual Inuencers awards. Lowndes, Drosdick, Doster, Kantor & Reed is pleased to announce that it has been honored with the Y our Honor runner-up award in the Social Media Initiative category by The Le to announce the inclusion of four new members to its board of directors: Dean Bosco, wealth management adviser, BB&T; Duncan DeWahl, district manager & CFP, Waddell & Reed Finan cial Services; Sean Hall, Kristine Wood, director of design, Urbanscape Properties Inc. NAI Realvest recently completed two new lease facilities in Maitland. Total Health Diabetes, a lo cal rm that provides diabetes education, sup port and referral services, leased suite 204 with opment Planning & Financing Group Inc., busi in San Juan Capistrano, Calif., is the new tenant 1060 Maitland Center Commons. The Central Florida ofce of Charles Perry Partners Inc. announced the rm received two Central Florida Chapter. Community Bulletin Club founder Rollins College Football Club founder Bill Caldwell poses after the teams rst game Oct. 24. He donated $5,000 to get the club off the ground. T earful reunion On Veterans Day, Maitland-based team leader Kelly Lofgren, with an unexpected at-work reunion. Sar ah and Kelly Lofgren had not seen each other for more than four months. Stationed at Fort Drum, N.Y ., the thousands of miles be tivEngage team leader had been hard on them. Were closer than sisters, said Sarah, still beaming from the surprise reunion. Were best friends and we tell each oth er everything. Keeping this secret from her was so hard. Maitlander wins silver petition, held on Saturday, Nov. 19. More than 45 entrants from around the state competed, with 12 prize-winning contestants advancing to the nalist round. Local winners include: Second-prize winner: Leah Hollingshead (below center), soprano, Maitland, singing Other competition nalists include: David Brill, violin; Orlando Gabriella Galletti, soprano; Orlando David Gordon, piano; Lake Mary John Horzen, violin; Orlando John Li, piano; Oviedo Enoch Wong, piano; Orlando

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CenturyLink-provided STBs are required to view TV. Local channel availability varies by market. High Denition (HD) available on all TV plans, and up to two (2) of the up to four (4) video streams can be in HD. Customers location determines both HD availability and the maximum number of HD video streams (between 0 and 2 HD streams) a customer can view and record at any one time per residence, regardless of the number of STBs in the household. All non-HD video streams are provided in standard denition. Subscription to service precludes customer from purchasing high-speed Internet services from any third party. Additional charges will apply for additional programming packages, movie channel subscriptions (except for PrismTM Premium plan), Pay Per View movies and events, On Demand purchases, and premium services/subscriptions for all plans. Some subscription services, events, and broadcast network service may be blacked out in customers area. Vacation Program Offer available to residential customers only. Only certain CenturyLink services are eligible for the Vacation Program; third party services received through CenturyLink are not eligible. Offer may include a reduced monthly recurring charge for a predetermined number of months each year, retention of equipment and suspension of service, programming and agreement during Vacation Program activation. A zero balance for each applicable service is required for eligibility. If customer does not contact CenturyLink to resume full activation of applicable services before the end of six (6) consecutive month period, all applicable monthly charges, fees, surcharges, contractual obligations, etc., will resume automatically. Vacation Program services will have restrictions and limitations that will vary for each applicable service. Contact CenturyLink for details. Equipment Minimum equipment and CenturyLink professional installation are required. At initial installation, each customer receives: one (1) VDSL 2 modem; up to six (6) STBs (standard plan includes one (1) STB; additional STBs are available for an additional monthly rate, per STB); and one (1) remote control per STB installed. All equipment must be returned to designated CenturyLink retail store within thirty (30) days after service disconnection in an undamaged condition, or customer is charged for each equipment piece not returned or returned as damaged. Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides: 2011 Disney. All Rights Reserved. 2011 CenturyLink, Inc. All rights reserved. The name CenturyLink and the pathways logo are property of CenturyLink, Inc. All other marks are property of their respective owners. BONUS!PUT YOUR P RISMTM TV ON VACATION IF YOU ARE HEADING BACK NORTH NO CONTRACT A ND FREE H D WHEN YOU PICK 2. for 12 months CNTL11-1144H_10.15x9_r1.indd 1 11/3/11 5:19 PM Getting to know Miles Supporters weigh in what was best for Winter Park without Whirling campaign MAY OR | Just seven weeks until Election Day C Visit nancyforwinterpark.org for more information on mayoral candidate Nancy Miles. Dates for meet and greets mayoral debates have not yet been set. Stay tuned to wpmobserver.com for more information. Learn more Bradley talks jobs, civility ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff

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Page 6 Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Savannah Court and CoeExcellence in Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation 1301 W. Maitland Blvd. Maitland, FL 32751407-645-3990www.SavannahCourtMaitland.comAssisted Living Facility License No. 8447 Skilled Nursing Facility License No. 1635096 The quality of care is outstanding. Our mother has made so many friends here. And she especially loves the hair salon! Peggy, her daughter Merrel & son DwightAssisted Living Rehabilitation and Skilled Nursing Care Variety of Apartment Suite Selections, some with Lake Views Restaurant Style Dining Laundry, Housekeeping, Maintenance Services Transportation to Outings and Medical Appointments Beautifully Landscaped Courtyard Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above. You are always welcome! A Senior Living Community where Hospitality is a Way of Life. Effective December 9, 2011T. Eugene Chambers, Jr., DO, will be moving his practice, South Semoran Family Care, from their current location at: 429 South Semoran Blvd., Ste 1 Orlando, FL 32807 to East Orlando Medical Group 900 S. Goldenrod Road, Ste B Orlando, FL 32822 407.281.6424 Patient medical records will be maintained at the new NOTICE TO PATIENTS fourth quarter before a shot in Edgewater Cats drop tourney, look to rebound ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff Tough competition at Winter Park Rotary Living for the art PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Winter Park Observers culture columnist, Josh Garrick, above left, hosted a tour of his art-laden Orlando home on Tuesday, Nov. 29.

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Page 7 Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer TOBACCO | Rollins and UCF to implement bans C PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Winter Park has been pushing for the right to ban tobacco use since January. Maitland is also seeking that abillity. Knights bounce back ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER UCF sophomore Isaiah Sykes has emerged as a dominant force on offense and defense in his second season.

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Page 8 Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer City Council Agenda of Dec. 12 Special Presentation: Public Hearing: Consent Agenda: Decision Items: Appointments Discussion Item: For updates, visit www.itsmymaitland.com Maitland City Talk BY HOW ARD SCHIEFERDECKER MAYOR City pays tribute to its nest statesman Subscribe to Maitlands free weekly e-newsletter. Visit IndependenceLane.com and click subscribe today. Learn more PHOTO COUR TESY OF CITY OF MAITLAND Benches dedicated to former Maitland Mayor James G. Houser and his wife, Peggie, sit together in a city park.

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Page 9 Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer PLEASE NOTE: BEGINNING MONDAY, DEC. 12, THROUGH FEBRUARY 2012, CITY COM MISSION MEETINGS WILL BE HELD AT THE RACHEL D. MURRAH CIVIC CENTER (1050 W. MORSE BLVD.) DUE TO CITY HALL RENOVATIONS. City Commission Work Session There will be a City Commis sion Work Session held on Mon day, Dec. 12, from 2 p.m. 3:15 p.m., at the Rachel D. Murrah Civic Center located at 1050 W. Morse Blvd. to discuss Mead Garden. This meeting is open to the public, however, no public comment will be taken. Dec. 12 City Commission meeting topics of interest There will be a City Commis sion meeting on Monday, Dec. 12, at 3:30 p.m., at the Rachel D. Murrah Civic Center located at 1050 W. Morse Blvd. Below are a few topics of interest: Mayors Report Thank you from Brookshire Elementary School for use of Cady Way pool Special citizen recognition by the Winter Park Fire-Rescue De partment Presentation of the Orlan do Business Journals Central Floridas Healthiest Employer Award Board appointments: Winter Park Police Officers Pension Board Martin Luther King, Jr., Task Force members Reappointment to the Orange County Civic Facilities Board Non-action Items Economic impact and re search analysis of the Winter Park Farmers Market present ed by Rollins College Crummer Graduate School of Business students Downtown parking study Consent Agenda Approve the minutes of Nov. 28. Approve the following con tract and bids: Piggybacking the City of Denver/US Communities con tract with Kone Inc. for elevator maintenance and service and authorize the mayor to execute the piggyback contract. Pierce Manufacturing Inc. for purchase of aerial fire appara tus. Wesco Distribution for pur chase of circuit breakers. Approve the Historic Preser vation Faade Easement dona tion for 121 W. Garfield Ave., commonly known as the Kum mer-Kilbourne House, and au thorize the mayor to execute the agreement. Action Items Requiring Discussion Request of the Tree Preserva tion Board to review the Tree Preservation Ordinance Public Hearings Second reading of the ordi nance regarding lakeshore pro tection Second reading of the ordi nance to vacate a portion of the city right-of-way located at 2525 Via Tuscany. Request of Rollins College: Final Conditional Use approval for the Alfond Inn, 112-room ho tel with a restaurant/bar, meet ing/ballroom space and on-site parking at 300 E. New England Ave. Resolution electing to use the uniform method of collect ing non-ad valorem special as sessments levied within the city to collect the costs for abatement of code violations. City Commission Reports Commissioner Leary Commissioner Sprinkel Commissioner Cooper Affordable housing Commissioner McMacken Mayor Bradley You can find the Commis sions full agenda and informa tion on specific agenda items by logging on to the citys official website at www.cityofwinter park.org and by clicking on Government > City Commis sion > Packets. Correction on the Nov. 28 City Commission Meeting Highlights printed in the Dec. 1 Observer: The resolution determining that Affordable Housing devel opments should be given prior ity processing was referred to the Economic Development Ad visory Board and the Planning & Zoning Board. Come out and ice skate! Dont forget the citys Win ter in the Park holiday ice skating rink in Central Park West Meadow is officially open! Come out and skate: Monday thru Thursday, 3 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday, 3 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sunday, Noon to 8 p.m. See website for extended school and holiday hours. Only $10 per skater including skate rental all day! For more information, please call 407599-3203 or visit our website at www.cityofwinterpark.org Santa Claus is coming to town The city of Winter Park is preparing to welcome Santa and Mrs. Claus to the city on the evenings of Monday, Dec. 12, through Monday, Dec. 19. Young and young-at-heart will have the chance to mingle with old St. Nick himself as he rides his sleigh through Winter Park neighborhoods. On Dasher, on Dancer and Donner and Blitzen! Santa and Mrs. Claus will make stops in local neigh borhoods according to the fol lowing schedule*: Monday, Dec. 12 6:30 p.m. Shady Park 6:45 p.m. Israel Simpson Court 7:30 p.m. Winter Park Country Club Tuesday, Dec. 13 6:30 p.m. Lake Knowles, east side 7:30 p.m. Phelps Park Wednesday, Dec. 14 6:15 p.m. Brookshire El ementary 7:15 p.m. Lakemont Fire Station 62 8 p.m. Genius and Mizell avenues Thursday, Dec. 15 6:45 p.m. Briarwood Drive 7:30 p.m. Harland Park on Blueridge Road 8 p.m. Chelton Circle Monday, Dec. 19 6:30 p.m. DePugh Nursing Center 7:30 p.m. Margaret Square Times are approximate and subject to change. In addition to welcoming Santa and Mrs. Claus this holi day season, the city of Winter Park has many holiday events planned for all ages to enjoy. Gather with friends, family and loved ones to experience Winter Parks holiday traditions. For complete details on each of the citys events, please visit the official website at www.cityof winterpark.org Please pardon our mess, were improving City Hall During the months of De cember through February, the city will be working at making City Hall much more welcom ing, customer friendly and en ergy efficient. As a result, many of the services offered at City Hall will be temporarily offered at other locations, some within areas of City Hall and others off-site. The following is a list ing of the city services and their temporary locations during construction: City Management/Adminis tration has moved to City Hall West Wing, 2nd Floor Building/Permitting has moved to City Hall West Wing, 2nd Floor Cashiers and Utility Billing Customer Service has moved to City Hall West Wing, 1st Floor Economic Development/ CRA Department has moved to the Welcome Center located at 151 W. Lyman Ave. Planning Department has moved to the Azalea Lane Rec reation Center located at 1045 Azalea Lane Beginning Monday, Dec. 12 through February, City Com mission meetings will be held at the Rachel D. Murrah Civic Center located at 1050 W. Morse Blvd. For any city advisory board meetings temporary locations, please visit www.cityofwinter park.org > Government > Board & Public Meetings. We ask for your patience as we work toward improving your City Hall experience and becoming more energy efficient. Thank you! Visit the citys official website at www.cityofwinterpark.org, find us on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter. Lack of Desire or Low Energy? Testosterone Lab Work for $35 (a $240 Value) Call today for a risk-free appointment: 407-894-9959 PARKER LUMBER COMPANY, Inc.Building Supplies MAITLAND, FLORIDA 32751-4408Phone (407) 644-3600 December 5, 2011 851 N Orlando A ve.Dear Friends and Neighbors, After over 100 years in business in Central Florida, Parker Lumber Company will be closing our lumber and hardware business. Our family would like to thank all of our loyal customers, vendors, employees and the community for supporting us throughout the years. Four generations of Parkers are very proud of what we have accomplished. We could not have succeeded without all of you. A heartfelt THANK Y OU!!! Maitland wants a SunRail commuter station. Our property was selected as the best location. We have worked with the city of Maitland and the Florida Department of T ransportation for the last four years to make Maitlands commuter the past and look to the future. As the saying goes, to everything there is a season, and our season is here. Our family believes it is time to say goodbye to the lumber and hardware business, and now concentrate on our rental property and the development of the remainder of our property. quarter of 2012. Please come in and see our great going-out-of-business sale on all of our inventory. T he Parkers and our employees would like to shake your hand and say thanks for all the years of your support. Yours T ruly, PAR KER LUM BER COMP ANY AND EMP LO YEES Bud Parker Larry Parker David Parker Steven Parker Dottie Parker T eresa Burks Kevin Burks Paul Guimarin Michelle Ziesmer Winter Park City Talk BY RAND Y KNIGHT CITY MANAGER

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Page 10 Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer contest CALLING ALL JUDGES !We need YOU for thePeoples Choice AwardCheck out the competition along Park Avenue, Morse Boulevard & New England Avenue, and choose your favorite holiday window display!participating merchantsMorse BoulevardGurtzberry Yogurt Things & Fashion BoutiqueNew England AvenueCapricci Ricci SalonSouth Park AvenueThread Siegels Clothing Company Taylors Pharmacy Tuni SynergyNorth Park AvenueThrough the Looking Glass Eileen Fisher Kilwins Winter Park DownEast Orvis Breakaway Bicycles Claret Cosmetics Absolute Dcor Bay Hill Jewelers on Park Simmons Jewelers Timothys Gallery The Collection Bridal Shoooz on Park Orchid Thai Cuisine The Spice & Tea Exchange Tugboat & the Bird Bella Unique Boutique The Doggie Door Rosie Wrays Roost The Paper ShopPick up your ballot at any participating merchant, the WinterPark Welcome Center, or the holiday ice skating rink. All ballots must be dropped off at the ice rink to be counted. You may also vote online at www.cityofwinterpark.org/WITP by clicking on the Window Contest tab. Contest begins Thursday, December 1, 2011. All ballots are due Sunday, January 8, 2012.Contest sponsored by the City of Winter Park Economic Development/CRA Department.HOLIDAY WINDOW WITP HolidayWindowContest Observer Ad 5x16_WITP HolidayWindowContest Observer Ad 5x16 11/29/11 4:58 PM Page 1 T iffany glass delights Santa at Casa PHOTOS BY JENNY ANDREASSON THE OBSERVER Morse Museums 33rd Christmas in the Park on Dec. 1 featured eight Tiffany windows and Bach Festival Choir. PHOTO BY JENNY ANDREASSON THE OBSERVER Christmas at the Casa was held on Thursday, Dec. 1, at Casa Feliz and featured hot cocoa and Santa photos.

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Page 11 Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Maitland plaza turns 25 Parading on Park PHOTOS BY KYLE T A YLOR THE OBSERVER Park Avenue came to life at the 59th annual Y e Olde Hometown Christmas Parade on Saturday, Dec. 3. PHOTOS BY KYLE T A YLOR THE OBSERVER The Great Maitland Muscle Car and Antique Auto Show was Saturday, Dec. 3, at the Shoppes at Maitland Plaza.

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Page 12 Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer THURSDA Y JFS Glow and Golf fundraiser is 6 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 8, at Winter Park Country Club, 761 Old England Ave., Winter Park. Individuals can register for $70 and teams of four for $260. A $5 discount on registration will be of fered to golfers donating toys. To reg ister, visit www.jfsorlando.org/#golf Newcomers of Central Florida holi day luncheon with musical entertain ment is 11:30 a.m. Thursday, Dec. 8, at Maison & Jardin, 430 S. Wymore Road, Altamonte Springs. Tickets are $23. Advance reservations are required. For information, visit new comersc.org T raveling Between Worlds: An Ar chaeological Exploration of Complex Societies Research Based around Household Economies and Lithic Studies by Lucas Martindale John son is the subject of the 7 p.m. Thurs day, Dec. 8, Central Florida Anthropo logical Society meeting at Harry P. Leu Gardens. Contact kagidusko@ hotmail.com or 321-948-3994. FRIDA Y To help raise money for American Project, StillWaters Healing Center is hosting a Stress Reducing Com munity Acupuncture Event from 5 p.m.-7 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 9, at 260 Lookout Place Suite 209, Maitland. Seating is limited; call 407-772-9243 for reservations. UCF Ice Hockey vs. USF Ice Hockey is 10:15 p.m. Friday, Dec. 9, at RDV Ice Den. Its $5 for the general public and free with an UCF ID. SA TURDA Y Winter Park Florida Blue centers free Health Fair is 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 10. There will be free health screenings. Mayor Howard Schieferdeckers re-election campaign kickoff is 4 p.m.-5:30 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 10, at Swoope Studio, 142 S. Swoope Ave. in Maitland. Fresh Med Spas is hosting a Holiday SPA-rty Saturday, Dec. 10, from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. with holiday refresh ments, discounts and exclusives. Visit www.freshmedspas.com. MONDA Y On Monday, Dec. 12, at 3:30 p.m., Chris Miles will speak on Accents of English-Speaking People at a meeting of the English-Speaking Union at the University Club of Win ter Park, 841 Park Ave. Contact 407365-4051 for more information. The Goldenrod Chambers Annual Holiday Party is Monday, Dec. 12, at the Goldenrod Station from 5:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m. The event is free for all and will include heavy appetizers and cocktails. Bring unwrapped toys. RSVP to 407-677-5980. TUESDA Y The Rollins College Center for Ad vanced Entrepreneurship will host a forum at the Mills Memorial Center at Rollins College in Winter Park on Tuesday, Dec. 13. To learn contact info@CEONexus.com or 407-5906101. WEDNESDA Y Playhouse favorites Heather Alexan der & Laura Hodos will bring holiday cheer to Central Florida one more time in the popular Winter Park Play house Spotlight Cabaret Series on Wednesday, Dec. 14, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $20 and include a drink. DEC. 15 Orange Audubon Society presents A Y ear in the Life of a Park Ranger by Amy Conyers at 7 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 15. Its free and at Leu Gardens, 1920 N. Forest Ave., Orlando. Call 407-637-2525 or visit www.orange audubon.org ONGOING The Winter Park Farmers Market is every Saturday from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the old train depot, 200 W. New England Ave. Visit CityofWinterPark. org. The Maitland Farmers Market is every Sunday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Lake Lily Park. Visit ItsMyMatiland. com or call 407-539-6268. Mid-Century: A Photographic View of Three African-American Commu nities in Florida is at the Hannibal Square Heritage Center through Fri day, Dec. 30. Visit HannibalSquare HeritageCenter.org. Food T ruck Caf is every Wednes day from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Lake Lily Park in Maitland. Music at the Casa is a free week ly Sunday open house featuring live performances and tours of the histor ic Casa Feliz, 656 N. Park Ave. Visit CasaFeliz.us or call 407-628-8200 ext. 3. Ballroom Dancing Lessons are every Monday night except the rst Monday of the month at 7 p.m. at the University Club of Winter Park, 841 N. Park Ave. Line Dance Instruction is held on the rst Monday. Its $5 per lesson. Call 407-644-6149. Visit wpmobserver.com/events for more details. Send submissions to editor@ observernewspapers.com Calendar HOLIDAY CALENDAR For more holiday event listings, see Page 15 or scan this code using the Q R reader app on your smartphone. Borders of Paradise Borders of Paradise: The New World in the Eyes of Explorers begins on Friday, Dec. 9, and continues through Feb. 26 at the Maitland Historical Museum, 221 W. Packwood Ave., Maitland. An opening reception will be held on Friday, Dec. 9, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. For more information, call 407-539-2181 or visit www. ArtandHistory.org Fridays @ Morse Friday Nights at the Morse features free admission to the Morse Museum on Fridays from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. through April 27. Occasional programs include live music, art dem onstrations, curator tours and family tours. Visit MorseMu seum.org for details. Culture & Cocktails The UCF Print Collective takes center stage at this months Culture & Cocktails, held on Friday, Dec. 9, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. both inside and outside the A&Hs Germaine Marvel Build ing.

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Page 13 Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Lifestyles They all have that one story. Theyre way behind, the famed Winter Park Crew losing a race not a common sight. And then, somehow, the team pulls together. Their oars slice into the water in unison, arms pumping together, everything disappears but them and the water. Theres no hot sun beaming on them, no other team pushing past them, no single ath letes. Just one team. And then they win. All of a sudden the boat came together, John McCabe said about his race. It was like one person, one mind. Theres nothing else outside of that boat, said Matthew Cas caddan, a 2004 grad and the boys coach. Winning history And while the alumni remi nisced about their win after a struggle, those stories arent that common for the team. Winter Park High Schools boys and girls crew teams boast two of the best teams in the nation, with numerous na tional championships and medals from the Stotesbury Cup, the na tions oldest and highest regarded high school regatta. Its a tradition of winning thats been built over the course of decades. And for much of its most successful years the boys team was helmed by the same coach, Dan Bertossa, who af ter 21 years stepped down as head coach in October 2010. This month, Winter Park Crew celebrates 50 years full of success es with a party and alumni race. But it didnt start so glamorous a bulletin board post, said Jona than Rich, a former president of the Winter Park Crew Boosters and father to two crew graduates. First crew member David Hoff man, class of 1962, said he jumped at the chance after hearing it over the PA system during his chem istry class. At a beanpole 115 pounds, his only chance at par ticipating in sports came with the experimental rowing team. The jocks never showed up because it was not a lettered sport yet, he said. They began as the Optimist Hustlers in honor of the North Orlando Optimist Club that spon sored the team. The Hustlers part, one teammate said in a let ter, doesnt have as clear an origin other than it might have sounded pretty fast and tough at the time. There were lots of questions when he wore his crew sweatshirt around, to say the least. Hoffman said they were inspired by the pool shark movie The Hustler. You had to hustle and learn how to keep up, Hoffman said. We probably worked harder than Rollins. Since then, theyve built a team known nationwide for its skill and speed. Paul Deatrick, a 1977 Win ter Park High School graduate and crew member, said its pretty great to be a part of that history and the present team, which now does all the work for the great reputation. And I get to take the credit for it, he joked. Were such a storied team, said Nathan Meeks, a 2004-06 rower and recent University of Central Florida graduate. A forever experience That history, and being a part of it, has the ability to change a person, said McCabe, a 1978-79 crew member. He said it took him beyond what he couldve imag ined his limits were and helped Visit us in Winter Pa rk Pr em iu m Pe t Food s Fu ll & Se lf Se rv ic e Gr oo m St ylis h Acce ss orie s Holiday Photograph y Go ur me t Dog Trea ts Doggie Da yc ar eW oof Gang Bakery is an authorized dealer of the following premium pet foods, plus many more !918 Orange Ave., Winter Park, FL 32789 407.647.-9663 Dennis AllenOwner/ Administrator PHOTO BY BRITTNI JOHNSON THE OBSERVER Winter Park High School Crew alumni Nathan Meeks, from left, John McCabe and Paul Deatrick pose in the Winter Park Crews McAllister Boathouse. Although the three had never met, they chatted incessantly about the sport. Please see CREW on page 14 Winter Park Crew celebrates its 50th birthday with an alumni race and barbecue on Saturday, Dec. 17 BRITTNI JOHNSON Observer Staff Winter Park Crew is celebrating its 50th birthday with an alumni race and barbecue for the community on Saturday, Dec. 17, at the Winter Park Crew McAllister Boathouse. The race begins at 10 a.m., and tickets are $15 for adults, $10 for kids 10 and younger. Y ou may purchase tickets at the event and in advance, but an RSVP is request ed. For more information, email wpcrewalumni@gmail.com or call 407-414-2947. Learn more Half a century on the water

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Page 14 Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Our Salad Bar features a complete buffet of over 40 items with cold and hot dishes, including Brazilian specialties. We serve 14 cuts of meat continuously, all you can eat table side service. Where you can choose from beef, pork, lamb or chicken, all served with our house specialty, oven-warm cheese bread. Nelore Steakhouse 115 E. Lyman Ave. Winter Park, FL 32789(407) 645-1112www.neloresteakhouse.com Authentic Brazilian Steak House lenged him. It really sort of transforms your outlook on life, he said. Theres really no sport like crew. Thats easy to see. These three men dont know each other, but its hard to get a word in edgewise. They wander the boat house Meeks looks up and touches the boats he practiced in as he walks by and talk crew shop. Like how certain old wooden boats whistle as they glide over the bubbles beneath them when the team is in sync and really moving. Or the less fond, but funny memories of crabbing, when your oar hits the water the wrong way and rowers get hurled out, which is Meeks one story of winning against the odds. While McCabe and Meeks have left their rowing days be hind them, theres still a visible pull to the memories. Its something youre always going to miss, Meeks said. Deatrick doesnt miss it, though. He still lives it, six days a week. Im 52, and this morning I did 20K, Ill do it forever, he said. But theyll all do it at the alumni race. Meeks will row for Maybe against my kids, said McCabe, whose two sons joined crew this year. CREW | Some alumni still row C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 13 ABOVE ARCHIVE PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER The rst Winter Park Crew team, above left, was named the Optimist Hustlers. That rst boat was donated by Y ale University and own down in a cargo aircraft, David Hoffman said. The 2010-2011 Winter Park High School girls crew team, pictured at top with Coach Mike Vertullo, made history at the Stotesbury Cup. Dan Bertossa, above, has retired from his post as legendary Winter Park Crew coach. He has been replaced by his former student Stephen Freygang.

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Page 15 Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer H o l i r a d n e l a C d a y 2 p a r t DEC. 10 Maitland Public Library proudly pres ents the second Annual Winter Won derland on Saturday, Dec. 10, from 2 p.m.-4 p.m. Call 407-647-7700 or visit MaitlandPublicLibrary.com. Join New Hope for Kids on Saturday, Dec. 10, for the ninth annual Holi day Bicycle Ride where hundreds of bicycle riders cruise through nine miles of brightly lit Winter Park and Casselberry neighborhoods. Regis tration and festivities begin at 4 p.m. with the ride starting promptly at 6 p.m. Anyone 10 years and older may ride solo. Cost is $10 in advance/$12 night of the event and includes music and refreshments. For more informa tion, visit www.newhopeforkids.org or call 407-331-3059 extension 10. DEC. 11 A visit by Santa and musical perfor mances by Orlando-area singers Jac queline Jones and Kathy Puzzo with music by Michael Kramer and Michael Lamy highlight the Steinway Society of Central Floridas holiday concert and piano gifting Sunday, Dec. 11, at 2:30 p.m. at Steinway Piano Galler ies at the Renaissance Center, 303 E. Altamonte Drive, Altamonte Springs. Hosts are Bob Frier, news anchor of FOX 35, and Society founders Gary and Kathy Grimes. The event is free to the public; call 407-339-3771 for more information. Join the choirs of Winter Park and Sweetwater First Baptist churches for The Gift of Christmas on Sunday, Dec. 11, at 6:30 p.m. at First Baptist Church, 1021 N. New Y ork Ave. Call 407-644-3061. A free Christmas concert is 7 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 11, at Orangewood Presbyterian Church, 1300 W. Maitland Blvd., Maitland. Enjoy a holiday concert featuring Lori Smith, classically trained musi cian and contemporary violinist. The nursery is provided for ages 4 and younger. Visit www.orangewood.org/ ChristmasEvents. Its T insel T apestry time! The Mai tland Symphony Orchestra, under the sponsorship of The Performing Arts of Maitland, will present a spar kling concert on Sunday, Dec. 11, at 7:30 p.m. in the sanctuary of the First Presbyterian Church of Mait land. Program highlights will feature music from the beloved Nutcracker Suite of Tchaikovsky, Leroy Ander son favorites, Deck the Halls from the Mannheim Steamroller collection, familiar Christmas melodies from Ir ving Berlin, and a medley of festive Hanukkah folk tunes. The concert is free and is a celebration in music for all ages. DEC. 17 Maitland residents should be on the look out for Santa Claus The Mait land police will be escorting Santa though the citys street on Saturday, Dec. 17. For more details and times in your neighborhood, visit www.itsmy maitland.com Enjoy the rich sounds of Christmas as tuba, euphonium, sousaphone and baritone players of all ages gather to perform a free concert from the main stage in Central Park beginning at 1 p.m., on Saturday, Dec. 17. Win ter Parks 16th annual Merry T uba Christmas has become a must see on the holiday list of things to do. For more information, please call 407599-3463. DEC. 24 The Charles Hosmer Morse Muse um of American Art will hold a free Christmas Eve Open House on Sat urday, Dec. 24, from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, please call 407-645-5311. DEC. 25 Chabad of Greater Orlando will pres ent Hanukkah on the Park on Sun day, Dec. 25, at 5 p.m. in Central Park. The evening will include singing performances, live music, dancers, face painting, jugglers and food. For more information, please call 407644-2500. DEC. 29 To wrap up the holiday season with a bright red bow on top, the city of Winter Park will proudly host the fth annual Champs Sports Bowl Parade of Bands on Thursday, Dec. 29, at 11 a.m. As a prelude to the Champs Sports Bowl game on Thursday eve ning at 5:30 p.m. at the Florida Citrus Bowl, school bands from the Atlantic Coast Conference and Big East cham pionship teams will march through downtown Winter Park and perform a Bandastic Game Day Preview in Central Park. For more information, please call 407-599-3463. ONGOING In celebration of the holiday season, the Orlando Magic will host four holi day basketball camps at the Jewish Community Center Maitland campus and the RDV Sportsplex Athletic Club from Dec. 19 and Dec. 26. The camps, which run from 9 a.m.1 p.m. daily, are open to youth of all skill levels ages 7. To register or for more information, visit www.Or landoMagicCamps.com or call 216378-0932. The Breakthrough Theatre of Winter Park presents the holiday play, Its A Wonderful Life: A Live Radio Play from Dec. 9-19. This beloved American holiday classic comes to captivating life as a live 1940s radio Boat Parade On Saturday, Dec. 10, the Albin Po lasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens will become the ofcial judging and viewing site for the eighth annual Winter Park Boat Parade & Fes tival of Lights including a water ski show on Lake Virginia near Rollins College at 4 p.m. This free event will begin at dusk and parking fees will apply. For more information, please call 407-647-6294. Bach Christmas Bach Festival Society of Winter Park presents A Classic Christmas at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 10, and 2 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 11, at Knowles Memorial Chapel. This anticipated an nual tradition features music arranged specically for the Bach Choir and Or chestra, paired with selections from Tchaikovskys Nutcracker Suite. Tickets range from $20 to $50. Visit www.BachFestivalFlorida.org. Ice skating rink Winter in the Park ice-skating rink in Central Park West Mead ow is open through Sunday, Jan. 8. For more information, visit Cit yOfWinterPark.org. Please see HOLIDA Y CALENDAR on page 16

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Page 16 Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer 145 West SR 46 Geneva, FL. 32732 407-349-2200 Focal Point Landscape Nursery & Gift Shop Garden Center Blow Out Sale!3 DAYS ONL Y! Friday, December 9th through Sunday, December 11th30% Off ALL Trees, Fruit Trees & Plant Material! 20% Off ALL Perennials & Annuals 10% Off ALL Bagged Mulch 20% to 25% Off ALL Pottery Italian Clay, Chinese Glazed and Imported Pebble PotsLocated between the Geneva General Store and Subway Marathon at the corner of CR 426 & SR 46 And, Dont forget Our beautiful Gift Shop! All Christmas Dcor 20% to 30% Off! Patience Brewster Ornaments Hand-Crafted one-of-a-kind ornaments with personality!Monday Friday: 8am 6pm Saturday: 8am 5pm Sunday: 10am 5pmFancy Redneck Wine Glasses Corkcicle Wine Chiller 1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORGTHIS WEEK AT ENZIAN SENNA Fri-Sat 3:45PM, 6:30PM, 9:15PM Sun 1PM, 3:45PM, 6:30PM Mon 9:30PM Tue 6:30PM Wed & Thu 6:30PM, 9:15PM PEARL JAM TWENTY Fri & Sat 11:59PM RED STATE Sun 10PM 13th ANNUAL MANHATTAN SHORT FILM FESTIVAL Mon 6:30PM NETWORK Tue 9:30PM 1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORGTHIS WEEK AT ENZIAN SENNA Fri-Sat 3:45PM, 6:30PM, 9:15PM Sun 1PM, 3:45PM, 6:30PM Mon 9:30PM Tue 6:30PM Wed & Thu 6:30PM, 9:15PM PEARL JAM TWENTY Fri & Sat 11:59PM RED STATE Sun 10PM 13th ANNUAL MANHATTAN SHORT FILM FESTIVAL Mon 6:30PM NETWORK Tue 9:30PM YOUNG GOETHE IN LOVE Fri Sun: 3:45PM, 6:30PM, 9:15PM Mon, Wed, Thur: 6:30PM, 9:15PM Tues: 6:30PM Saturday Matinee Classics ITS A WONDERFUL LIFE Sat 12 NOON FilmSlam Sun 1:00PM Only $5 Cult Classics GOODFELLAS Tues 9:30PM Only $5 broadcast. With the help of an ensemble that brings a few doz en characters to the stage, the story of idealistic George Bailey unfolds as he considers ending his life one fateful Christmas Eve. Call 407-920-4034. The Break through Theatre is located at 419A W. Fairbanks Ave. in Winter Park. The city of Winter Park is prepar ing to welcome Santa and Mrs. Claus to the city on the evenings of Monday, Dec. 12, through Monday, Dec. 19. Old St. Nick himself will ride in his sleigh through Winter Park neighbor hoods. On Dasher, on Dancer and Donner and Blitzen! Visit cityofwinterpark.org for a full schedule. Orlando Fashion Square wel comes back Santa Claus for vis its and pictures with children this holiday season. Santa photos will be taken daily through Saturday, Dec. 24. Also, Fido and Fluffy can sit with St. Nick on Pet Nights from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Mondays through Dec. 19. HOLIDA Y CALENDAR C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 15 Planet gazing A spot for tea PHOTO BY JENNY ANDREASSON THE OBSERVER Aspiring stargazers caught a glimpse of the night sky at the Maitland Public Librarys Viewing the Night Sky w/ Telescopes on Thursday, Dec. 1. PHOTO BY JENNY ANDREASSON THE OBSERVER Maitland Public Librarys Circulation Supervisor Veronica Dailey pours a cup of tea at the second annual Holiday Tea on Sunday, Dec. 4, at the Library.

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Page 17 Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer The Art & History Museums Maitland invites us to explore what our Florida peninsula was like before the European explor ers in its new exhibit Borders of Paradise: The New World in the Eyes of Explorers, beginning Friday, Dec. 9, and continuing through Feb. 26. Borders of Paradise includes watercolors, prints and maps that illustrate real (and exaggerated) versions of the New World, including works by artists who viewed the new Many of their portrayals were reproduced throughout Eu rope, shaping Europes skewed perception of the new lands well into the 19th century. Of special interest are the maps, which are often outrageously divergent from what we now recognize as geographical fact. The museum is at 221 W. Packwood Ave. in Maitland. An opening reception will be held Friday, Dec. 9, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. in the museum gal leries. The Maitland Art Center galleries will also be open during the reception featuring the exhibit Dialogue: Camilo Velasquez. Call 407-539-2181 or visit Artan dHistory.org Music of a classic Christmas The superbly trained, 160-voice Bach Festival Choir and Bach Festival Orchestra invite the community to the Knowles Memorial Chapel (on the Rollins College campus) for their annual holiday concert. A tradition for generations of Central Florida families, the Bach Festival Society celebrates 77 years of musical offerings this season. One of the longest continuously operating Bach Festivals in the country, the choirs performances are of the highest caliber. Under conductor John Sinclair, the Christmas pro gram will also feature the Festival Youth Choir as they perform holiday favorites and selections from Tchaikovskys Nutcracker Suite. Performances are Sat urday, Dec. 10, at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, Dec. 11, at 2 p.m. at the Knowles Chapel. Call 407-6462182 or visit BachFestivalFlorida. org Free holiday concert Tinsel Tapestry is the title given to the free program of holiday music being offered by the Maitland Symphony Orches tra on Sunday, Dec. 11, at 7:30 pm. The tinsel in the title is a major clue as to the music to be included in the concert, as the symphony, sponsored by the Per forming Arts of Maitland, offers the concert in the sanctuary of the First Presbyterian Church of Mai tland. Program highlights include the Nutcracker Suite by Tchaik ovsky, Leroy Anderson favorites, Deck the Halls from the Man nheim Steamroller collection, and Christmas melodies from Irving Berlin. The concert is free and is a celebration for all ages. The First Presbyterian Church is located at 340 N. Orlando Ave. No reserva tions are required. Winter Park Boat Parade Rain or shine, the eighth an nual Winter Park Holiday Boat Parade will take place Saturday, Dec. 10, on Lake Virginia and Lake Osceola. This communitywide water parade with holi day-themed (and lighted) boats along the shorelines is hosted by the Rotary Club of Winter Food, wine and beer are available for purchase, but admission to the very best viewing area the Gardens at the Polasek Museum is free. The event schedule includes: 3:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m., water ski show on Lake Virginia with viewing on the Rollins Col begin at the Polasek Museum with a visit from Santa. (Bring p.m., the boat parade begins on the east shore of Lake Virginia and proceeds through the Palm Canal to Lake Osceola, where the parade will pass in front of judges at the Polasek Museum. Visit wpboatparade.com or call 407-647-6492. It is a wonderful life That beloved holiday movie Its a Wonderful Life has been turned into a play, and the Breakthrough Theatre of Winter Park will present "It's A Won derful Life: A Live Radio Play" through Monday, Dec. 19. This American classic comes to life as a 1940s radio broadcast with an ensemble that brings dozens of characters to the stage. The story of George Bailey unfolds as he considers ending his life one fateful Christmas Eve, and while it doesnt exactly spoil the story to say that this is not a tragedy, it is interesting to note that the plot includes the recipe for helping a fairy to earn his/her wings! Tom Larkin directs. The Breakthrough Theatre is located at 419A W. Fairbanks Ave. in Winter Park. Call 407920-4034. Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906. Josh Garrick Culture worthy of your calendar The new world from the explorers perspective Boat Parade is Saturday Bach Christmas

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Page 18 Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Opinions I would like to update you on Andrew Weinstock, Operation Gratitude and the Halloween candy collection. With your help, the help of more than 11 schools, neighborhoods, volunteers, the city of Winter Park, countless stores and businesses with candy collection boxes, the media and military personnel, Andrew col lected 5,666 pounds of Halloween candy for our deployed soldiers. What a truly amazing accom plishment for a 15-year-old to do in just three weeks! The entire community of Central Florida helped and deserves to know what they helped him accom plish. So many stories have come out since the candy-packing day at our home. First, let me tell you that it was an amazing day. The Winter Park Fire Rescue Depart ment was here helping to pack the candy along with the Winter Park Mayor Ken Bradley, army reservists, enlisted men and women still on active duty and in full uniform asking Andrew what needed to be done and taking direction from him. There were children of all ages, teachers, a school principal, store owners, neighbors, total strangers and of course Andrew's family, all here to help pack carton after carton, pallet after pallet. They packed nine shipping pallets! It was the most organized chaos I have ever seen. Several of the army reservists brought their fami lies, which included very young children. These young children obviously knew the importance of the candy because there were thousands of pieces of chocolate candy bars, gummy bears, M&Ms and lollipops all around them yet not one child asked for a piece of candy, cried for a piece of candy or took a piece of candy and put it in their pocket! These children knew that their mission was to pack the candy and not to eat it! While I was packing a box, the man helping me told me a story about his experience with the Halloween candy. I stopped packing, looked up at the man who was dressed in full uniform and listened to his story. Tears sergeant, still on active duty and told me how the candy has saved not only his life but also the lives of the men and women in his pla toon. This is the story he told me: As we drive through a town on a mission, we see all the streets are empty. We know some thing is going down. I tell my soldiers to throw candy, throw it into the streets, like they do in a parade. Before we can blink, 300 children run into the streets to get the sweet treat. As soon as that happens we know we are safe and the snipers will not shoot. The snipers will not shoot if the children are in harms way, so we must keep the children running into the streets, running to get more and more candy. Our soldiers pass through the town unharmed. If we are on a mission and have little food, we have candy to hold us over. The candy is life-saving in so many ways! We can never have enough candy. It is one of the things we continu ally ask our families to send to us. The sergeant's voice was cracking, and I asked him to tell this story to the volunteers who were here packing the candy, the candy that saves lives. The sergeant didn't want to draw attention to himself, but I explained that his story is the reason Andrew collects the candy. The sergeant told his story to the volunteers, which brought a new sense of meaning to the Hallow een candy collection, to Andrew's efforts and to what our deployed soldiers must be enduring each speaking there was not a dry eye in the crowd. The volunteers clapped for the sergeant who turned to Andrew. He then said, "The real hero is Andrew and his efforts to help the soldiers. It takes a hero to do what he has done!" On Tuesday the candy pallets were picked up to begin their long journey from Orlando to Operation Gratitude's headquar ters in Van Nuys, Calif., and to deployed in remote areas of the world, probably Afghani stan. In the meantime, Andrew has received many emails and phone calls thanking him for his efforts. He has even received a few donations from total strang ers who want to help defer the shipping expense. Andrew also received an amazing gift and card from a young, local veteran who met Andrew and wanted to help collect candy for Opera tion Gratitude. Excerpting his comments, he said: "I just wanted to say thank you. What you have done with this candy collection and the support you show are the reasons why we serve and heroes for different reasons. I once was given this as a token for a heroic act. I now turn and give this to you, as in my eyes you are a true hero. Thank you for all you have done." This sergeant in the USMC gave Andrew his bronze star that he was awarded for his valor during his service in Iraq. Andrew tried to refuse it, but this soldier insisted. As Andrew's mother I am at a complete loss as to what to say. There are no words to describe this honor. I am telling you these stories because you helped give An unsure if Andrew would meet his goal of collecting 5,000 pounds of candy. Andrew continually assured me he would, but I admit I was not as sure as he was. With your help and the help of hundreds if not thousands of total strangers participating in this project, people donated 5,666 pounds of Halloween candy! Andrew has been collecting Halloween candy since 2009 and has collected more then 10,900 pounds of candy! Thank you for and sore to new heights. The Orlando community not only helped Andrew but the men and women who serve our country and help to keep us safe. The Weinstock family lives in Winter Park. Visit operationgratitude.com for more in formation on Operation Gratitude. More than 5,000 pounds of candy on its way to soldiers JODI WEINSTOCK Guest Writer The camping ban and other forgotten laws Freedom of speech clashed with freedom to selectively enforce laws on Dec. 5, and that ing arrested just north of down town Orlando. As a land founded on the rule itself debating how and when those laws can be justly applied. Take for example laws that have existed for decades and are rarely enforced but, as they are still law, can be wielded by police at will. In Florida, if you forget to use your turn signal to change lanes, you (and likely every other driver on the road) have broken the law. But thats childs play compared to some other rarely enforced laws. If you live and sleep with not married, you can be arrested for it. The legality of women sky diving on Sunday is contingent upon their marital status. But when was the last time you heard of somebody actually being arrested for living with his girlfriend? In Orlando, city code makes it illegal to camp out in a city park. For the past two months Occupy Orlando protestors have been doing just that, brandishing signs and slogans while camp ing out along the edge of Senator Beth Johnson Park as part of an extended protest, an offshoot of the Occupy Wall Street protest in New York City. But theyre not allowed to part. Though theyre exercising their right to protest, theyre still breaking a city ordinance. Le gally, police are allowed to make them remove their tents, and to arrest anybody who doesnt com ply. But theyre also allowed to jail you for having sex if its not in the missionary position. Sick of the protestors using the park, Orlando decided that now was the time to get righteous about a code enforcement rule that prevents camping on city property. The law was designed to curb vagrancy, not freedom of speech, but in enforcing it against people who are obviously protesting, the effect is the same: quelling freedom of speech. In this instance, the occupation of the park itself is in a gray area Its an organized protest thats masse during the anti-war pro tests of the 1960s. cant end a peaceful protest, but they can do everything within their power to make protesting as cludes enforcing as many laws as necessary to keep protestors out of the public eye. Visibility is the protestors greatest weapon. In order for a be seen. In a country in love with capitalism, theyre simply leveraging the great location to do some free advertising for their grievances. Absent dedicated me dia coverage, visibility is all they have. Erecting a tent city within view of a well-traveled interstate freeway seems like a good start. ing that visibility away could be a King Features Weekly ServiceDecember 5, 2011 Our Observation

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Page 19 Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer The holidays are in full swing, and with them come joyous par ties with abundant spreads of food. Its hard to imagine how it would feel to go to bed hungry. Yet that is a real possibility for who struggle to afford enough food for themselves and their families. The CBS program Min these individuals and families in a segment about homelessness in Central Florida, following up on a report that aired in March. The show featured regular people, accustomed to earning a wage and making their own way in life, who have found themselves with few options for sustainability fol lowing the Great Recession. At Second Harvest Food Bank of Central Florida, we often hear from people with similar stories typical image of poverty. Some are college-educated individuals who held high-powered jobs a year ago and now struggle to afford three meals a day. Others work long hours to provide for their families, yet their paychecks simply dont stretch far enough. Still others are seniors living on their essential medications, let alone food. Nearly all held out as long as they could, feeling the sting of shame as they realize they have nowhere else to go. And children suffer dispropor tionately. Last year, 47 percent of those receiving help from Second Harvests network of charitable feeding programs were children younger than 18. More than 246,000 kids in Central Florida are at risk for experiencing life long adverse physical, behavioral and mental health effects due to our hearts to see kids who are losing adult teeth because theyre malnourished, yet that is happen ing in our own backyard. These numbers can easily become overwhelming. Consider ing the magnitude of the crisis, is it possible to make a real differ ence? The answer is a resounding yes. Every dollar given to Second Harvest can provide up to $9 worth of grocery products for those who need it, and 96 percent of that dollar goes straight to programs that feed people. Last year, thanks to the gener osity of thousands of donors and volunteers, our network of agen cies distributed nearly 33 million pounds of food, the equivalent of more than 22 million meals. Its not just canned products, either. We collect and store millions of pounds of fresh produce in our refrigerated facilities every year, ready for distribution to those who might otherwise be forced to eat a cheaper meal with less nutrition. This year, the need is even more critical than ever before especially during the holiday season, when even more people faith in Central Floridas giving community. Weve stepped up before, and we need to continue our efforts. Its unacceptable that anyone in our community should lack the basics of human life. way to help. You can learn how to get involved and make a differ ence by visiting www.feedhope now.org Dave Krepcho is the president and C E O of S econd H arvest Food B ank of Central Florida. Chris Jepson Perspectives Louis Roney Play On! Halfway to a place I dont wanna be AAADD Im not much of a fan of modern coun try western music. It just doesnt resonate. Much of it sounds like s bubblegum music with a twang. Big-thighed, thir tyish, balding white boys in black hats singing of love, for all I know, for their customized Ford F-150s. I prefer Patsy Cline and Johnny Cash. They sang of love and loss and sorrow, and you sensed they felt it because they actually lived it. Sometimes I write a line and I think, Damn, thatd make a great country western song! I thought I heard an indi vidual once describe himself as halfway married when, in reality, he was actually claiming to be happily married. Haha! Quite a difference, and what a great open ing line for a song of regret. She thought we were happily married but I was only halfway married and . Invariably over the course of a day my mind will wander, depending on the prompt, from the state of the nation to Americas political leadership, environ mental issues, reproductive choice, health care access, poverty, Republican simple tons, Tea Party yahoos, spineless liberals, the perverse Israeli/American relation ship, the nations many wars, American imperialism, our economy, elections in Russia or congressional ineptitude. During a recent particularly bleak day privately assessing Americas current position and prospects, I wrote, Im about halfway to a place I dont wanna be. I immediately scribbled underneath country western song. Its a good line and a valid determination of where a lot half a load on intellectually, then you cannot help but be alarmed at where the I have a relative who recently par ticipated in a surgery in a western U.S. hospital. A number of physicians were involved and over the course of the operation, the conversation between the doctors turned to whether bullets or gold would be more valuable (and tradable) if, heaven forbid, the center didnt hold and Americas government collapsed. Ive a call in to see what was the consensus of that esteemed, educated assemblage. Any student of history clearly under stands that what is or what was is no guarantee for what will be. No nation has Historically, simply persevering as a national entity has been success enough. Many nations, many empires that once were, simply do not exist today in any form. Let alone in a reduced state such as Great Britain or Russia. It is hard not to consider that America is inexorably moving to an Orwellian oligarchy predicated on (necessitating) a gullible electorate skillfully manipulated to voting against its own interests. There is a despair setting in, a growing feeling, a realization that the game is rigged that those who have the most will inevitably get the rest. long before such perception erodes what system? American exceptionalism is best summed up in two modern advertising slogans: Be all that you can be and Just do it. That is so American and, seemingly, so yesterday. We desperately need a new vision. A new order. A new song. As Walt Whitman commemorated in his poetic vision of the United States, I hear America singing, the varied carols I hear . Its about work. Life. America. Its about happiness and hope. All in short supply these days. Jepson is a 24-year resident of Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.US I think Ive got age-activated attention Right now its Saturday morning: I decide to put things in order in our garage today. I get the garage-opener from the drawer in the front hall table. I start to go out the front door and notice some mail lying on the table. OK, Im going to straighten up the mail. I sit down at the desk in the library. I lay the garage-opener down on the desk. I see bills among lots of junk mail. While discarding junk mail I notice that the trash basket is full. OK, Ill just leave the bills on my desk and take the trash can out. But no, since Im going bills Now, where is my checkbook? Oops, theres only one check left. My extra checks are somewhere in the bottom of a desk drawer. Uh-oh, theres the can of Pepsi Lite I checks. of Pepsi farther from where Ill be writing. Even better, Ill put it in the fridge to keep it cold for a while. I head toward the kitchen and through the glass door, the potted plants on the porch catch my eye. They need watering. I set the Pepsi on the kitchen counter. There are my eyeglasses! Ive been looking all over for them. Id better put them on the desk in the and head for the plants. Oops! Someone left the big TV remote in the kitchen. Well never think to look in the kitchen tonight when we want to watch television, so Id better put it back in the living room where it belongs. I splash some water into the pots remote on a sofa cushion, and go back was I was going to do. Saturday, now 5 p.m.: The garage is not straightened up, the bills are unpaid, the Pepsi is sitting on the kitchen counter, the plants are half watered, the checkbook still has only one and I lost my eyeglasses again! got done today, Im nonplussed because Im tired from being so busy. email It seems to me that life is built on op posites, e.g., day and night, rich and poor, fat and thin, Republicans and Democrats, dumb and smart, mean and amicable, place in the scheme of things, youre not alive anymore, youre the opposite. Sage words: I predict future happiness for Ameri cans if they can prevent government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of taking care of them. Thomas Jefferson About Roney: HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney) I think Ive got age-activated attention deficit disorder, but Im not sure. Holiday season shines spotlight on the local ght against hunger D AVE KREPCHO Guest Writer Krepcho

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Page 20 Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Recently, President Obama announced a new plan to help nance to lower their monthly mortgage payments. Working with the Federal Housing Finance Agency, the president has revised Program, aiming to help 1 million homeowners who owe more than their homes are worth to avoid foreclosure. Realtors commend President Obama for pledging to help more struggling homeowners Mike McGraw, chairman of the Orlando Regional Realtor Asso ciation. When people lose homes to foreclosure, families, commu nities, the housing market and the economy all suffer. Helping even more families stay current on their mortgage and remain in their homes will help support the housing recovery. HARP was created in 2009 and their mortgages at lower rates without having to meet the typi cal requirement of having at least 20 percent of equity in their home to do so. Under previous guide lines, many homeowners have been ineligible for the program because their home values had to be no more than 25 percent below what they owed their lender and some were unable to afford the closing costs and appraisal fees. With the new rules, which took effect Dec. 1, some of the extra fees to participate in HARP have been waived and homeown ers eligibility wont be contingent on how far the homes value has fallen. Homeowners with loans backed by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac, and who are current on their mortgages, may participate in the program. Realtors hope the recent changes to HARP will encour age other mortgage investors to help struggling homeowners some, the money saved is worth it, McGraw said. Realtors have been advocating for the govern ment and lenders to take more aggressive steps to modify loans, as well as streamline the short sales process, another alternative for struggling homeowners. The National Association of Realtors is also calling upon Congress and the Obama admin istration to create policy solu tions that stimulate housing and economic recovery. In a recent outlined in part by NAR, lenders and the government are urged to take more aggressive steps to modify loans and approve short sales to help reduce high foreclo sure inventory levels. Realtors are hopeful that reduced fees programs such as HARP will help more struggling homeowners reduce their monthly mortgage payments and avoid losing their home to foreclosure. McGraw said the changes to HARP are just one step toward re housing market. We are begin ning to see early signs of stabili zation in the housing market, but reduced and housing inventory reaches a more normal level, there can be no true recovery. HODGES BROTHERS INCROOFING & CONSTRUCTION Jeff ClarkColdwell Banker Residential407.733.0773j.clark@coldwellbanker.com www.BaldwinParkLiving.com New Construction!4 bed / 2.5 bath / 2190 sq ft $339,000 808 Hamilton Place Court Winter Park, FL 32789 Commerce Brokerage, LLC407-566-1636 Homes Observer Homes brought to you by: Fannie Hillman + Associates Serving Central Florida for over 29 years! 407-644-1234 fanniehillman.com Orlando Realtors support renancing rules to reduce foreclosures

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Page 21 Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer PLEASE MARK YOUR RESPONSE HERE:Will you please review and respond as soon as possible? We are waiting for your approval. Please NOTE: this is NOT a second opportunity to design the ad. Redesign changes may result in additional charges. Thank you!1. Please circle A or B below: A: I approve this ad as shown here B: I approve this ad with changes as marked (How many changes are marked? _____)2. Please double check phone/address/names.Phone & address are correct (initials here) ________ With this signature, I signify my understanding that payment for this ad is due per Advertising Agreement.Signed ________________________________Since 1995(407) 366-8696 Fax (407) 359-2118 P.O. Box 4548 Winter Park, FL 32793FOR YOUR INFORMATIONThis ad will appear in these areas and months. ____Waterford Lakes__________________ ____College Park/Orlando______________ ____Winter Park/Maitland_______________ ____Sweetwater/Heathrow______________ ____Tuscawilla/Wntr Sprgs _____________ ____Oviedo__________________________ ____ Baldwin/Winter Pk. East ____________X JUNE 2011 X JUNE 2011 A Better Plumber407-644-4000 X JUNE 2011 Sales of existing single-family homes jump 18 percent in October Members of the Orlando Regional Realtor Association participated in the sales of 18.16 more existing single-family homes in October of this year than in October of 2010, which is the years greatest month-overmonth increase in sales of this home type. In addition to the 18.16 per cent increase in existing singlefamily home sales, Orlandos overall home sales for October have increased by 5.89. since March that overall sales have indicated a month-overmonth improvement, said ORRA Chairman Mike McGraw, McGraw Real Estate Services, PL. This additional activity can be attributed to a multitude of local factors such as low inter est rates, a higher percentage of normal sales, and a steady incline in median price that are encouraging buyers to take advantage of today extraordi nary market conditions. In addition to an increase in sales, the overall median price of all home sale types combined ($112,700) increased by 7.33 percent compared to the $105,000 median price in October 2010. Since January of this year, Orlan dos median price has increased by 18.76 percent. The median price of normal sales closing in October 2011 was $153,000, and normal sales accounted for 41.30 percent of all transactions. These two steadily improving factors have been helping to keep overall median prices hovering above those recorded in 2010. But the lower median price of foreclosures and short sales (which combined account for 58.70 percent of all sales in Octo ber) does continue to negatively price. The median price for bankowned sales in October is $80,000 and the median price for short sales is $95,000. Sales of foreclosed homes de clined 38.50 percent in October of this year compared to last, while short sales and normal sales both increased (by 40.83 percent and 34.91 percent, respectively). Buyers who purchased an Orlando area home in October paid average interest rate of 4.21 percent, which is slightly above the 4.19 percent average inter est rate recorded for September. That rate was the lowest since the Orlando Regional Realtor Association began tracking the statistic in January of 1995. Homes of all types spent an average of 106 days on the mar ket before coming under contract in October 2011, and the average home sold for 94.66 percent of its listing price. In October 2010 those numbers were 91 days and 94.67 percent, respectively. At the current pace of sales, there is a 4.82-month supply of homes in Orlandos inventory. The number of homes available for purchase in the Orlando area increased in October by 42 homes and now rests at 9,973. Overall inventory is down 35.41 percent from October of last tory is down 33.52 percent while condo inventory is down 38.69 percent. Pending sales those under contract and awaiting closing are currently at 8,937. The num ber of pending sales in October 2011 is 1.36 percent greater than in October 2010. Affordability The Orlando affordability in dex decreased to 254.94 percent in October. (An affordability index of 99 percent means that buyers earning the state-reported median income are 1 percent short of the income necessary to purchase a median-priced home. Conversely, an affordability index that is over 100 means that median-income earners make more than is necessary to qualify for a median-priced home.) Buyers who earn the reported median income of $54,017 can qualify to purchase one of 5,605 homes in Orange and Seminole counties currently listed in the local multiple listing service for $287,314 or less. First-time homebuyer afford ability in October decreased a bit to 181.29 percent from last months 181.81 percent. First-time buyers who earn the reported median income of $36,732 can qualify to purchase one of the 3,984 homes in Orange and Seminole counties currently listed in the local multiple listing service for $173,665 or less. ORRA

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Page 28 Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer ADVERTISING NETWORKS OF FLORIDA Donate A Boat sponsored by boat angel outreach centers STOP CRIMES AGAINST CHILDREN www.boatangel.com2-Night Free Vacation!or Car Today! 800 1 CAR L ANGE