<%BANNER%>
Winter Park-Maitland observer
ALL ISSUES CITATION MAP IT! DOWNLOADS
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00185
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park FL
Publication Date: 11-10-2011
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates: 28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID: UF00091444:00185

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:

( PDF )

( PDF )


Full Text

PAGE 1

Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011 50+ tax wpmobserver.com BUS_CARD 3.25 x 2 August 2010Grafton Wealth ManagementWilliam D. Grafton III, Sarah Grafton DeVoe William D. Grafton IV Financial Advisors (407) 646-6725 400 Park Avenue South Suite 300 Winter Park, FL 32789 Merrill Lynch Wealth Management makes available products and services offered by Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated (MLPF&S) and other subsidiaries of Bank of America Corporation. MLPF&S is a registered broker-dealer, member SIPC. Investment products: 2010 Bank of America Corporation. All rights reserved. Are Not FDIC InsuredAre Not Bank GuaranteedMay Lose Value 407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC d USPS 00-6186 Publisher statement on page 4. We would like to thank you for carrying the writings of a great conservative like Louis Roney.Page 14 Photo galleryThe Winter Park Concours dElegance took place on Sunday, Nov. 6, on Park Avenue. Page 2 Calendar The Baldwin Park Half Marathon & 5K is Sunday at Audubon Park Elementary School.Page 8 Doggie devotion Page 9 Minutes before the Winter Park qualifying period closed on Tues day, Mayor Ken Bradley got a chal lenger. A whole week before the Maitland qualifying period opened, work to challenge Mayor Howard Schieferdecker. At press time, City Clerk Cindy Bonham was still verifying Winter Park mayoral candidate Nancy Miles paperwork. In Maitland, former Mayor Tuesday morning to run against Schieferdecker. On Nov. 3, Mait land resident John Yanchunis also until Maitlands qualifying period closes at noon on Nov. 18.MaitlandSchieferdecker replaced Kinson at the mayors post in January, when Kinson had to resign with 16 months left on his term in order to run for Orange County Commis sion. Former County Commissioner Ted Edwards defeated Kinson in the race. In June 2010, Kinson seconded Councilwoman Bev Reponens mo tion to nominate Schieferdecker as vice mayor under the notion that Please see MAYOR Page 5Mayor seats contested JENNY A ANDREASSON AND ISAAC BAbBCOCK Observer Staff The city of Winter Park will be presenting its inaugural Veterans Day Celebration on Friday, Nov. 11, at 11 a.m. to honor all local veterans. The event will be outside at the new Win ter Park Community Center Ruby Ball Am phitheatre at 721 W. New England Ave. and will have organizations there that offer infor mation and services for veteran needs. There will also be speakers, musical tributes and, most importantly, the recognition of local veterans. Winter Park Mayor Ken Bradley said he is excited and honored to recognize the people who have protected and served our country. Its certainly because of our veterans that we enjoy the quality of life and freedom that we do, he said. Each one of us has not for gotten their service. their military service:Birke Bryant Army Army after 30 years of service. A Winter Park native, he enlisted right after graduating from Hungerford High School in 1959. He served tours in Germany, Korea and Vietnam. Bryant was often the only black man in his unit, and almost always the only black man in They looked at me as being an outsider, said Bryant, who serves as chairman of dea cons of Mt. Moriah Baptist Church Winter Park. But once he proved himself, the other soldiers were more accepting. He continued to advance in the military, and at one point was in charge of 600 men. He also faced danger frequently and was in combat in Vietnam. He told one story of being confronted with mortar bombs from the enemy. His job was to take data and turn that was communicating data to him was wounded. It was a scary night. I think my hair stood on end, he said. You just have a fear come over you, but you dont stop what youre doing. Those days taught him a lot about life. It was an experience; one you never for get, Bryant said. Stephen Seay ArmyArmy Brig. Gen. Stephen Seay, who will be speaking at Winter Parks event, spent his 34-year career all over the world, including being stationed in Germany, South America and Central America and the Balkans as well as being deployed to Iraq for 13 months. He graduated from the University of New Hampshire, where he was a part of the ROTC Seay said what drew him to a career in the military was the opportunity to work in technology, where he got to work with rock ets and missiles. But in the end, what he re ally learned in the military was to be a great Please see VETERANS Page 2Winter Park debuts veterans event BRiITTNiI JOHNSON Observer Staff Barnies Coffee has come a long way since its in augural store opened on Park Avenue in down town Winter Park nearly 30 years ago. To celebrate the anniversary, the chain has launched a company-wide re-branding as Bar nies CoffeeKitchen, starting with its original Park Avenue location. Winter Park is a special place, CEO Jona than Smiga said. Were trying to give them the coffee experience they deserve. After a weeks worth of soft openings, the remodeled location is now open to the public. With added seating, a micro-roasting station and a more kitchen feel, the Park Avenue remodel PHoO To O BY iISAAC bBAbBCOCK THE oOBsSERVER CCollette HHaw puts the nishing touches on a sandwich at the remodeled BBarnies agship location on Monday. Please see bBARNiIES Page 5Barnies rebornThe original Barnies location on Park gets remodeled and re-branded as agship Barnies CoffeeKitchen SSARAH WiILSON Observer Staff

PAGE 2

Page 2 Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011Winter Park / Maitland Observer friend and leader. The hook was the technology, but what kept me were the peo ple, he said. As a leader and teacher, Seay was able to encourage other sol diers to develop their personal talents. Some of his best memories while serving were running into soldiers he had mentored who had achieved their goals either in the military or out. Youre invested in their fu ture, he said. Jesse Fitzgerald Air ForceJesse Fitzgerald, chairman of trustees of Ward Chapel AME Church in Winter Park, joined the Air Force straight out of high school in 1953 and served until 1961. There werent any jobs, and he didnt choose college, so he thought the military would be a good opportunity to get some life experience and education. Like the other soldiers, he learned how to be a leader and took away spe cial bonds with the men he served with. I have lifelong friendships with fellows that I was stationed with, he said. Its almost like one big family. Fitzgerald didnt see combat as a mechanic, but some of his most memorable, and frightening, times were when he was stationed in Alaska. Aside from the bears and other wild animals, there were the freezing temperatures one time the power went out for days and a wild storm he got caught in while on the coast on waves splashed onto the ship, and he didnt know if it would sink or not. defense to the north, which was also a stressful concept, he said. And because he served during the Vietnam War, it was a time of unknowns. You never know what could happen, Fitzgerald said. Douglas Metcalf Air ForceAir Force Maj. Gen. Douglas Met calf, a former Winter Park city commissioner, served for 36 years before retiring in 2005. His father and brother served in the Army, and said he grew up in a time when most men served. Metcalf wasnt drafted but enlisted him self, and before becoming a major general in charge of logistics, his Metcalf said that being in the military served as the foundation for the rest of his life and taught him how to be a leader and a re sponsible person early on while surrounded by people, who be came friends, with the same strong beliefs in being a leader and de fender of the United States. What he hopes the Veterans Day event will do most is honor those who are serving now. They are trying to bring the rest of the world the same peace and freedom we have, he said. Individual & Family health plans For an Instant Quote or to apply, visit our website www.HealthInsuranceIBS.com407-831-5166 Learn moreFor more information about the event, visit www.cityofwinterpark. org. All local veterans are encour aged to attend and be recognized for their service. VETERaANsS | Winter Park veterans honored at Fridays event C ONTNTINNUEDED FRR OM fFRo ONT pP AGE PHoO To O BY iISAAC bBAbBCOCK THE oOBsSERVER Jesse Fitzgerald battled bears, angry seas and freezing temperatures in A Alaska. Elegant avenue PHoO To O BY iISAAC bBAbBCOCK THE oOBsSERVER CClassic M Morgan roadsters invaded the streets at the 10th annual Winter Park Concours dEElegance, which took place on Sunday, NNov. 6, along Park A A venue. SCAN HERE Use your smartphones QR R code reader app to view more photos or visit wpmobserver.com/photos/galleries

PAGE 4

Page 4 Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011Winter Park / Maitland Observer USPS 00-6186 ISSN 1064-36131500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835-5705Member of: Goldenrod Chamber of CommercePublisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor. Submission does not guarantee publication. Columnists opinions are made independently of the newspaper. All rights reserved. Winter Park / Maitland Observer 2011P.O. Box 2426 Winter Park, FL 32790 Published TThursday, NNov. 10, 2011 CONTNT ACTTS VV olume 23, Issue NNumber 45 PUBLISHER Kyle TT aylor 407-563-7009 maaggI Jenny Andreasson 407-563-7026 DESIGNER Jonathan Gallagher 407-563-7054 Jenny Andreasson 407-563-7026 Isaac Babcock 407-563-7023 egalslassfeds Ashley McBride I Isaac Babcock Padrick Brewer NI Chris Jepson Louis RRoney Josh Garrick IIN aager TT racy Craft 407-515-2605 suscrptoscrculato Amanda RRayno 407-563-7073 InternNTERN Meisha Perrin tuares obit@observernewspapers.com Business Briefs Community Bulletin Yields and ratings as of 11/08/2011. Availability, quantities, ratings and prices for offerings are subject to change. Moodys, income-tax bracket. Please consult your tax advisor. Income is generally free from federal taxes and state taxes for residents of the issuing state. While the interest income is tax-free, capital gains, if any, will be subject to taxes. Income for some investors may be subject to the federal Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT). Wells Fargo Advisors is not a tax or legal advisor. Katherine SmithFinancial Advisor 275 S. New York Ave Winter Park, FL 32789 407-622-8997 katherine.a.smith1@wellsfargo.comTax-Exempt Missouri Municipal BondsRyan WyattFinancial Advisor 275 S. New York Ave Winter Park, FL 32789 407-622-8150 ryan.wyatt@wellsfargo.com 4.00%6.15%Yield to Maturity Taxable Equivalent Yield 0811-1550 8/11 Playhouse raises $25K N tains rose on a spectacular fundraising evening only professional musical theatre. The event playhouse.org or call 407-645-0145.Fete benets food bank be combined with funds raised through efforts on campus to purchase food in bulk for Second B B to provide $9 in grocery products. In 2010, the donated 16,000 pounds of food to those in need. The goal this year is 20,000 pounds of food. To inghands. NNew EEagle Scouts Boy Scout Troop 62 will award the rank of Ea gle Scout to seven scouts in a Court of Honor N The inductees are: B paratory School B B School I BIB B IB High IB IB High B High SchoolProperty appraisers new site B erty appraiser, introduced the newly designed streamlined information and dynamic graphics. web service. Get involved B B B resident to apply. Contact the city clerk at mwal information. Get Caught Caring and food for its Get Caught Caring campaign. The goal of the program is to provide all families with the ability to have gifts for their children and food for their holiday meal. Donations can $18 or more on your childs behalf and they will be mailed a special certicate with their name. NNew Hope for Kids TThanksgiving Food DriveNew Hope for Kids provides a bag of Thanksgiv families in need. Last year New Hope for Kids provided Thanksgiving meals to 160 families. To see the list of foods they need or to make a donation visit newhopeforkids.org or call 407Send bulletin submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com SIKONN Construc tion I rm Averett Warmus Durkee Osburn Henning that provide physical activities and a healthy work environment for their employees. Mercantile Capital Corporation one of the nations largest providers of U.S. Small Busi ness owners who want to acquire or develop their own facilities, closed four commercial more than $9.4 million. Lowndes, Drosdick, Doster, Kantor & R Reed, P.A. is proud to announce that long-time real I Businessmen award in the legal category by B N Wawa Inc., the Pennsylvaniabased convenience retailer, ofcially entered breaking celebration of their very rst store in Parkway and International Drive. The store is set to open in July. Foley & Lardner LLP announced that it has been named the rst U.S. News Best Law ally ranked practice areas receives this level of I was ranked in the following categories: JFS event nets $200K tel. The event honored the Chapin Pictured are Harriett and Shelley please visit www.jfsorlando.org

PAGE 5

Page 5 Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011Winter Park / Maitland Observer he would become mayor in January. Kinson then tutored Schieferdecker during the six months leading up to the changeover. Schieferdecker said he wasnt taken aback by Kinsons intention to reclaim the mayors seat. He was a good mayor and hes been good to me, Schieferdecker said. He worked hard to train me and I have no negative stuff to say period. Im not going to go there. In turn, Kinson had nothing but nice things to say about Schiefer decker. I have great respect for him, Kinson said. If I didnt, I wouldnt have supported him so strongly in becoming vice mayor at the time. Both candidates agreed that their campaign platforms will be similar, as they share the same core goals: to revitalize Maitlands downtown, embrace SunRail and stabilize the citys tax base. Both have back grounds in commercial real estate, but Schieferdecker is retired. The third candidate, John Yanchunis, is a newcomer to politics. Hes lived in Maitland for two years and owns a wireless communications business in the metro area. He said he also wants to see the downtown revitalized and SunRail come through. He said he could be a breath of fresh air on Council. I dont have any bad habits, he said. Im not stuck in the old tendencies of a previous adminis tration.Winter ParkMayor Ken Bradley has a challenger for his seat, and she submitted her paperwork with just a few minutes left before the end of qualifying, which ended at noon on Nov. 8. Nancy Miles is a homemaker, community volunteer and former school board member who has lived in Winter Park for 11 years. She served on the school board when she lived in Salem, Conn., where she also said she worked to candidate said. Im looking for ward to it. She said shes worked quickly to put together a campaign during the week of qualifying, amassing 40 signatures from supporters. Its been busy, she said. Ive had a lot of people helping me out. Incumbent Bradley has been on Nov. 1, when he hosted his kickoff party. He said he was ready to run, their paperwork until the last day of qualifying. Im very excited, Bradley said. Ive been planning to run this race already. Bradley said that his record as mayor should help him win reelection on Jan. 31, 2012. Im excited to tell the citizens of Winter Park about how much better this city is compared to three years ago, Bradley said. Our economy better, Central Park is remodeled, more roads are paved, better side walks. I think the citizens see that already. will serve as a template for the entire Florida chains re-branding that will take place at all locations in the upcoming year. NNew brand, new look Walking into the remodeled location, Smiga says he hopes people will realize that coming into a Barnies Coffee Kitchen is about more than just the coffee. Its an overall experience. With walls the color of fresh unroasted coffee beans and a makeover in both look and function with 26 seats inside and aside from the dcor is the addition of a micro-roasting station where trained coffee roasters will be roasting up to 50 pounds of fresh coffee beans a day. The fresh-roasted and packaged beans will be on sale for any where from $13 to $70 depending on the rarity of the bean. In roughly 18 minutes, customers can watch as beans go into the roaster green, come out brown and are packaged and sealed. In addition to seeing it roasted, people will know the farm and origin of their coffee from its label, from where it was har vested to the name of the roaster, he said. An array of grab-and-go food options, as well as sit-down op tions for both breakfast and lunch/dinner, are also available. Ev ery dish, Smiga said, is made with quality in mind, using organic and high-grade products. This extra effort and attention, Smiga said, was paid to help Barnies stand apart from their competition, with a Panera Bread and Starbucks located on either end of the Avenue. Our job is to be more interesting than them, he said. NOW YOU HAVE A BETTER TV CHOICE. CenturyLinkTM PrismTM paired with the perfect partner Internet or Voice175 East Altamonte Dr., Altamonte Springs 3030 East Semoran Blvd., Apopka 260 Citrus Tower Blvd., Clermont 1359 East Vine St., Kissimmee 3244 North John Young Pkwy., KissimmeeSEE THE DIFFERENCE FOR YOURSELF! Test-drive it online at seeprismtv.com or in store today: Call 866.552.4971Espaol 866.960.7085Offer ends 12/31/2011. Offers are available to new, rst-time CenturyLink Prism TV residential customers only. Offers include Prism TV service bundled with Pure Broadband service and Prism TV bundled with CenturyLink Unlimited Calling. Standard monthly rates and fees apply to these services and required equipment. All prices, packages and programming are subject to change without notice. Customer must cancel DVR and/or HD service by calling CenturyLink Customer Service before the end of the three-month-free promotional period to avoid monthly charges or the standard monthly rate for each service will apply until services are cancelled. Offers may be limited to specic locations. General Services and offers not available everywhere. CenturyLink may change, cancel, or substitute offers and services, or vary them by service area, at its sole discretion without notice. Requires credit approval and deposit may be required. Additional restrictions apply. Terms and Conditions All products and services listed are governed by tariffs, local terms of service, or terms and conditions posted at www.centurylink.com. CenturyLink Prism TV All plans require separate local phone service plan and include digital channels (including local channels), one (1) set-top box (STB), one (1) modem gateway, and up to four (4) standard direct video streams to residence. CenturyLink-provided STBs are required to view TV. Local channel availability varies by market. High Denition (HD) available on all TV plans, and up to two (2) of the up to four (4) video streams can be in HD. Customers location determines both HD availability and the maximum number of HD video streams (between 0 and 2 HD streams) a customer can view and record at any one time per residence, regardless of the number of STBs in the household. All non-HD video streams are provided in standard denition. Subscription to service precludes customer from purchasing high-speed Internet services from any third party. Additional charges will apply for additional programming packages, movie channel subscriptions (except for PrismTM Premium plan), Pay Per View movies and events, On Demand purchases, and premium services/subscriptions for all plans. Some subscription services, events, and broadcast network service may be blacked out in customers area. Vacation Program Offer available to residential customers only. Only certain CenturyLink services are eligible for the Vacation Program; third party services received through CenturyLink are not eligible. Offer may include a reduced monthly recurring charge for a predetermined number of months each year, retention of equipment and suspension of service, programming and agreement during Vacation Program activation. A zero balance for each applicable service is required for eligibility. If customer does not contact CenturyLink to resume full activation of applicable services before the end of six (6) consecutive month period, all applicable monthly charges, fees, surcharges, contractual obligations, etc., will resume automatically. Vacation Program services will have restrictions and limitations that will vary for each applicable service. Contact CenturyLink for details. Equipment Minimum equipment and CenturyLink professional installation are required. At initial installation, each customer receives: one (1) VDSL 2 modem; up to six (6) STBs (standard plan includes one (1) STB; additional STBs are available for an additional monthly rate, per STB); and one (1) remote control per STB installed. All equipment must be returned to designated CenturyLink retail store within thirty (30) days after service disconnection in an undamaged condition, or customer is charged for each equipment piece not returned or returned as damaged. Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides: 2011 Disney. All Rights Reserved. 2011 CenturyLink, Inc. All rights reserved. The name CenturyLink and the pathways logo are property of CenturyLink, Inc. All other marks are property of their respective owners. BONUS!PUT YOUR P RISMTM TV ON VACATION IF YOU ARE HEADING BACK NORTH NO CONTRACT A ND FREE H D WHEN YOU PICK 2. for 12 months CNTL11-1144H_10.15x9_r1.indd 1 11/3/11 5:19 PM Learn moreBarnies Coffee Kitchen is located at 118 S. Park Ave., in Winter Park. For more information on the Barnies re-branding visit www. barniescoffeekitchen.com baBARNiIEsS | Coffee roasted on site maMA Yo OR | NNancy Miles is a former school board member C ONTNTINNUEDED FRR OM fFRo ONT pP AGE C ONTNTINNUEDED FRR OM fFRo ONT pP AGE CCandidates for mayorWinter Park: Ken Bradley (incumbent) NNancy Miles Maitland: Howard Schieferdecker (incumbent) Doug Kinson John YY anchunis RRun for mayor TThe qualifying period for the Maitland mayoral election opens at noon on Monday, NNov.14, and closes at noon on Friday, NNov.18. For ad ditional information, call 407-5396219.

PAGE 6

Page 6 Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011Winter Park / Maitland Observer Its district playoff time for the Winter Park up in a district tiebreaker. Now they head to Olympia (6-3) for a Nov. 18 showdown Just three days after defeating district rival Timber Creek 28-25 to force a threeway tie for the district lead, the Winter Park Wildcats watched the Wolves sneak away with a tiebreaker win for the championship. The Wildcats edged East River 6-0 in Nov. 7. East River had fumbled on an early drive, coughing the ball up to Winter Park, which then completed a 54-yard drive for the win. But in their next showdown against Tim ber Creek, the Wildcats luck ran out, with sailing into the hands of Timber Creeks Shawn Risbrook. The Wildcats forced sev eral third down plays but didnt stop the Wolves from scoring. The Wildcats failed to score from within the 10-yard line on the ensuing drive, losing the district crown. In an anti-climactic end to the regular season for the Wildcats, they still have one game left to play before playoff time. Theyll host Ocoee (2-7) at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 11. Wildcats JVV The Winter Park JV football team posted its fourth shutout of the season and capped off its 2011 schedule (6-2) with a 6-0 road victory over the Evans Trojans. Freshman running back Travis Jones took care of all the scoring when he scam pered 17 yards on the Wildcats second It was a defensive struggle all night. Our linebacking corps was exceptional, nose tackle Daniel Tommey recovered a fumble, and cornerback Cameron Gergley intercepted a pass to help ensure the shut out, said Coach Scott Hillman, whose squad this year was his youngest with 10 freshmen on the roster. It was a very enjoyable and rewarding season. It seemed like we improved every week as the season went along, said Hill man whose team averaged 19.1 points per game and allowed only an average of 4.6 points per game. The Tars (1-1) blasted the visiting Clemson Tigers 30-14 on Nov. 5 after a big comeback took them over the top. They were a good group of guys and that game was a lot of fun. The Tars had been down 14-12 after a failed two-point conversion set them back with but the Tars found some legroom on some outside runs to pick up key yardage. In the meantime, the Tars defense managed to sack the Tigers a handful of times, pres suring the defense and picking up big tackles for loss. They were playing a lot of sweep plays and playing pretty much pure club football, so we took advantage, Hoblick said. Some special teams miscues hurt the Tars early, with bad snaps reversing the yardage on Hoblick found his arm early on, connecting on passes of more than 30 yards to bring his comeback rally. ball off to Dylan Kelly for a 32-yard touchdown run. The Tars defense turned into a in the second half to pull away with the win, despite some injuries that decimated the teams numbers late in the game. By the end I think we had maybe 18 guys left, Hoblick said. With some of the club football sea son left, he said that they still had time the season, but that at this point hes thinking about the 2012 season. Now its all about fundraising and show ing Rollins staff and fans that theyre serious about football. Were looking at the next season, trying to build a good program and have a good fan experience, he said. Its gonna be fun. Thank You to All of Our VeteransHidden Government Program Pays the Cost of Home CareBy Bob AdamsAre either you or your spouse a Veteran ... with 90 days of consecutive, active military service, 1 day served during wartime (WWII, Korea or Vietnam),with a discharge of any kind other than dishonorable and at least age 65 or older? If you can answer yes to these questions, then you should apply for your benet offered by the VA. The Improved Pension and Aid and Attendance are benets payable by the Department of Veterans Affairs to veterans, spouses and surviving spouses The little used benet especially reserved for Veterans & Widows of Veterans can provide up to $23,396 a year Tax-Free per couple. According to a VA estimate, only one in seven of the widows of Vets who probably could qualify for the pension actually get the monthly checks. Most people who have heard about Pension know that it will cover the costs of assisted living and, in some cases, cover nursing home costs as well. But the majority of those receiving long term care in this country are in their homes. The great news is the Benet will allow you to hire your family, friends or just about anyone to take care of you. The tax-free Improved Pension and Aid and Attendance Benet could greatly help many deserving families care for their loved ones. The truth is, the process can be daunting, and few actually received the benet. Some seek assistance from un-accredited individuals. The Code of Federal Regulations states: No individual may assist claimants in the preparation, presentation, and prosecution of claims for VA benets, as an agent or attorney unless he or she has rst been accredited by VA for such purpose 38CFR 14.629 (b) (1). You can make an informed decision on how to proceed. If you or a loved one would like a professional evaluation of your potential eligibility by an accredited individual please contact Bob Adams at 407/644-6646 or www. VABentsForFlorida.com. Their team of professionals can provide you with an evaluation of eligibility. This service is provided free to our Veterans.Bob Adams is President of A Safeharbor, LLC. He may be contacted at A SafeHarbor, LLC, PO Box 3167, Winter Park, FL.,32790, telephone 407/644-6646 or e-mail BobAdams@ASafeHarbor.com. ADVERTISEMENT For this weeks Knights football preview story, visit WPMObserver.com PHoO To O BY iISAAC bBAbBCOCK THE oOBsSERVER CCorey Gonsalves races past a Clemson player on NNov. 5. Rollins caps historic win ISAAC BAbBCOCK Observer Staff Wildcats playoff bound ISAAC BAbBCOCK Observer Staff

PAGE 7

Page 7 Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011Winter Park / Maitland Observer On Oct. 26, the U.S. Green Building Council, Central Florida Chapter, hosted their annual LEEDership Dinner at the Hilton Orlando. LEED stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental De sign, a program that encourages and construction. The purpose of the dinner event was to formally recognize outstanding projects and achievements by businesses, community leaders and volunteers who are helping to shape the green building initiative in Cen tral Florida. At the dinner, the Green Build ing Council presented awards in eight categories, and I am proud to announce that Maitlands new Edward J. Doyle Police Station won the award for Project of the Year for New Construction in the small construction category. This award represents the hard work and close collaboration of a great number of people who were involved in the project. Wharton Smith, Inc., as construction man ager, assembled a very capable team of contractors and sub-con tractors who were careful to fol low the LEED guidelines closely. This included regular monitoring and close coordination among contractors, materials suppliers and design professionals. ACi, the project architect, and AVCON, the project engineer, set the stage building that incorporated con equipment that represented the ogy. Some examples of these in novations include energy-saving ing, extra roof insulation, a cool roof, occupancy sensors and an energy recovery ventilation system. Water conservation was also a major focus of the project. Stormwater quality and quantity were key focus points included in the site planning for the project. Additionally, zero potable water is used to provide for landscaping needs. The City staff who managed the project were careful to provide the monitoring and administra tion necessary to maintain focus on the LEED requirements for the building as it progressed and to address the necessary criteria. With the help of the projects LEED facilitator, the City researched the possibility of purchasing Renew able Energy Credits that allow for the research and development of renewable energy technolo gies. By contributing to this type of credit, the City did its part to direct the community toward a mately, the new police station actually exceeded the LEED Silver level of achievement that was the original goal and was awarded construction and operation meth ods. Edward J. Doyle Police Station has received this kind of recogni tion, and I hope that the citizens of Maitland will take note of this worthy achievement and see what their own environments to save energy. Community Development DepartmentCity Council Agenda of NNov. 14 City Council meets the second and fourth Mondays of the month at 6:30 p.m. The next meeting is scheduled for November 14th in the Council Chambers, 1776 Inde pendence Lane. Below are items that will be addressed at that meeting. Special Presentation: Jonni SchardinePublic Hearing: Development Plan (CDP) Text AmendmentConsent Agenda: Oct. 24, 2011 Board meeting minutes ward List 45 Decision Item: Council Meetings portation (FDOT) Request to Sub ordinate City Easement, Parcel 568 portation (FDOT) Request to Sub ordinate City Easement, Parcel 570 For updates, please check www. itsmymaitland.com Last CoffeeTT alk of the season featuring Commissioner TT om McMacken If you have a latte beans to grind or simply want to espresso your thoughts, please join Commis sioner Tom McMacken for the last CoffeeTalk of the season on Thurs day, Nov. 10, from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Winter Park Welcome Cen ter located at 151 W. Lyman Ave. Special thanks to our coffee provider, Palmanos Roastery & Espresso Bar. Attention all veteransThe City of Winter Park, in partnership with the Winter Park Ministerial Alliance and the Win ter Park Chamber of Commerce, calls all Winter Park veterans to attend its inaugural Veterans Day Celebration on Friday, Nov. 11, at 11 a.m. The event will be held outside at the new Winter Park Community Center Ruby Ball Amphitheatre located at 721 W. New England Ave. Beginning at 10 a.m., attendees can gather information from a va riety of organizations and services for veteran needs including the Department of Veterans Affairs, Orlando VA Medical Center, Dis abled American Veterans, Veter ans of Foreign Wars, American Legion and more. At 11 a.m., the musical tributes, anecdotal speak ers and recognition of veterans according to the various military branches and campaigns served. Veterans who have served in any military campaign (World War II, Korean War, Vietnam War, Desert Storm, Iraqi Freedom or Afghanistan) or have served in any military branch in honor of our nations freedom are encour aged to join us to be honored at the event. Winter Park would like to pay tribute to your dedicated service to our country. In addition, the Winter Park Fire-Rescue Department (WPFD) is once again supporting Operation Gratitude, a program designed to collect candy and letters of encouragement for American servicemen and women who are currently deployed in the hostile and remote regions of Iraq and Afghanistan. Everyone attending the Veterans Day Celebration is encouraged to drop off leftover Halloween candy and letters of support for our troops. For information regarding additional Winter Park events, site at www.cityofwinterpark.org.WPPD launches Click It or TT icket The Winter Park Police Depart ment (WPPD) will be joining state and local law enforcement agen cies and highway safety groups in supporting an aggressive national Click It or Ticket seat belt en forcement campaign. Stepped-up law enforcement activities will be conducted during the 2011 Click It or Ticket mobilization period from Monday, Nov. 14, through Sunday, Nov. 27. Seat belts are the single most effective piece of safety equip ment in a vehicle, yet Winter Parks seatbelt usage is typically measured at around 80 percent, leading into enforcement activi ties such as Click It or Ticket. Kids have to be buckled up, too. Your child seat can be installed by appointment. This is a long-time service that has been provided for many years at no cost to the pub lic. Seat belts clearly save lives. When worn correctly, seat belts have been proven to reduce the risk of fatal injury to front-seat passenger car occupants by 45 per cent, and by 60 percent in pickup trucks, SUVs and minivans. WPPD is encouraging compli ance in lieu of having to issue cita tions as costly reminders of a law that everyone should be following every time they are in a vehicle. NNov. 14 City Commission and CRRA board meeting There will be a Community Rede velopment Agency Board meeting on Monday, Nov. 14, at 2:30 p.m., in City Hall Commission Cham bers located at 401 Park Ave. S. Immediately following, there will be a city commission meeting at 3:30 p.m. full agenda and information on www.cityofwinterpark.org and by clicking on Government > City Commission > Packets. Lack of Desire or Low Energy? Testosterone Lab Work for $35 (a $240 Value) Call today for a risk-free appointment: 407-894-9959 NNew police station wins LEEEED project of the year Maitland City Talk bBY HowaOWARdD SchiCHIEfFERdDEckCKER MAYOR Winter Park City Talk bBY RaRANdD Y KNighIGHT CITY MANAGER Dennis AllenOwner/ Administrator Visit our webpage for more info!www.NRG-DanceStudios.weebly.com Dancers Ages 2 & Up!Ballet, Tap, Jazz, Lyrical, Modern, Hip-hop, & Expressive Dance Location: Winter Park Community Center721 West New England Ave. Winter Park, FL 32789 FREE NRG-Dance Studios T-shirt and NO registration fee for the first 75 dancers to enroll! Where students transform into dancers!Meet the owner Nichole Genchi ...B.A. Dance from FIU Over 10 Years Teaching Former Miami Dolphins Cheerleader (NFL) & Panthers Ice Dancer (NHL) 1st Dance Class FREENow Enrolling!Call: (407)519-0477

PAGE 8

Page 8 Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011Winter Park / Maitland Observer TTHURRSDAY Y N Gardens, James Zach Zacharias 3994. presents Fraud 101 on Thursday, Nov. 10 at 7 p.m. Call 407-6477700. Brian & Melissa Minyard perform at N N terParkPlayhouse.org The Signature Chefs Auction benday, Nov. 10, at Rosen Shingle Creek CoffeeTT alk featuring Commissioner N FRRIDAY Y Series presents Social N Networking for Seniors SKYYPEE Nov. 11 at 10 a.m. Register by calling 407-647-7700. Renowned medieval scholar and au thor Clair W. McPherson will deliver N Sunday morning, Nov. 13 at 10:15 a.m. The fth annual Jack in the Park, N Culture and Cocktails N B SAT TURRDAY Y bers from 10 a.m. 4 p.m., Nov. 12, the Winter Park Florida Blue Health Fair is offering attendees free health B annual Alternative Global Christ mas Market is Saturday, Nov. 12, from 9 a.m. until 1:30 p.m. at 400 S. Fiddle Fest N p.m. for a donation of $5 per family. Dr. N Nancy R Rudner Lugo will be Nov. SUNNDAY Y The Baldwin Park Half Marathon & 5K will be 7 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 13 B Sundew Gardens Intro to Sundew Gardening is Nov. 13, 10 a.m. to JCC Family Festival will run from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Springs on Sunday, Nov. 13. The Center for Contemporary Dance hosts A Decade of Dance from noon to 3 p.m. Sunday, Nov.13 at Byron Marshall is Sunday, Nov. 13 from 2 to 4 p.m. Clarinetist R Richard Stoltzman per B N B MONNDAY Y The qualifying period for Maitland mayor N Nov.18. Call 407-539-6219. Cultural Centers Cooks Series presents VV enezuelan N 14 at 7 p.m. Register by calling 407647-7700. TTUEESDAY Y Guest lecture series Freedom of RReligion N Not Freedom from R Re ligion is Nov. 15 at 7 p.m. at the AARRP Winter Park Chapter 1047 will have a meeting on Nov.15 at 1:30 B 629-2585. WEEDNENESDAY Y oral design class will be at 10 N den Club, 1300 South Denning Drive. Cost is $10. Reservations required by Nov. 14. Call 407-644-5770. American Association of Individual Investors N N II shopping event of the year, RRed Bag Days, returns from Nov. 17-20 with discounts at participating stores along NNOVV 18 The fth annual Peacock Ball is Nov. munity Center in Hannibal Square. Cost is $150. Call 406-647-2330 or Calendar VV eterans Day events NNOVV 10 having a special SOS breakfast at B I day, Nov. 10 at 8:30 a.m. The cost is $25. NNOVV 11 an Open House, from 10 a.m. N 4490 N Goldenrod Road. Call 407org N inaugural VV eterans Day Celebra tionN NNOVV 12 VV eterans Day Parade is Saturday, Nov. 12, at 11

PAGE 9

Page 9 Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011Winter Park / Maitland Observer Lifestyles Diesta Gundacker has spent the past 12 years training mans best friend to be someone elses best friend. The Winter Park resident is a volunteer puppy raiser for Canine Companions for Independence. For her, saying goodbye to the puppies she trains is a great mo ment. To spend 15-18 months with a puppy and then turn it over to somebody else is a great feeling, she said. We want them, but somebody else needs them. Gundacker has trained and placed 10 dogs to enhance the lives of people with disabilities, an experience that has not only changed the lives of the people who receive the dogs, but has also had a lasting impact on Gundack er and her children, who she said have learned so much about self lessness and helping others from the experience.Lasting bondGundacker raises the pups, which are either golden retrievers, black or yellow Labradors or a cross breed of both, for an average of 18 months before sending them on to advanced training, which takes another six months to a year, where they learn skills such as turning on light switches and opening cabinets and doors. The next step, the matchmaking process, requires the graduates to live in a dorm at the CCI campus for two weeks where they interact and train with different compan ions until a match is made. Once they learn to bond, they can transfer that bond to anyone, she said. I think it is harder for people than it is for the dog even though we dont want to think so. Gundacker is currently train ing an 8-month-old black Labrador-golden retriever mix named Odiele. Her last graduate, Dulce, was placed with a family from South Florida about three years ago.Making a matchDavid Ruttenberg, whose daugh ter Phoebe was matched with Dulce, said he thought a compan ion would be a good way to help facilitate his autistic daughters communication skills. It has been a love affair ever since, Ruttenburg said. It's been nearly two years now, and I can honestly tell you that everywhere we bring Dulce, whether to a grocery store, library, hotel, park or school, she lights up the room, Ruttenberg said. The Ruttenberg family feels blessed to have Dulce in their lives, he said, and the experience has given Phoebe a newfound third-grade class every day. Dulce is more than a family member to all of us, he said. She is a tonic, elixir and lever that en ables our daughter to communicate and connect lovingly with the world around her. And for that, we're indebted to Diesta, her family and everyone at CCI.Big fundraiserThe 15th annual Tales and Tails gala on Saturday, Nov. 12, is the largest fundraiser for the South east region of CCI. It includes a silent and live auction, dinner and cocktails, and features animals in a program by SeaWorlds profes sional animal trainer Joel Slaven. [The event] has grown quite a bit over the past 15 years, said Cathy Rodgers, director of development. And because it is the largest fundraising event we have, the success of the gala is very im portant to the region. Three canine companion graduates will be honored at the event and will share their stories about how their companions have changed and improved their lives. Previous graduates and CCI dogs of appropriate ages will also be at the event, in addition to Gundack er and her 8-month-old puppy. Learn moreCanine Companions for Independence will be having its 15th annual Tales and Tails Gala on Saturday, Nov. 12, at Rosen Shingle Creek. Visit www.cci.org/talesandtailsgalaDevoted to dogsPHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERDiesta Gundacker poses with her 8-month-old trainee, OOdiele. T The Winter Parker has raised 10 guide dogs in 12 years. Canine Companions volunteer puppy raisers to speak at Nov. 12 fundraiserMEISHA PERRIN OObserver SStaff

PAGE 10

Page 10 Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011Winter Park / Maitland Observer FamilyCalendar Letters to Santa Contest Kids, submit your letters, starting with The gift I most want to give is The winner of the contest will ride in the Winter Park Christmas parade and receive a special prize package, including a family four-pack of tickets to Winter in the Park. The winning letter will be published in The Observer. Letters to Santa Contest entries are to be no longer than one page and are due by 5 p.m. Friday, Nov. 25, either by email, editor@observernewspapers.com, or physical mail, 1500 Park Center Drive, Orlando, FL 32835. Include the authors name, phone number, address and email. Sponsored by: Alan Currie Parker walked along Park Avenue every day, sticking his head inside the stores to say hi to the tenants and ask about the latest Winter Park news. If there were any new happen ings along the Avenue, he knew about them. If there were any community projects being considered, he knew about them. If there were any new tenants in the business district, he knew about them. He was kind of the Chamber of Commerce on legs, family friend Tom Kelly said. Two weeks ago, Parker took his last walk in Winter Park. On Oct. 29, Parker died and the Winter Park community lost a friend, family member and active community leader. He was 77. He was the essence to Win ter Park, Kelly said. He cared very much for the city and the merchants. I mean, to me, he was Winter Park. Parkers family members and friends will join the Winter Park community at the University Club of Winter Park on Tuesday, Dec. 6, at 5:30 p.m. to celebrate his life.Career in real estateParker was born in Massachusetts and moved to Winter Park in 1969 after spending his earlier years with the Navy as an air and radar drilling reservist. After moving to Winter Park, he became the presi dent of Amherst Development Inc., developer of Cloisters con dominium on Lake Osceola, and later founded Alan Parker Realty Inc. During his years in Winter Park, he served as trustee, direc tor and member of the executive board committee for the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce and served on the Community Rede velopment Area advisory board. He also spent the latter part of his life making plenty of friends in the community. He was a man who did much for his city but did it behind the scenes, said Joe Terranova, a former Winter Park mayor who served on the CRA advisory board alongside Parker. Hes not one out looking for glory, but he did a lot of things for the community, and a lot of people knew about it.Beloved citizenParkers behind-the-scenes civic engagement was so extensive that it earned him the title of Winter Park Chamber of Commerces citizen of the year in 2007, and he remained just as active in Winter Park thereafter. He was a major player in the project for the improvement to Orange Avenue, which would not have been completed without him, Terranova said. from real estate but loved being a citizen of Winter Park so much that he built his retirement home within a block of Central Park. Parker was also a member of the Winter Park Rotary Club, where he and Kelly sat for lunch almost every Monday. Hell be greatly missed, Kel ly said. The smile, the twinkle in his eye and the care that he had for this city it will be tough for anyone to match that. Though Parker did not have any children of his own, he was still a beloved family man and member of the community. He had a passion for traveling and was very good about keeping con tact with his friends and family in other locations. He was a devoted family man to his extended family members, said his niece Laura Goty of Port land, Ore. He had four nieces and nephews, and he was much more than an uncle to us.PHOTO BY COURTNEY SHApPIRO AAlan Parker, middle, poses with Phil Chimento, left, and BBill Walker, right, at a Winter Park Chamber of Commerce political event on May 24 at the Civic Center. Parker embodied the ChamberMEISHA PERRIN OObserver SStaff Learn moreA celebration of Alan Parkers life and contributions will be held at the University Club of Winter Park on Dec. 6 at 5:30 p.m.The historic Annie Russell The atre, which is celebrating its 79th season, presents Little Shop of Horrors from Friday, Nov. 11, to Saturday, Nov. 19, with both eve ning and matinee performance times. Cost is $20, $10 for stu dents with ID. Call 407-646-2145 or visit Rollins.edu/annierussell. Orlando Fashion Square welcomes back Santa Claus for visits and pictures with children this holiday season starting at 7 p.m. Friday, Nov. 11. Santa photos will be tak en daily through Saturday, Dec. 24. Also, Fido and Fluffy can sit with St. Nick on Pet Nights from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Mondays from Nov. 14 through Dec. 19. Maitland Public Library proudly presents Childrens READing Fest 2011 on Saturday, Nov. 12, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Guests in clude Kevin King the Magician and Alligator Annie, authors Loreen Leedy, Danette Haworth, Phil Card, and musician John Holley. There will be poetry and writing sideshows. Call 407-647-7700. Winter Park Sports Hall of Fame induction ceremony is Saturday, Nov. 12, at the Winter Park Com munity Center. Cocktail hour begins at 5:30 p.m. followed by din ner, catered by Johnny Rouse JRs BBQ and the induction ceremony. Contact jmiller@cityofwinterpark. org for more information. Movie in the Park featuring Tangled is 6 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 12, at Quinn Strong Park in Maitland. Bring your blankets and chairs and the city will bring you the stars. Visit ItsmyMaitland.com for more information. The fth annual Roar n Soar, a signature two-day racing extravaganza showcasing the nest clas sic racing machines ever built for land, sea or air, revs into Fantasy of Flight on Sat., Nov. 12, and Sun., Nov. 13, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the attractions lakefront grounds and aireld in Polk City, midway between Orlando and Tampa. Call 863-984-3500 or visit FantasyOf Flight.com The Young Composers Chal lenge Composium will take place Sunday, Nov. 13, from 2 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. at the Bob Carr Per forming Arts Centre in downtown Orlando. Winning contestants, ages 13 to 18, representing states from coast to coast, will have their compositions performed for the rst time on stage by the Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra. Visit YoungComposersChallenge.org The Maitland Public Library has bedtime stories for all ages at 6 p.m. every Monday. Preschool story time is 10:30 a.m. every Tuesday. Infant and toddler story time is at 10:30 a.m. every Thurs day. Reading buddies is Thursdays at 4 p.m. Call 407-647-7700 for more information. Send submissions to editor@ob servernewspapers.com

PAGE 11

Page 11 Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011Winter Park / Maitland Observer This seasons Festival of Trees is the 25th anniversary of this much-anticipated holiday event, and the Orlando Museum of Arts Council of 101 has chosen Hip Holidays! including cool s retro design as the theme for the events entertainment, dcor and activities. The mod ness begins Friday, Nov. 11, with the Mad Mod Gala, a black tie party that opens the 2011 Festival of Trees and Pop Art and Pop Culture in Contemporary Prints, an exhibit of selected works from the OMAs permanent collection. The always-elegant opening evening promises food and drinks (vintage cocktails) and Frank Sinotra in the Lava Lounge. The Buzzcatz begin the night with music from the s and progress through hits of each following decade. Other events include the family-oriented Reindeer Romp (Wednesday, Nov. 16, beginning at 6:30 p.m.), and the Holiday Stroll (Friday, Nov. 18, from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.). For 25 years, The Festival of Trees has showcased magical displays of designer trees, wreaths and gingerbread creations, a gift boutique, the Toyland Town activity area, a Holiday Garden and a Festival Caf complete with daily enter tainment. The entire family can enjoy this holiday tradition from Saturday, Nov. 12, to Sunday, Nov. 20, at the Orlando Museum of Art. Its open daily from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. For tickets, call 407-896-4231 extension 254, or purchase them at the door. The OMA is located in Loch Haven Park at 2416 N. Mills Ave. in Or lando. Visit www.omart.org.Rock Orlando-styleIts only rock n roll, but we like it! A major new, star-packed music festival is set to rock your world Saturday, Nov. 12, and Sunday, Nov. 13, celebrating American music with headlin ers Bob Seger & the Silver Bullet Band, Kid Rock, the Doobie Brothers and The Killers. The Orlando Calling music festival, at the Citrus Bowl park in Orlando, ican, platinum-selling marquee acts with one of the stages dedicated to acts from Orlando. With more than 40 acts signed, and more added every day, if you like your music live, this is your rock music fantasy weekend! Visit www.orlandocalling.com.A Winter Park welcome Gary Sain, president of Visit Orlando, the organization that spreads the good word about visiting Central Florida around the world, is the speaker at the next Winter Park Chamber of Commerce monthly breakfast program set for Friday, Nov. 11. We are invited for a complimentary continental breakfast begin ning at 7:45 a.m. with the pro gram to follow at 8:15 a.m. There is no more informed person to give us the latest on tourism in Central Florida and the news is good! Spoiler alert: We set records last year, and we are ontrack to top those record-breaking numbers this year. The event is free at the Winter Park Welcome Center, home of the Chamber of Commerce at 151 W. Lyman Ave. in Winter Park. Velasquez in MaitlandIn a manner similar to adding lyrics to a melody, artist Camilo Velasquez combines written text with sophisticated images. He says, I like to tell stories. I enjoy taking pictures. If I had to label my work, I would call it con narrative implies a story, and trust, intimacy or confession; its the distillation and untangling of lifes experiences for the pur pose of making sense of it all. An artist of exquisite sensitivity, Velasquez will make sense of it all as the next featured artist to be exhibited at the Maitland Art Center. His opening is scheduled for Friday, Nov. 18, from 6 p.m.-8 p.m., with the exhibit running through Jan. 22. The Maitland Art Center is at 231 W. Packwood Ave. in Maitland. Call 407-5392181 or visit www.artandhistory. org.And not to be missed American Voices, an epic con cert that has taken more than two years to create, will have its one-night-only performance at the Bob Carr Performing Arts Centre on Saturday, Nov. 12, at 8 p.m. This collaborative evening features the Orlando Philharmonic in a night of American music honoring the legacy of Florida author Zora Neale Hurston. Visit orlandophil.org or call 407-7700071. 1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORGTHIS WEEK AT ENZIAN SENNA Fri-Sat 3:45PM, 6:30PM, 9:15PM Sun 1PM, 3:45PM, 6:30PM Mon 9:30PM Tue 6:30PM Wed & Thu 6:30PM, 9:15PM PEARL JAM TWENTY Fri & Sat 11:59PM RED STATE Sun 10PM 13th ANNUAL MANHATTAN SHORT FILM FESTIVAL Mon 6:30PM NETWORK Tue 9:30PM 1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORGTHIS WEEK AT ENZIAN SENNA Fri-Sat 3:45PM, 6:30PM, 9:15PM Sun 1PM, 3:45PM, 6:30PM Mon 9:30PM Tue 6:30PM Wed & Thu 6:30PM, 9:15PM PEARL JAM TWENTY Fri & Sat 11:59PM RED STATE Sun 10PM 13th ANNUAL MANHATTAN SHORT FILM FESTIVAL Mon 6:30PM NETWORK Tue 9:30PM MARTHA MARCY MAY MARLENE Fri Sun 3:45PM, 6:30PM, 9:15PM Mon, Wed Thu 6:30PM, 9:15PM Tue 9:30PM Saturday Matinee Classic ITS A MAD MAD MAD MAD WORLD Sat 11AM Wednesday Night Pitcher Show HAROLD & KUMAR GO TO WHITE CASTLE FREE at Eden Bar Wed 8PM Josh Garrick Hip holidays Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906.WHO ISGARRICK > Nelore Authentic Brazilian Steakhouse offers extensive table-side serviceOur Salad Bar features a complete buffet of over 40 items with cold and hot dishes, including Brazilian specialties. We serve 14 cuts of meat continuously, all you can eat table side service. Where you can choose from beef, pork, lamb or chicken, all served with our house specialty, oven-warm cheese bread. Nelore Steakhouse 115 E. Lyman Ave. Winter Park, FL 32789(407) 645-1112www.neloresteakhouse.com

PAGE 12

Page 12 Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011Winter Park / Maitland Observer The temperature is dropping, leaves are changing and Oviedo is gearing up for another big fall event. The 38th annual Great Day in the Country arts and crafts festival is Saturday, Nov. 12, and it will feature more than 350 exhibitors displaying and selling their arts and crafts to raise thousands of dollars for local charities, schools and scholarships that will have I think people like Great Day because of its affordability, festi val Chairwoman Angela Iversen said. A lot of people like to do their Christmas shopping and we have a lot of variety. The event will award $3,000 in prize money to several different art categories. The GFCW Oviedo Womans Club will also award $1,500 in art scholarships at the Student Art Fest sponsored by Commissioner Bob Dallari, and each school participating in the Student Art Fest will receive $50, provided by Oviedo Mayor Dom inic Persampiere. There will also have live en tertainment in two areas, food, drinks, a country store that sells homemade baked goods by OWC women, childrens activities, the Womans Clubs famous bean soup, as well as many longtime art and craft vendors. Eighty-year-old Ann Robinson has been showcasing her pottery skills at Great Day in the Country for more than 30 years and said she has always enjoyed taking part. Im amazed at how many people come out, Robinson said. Ive had a lot of good experienc es with it. She said shes always had an interest in crafts but knew shed found her real passion when she found clay. She eventually opened her own studio in Oviedo that shes had for 27 years, and she enjoys sharing her talent with the community every year. Lynne Seigler has also been a longtime vendor at the festival and said it has always been a very positive experience for her. I enjoy working with the la dies, Seigler said. And I like the fact that its a one-day show. Seigler has been displaying her embroidery skills at the event for more than 10 years and said she embroidering has helped her through surviving breast cancer. After being diagnosed in 2005, she never gave up. She continued embroidery and taking part in Great Day in the Country through it all. I continued to do craft shows at that time and just wore a wig or a scarf, she said. And that as pect of it was very a positive experience, because people would say you can do it. I did it. ing those who are going through the same experience she once did, and sharing what she calls her little hobby with others at Great Day in the Country. Its a little hobby that went crazy, Seigler said. And I expect Great Day to be another great day this year. Owners of Frederickson Apiar ies Bill Frederickson and his wife, Marion, are also looking forward to another year at Great Day in the Country, and a chance to share their natural honey and the im portance of honeybees with the community they love. Oviedo is a neat place where all the organizations work with the community, Bill said. It doesnt matter whats put out in Oviedo its got more of a fam ily-orientated atmosphere, and everyone is welcome, and every body always walks away with a smile and we are pretty blessed to be a part of it. Call today for your FREE estate planning consult Now accepting Visa, Discover and Mastercard Shop countrystyle in Oviedo KKRISTY VICKERY OObserver SStaff ARcCHIVE PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK OBSERVER STAFFVendors are ready to showcase their holiday gifts at the 38th annual Great Day in the Country in OOviedo. Learn moreThe 38th annual Great Day in the Country arts and crafts festival will be held on Saturday, Nov. 12th at Lawton Elementary School located at Lake Jessup Avenue and Broadway in Oviedo. Admission and parking are free, and a free shuttle service will be available to and from the parking area at Oviedo High School. For more information on the event call the GFWC Oviedo Womans Club at 407-365-9420 or visit www.greatdayoviedo.org

PAGE 13

Page 13 Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011Winter Park / Maitland Observer Bring this ad in to recieve 20% off all regular-priced clothing(some items may be excluded) 38 E. Broadway St. Oviedo, FL 32765 407-359-0099 www.sweetrepeats2.com Come see our large selection of Fall Jackets, Coats, Blazers, Ski Wear, Suits, Christmas Dresses, Holiday Attire for all Women, Children and Juniors!Sweet Repeats Consignment Boutique The 38th Annual Great Day in the CountryPresented by GFWC Oviedo Womans ClubSaturday, Nov. 12, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Lawton Elementary School State Road 426 and Lake Jessup Ave., OviedoFREE ADMISSIONMain Stage9:00 a.m.Welcome Prayer Recognition of American Legion Post 243 Hagerty High School ROTC Presentation of Colors Pledge of Allegiance National Anthem Trumpet Soloist Gregory Frey Presentation of Student Art Awards10:00 a.m.Winter Springs Performing Arts 10:30 a.m. BrenDon Squares11:00 a.m. Late Fer Dinner11:30 a.m. Late Fer Dinner12:00 p.m. Jackson Heights Middle School Dance Team Lady Bobcats12:30 p.m. St. Lukes Brass Ensemble1:00 p.m. St. Lukes Praise Band1:30 p.m. Double Down Gymnastics2:00 p.m. University Performing Arts Center2:30 p.m. The Right Notes OWC Premier Vocal GroupLawton House Stage9:00 a.m. The Old Guys on the Porch10:00 a.m. Story Time with Zell10:30 a.m. Aerialfusion11:00 a.m. Magic Show with Brian Happie11:45 a.m. Little Rascals Cheerleaders12:00 p.m. The Old Guys on the Porch1:00 p.m. Aerialfusion1:30 p.m. WSHS Step Team (demonstration and step lesson) Childrens Art Activities Free Parking Oviedo High School Fresh Vegetables Live Entertainment Food and Drink Student Art Fest Cash Awards and Ribbons College Scholarships HOPE Helps, Inc. Share the Care/Lutheran Haven Shepherds Hope Oviedo Police and Fire Challenger League Oviedo Schools FUMCO Entertainment schedule ... and many more organizations!

PAGE 14

Page 14 Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011Winter Park / Maitland Observer Opinion/ Editorial Letters to the Editor Roney a breath of fresh air We are absentee property owners in Winter Park Pines and we receive the Observer in the mail. First we would like to thank you for sending us this useful publication; we look forward to each copy. We would like to thank you for carry ing the writings of a great conservative like Louis Roney. He is like a rock in the middle of the sea of liberals. Too bad his thoughtful, reasoned positions cant be taught in our schools and colleges. Good job!Patricia and Ralph Taddeo St. Petersburg Veterans respected world overLast June, my husband and I took our family to France for a riverboat trip on the Seine River followed by a few days in Paris. For me, the highlight of the journey was our visit to the American Cemetery near the village of Colleville in Normandy. Perhaps it was the recent anniversary of D-Day, but throughout can soil and is landscaped as such, down to the American Beauty roses and zoysia and fescue grass. On the terrace of the large neo-Classical temple that serves as a museum sat a wheelchair-bound veteran in full dress uniform displaying the insignia of the 101st Airborne Division, later celebrated in the book and movie Band of Brothers. Now 87, the veteran had been in his teens when his plane hallowed place returning veterans such as he are treated like the superstars they him before wandering among the nearly 10,000 graves. Many were marked with the names of brothers. Two of Theodore Roosevelt's sons are buried here. Theodore Jr., recipient of the Medal of Honor, lies beside his brother Quentin, who had been killed over Germany in World War I In the town of Arromanches on the way back to Rouen where our boat was docked, I found a postcard that expresses the heartfelt gratitude the French felt for our veterans and their rescue from years of Nazi oppression. What could be a more words written by Jean Goujon, a child of the liberation: "Dear Veteran: I am writing to say 'thank you,' and through me there are thousands of chil dren speaking to thousands of veterans. Like us, you were young and carefree, but when you were only 20 years old, Liberty called you to say: 'I am dying. Come save me!' And you arose, full of courage and zeal, to answer the call. You underwent training, day after day, for D-Day, and, one day in June, you arrived by air and sea. And you fought with the heart and soul of a free man so that we too might be free. You saw your fellows fall on our your grief and injuries, you stayed on and fought side-by-side with us. And so you, dear Veteran, I want to tell you, regard youth and are resting in peace, the sleep of the just, that We Are The Children They Several weeks ago, the Orlando Sentinel published a letter from a reader who questioned why schools were wasting money teaching chorus, drama, visual arts, band and foreign languages instead of focusing solely on the subjects that are meaningful to the students. This attitude that the arts are somehow expendable, frivolous or simply a waste of resources is an attitude that is shared by too many in our community. As an arts teacher, I wonder why so many think that our collective culture and self-expression are meaningless. After 10 years of teaching drama and English, I have encountered many different opin ions from my teenage students and have or misplaced priorities. Our leaders are seemingly worse than teenagers at times, altering our societal priorities by relying solely on whatever numbers theyre told are important. We have become a society that seeks quannumber on it, it can be properly judged. The value of a building project can only be determined if there are numbers with ones retirement portfolio clearly represent ones judgment, education and character; and teachers capabilities can be accurately established by giving multiplechoice tests to their students. Hey, numbers tell the whole story, dont they? You cant debate numbers! Actually, stories are written with words, and numbers are debatable, espe cially when it comes to determining value. Dont agree? Then you obviously think that this summers blockbuster hit Trans formers: Dark Of The Moon is a better derful Life. After all, the Transformers movie made more than a billion dollars at its budget of $195 million). In contrast, Its A Wonderful Life was considered recoup its budget during its initial run. And we know numbers tell the whole story, right? Now you may wish to explain that movie, not actually the better one, that and have no direct relation to its artistic, emotional or moral quality. Now youre getting my point. No one should be evaluated simply on the numbers in their lives. Vincent van Gogh sold one painting in his lifetime. Emily Dickinson never sold a single poem. Judy Garland died broke. Do we really think of these artists as failures? I don't need numbers to understand who someone is. I can tell more about people by examining the art they choose to surround themselves with (books, hypotheses or test scores you could ever provide me. The arts exist primarily to provide everyone with the necessary tools to express their individuality in the world, as well as to connect each person to every other person out there on a basic human level because, after all, we all experience most of the same emotions. And emotions dont come with numbers. And shouldnt. Despite what the Sentinel reader may have thought, I believe that whats meaningful to our students is for them their own meaning. Robert Dutton, drama instructor at Winter Park High School, will be presenting an hourlong talk, Why your child needs an arts eduAuditorium on Thursday, Nov. 17, at 7 p.m. All are invited to attend. RR OBERT DUTTON Guest WriterShouldering the burden of memory Please see LETTERS Page 15 discharged from the military and considered physically able. The onus is frequent ly on the wounded to prove otherwise in order to receive medical care. That proof is sometimes far from obvious. For those who escaped the physical from post-traumatic stress, their reward is a lifetime of depression, anger and terrible nightmares. logical diagnosis, were losing the battle to bring our soldiers back from the battle soldiers died of suicide than in combat, A February report paid for by the New York State Health Foundation found that veterans, compared to non-veterans, are four times more likely to suffer from major depression, and eight times more likely to suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder. Of those few who sought treat ment, only half received care described by the study as minimally adequate. Those veterans with brain injuries out of sight and out of mind walk invisibly among us, struggling to do things that were once second nature: Carrying on a conversation. Driving a car. Holding a job. And after theyre discharged from the to access expensive treatment to help them live a normal life again. In July a group of more than 1,000 veterans, backed by the National Veterans Legal Service Program, had to sue the federal government to get treatment for mental health issues incurred during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. In a class action lawsuit, that group won the right to from the military with PTSD. For those soldiers not a part of that suit or ones like it, the options grow slim outside the Veterans Administration hospitals, though groups such as the Disabled American Veterans Charitable Service Trust and Operation Homefront try to and our own to make them healthy again. For the rest, theyre in a hospital if they can afford it; theyre in the gutter if they cant. But for those soldiers who can help the few who have the courage to ask for help, their new mission is to remind us of Theyre hard to miss. This Veterans Day weekend, perhaps with an Ameri the breeze, well drive by them. Theyre standing in the middle of the road, with a hand outstretched, begging you not to forget. Every weekend at the corner of Red Bug Lake Road and Tuskawilla Road, two men slowly walk the concrete median, begging passers-by for money. The needy image is unmistakable: Its the outstretched hat in hand. But in the hands of this rotating group of men col lecting what they can, the hats are camou The men are dressed in ACUs, combat uniforms that still may carry remnants of dust from Iraq or Afghanistan. Free from the horrors of the front line, they stand on a street corner shouldering the burden of memory, of soldiers who may never walk again, of heroes who may never come home. These men can still stand, and so they do, underneath a hot sun, begging fellow Americans for some change to help our he roes who wage their second war at home. These are men who swore to protect American citizens civilians, and each other against our enemies. They swore to keep us safe. But in the words of cartoonist Walt Kelly, We have met the enemy, and he is us. Were a country that counts on its soldiers to protect us when we need them most. But when they return to our shores, they can never be certain that we will return the favor. Make no mistake, we are a country that reveres its veterans. We salute them in line at McDonalds, then we give them a free meal. We thank them for their service as we pass them in the grocery store. If something good happens to a veteran, its rendered all the more special by virtue to a veteran, it saddens us just as equitably. When we give deference to their sacopenly. We let them know that not only do our veterans matter, but also that we, the people, salute them. But when we go home for the evening, when we close that door, we forget. We forget, because we dont know what that graves. Acute injuries from war can become chronic, lingering long after the soldier is We count on soldiers to protect us but they can never be certain that we will return the favor. Arts programs are more than numbers

PAGE 15

Page 15 Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011Winter Park / Maitland Observer Chris Jepson Louis Roney Never Had. And to you, dear Veteran, who offered your bravery and your most promising years for this land, I say to you, WE ARE YOUR SONS, SONS AND DAUGHTERS OF LIBERTY, WHO WANT TO SAY TO YOU TODAY, A HEARTFELT 'THANK YOU!'" Kathryn Grammer Winter Park Rollins blinks, Phi Beta Kappa takes noticeIn June 1977, a month after my graduation from Rollins College, I penned a letter to the Rollins president who had handed me my diploma the month before. In my letter I asked if Rollins had applied for Phi Beta Kappa membership, which would cement the college's reputation for academic rigor with an enthusiastic "Yes!" and promised to keep me abreast of the college's progress as much as possible. He would go on to be one of my career references and insist that I'd make an excellent Rollins trustee one day. You can imagine how I felt when I read in The Rollins Sandspur that the handling of the formation of a new College of Professional Studies at Rollins "had a negative effect on the college's reputation in the decision by Phi Beta Kappa, the nation's most presti gious honor society, to terminate Rollins' candidacy." The article implied that the cur rent Rollins president, Lewis Duncan, was completely responsible, which is a laughable assertion when one considers that nothing approaching this magnitude could ever be done unilaterally without the trustees being on board. And only the president and his trustees know how this played out. But what we do know is that nothing could be worth causing a Phi Beta Kappa candidacy to be terminated. I urge all alums and supporters of Rollins College to let the Rollins leadership know how vitally important that Phi Beta Kappa candidacy is to the college, and to make whatever changes are necessary to get back in the good graces of Phi Beta Kappa. Many individuals have worked cease lessly over a period of decades to land a Phi Beta Kappa chapter at Rollins, including one Rollins president in particular who made major inroads. Let's get going on a new application!Will Graves Winter ParkSinging and other aberrationsMy regular lunch buddy (now deceased) Every Thursday week in and week out for 17 years Id convene with John Fisher at that toniest of Winter Park eater ies, Andros Restaurant, to break bread and discuss and laugh over the human condition. Once or twice a year wed fantasize over whom wed invite for that dream dinner of eight. Twain, Jefferson, Voltaire and Montaigne were a few of my regulars. Oh, and, of course, Ava Gardner. Ive been thinking of late about the nature of beauty, women, intelligence and what makes a woman particularly attracIve been intrigued for some time about the idea of how much further advanced wed be as a species if mankind had uni versally treated womankind with respect, dignity and equality. Males for thousands of years have treated women as inferior. That this injustice is well documented historically is undeniable, that it was/is a setback developmentally for our species, a travesty. Aside: The Islamic world will never amount to much until it accepts/promotes its women as equal to men. It brings up a question that Ive asked over the years from any number of my students. Where did such male discrimi nation originate? Is it an innate bias that men have to be culturally taught not to practice? Organized religion is an incred ibly complicit factor. Let the women learn in silence with all subjection. But I suffer not a woman to teach, nor to usurp authority over the man, but to be then Eve. I Timothy 2:11-14. What bibli cal gibberish. What injustice. And what a setback for humanity. Regardless of its origins, male sexism has not served our species well and has been unequivocally wretched for women. Its interesting to read of the isolated instances in history where a civilization treated its females with greater equality. Ancient Egypt, for example, was surprisingly accepting of females and by the standards of contemporary cultures then, almost enlightened. The Etruscans of seventh century B.C. Italy were quite lib erated and scandalized the Ancient Greek world. Why, Etruscan women actually speak in public meetings! Damned if they dont! But such historical examples number, hand. Mostly women experienced (literalon the back of their neck. But examples do exist of exceptional women achieving greatness in a mans world. I propose a dinner table of beauty and brains, of talent, verve, intellect and saucy, sexy repartee. Hot women with history! Cleopatra, of course. Not the Liz Taylor caricature, but the wily Cleopa tra of charm and intelligence. Pericles mistress Aspasia, an unquestioned beauty with brains. Socrates sought her out for more freedom than Greek wives. The last administrator of the Library of Alexandria, the pagan Hypatia. Brilliant, strong, an incredible intellect. Rioting Christians in 415 A.D. dragged her from her carriage, stripped her naked and scrapped the skin from her entire body with pottery shards. They then burned the library. Eleanor of Aquitaine. What a woman! Unbelievable for any age. And Mary Wollstonecraft, 18th century Brit, author of the Vindica tion of the Rights of Women. Id add Emily Dickinson (cuz I love her poetry so!) and on my immediate left, the inestimable Dorothy Parker forever pour ing forth both champagne and quips. And, Ava Gardner on my right. Of course. All wonderfully female.Hot women with historySingers are show-offs! The Italians, who invented great singing, do not utilize a concept of teaching a person to sing. They coach people who already have some God-given singing ability of their own. Coaching people to sing as a voice professor is a ticklish psychological proposi tion. The teacher must communicate not only his knowledge of singing and the musical selection involved, but also the particular problems of calling upon body parts that are invisible. Singing concerns itself with beautiful sound and how to produce it while communicating words in some language. The following is taken from a recent letter from a former student: My name is Richard S. and I studied voice from you at UCF in the early s. While I still sing as a hobby, professionally I am a writer I very much enjoyed your instruction and your own voice. In particular, I continue to love some of the wonderful songs you introduced me to: Musica Proibita, Die beiden Grenadiere, Santa Lucia and so many others. It was a treat to hear your obser vations and anecdotes about the great singers you worked with and admired throughout the years. Thank you for all the wonderful hours of learning and singing. You cer tainly have left a beautiful legacy in all the people whose lives you have touched. On your website I was enjoying the audio samples from your CDs Many thanks! Singers are born, not made. Singing combines body, mind and spirit into results that can be exciting, astounding and highly moving, all with two little vocal cords about the length of your thumbnail. What a singer is thinking comes out of his mouth as his art. The singer not only plays the instrument, he is the instru ment! Singing is, I think, built on a logical extension of the speaking voice with increased air movement and more (elongated) vowel sounds. I believe that singing evolved from days when men called through forests and the voice needed carrying power. I never found myself able to teach anything much to a person who had no gift of his own. My great Italian coach, Renato Bellini, taught me in New York for seven years after I got out of the Navy. Maestro was, as long as he lived, the most important person in my world outside my family. He taught me a slew of major Italian opera roles, and after one and a half years, I debuted in the leading role of Cavaradossi in Puccinis Tosca with the New York Philharmonic. Before undertak ing new roles, I often crossed the Atlantic to work with Maestro for several days. He put the roles in my voice. Most people have speaking voices that they use daily within the range of about an octave. A useful singing voice requires two octaves and more, and some colora tura sopranos perform in more than three octaves. These attributes are somewhat acro batic in nature and do not, by themselves, embody the aesthetic requisites of great singing, which must end in expressive beauty of sound. In my opinion, if singing is not beautiful, forget it! Singing is acting enhanced by the al luring patina of the musical human voice. The beauty produced by singing is its art, and its art is the realization of that beauty. Jepson is a 24-year resident of Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.USWHO ISJEPSON > HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney)WHO IS RRONEY > lettersLETTERS | Rollins Phi Beta Kappa candidacy is vital C OONTITINUEED FROFROM pP Ag GE 14 King Features Weekly ServiceNovember 7, 2011 Editorial Cartoon Have an opinion? Send your thoughts (400 words or less) to Managing Editor Jenny Andreasson at editor@observernewspapers.com

PAGE 16

Page 16 Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011Winter Park / Maitland Observer Recently, President Obama announced a new plan to help nance to lower their monthly mortgage payments. Working with the Federal Housing Finance Agency, the president is revising Program, aiming to help 1 million homeowners who owe more than their homes are worth avoid foreclosure. Realtors commend President Obama for pledging to help more struggling homeowners Orlando Regional Realtor Association Chairman Mike McGraw, McGraw Real Estate Services, PL. When people lose homes to foreclosure, families, our communities, the housing market and our economy all suffer. Helping even more families stay current on their mortgage and remain in their homes will help support the housing recovery. HARP was created in 2009 and their mortgages at lower rates without having to meet the typi cal requirement of having at least 20 percent of equity in their home to do so. Under current guidelines, many homeowners have been ineligible for the program because their home values had to be no more than 25 percent below what they owed their lender and some were unable to afford the closing costs and appraisal fees. With the new rules, which will take effect by Dec. 1, some of the extra fees to participate in HARP have been waived and homeowners eligibility wont be contingent on how far the homes value has fallen. Homeowners with loans backed by only Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac can participate and must be current on their mortgage. Orlando Regional Realtor Association said they hope the recent changes to HARP will en courage other mortgage investors to help struggling homeowners some, the money saved is worth it, said McGraw. Realtors have been advocating tirelessly for the government and lenders to take more aggressive steps to modify loans, as well as streamline the short sales process, another alternative for struggling hom eowners. The National Association of Realtors is also calling upon Con gress and the Obama administration to create policy solutions that stimulate housing and economic housing solutions plan outlined in part by NAR, lenders and the government are urged to take more aggressive steps to modify loans and approve short sales to help reduce high foreclosure inventory levels. Realtors are hopeful that reduced fees and grams such as HARP will help more struggling homeowners reduce their monthly mortgage payments and avoid losing their home to foreclosure. McGraw said the changes to HARP are just one step toward ing the housing market. We are beginning to see early signs of stabilization in the housing market, but until foreclosures housing inventory reaches a more normal level, there can be no true recovery, McGraw said. ORRA New Construction!4 bed / 2.5 bath / 2190 sq ft $339,000 808 Hamilton Place Court Winter Park, FL 32789 Commerce Brokerage, LLC407-566-1636 Jeff ClarkColdwell Banker Residential407.733.0773j.clark@coldwellbanker.com www.BaldwinParkLiving.com HomesObserver Homes brought to you by: Fannie Hillman + AssociatesServing Central Florida for over 29 years! 407-644-1234 fanniehillman.com Realtors support new renancing rules that help reduce foreclosures

PAGE 17

Page 17 Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011Winter Park / Maitland Observer 1300 Oneco WP Sold $1,035,000 CapTrust Tampa Sold$5,000,000 Tallahassee Office For Lease Tarawood For Sale$1,750,000 OWENS REALTY NETWORK 228 PARK AVE N. SUITE F WINTER PARK, FL 32789 OFFICE (407) 681-2000 OWENSREALTYNETWORK.COM Masterful renovation of 4741 Sq Ft of luxurious living. Two Thermador Ref, Yards of high end granite, cooking island, separate bar w/beverage ref, heated pool, spa AND 4 Bedrooms & 5 1/2 Baths with all bedrooms en suite, separate study & every other item on your wish list! Over one acre located on a lush green belt with pond and golf view. Why settle for less when this can be your new home for a remarkable $839,000. New Kitchen, Granite counters, solid wood staggered cabinetry, all appliances, new roof in 05, oversized 2 car garage on fenced corner lot, trendy paint colors, updated lighting, draperies & so much more for $199,000. $139,900 buys a fabulous split plan home located on almost 1/2 acre w/French Doors to screened porch, updated bath, large kitchen with breakfast bar & just a few steps to top rated elementary school & all the amenities of Red Bug Park inc. tennis, racquetball & picnic pavilions. Just seconds to 417 & walking distance to shopping & fine dining. 400 S PARK AVENUE, Suite 210 WINTER PARK, FL 32789 407-697-8796 CELL Glenda.massie@floridamoves.com EACH HOME COMES WITH A ONE YEAR HOME WARRANTY Visit us on the web: WPMObserver.com

PAGE 18

Page 18 Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011Winter Park / Maitland Observer

PAGE 19

Page 19 Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011Winter Park / Maitland Observer

PAGE 20

Page 20 Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011Winter Park / Maitland Observer

PAGE 21

Page 21 Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011Winter Park / Maitland Observer

PAGE 22

Page 22 Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011Winter Park / Maitland Observer

PAGE 23

Page 23 Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011Winter Park / Maitland Observer

PAGE 24

Page 24 Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011Winter Park / Maitland Observer ADVERTISING NETWORKS OF FLORIDA BALLROOMAlabama, Georgia, Florida & South Carolina Online Bidding Available Many Selling Absolute! Nov. 14-17 & Nov. 21-22215 BankForeclosed Properties RowellAuctions.comRowell Realty & Auction Co., Inc. 10% Buyers PremiumAU 479, AB 296 800-323-8388For More Information PLEASE MARK YOUR RESPONSE HERE:Will you please review and respond as soon as possible? We are waiting for your approval. Please NOTE: this is NOT a second opportunity to design the ad. Redesign changes may result in additional charges. Thank you!1. Please circle A or B below: A: I approve this ad as shown here B: I approve this ad with changes as marked (How many changes are marked? _____)2. Please double check phone/address/names.Phone & address are correct (initials here) ________ With this signature, I signify my understanding that payment for this ad is due per Advertising Agreement.Signed ________________________________Since 1995(407) 366-8696 Fax (407) 359-2118 P.O. Box 4548 Winter Park, FL 32793FOR YOUR INFORMATIONThis ad will appear in these areas and months. ____Waterford Lakes__________________ ____College Park/Orlando______________ ____Winter Park/Maitland_______________ ____Sweetwater/Heathrow______________ ____Tuscawilla/Wntr Sprgs _____________ ____Oviedo__________________________ ____Baldwin/Winter Pk. East ____________X JUNE 2011 X JUNE 2011 A Better Plumber407-644-4000 X JUNE 2011 American Family Funerals & Cremations Phone (407)339 0070 Serving all of Central Florida Family Owned and Operated Se habla Espaol Alan Trueba L.F.D. American Family Funerals & Cremations Phone (407)339 0070 Serving all of Central Florida Family Owned and Operated Se habla Espaol Alan Trueba L.F.D. Cremation Services, Shipping & Monuments. Traditional, Contemporary & Veteran Services at half the price of what others would charge Male & Female Models needed, all ages, All ethnicity, for upcoming national ads!! Also casting Actors for commercials & Movies in Orlando & NYC! Call today for an appointment! Drake Model & Talent 407-339-4570 MODELS ACT ORS MODELS Paid Jobs HODGES BROTHERS INCROOFING & CONSTRUCTION 25 years Antique Sales experience Serving Winter Park and Maitland for 12 years Family owned and operatedPay Top Dollar for Gold and Silver items No Up-front or Out of Pocket expense on Estate saleSandbergEstateSales.com 321-299-4179 James 407-923-5013 MargeLicensed, InsuredSandberg Estate Sales Tom Carey SundewGardens@gmail.comHomegrown always tastes better. Experience homegrown gardening:



PAGE 1

Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011 50+ tax wpmobserver.com BUS_CARD 3.25 x 2 August 2010Grafton Wealth ManagementWilliam D. Grafton III, Sarah Grafton DeVoe William D. Grafton IV Financial Advisors (407) 646-6725 400 Park Avenue South Suite 300 Winter Park, FL 32789 Merrill Lynch Wealth Management makes available products and services offered by Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated (MLPF&S) and other subsidiaries of Bank of America Corporation. MLPF&S is a registered broker-dealer, member SIPC. Investment products: 2010 Bank of America Corporation. All rights reserved. Are Not FDIC Insured Are Not Bank Guaranteed May Lose Value 407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC d USPS 00-6186 Publisher statement on page 4. We would like to thank you for carrying the writings of a great conservative like Louis Roney. Page 14 Photo gallery The Winter Park Concours dElegance took place on Sun day, Nov. 6, on Park Avenue. Page 2 Calendar The Baldwin Park Half Mara thon & 5K is Sunday at Audu bon Park Elementary School. Page 8 Doggie devotion Page 9 Minutes before the Winter Park qualifying period closed on Tues day, Mayor Ken Bradley got a chal lenger. A whole week before the Maitland qualifying period opened, work to challenge Mayor Howard Schieferdecker. At press time, City Clerk Cindy Bonham was still verifying Win ter Park mayoral candidate Nancy Miles paperwork. In Maitland, former Mayor Tuesday morning to run against Schieferdecker. On Nov. 3, Mait land resident John Yanchunis also until Maitlands qualifying period closes at noon on Nov. 18. Maitland Schieferdecker replaced Kinson at the mayors post in January, when Kinson had to resign with 16 months left on his term in order to run for Orange County Commis sion. Former County Commission er Ted Edwards defeated Kinson in the race. In June 2010, Kinson seconded Councilwoman Bev Reponens mo tion to nominate Schieferdecker as vice mayor under the notion that Please see MAYOR Page 5 Mayor seats contested JENNY ANDREASSON AND ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff The city of Winter Park will be presenting its inaugural Veterans Day Celebration on Friday, Nov. 11, at 11 a.m. to honor all local veterans. The event will be outside at the new Win ter Park Community Center Ruby Ball Am phitheatre at 721 W. New England Ave. and will have organizations there that offer infor mation and services for veteran needs. There will also be speakers, musical tributes and, most importantly, the recognition of local veterans. Winter Park Mayor Ken Bradley said he is excited and honored to recognize the people who have protected and served our country. Its certainly because of our veterans that we enjoy the quality of life and freedom that we do, he said. Each one of us has not for gotten their service. their military service: Birke Bryant Army Army after 30 years of service. A Winter Park native, he enlisted right after graduating from Hungerford High School in 1959. He served tours in Germany, Korea and Vietnam. Bryant was often the only black man in his unit, and almost always the only black man in They looked at me as being an outsider, said Bryant, who serves as chairman of dea cons of Mt. Moriah Baptist Church Winter Park. But once he proved himself, the other sol diers were more accepting. He continued to advance in the military, and at one point was in charge of 600 men. He also faced danger frequently and was in combat in Vietnam. He told one story of being confronted with mortar bombs from the enemy. His job was to take data and turn that was communicating data to him was wounded. It was a scary night. I think my hair stood on end, he said. You just have a fear come over you, but you dont stop what youre doing. Those days taught him a lot about life. It was an experience; one you never for get, Bryant said. Stephen Seay Army Army Brig. Gen. Stephen Seay, who will be speaking at Winter Parks event, spent his 34-year career all over the world, including being stationed in Germany, South America and Central America and the Balkans as well as being deployed to Iraq for 13 months. He graduated from the University of New Hampshire, where he was a part of the ROTC Seay said what drew him to a career in the military was the opportunity to work in technology, where he got to work with rock ets and missiles. But in the end, what he re ally learned in the military was to be a great Please see VETERANS Page 2 Winter Park debuts veterans event BRITTNI JOHNSON Observer Staff Barnies Coffee has come a long way since its in augural store opened on Park Avenue in down town Winter Park nearly 30 years ago. To celebrate the anniversary, the chain has launched a company-wide re-branding as Bar nies CoffeeKitchen, starting with its original Park Avenue location. Winter Park is a special place, CEO Jona than Smiga said. Were trying to give them the coffee experience they deserve. After a weeks worth of soft openings, the remodeled location is now open to the public. With added seating, a micro-roasting station and a more kitchen feel, the Park Avenue remodel PHO T O BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Collette Haw puts the nishing touches on a sandwich at the remodeled Barnies agship location on Monday. Please see BARNIES Page 5 Barnies reborn The original Barnies location on Park gets remodeled and re-branded as agship Barnies CoffeeKitchen SARAH WILSON Observer Staff

PAGE 2

Page 2 Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer friend and leader. The hook was the technology, but what kept me were the peo ple, he said. As a leader and teacher, Seay was able to encourage other sol diers to develop their personal talents. Some of his best memories while serving were running into soldiers he had mentored who had achieved their goals either in the military or out. Youre invested in their fu ture, he said. Jesse Fitzgerald Air Force Jesse Fitzgerald, chairman of trustees of Ward Chapel AME Church in Winter Park, joined the Air Force straight out of high school in 1953 and served until 1961. There werent any jobs, and he didnt choose college, so he thought the military would be a good opportunity to get some life experience and education. Like the other soldiers, he learned how to be a leader and took away spe cial bonds with the men he served with. I have lifelong friendships with fellows that I was stationed with, he said. Its almost like one big family. Fitzgerald didnt see combat as a mechanic, but some of his most memorable, and frightening, times were when he was stationed in Alaska. Aside from the bears and other wild animals, there were the freezing temperatures one time the power went out for days and a wild storm he got caught in while on the coast on waves splashed onto the ship, and he didnt know if it would sink or not. defense to the north, which was also a stressful concept, he said. And because he served during the Vietnam War, it was a time of un knowns. You never know what could happen, Fitzgerald said. Douglas Metcalf Air Force Air Force Maj. Gen. Douglas Met calf, a former Winter Park city commissioner, served for 36 years before retiring in 2005. His father and brother served in the Army, and said he grew up in a time when most men served. Metcalf wasnt drafted but enlisted him self, and before becoming a major general in charge of logistics, his Metcalf said that being in the military served as the foundation for the rest of his life and taught him how to be a leader and a re sponsible person early on while surrounded by people, who be came friends, with the same strong beliefs in being a leader and de fender of the United States. What he hopes the Veterans Day event will do most is honor those who are serving now. They are trying to bring the rest of the world the same peace and freedom we have, he said. Individual & Family health plans For an Instant Quote or to apply, visit our website www.HealthInsuranceIBS.com407-831-5166 Learn more For more information about the event, visit www.cityofwinterpark. org. All local veterans are encour aged to attend and be recognized for their service. VETERANS | Winter Park veterans honored at Fridays event C ONTINUED FR OM FR ONT P AGE PHO T O BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Jesse Fitzgerald battled bears, angry seas and freezing temperatures in Alaska. Elegant avenue PHO T O BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Classic Morgan roadsters invaded the streets at the 10th annual Winter Park Concours dElegance, which took place on Sunday, Nov. 6, along Park A venue. SCAN HERE Use your smartphones Q R code reader app to view more photos or visit wpmobserver.com/photos/galleries

PAGE 4

Page 4 Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer USPS 00-6186 ISSN 1064-3613 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835-5705 Member of: Goldenrod Chamber of Commerce Publisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor. Submission does not guarantee publication. Columnists opinions are made independently of the newspaper. All rights reserved. Winter Park / Maitland Observer 2011 P.O. Box 2426 Winter Park, FL 32790 Published Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011 CONT ACTS V olume 23, Issue Number 45 PUBLISHER Kyle T aylor 407-563-7009 Jenny Andreasson 407-563-7026 DESIGNER Jonathan Gallagher 407-563-7054 Jenny Andreasson 407-563-7026 Isaac Babcock 407-563-7023 Ashley McBride Isaac Babcock Padrick Brewer Chris Jepson Louis Roney Josh Garrick T racy Craft 407-515-2605 Amanda Rayno 407-563-7073 INTERN Meisha Perrin obit@observernewspapers.com Business Briefs Community Bulletin Yields and ratings as of 11/08/2011. Availability, quantities, ratings and prices for offerings are subject to change. Moodys, income-tax bracket. Please consult your tax advisor. Income is generally free from federal taxes and state taxes for residents of the issuing state. While the interest income is tax-free, capital gains, if any, will be subject to taxes. Income for some investors may be subject to the federal Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT). Wells Fargo Advisors is not a tax or legal advisor. Katherine SmithFinancial Advisor 275 S. New York Ave Winter Park, FL 32789 407-622-8997 katherine.a.smith1@wellsfargo.comTax-Exempt Missouri Municipal BondsRyan WyattFinancial Advisor 275 S. New York Ave Winter Park, FL 32789 407-622-8150 ryan.wyatt@wellsfargo.com 4.00% 6.15%Yield to Maturity Taxable Equivalent Yield 0811-1550 8/11 Playhouse raises $25K tains rose on a spectacular fundraising evening only professional musical theatre. The event playhouse.org or call 407-645-0145. Fete benets food bank be combined with funds raised through efforts on campus to purchase food in bulk for Second to provide $9 in grocery products. In 2010, the donated 16,000 pounds of food to those in need. The goal this year is 20,000 pounds of food. To inghands. New Eagle Scouts Boy Scout Troop 62 will award the rank of Ea gle Scout to seven scouts in a Court of Honor The inductees are: paratory School School High High High School Property appraisers new site erty appraiser, introduced the newly designed streamlined information and dynamic graphics. web service. Get involved resident to apply. Contact the city clerk at mwal information. Get Caught Caring and food for its Get Caught Caring campaign. The goal of the program is to provide all families with the ability to have gifts for their children and food for their holiday meal. Donations can $18 or more on your childs behalf and they will be mailed a special certicate with their name. New Hope for Kids Thanksgiving Food Drive New Hope for Kids provides a bag of Thanksgiv families in need. Last year New Hope for Kids provided Thanksgiving meals to 160 families. To see the list of foods they need or to make a donation visit newhopeforkids.org or call 407Send bulletin submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com SIKON Construc tion rm Averett Warmus Durkee Osburn Hen ning that provide physical activities and a healthy work environment for their employees. Mercantile Capital Corporation one of the nations largest providers of U.S. Small Busi ness owners who want to acquire or develop their own facilities, closed four commercial more than $9.4 million. Lowndes, Drosdick, Doster, Kantor & Reed, P.A. is proud to announce that long-time real Businessmen award in the legal category by Wawa Inc., the Pennsylvaniabased convenience retailer, ofcially entered breaking celebration of their very rst store in Parkway and International Drive. The store is set to open in July. Foley & Lardner LLP announced that it has been named the rst U.S. News Best Law ally ranked practice areas receives this level of was ranked in the following categories: JFS event nets $200K tel. The event honored the Chapin Pictured are Harriett and Shelley please visit www.jfsorlando.org

PAGE 5

Page 5 Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer he would become mayor in January. Kinson then tutored Schieferdecker during the six months leading up to the changeover. Schieferdecker said he wasnt taken aback by Kinsons intention to reclaim the mayors seat. He was a good mayor and hes been good to me, Schieferdecker said. He worked hard to train me and I have no negative stuff to say period. Im not going to go there. In turn, Kinson had nothing but nice things to say about Schiefer decker. I have great respect for him, Kinson said. If I didnt, I wouldnt have supported him so strongly in becoming vice mayor at the time. Both candidates agreed that their campaign platforms will be similar, as they share the same core goals: to revitalize Maitlands downtown, embrace SunRail and stabilize the citys tax base. Both have back grounds in commercial real estate, but Schieferdecker is retired. The third candidate, John Yanc hunis, is a newcomer to politics. Hes lived in Maitland for two years and owns a wireless communica tions business in the metro area. He said he also wants to see the downtown revitalized and SunRail come through. He said he could be a breath of fresh air on Council. I dont have any bad habits, he said. Im not stuck in the old tendencies of a previous adminis tration. Winter Park Mayor Ken Bradley has a challenger for his seat, and she submitted her paperwork with just a few minutes left before the end of qualifying, which ended at noon on Nov. 8. Nancy Miles is a homemaker, community volunteer and former school board member who has lived in Winter Park for 11 years. She served on the school board when she lived in Salem, Conn., where she also said she worked to candidate said. Im looking for ward to it. She said shes worked quickly to put together a campaign during the week of qualifying, amassing 40 signatures from supporters. Its been busy, she said. Ive had a lot of people helping me out. Incumbent Bradley has been on Nov. 1, when he hosted his kickoff party. He said he was ready to run, their paperwork until the last day of qualifying. Im very excited, Bradley said. Ive been planning to run this race already. Bradley said that his record as mayor should help him win reelection on Jan. 31, 2012. Im excited to tell the citizens of Winter Park about how much better this city is compared to three years ago, Bradley said. Our economy better, Central Park is remodeled, more roads are paved, better side walks. I think the citizens see that already. will serve as a template for the entire Florida chains re-branding that will take place at all locations in the upcoming year. New brand, new look Walking into the remodeled location, Smiga says he hopes people will realize that coming into a Barnies Coffee Kitchen is about more than just the coffee. Its an overall experience. With walls the color of fresh unroasted coffee beans and a makeover in both look and function with 26 seats inside and aside from the dcor is the addition of a micro-roasting station where trained coffee roasters will be roasting up to 50 pounds of fresh coffee beans a day. The fresh-roasted and packaged beans will be on sale for any where from $13 to $70 depending on the rarity of the bean. In roughly 18 minutes, customers can watch as beans go into the roaster green, come out brown and are packaged and sealed. In addition to seeing it roasted, people will know the farm and origin of their coffee from its label, from where it was har vested to the name of the roaster, he said. An array of grab-and-go food options, as well as sit-down op tions for both breakfast and lunch/dinner, are also available. Ev ery dish, Smiga said, is made with quality in mind, using organic and high-grade products. This extra effort and attention, Smiga said, was paid to help Barnies stand apart from their competition, with a Panera Bread and Starbucks located on either end of the Avenue. Our job is to be more interesting than them, he said. NOW YOU HAVE A BETTER TV CHOICE. CenturyLinkTM PrismTM paired with the perfect partner Internet or Voice175 East Altamonte Dr., Altamonte Springs 3030 East Semoran Blvd., Apopka 260 Citrus Tower Blvd., Clermont 1359 East Vine St., Kissimmee 3244 North John Young Pkwy., KissimmeeSEE THE DIFFERENCE FOR YOURSELF! Test-drive it online at seeprismtv.com or in store today: Call 866.552.4971Espaol 866.960.7085Offer ends 12/31/2011. Offers are available to new, rst-time CenturyLink Prism TV residential customers only. Offers include Prism TV service bundled with Pure Broadband service and Prism TV bundled with CenturyLink Unlimited Calling. Standard monthly rates and fees apply to these services and required equipment. All prices, packages and programming are subject to change without notice. Customer must cancel DVR and/or HD service by calling CenturyLink Customer Service before the end of the three-month-free promotional period to avoid monthly charges or the standard monthly rate for each service will apply until services are cancelled. Offers may be limited to specic locations. General Services and offers not available everywhere. CenturyLink may change, cancel, or substitute offers and services, or vary them by service area, at its sole discretion without notice. Requires credit approval and deposit may be required. Additional restrictions apply. Terms and Conditions All products and services listed are governed by tariffs, local terms of service, or terms and conditions posted at www.centurylink.com. CenturyLink Prism TV All plans require separate local phone service plan and include digital channels (including local channels), one (1) set-top box (STB), one (1) modem gateway, and up to four (4) standard direct video streams to residence. CenturyLink-provided STBs are required to view TV. Local channel availability varies by market. High Denition (HD) available on all TV plans, and up to two (2) of the up to four (4) video streams can be in HD. Customers location determines both HD availability and the maximum number of HD video streams (between 0 and 2 HD streams) a customer can view and record at any one time per residence, regardless of the number of STBs in the household. All non-HD video streams are provided in standard denition. Subscription to service precludes customer from purchasing high-speed Internet services from any third party. Additional charges will apply for additional programming packages, movie channel subscriptions (except for PrismTM Premium plan), Pay Per View movies and events, On Demand purchases, and premium services/subscriptions for all plans. Some subscription services, events, and broadcast network service may be blacked out in customers area. Vacation Program Offer available to residential customers only. Only certain CenturyLink services are eligible for the Vacation Program; third party services received through CenturyLink are not eligible. Offer may include a reduced monthly recurring charge for a predetermined number of months each year, retention of equipment and suspension of service, programming and agreement during Vacation Program activation. A zero balance for each applicable service is required for eligibility. If customer does not contact CenturyLink to resume full activation of applicable services before the end of six (6) consecutive month period, all applicable monthly charges, fees, surcharges, contractual obligations, etc., will resume automatically. Vacation Program services will have restrictions and limitations that will vary for each applicable service. Contact CenturyLink for details. Equipment Minimum equipment and CenturyLink professional installation are required. At initial installation, each customer receives: one (1) VDSL 2 modem; up to six (6) STBs (standard plan includes one (1) STB; additional STBs are available for an additional monthly rate, per STB); and one (1) remote control per STB installed. All equipment must be returned to designated CenturyLink retail store within thirty (30) days after service disconnection in an undamaged condition, or customer is charged for each equipment piece not returned or returned as damaged. Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides: 2011 Disney. All Rights Reserved. 2011 CenturyLink, Inc. All rights reserved. The name CenturyLink and the pathways logo are property of CenturyLink, Inc. All other marks are property of their respective owners. BONUS!PUT YOUR P RISMTM TV ON VACATION IF YOU ARE HEADING BACK NORTH NO CONTRACT A ND FREE H D WHEN YOU PICK 2. for 12 months CNTL11-1144H_10.15x9_r1.indd 1 11/3/11 5:19 PM Learn more Barnies Coffee Kitchen is located at 118 S. Park Ave., in Winter Park. For more information on the Barnies re-branding visit www. barniescoffeekitchen.com BARNIES | Coffee roasted on site MA Y OR | Nancy Miles is a former school board member C ONTINUED FR OM FR ONT P AGE C ONTINUED FR OM FR ONT P AGE Candidates for mayor Winter Park: Ken Bradley (incumbent) Nancy Miles Maitland: Howard Schieferdecker (incumbent) Doug Kinson John Y anchunis Run for mayor The qualifying period for the Maitland mayoral election opens at noon on Monday, Nov.14, and closes at noon on Friday, Nov.18. For ad ditional information, call 407-5396219.

PAGE 6

Page 6 Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Its district playoff time for the Winter Park up in a district tiebreaker. Now they head to Olympia (6-3) for a Nov. 18 showdown Just three days after defeating district rival Timber Creek 28-25 to force a threeway tie for the district lead, the Winter Park Wildcats watched the Wolves sneak away with a tiebreaker win for the cham pionship. The Wildcats edged East River 6-0 in Nov. 7. East River had fumbled on an early drive, coughing the ball up to Winter Park, which then completed a 54-yard drive for the win. But in their next showdown against Tim ber Creek, the Wildcats luck ran out, with sailing into the hands of Timber Creeks Shawn Risbrook. The Wildcats forced sev eral third down plays but didnt stop the Wolves from scoring. The Wildcats failed to score from within the 10-yard line on the ensuing drive, losing the district crown. In an anti-climactic end to the regular season for the Wildcats, they still have one game left to play before playoff time. Theyll host Ocoee (2-7) at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 11. Wildcats JV The Winter Park JV football team posted its fourth shutout of the season and capped off its 2011 schedule (6-2) with a 6-0 road victory over the Evans Trojans. Freshman running back Travis Jones took care of all the scoring when he scam pered 17 yards on the Wildcats second It was a defensive struggle all night. Our linebacking corps was exceptional, nose tackle Daniel Tommey recovered a fumble, and cornerback Cameron Gergley intercepted a pass to help ensure the shut out, said Coach Scott Hillman, whose squad this year was his youngest with 10 freshmen on the roster. It was a very enjoyable and rewarding season. It seemed like we improved every week as the season went along, said Hill man whose team averaged 19.1 points per game and allowed only an average of 4.6 points per game. The Tars (1-1) blasted the visiting Clemson Tigers 30-14 on Nov. 5 after a big comeback took them over the top. They were a good group of guys and that game was a lot of fun. The Tars had been down 14-12 after a failed two-point conversion set them back with but the Tars found some legroom on some outside runs to pick up key yardage. In the meantime, the Tars defense managed to sack the Tigers a handful of times, pres suring the defense and picking up big tackles for loss. They were playing a lot of sweep plays and playing pretty much pure club football, so we took advantage, Hoblick said. Some special teams miscues hurt the Tars early, with bad snaps reversing the yardage on Hoblick found his arm early on, connecting on passes of more than 30 yards to bring his comeback rally. ball off to Dylan Kelly for a 32-yard touchdown run. The Tars defense turned into a in the second half to pull away with the win, despite some injuries that decimated the teams numbers late in the game. By the end I think we had maybe 18 guys left, Hoblick said. With some of the club football sea son left, he said that they still had time the season, but that at this point hes thinking about the 2012 season. Now its all about fundraising and show ing Rollins staff and fans that theyre serious about football. Were looking at the next season, trying to build a good program and have a good fan experience, he said. Its gonna be fun. Thank You to All of Our VeteransHidden Government Program Pays the Cost of Home CareBy Bob AdamsAre either you or your spouse a Veteran ... with 90 days of consecutive, active military service, 1 day served during wartime (WWII, Korea or Vietnam),with a discharge of any kind other than dishonorable and at least age 65 or older? If you can answer yes to these questions, then you should apply for your benet offered by the VA. The Improved Pension and Aid and Attendance are benets payable by the Department of Veterans Af fairs to veterans, spouses and surviving spouses The little used benet especially reserved for Veterans & Widows of Veter ans can provide up to $23,396 a year Tax-Free per couple. According to a VA estimate, only one in seven of the widows of Vets who probably could qualify for the pension actually get the monthly checks. Most people who have heard about Pension know that it will cover the costs of assisted living and, in some cases, cover nursing home costs as well. But the majority of those receiving long term care in this country are in their homes. The great news is the Benet will allow you to hire your family, friends or just about anyone to take care of you. The tax-free Improved Pension and Aid and Attendance Benet could greatly help many deserving families care for their loved ones. The truth is, the process can be daunting, and few actually received the benet. Some seek assistance from un-accredited individuals. The Code of Federal Regulations states: No individual may assist claimants in the preparation, presentation, and prosecution of claims for VA benets, as an agent or at torney unless he or she has rst been accredited by VA for such purpose 38CFR 14.629 (b) (1). You can make an informed decision on how to proceed. If you or a loved one would like a professional evaluation of your potential eligibility by an accredited individual please contact Bob Adams at 407/644-6646 or www. VABentsForFlorida.com. Their team of professionals can provide you with an evaluation of eligibility. This service is provided free to our Veterans.Bob Adams is President of A Safeharbor, LLC. He may be contacted at A SafeHarbor, LLC, PO Box 3167, Winter Park, FL.,32790, telephone 407/644-6646 or e-mail BobAdams@ASafeHarbor.com. ADVERTISEMENT For this weeks Knights football preview story, visit WPMObserver.com PHO T O BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Corey Gonsalves races past a Clemson player on Nov. 5. Rollins caps historic win ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff Wildcats playoff bound ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff

PAGE 7

Page 7 Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer On Oct. 26, the U.S. Green Building Council, Central Florida Chapter, hosted their annual LEEDership Dinner at the Hilton Orlando. LEED stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental De sign, a program that encourages and construction. The purpose of the dinner event was to formally recognize outstanding projects and achievements by businesses, community leaders and volun teers who are helping to shape the green building initiative in Cen tral Florida. At the dinner, the Green Build ing Council presented awards in eight categories, and I am proud to announce that Maitlands new Edward J. Doyle Police Station won the award for Project of the Year for New Construction in the small construction category. This award represents the hard work and close collaboration of a great number of people who were involved in the project. Wharton Smith, Inc., as construction man ager, assembled a very capable team of contractors and sub-con tractors who were careful to fol low the LEED guidelines closely. This included regular monitoring and close coordination among contractors, materials suppliers and design professionals. ACi, the project architect, and AVCON, the project engineer, set the stage building that incorporated con equipment that represented the ogy. Some examples of these in novations include energy-saving ing, extra roof insulation, a cool roof, occupancy sensors and an energy recovery ventilation sys tem. Water conservation was also a major focus of the project. Stormwater quality and quantity were key focus points included in the site planning for the project. Additionally, zero potable water is used to provide for landscaping needs. The City staff who managed the project were careful to provide the monitoring and administra tion necessary to maintain focus on the LEED requirements for the building as it progressed and to address the necessary criteria. With the help of the projects LEED facilitator, the City researched the possibility of purchasing Renew able Energy Credits that allow for the research and development of renewable energy technolo gies. By contributing to this type of credit, the City did its part to direct the community toward a mately, the new police station ac tually exceeded the LEED Silver level of achievement that was the original goal and was awarded construction and operation meth ods. Edward J. Doyle Police Station has received this kind of recogni tion, and I hope that the citizens of Maitland will take note of this worthy achievement and see what their own environments to save energy. Community Development Department City Council Agenda of Nov. 14 City Council meets the second and fourth Mondays of the month at 6:30 p.m. The next meeting is scheduled for November 14th in the Council Chambers, 1776 Inde pendence Lane. Below are items that will be addressed at that meeting. Special Presentation: Jonni Schardine Public Hearing: Development Plan (CDP) Text Amendment Consent Agenda: Oct. 24, 2011 Board meeting minutes ward List 45 Decision Item: Council Meetings portation (FDOT) Request to Sub ordinate City Easement, Parcel 568 portation (FDOT) Request to Sub ordinate City Easement, Parcel 570 For updates, please check www. itsmymaitland.com Last CoffeeT alk of the season featuring Commissioner T om McMacken If you have a latte beans to grind or simply want to espresso your thoughts, please join Commis sioner Tom McMacken for the last CoffeeTalk of the season on Thurs day, Nov. 10, from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Winter Park Welcome Cen ter located at 151 W. Lyman Ave. Special thanks to our coffee provider, Palmanos Roastery & Espresso Bar. Attention all veterans The City of Winter Park, in part nership with the Winter Park Ministerial Alliance and the Win ter Park Chamber of Commerce, calls all Winter Park veterans to attend its inaugural Veterans Day Celebration on Friday, Nov. 11, at 11 a.m. The event will be held outside at the new Winter Park Community Center Ruby Ball Amphitheatre located at 721 W. New England Ave. Beginning at 10 a.m., attendees can gather information from a va riety of organizations and services for veteran needs including the Department of Veterans Affairs, Orlando VA Medical Center, Dis abled American Veterans, Veter ans of Foreign Wars, American Legion and more. At 11 a.m., the musical tributes, anecdotal speak ers and recognition of veterans according to the various military branches and campaigns served. Veterans who have served in any military campaign (World War II, Korean War, Vietnam War, Desert Storm, Iraqi Freedom or Afghanistan) or have served in any military branch in honor of our nations freedom are encour aged to join us to be honored at the event. Winter Park would like to pay tribute to your dedicated service to our country. In addition, the Winter Park Fire-Rescue Department (WPFD) is once again supporting Op eration Gratitude, a program de signed to collect candy and letters of encouragement for American servicemen and women who are currently deployed in the hostile and remote regions of Iraq and Afghanistan. Everyone attending the Veterans Day Celebration is encouraged to drop off leftover Halloween candy and letters of support for our troops. For information regarding additional Winter Park events, site at www.cityofwinterpark.org. WPPD launches Click It or T icket The Winter Park Police Depart ment (WPPD) will be joining state and local law enforcement agen cies and highway safety groups in supporting an aggressive national Click It or Ticket seat belt en forcement campaign. Stepped-up law enforcement activities will be conducted during the 2011 Click It or Ticket mobilization period from Monday, Nov. 14, through Sunday, Nov. 27. Seat belts are the single most effective piece of safety equip ment in a vehicle, yet Winter Parks seatbelt usage is typically measured at around 80 percent, leading into enforcement activi ties such as Click It or Ticket. Kids have to be buckled up, too. Your child seat can be installed by appointment. This is a long-time service that has been provided for many years at no cost to the pub lic. Seat belts clearly save lives. When worn correctly, seat belts have been proven to reduce the risk of fatal injury to front-seat passenger car occupants by 45 per cent, and by 60 percent in pickup trucks, SUVs and minivans. WPPD is encouraging compli ance in lieu of having to issue cita tions as costly reminders of a law that everyone should be following every time they are in a vehicle. Nov. 14 City Commission and CRA board meeting There will be a Community Rede velopment Agency Board meeting on Monday, Nov. 14, at 2:30 p.m., in City Hall Commission Cham bers located at 401 Park Ave. S. Immediately following, there will be a city commission meeting at 3:30 p.m. full agenda and information on www.cityofwinterpark.org and by clicking on Government > City Commission > Packets. Lack of Desire or Low Energy? Testosterone Lab Work for $35 (a $240 Value) Call today for a risk-free appointment: 407-894-9959 New police station wins LEED project of the year Maitland City Talk BY HOWARD SCHIEFERDECKER MAYOR Winter Park City Talk BY RAND Y KNIGHT CITY MANAGER Dennis AllenOwner/ Administrator Visit our webpage for more info!www.NRG-DanceStudios.weebly.com Dancers Ages 2 & Up!Ballet, Tap, Jazz, Lyrical, Modern, Hip-hop, & Expressive Dance Location: Winter Park Community Center721 West New England Ave. Winter Park, FL 32789 FREE NRG-Dance Studios T-shirt and NO registration fee for the first 75 dancers to enroll! Where students transform into dancers!Meet the owner Nichole Genchi ...B.A. Dance from FIU Over 10 Years Teaching Former Miami Dolphins Cheerleader (NFL) & Panthers Ice Dancer (NHL) 1st Dance Class FREENow Enrolling!Call: (407)519-0477

PAGE 8

Page 8 Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer THURSDA Y Gardens, James Zach Zacharias 3994. presents Fraud 101 on Thursday, Nov. 10 at 7 p.m. Call 407-6477700. Brian & Melissa Minyard perform at terParkPlayhouse.org The Signature Chefs Auction ben day, Nov. 10, at Rosen Shingle Creek CoffeeT alk featuring Commissioner FRIDA Y Series presents Social Networking for Seniors SKYPE Nov. 11 at 10 a.m. Register by calling 407-647-7700. Renowned medieval scholar and au thor Clair W. McPherson will deliver Sunday morning, Nov. 13 at 10:15 a.m. The fth annual Jack in the Park Culture and Cocktails SA TURDA Y bers from 10 a.m. 4 p.m., Nov. 12, the Winter Park Florida Blue Health Fair is offering attendees free health annual Alternative Global Christ mas Market is Saturday, Nov. 12, from 9 a.m. until 1:30 p.m. at 400 S. Fiddle Fest p.m. for a donation of $5 per family. Dr. Nancy Rudner Lugo will be Nov. SUNDA Y The Baldwin Park Half Marathon & 5K will be 7 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 13 Sundew Gardens Intro to Sundew Gardening is Nov. 13, 10 a.m. to JCC Family Festi val will run from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Springs on Sunday, Nov. 13. The Center for Contemporary Dance hosts A Decade of Dance from noon to 3 p.m. Sunday, Nov.13 at Byron Marshall is Sunday, Nov. 13 from 2 to 4 p.m. Clarinetist Richard Stoltzman per MONDA Y The qualifying period for Maitland mayor Nov.18. Call 407-539-6219. Cultural Centers Cooks Series pres ents V enezuelan 14 at 7 p.m. Register by calling 407647-7700. TUESDA Y Guest lecture series Freedom of Religion Not Freedom from Re ligion is Nov. 15 at 7 p.m. at the AARP Winter Park Chapter 1047 will have a meeting on Nov.15 at 1:30 629-2585. WEDNESDA Y oral design class will be at 10 den Club, 1300 South Denning Drive. Cost is $10. Reservations required by Nov. 14. Call 407-644-5770. American Association of Individual Investors shopping event of the year, Red Bag Days returns from Nov. 17-20 with discounts at participating stores along NOV 18 The fth annual Peacock Ball is Nov. munity Center in Hannibal Square. Cost is $150. Call 406-647-2330 or Calendar V eterans Day events NOV 10 having a special SOS breakfast at day, Nov. 10 at 8:30 a.m. The cost is $25. NOV 11 an Open House from 10 a.m. 4490 N Goldenrod Road. Call 407org inaugural V eterans Day Celebra tion NOV 12 V eterans Day Parade is Saturday, Nov. 12, at 11

PAGE 9

Page 9 Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Lifestyles Diesta Gundacker has spent the past 12 years training mans best friend to be someone elses best friend. The Winter Park resident is a volunteer puppy raiser for Canine Companions for Independence. For her, saying goodbye to the puppies she trains is a great mo ment. To spend 15-18 months with a puppy and then turn it over to somebody else is a great feeling, she said. We want them, but somebody else needs them. Gundacker has trained and placed 10 dogs to enhance the lives of people with disabilities, an experience that has not only changed the lives of the people who receive the dogs, but has also had a lasting impact on Gundack er and her children, who she said have learned so much about self lessness and helping others from the experience. Lasting bond Gundacker raises the pups, which are either golden retrievers, black or yellow Labradors or a cross breed of both, for an average of 18 months before sending them on to advanced training, which takes another six months to a year, where they learn skills such as turning on light switches and opening cabinets and doors. The next step, the matchmaking process, requires the graduates to live in a dorm at the CCI campus for two weeks where they interact and train with different compan ions until a match is made. Once they learn to bond, they can transfer that bond to anyone, she said. I think it is harder for people than it is for the dog even though we dont want to think so. Gundacker is currently train ing an 8-month-old black Labra dor-golden retriever mix named Odiele. Her last graduate, Dulce, was placed with a family from South Florida about three years ago. Making a match David Ruttenberg, whose daugh ter Phoebe was matched with Dulce, said he thought a compan ion would be a good way to help facilitate his autistic daughters communication skills. It has been a love affair ever since, Ruttenburg said. It's been nearly two years now, and I can honestly tell you that everywhere we bring Dulce, whether to a grocery store, library, hotel, park or school, she lights up the room, Ruttenberg said. The Ruttenberg family feels blessed to have Dulce in their lives, he said, and the experience has given Phoebe a newfound third-grade class every day. Dulce is more than a family member to all of us, he said. She is a tonic, elixir and lever that en ables our daughter to communi cate and connect lovingly with the world around her. And for that, we're indebted to Diesta, her fam ily and everyone at CCI. Big fundraiser The 15th annual Tales and Tails gala on Saturday, Nov. 12, is the largest fundraiser for the South east region of CCI. It includes a silent and live auction, dinner and cocktails, and features animals in a program by SeaWorlds profes sional animal trainer Joel Slaven. [The event] has grown quite a bit over the past 15 years, said Cathy Rodgers, director of devel opment. And because it is the largest fundraising event we have, the success of the gala is very im portant to the region. Three canine companion graduates will be honored at the event and will share their stories about how their companions have changed and improved their lives. Previous graduates and CCI dogs of appropriate ages will also be at the event, in addition to Gundack er and her 8-month-old puppy. Learn more Canine Companions for Indepen dence will be having its 15th annual Tales and Tails Gala on Saturday, Nov. 12, at Rosen Shingle Creek. Visit www.cci.org/talesandtailsgala Devoted to dogs PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Diesta Gundacker poses with her 8-month-old trainee, Odiele. The Winter Parker has raised 10 guide dogs in 12 years. Canine Companions volunteer puppy raisers to speak at Nov. 12 fundraiser MEISHA PERRIN Observer Staff

PAGE 10

Page 10 Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Family Calendar Letters to Santa Contest Kids, submit your letters, starting with The gift I most want to give is The winner of the contest will ride in the Winter Park Christmas parade and receive a special prize package, including a family four-pack of tickets to Winter in the Park. The winning letter will be published in The Observer. Letters to Santa Contest entries are to be no longer than one page and are due by 5 p.m. Friday, Nov. 25, either by email, editor@observernewspapers.com, or physical mail, 1500 Park Center Drive, Orlando, FL 32835. Include the authors name, phone number, address and email. Sponsored by: Alan Currie Parker walked along Park Avenue every day, sticking his head inside the stores to say hi to the tenants and ask about the latest Winter Park news. If there were any new happen ings along the Avenue, he knew about them. If there were any com munity projects being considered, he knew about them. If there were any new tenants in the business district, he knew about them. He was kind of the Chamber of Commerce on legs, family friend Tom Kelly said. Two weeks ago, Parker took his last walk in Winter Park. On Oct. 29, Parker died and the Winter Park community lost a friend, family member and active community leader. He was 77. He was the essence to Win ter Park, Kelly said. He cared very much for the city and the merchants. I mean, to me, he was Winter Park. Parkers family members and friends will join the Winter Park community at the University Club of Winter Park on Tuesday, Dec. 6, at 5:30 p.m. to celebrate his life. Career in real estate Parker was born in Massachusetts and moved to Winter Park in 1969 after spending his earlier years with the Navy as an air and radar drilling reservist. After moving to Winter Park, he became the presi dent of Amherst Development Inc., developer of Cloisters con dominium on Lake Osceola, and later founded Alan Parker Realty Inc. During his years in Winter Park, he served as trustee, direc tor and member of the executive board committee for the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce and served on the Community Rede velopment Area advisory board. He also spent the latter part of his life making plenty of friends in the community. He was a man who did much for his city but did it behind the scenes, said Joe Terranova, a former Winter Park mayor who served on the CRA advisory board alongside Parker. Hes not one out looking for glory, but he did a lot of things for the community, and a lot of people knew about it. Beloved citizen Parkers behind-the-scenes civic engagement was so extensive that it earned him the title of Winter Park Chamber of Commerces citizen of the year in 2007, and he remained just as active in Winter Park thereafter. He was a major player in the project for the improvement to Orange Avenue, which would not have been completed without him, Terranova said. from real estate but loved being a citizen of Winter Park so much that he built his retirement home within a block of Central Park. Parker was also a member of the Winter Park Rotary Club, where he and Kelly sat for lunch almost every Monday. Hell be greatly missed, Kel ly said. The smile, the twinkle in his eye and the care that he had for this city it will be tough for anyone to match that. Though Parker did not have any children of his own, he was still a beloved family man and member of the community. He had a passion for traveling and was very good about keeping con tact with his friends and family in other locations. He was a devoted family man to his extended family members, said his niece Laura Goty of Port land, Ore. He had four nieces and nephews, and he was much more than an uncle to us. PHOTO BY COURTNEY SHAPIRO Alan Parker, middle, poses with Phil Chimento, left, and Bill Walker, right, at a Winter Park Chamber of Commerce political event on May 24 at the Civic Center. Parker embodied the Chamber MEISHA PERRIN Observer Staff Learn more A celebration of Alan Parkers life and contributions will be held at the University Club of Winter Park on Dec. 6 at 5:30 p.m. The historic Annie Russell The atre, which is celebrating its 79th season, presents Little Shop of Horrors from Friday, Nov. 11, to Saturday, Nov. 19, with both eve ning and matinee performance times. Cost is $20, $10 for stu dents with ID. Call 407-646-2145 or visit Rollins.edu/annierussell. Orlando Fashion Square welcomes back Santa Claus for visits and pictures with children this holiday season starting at 7 p.m. Friday, Nov. 11. Santa photos will be tak en daily through Saturday, Dec. 24. Also, Fido and Fluffy can sit with St. Nick on Pet Nights from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Mondays from Nov. 14 through Dec. 19. Maitland Public Library proudly presents Childrens READing Fest 2011 on Saturday, Nov. 12, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Guests in clude Kevin King the Magician and Alligator Annie, authors Loreen Leedy, Danette Haworth, Phil Card, and musician John Holley. There will be poetry and writing sideshows. Call 407-647-7700. Winter Park Sports Hall of Fame induction ceremony is Saturday, Nov. 12, at the Winter Park Com munity Center. Cocktail hour be gins at 5:30 p.m. followed by din ner, catered by Johnny Rouse JRs BBQ and the induction ceremony. Contact jmiller@cityofwinterpark. org for more information. Movie in the Park featuring Tangled is 6 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 12, at Quinn Strong Park in Maitland. Bring your blankets and chairs and the city will bring you the stars. Visit ItsmyMaitland.com for more information. The fth annual Roar n Soar, a signature two-day racing extrava ganza showcasing the nest clas sic racing machines ever built for land, sea or air, revs into Fantasy of Flight on Sat., Nov. 12, and Sun., Nov. 13, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the attractions lakefront grounds and aireld in Polk City, midway between Orlando and Tampa. Call 863-984-3500 or visit FantasyOf Flight.com The Young Composers Chal lenge Composium will take place Sunday, Nov. 13, from 2 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. at the Bob Carr Per forming Arts Centre in downtown Orlando. Winning contestants, ages 13 to 18, representing states from coast to coast, will have their compositions performed for the rst time on stage by the Orlan do Philharmonic Orchestra. Visit YoungComposersChallenge.org The Maitland Public Library has bedtime stories for all ages at 6 p.m. every Monday. Preschool story time is 10:30 a.m. every Tuesday. Infant and toddler story time is at 10:30 a.m. every Thurs day. Reading buddies is Thursdays at 4 p.m. Call 407-647-7700 for more information. Send submissions to editor@ob servernewspapers.com

PAGE 11

Page 11 Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer This seasons Festival of Trees is the 25th anniversary of this much-anticipated holiday event, and the Orlando Museum of Arts Council of 101 has chosen Hip Holidays! including cool s retro design as the theme for the events entertainment, dcor and activities. The mod ness begins Friday, Nov. 11, with the Mad Mod Gala, a black tie party that opens the 2011 Festival of Trees and Pop Art and Pop Culture in Contemporary Prints, an exhibit of selected works from the OMAs permanent collection. The always-elegant opening eve ning promises food and drinks (vintage cocktails) and Frank Sinotra in the Lava Lounge. The Buzzcatz begin the night with music from the s and progress through hits of each following decade. Other events include the family-oriented Reindeer Romp (Wednesday, Nov. 16, beginning at 6:30 p.m.), and the Holiday Stroll (Friday, Nov. 18, from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.). For 25 years, The Festival of Trees has showcased magical displays of designer trees, wreaths and gingerbread creations, a gift boutique, the Toyland Town activity area, a Holiday Garden and a Festival Caf complete with daily enter tainment. The entire family can enjoy this holiday tradition from Saturday, Nov. 12, to Sunday, Nov. 20, at the Orlando Museum of Art. Its open daily from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. For tickets, call 407-896-4231 extension 254, or purchase them at the door. The OMA is located in Loch Haven Park at 2416 N. Mills Ave. in Or lando. Visit www.omart.org. Rock Orlando-style Its only rock n roll, but we like it! A major new, star-packed music festival is set to rock your world Saturday, Nov. 12, and Sunday, Nov. 13, celebrating American music with headlin ers Bob Seger & the Silver Bullet Band, Kid Rock, the Doobie Brothers and The Killers. The Orlando Calling music festival, at the Citrus Bowl park in Orlando, ican, platinum-selling marquee acts with one of the stages dedi cated to acts from Orlando. With more than 40 acts signed, and more added every day, if you like your music live, this is your rock music fantasy weekend! Visit www.orlandocalling.com. A Winter Park welcome Gary Sain, president of Visit Orlando, the organization that spreads the good word about visiting Central Florida around the world, is the speaker at the next Winter Park Chamber of Commerce monthly breakfast program set for Friday, Nov. 11. We are invited for a complimen tary continental breakfast begin ning at 7:45 a.m. with the pro gram to follow at 8:15 a.m. There is no more informed person to give us the latest on tourism in Central Florida and the news is good! Spoiler alert: We set records last year, and we are ontrack to top those record-breaking numbers this year. The event is free at the Winter Park Welcome Center, home of the Chamber of Commerce at 151 W. Lyman Ave. in Winter Park. Velasquez in Maitland In a manner similar to adding lyrics to a melody, artist Camilo Velasquez combines written text with sophisticated images. He says, I like to tell stories. I enjoy taking pictures. If I had to label my work, I would call it con narrative implies a story, and trust, intimacy or confession; its the distillation and untangling of lifes experiences for the pur pose of making sense of it all. An artist of exquisite sensitivity, Velasquez will make sense of it all as the next featured artist to be exhibited at the Maitland Art Center. His opening is scheduled for Friday, Nov. 18, from 6 p.m.-8 p.m., with the exhibit running through Jan. 22. The Maitland Art Center is at 231 W. Packwood Ave. in Maitland. Call 407-5392181 or visit www.artandhistory. org. And not to be missed American Voices, an epic con cert that has taken more than two years to create, will have its one-night-only performance at the Bob Carr Performing Arts Centre on Saturday, Nov. 12, at 8 p.m. This collaborative evening features the Orlando Philharmon ic in a night of American music honoring the legacy of Florida author Zora Neale Hurston. Visit orlandophil.org or call 407-7700071. 1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORGTHIS WEEK AT ENZIAN SENNA Fri-Sat 3:45PM, 6:30PM, 9:15PM Sun 1PM, 3:45PM, 6:30PM Mon 9:30PM Tue 6:30PM Wed & Thu 6:30PM, 9:15PM PEARL JAM TWENTY Fri & Sat 11:59PM RED STATE Sun 10PM 13th ANNUAL MANHATTAN SHORT FILM FESTIVAL Mon 6:30PM NETWORK Tue 9:30PM 1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORGTHIS WEEK AT ENZIAN SENNA Fri-Sat 3:45PM, 6:30PM, 9:15PM Sun 1PM, 3:45PM, 6:30PM Mon 9:30PM Tue 6:30PM Wed & Thu 6:30PM, 9:15PM PEARL JAM TWENTY Fri & Sat 11:59PM RED STATE Sun 10PM 13th ANNUAL MANHATTAN SHORT FILM FESTIVAL Mon 6:30PM NETWORK Tue 9:30PM MARTHA MARCY MAY MARLENE Fri Sun 3:45PM, 6:30PM, 9:15PM Mon, Wed Thu 6:30PM, 9:15PM Tue 9:30PM Saturday Matinee Classic ITS A MAD MAD MAD MAD WORLD Sat 11AM Wednesday Night Pitcher Show HAROLD & KUMAR GO TO WHITE CASTLE FREE at Eden Bar Wed 8PM Josh Garrick Hip holidays Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906. WHO IS GARRICK > Nelore Authentic Brazilian Steakhouse offers extensive table-side serviceOur Salad Bar features a complete buffet of over 40 items with cold and hot dishes, including Brazilian specialties. We serve 14 cuts of meat continuously, all you can eat table side service. Where you can choose from beef, pork, lamb or chicken, all served with our house specialty, oven-warm cheese bread. Nelore Steakhouse 115 E. Lyman Ave. Winter Park, FL 32789(407) 645-1112www.neloresteakhouse.com

PAGE 12

Page 12 Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer The temperature is dropping, leaves are changing and Oviedo is gearing up for another big fall event. The 38th annual Great Day in the Country arts and crafts festi val is Saturday, Nov. 12, and it will feature more than 350 exhibitors displaying and selling their arts and crafts to raise thousands of dollars for local charities, schools and scholarships that will have I think people like Great Day because of its affordability, festi val Chairwoman Angela Iversen said. A lot of people like to do their Christmas shopping and we have a lot of variety. The event will award $3,000 in prize money to several different art categories. The GFCW Oviedo Womans Club will also award $1,500 in art scholarships at the Student Art Fest sponsored by Commissioner Bob Dallari, and each school participating in the Student Art Fest will receive $50, provided by Oviedo Mayor Dom inic Persampiere. There will also have live en tertainment in two areas, food, drinks, a country store that sells homemade baked goods by OWC women, childrens activities, the Womans Clubs famous bean soup, as well as many longtime art and craft vendors. Eighty-year-old Ann Robinson has been showcasing her pottery skills at Great Day in the Country for more than 30 years and said she has always enjoyed taking part. Im amazed at how many people come out, Robinson said. Ive had a lot of good experienc es with it. She said shes always had an interest in crafts but knew shed found her real passion when she found clay. She eventually opened her own studio in Oviedo that shes had for 27 years, and she enjoys sharing her talent with the community every year. Lynne Seigler has also been a longtime vendor at the festival and said it has always been a very positive experience for her. I enjoy working with the la dies, Seigler said. And I like the fact that its a one-day show. Seigler has been displaying her embroidery skills at the event for more than 10 years and said she embroidering has helped her through surviving breast cancer. After being diagnosed in 2005, she never gave up. She continued embroidery and taking part in Great Day in the Country through it all. I continued to do craft shows at that time and just wore a wig or a scarf, she said. And that as pect of it was very a positive expe rience, because people would say you can do it. I did it. ing those who are going through the same experience she once did, and sharing what she calls her little hobby with others at Great Day in the Country. Its a little hobby that went crazy, Seigler said. And I expect Great Day to be another great day this year. Owners of Frederickson Apiar ies Bill Frederickson and his wife, Marion, are also looking forward to another year at Great Day in the Country, and a chance to share their natural honey and the im portance of honeybees with the community they love. Oviedo is a neat place where all the organizations work with the community, Bill said. It doesnt matter whats put out in Oviedo its got more of a fam ily-orientated atmosphere, and everyone is welcome, and every body always walks away with a smile and we are pretty blessed to be a part of it. Call today for your FREE estate planning consult Now accepting Visa, Discover and Mastercard Shop countrystyle in Oviedo KRISTY VICKERY Observer Staff ARCHIVE PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK OBSERVER STAFF Vendors are ready to showcase their holiday gifts at the 38th annual Great Day in the Country in Oviedo. Learn more The 38th annual Great Day in the Country arts and crafts festival will be held on Saturday, Nov. 12th at Lawton Elementary School located at Lake Jessup Avenue and Broad way in Oviedo. Admission and parking are free, and a free shuttle service will be available to and from the parking area at Oviedo High School. For more information on the event call the GFWC Oviedo Womans Club at 407-365-9420 or visit www.greatdayoviedo.org

PAGE 13

Page 13 Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Bring this ad in to recieve 20% off all regular-priced clothing(some items may be excluded) 38 E. Broadway St. Oviedo, FL 32765 407-359-0099 www.sweetrepeats2.com Come see our large selection of Fall Jackets, Coats, Blazers, Ski Wear, Suits, Christmas Dresses, Holiday Attire for all Women, Children and Juniors!Sweet Repeats Consignment Boutique The 38th Annual Great Day in the Country Presented by GFWC Oviedo Womans Club Saturday, Nov. 12, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Lawton Elementary School State Road 426 and Lake Jessup Ave., Oviedo FREE ADMISSION Main Stage 9:00 a.m. Welcome Prayer Recognition of American Legion Post 243 Hagerty High School ROTC Presentation of Colors Pledge of Allegiance National Anthem Trumpet Soloist Gregory Frey Presentation of Student Art Awards 10:00 a.m. Winter Springs Performing Arts 10:30 a.m. BrenDon Squares 11:00 a.m. Late Fer Dinner 11:30 a.m. Late Fer Dinner 12:00 p.m. Jackson Heights Middle School Dance Team Lady Bobcats 12:30 p.m. St. Lukes Brass Ensemble 1:00 p.m. St. Lukes Praise Band 1:30 p.m. Double Down Gymnastics 2:00 p.m. University Performing Arts Center 2:30 p.m. The Right Notes OWC Premier Vocal Group Lawton House Stage 9:00 a.m. The Old Guys on the Porch 10:00 a.m. Story Time with Zell 10:30 a.m. Aerialfusion 11:00 a.m. Magic Show with Brian Happie 11:45 a.m. Little Rascals Cheerleaders 12:00 p.m. The Old Guys on the Porch 1:00 p.m. Aerialfusion 1:30 p.m. WSHS Step Team (demonstration and step lesson) Childrens Art Activities Free Parking Oviedo High School Fresh Vegetables Live Entertainment Food and Drink Student Art Fest Cash Awards and Ribbons College Scholarships HOPE Helps, Inc. Share the Care/Lutheran Haven Shepherds Hope Oviedo Police and Fire Challenger League Oviedo Schools FUMCO Entertainment schedule ... and many more organizations!

PAGE 14

Page 14 Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Opinion/ Editorial Letters to the Editor Roney a breath of fresh air We are absentee property owners in Winter Park Pines and we receive the Observer in the mail. First we would like to thank you for sending us this useful publication; we look forward to each copy. We would like to thank you for carry ing the writings of a great conservative like Louis Roney. He is like a rock in the middle of the sea of liberals. Too bad his thoughtful, reasoned positions cant be taught in our schools and colleges. Good job! Patricia and Ralph Taddeo St. Petersburg Veterans respected world over Last June, my husband and I took our family to France for a riverboat trip on the Seine River followed by a few days in Paris. For me, the highlight of the journey was our visit to the American Cemetery near the village of Colleville in Normandy. Perhaps it was the recent anniversary of D-Day, but throughout can soil and is landscaped as such, down to the American Beauty roses and zoysia and fescue grass. On the terrace of the large neo-Classical temple that serves as a museum sat a wheelchair-bound vet eran in full dress uniform displaying the insignia of the 101st Airborne Division, later celebrated in the book and movie Band of Brothers. Now 87, the veteran had been in his teens when his plane hallowed place returning veterans such as he are treated like the superstars they him before wandering among the nearly 10,000 graves. Many were marked with the names of brothers. Two of Theodore Roosevelt's sons are buried here. Theo dore Jr., recipient of the Medal of Honor, lies beside his brother Quentin, who had been killed over Germany in World War I In the town of Arromanches on the way back to Rouen where our boat was docked, I found a postcard that expresses the heartfelt gratitude the French felt for our veterans and their rescue from years of Nazi oppression. What could be a more words written by Jean Goujon, a child of the liberation: "Dear Veteran: I am writing to say 'thank you,' and through me there are thousands of chil dren speaking to thousands of veterans. Like us, you were young and carefree, but when you were only 20 years old, Liberty called you to say: 'I am dying. Come save me!' And you arose, full of courage and zeal, to answer the call. You underwent training, day after day, for D-Day, and, one day in June, you arrived by air and sea. And you fought with the heart and soul of a free man so that we too might be free. You saw your fellows fall on our your grief and injuries, you stayed on and fought side-by-side with us. And so you, dear Veteran, I want to tell you, regard youth and are resting in peace, the sleep of the just, that We Are The Children They Several weeks ago, the Orlando Sentinel published a letter from a reader who questioned why schools were wasting money teaching chorus, drama, visual arts, band and foreign languages instead of focusing solely on the subjects that are meaningful to the students. This attitude that the arts are somehow expendable, frivolous or simply a waste of resources is an attitude that is shared by too many in our community. As an arts teacher, I wonder why so many think that our collective culture and self-expression are meaningless. After 10 years of teaching drama and English, I have encountered many different opin ions from my teenage students and have or misplaced priorities. Our leaders are seemingly worse than teenagers at times, altering our societal priorities by relying solely on whatever numbers theyre told are important. We have become a society that seeks quan number on it, it can be properly judged. The value of a building project can only be determined if there are numbers with ones retirement portfolio clearly represent ones judgment, education and character; and teachers capabilities can be accurately established by giving multiplechoice tests to their students. Hey, numbers tell the whole story, dont they? You cant debate numbers! Actually, stories are written with words, and numbers are debatable, espe cially when it comes to determining value. Dont agree? Then you obviously think that this summers blockbuster hit Trans formers: Dark Of The Moon is a better derful Life. After all, the Transformers movie made more than a billion dollars at its budget of $195 million). In contrast, Its A Wonderful Life was considered recoup its budget during its initial run. And we know numbers tell the whole story, right? Now you may wish to explain that movie, not actually the better one, that and have no direct relation to its artistic, emotional or moral quality. Now youre getting my point. No one should be evaluated simply on the numbers in their lives. Vincent van Gogh sold one painting in his lifetime. Emily Dickinson never sold a single poem. Judy Garland died broke. Do we really think of these artists as failures? I don't need numbers to understand who someone is. I can tell more about people by examining the art they choose to surround themselves with (books, hypotheses or test scores you could ever provide me. The arts exist primarily to provide everyone with the necessary tools to express their individuality in the world, as well as to connect each person to every other person out there on a basic human level because, after all, we all experience most of the same emotions. And emotions dont come with numbers. And shouldnt. Despite what the Sentinel reader may have thought, I believe that whats meaningful to our students is for them their own meaning. Robert Dutton, drama instructor at Winter Park High School, will be presenting an hourlong talk, Why your child needs an arts edu Auditorium on Thursday, Nov. 17, at 7 p.m. All are invited to attend. R OBERT DUTTON Guest Writer Shouldering the burden of memory Please see LETTERS Page 15 discharged from the military and consid ered physically able. The onus is frequent ly on the wounded to prove otherwise in order to receive medical care. That proof is sometimes far from obvi ous. For those who escaped the physical from post-traumatic stress, their reward is a lifetime of depression, anger and terrible nightmares. logical diagnosis, were losing the battle to bring our soldiers back from the battle soldiers died of suicide than in combat, A February report paid for by the New York State Health Foundation found that veterans, compared to non-veterans, are four times more likely to suffer from major depression, and eight times more likely to suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder. Of those few who sought treat ment, only half received care described by the study as minimally adequate. Those veterans with brain injuries out of sight and out of mind walk invisibly among us, struggling to do things that were once second nature: Carrying on a conversation. Driving a car. Holding a job. And after theyre discharged from the to access expensive treatment to help them live a normal life again. In July a group of more than 1,000 veterans, backed by the National Veterans Legal Service Program, had to sue the federal government to get treatment for mental health issues incurred during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. In a class action lawsuit, that group won the right to from the military with PTSD. For those soldiers not a part of that suit or ones like it, the options grow slim out side the Veterans Administration hospi tals, though groups such as the Disabled American Veterans Charitable Service Trust and Operation Homefront try to and our own to make them healthy again. For the rest, theyre in a hospital if they can afford it; theyre in the gutter if they cant. But for those soldiers who can help the few who have the courage to ask for help, their new mission is to remind us of Theyre hard to miss. This Veterans Day weekend, perhaps with an Ameri the breeze, well drive by them. Theyre standing in the middle of the road, with a hand outstretched, begging you not to forget. Every weekend at the corner of Red Bug Lake Road and Tuskawilla Road, two men slowly walk the concrete median, begging passers-by for money. The needy image is unmistakable: Its the outstretched hat in hand. But in the hands of this rotating group of men col lecting what they can, the hats are camou The men are dressed in ACUs, combat uniforms that still may carry remnants of dust from Iraq or Afghanistan. Free from the horrors of the front line, they stand on a street corner shouldering the burden of memory, of soldiers who may never walk again, of heroes who may never come home. These men can still stand, and so they do, underneath a hot sun, begging fellow Americans for some change to help our he roes who wage their second war at home. These are men who swore to pro tect American citizens civilians, and each other against our enemies. They swore to keep us safe. But in the words of cartoonist Walt Kelly, We have met the enemy, and he is us. Were a country that counts on its soldiers to protect us when we need them most. But when they return to our shores, they can never be certain that we will return the favor. Make no mistake, we are a country that reveres its veterans. We salute them in line at McDonalds, then we give them a free meal. We thank them for their service as we pass them in the grocery store. If something good happens to a veteran, its rendered all the more special by virtue to a veteran, it saddens us just as equitably. When we give deference to their sac openly. We let them know that not only do our veterans matter, but also that we, the people, salute them. But when we go home for the evening, when we close that door, we forget. We forget, because we dont know what that graves. Acute injuries from war can become chronic, lingering long after the soldier is We count on soldiers to protect us but they can never be certain that we will return the favor. Arts programs are more than numbers

PAGE 15

Page 15 Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Chris Jepson Louis Roney Never Had. And to you, dear Veteran, who offered your bravery and your most promising years for this land, I say to you, WE ARE YOUR SONS, SONS AND DAUGHTERS OF LIBERTY, WHO WANT TO SAY TO YOU TODAY, A HEARTFELT 'THANK YOU!'" Kathryn Grammer Winter Park Rollins blinks, Phi Beta Kappa takes notice In June 1977, a month after my graduation from Rollins College, I penned a letter to the Rollins president who had handed me my diploma the month before. In my letter I asked if Rollins had applied for Phi Beta Kappa membership, which would cement the college's reputation for academic rigor with an enthusiastic "Yes!" and promised to keep me abreast of the college's progress as much as possible. He would go on to be one of my career references and insist that I'd make an excellent Rollins trustee one day. You can imagine how I felt when I read in The Rollins Sandspur that the handling of the formation of a new College of Profession al Studies at Rollins "had a negative effect on the college's reputation in the decision by Phi Beta Kappa, the nation's most presti gious honor society, to terminate Rollins' candidacy." The article implied that the cur rent Rollins president, Lewis Duncan, was completely responsible, which is a laughable assertion when one considers that nothing approaching this magnitude could ever be done unilaterally without the trustees being on board. And only the president and his trustees know how this played out. But what we do know is that nothing could be worth causing a Phi Beta Kappa candidacy to be terminated. I urge all alums and supporters of Rollins College to let the Rollins leadership know how vitally important that Phi Beta Kappa candidacy is to the college, and to make whatever changes are necessary to get back in the good graces of Phi Beta Kappa. Many individuals have worked cease lessly over a period of decades to land a Phi Beta Kappa chapter at Rollins, including one Rollins president in particular who made major inroads. Let's get going on a new application! Will Graves Winter Park Singing and other aberrations My regular lunch buddy (now deceased) Every Thursday week in and week out for 17 years Id convene with John Fisher at that toniest of Winter Park eater ies, Andros Restaurant, to break bread and discuss and laugh over the human condition. Once or twice a year wed fantasize over whom wed invite for that dream dinner of eight. Twain, Jefferson, Voltaire and Montaigne were a few of my regulars. Oh, and, of course, Ava Gardner. Ive been thinking of late about the nature of beauty, women, intelligence and what makes a woman particularly attrac Ive been intrigued for some time about the idea of how much further advanced wed be as a species if mankind had uni versally treated womankind with respect, dignity and equality. Males for thousands of years have treated women as inferior. That this injustice is well documented historically is undeniable, that it was/is a setback developmentally for our species, a travesty. Aside: The Islamic world will never amount to much until it accepts/pro motes its women as equal to men. It brings up a question that Ive asked over the years from any number of my students. Where did such male discrimi nation originate? Is it an innate bias that men have to be culturally taught not to practice? Organized religion is an incred ibly complicit factor. Let the women learn in silence with all subjection. But I suffer not a woman to teach, nor to usurp authority over the man, but to be then Eve. I Timothy 2:11-14. What bibli cal gibberish. What injustice. And what a setback for humanity. Regardless of its origins, male sexism has not served our species well and has been unequivocally wretched for women. Its interesting to read of the isolated instances in history where a civilization treated its females with greater equality. Ancient Egypt, for example, was surpris ingly accepting of females and by the standards of contemporary cultures then, almost enlightened. The Etruscans of seventh century B.C. Italy were quite lib erated and scandalized the Ancient Greek world. Why, Etruscan women actually speak in public meetings! Damned if they dont! But such historical examples number, hand. Mostly women experienced (literal on the back of their neck. But examples do exist of exceptional women achieving greatness in a mans world. I propose a dinner table of beauty and brains, of talent, verve, intellect and saucy, sexy repartee. Hot women with history! Cleopatra, of course. Not the Liz Taylor caricature, but the wily Cleopa tra of charm and intelligence. Pericles mistress Aspasia, an unquestioned beauty with brains. Socrates sought her out for more freedom than Greek wives. The last administrator of the Library of Alexan dria, the pagan Hypatia. Brilliant, strong, an incredible intellect. Rioting Christians in 415 A.D. dragged her from her carriage, stripped her naked and scrapped the skin from her entire body with pottery shards. They then burned the library. Eleanor of Aquitaine. What a woman! Unbelievable for any age. And Mary Wollstonecraft, 18th century Brit, author of the Vindica tion of the Rights of Women. Id add Emily Dickinson (cuz I love her poetry so!) and on my immediate left, the inestimable Dorothy Parker forever pour ing forth both champagne and quips. And, Ava Gardner on my right. Of course. All wonderfully female. Hot women with history Singers are show-offs! The Italians, who invented great singing, do not utilize a concept of teaching a person to sing. They coach people who already have some God-given singing ability of their own. Coaching people to sing as a voice pro fessor is a ticklish psychological proposi tion. The teacher must communicate not only his knowledge of singing and the musical selection involved, but also the particular problems of calling upon body parts that are invisible. Singing concerns itself with beautiful sound and how to produce it while communicating words in some language. The following is taken from a recent letter from a former student: My name is Richard S. and I studied voice from you at UCF in the early s. While I still sing as a hobby, professionally I am a writer I very much enjoyed your instruction and your own voice. In particular, I continue to love some of the wonderful songs you introduced me to: Musica Proibita, Die beiden Grenadiere, Santa Lucia and so many others. It was a treat to hear your obser vations and anecdotes about the great singers you worked with and admired throughout the years. Thank you for all the wonderful hours of learning and singing. You cer tainly have left a beautiful legacy in all the people whose lives you have touched. On your website I was enjoying the audio samples from your CDs Many thanks! Singers are born, not made. Singing combines body, mind and spirit into re sults that can be exciting, astounding and highly moving, all with two little vocal cords about the length of your thumbnail. What a singer is thinking comes out of his mouth as his art. The singer not only plays the instrument, he is the instru ment! Singing is, I think, built on a logical extension of the speaking voice with increased air movement and more (elon gated) vowel sounds. I believe that sing ing evolved from days when men called through forests and the voice needed carrying power. I never found myself able to teach anything much to a person who had no gift of his own. My great Italian coach, Renato Bellini, taught me in New York for seven years after I got out of the Navy. Maestro was, as long as he lived, the most important person in my world outside my family. He taught me a slew of major Ital ian opera roles, and after one and a half years, I debuted in the leading role of Cavaradossi in Puccinis Tosca with the New York Philharmonic. Before undertak ing new roles, I often crossed the Atlantic to work with Maestro for several days. He put the roles in my voice. Most people have speaking voices that they use daily within the range of about an octave. A useful singing voice requires two octaves and more, and some colora tura sopranos perform in more than three octaves. These attributes are somewhat acro batic in nature and do not, by themselves, embody the aesthetic requisites of great singing, which must end in expressive beauty of sound. In my opinion, if singing is not beauti ful, forget it! Singing is acting enhanced by the al luring patina of the musical human voice. The beauty produced by singing is its art, and its art is the realization of that beauty. Jepson is a 24-year resident of Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.US WHO IS JEPSON > HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney) WHO IS RONEY > LETTERS | Rollins Phi Beta Kappa candidacy is vital C ONTINUED FROM P A GE 14 King Features Weekly ServiceNovember 7, 2011 Editorial Cartoon Have an opinion? Send your thoughts (400 words or less) to Managing Editor Jenny Andreasson at editor@observernewspapers.com

PAGE 16

Page 16 Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Recently, President Obama announced a new plan to help nance to lower their monthly mortgage payments. Working with the Federal Housing Finance Agency, the president is revising Program, aiming to help 1 mil lion homeowners who owe more than their homes are worth avoid foreclosure. Realtors commend President Obama for pledging to help more struggling homeowners Orlando Regional Realtor Asso ciation Chairman Mike McGraw, McGraw Real Estate Services, PL. When people lose homes to foreclosure, families, our com munities, the housing market and our economy all suffer. Helping even more families stay current on their mortgage and remain in their homes will help support the housing recovery. HARP was created in 2009 and their mortgages at lower rates without having to meet the typi cal requirement of having at least 20 percent of equity in their home to do so. Under current guide lines, many homeowners have been ineligible for the program because their home values had to be no more than 25 percent below what they owed their lender and some were unable to afford the closing costs and appraisal fees. With the new rules, which will take effect by Dec. 1, some of the extra fees to participate in HARP have been waived and homeowners eligibility wont be contingent on how far the homes value has fallen. Homeowners with loans backed by only Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac can partici pate and must be current on their mortgage. Orlando Regional Realtor Association said they hope the recent changes to HARP will en courage other mortgage investors to help struggling homeowners some, the money saved is worth it, said McGraw. Realtors have been advocating tirelessly for the government and lenders to take more aggressive steps to modify loans, as well as streamline the short sales process, another alternative for struggling hom eowners. The National Association of Realtors is also calling upon Con gress and the Obama administra tion to create policy solutions that stimulate housing and economic housing solutions plan outlined in part by NAR, lenders and the government are urged to take more aggressive steps to modify loans and approve short sales to help reduce high foreclosure inventory levels. Realtors are hopeful that reduced fees and grams such as HARP will help more struggling homeowners reduce their monthly mortgage payments and avoid losing their home to foreclosure. McGraw said the changes to HARP are just one step toward ing the housing market. We are beginning to see early signs of stabilization in the housing market, but until foreclosures housing inventory reaches a more normal level, there can be no true recovery, McGraw said. ORRA New Construction!4 bed / 2.5 bath / 2190 sq ft $339,000 808 Hamilton Place Court Winter Park, FL 32789 Commerce Brokerage, LLC407-566-1636 Jeff ClarkColdwell Banker Residential407.733.0773j.clark@coldwellbanker.com www.BaldwinParkLiving.com Homes Observer Homes brought to you by: Fannie Hillman + Associates Serving Central Florida for over 29 years! 407-644-1234 fanniehillman.com Realtors support new renancing rules that help reduce foreclosures

PAGE 17

Page 17 Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer 1300 Oneco WP Sold $1,035,000 CapTrust Tampa Sold $5,000,000 Tallahassee Office For Lease Tarawood For Sale $1,750,000 OWENS REALTY NETWORK 228 PARK AVE N. SUITE F WINTER PARK, FL 32789 OFFICE (407) 681 -2000 OWENSREALTYNETWORK.COM Masterful renovation of 4741 Sq Ft of luxurious living. Two Thermador Ref, Yards of high end granite, cooking island, separate bar w/beverage ref, heated pool, spa AND 4 Bedrooms & 5 1/2 Baths with all bedrooms en suite, separate study & every other item on your wish list! Over one acre located on a lush green belt with pond and golf view. Why settle for less when this can be your new home for a remarkable $839,000. New Kitchen, Granite counters, solid wood staggered cabinetry, all appliances, new roof in 05, oversized 2 car garage on fenced corner lot, trendy paint colors, updated lighting, draperies & so much more for $199,000. $139,900 buys a fabulous split plan home located on almost 1/2 acre w/French Doors to screened porch, updated bath, large kitchen with breakfast bar & just a few steps to top rated elementary school & all the amenities of Red Bug Park inc. tennis, racquetball & picnic pavilions. Just seconds to 417 & walking distance to shopping & fine dining. 400 S PARK AVENUE, Suite 210 WINTER PARK, FL 32789 407-697-8796 CELL Glenda.massie@floridamoves.com EACH HOME COMES WITH A ONE YEAR HOME WARRANTY Visit us on the web: WPMObserver.com

PAGE 18

Page 18 Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer

PAGE 19

Page 19 Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer

PAGE 20

Page 20 Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer

PAGE 21

Page 21 Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer

PAGE 22

Page 22 Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer

PAGE 23

Page 23 Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer

PAGE 24

Page 24 Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer ADVERTISING NETWORKS OF FLORIDA BALLROOMAlabama, Georgia, Florida & South Carolina Online Bidding Available Many Selling Absolute! Nov. 14-17 & Nov. 21-22215 BankForeclosed Properties RowellAuctions.comRowell Realty & Auction Co., Inc. 10% Buyers PremiumAU 479, AB 296 800-323-8388For More Information PLEASE MARK YOUR RESPONSE HERE:Will you please review and respond as soon as possible? We are waiting for your approval. Please NOTE: this is NOT a second opportunity to design the ad. Redesign changes may result in additional charges. Thank you!1. Please circle A or B below: A: I approve this ad as shown here B: I approve this ad with changes as marked (How many changes are marked? _____)2. Please double check phone/address/names.Phone & address are correct (initials here) ________ With this signature, I signify my understanding that payment for this ad is due per Advertising Agreement.Signed ________________________________Since 1995(407) 366-8696 Fax (407) 359-2118 P.O. Box 4548 Winter Park, FL 32793FOR YOUR INFORMATIONThis ad will appear in these areas and months. ____Waterford Lakes__________________ ____College Park/Orlando______________ ____Winter Park/Maitland_______________ ____Sweetwater/Heathrow______________ ____Tuscawilla/Wntr Sprgs _____________ ____Oviedo__________________________ ____ Baldwin/Winter Pk. East ____________X JUNE 2011 X JUNE 2011 A Better Plumber407-644-4000 X JUNE 2011 American Family Funerals & Cremations Phone (407)339 0070 Serving all of Central Florida Family Owned and Operated Se habla Espaol Alan Trueba L.F.D. American Family Funerals & Cremations Phone (407)339 0070 Serving all of Central Florida Family Owned and Operated Se habla Espaol Alan Trueba L.F.D. Cremation Services, Shipping & Monuments. Traditional, Contemporary & Veteran Services at half the price of what others would charge Male & Female Models needed, all ages, All ethnicity, for upcoming national ads!! Also casting Actors for commercials & Movies in Orlando & NYC! Call today for an appointment! Drake Model & Talent 407-339-4570 MODELS ACT ORS MODELS Paid Jobs HODGES BROTHERS INCROOFING & CONSTRUCTION 25 years Antique Sales experience Serving Winter Park and Maitland for 12 years Family owned and operatedPay Top Dollar for Gold and Silver items No Up-front or Out of Pocket expense on Estate saleSandbergEstateSales.com 321-299-4179 James 407-923-5013 MargeLicensed, InsuredSandberg Estate Sales Tom Carey SundewGardens@gmail.comHomegrown always tastes better. Experience homegrown gardening: