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Winter Park-Maitland observer
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00184
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park FL
Publication Date: 11-03-2011
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates: 28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID: UF00091444:00184

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Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011 50+ tax wpmobserver.com BUS_CARD 3.25 x 2 August 2010Grafton Wealth ManagementWilliam D. Grafton III, Sarah Grafton DeVoe William D. Grafton IV Financial Advisors (407) 646-6725 400 Park Avenue South Suite 300 Winter Park, FL 32789 Merrill Lynch Wealth Management makes available products and services offered by Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated (MLPF&S) and other subsidiaries of Bank of America Corporation. MLPF&S is a registered broker-dealer, member SIPC. Investment products: 2010 Bank of America Corporation. All rights reserved. Are Not FDIC InsuredAre Not Bank GuaranteedMay Lose Value 407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC d USPS 00-6186 Publisher statement on page 4. Its time to give the indomitable Tars credit for playing football purely for the joy of playing Page 11 Photographic memories mental muscles in a Rollins pho tograph-as-language class.Page 13 Face-lift completeLake Sybelias $11M renovation features digital boards and tools for the schools deaf program.Page 9 Page 8 Winter Parks greenest family approved a design at the Oct. 24 meeting. tive enough for the city, calling it a featuring a peacock on a threecolored background, and one more elaborate design featuring a build ing, arched brick window, peacock three, Leary said, the most elaborate one dubbed design three best represented what the city had to offer. I think three communicates a lot more of what Winter Park is all It almost feels like were a Please see FLAG Page 2City picks an ocial ag designWinter Park, Maitland put up seven cameras, plan six more ISAAC BAbBCOCK Observer StaffRed-light cameras multiplyThere are now seven intersections with red-light cameras in Winter Park and Maitland with plans to add six more. Maitland Boulevard at Keller Road is the most recent addition to the areas growing red-light camera lineup. Since going live Sept. 29, that camera issued more than 1,500 tickets, Maitland Police Lt. John Schardine said. That intersection and the three others in Mai tland Maitland Avenue and Marion Way, Horatio Avenue and Highway 17-92 and Lake Avenue and Highway 17-92 issued 2,400 tick ets in October, Schardine said. February on Howell Branch Road at Temple Trail and Temple Drive and have nabbed 2,278 viola tors to date. The citys third camera, which went live on Sept. 3 at Aloma Avenue and Lakemont Avenue, has issued 332 tickets, Winter Park Po On Wednesday, an electronic sign went up at Maitland Boulevard and Maitland Avenue to warn motorists that that a red-light camera will go live there later this month. The Florida Department of Transportation has green lit two other Maitland intersections for cameras Maitland Boulevard at Lake Destiny Drive and Maitland Boulevard at the Interstate 4 overpass. said of the I-4 location. In Winter Park, construction will start any Highway 17-92 at Orange Avenue, Fairbanks Avenue and Lee Road, King said. There was a backlog of red-light camera ap plications at FDOT after the Legislature passed the camera programs, Schardine said. That could few months. They had 100 or 200 (red-light camera) re There have been efforts in the Legislature to repeal the statute, which opponents say is uncon stitutional. So far, it has stood up to challenges in court, Schardine said. Winter Park has netted $104,536 since Febrary after paying its vendor, Gatso USA, and the state. Did you know? While a red-light ticket is a code violation, it turns into a criminal violation including points on the drivers license if its not paid within 30 days. In Maitland, you can legally turn right on red without coming to a complete stop as long as youre going 16 mph or slower. Please see RED LiIGHT Page 2 JENNY A ANDREASSON Observer Staff Fashion furward PHoO Tos OS BY iISAAC bBAbBCOCK THE oOBsSERVER DDogs and their owners pulled out all the stops at the 12th Annual Pet Costume Contest on Oct. 30 at the Doggie Door on Park Avenue. At right is a scuba dog. SCAN HERE Use your smartphones QR R code reader app to view more photos or visit wpmobserver.com/ photos/galleries

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Page 2 Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011Winter Park / Maitland Observer Individual & Family health plans For an Instant Quote or to apply, visit our website www.HealthInsuranceIBS.com407-831-5166 New Construction!4 bed / 2.5 bath / 2190 sq ft $339,000 808 Hamilton Place Court Winter Park, FL 32789 Commerce Brokerage, LLC407-566-1636 lone peacock. I think were more than that. It looks like a zoologia longtime teacher, had a quibble favored design that stretched the peacocks tail over a letter printed Every time I see something Sprinkel said. That little feather on top of the E bothers me. I would just like to see it not be on considered replacing the word established, though even that date seemed to be in question on I think were still debating whether we were established Bradley said. The thing I can guarantee is none of us were here en suggested removing the word Florida, but was then reminded that the city could be confused But theyre in the snow most printed within a few weeks, soon time in the citys history. fFLAG | Commission talked about omitting Florida from flag C ONTTINUEED FRR OM fFRon ONT paPA GE REndNDERinING couCOURTEsSY ofOF WiINTER PARK TThe winning design was criticized by a commissioner for being zoological.ing revenue is split between the vendor and the city. Maitland pays Gatso $9,200 per month to run its program. From January through June 30, Maitlands ticket revenue at Maitland Avenue and Marion Way was $117,394. Out of that, $61,669 went to the state; $53,716 went to the vendor; and $1,486 went to a law enforcementtraining fund. The city was left with $523 to add to its general fund. In the new budget year, which began Oct. 1, Maitland has pro jected it will bring in $1.3 million in red-light camera revenue.Safety rst about the revenue there were 10 accidents at Maitland Avenue and Marion Way in the two years leading up to the red-light cameras installation. Since January, theres been one accident, Schardine said. Bonus, who admits to being one of light camera, said the program is a win-win. I cant think of a better item that produces greater safety and sup rRED LiIGHT | AAccidents decrease to one C ONTTINUEED FRR OM fFRon ONT paPA GE LocationsMonitored intersections: Maitland AA venue and Marion Way HHoratio AA venue and HHighway 17-92 LLake AA venue and HHighway 17-92 Maitland Boulevard and Keller Road HHowell Branch Road and TT emple TT rail HHowell Branch Road and TT emple DDrive AAloma AA venue and LLakemont AA venue Future locations: Maitland Boulevard and Maitland AA venue (November) Maitland Boulevard and LLake DDestiny DDrive Maitland Boulevard and Interstate 4 Orange AA venue and HHighway 17-92 Fairbanks AA venue and HHighway 17-92 LLee Road and HHighway 17-92 Our photo contest winner PHoO To O BY CCLYDE MOORE TThe ILLuvWWinterPP ark.com mascot greets a costumed child on Park Avenue. V Visit wpmobserver to view all entries.

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Page 3 Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011Winter Park / Maitland Observer Khan Aga, an Afghan entrepreneur, visited Winter Park last week as a guest of Bajalia International as part of an entrepreneur ship program sponsored by the State De While in the U.S., he was visiting compa nies as an apprentice and visited Washington and New York as well as Winter Park. Before heading back to Afghanistan, he was founder of Bajalia, about his experience in Winter Park.Farah: What was your impression of the community of Winter Park? AAga: I thought this was going to be a with the beauty and all the green space and how warm and friendly everyone is. Farah: was your impression of it? AAga: I wish we could build a place like ture generations. Education is very impor families to go through 12 standard (grade). I am educating my children including my eration in our family to go to college. My dream would be for them to go to a place like this. Farah: What left the biggest impression on you here in Winter Park? AAga: To see my jewelry on display at Ba jalia. And to see it on TV on HSN, and to see that you actually have a bakery for dogs. I a bakery dedicated solely for dogs and that an economy can be so strong to afford such luxury. Our economy is not even strong enough to support our children and fami lies.Farah: What did you think of the train ing you received from your host company here in Winter Park? AAga: This training was most worthy. I learned things here that I can use to help me grow my business and create even more jobs in Afghanistan. In just two days spent at Bajalia, I learned as much as if I had spent a month in training. Bajalia and BPeace have helped me grow from eight people employed to 48, with that impact ing 288 people. And in Afghanistan and other countries for each job created, seven more are created so that is over 336 jobs. It was a dream to visit this company that is responsible for 50 percent of my business. My wife and I work together, and I think that it is OK for women to work and that men and women working together is good for the family and good for the future of our country.Farah: Would you like to come back and visit Winter Park? AAga: If I came back a thousand times it would not be enough. One of the things I loved about my visit at Bajalia was that it felt like a eastern store, and I felt very much at home, and seeing my wifes picture with our jewelry made me very happy. To learn more about the BPeace apprenticeship road trip (BART) visit Bpeace.org. To learn more about Bajalias work with global entrepreneurs, visit them at bajalia.com or at 520 S. Park Ave., where you will see the jewelry that Khan Aga and his wife, Bahktnazira, export to help change their world. 407-381-3335 $1000 off Cannot be used with any discounts, discount plans or HMOs. Offer expires 12/21/11Complimentary ExamIncluding Xray & PhotosWith this coupon. Not valid with other offers. Offer expires 12/21/11 Braces or Invisalign Yields and ratings as of 10/31/2011. Availability, quantities, ratings and prices for offerings are subject to change. Moodys, Moodys and rated AA by S&P. Katherine SmithFinancial Advisor 275 S. New York Ave Winter Park, FL 32789 407-622-8997 katherine.a.smith1@wellsfargo.comTax-Exempt Florida Municipal BondsRyan WyattFinancial Advisor 275 S. New York Ave Winter Park, FL 32789 407-622-8150 ryan.wyatt@wellsfargo.com 4.624% 7.114%Yield to Call Taxable Equivalent Yield 0811-1550 8/11 AAfghan entrepreneur reects on Winter Park apprenticeship AAga

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Page 4 Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011Winter Park / Maitland Observer USPS 00-6186 ISSN 1064-3613 1500 Park Center DDrive Orlando, FLL 32835-5705 Member of: Goldenrod Chamber of CommercePublisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor. Submission does not guarantee publication. Columnists opinions are made independently of the newspaper. All rights reserved. Winter Park / Maitland Observer 2011Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. MunsterP.O. Box 2426 Winter Park, FLL 32790 Published TThursday, Nov. 3, 2011 CONTATACTTS Volume 23, Issue Number 44PUBLISHER Kyle TT aylor 407-563-7009 maaI Jenny AAndreasson 407-563-7026 IGN Jonathan GGallagher 407-563-7054 Jenny AAndreasson 407-563-7026 Isaac Babcock 407-563-7023 ealslassfeds AAshley McBride I Isaac Babcock Padrick Brewer NI Chris Jepson LLouis Roney Josh GGarrick IING aaer TT racy Craft 407-515-2605 suscrptoscrculato AAmanda Rayno 407-563-7073 InternNTERN Meisha Perrin tuares obit@observernewspapers.com Mission: Fit Possiblepital for Childrens Healthy 100 Kids, equips local schools and community organizations with proven childhood obesity prevention tools that get children excited about healthy living. Hundreds of kids from around Cen experience of the rst-of-its-kind in teractive program that will be launch ing in January 2012. Park Maitland School is a participant.New anti-scam siteMaitland resident Bill Kahn has de veloped a public service website that informs people how they can protect themselves against being scammed or defrauded. The website, StopTh eScam.org, is an expanding Encyclo pedia that quickly identies crooks actions. New student University in Chicago. DDonations up G primary provider of essential school supplies and resources for students in need, has experienced some un1,500 teachers and school person G gust a 37 percent increase from I critical learning tools have reached 55,000 deserving students so far this year. Call 407-318-3123 or visit G TT -shirt campaign for AAfrica Luxury Trips, a Winter Park-based luxury travel consultancy, brings you devoted to famine relief in Eastern the prot generated from shirt sales will go to long-term aid in the Horn T-shirt, stop by 190 E. Morse Blvd. or GGet involved Interested in serving your community? The city of Maitland has openings on the following volunteer boards: B sonnel Board and the Transportation B land resident to apply. Please contact maitland.com or 407-539-6219 for information. Send bulletin submissions to editor@ observernewspapers.comBusinessBriefs Community Bulletin Acupuncture, herbal therapy, cupping, moxibustion, electrical stimulation, Tongue/Pulse DiagnosisSpecialize in treating pain management and stress407-429-1066spectrumwellcare@gmail.com1298 Minnesota Ave. Suite A Winter Park 25% off your rst visit with this ad! All proceeds help support the National Lung Cancer Partnerships vital research, education and awareness programs. For more information or to register, donate, sponsor or volunteer, please visit www.FreeToBreathe.org.1st Annual Free to Breathe 5K Fun Run/Walk and 1 Mile WalkWHEN: Saturday, Nov. 19 7 a.m. Event-day registration opens 8:30 a.m. Welcome, 5K Fun Run/Walk begins (1-mile walk begins after the 5K) WHERE: Moss Park 12901 Moss Park Road, Orlando, FL 32832 WHAT: to Breathe Orlando 5K Fun Run/Walk and 1 Mile Walk, a fun event for the entire family that brings the community together to inspire hope and create change for everyone impacted by lung cancer. TThe Rollins MBAA at the Crummer GGraduate School of Business is included in the Princeton Reviews BB for 2012. Ride G Green Scooters been named the exclusive area dealer for battery-powered TNT E Scooters designed and manufactured by Top Notch Technology Inc. of Ligonier, Ind. Fannie H Hillman + A Associates posted 93 existing home closings for $32.3 million in the third quarter, giving the Winter Park rm seven consecutive quarters in which transactions and sales volume have been up over comparable periods in previous years. B pointed Margaret Pegi Brock, of Keller Williams Heritage Realty, to ll a vacancy on the board. Bobby Kuykendall, executive vice president of Kuykendall Gardner, a Winter Park-based insurance bro kerage rm, was recently appointed B ident Nicholas Carbone was recently hired as vice president of transaction al risk for Kuykendall Gardner. Shaw Mechanical Services LL LLC B systems in a 30,000-square-foot building being renovated and a 49,000-square-foot new building at ange County. Ronald L Lowry, IN B I B Cuhaci & Peterson A Architects, based in Baldwin Park, recently com pleted the design of ve residential handicap ramps valued at $25,000 for the Center for Independent Living SIKON Construction, Maitland, was a proud G tion for those diagnosed with Spinal Second in the nation Winter Park resident Bonnie Jacksons N ranked adult tennis league, earning the chance to compete this past weekend N N B Lori Weisberg, Bonnie Jackson, Sharon B Sandra Ruark Visit us on the web WPMObserver.com

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Page 5 Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011Winter Park / Maitland Observer The Wildcats are back in the win column and coming home for a district showdown against Tim Winter Park (4-4, 2-1) nipped winning 19-14 in a defensive showdown. But it took a big comeback to get there after the Wildcats entered the fourth quar ter trailing 14-13 in a game that saw both teams attempt wild twopoint conversions after nearly ev ery touchdown. minutes of the game by Wildcats quarterback Asiantii Woulard put them ahead until the end, handing them their second district win of the season. Now the Wildcats meet one of their toughest rivals in Timber unbeatable against district op ponents so far. In eight games, the Wolves have amassed a massive 231-124 scoring differential against their opponents, includ ing a 49-20 blowout against Uni versity on Oct. 27. Their game Nov. 4. EEagles soar The Eagles shocked football pow erhouse Apopka with a 35-29 win on Oct. 27. The Eagles actually before Apopka came back to tie it just before the end of regulation. Then in overtime Eagles power house running back Jon Altman ran for the winning touchdown, capping off a 182-yard ground game for Altman. Quarterback J.B. Woodmans Darter defense, with Woodman only throwing for 32 yards. Allpurpose back Alton Howard threw for 77 yards in the game, ran for 80 and caught two passes for 14 yards. Meanwhile the Edgewater defense sacked the Darters three the game. Now Edgewater (5-2, 2-1) is set of the season hosting Lake How winning streak since 2007. The p.m. Nov. 4. JV Blanks ColonialFor the second consecutive game, the Winter Park JV football team put together a strong defensive effort and generated a dual-threat running and passing attack to 35-0 at Showalter Field. It was the Wildcats fourth shutout of the seven games. Were really clicking right is averaging 28.5 points per game in its last four and only allowing an average of 5.3 points per game for the season. The defense picked off two man linebacker Johnny Evans and another by nose tackle Dan iel Tommey, which he returned 20 yards for a touchdown. Running back Travis Jones scored on runs of eight and 10 yards, and quar of touchdowns, one of 40 yards to freshman wide receiver Gavin of the season, and another of 10 yards to wide receiver/tight end eight of them to Stutts. with a 7 p.m. game at Evans on Thursday, Nov. 3. FLORIDA RECEIVES D ON 2011 MARCH OF DIMES PREMATURE BIRTH REPORT CARDNovember 17 is First-Ever World Prematurity DayFlorida received a D on the March of Dimes 2011 Premature Birth Report Card, but the biggest news is the three-year, improving trend in its preterm birth rate. Our states preterm birth rate has improved this year. Were proud of this achievement and what we accomplished by working together with our partners for stronger, healthier babies, said Julie Samples, ARNP, MSN, March of Dimes Florida Chapter Program Services Committee Chair. We are determined to continue to nd and implement solutions to improve the health of babies, such as improving access to health care coverage, helping women quit smoking, and preventing unnecessary early c-sections, so more babies can get a healthy start in life. Factors that contribute to preterm birth improved in Florida. It earned a star for: Reducing the percentage of women of childbearing age who smoke Lowering the late preterm birth rate Since 2006, Floridas preterm birth rate has dropped to 13.5 percent. The rate of late preterm births is 9.6 percent; the rate of women smoking is 17.3 percent, and the rate of uninsured women is 28.5 percent. Quality improvement programs are key to lowering preterm birth rates, according to the March of Dimes. In Florida, March of Dimes supports programs that provide information and support to families with babies in a neonatal intensive care unit. We have grant-funded programs in Hillsborough and Duval Counties that provide education and support to women who have had a stillbirth, infant death, or who have had a baby in a NICU, to help them reduce their risks for future pregnancies. And we have the Healthy Babies are Worth the Wait campaign, which is working to prevent non-medically indicated deliveries before 39 weeks of pregnancy. A normal pregnancy lasts 40 weeks, but in recent years it has become more common to schedule deliveries early at 37 or 38 weeks. The United States received a C on the March of Dimes Report Card. Grades are based on comparing the state and the nations 2009 preliminary preterm birth rates with the March of Dimes 2020 goal of 9.6 percent of all live births. The U.S. preterm birth rate is 12.2 percent down nearly 5 percent from the peak of 12.8 percent in 2006. Preterm birth, birth before 37 weeks completed gestation, is a serious health problem that costs the United States more than $26 billion annually, according to the Institute of Medicine. It is the leading cause of newborn death, and babies who survive an early birth often face the risk of lifetime health challenges, such as breathing problems, cerebral palsy, intellectual disabilities and others. Even babies born just a few weeks early have higher rates of hospitalization and illness than full-term infants. At least 39 weeks of pregnancy are critical to a babys health because many important organs, including the brain, are not completely developed until then. The March of Dimes says its 2020 preterm birth goal can be achieved by a combination of activities: giving all women of childbearing age access to health care coverage, fully implementing proven interventions to reduce the risk of an early birth, such as not smoking during pregnancy, getting preconception and early prenatal care, progesterone treatments for women who are medically eligible, avoiding multiples from fertility treatments, avoiding elective c-sections and inductions before 39 weeks of pregnancy, and by funding new research on prevention of preterm birth. This year, for the rst time, a World Prematurity Day will be observed on November 17 by the March of Dimes along with organizations in Africa, Europe, and Australia. An estimated 13 million babies are born preterm and of those one million die as a result of their early birth, according to an October 2009 March of Dimes report on the global toll of preterm birth. For more information, visit www.facebook.com/worldprematurityday. The March of Dimes is the leading nonprot organization for pregnancy and baby health. With chapters nationwide, the March of Dimes works to improve the health of babies by preventing birth defects, premature birth and infant mortality. For the latest resources and information, visit marchofdimes.com/orida or nacersano.org. Find us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter. Alabama Oaks offers the highest quality affordable care in the most beautiful Winter Park home-setting. Call us for a personal tour or for more information 407-434-9654 PHoO To O BY iISAAC bBAbBCOCK THE oOBsSERVER AAfter losing two games, the Wildcats beat Colonial HHigh on the road. Wildcats ght Wolves Nov. 4 ISAAC BAbBCOCK Observer Staff grave, but the team only needed two weeks to prepare before playing its second game. The Tars will return to the gridiron again Saturday, The Tars will be looking to build excitement even after a 48-17 loss 2,500, easily eclipsing quarterback Jeff Hoblicks hope of 2,000. look for some more. Winter Parks Showalter Field to Memorial Stadium at Orlandos Tars Game 2 is Nov. 5 ISAAC BAbBCOCK Observer Staff

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Page 6 Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011Winter Park / Maitland Observer CRAA Board Meeting meeting on Monday, Nov. 14, at Nov. 14 City Commission meeting topics of interest meeting immediately following located at 401 Park Ave. S. Below Mayors reportKeep Winter Park Beautiful scape improvements and Azalea Lane Volunteer Project. Proclamation National Hos Recognition of the Winter Park High Schools 500th football victory Presentation of Winter 2011 Webisode produced in partner ship with Full Sails SPARK program Appointment of Martin Lu ther King Jr. task force members Board Non-action itemsFinancial Report Septem ber 2011Consent agendaApprove the minutes of Oct. 24. Approve piggybacking the Florida Bearings Inc. for repair of electric motors and pumps, and authorize the mayor to execute the piggyback contract as recommended by the ethics board. holiday. Approve the On-site Energy Audit Services Program Master Agreement with Progress Energy Florida (PEF) and authorize the mayor to execute the agreement. AAction items requiring discussionDiscussion of Today in Public hearings ter Park to revise the public notice requirements for citywide notices to streamline the zoning approval o Second reading of the ordi nance revising the application and approval procedures for zon ing amendments and conditional uses, revising the submittal re quirements for conditional uses, and the extension or re-establish ment of conditional uses o Second reading of the ordi nance adopting new public no tice and adoption procedures for amendments to the comprehensive plan, goals, objectives and policies document and substituting for the current amendment procedures Request of Bank First Realty proval to construct a McDonalds Restaurant with a drive-thru ser vice at 1282/1288/1302 West Fair banks Ave. and 1281/1289/1301 Request of Surrey Homes to modify the Development Agree ment for Windsong. QUASI JUDI Equalization Board Hearings Dixie Parkway and Williams o Resolution Declaring that the city is to fund capital improvements to underground electric/ Parkway and Williams Drive and declaring that the cost be paid by special assessments levied against ted by said improvements. special assessments for the un (BHN) facilities on properties ad jacent to Dixie Parkway and Wil liams Drive. building exchange agreement First reading of the ordinance regarding the exchange agreement City Commission reports Mayor Bradley full agenda and information on www.cityofwinterpark.org and LLast CoffeeTT alk If you have a latte beans to grind or simply want to espresso your sioner Tom McMacken for the last day, Nov. 10, from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. ter located at 151 W. Lyman Ave. This is your opportunity to talk to your city leaders in a more ca sual, informal environment. Special thanks to our coffee provider Palmanos Roastery & Espresso Bar. LLeft over HHalloween candy? If you have too much candy, dont forget about Operation Gratitude. You can drop off candy and letters of appreciation for our American service men and women who are currently deployed in the hostile and remote regions of Iraq and Afghanistan. Items are accepted between now and Saturday, Nov. 12. For more information, please call 407-454-0878, email opgratitudeorlando@gmail.com or visit www.operationgratitude.com us on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter. Over the years, even though Mai tlands demographics have been very attractive to new develop ment and redevelopment, many developers have avoided doing projects in our city. The ones who have built projects in Maitland found it a real challenge getting their projects approved. This is largely due to the expensive and time-consuming permitting process that had been in place. With the decline of the economy the last few years, our city can no longer afford to continue doing business that way. The economic downturn has caused a substantial decrease in our property values as well as our ability to collect various state and local fees. All of this translates into a major reduction in our citys tax revenues. have been working hard to offset this loss of tax revenue wherever possible by reducing overhead, and applying for federal, state and local grants. However, these alone will not be enough to make up for our tax revenue loss. In ad dition, we need to increase our tax base. This is, by far, the best and most substantial way to offset our declining tax revenues. To accomplish this, Maitland has created a positive open for quality development to our city by making our permitting process developers. The basic key princi ples that we have implemented to make our permitting process more staff when reviewing new and re development projects in our city. project review team that will provide initial project feedback and promote an upfront positive working relationship between city staff and the developer. ing the permit approval process. to the developer for project approval by providing different op tions depending on the type and size of the development. lines for project approvals. After project approval, minimize the steps and time for project amendments and/or revisions. This will afford the following for development. development by saving the devel oper time and money. needed (temporary and perma nent). base, therefore increasing our tax revenues. In addition, along with the revision of our land development code that is presently in process, it will improve the quality of our community by developing and/ or redeveloping the areas of our city that have been in decline, es pecially our downtown area. With the continued cost saving city staff and the commitment to attract new quality development to our community, in part by streamlining our permitting process and promoting an open for reduce the future prospect of ei ther having to raise taxes or cut services. Neither of those alternatives is acceptable. We must continue to move forward and make every effort to improve the quality of life in our city as well as contin ue the high quality of services that our citizens have come to expect and deserve. Attracting new quality development to increase our tax base and, therefore, our tax revenues, is a major step forward to achieving those goals. Nov. 14 meeting is scheduled to be held Monday, Nov. 14. For more information, visit www.itsmymaitland.comStreamline permitting Maitland City Talk bBY HowHOW ArRD ScCHiIEfFErRDEckCKErR MAYOR Winter Park City Talk bBY RAnNDY KniNIGHT CITY MANAGER Effective October 13, 2011 Michelle Dolske, PhD, Charles Lammers, PhD, Jodi Nadler, PhD, Anthony Logalbo, PhD, Michael Westerveld, PhD and Benjamin Johnson-Markve, PsyD are moving their practice, Medical Psychology Associates, from their current location to: 1685 Lee Rd., Suite 200 Winter Park, Fl 32789 Patient medical records will be maintained at the Telephone and fax numbers for the practice will remain the same. at 407.303.7991.NOTICE TO PATIENTS www.gulfstatescu.org 407-831-8844

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Page 7 Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011Winter Park / Maitland Observer THTHURSDAYDAY G Faces of H Hunger program on Nov. 3 Concourse Parkway S. in Maitland at The HHarriett L Lake Festival of New Plays is running Nov. 3-6 at the John and Rita Lowndes Shakespeare Cen Spice Up Y Y our Culinary Skills. The cost is $25 and it will be Nov. 3, at 6:30 p.m. Register online at The Orange County Retired E Educa tors A Association will meet Thursday, Nov. 3, at 10 a.m. at College Park United Methodist Church. FRIDAYDAY Friday Nights at the Morse is free N MorseMuseum.org for details. The groundbreaking ceremony of I N mony will take place at the southeast corner of South Interlachen and East New England avenues. The Breakthrough Theatre of Winter Park presents, Nobody L Likes Y Y ou When Y Y oure 23 a cabaret per Gillette. Performances are Nov. 4 at 7 and 11 p.m. Tickets are $10. Call 407-920-4034. The Winter Park Institute at Rollins College welcomes author and histo tation on HHistory and the L Love of LLearning N SATATURDAYDAY The 33rd A Annual G Goldenrod Festival & Parade is Saturday, Nov. 5. The fes tivities will begin at 7 a.m. with a pan cake breakfast hosted by the Winter Park Elks Lodge, Post 1830. The pa rade will begin at 11 a.m. eastbound Rollins Football vs. Clemson Club is Saturday, Nov. 5 at 2 p.m. at Memo rial Stadium at Bishop Moore Catholic High School. The rst Clean the World G Gala will IN 5 from 6:30 p.m. to 11 p.m. Individual Festival Under the T T rees A Arts & Crafts Show is Nov. 5 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Episcopal Church of the Resurrection, 251 E. Lake Brant org SUNDAYDAY The Womans Club of Winter Parks Fall A Antiques Show and Sale is Saturday, Nov. 5, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday, Nov. 6, from 11 a.m. to I Winter Park. Kristallnacht Community Remembrance E Event on Sunday, Nov. 6 at 2 p.m. at the Jewish Community Center. The Central Florida Watercolor So ciety will hold its next monthly meet ing on Sunday, Nov. 6, at 1:30 p.m. at B The 10th annual Winter Park Concours dEElegance is Sunday, Nov. 6. ture high-end classic and exotic au com Gardener extraordinaire TT om Mac Cubbin Historical Rose Society meeting on Sunday, Nov. 6 at Harry P. Leu Gar N MONDAYDAY Learn how to line dance on Monday, Nov. 7, at 7 p.m. at the University Club of Winter Park. Cost is $5 to the instructor. Call 407-644-6149 or visit UniversityClubWinterPark.org Winter Park Executive Women hosts LLead Y Y ourself First In Order to LLead Others at the Winter Park Wel come Center on Monday, Nov. 7, at N 644-8281 or visit WinterPark.org TTUEESDAYDAY Qualifying for Winter Park mayor N more election information, visit Cit Join us for a DDiabetes A A wareness and Prevention event on Tuesday, Nov. 8, at 6 p.m. at the StillWaters Healing Center, 260 Lookout Place Suite 209, Maitland. Call 407-7729243. WEDEDNEESDAYDAY Central Florida L Landscaping has an event at 10 a.m. Nov. 9 at the Winter G NOV. 10 N Gardens, James Zach Zacharias, senior curator of education and history B hotmail.com or 321-948-3994. Broadway veterans Brian & Melissa Minyard with pianist Chris Leavy, will perform in the Winter Park Playhouse Spotlight Cabaret Series Thursday, NN visit WinterParkPlayhouse.org The Signature Chefs A Auction benday, Nov. 10, at Rosen Shingle Creek CoffeeTT alk featuring Commissioner Tom McMacken is Nov. 10 at 6 p.m. at the Winter Park Welcome Center. Visit wpmobserver.com/events for more details. Send submissions to editor@observernewspapers.comCalendar 250 North Orlando Avenue Winter Park, Florida 32789 407.677.9777 A Premier Flooring Source nCARPETOODTONE TILELAMINATE AREA RUGINDO TREATMENT Featuring Exquisite Products for Residential & Commercial Projects Custom Design and Quality Installationn Professional Pet Sitting, Dog Walking and Pet Taxi F Orlando Pet Connections oers a variety of custom pet care and sitting services. Our specialties include: www.OrlandoPetSitting.com info@OrlandoPetSitting.com Friday Nights at the Morse resume Nov. 4

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Page 8 Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011Winter Park / Maitland Observer Lifestyles From the inside out, every de sign element of Rob and Denise Smiths Winter Park home serves a purpose. Outside, from the materials used for their driveway, to the greenery planted around it and the cars parked on it, and inside, from the basic structure of the walls, to said every detail has been carefully planned with sustainability and functionality in mind. Theres a story behind everyThe stone on the driveway was repurposed from materials of the house that previously stood on the property, the drywall was recycled from a manufacturer in Tampa, and the decorative pond outside doubles as a rainwater re tention area for use of irrigation. Even the couples old yellow Lab rador retriever, Yeller, has his own tale. so we joke that hes our recycled When bound together, ele ments of these stories and details combined to make the Smiths ship in Energy and Environmen2009. Rob, a green builder, and Denise, a landscape architect, are known for keeping the environment and sustainable practices in mind in both their personal and professional lives. Last month, the pair was honored with a Keep Winter Park Beautiful Award by the city for their ongoing green ef forts in the community. KWPB Executive Director Tim Maslow said the Smiths are doing a great job of leading by example as to how other citizens, and the city, can incorporate sustainable, environmentally conscious efforts into their home and work. Theyre doing at the home level what were trying to do Were hoping more residents and HHome sweet home Parked in the couples repurposed driveway are a pair of hybrid ve hicles. I think Im probably the only builder who doesnt drive a his compact Toyota Prius. On the back of each of their cars are bumper stickers representing man for Rob, woman for Denise, toddler for their son, Elliott, baby for their one on the way, a dog for Yeller, and a bee for the eight hives they host on their roof. The pair tends to the hives and harvests honey a few times a year. They also grow bananas, key limes, rosemary and thyme from their rooftop garden. It all plays into the sustainability factor of their home, Denise said. By growing your own food, youre making yourself more sus tainable while also helping to limit your impact on the world around Through the plotted-out land scaping around the home, using native plants and less sod, Denise said the mass planting method she used to design the greenery helps conserve water and prevent weeds. She and Rob estimate that while the average Winter Park home owner uses well more than 10,000 gallons of water outside their home per month, they have gotten their usage down to less than 5,000 gallons, which saves not only water, but money. Our idea is to integrate green ideas and practices into buildings and present them to people as a I like to call it high-performance Beauty in businessSmith is taking his high-perfor mance building to the next level scale project to date a zero-net energy home just a few streets over from his own home in Win ter Park. The home, when completed by E2 Homes, will harvest enough of its own energy via solar panels that it will be able to operate in dependent of the energy grid, he said. This is a really exciting proj pond to a 7,000-gallon rainwater cistern and drought tolerant land scaping, he said this will be his most sustainable and high-per forming construction yet. Visit wpmobserver.com to learn about green initiatives by Phil Kean, Roll ins College and Winter Park. Effective October 17, 2011 Sheila Baez-Torres, MD will be moving her practice, Neurology & Movement Disorders Assoc., from their current location to: 1685 Lee Road, Suite 210 Winter Park, FL 32789 Patient medical records will be If you have any questions, please NOTICE TO PATIENTS Visit our webpage for more info!www.NRG-DanceStudios.weebly.com Dancers Ages 2 & Up!Ballet, Tap, Jazz, Lyrical, Modern, Hip-hop, & Expressive Dance Location: Winter Park Community Center721 West New England Ave. Winter Park, FL 32789 FREE NRG-Dance Studios T-shirt and NO registration fee for the first 75 dancers to enroll! Where students transform into dancers!Meet the owner Nichole Genchi ...B.A. Dance from FIU Over 10 Years Teaching Former Miami Dolphins Cheerleader (NFL) & Panthers Ice Dancer (NHL) 1st Dance Class FREENow Enrolling!Call: (407)519-0477 PHoO Tos OS BY iISAAC bBAbBCOCK THE oOBsSERVER RRob and DDenise SSmith pose with their son, EElliott at their Winter Park home, which was recognized as the rst LEEEED-certied residential property in Central Florida is 2009. T The couple won a KWPBB award. Living green SSARAH Wi WILSON Observer Staff Learn moreFor more information about Rob and DDenise Smiths high-performanceliving work, visit www.e2homes. com and www.4egc.com. TT o keep updated on the city of Winter Parks ongoing sustainability efforts, visit www.winterparkgreenbutton.org

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Page 9 Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011Winter Park / Maitland Observer FamilyCalendar PICTURE A HEALTHIER YOUAt the Y, we are focused on improving the health and well-being of our community. Thats why we are devoted to you. Join the Y and register for our GET MOVING program by November 15th and well invest up to $200 toward your journey to a healthy lifestyle. For more information, contact:Start your journey to a healthy lifestyle. October 15 November 15, 2011WINTER PARK YMCA 1201 N. Lakemont Ave, Winter Park, FL 32792 | 407 644 1509 Visit ymcacentralflorida.com In the spirit of Halloween, the students in Maria Avilas fourthgrade class at Lake Sybelia Elementary School spent much of Fridays class gutting pumpkins in their upstairs classroom. Two years ago, they were carv ing pumpkins in portables behind the school. Now, after an almost $11 million renovation project, the ground where those portables once stood reveals a restored basketball court Two years after breaking ground, the elementary school now boasts a 25,000-square-foot addition to its 43-year-old, twostory building that includes major technological advances and spaces dedicated to the advancement of their unique program for deaf and partially deaf students. Our biggest upgrade was technology, Principal Julie Para dise said.Going high techHigh-tech interactive boards have taken over for old-fashioned dryerase boards in every classroom. We kindergarten teachers were dragged kicking and scream ing saying we dont need that, kindergarten teacher Kathie Olsen said. And now we cant go a day without it. These boards are comparable in size to dry erase boards but project the teachers computer screen and have touch-screen features that re quire only a pen to work. The classrooms new dot cams, another projection technology that makes overhead projectors a thing of the past, are exciting in terms of classroom management, Olsen said, as they can project any item onto the interactive board so that the children can see it from anywhere in the classroom. The interactive boards also double as televisions, playing the morning announcements, and come with microphones that the teachers wear around their necks on a lanyard and they are creat ing quite the buzz at the elementary school. You wonder how we ever lived without those, music teach er Cathy Kies said. Weve gotten so used to it.Advancing deaf programIn addition to the interactive board and dot cams, Lake Sybelias pro gram for deaf and partially deaf students, the only one of its kind in Orange County, also received technological updates that will push the total-communication program forward. The school received two ob servation rooms where interns, students and potential teachers can watch the teachers without interrupting the classroom as they communicate verbally and through sign language with the students. All of our teachers are won derful, Paradise said. But what those teachers do for the students is really amazing. The 25,000-square-foot addi tion has also provided the pro gram with an audiology booth that rids the school of the need to transport the students elsewhere for testing, saving more time for the 42 deaf and partially deaf stu dents to learn how to communi cate. Its supposed to be the latest and the greatest, Paradise said, which they deserve.Already overowingLake Sybelia also gained a media center with a story room and com puter lab, a patio and a revamped kindergarten playground decorated with engineered mulch on which students in wheelchairs can maneuver freely. Despite the new additions, Lake Sybelia Elementary has al ready outgrown itself, and Paradise is seeking to bring back two portables to house the speech and language students who are in the conference room and the music class that practices in the new up stairs computer lab. how to make it work, Paradise said. And I thank goodness the teachers here are usually very Still, spirits are high at Lake the lines of children waving their from one part of the renovated building to another. It is the best place to come to work every day, Paradise said.PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Lake SSybelia teacher Kathy T Tindal communicates via sign language to one of the schools 42 deaf or partially deaf students. Lake Sybelia gets $11M renovationAdditions include interactive boards, audiology booth for deaf programMEISHA PERRIN OObserver SStaff Learn moreVisit www.lakesybelia.ocps.net for more information on the renovations or the deaf and hard of hearing program. Popcorn Flicks in Central Park featuring National Velvet is 7 p.m.-9 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 3, in Central Park in downtown Win ter Park. Its presented by Winter Park and Enzian Theater to coin cide with Orange Countys annual Week of the Family. Rain date will be Nov. 17. Contact 407-6290054 or visit Enzian.org Movie in the Park featuring Mr. Poppers Penguins is 7 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 5, at Quinn Strong Park in Maitland. Bring your blankets and chairs and the city will bring you the stars. Visit ItsmyMaitland.com for more information. Ripleys Believe It or Not! is launching a campaign to combat hunger in all the cities where it has Believe It or Not! Odditoriums. Ripleys Gimme Five Food Drive will take place from Sunday, Nov. 6, through Thursday, Nov. 10. Guests who bring a donation of ve non-perishable food items can get a ticket to Ripleys Believe It or Not! Orlando Odditorium for just $5 (regular adult ticket price is $19.99). All the food collected will go to the Second Harvest Food Bank of Central Florida. Orlando Fashion Square wel comes back Santa Claus for visits and pictures with children this holiday season starting at 7 p.m. Friday, Nov. 11. Santa photos will be taken daily through Dec. 24. Also, Fido and Fluffy can sit with St. Nick on Pet Nights, from 6 to 8 p.m. Mondays from Nov. 14 through Dec. 19. The historic Annie Russell Theatre, which is celebrating its 79th Sea son, presents Little Shop of Hor rors from Nov. 11 19 with both evening and matinee performance times. Cost is $20, $10 for stu dents with ID. Call 407-646-2145 or visit Rollins.edu/annierussell Winter Park Sports Hall of Fame induction ceremony is Satur day, Nov. 12, at the Winter Park Community Center. Cocktail hour begins at 5:30 p.m. followed by dinner, catered by Johnny Rouses JRs BBQ, and the induction cere mony. Contact jmiller@cityofwinterpark.org for more information. Movie in the Park featuring Tangled is 6 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 12, at Quinn Strong Park in Maitland. Bring your blankets and chairs and the city will bring you the stars. Visit ItsmyMaitland.com for more information. The Maitland Public Library has bedtime stories for all ages at 6 p.m. every Monday. Preschool story time is 10:30 a.m. every Tuesday. Infant and toddler story time is at 10:30 a.m. every Thurs day. Call 407-647-7700 for more information. Send submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com

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Page 10 Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011Winter Park / Maitland Observer Opinion/ Editorial Who would think that poking a few bean seeds into the dirt could preserve many of our constitutional freedoms? The process of growing our own food and pulling our hard-earned dollars out of the commercial/industrial food production conglomerate could be considered one of the most powerful political statements any individual can make. Since everyone has to eat every day, our sustainable gardening efforts grow a healthier existence for each of us now and for future generations. Recognizing that we are in the midst of historic political, cultural and environmental changes is half the battle. Remember in the 1960s when smoking marijuana was considered a political statement? The culture of the hippies brought the aware ness of weed into the mainstream, but then the disco culture merely added cannabis to its list of distractions. With the wave of economic refugees and homesteaders dur ing the recession of the mid-1970s growing their own, frugality became the norm. Next came the big money smugglers and cartels to ruin it all. Think of the mayhem that could be avoided by legalizing victimless crimes and taxing their maintenance taken by George Washington were to collect excise taxes on whiskey.) Oops, I advocated the t-word. I consider that many in the U.S. Congress receiving agricultural subsidy mon eys for which they vote be seen as a con2012 is on hold while the super-committee their budget. Then both houses plan to fast-track one of most important pieces of legislation. I can only surmise that few sustainable agricultural laws will survive this cantankerous process. change are spun to a political advantage. Al Gores inconvenient truths are just the tip of a melting iceberg. Coalescing statistical trends to conduct populist polls goes far beyond a scientist doing hard research. Special interests that buy a study a larger trend, but heat islands in cities do not deny the fact that polar ice caps will melt in my lifetime. Keeping the lid on a pot of boiling frogs because corporacampaigns will only push the problems to disastrous extremes. All Im saying is to level the playing centage of the electorate, our voice must be heard through other methods. Occupy your garden, grow some of your own food and be aware, be very aware!Occupy my garden For the third year in a row, I am devoting much of my spare time (and a lot of my not-so-spare time) working for a project called Operation Gratitude. Operation seeks to lift morale and put smiles on U.S. soldiers faces by sending them care packages overseas. Operation Gratitude packages contain food, hygiene products, entertainment items, candy and personal letters of appreciation, all wrapped with good wishes of love and support. I originally heard about Operation Gratitude through a dentist who was asking children in his practice to donate the candy they collected at Halloween (or any extra candy that they didnt give out to trick-or-treaters) rather than eating it. When I learned that he wasnt just collecting the candy to save his patients teeth from too many sweets, but rather to send to U.S. troops, I decided to learn more, and ultimately started my own collection process. As it turns out, the soldiers love getting the care packages who wouldnt love a package from home when one is living in constant danger in places such as Iraq and Afghanistan? And reading a letter of appreciation from a U.S. citizen, usually a schoolchild, can really help keep up spirits, especially after a day of the troops not only get a sweet treat from back home, but they sometimes use the candy to barter with village children for information about hidden improvised explosive devices or the location of en emy troops. Its hard to believe, but many soldiers lives have been saved by a bag of M&Ms or a chocolate bar. For the past two years, I have colyear, 2009, I collected exactly 911 pounds of candy. The coincidence of /11 was hard to ignore. My second year, 2010, I collected more than 4,300 pounds of candy, and I am hoping to collect more than 5,000 pounds this year. I dont have any family members in the military (although my grandfather served in the Army way back when before my dad was born!) So why do I work for Operation Gratitude? Simple. We have the good life here in America for one reason and one reason only: because our soldiers risk their lives, and some times give their lives, to protect our way of life. They risk their lives for us every day, away from their family and friends for months at a time, never knowing if they will make it home alive and in one piece or not. We spend our days inside air-conditioned homes and schools, ride in comfortable cars and enjoy great food every day. Our brave men and women get nothing of the sort, not to mention the risk they constantly endure of get ting shot or blown up by a rusty can or some other non-descript object that turned out to be a bomb. Perhaps even more important than our lifestyle is our freedom freedom of speech, freedom of religion, freedom to agree or disagree with our own government. We should never take any of those things for granted. My collecting candy for Operation Gratitude is one small thing I can do to thank our soldiers for all that they do to protect America. Drop off candy and letters of apprecia tion by Saturday, Nov. 12, to one of the following Winter Park locations: New England Ave. For further details, contact OpGratitu deOrlando@gmail.com or 407-454-0878. Andrew Weinstock, 15, lives in Winter Park and attends Trinity Preparatory School.Life-saving candy AANDREW W WEINSTOCK Guest WriterBacking down the banksThe word redistribution has rarely been seen in such shining light as it is at this moment. That word had morphed into a euphemism of fear over the course of the last three decades or so. Regardless of whom you say that word to, they almost invariably fear that it means less money for them and more money for some body else. But a funny thing has hap word, at least in the past few weeks, as the mass outcry about Americas wealth and income disparity has grown louder. More and more people have started to realize that redistribution isnt some harbinger of a dystopian future where the average fam ily loses all its money to greedy homeless people living off government cheese. Redistribution isnt some hobo-enriching peril to be pre vented. Its already happened. direction than where many at the top of Americas economic food chain would lead us to believe. Its why a story Tuesday morning in the Orlando Sentinel about $5 bank fees disappearing wasnt just on the front page; it was the banner headline. Those checking and debit card fees had been put in place by many of Americas largest banks beginlighting just how broad the gap between their economic fantasy and our reality really was. The banks, already making masmoney. American consumers, still struggling to make ends meet in the wake of the Great Recession, had nothing left to give. According to the economic books, our recession ended in July 2009. The word recovery began to pervade the headlines. The banks quickly resumed raking in billions again. But a year and a half later, most Americans are still waiting for the real recession to end, as continue to hover around 10 as high as 18 percent. Before American consumers could get new jobs and get back on their feet again, banks hit them while they were down, instituting new fees while they were already making huge prof its. SunTrust, JPMorgan Chase, Wells Fargo and Bank of Amer ica all jumped into the feeding frenzy. In Bank of Americas case, the new fee announcement came just days after it reported a record The outcry was huge. Videos of protestors organizing and entering banks to close their accounts en masse soon hit the major networks. Bank Transfer Day Saturday, Nov. 5 was (and still is) set to see hordes of customers closing their bank accounts and taking their money to Suddenly the banks were scrambling to cancel the fees and refund money to their customers before they withdrew all their deposits. Thats a big win for the Occupy Wall Street movement, which began protesting Ameri cas record income disparity and greedy banks among other things nearly two months ago. That movement has continued to grow, spawning new movements such as the aforementioned Bank Transfer Day. And with that growth, so has public support of Occupy Wall Streets message. According to a joint New York Times/CBS News poll released last week, two out of three Amer icans now believe the nations wealth should be more evenly distributed. More than half of Republicans, in a sudden break with a long history of championing tax cuts, now believe that the rich should be taxed more. Maybe thats a response to the growing feeling that Americas longstanding narrative of going from rags to riches through hard work has been replaced with the grim reality of an economic and political system that stacks the odds massively in favor of those who are already rich. But theres a limit to that excess, and we may have just reached a breaking point. Just as wealthy banks were deciding that we should pay more, American consumers said its time for some payback. Tom Carey GARDENFrom my to yoursTom Carey is the owner of Sundew Gardens, a you-pick gardening business in Oviedo. Visit the Sundew Gardens Facebook page.WHO ISCAREY > Remember in the 1960s when smoking marijuana was considered a political statement?

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Page 11 Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011Winter Park / Maitland Observer Chris Jepson Louis Roney Men at some time are masters of their fates: The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, But in ourselves Cassius from Shakespeares Julius Caesar Ah, the human condition. I am of mixed emotions when assessing mankind. And why wouldnt any rational human being? One moment, I am upbeat, optimistic and enthralled with our species enchanted, if you will. The next, I despair at our collective stupidity. Progress may, indeed, be inexorable, but the steps, the stumbles, are oh so treacherous. What to make of our nation, of Amer ica, of us as a people? Are we (as individual citizens) so incapable of discerning reality, of separating the wheat of truth from the chaff of deception that all we are as a nation is risked over meaningless slo gans, historical revisionism and lies? Are we not required to think for ourselves and in that process, to thoughtfully consider our fellow Americans? Whenever I consider an issue, I start from my ideal. A problem? What is the ideal solution? If we lived in the best of all possible worlds, would we have poor people, or the chronically ill? Would the elderly or young ever require more than what their familys could provide? Would bad luck or misfortune hobble or maim the strong? Or the vulnerable? Would not Furthermore, would women not be universally considered and respected as mens equal? Would we not, indeed, be color-blind (as in race/ethnicity/ religion)? Would not mans ecological footprint be truly green and have been so since the dawn of the industrial revolution? Would not mankinds population be in harmony with what Mother Earth could sustainably support? Would not our species (as individuals, nations and people) be kind, generous and tolerant with one another? No war? No poverty? Would not all our children be born loving parents in decent homes, with nutritious food, with health care and challenging educational opportunities? Would not all our citizens be industrious, live and die peacefully knowing their progeny will experience the same? But, alas, we do not live in the best of all possible worlds as I (or you) might imagine or create if one were a god. No, we live in this world. We live now. With all its attending sorrow, pain and suffer ing. As context and relativism are everything, I have the occasional reader take me to task for lauding Presidents Roosevelts New Deal efforts to help the hurt Americans experienced during the Great Depression. They will caustically and ignorantly dismiss Roosevelts (our) governments achievements by saying the New Deal was just socialism, that it accomplished nothing meaningful and it was WWII that pulled America out of the Great Depression. And I mentally shout, You ignoramus! Do you not see that Americas WWII mobilization was nothing more than a completely organized, governmentmandated social program? Everybody worked. Everybody participated. Everyone had a job to do. It was complete so cialism. Orchestrated by the government, for the people. For the nation. And it was considered good. Jump ahead today, and Republicans have morphed into weaponized Keynesians. They wail, We must save the defense budget because any cuts will be horrible, because jobs will be lost! What hypocrisy! The government can legitimately create jobs only to the extent that they are military related? Shameful. Please see the deceit in their position. Think/vote accordingly.Republican deceit. Republican shame.A billionaire Hungarian immigrant named George Soros seems to hunger for control and to see in the latent power of groups of humanity a way to serve his noxious compulsion to abolish the click. (Wonder where Soros got all his money? Wonder why he hasnt given it all away?) I wish George would tell me one country in the world that has succeeded big economically by replacing capitalism with socialism/communism. Soros or ganizations are ACORN, SEIU, MoveOn. Org and Tides Foundation, among many others he sponsors that thrive on political iconoclasm. For a long time, Soros has been poking around in the U.S. looking for ways to make trouble for you and me. Why? My belief is that Soros hates us, and most everything else American. sicko. We are lucky that Soros has not yet found a personal following similar to the deluded millions who fell for Hitlers rav ings. We know that Soros has visited the meaning someone living there must be interested in what he has to say or to sell and that fact scares me a lot At this moment I am thinking of Jesus Christ, Mahatma Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Abraham Lincoln and even John F. Kennedy. These were men who meant well while on Earth and whose lives were cut short in the despicable manner that some lesser men use to remove their moral superiors. simple Austrian village that produced Adolph Hitler, destroyer of 50 million lives. Why do so many nobodies rise to such monstrous power? opera in Germany was Berlin, and I lost no time taking a taxi to see where Hitler A young pretty girl who spoke a bit of English was my guide, and showed me the cement steps up which they carried Hitlers body, along with his mistress Eva Braun after Hitler had shot them both deep in his underground bunker. All of Berlin still lay in ruins from massive American bombings. I wondered what the man who said Today Germany, tomor row the whole world would have said to the Germans if he had had to accept publicly the responsibility for the tomor row he brought them. My frulein guide was smiling and as happy as a princess as she stood among the ruins of Berlin. It seemed to me that she had stepped lightly out of history and was thinking of the boy who would join her in a beer hall later that day. After all, the only Berlin she knew was some square miles of scattered sticks and stones now being slowly put back together. Present-day American happenings are painful for an antiquated patriot to live through. I had learned from my observations of history that politicians are scoundrels, but often laughable scoundrels. Today, kiddos, politics is no laughing matter. I wonder if my happy frulein from Berlin would be smiling beside me now if she had been born in America and could see what unbridled lust and greed are busily concocting for us in this great land. Those who do not know history are doomed to repeat it.What times the next change? Jepson is a 24-year resident of Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.USWHO ISJEPSON > HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney)WHO IS RRONEY > Have an opinion? Send your thoughts (400 words or less) to Managing Editor Jenny Andreasson at editor@ observernewspapers.comTar-icIt would be hard to agree on the best college football program in Florida now that all of our traditional powerhouses have been kicked out of the top 25 for sad moment when the world sees Boise State and West Virginia towering over the University of Florida, Florida State and the University of Miami. But this years Gators seemed toothless during their four-game losing streak, while the preseason favorite Seminoles (5-3) have apparently gone to ground in the Okefenokee Swamp and the often-puzzling Hurricanes (4-4) look more like a morning drizzle. Even the states aspirational teams dont seem to be aspiring to much, with USFs Bulls (4-3), FIUs Golden Panthers (5-3), Bethune-Cookmans Wildcats (5-3), and UCFs Knights (4-4) all struggling to avoid losing seasons. FAUs hapless Owls (0-7) have already lost that battle. If we cant determine the best team, its at least easy to identify the one with the most joy: the Rollins College Tars. After losing Monday night to Webber Inter national, the 28 members of the Rollins club football squad were ecstatic. Of course, it was also the ter Park school, which is better known for its liberal arts program and its U.S. News and World Re port ranking as the best college in the South. (President Paul Wag ner canceled the colleges football program after the 1949 season only to be permanently sacked himself the following year.) For a team with no athletic scholarships, no training table and no physical education majors or even minors the thrill of the game was all that mattered. When 6-foot, 175-pound lineman Chris Alvarez took on Webbers 6-foot-4, 350-pound Handell Orange, he may have looked like Gulliver in the land of giant Brobdingnagians. But Chris, an English major and amateur boxer, and the rest of the squad, led by founder and quarterback Jeff Hoblick, felt more like the Green Bay Packers. They are, after all, students who love athletics and were willing to raise all the funds And their fans loved the game, fore the massive Webber players wore down their opponents in the last quarter, the Tars showed their fellow philosophy and biochem majors what pure deter mination can do by intercepting three passes and making a goalline stand. The crowd erupted loudest when the team took a Actually the Rollins football tradition, which started in 1904, is older than either UFs (1908) or Miamis (1926), both of which chose what were then the mighty Tars as their opponents for their tough year for the Gators, since Rollins beat it consistently in becoming state champion in football, baseball and basketball. And when George Merrick, the de veloper of Coral Gables, decided that a college might attract buy ers to his new project, he founded UM in 1925 as a little sister school to his alma mater, Rollins. In the semi-professional world of college sports where Ohio State alone spends $115 million on athletics and almost every school seems to be facing an NCAA investigation, its time to give the indomitable Tars credit for playing football purely for the joy of playing and for showing what college athletics could and should be. Maurice J. O'Sullivan Kenneth Curry Professor of Literature Rollins CollegeEnough of land-swap half-truthsWinter Parks Mayor Ken Bradley succeeded in keeping quiet the exact number of citizens who signed the petition regarding the CNL/Progress Point land swap. While 234 residents signed the petition, the mayor allowed the minutes to only read numerous signatures. There is a difference! When Commissioner Cooper spoke to correct the minutes taxpayers that want their voices heard, she was, as usual, outvoted by the mayor, along with Commissioners Steven Leary and Sarah Sprinkel. Half-truths are not accurate, or of the numbers?Sally Flynn Winter ParkLetters to the Editor

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Page 12 Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011Winter Park / Maitland Observer The combined wisdom and technical mastery of Florida artists Maury Hurt, Hal McIntosh roots in the iconic Andre Smiths Research Studio, established post World War I as a unique artists haven in Maitland. Those artists will be celebrated in Allegory Echoes: Hal Mcintosh, Maury Hurt, Bill Orr at the Lake Eustis Museum of Art with an opening on Friday, Nov. 4, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. The exhibit runs through Dec. 4. The human-animal con nection dominates Hurts surreal paintings. McIntosh explores the natural world with an abstract/ impressionistic touch, and at 86, Bill Orr creates dramatic, nationally celebrated paintings of The opening is free to the public. The Lake Eustis Museum of Art is at 200 B E. Orange Ave. in Eustis. Call 352-483-2900 or visit LakeEustisMuseumofArt.orgFall Fiesta in the ParkThe Fall Fiesta in the Park offers an always beautiful stroll along the Lake Eola Park coupled with more than 400 juried artists in all media from ceramics to painting to handmade clothing. This event is set for Nov. 5-6, and festival promoters tell us to come hungry, as the Fiesta offers a variety of food venues along with the art and live entertainment. Admission is free. Visit www.facebook. com/FiestaInTheParkChefs auction recipesBring together top chefs from across Central Florida to showcase their culinary masterpieces. Mix in a generous sampling of tails. Add in live entertainment and an auction of one-of-a-kind packages, and you have the recipe for the March of Dimes Signature Chefs Auction. Celebrating Central Florida, the event raises important dollars for the March of Dimes, the leading nancy and baby health. The event begins Thursday, Nov. 10, at 6 p.m. with a tasting event, after which guests are invited to bid on a variety of auction packages. The event will take place at the Rosen Shingle Creek Resort, 9939 Universal Blvd. For tickets, visit or call 407-599-5077 ext. 33.American VoicesThis concert has taken over two years to create, and the onenight-only performance will take place at the Bob Carr Performing Arts Centre on Saturday, Nov. 12, at 8 p.m. The concert is a col laboration between the Orlando Philharmonic, the Zora Neale Hurston Festival, the Association to Preserve Eatonville, the Negro Spiritual Foundation, the Florida Opera Theatre, composer Adolphus Hailstork, librettist Elizabeth Van Dyke and baritone James Brown III. All these talented people join forces to present a night of authentic American music, poetry and song honoring the legacy of author Zora Neale Hurston. Visit orlandophil.org/ american-voices or call 407-7700071Culture and CocktailsFine art, cocktails, and art-lovers make up the happy mix as the Associate Board of the Art & History Museums Maitland invites us to Culture and Cocktails, the second Friday of every month event that kicks off Nov. 11 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Maitland Art Center at 210 W. Packwood Ave. in Maitland. Guests are invited to an evening of art, music, poetry, food and fun as the tel. In his collection, Patel reveals the textures of India, evocative of its ancient society and complex civilization. Big Wheel Provisions will be on hand with their popular food truck. Admission is $5 and includes one drink ticket. Call 407-539-2181 or visit www. ArtandHistory.org Josh Garrick Icons of art in Lake Eustis Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906.WHO IS GARRIcCK > Waterford Lakes Town Center is located by Alafaya Trail and SR408 in East Orlando407.737.2866 TASTE OF ORLANDO 12th Annual Taste of OrlandoSaturday, November 12 11:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m. Waterford Lakes Town CenterEnjoy unlimited food sampling from more than 40 restaurants, live music, a kids entertainment area and local business expoVisit www.thetasteoforlando.com for more details.Advance wristbands are available at Waterford Lakes Town Center Property Management Of ce 413 N. Alafaya Trail Waterford Lakes Town Center Chase Bank 881 N. Alafaya Trail Gators Dockside 12248 Lake Underhill Road $10 Adults, $5 Children (10 and under) Wristbands are also available day of the event, $12 Adults, $5 Children (10 and under) MARKETING GROUPINSIGHT Media Partners include: Booths include: Sponsors include: Taste of Ad 5x8 Observer.indd 1 10/6/11 3:52 PM 1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORGTHIS WEEK AT ENZIAN SENNA Fri-Sat 3:45PM, 6:30PM, 9:15PM Sun 1PM, 3:45PM, 6:30PM Mon 9:30PM Tue 6:30PM Wed & Thu 6:30PM, 9:15PM PEARL JAM TWENTY Fri & Sat 11:59PM RED STATE Sun 10PM 13th ANNUAL MANHATTAN SHORT FILM FESTIVAL Mon 6:30PM NETWORK Tue 9:30PM 1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORGTHIS WEEK AT ENZIAN SENNA Fri-Sat 3:45PM, 6:30PM, 9:15PM Sun 1PM, 3:45PM, 6:30PM Mon 9:30PM Tue 6:30PM Wed & Thu 6:30PM, 9:15PM PEARL JAM TWENTY Fri & Sat 11:59PM RED STATE Sun 10PM 13th ANNUAL MANHATTAN SHORT FILM FESTIVAL Mon 6:30PM NETWORK Tue 9:30PM MARGIN CALL Fri 3:30PM, 6:30PM Sat Sun 3:30PM, 6:30PM, 9:30PM Mon 9:30PM Tue 6:30PM Wed Thu 6:30PM, 9:30PM Afternoon Special Screening with Band Q&A EVERYDAY SUNSHINE: THE STORY OF FISHBONE Sat 12:30PM Jewish Film FestivalIN HEAVEN, UNDERGROUND Sun 11AM DAVID Sun 1:30PMJewish Film FestivalSHOLEM ALEICHEM: LAUGHING IN THE DARKNESS Mon 4:30PM RESTORATION Mon 7PMCult Classic CAT ON A HOT TIN ROOF Tue 9:30PM Bill Orrs art in Eustis

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Page 13 Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011Winter Park / Maitland Observer As the man looks at the photo of the young woman on the screen, he thinks nothing. He doesnt know her. Some students say, thats your daughter, up there, but he resists, quietly uncertain. They point to the printout of the very same pho to in his hands, telling him again. Recognition maybe, but memories certainly, come to him. Thats her, he remembers, he knows her name and little things about her. This man has dementia, and hes one of Winter Parks Brain Fitness Club members. He and a dozen others with Alzheimers or some type of dementia gather at the First United Methodist Church in Winter Park two days a week to exercise their minds and bodies. Director Peggy Bargmann, a registered nurse who has specialized in dementia for 25 years, partnered with the University of Central Florida communicative sciences and disorders masters program to form the Club in 2007. They offer brain building, physical exercise, friendship and speech therapy. Prompting conversation week, they meet with Rollins College freshman students for a photography class. The students and Brain members each have an assignment to complete, and then they discuss their photos in class. Were trying to make that connection, Rollins student David Cottrell said. When you look at a photo, it brings you back to that moment. For the members with dementia, that moment might not be ex actly whats in the photo they discuss with the students that week. Sometimes they dont remember taking the picture, but the photo almost always sparks some mem ory or conversation. Creative and critical thinking will help anyone in terms of their brain activity, said Dawn Roe, professor of the photograph-aslanguage course. Talent revealedThe Brain Fitness members and students work in small and large groups, discussing what they see in the photos, the feelings they bring up and what they hope oth ers might think or wonder. Then they all come together to talk about a few featured photos. There is one of a book on a table, and they muse about where it might have been taken, at what angle, and how pretty the light hits the items sitting there. Another featured is one of the members tak ing a photo of himself in a mirror. They discuss contrast, light and dark. While some of the young students attentions wander, the members are completely engaged. These sophisticated trains of thought and talk take focus and attention, and thats a great brain workout, Bargmann said. A lot of [the photos] are remarkable there is clarity and thought at the moment they take the photo, Roe said.Restoring worth Many members take photos theyre very proud of. One mem ber shows pictures of a beautiful sunset hes taken in his backyard, which faces a lake. The colors, pink and yellow, gleam off the water. He shows them to everyone each week. The member who took a photo of himself in the mir ror takes the assignments very seriously, and has a lot of talent, Bargmann said. He is a man living with de mentia, living with so many loss es, and now, heres a new skill he has, she said. You want a sense of worth and this certainly does that. The students have learned to see that, too, with seniors struggling against losing abilities. Its very frustrating for them, Cottrell said. Something that was so easy all of a sudden is out the window.Learning from each otherAnd it wasnt easy for the stusurprised to hear they would be working with the Brain Fitness Club. In the beginning, members didnt remember them; now they know their names. While the room was once quiet, now it whis pers with friendly talk. Student Brad Baker said hes learned so much from the members, not just about the disease itself, but about history and life, too. Its a place for them to feel safe and accepted. I feel like thats mostly what were here for, to listen to what they have to say, Baker said. And even though this class is no miracle cure, the students said they have a strong feeling that it is helping, somehow. I feel like our time here isnt really wasted whether its big or small its still making an im pact, Cottrell said. Bargmann hears it after the class, the members tell her that go ing there two days a week makes a difference in their lives; they say its important to them, that they can focus just a little bit better. Whether we can measure that or not, its the feeling, Bargmann said. They feel hope. Thrive @ 55 and beyond! St. Dorothy Catholic CommunityLove Without Judgment where ALL are welcome301 New England Avenue Mass: Sundays@11:00AM www.stdorothycatholiccommunity.org SAINT DOROTHY CATHOLIC COMMUNITY IS A PROGRESSIVE CATHOLIC COMMUNITY (Respectfully not associated with the Diocese of Orlando) WHERE ALL ARE WELCOME! We have continued the reformed true Catholic Tradition in the Spirit of Vatican Council II! Are you divorced, gay, a recovering Catholic, feeling disenfranchised by your present worshiping community of whatever denomination, looking for a small worshipping community where you are known and not lost in the crowd? Then you have found what you are looking for in St. Dorothy Catholic Community! Learn moreFor more information about the Brain Fitness Club, contact Peggy Bargmann at 407-927-4380 or email BrainFitness@c.rr.com. The Club is done on a semester basis, with the photography class possibly coming back next fall. The cost of a 14week semester is $1,000, but there are scholarship opportunities.PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER AA RRollins student and a BBrain Fitness Club member reect on photos he took. Photographic memories BBRITTNI JOHNSON OObserver SStaff Senior Survival SeminarBoard Certied Elder Law Attorney Kathleen Flammia will be hosting the next Senior Survival seminar in the Winter Park Public Library located at 460 E. New England Avenue in Winter Park on Wednesday, November 9th, 2011 beginning at 6:00pm. This free seminar will take place on the 1st oor in The Community Room. Attorney Flammia will discuss Medicaid Pre-Planning and Emergency Planning techniques, and will also focus on the importance of those Estate Planning documents necessary for anyone over the age of 18. Light snacks will be provided. Please call the ofce at 407-478-8700 to RSVP and visit our website at: www.ammialaw.com. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information about our qualications and experience. This brochures is designed for general information only. The information presented within should not be construed to be formal legal advice nor the formation of a lawyer/client relationship.

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Page 16 Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011Winter Park / Maitland Observer You may know Orlando Sentinel columnist Greg Dawson from his consumer advo cacy column, The Last Resort, in which he helps mediate between companies and mother, Zhanna Arshanskaya Dawson, a Jewish girl from the Ukraine, was truly at her last resort from 1941-45, when she survived the Holocaust as a piano playing papers. Zhanna, who used the alias Anna Morozova, kept alive by playing the piano throughout European war zones. Zhanna made it through this unbearable existence by relying on the last words her father told her: I dont care what you do, just live. For his sake, and for her younger sister, Frina, who remained in her care throughout World War II, she did what was necessary to survive. Remarkably, Greg Dawson did not learn his mothers incredible story until he was an adult. In 2009, he retold her story in a book, Hiding in the Spotlight. On Sunday, Nov. 6, the documentary cuses on the Dawson familys shared experience, will premier at the Jewish Commu Zhannas wartime experiences and will be enhanced through discussion session from Zhanna, Greg, wife Candy and their daugh ter, Aimee. Greg explains that writing Hiding in the Spotlight presented challenges to his usually light writing style. He notes, Books about the Holocaust are usually written by survivors or historians. I wanted my moth ers story told, so I put aside my whimsical tone, and my wife, Candy, helped keep me in check whenever I lightened my approach. Gregs skill in telling the story is Amazon.com and strong reviews on the website goodreads.com At the wars end, Zhanna and Frina were rescued by Larry Dawson, the U.S. Army serviceman who liberated them. Larry planned to adopt the two sisters and bring them to America. Zhanna eventually fell in love with, and married, Larrys brother, David (a musical prodigy who graduated from The Juilliard School). Both Zhanna and Frina later attended Juilliard, despite their lack of formal education, Zhanna could not bear to share the de her children. Greg did not become aware of his mothers childhood history and heritage until he was 16 years old. The whole story did not come out until many years later, when Greg was a grown man with a family, and his daughter, Aimee, was given an as signment by her middle school teacher. Amy was asked to interview a grandparent about what life was like when they were of middle school age, Greg said. At the time, my mother was the only grand parent left. Much to his surprise, Zhanna wrote down four pages of text for Aimee, detail ing her life under the Nazi regime. Once my mother began telling her story, Greg said. She wanted everyone to know. She did a taping for Steven Spielbergs Shoah Project, and later we discussed putting to gether a book. How has the discovery of his mothers roots and her experiences during the Holocaust impacted Greg Dawson? I am more self-aware of where I come from, he said. Remember, by the time I knew the details, I was almost 30 and an established newspa per writer and family man. Zhannas situa tion was clearly way beyond what any sane person would consider The Last Resort. From the perspective of a writer, I thought my mothers history was amazing and astonishing and worthy of the spotlight.PHOTO BY pP AmM RUBEN Greg DDawsons book was born out of his daughters school assignment to interview her grandma.Putting the spotlight on survivalA documentary lm premieres Nov. 6 about a Jewish girls story and the affects on her sons family PAmMElLA RR UBEN Guest Writer Learn moreSharing in the Spotlight will premier Sunday, Nov. 6, at 2 p.m. at the JCC Auditorium sponsored by the Holocaust Center of Florida. For more information, call 407-628-0555.

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Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com ASSISTED LIVING RESIDENCE 395 Alafaya Woods Blvd., Oviedo, FL 32765 407-977-8786ALF License No. 9235, 9308, 9307 www.slm.net/SCOviedo1 Signature property of Located on a beautiful campus setting, our two Savannah Court communities provide full assisted living services while Savannah Cottage offers a secured residence for those with memory loss. Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above! You are always welcome at Savannah Court and Cottage of Oviedo. MEMORY CARE RESIDENCEWhere hospitality is truly a way of life! Savannah Court and Cottage ASSISTED LIVING RESIDENCE 395 Alafaya Woods Blvd., Oviedo, FL 32765 407-977-8786ALF License No. 9235, 9308, 9307 www.slm.net/SCOviedo1 Signature property of Located on a beautiful campus setting, our two Savannah Court communities provide full assisted living services while Savannah Cottage offers a secured residence for those with memory loss. Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above! You are always welcome at Savannah Court and Cottage of Oviedo. MEMORY CARE RESIDENCEWhere hospitality is truly a way of life! Savannah Court and Cottage S S S S S S S S S S Signature property of S Signature property of S S Savannah Court and Cottageof Oviedo S S S Located on a beautiful campus setting, our two Savannah Court communities provide full assisted living services while Savannah Cottage offers a secured residence for those with memory loss.www.savannahcourtoviedo.com395 Alafaya Woods Blvd., Oviedo, FL 32765407-977-8786 S S S www.savannahcourtoviedo.com S S You are always welcome at Savannah Court and Cottage of Oviedo Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above! Dennis AllenOwner/ Administrator Senior Community Bulletin Veterans Day eventsNOV. 10 The Central Florida Chapter of the First Marine Division Association invites you to a special SOS breakfast at the Best Western Mt. Vernon Inn, 110 S. Orlando Ave., on Nov. 10, at 8:30 a.m. NOV. 11 To mark Veterans Day, the Winter Park Memorial Post 112, will host an Open House, from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m., on Friday, Nov. 11 at 4490 N Goldenrod Rd. Call 407671-6404 or visit WPFLPOST112. org On Friday, Nov. 11 at 11 a.m., Winter Park will present its inaugural Veterans Day Celebration in honor of all of the veterans of Winter Park at the Winter Park Community Center Ruby Ball Amphitheatre, 721 W. New England Ave. NOV. 12 Join Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer in honoring our local veterans during the city of Orlandos 2011 Veterans Day Parade on Saturday, Nov. 12, at 11 a.m. in downtown Orlando.NOV. 3The Kinneret Council on Aging will hold a health care expo from 1-4 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 3, in the Delaney Dining Room at Kinneret Apartments, 515 Delaney Ave. Contact Leslie at 407-425-4537 or lcollin@bellsouth. net The Les Grande Dames 2011 Fall Championships, featuring women ranging in age from 35 to 85 compet ing in singles and doubles tennis, is Nov. 3-6 at Winter Park Tennis Cen ter. NOV. 5The Alzheimers & Dementia Resource Center will host its 18th Annual Caregiver Conference, on Saturday, Nov. 5, at Winter Park Towers from 8:30-11:30 a.m. and 12:30-4 p.m. To register, contact 407-843-1910 ext. 301 or cindi@ADRCcares.org The Armand Marchesano Orchestra will play music for dancing from 7:30 p.m.-10 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 5 at the Beardall Center on Gore Street and Orange Avenue. Admission is $4. Call 407-246-2637.NOV. 7Fall Health and Wellness Clinic at Life Care Center Altamonte Springs, 989 Orienta Ave is 2 to 4 p.m. on Monday, Nov 7. Call 407-831-3446.NOV. 8Central Florida Guardianships Chapter Meeting is Tuesday, Nov. 8 at 12:30 p.m. at Savannah Court, 1301 W. Maitland Blvd. RSVP to 407645-3990 or email 5665mktg@hcrmanorcare.comNOV. 12The Center for Independent Livings Stroll N Roll will be held Satur day, Nov. 12, at 9 a.m. at Harbor Park on Lake Baldwin. Register online at CilOrlando.org.kintera.org/StrollNRollNOV. 17Counsel for Caregivers Seminar Series at the Orlando Public Library, Third Floor, Albertson Room, 101 E. Central Blvd, will be Nov. 17 from 12:10 to 12:50 p.m. RSVP to ofceonaging@oc.net or 407-836-7446.NOV. 24The Turkey Trot, a 5K run/power walk and Tot Trot to benet Seniors First, is Thursday, Nov. 24, at 8 a.m. Register online at TrackShack.comSenior Center eventsThe Maitland Senior Center is located at 345 S. Maitland Ave. Schedule is subject to change without notice. Call 407-539-6251 or visit ItsMyMaitland. com be closed Nov. 23 and 24 for the Thanksgiving holiday. Zumba will now be two days a week! Join Patricio every Tuesday and Friday in November at 11:15 a.m. for Zumba Gold. Cost of the class is $4 to the teacher. and Friday in November at 9 a.m. for Yoga. Cost of the class is $2 to the teacher. Knit & Crochet group every Monday in November at 10 a.m. ber at 1 p.m. for our conversational French group. Must be uent in French. vember at 9 a.m. for Tai Chi classes. Cost of the class is $2 to the teacher. ber for basic Italian lessons at 11 a.m. Lessons are free. ber at 1 p.m. for our conversational Spanish group. Must be uent. ber for recorder classes. Beginning classes are held at 12:30 p.m. and in termediate classes are held at 1 p.m. Cost of the class is $2 to the teacher. the Maitland Senior Center presents free counseling about Medicare, medigap, HMOs, Medicaid, prescrip tions drug plans and long-term care. Call 1-800-96 ELDER or visit Flori daShine.orgOrange County Commission On Aging Newsletter Open Enrollment for Medicare/ Medicaid is now. Call the Elder Hel pline by dialing -1-1 or 407-839HELP and ask for a Shine Counselor or visit Medicare.gov/open-enrollment. Open enrollment ends Dec. 7. Elder Conference Youre invited to a Aging with Grace conference at St. Lukes Methodist Church, 4851 S. Apopka-Vineland Road on Nov. 5, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. For info or to RSVP, contact Carol Crowley @ 407876-4991 ext 262.

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Page 18 Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011Winter Park / Maitland Observer Each year on Nov. 11, America ob serves Veterans Day and honors the men and women who have served in our nations Armed Forces. Many of our Vietnam-era veterans are now nearing retire ment age, or are already there. It is important they and other American service personnel know just what retirement ben Security as they make their future Like most of the civilian workforce, all current military person nel pay Social Security taxes and earn Social Security coverage. Earnings for active duty military service or active duty training have been covered under Social Security since 1957. Also, earnings for inactive duty service in the reserves (such as weekend drills) have had Social Security coverage since 1988. In addition to regular military pay, Social Security adds special earnings credits to an individuals Social Security record when he or she serves in the military. The ex tra earnings are for periods of ac tive duty or active duty training. If, for example, a person served in the military between 1957 and 1977, he or she has been credited with $300 in additional earnings for each calendar quarter in which active duty basic pay was earned. These extra earnings may help someone qualify for Social Security or increase the amount of the The number of credits an indi vidual needs to qualify for Social Security depends on his or her age depends on a persons earnings, averaged over a working lifetime. Generally, the higher a persons earnings, the higher his or her So And remember that Social Se curity is more than retirement. If a worker becomes disabled before reaching retirement age, he or she may be eligible for Social Secu workers spouse and dependent children also may be eligible for ow or widower and dependent children may be eligible for Social If you or someone you know were wounded while on active about what Social Security can do by visiting our website designed riors: www.socialsecurity.gov/ woundedwarriors. There, you commonly asked questions, as well as other useful information plemental Security Income. Veterans and others who are within 10 years of retirement age should begin planning for retire ment. A good place to start is with Social Securitys Retirement Esti mator at www.socialsecurity.gov/ estimator For more information, read our fact sheet, Military Service and Social Security, which is available on our website at www.socialsecurity.gov/pubs/10017.html Blanca Taylor is a Social Security Public Affairs Specialist. Lack of Desire or Low Energy? Testosterone Lab Work for $35 (a $240 Value) Call today for a risk-free appointment: 407-894-9959 ARcCHIVE PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERVeterans within 10 years of retirement age should begin planning now by visiting socialsecurity.gov/estimatorVeterans Day reminder: military service and social securityVeterans, wounded veterans and their family members may qualify for additional benets BlBLANCA T T AYlLOR Guest Writer

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Page 19 Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011Winter Park / Maitland Observer The number of homeless veterans doesnt seem to be getting any less. The latest homeless every night, with 135,000 needing to spend at least one night in a shelter. But the Department of Veterans Affairs is trying to help. Recently an additional $10 million was granted to 11 states to provide more services to homeless veterans. The money is going to the National Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem programs so they can continue to help mentally ill veterans, as well as homeless women veterans and others. This is on top of the nearly $60 million handed out this year. Some $3.4 billion has been earmarked for homeless programs. The VA also has launched a program to eliminate homelessness among veterans by 2015. Instead of limiting it to emergencyshelter services, its focusing on prevention itself, with employment and permanent housing as part of the long-term solution. To that end, the Department of Housing and Urban Development and VA Supported Housing has more than 20,000 housing units throughout the country designed for homeless veterans who need support ser vices. The housing is available via Section 8 housing vouchers, and veterans with families are included. Veterans have to meet certain criteria to be eligible for the vouchers, including physical disability, substance use or mental illness. Those accepted are required to take advantage of the support services and case management, but must be able to live independently on a daily basis. If you need emergency or permanent housing help, call 1-877-4243838. There are counselors available 24/7. You can call for yourself or for someone else who might need help. Theyll ask a few questions and will have information about programs in your area. You can also go online at www. va.gov/homeless Write to Freddy Groves in care of King Features Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 328536475, or send email to columnreply@ gmail.com 2011 King Features Synd. Inc. More money to help homeless veteransDo we really need to take vitamins? By Samantha MazzottaReusing Wood for FlooringQ:Ive been watching some home-improvement shows on television lately that advocate greenbuilding techniques, including reusing wood from other structures for a homes wood flooring,rather than buying new. What do you think about this trend,and how do I go about doing this? Larry in Tempe,Ariz.A:Recycled wood flooring is a good trend,in my opinion, because rather than chopping down live trees to supply the hardwood for your floor,wood from many types of disused structures or other sources of salvaged lumber can be remilled to give it a second life. There is some concern that the current stock of highquality salvaged wood will run out eventually,but no timetable has been given for that. Recycled hardwood is often of better quality than new hardwoods. Its been curing for many years,resulting in a tighter grain and more stability. Also, much of the current stock of recycled wood originally came from oldgrowth forests,most of which either no longer exist or are protected,and so youre getting high-quality denseness and stability that most new woods cant match. One thing it is not,however,is cheap. Recycled hardwood costs much more than new (Toolbase Services estimates that it runs about $5.75 to $11 per square foot,while new oak flooring runs about $3 per square foot). Recycled wood also must be installed by a professional. Despite the cost,recycled wood tends to be beautiful and durable and a nice conversation piece at parties. If youre interested in having it installed, many flooring contractors are able to procure and install recycled wood. You should check with more than one contractor,though,get estimates,and ideally work with someone who specializes in recycled wood-flooring installation. Send questions or home-repair tips to homeguru2000@hotmail.com,or write This Is a Hammer,c/o King Features Weekly Service,P.O. Box 536475,Orlando,FL 32853-6475.2009 King Features Synd.,Inc.All types of wood floors need the same type of care: Wipe up liquid spills immediately, dont use harsh cleaners or oil soaps,and sweep,dust mop or vacuum regularly to prevent grit from dulling the finish.Dogs Help Vets Cope With PTSDTheres new ammo in the hunt for a fix for post-traumatic stress disorder. For some veterans,the answers lie in dogs. But not just any dogs. Specially trained dogs are being given to some veterans suffering from PTSD,and in many cases,its working. When out in public,the dogspresence invites social conversation,yet they will place themselves physically between someone approaching and the veteran,who is likely to still be leery of contact. With the dogs,veterans find that theyre able to leave home without fear and can slowly transition to a more normal life. Many of the dogs are trained in prisons in the Puppies Behind Bars program,where they spend a year with specially trained prisoners [www.puppiesbehindbars.com]. To turn the tables a bit,a group called Paws for Purple Hearts [www.assistancedog.org] allows veterans with PTSD to become trainers for dogs that will assist veterans with physical disabilities. Run by Bergin University in California,the Paws program gives a needed sense of purpose to veterans with PTSD,as well as the grounding and self-worth that come from knowing theyre working to help someone else. In this case its a veteran with physical disabilities. For more information,call PPH at 707545-3647 ext. 28. Steps also are being taken to head PTSD off at the pass,again using dogs. Combat Stress Teams in Iraq and Afghanistan are shipped over with therapy dogs that quickly become popular with service personnel. The dogs serve,among other things,as icebreakers and stress relievers,inviting conversations that might otherwise not take place. For a real treat,do an Internet search for Boe and Budge,two therapy dogs that were sent to Iraq with a stress team. Write to Freddy Groves in care of King Features Weekly Service,P.O. Box 536475,Orlando,FL 328536475,or send e-mail to columnreply@gmail.com.2009 King Features Synd.,Inc. King Features Weekly ServiceMarch 2-8, 2009 Recent studies show that in some cases, vi tamins actually can be detrimental to our health instead of the other way around. One reason is that so many vitamins already are put in our food and drinks, its easy to get too much. research results. Here are some samples: Vitamin E, when taken in large doses, has been shown to cause a slightly higher risk of prostate cancer, but can lower the risk for Alzheimers disease. Low vitamin D is often seen in cancer patients. Senior women might have a slightly higher risk of dying if they take certain vi tamins and supplements. Iron can increase mortality, while calcium can reduce it. Vitamin B-12 might help with memory problems. Unfortunately, vitamins and supplements dont have to pass scrutiny in testing, so you might not be getting what the bottle says. It could be more, or less, or the contents could be contaminated. Dont self-diagnose. If you take vitamins and supplements, or are considering If you really need to know whats in your supplements, Consumer Lab (con sumerlab.com) does testing and issues re ports. It costs $33 per year for a subscription (call 888-5025100 instead of putting your credit card number on the purchase page). Theres also a free email newsletter that will tell you about warnings, recalls and reviews. To learn more about vitamins, go online (http://ods.od.nih.gov), which is part of the National Institutes of Health. On the right, look for the link to Tips for Older Supplement Users. Matilda Charles regrets that she cannot personally answer reader questions, but will incorporate them into her column whenever possible. Write to her in care of King Features Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475, or send email to columnreply@ gmail.com. 2011 King Features Synd. Inc. Nothing happened in a straight line for Jasper Jackie Smith, born in 1940 in Durham, N.C. When it came time to graduate from high school, he did so at St. Nicholas High School in Manhattan, N.Y., and soon thereafter enlisted in the Army, seeing his basic training in Fort Dix, N.J. His rst overseas deployment took him to the city of Ulm in Germany, where the U.S. armed forces were still in the process of reconstructing the city and industrial areas devastated by Allied bombing during WWII. Upon returning from Germany, Jasper enlisted in the New Jersey Police Academy in Bergen County, serving with distinction in the Englewood, N.J., police force during the next 28 years, serving the last 14 years as detective. In 1975, Jasper married his wife, Barbara, and they had one son, Jack. Smith says his career goal was to help people in the community to live under law and order and feel safe in their communities and in their homes. He recalls chasing the bad guys from New Jersey over the George Washington Bridge as far as Fort Apache in the Bronx in an effort to bring certain characters to justice, which he did many times over. Cindi Harris-Panning, executive director for Cornerstone Hospices Orange and Osceola region, indicates that many veterans and law enforcement ofcers experienced traumatic conditions that are present today, even several decades later These patients require specialized, individual needs not solely based on medical, emotional, physical, social and spiritual issues. Diagnosed with prostate cancer, Jasper is under the care of nonprot Cornerstone Hospice by his care team made up of Ann Harr, regional team manager; Fran Riggins, patient care supervisor; Sandy Mahan; Mari Fogue; home health aide Sonia Chen; social worker Mardi Weatherford-Mitchell and Chaplain Geren Baird. The Cornerstone Hospice unit is at the Winter Park Towers community by Lake Berry. Cornerstone Hospice patient, Army veteran served 28 years in New Jersey police force At the Cornerstone Hospice Inpatient Unit at Winter Park Towers, certied nursing assistant Adeline Dalexis comforts patient and U.S. Army veteran Jasper Jackie Smith, who is also a 28-year veteran of the Englewood, New Jersey police force. Smith also served as a Detective fourteen years.Cornerstone Hospice, a nonprot community-based health care organization, has provided since 1984 care and services to central Florida and Orange and Osceola patients and families experiencing life-limiting illnesses. To learn more, call 407-206-2273 or toll-free 1-800-679-6088 in Orange and Osceola counties. Also, please visit Cornerstone Hospice at www.cornerstonehospice.org Most Older People Have DiverticulosisDEAR DR. DONOHUE:I am a 78-year-old female,active and in good health or so I thought. I eat right and never smoked or drank alcohol. Yesterday,a colonoscopy showed severe diverticulosis. The doctor prescribed Benefiber,then left and never returned. I am stunned. What do I do now? Will I have this forever? Am I unhealthy? How does one develop diverticulosis? What the difference between osisand itis? S.K. ANSWER:Your world isnt collapsing. Youre healthy. Youll have diverticulosis forever. By age 60,half of the people in North America have it. By age 80,two-thirds have it. A diverticulum is a bulge of the inner colon lining through the colons muscular wall to its outer surface. A diverticulum looks like a small soap bubble. Its only 1/5 to 2/5 inches (0.5 to 1 cm) in diameter. You can thank our diet for diverticulosis. We refine flour and throw away its bran the outer coat of grain. In countries where whole grains (including the bran) are commonly used,diverticulosis is a rarity. Bran and other fiber hold water in undigested food. Without fiber,the food residue dries and becomes hard. The colon muscles have to generate a great deal of force to keep it moving. That force causes the colon lining to pop through the colon wall as a diverticulum. For most,diverticulosis is a silent condition that remains silent for life. For a few,the diverticulum breaks and causes a local infection in the colon diverticulitis. The pain of a diverticulitis attack is usually felt in the lower left corner of the abdomen, and sometimes people have fever and chills along with the pain. The attack is treated by resting the tract and by giving antibiotics. Were supposed to get 30 grams of fiber a day. Fruits (especially those with edible skins),many vegetables and whole-grain products are the source of dietary fiber. If people cannot get enough fiber in their diet,then commercial products like the one youre taking fill the gap. Metamucil, Perdiem,Citrucel and Fiberall are other examples. The booklet on diverticulosis explains the ins and outs of this very common disorder. To order a copy, write:Dr. Donohue No. 502W,Box 536475,Orlando,FL 32853-6475. Enclose a check or money order (no cash) for $4.75 U.S./$6 Canada with the recipients printed name and address. Please allow four weeks for delivery. *** DEAR DR. DONOHUE:My husband has chronic blepharitis and frequently develops hard buildups in both eyes that cause great discomfort. The doctor must remove them two times a month. What can be done to prevent them? S.R. ANSWER:Blepharitis (BLEF-uhRYE-tiss) is inflammation of the eyelid margins,which become red and crusty. The crust can build up into hard deposits. A twice-a-day program of lid cleansing might eliminate the crusts. Have your husband apply warm compresses (a wet washcloth) to closed lids for five to 10 minutes and then massage the lids. After the massage,he cleanses the lid margins with a cotton-tipped applicator dipped in a solution of one part baby shampoo and one part water. The doctor might have to prescribe an antibiotic ointment. *** Dr. Donohue regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but he will incorporate them in his column whenever possible. Readers may write him or request an order form of available health newsletters at P.O. Box 536475,Orlando,FL 328536475.2009 North America Synd.,Inc. All Rights ReservedHow Does Your Hospital Rate?It really DOES matter what hospital you go to when you need care. Your life could depend on it. So says the seventh annual study by HealthGrades. This is the same group that tracks doctors,hospitals and nursing homes and assigns a grade for the level of care. Its latest study reveals that your risk of death can be cut as much as 27 percent if you get your care at a Distinguished Hospital for Clinical Excellence.To get that designation,a hospital has to pass a long list of criteria. The HealthGrades Web site [www.healthgrades.com] lists by state all of the Distinguishedhospitals. You can search (for free) for grades on a given hospital for any of dozens of medical conditions. Look for Research Hospitals on the front screen of the Web site. Its when you want a full report on a hospital that you have to pay a fee. Youll also have to pay a fee to check out a specific doctor or nursing home it costs money for the report. A much easier way to check on a hospital or doctor is on the governments Health and Human Services website [www.hospitalcompare.hhs .gov]. The HHS layout lets you compare multiple hospitals,right on the same screen. The information is very comprehensive,too. For example,one question concerns the percent of surgery patients who were given an antibiotic at the right time,within one hour before surgery. This is a small detail maybe,but crucial to ones recovery. To find out if there is a Distinguishedhospital in your area,check the HealthGrades Web site and then search for details at the HHS site. Still,if youre facing a major medical issue,perhaps paying for the HealthGrades report would give you needed extra information. Matilda Charles regrets that she cannot personally answer reader questions,but will incorporate them into her column whenever possible. Write to her in care of King Features Weekly Service,P.O. Box 536475, Orlando,FL 32853-6475,or send email to columnreply@gmail.com.2009 King Features Synd.,Inc. King Features Weekly ServiceMarch 2-8, 2009 Plan your weekend with The Weekender!Visit wpmobserver.com and click "Subscribe to Newsletter"

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Page 20 Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011Winter Park / Maitland Observer 25 years Antique Sales experience Serving Winter Park and Maitland for 12 years Family owned and operatedPay Top Dollar for Gold and Silver items No Up-front or Out of Pocket expense on Estate saleSandbergEstateSales.com 321-299-4179 James 407-923-5013 MargeLicensed, InsuredSandberg Estate Sales American Family Funerals & Cremations Phone (407)339 0070 Serving all of Central Florida Family Owned and Operated Se habla Espaol Alan Trueba L.F.D. American Family Funerals & Cremations Phone (407)339 0070 Serving all of Central Florida Family Owned and Operated Se habla Espaol Alan Trueba L.F.D. Cremation Services, Shipping & Monuments. Traditional, Contemporary & Veteran Services at half the price of what others would charge PLEASE MARK YOUR RESPONSE HERE:Will you please review and respond as soon as possible? We are waiting for your approval. Please NOTE: this is NOT a second opportunity to design the ad. Redesign changes may result in additional charges. Thank you!1. Please circle A or B below: A: I approve this ad as shown here B: I approve this ad with changes as marked (How many changes are marked? _____)2. Please double check phone/address/names.Phone & address are correct (initials here) ________ With this signature, I signify my understanding that payment for this ad is due per Advertising Agreement.Signed ________________________________Since 1995(407) 366-8696 Fax (407) 359-2118 P.O. Box 4548 Winter Park, FL 32793FOR YOUR INFORMATIONThis ad will appear in these areas and months. ____Waterford Lakes__________________ ____College Park/Orlando______________ ____Winter Park/Maitland_______________ ____Sweetwater/Heathrow______________ ____Tuscawilla/Wntr Sprgs _____________ ____Oviedo__________________________ ____Baldwin/Winter Pk. East ____________X JUNE 2011 X JUNE 2011 A Better Plumber407-644-4000 X JUNE 2011 Casting Boys & Girls, ages 4-17 years old, all ethnicities! Drake Model & Talent Agency has Opportunities for young talent to be cast at both Disney & Universal Studios!!! Call today for an appointment!Drake Model & Talent 407-339-4570 NOW Casting for Kids! Paid Jobs Adversing Networks of Florida Statewide advertisingone low price BALLROOMAlabama, Georgia, Florida & South Carolina Online Bidding Available Many Selling Absolute! Nov. 14-17 & Nov. 21-22215 BankForeclosed Properties RowellAuctions.comRowell Realty & Auction Co., Inc. 10% Buyers PremiumAU 479, AB 296 800-323-8388For More Information HODGES BROTHERS INCROOFING & CONSTRUCTION

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Presented by: Hosted by: Sponsored by: Join the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce as we host our monthly breakfast update, featuring: Gary Sain President/CEO Visit Orlando Hear the latest on tourism in Central Florida and Winter Parks role in attracting visitors to our region. Friday, November 11, 2011 7:45 a.m. Networking/ 8:15 a.m. Program WINTER PARK WELCOME CENTER 151 W. Lyman Avenue, Winter Park, FL 32789 A complimentary continental breakfast will be served. The event is free and open to the public. For information, call the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce at (407) 644-8281 or visit www.winterpark.org.



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Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011 50+ tax wpmobserver.com BUS_CARD 3.25 x 2 August 2010Grafton Wealth ManagementWilliam D. Grafton III, Sarah Grafton DeVoe William D. Grafton IV Financial Advisors (407) 646-6725 400 Park Avenue South Suite 300 Winter Park, FL 32789 Merrill Lynch Wealth Management makes available products and services offered by Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated (MLPF&S) and other subsidiaries of Bank of America Corporation. MLPF&S is a registered broker-dealer, member SIPC. Investment products: 2010 Bank of America Corporation. All rights reserved. Are Not FDIC Insured Are Not Bank Guaranteed May Lose Value 407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC d USPS 00-6186 Publisher statement on page 4. Its time to give the indomitable Tars credit for playing football purely for the joy of playing Page 11 Photographic memories mental muscles in a Rollins pho tograph-as-language class. Page 13 Face-lift complete Lake Sybelias $11M renovation features digital boards and tools for the schools deaf program. Page 9 Page 8 Winter Parks greenest family approved a design at the Oct. 24 meeting. tive enough for the city, calling it a featuring a peacock on a threecolored background, and one more elaborate design featuring a build ing, arched brick window, peacock three, Leary said, the most elabo rate one dubbed design three best represented what the city had to offer. I think three communicates a lot more of what Winter Park is all It almost feels like were a Please see FLAG Page 2 City picks an ocial ag design Winter Park, Maitland put up seven cameras, plan six more ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff Red-light cameras multiply There are now seven intersections with red-light cameras in Winter Park and Maitland with plans to add six more. Maitland Boulevard at Keller Road is the most recent addition to the areas growing red-light camera lineup. Since going live Sept. 29, that camera issued more than 1,500 tickets, Maitland Police Lt. John Schardine said. That intersection and the three others in Mai tland Maitland Avenue and Marion Way, Horatio Avenue and Highway 17-92 and Lake Avenue and Highway 17-92 issued 2,400 tick ets in October, Schardine said. February on Howell Branch Road at Temple Trail and Temple Drive and have nabbed 2,278 viola tors to date. The citys third camera, which went live on Sept. 3 at Aloma Avenue and Lakemont Avenue, has issued 332 tickets, Winter Park Po On Wednesday, an electronic sign went up at Maitland Boulevard and Maitland Avenue to warn motorists that that a red-light camera will go live there later this month. The Florida Department of Transportation has green lit two other Maitland intersections for cameras Maitland Boulevard at Lake Destiny Drive and Maitland Boulevard at the Interstate 4 overpass. said of the I-4 location. In Winter Park, construction will start any Highway 17-92 at Orange Avenue, Fairbanks Av enue and Lee Road, King said. There was a backlog of red-light camera ap plications at FDOT after the Legislature passed the camera programs, Schardine said. That could few months. They had 100 or 200 (red-light camera) re There have been efforts in the Legislature to repeal the statute, which opponents say is uncon stitutional. So far, it has stood up to challenges in court, Schardine said. Winter Park has netted $104,536 since Febrary after paying its vendor, Gatso USA, and the state. Did you know? While a red-light ticket is a code violation, it turns into a criminal violation including points on the drivers license if its not paid within 30 days. In Maitland, you can legally turn right on red with out coming to a complete stop as long as youre going 16 mph or slower. Please see RED LIGHT Page 2 JENNY ANDREASSON Observer Staff Fashion furward PHO T OS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Dogs and their owners pulled out all the stops at the 12th Annual Pet Costume Contest on Oct. 30 at the Doggie Door on Park Avenue. At right is a scuba dog. SCAN HERE Use your smartphones Q R code reader app to view more photos or visit wpmobserver.com/ photos/galleries

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Page 2 Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Individual & Family health plans For an Instant Quote or to apply, visit our website www.HealthInsuranceIBS.com407-831-5166 New Construction!4 bed / 2.5 bath / 2190 sq ft $339,000 808 Hamilton Place Court Winter Park, FL 32789 Commerce Brokerage, LLC407-566-1636 lone peacock. I think were more than that. It looks like a zoologi a longtime teacher, had a quibble favored design that stretched the peacocks tail over a letter printed Every time I see something Sprinkel said. That little feather on top of the E bothers me. I would just like to see it not be on considered replacing the word established, though even that date seemed to be in question on I think were still debating whether we were established Bradley said. The thing I can guarantee is none of us were here en suggested removing the word Florida, but was then reminded that the city could be confused But theyre in the snow most printed within a few weeks, soon time in the citys history. FLAG | Commission talked about omitting Florida from flag C ONTINUED FR OM FR ONT PA GE RENDERING COURTESY OF WINTER PARK The winning design was criticized by a commissioner for being zoological. ing revenue is split between the vendor and the city. Maitland pays Gatso $9,200 per month to run its program. From January through June 30, Maitlands ticket revenue at Maitland Avenue and Marion Way was $117,394. Out of that, $61,669 went to the state; $53,716 went to the vendor; and $1,486 went to a law enforcementtraining fund. The city was left with $523 to add to its general fund. In the new budget year, which began Oct. 1, Maitland has pro jected it will bring in $1.3 million in red-light camera revenue. Safety rst about the revenue there were 10 accidents at Maitland Avenue and Marion Way in the two years leading up to the red-light cameras installation. Since January, theres been one accident, Schardine said. Bonus, who admits to being one of light camera, said the program is a win-win. I cant think of a better item that produces greater safety and sup RED LIGHT | Accidents decrease to one C ONTINUED FR OM FR ONT PA GE Locations Monitored intersections: Maitland A venue and Marion Way Horatio A venue and Highway 17-92 Lake A venue and Highway 17-92 Maitland Boulevard and Keller Road Howell Branch Road and T emple T rail Howell Branch Road and T emple Drive Aloma A venue and Lakemont A venue Future locations: Maitland Boulevard and Maitland A venue (November) Maitland Boulevard and Lake Destiny Drive Maitland Boulevard and Interstate 4 Orange A venue and Highway 17-92 Fairbanks A venue and Highway 17-92 Lee Road and Highway 17-92 Our photo contest winner PHO T O BY CLYDE MOORE The ILuvWinterP ark.com mascot greets a costumed child on Park Avenue. Visit wpmobserver to view all entries.

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Page 3 Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Khan Aga, an Afghan entrepreneur, visited Winter Park last week as a guest of Bajalia International as part of an entrepreneur ship program sponsored by the State De While in the U.S., he was visiting compa nies as an apprentice and visited Washing ton and New York as well as Winter Park. Before heading back to Afghanistan, he was founder of Bajalia, about his experience in Winter Park. Farah: What was your impression of the community of Winter Park? Aga: I thought this was going to be a with the beauty and all the green space and how warm and friendly everyone is. Farah: was your impression of it? Aga: I wish we could build a place like ture generations. Education is very impor families to go through 12 standard (grade). I am educating my children including my eration in our family to go to college. My dream would be for them to go to a place like this. Farah: What left the biggest impression on you here in Winter Park? Aga: To see my jewelry on display at Ba jalia. And to see it on TV on HSN, and to see that you actually have a bakery for dogs. I a bakery dedicated solely for dogs and that an economy can be so strong to afford such luxury. Our economy is not even strong enough to support our children and fami lies. Farah: What did you think of the train ing you received from your host company here in Winter Park? Aga: This training was most worthy. I learned things here that I can use to help me grow my business and create even more jobs in Afghanistan. In just two days spent at Bajalia, I learned as much as if I had spent a month in training. Bajalia and BPeace have helped me grow from eight people employed to 48, with that impact ing 288 people. And in Afghanistan and other countries for each job created, seven more are created so that is over 336 jobs. It was a dream to visit this company that is responsible for 50 percent of my business. My wife and I work together, and I think that it is OK for women to work and that men and women working together is good for the family and good for the future of our country. Farah: Would you like to come back and visit Winter Park? Aga: If I came back a thousand times it would not be enough. One of the things I loved about my visit at Bajalia was that it felt like a eastern store, and I felt very much at home, and seeing my wifes picture with our jewelry made me very happy. To learn more about the BPeace apprenticeship road trip (BART) visit Bpeace.org. To learn more about Bajalias work with global entrepreneurs, visit them at bajalia.com or at 520 S. Park Ave., where you will see the jewelry that Khan Aga and his wife, Bahktnazira, export to help change their world. 407-381-3335 $1000 off Cannot be used with any discounts, discount plans or HMOs. Offer expires 12/21/11Complimentary ExamIncluding Xray & PhotosWith this coupon. Not valid with other offers. Offer expires 12/21/11 Braces or Invisalign Yields and ratings as of 10/31/2011. Availability, quantities, ratings and prices for offerings are subject to change. Moodys, Moodys and rated AA by S&P. Katherine SmithFinancial Advisor 275 S. New York Ave Winter Park, FL 32789 407-622-8997 katherine.a.smith1@wellsfargo.comTax-Exempt Florida Municipal BondsRyan WyattFinancial Advisor 275 S. New York Ave Winter Park, FL 32789 407-622-8150 ryan.wyatt@wellsfargo.com 4.624% 7.114%Yield to Call Taxable Equivalent Yield 0811-1550 8/11 Afghan entrepreneur reects on Winter Park apprenticeship Aga

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Page 4 Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer USPS 00-6186 ISSN 1064-3613 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835-5705 Member of: Goldenrod Chamber of Commerce Publisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor. Submission does not guarantee publication. Columnists opinions are made independently of the newspaper. All rights reserved. Winter Park / Maitland Observer 2011 Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster P.O. Box 2426 Winter Park, FL 32790 Published Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011 CONTACTS Volume 23, Issue Number 44 PUBLISHER Kyle T aylor 407-563-7009 Jenny Andreasson 407-563-7026 Jonathan Gallagher 407-563-7054 Jenny Andreasson 407-563-7026 Isaac Babcock 407-563-7023 Ashley McBride Isaac Babcock Padrick Brewer Chris Jepson Louis Roney Josh Garrick T racy Craft 407-515-2605 Amanda Rayno 407-563-7073 INTERN Meisha Perrin obit@observernewspapers.com Mission: Fit Possible pital for Childrens Healthy 100 Kids, equips local schools and community organizations with proven childhood obesity prevention tools that get children excited about healthy living. Hundreds of kids from around Cen experience of the rst-of-its-kind in teractive program that will be launch ing in January 2012. Park Maitland School is a participant. New anti-scam site Maitland resident Bill Kahn has de veloped a public service website that informs people how they can protect themselves against being scammed or defrauded. The website, StopTh eScam.org, is an expanding Encyclo pedia that quickly identies crooks actions. New student University in Chicago. Donations up primary provider of essential school supplies and resources for students in need, has experienced some un 1,500 teachers and school person gust a 37 percent increase from critical learning tools have reached 55,000 deserving students so far this year. Call 407-318-3123 or visit T -shirt campaign for Africa Luxury Trips, a Winter Park-based luxury travel consultancy, brings you devoted to famine relief in Eastern the prot generated from shirt sales will go to long-term aid in the Horn T-shirt, stop by 190 E. Morse Blvd. or Get involved Interested in serving your communi ty? The city of Maitland has openings on the following volunteer boards: sonnel Board and the Transportation land resident to apply. Please contact maitland.com or 407-539-6219 for information. Send bulletin submissions to editor@ observernewspapers.com Business Briefs Community Bulletin Acupuncture, herbal therapy, cupping, moxibustion, electrical stimulation, Tongue/Pulse DiagnosisSpecialize in treating pain management and stress407-429-1066spectrumwellcare@gmail.com1298 Minnesota Ave. Suite A Winter Park 25% off your rst visit with this ad! All proceeds help support the National Lung Cancer Partnerships vital research, education and awareness programs. For more information or to register, donate, sponsor or volunteer, please visit www.FreeToBreathe.org.1st Annual Free to Breathe 5K Fun Run/Walk and 1 Mile WalkWHEN: Saturday, Nov. 19 7 a.m. Event-day registration opens 8:30 a.m. Welcome, 5K Fun Run/Walk begins (1-mile walk begins after the 5K) WHERE: Moss Park 12901 Moss Park Road, Orlando, FL 32832 WHAT: to Breathe Orlando 5K Fun Run/Walk and 1 Mile Walk, a fun event for the entire family that brings the community together to inspire hope and create change for everyone impacted by lung cancer. The Rollins MBA at the Crummer Graduate School of Business is included in the Princeton Reviews for 2012. Ride Green Scooters been named the exclusive area dealer for battery-powered TNT E Scooters designed and manufactured by Top Notch Technology Inc. of Ligonier, Ind. Fannie Hillman + Associates posted 93 existing home closings for $32.3 million in the third quarter, giving the Winter Park rm seven consecutive quarters in which transactions and sales volume have been up over com parable periods in previous years. pointed Margaret Pegi Brock, of Keller Williams Heritage Realty, to ll a vacancy on the board. Bobby Kuykendall, executive vice president of Kuykendall Gardner, a Winter Park-based insurance bro kerage rm, was recently appointed ident Nicholas Carbone was recently hired as vice president of transaction al risk for Kuykendall Gardner. Shaw Mechanical Services LLC systems in a 30,000-square-foot building being renovated and a 49,000-square-foot new building at ange County. Ronald Lowry, Cuhaci & Peterson Architects, based in Baldwin Park, recently com pleted the design of ve residential handicap ramps valued at $25,000 for the Center for Independent Living SIKON Construction, Maitland, was a proud tion for those diagnosed with Spinal Second in the nation Winter Park resident Bonnie Jacksons ranked adult tennis league, earning the chance to compete this past weekend Lori Weisberg, Bonnie Jackson, Sharon Sandra Ruark Visit us on the web WPMObserver.com

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Page 5 Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer The Wildcats are back in the win column and coming home for a district showdown against Tim Winter Park (4-4, 2-1) nipped winning 19-14 in a defensive showdown. But it took a big comeback to get there after the Wildcats entered the fourth quar ter trailing 14-13 in a game that saw both teams attempt wild twopoint conversions after nearly ev ery touchdown. minutes of the game by Wildcats quarterback Asiantii Woulard put them ahead until the end, hand ing them their second district win of the season. Now the Wildcats meet one of their toughest rivals in Timber unbeatable against district op ponents so far. In eight games, the Wolves have amassed a mas sive 231-124 scoring differential against their opponents, includ ing a 49-20 blowout against Uni versity on Oct. 27. Their game Nov. 4. Eagles soar The Eagles shocked football pow erhouse Apopka with a 35-29 win on Oct. 27. The Eagles actually before Apopka came back to tie it just before the end of regulation. Then in overtime Eagles power house running back Jon Altman ran for the winning touchdown, capping off a 182-yard ground game for Altman. Quarterback J.B. Woodmans Darter defense, with Woodman only throwing for 32 yards. Allpurpose back Alton Howard threw for 77 yards in the game, ran for 80 and caught two passes for 14 yards. Meanwhile the Edgewater defense sacked the Darters three the game. Now Edgewater (5-2, 2-1) is set of the season hosting Lake How winning streak since 2007. The p.m. Nov. 4. JV Blanks Colonial For the second consecutive game, the Winter Park JV football team put together a strong defensive effort and generated a dual-threat running and passing attack to 35-0 at Showalter Field. It was the Wildcats fourth shutout of the seven games. Were really clicking right is averaging 28.5 points per game in its last four and only allowing an average of 5.3 points per game for the season. The defense picked off two man linebacker Johnny Evans and another by nose tackle Dan iel Tommey, which he returned 20 yards for a touchdown. Running back Travis Jones scored on runs of eight and 10 yards, and quar of touchdowns, one of 40 yards to freshman wide receiver Gavin of the season, and another of 10 yards to wide receiver/tight end eight of them to Stutts. with a 7 p.m. game at Evans on Thursday, Nov. 3. FLORIDA RECEIVES D ON 2011 MARCH OF DIMES PREMATURE BIRTH REPORT CARDNovember 17 is First-Ever World Prematurity DayFlorida received a D on the March of Dimes 2011 Premature Birth Report Card, but the biggest news is the three-year, improving trend in its preterm birth rate. Our states preterm birth rate has improved this year. Were proud of this achievement and what we accomplished by working together with our partners for stronger, healthier babies, said Julie Samples, ARNP, MSN, March of Dimes Florida Chapter Program Services Committee Chair. We are determined to continue to nd and implement solutions to improve the health of babies, such as improving access to health care coverage, helping women quit smoking, and preventing unnecessary early c-sections, so more babies can get a healthy start in life. Factors that contribute to preterm birth improved in Florida. It earned a star for: Reducing the percentage of women of childbearing age who smoke Lowering the late preterm birth rate Since 2006, Floridas preterm birth rate has dropped to 13.5 percent. The rate of late preterm births is 9.6 percent; the rate of women smoking is 17.3 percent, and the rate of uninsured women is 28.5 percent. Quality improvement programs are key to lowering preterm birth rates, according to the March of Dimes. In Florida, March of Dimes supports programs that provide information and support to families with babies in a neonatal intensive care unit. We have grant-funded programs in Hillsborough and Duval Counties that provide education and support to women who have had a stillbirth, infant death, or who have had a baby in a NICU, to help them reduce their risks for future pregnancies. And we have the Healthy Babies are Worth the Wait campaign, which is working to prevent non-medically indicated deliveries before 39 weeks of pregnancy. A normal pregnancy lasts 40 weeks, but in recent years it has become more common to schedule deliveries early at 37 or 38 weeks. The United States received a C on the March of Dimes Report Card. Grades are based on comparing the state and the nations 2009 preliminary preterm birth rates with the March of Dimes 2020 goal of 9.6 percent of all live births. The U.S. preterm birth rate is 12.2 percent down nearly 5 percent from the peak of 12.8 percent in 2006. Preterm birth, birth before 37 weeks completed gestation, is a serious health problem that costs the United States more than $26 billion annually, according to the Institute of Medicine. It is the leading cause of newborn death, and babies who survive an early birth often face the risk of lifetime health challenges, such as breathing problems, cerebral palsy, intellectual disabilities and others. Even babies born just a few weeks early have higher rates of hospitalization and illness than full-term infants. At least 39 weeks of pregnancy are critical to a babys health because many important organs, including the brain, are not completely developed until then. The March of Dimes says its 2020 preterm birth goal can be achieved by a combination of activities: giving all women of childbearing age access to health care coverage, fully implementing proven interventions to reduce the risk of an early birth, such as not smoking during pregnancy, getting preconception and early prenatal care, progesterone treatments for women who are medically eligible, avoiding multiples from fertility treatments, avoiding elective c-sections and inductions before 39 weeks of pregnancy, and by funding new research on prevention of preterm birth. This year, for the rst time, a World Prematurity Day will be observed on November 17 by the March of Dimes along with organizations in Africa, Europe, and Australia. An estimated 13 million babies are born preterm and of those one million die as a result of their early birth, according to an October 2009 March of Dimes report on the global toll of preterm birth. For more information, visit www.facebook.com/worldprematurityday. The March of Dimes is the leading nonprot organization for pregnancy and baby health. With chapters nationwide, the March of Dimes works to improve the health of babies by preventing birth defects, premature birth and infant mortality. For the latest resources and information, visit marchofdimes.com/orida or nacersano.org. Find us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter. Alabama Oaks offers the highest quality affordable care in the most beautiful Winter Park home-setting. Call us for a personal tour or for more information 407-434-9654 PHO T O BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER After losing two games, the Wildcats beat Colonial High on the road. Wildcats ght Wolves Nov. 4 ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff grave, but the team only needed two weeks to prepare before playing its second game. The Tars will return to the gridiron again Saturday, The Tars will be looking to build excitement even after a 48-17 loss 2,500, easily eclipsing quarterback Jeff Hoblicks hope of 2,000. look for some more. Winter Parks Showalter Field to Memorial Stadium at Orlandos Tars Game 2 is Nov. 5 ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff

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Page 6 Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer CRA Board Meeting meeting on Monday, Nov. 14, at Nov. 14 City Commission meeting topics of interest meeting immediately following located at 401 Park Ave. S. Below Mayors report Keep Winter Park Beautiful scape improvements and Azalea Lane Volunteer Project. Proclamation National Hos Recognition of the Winter Park High Schools 500th football victory Presentation of Winter 2011 Webisode produced in partner ship with Full Sails SPARK pro gram Appointment of Martin Lu ther King Jr. task force members Board Non-action items Financial Report Septem ber 2011 Consent agenda Approve the minutes of Oct. 24. Approve piggybacking the Florida Bearings Inc. for repair of electric motors and pumps, and authorize the mayor to execute the piggyback contract as recommended by the ethics board. holiday. Approve the On-site Energy Audit Services Program Master Agreement with Progress Energy Florida (PEF) and authorize the mayor to execute the agreement. Action items requiring discussion Discussion of Today in Public hearings ter Park to revise the public notice requirements for citywide notices to streamline the zoning approval o Second reading of the ordi nance revising the application and approval procedures for zon ing amendments and conditional uses, revising the submittal re quirements for conditional uses, and the extension or re-establish ment of conditional uses o Second reading of the ordi nance adopting new public no tice and adoption procedures for amendments to the comprehen sive plan, goals, objectives and policies document and substitut ing for the current amendment procedures Request of Bank First Realty proval to construct a McDonalds Restaurant with a drive-thru ser vice at 1282/1288/1302 West Fair banks Ave. and 1281/1289/1301 Request of Surrey Homes to modify the Development Agree ment for Windsong. QUASI JUDI Equalization Board Hearings Dixie Parkway and Williams o Resolution Declaring that the city is to fund capital improve ments to underground electric/ Parkway and Williams Drive and declaring that the cost be paid by special assessments levied against ted by said improvements. special assessments for the un (BHN) facilities on properties ad jacent to Dixie Parkway and Wil liams Drive. building exchange agreement First reading of the ordinance regarding the exchange agreement City Commission reports Mayor Bradley full agenda and information on www.cityofwinterpark.org and Last CoffeeT alk If you have a latte beans to grind or simply want to espresso your sioner Tom McMacken for the last day, Nov. 10, from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. ter located at 151 W. Lyman Ave. This is your opportunity to talk to your city leaders in a more ca sual, informal environment. Special thanks to our coffee provider Palmanos Roastery & Espresso Bar. Left over Halloween candy? If you have too much candy, dont forget about Operation Gratitude. You can drop off candy and letters of appreciation for our American service men and women who are currently deployed in the hostile and remote regions of Iraq and Afghanistan. Items are accepted between now and Saturday, Nov. 12. For more information, please call 407-454-0878, email opgrati tudeorlando@gmail.com or visit www.operationgratitude.com us on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter. Over the years, even though Mai tlands demographics have been very attractive to new develop ment and redevelopment, many developers have avoided doing projects in our city. The ones who have built projects in Maitland found it a real challenge getting their projects approved. This is largely due to the expensive and time-consuming permitting pro cess that had been in place. With the decline of the economy the last few years, our city can no longer afford to continue doing business that way. The economic downturn has caused a substantial decrease in our property values as well as our ability to collect various state and local fees. All of this translates into a major reduction in our citys tax revenues. have been working hard to offset this loss of tax revenue wherever possible by reducing overhead, and applying for federal, state and local grants. However, these alone will not be enough to make up for our tax revenue loss. In ad dition, we need to increase our tax base. This is, by far, the best and most substantial way to offset our declining tax revenues. To accomplish this, Maitland has created a positive open for quality development to our city by making our permitting process developers. The basic key princi ples that we have implemented to make our permitting process more staff when reviewing new and re development projects in our city. project review team that will provide initial project feedback and promote an upfront positive working relationship between city staff and the developer. ing the permit approval process. to the developer for project ap proval by providing different op tions depending on the type and size of the development. lines for project approvals. After project approval, mini mize the steps and time for project amendments and/or revisions. This will afford the following for development. development by saving the devel oper time and money. needed (temporary and perma nent). base, therefore increasing our tax revenues. In addition, along with the re vision of our land development code that is presently in process, it will improve the quality of our community by developing and/ or redeveloping the areas of our city that have been in decline, es pecially our downtown area. With the continued cost saving city staff and the commitment to attract new quality development to our community, in part by streamlining our permitting pro cess and promoting an open for reduce the future prospect of ei ther having to raise taxes or cut services. Neither of those alterna tives is acceptable. We must con tinue to move forward and make every effort to improve the quality of life in our city as well as contin ue the high quality of services that our citizens have come to expect and deserve. Attracting new qual ity development to increase our tax base and, therefore, our tax revenues, is a major step forward to achieving those goals. Nov. 14 meeting is scheduled to be held Monday, Nov. 14. For more information, visit www.itsmymaitland.com Streamline permitting Maitland City Talk BY HOW ARD SCHIEFERDECKER MAYOR Winter Park City Talk BY RANDY KNIGHT CITY MANAGER Effective October 13, 2011 Michelle Dolske, PhD, Charles Lammers, PhD, Jodi Nadler, PhD, Anthony Logalbo, PhD, Michael Westerveld, PhD and Benjamin Johnson-Markve, PsyD are moving their practice, Medical Psychology Associates, from their current location to: 1685 Lee Rd., Suite 200 Winter Park, Fl 32789 Patient medical records will be maintained at the Telephone and fax numbers for the practice will remain the same. at 407.303.7991.NOTICE TO PATIENTS www.gulfstatescu.org 407-831-8844

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Page 7 Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer THURSDAY Fac es of Hunger program on Nov. 3 Concourse Parkway S. in Maitland at The Harriett Lake Festival of New Plays is running Nov. 3-6 at the John and Rita Lowndes Shakespeare Cen Spice Up Y our Culinary Skills The cost is $25 and it will be Nov. 3, at 6:30 p.m. Register online at The Orange County Retired Educa tors Association will meet Thursday, Nov. 3, at 10 a.m. at College Park United Methodist Church. FRIDAY Friday Nights at the Morse is free MorseMuseum.org for details. The groundbreaking ceremony of mony will take place at the southeast corner of South Interlachen and East New England avenues. The Breakthrough Theatre of Winter Park presents, Nobody Likes Y ou When Y oure 23 a cabaret per Gillette. Performances are Nov. 4 at 7 and 11 p.m. Tickets are $10. Call 407-920-4034. The Winter Park Institute at Rollins College welcomes author and histo tation on History and the Love of Learning SATURDAY The 33rd Annual Goldenrod Festival & Parade is Saturday, Nov. 5. The fes tivities will begin at 7 a.m. with a pan cake breakfast hosted by the Winter Park Elks Lodge, Post 1830. The pa rade will begin at 11 a.m. eastbound Rollins Football vs. Clemson Club is Saturday, Nov. 5 at 2 p.m. at Memo rial Stadium at Bishop Moore Catholic High School. The rst Clean the World Gala will 5 from 6:30 p.m. to 11 p.m. Individual Festival Under the T rees Arts & Crafts Show is Nov. 5 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Episcopal Church of the Resurrection, 251 E. Lake Brant org SUNDAY The Womans Club of Winter Parks Fall Antiques Show and Sale is Sat urday, Nov. 5, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday, Nov. 6, from 11 a.m. to Winter Park. Kristallnacht Community Remem brance Event on Sunday, Nov. 6 at 2 p.m. at the Jewish Community Center. The Central Florida Watercolor So ciety will hold its next monthly meet ing on Sunday, Nov. 6, at 1:30 p.m. at The 10th annual Winter Park Con cours dElegance is Sunday, Nov. 6. ture high-end classic and exotic au com Gardener extraordinaire T om Mac Cubbin Historical Rose Society meeting on Sunday, Nov. 6 at Harry P. Leu Gar MONDAY Learn how to line dance on Monday, Nov. 7, at 7 p.m. at the University Club of Winter Park. Cost is $5 to the instructor. Call 407-644-6149 or visit UniversityClubWinterPark.org Winter Park Executive Women hosts Lead Y ourself First In Order to Lead Others at the Winter Park Wel come Center on Monday, Nov. 7, at 644-8281 or visit WinterPark.org TUESDAY Qualifying for Winter Park mayor more election information, visit Cit Join us for a Diabetes A wareness and Prevention event on Tuesday, Nov. 8, at 6 p.m. at the StillWaters Healing Center, 260 Lookout Place Suite 209, Maitland. Call 407-7729243. WEDNESDAY Central Florida Landscaping has an event at 10 a.m. Nov. 9 at the Winter NOV. 10 Gardens, James Zach Zacharias senior curator of education and history hotmail.com or 321-948-3994. Broadway veterans Brian & Melissa Minyard with pianist Chris Leavy, will perform in the Winter Park Playhouse Spotlight Cabaret Series Thursday, visit WinterParkPlayhouse.org The Signature Chefs Auction ben day, Nov. 10, at Rosen Shingle Creek CoffeeT alk featuring Commissioner Tom McMacken is Nov. 10 at 6 p.m. at the Winter Park Welcome Center. Visit wpmobserver.com/events for more details. Send submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com Calendar 250 North Orlando Avenue Winter Park, Florida 32789 407.677.9777 A Premier Flooring Source nCARPETOODTONE TILELAMINATE AREA RUGINDO TREATMENT Featuring Exquisite Products for Residential & Commercial Projects Custom Design and Quality Installationn Professional Pet Sitting, Dog Walking and Pet Taxi F Orlando Pet Connections oers a variety of custom pet care and sitting services. Our specialties include: www.OrlandoPetSitting.com info@OrlandoPetSitting.com Friday Nights at the Morse resume Nov. 4

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Page 8 Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Lifestyles From the inside out, every de sign element of Rob and Denise Smiths Winter Park home serves a purpose. Outside, from the materials used for their driveway, to the greenery planted around it and the cars parked on it, and inside, from the basic structure of the walls, to said every detail has been care fully planned with sustainability and functionality in mind. Theres a story behind every The stone on the driveway was repurposed from materials of the house that previously stood on the property, the drywall was recycled from a manufacturer in Tampa, and the decorative pond outside doubles as a rainwater re tention area for use of irrigation. Even the couples old yellow Lab rador retriever, Yeller, has his own tale. so we joke that hes our recycled When bound together, ele ments of these stories and details combined to make the Smiths ship in Energy and Environmen 2009. Rob, a green builder, and Denise, a landscape architect, are known for keeping the environ ment and sustainable practices in mind in both their personal and professional lives. Last month, the pair was honored with a Keep Winter Park Beautiful Award by the city for their ongoing green ef forts in the community. KWPB Executive Director Tim Maslow said the Smiths are doing a great job of leading by example as to how other citizens, and the city, can incorporate sustainable, environmentally conscious efforts into their home and work. Theyre doing at the home level what were trying to do Were hoping more residents and Home sweet home Parked in the couples repurposed driveway are a pair of hybrid ve hicles. I think Im probably the only builder who doesnt drive a his compact Toyota Prius. On the back of each of their cars are bumper stickers representing man for Rob, woman for Denise, toddler for their son, Elliott, baby for their one on the way, a dog for Yeller, and a bee for the eight hives they host on their roof. The pair tends to the hives and harvests honey a few times a year. They also grow bananas, key limes, rosemary and thyme from their rooftop garden. It all plays into the sustainability factor of their home, Denise said. By growing your own food, youre making yourself more sus tainable while also helping to limit your impact on the world around Through the plotted-out land scaping around the home, using native plants and less sod, Denise said the mass planting method she used to design the greenery helps conserve water and prevent weeds. She and Rob estimate that while the average Winter Park home owner uses well more than 10,000 gallons of water outside their home per month, they have gotten their usage down to less than 5,000 gallons, which saves not only water, but money. Our idea is to integrate green ideas and practices into buildings and present them to people as a I like to call it high-performance Beauty in business Smith is taking his high-perfor mance building to the next level scale project to date a zero-net energy home just a few streets over from his own home in Win ter Park. The home, when completed by E2 Homes, will harvest enough of its own energy via solar panels that it will be able to operate in dependent of the energy grid, he said. This is a really exciting proj pond to a 7,000-gallon rainwater cistern and drought tolerant land scaping, he said this will be his most sustainable and high-per forming construction yet. Visit wpmobserver.com to learn about green initiatives by Phil Kean, Roll ins College and Winter Park. Effective October 17, 2011 Sheila Baez-Torres, MD will be moving her practice, Neurology & Movement Disorders Assoc., from their current location to: 1685 Lee Road, Suite 210 Winter Park, FL 32789 Patient medical records will be If you have any questions, please NOTICE TO PATIENTS Visit our webpage for more info!www.NRG-DanceStudios.weebly.com Dancers Ages 2 & Up!Ballet, Tap, Jazz, Lyrical, Modern, Hip-hop, & Expressive Dance Location: Winter Park Community Center721 West New England Ave. Winter Park, FL 32789 FREE NRG-Dance Studios T-shirt and NO registration fee for the first 75 dancers to enroll! Where students transform into dancers!Meet the owner Nichole Genchi ...B.A. Dance from FIU Over 10 Years Teaching Former Miami Dolphins Cheerleader (NFL) & Panthers Ice Dancer (NHL) 1st Dance Class FREENow Enrolling!Call: (407)519-0477 PHO T OS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Rob and Denise Smith pose with their son, Elliott at their Winter Park home, which was recognized as the rst LEED-certied residential property in Central Florida is 2009. The couple won a KWPB award. Living green SARAH WILSON Observer Staff Learn more For more information about Rob and Denise Smiths high-performanceliving work, visit www.e2homes. com and www.4egc.com. T o keep updated on the city of Winter Parks ongoing sustainability efforts, visit www.winterparkgreenbutton.org

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Page 9 Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Family Calendar PICTURE A HEALTHIER YOUAt the Y, we are focused on improving the health and well-being of our community. Thats why we are devoted to you. Join the Y and register for our GET MOVING program by November 15th and well invest up to $200 toward your journey to a healthy lifestyle. For more information, contact:Start your journey to a healthy lifestyle. October 15 November 15, 2011WINTER PARK YMCA 1201 N. Lakemont Ave, Winter Park, FL 32792 | 407 644 1509 Visit ymcacentralflorida.com In the spirit of Halloween, the students in Maria Avilas fourthgrade class at Lake Sybelia El ementary School spent much of Fridays class gutting pumpkins in their upstairs classroom. Two years ago, they were carv ing pumpkins in portables behind the school. Now, after an almost $11 mil lion renovation project, the ground where those portables once stood reveals a restored basketball court Two years after breaking ground, the elementary school now boasts a 25,000-square-foot addition to its 43-year-old, twostory building that includes major technological advances and spac es dedicated to the advancement of their unique program for deaf and partially deaf students. Our biggest upgrade was technology, Principal Julie Para dise said. Going high tech High-tech interactive boards have taken over for old-fashioned dryerase boards in every classroom. We kindergarten teachers were dragged kicking and scream ing saying we dont need that, kindergarten teacher Kathie Olsen said. And now we cant go a day without it. These boards are comparable in size to dry erase boards but project the teachers computer screen and have touch-screen features that re quire only a pen to work. The classrooms new dot cams, another projection technology that makes overhead projectors a thing of the past, are exciting in terms of classroom management, Olsen said, as they can project any item onto the interactive board so that the children can see it from anywhere in the classroom. The interactive boards also double as televisions, playing the morning announcements, and come with microphones that the teachers wear around their necks on a lanyard and they are creat ing quite the buzz at the elemen tary school. You wonder how we ever lived without those, music teach er Cathy Kies said. Weve gotten so used to it. Advancing deaf program In addition to the interactive board and dot cams, Lake Sybelias pro gram for deaf and partially deaf students, the only one of its kind in Orange County, also received technological updates that will push the total-communication program forward. The school received two ob servation rooms where interns, students and potential teachers can watch the teachers without interrupting the classroom as they communicate verbally and through sign language with the students. All of our teachers are won derful, Paradise said. But what those teachers do for the students is really amazing. The 25,000-square-foot addi tion has also provided the pro gram with an audiology booth that rids the school of the need to transport the students elsewhere for testing, saving more time for the 42 deaf and partially deaf stu dents to learn how to communi cate. Its supposed to be the latest and the greatest, Paradise said, which they deserve. Already overowing Lake Sybelia also gained a media center with a story room and com puter lab, a patio and a revamped kindergarten playground deco rated with engineered mulch on which students in wheelchairs can maneuver freely. Despite the new additions, Lake Sybelia Elementary has al ready outgrown itself, and Para dise is seeking to bring back two portables to house the speech and language students who are in the conference room and the music class that practices in the new up stairs computer lab. how to make it work, Paradise said. And I thank goodness the teachers here are usually very Still, spirits are high at Lake the lines of children waving their from one part of the renovated building to another. It is the best place to come to work every day, Paradise said. PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Lake Sybelia teacher Kathy Tindal communicates via sign language to one of the schools 42 deaf or partially deaf students. Lake Sybelia gets $11M renovation Additions include interactive boards, audiology booth for deaf program MEISHA PERRIN Observer Staff Learn more Visit www.lakesybelia.ocps.net for more information on the renova tions or the deaf and hard of hearing program. Popcorn Flicks in Central Park featuring National Velvet is 7 p.m.-9 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 3, in Central Park in downtown Win ter Park. Its presented by Winter Park and Enzian Theater to coin cide with Orange Countys annual Week of the Family. Rain date will be Nov. 17. Contact 407-6290054 or visit Enzian.org Movie in the Park featuring Mr. Poppers Penguins is 7 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 5, at Quinn Strong Park in Maitland. Bring your blan kets and chairs and the city will bring you the stars. Visit ItsmyMai tland.com for more information. Ripleys Believe It or Not! is launching a campaign to combat hunger in all the cities where it has Believe It or Not! Odditori ums. Ripleys Gimme Five Food Drive will take place from Sunday, Nov. 6, through Thursday, Nov. 10. Guests who bring a donation of ve non-perishable food items can get a ticket to Ripleys Believe It or Not! Orlando Odditorium for just $5 (regular adult ticket price is $19.99). All the food collected will go to the Second Harvest Food Bank of Central Florida. Orlando Fashion Square wel comes back Santa Claus for vis its and pictures with children this holiday season starting at 7 p.m. Friday, Nov. 11. Santa photos will be taken daily through Dec. 24. Also, Fido and Fluffy can sit with St. Nick on Pet Nights, from 6 to 8 p.m. Mondays from Nov. 14 through Dec. 19. The historic Annie Russell Theatre, which is celebrating its 79th Sea son, presents Little Shop of Hor rors from Nov. 11 19 with both evening and matinee performance times. Cost is $20, $10 for stu dents with ID. Call 407-646-2145 or visit Rollins.edu/annierussell Winter Park Sports Hall of Fame induction ceremony is Satur day, Nov. 12, at the Winter Park Community Center. Cocktail hour begins at 5:30 p.m. followed by dinner, catered by Johnny Rouses JRs BBQ, and the induction cere mony. Contact jmiller@cityofwin terpark.org for more information. Movie in the Park featuring Tan gled is 6 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 12, at Quinn Strong Park in Maitland. Bring your blankets and chairs and the city will bring you the stars. Visit ItsmyMaitland.com for more information. The Maitland Public Library has bedtime stories for all ages at 6 p.m. every Monday. Preschool story time is 10:30 a.m. every Tuesday. Infant and toddler story time is at 10:30 a.m. every Thurs day. Call 407-647-7700 for more information. Send submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com

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Page 10 Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Opinion/ Editorial Who would think that poking a few bean seeds into the dirt could preserve many of our constitutional freedoms? The process of growing our own food and pulling our hard-earned dollars out of the commercial/industrial food production conglomerate could be considered one of the most powerful political statements any individual can make. Since everyone has to eat every day, our sustainable gardening efforts grow a healthier existence for each of us now and for future generations. Recognizing that we are in the midst of historic political, cultural and environmen tal changes is half the battle. Remember in the 1960s when smoking marijuana was considered a political statement? The culture of the hippies brought the aware ness of weed into the mainstream, but then the disco culture merely added cannabis to its list of distractions. With the wave of economic refugees and homesteaders dur ing the recession of the mid-1970s grow ing their own, frugality became the norm. Next came the big money smugglers and cartels to ruin it all. Think of the mayhem that could be avoided by legalizing victim less crimes and taxing their maintenance taken by George Washington were to collect excise taxes on whiskey.) Oops, I advocated the t-word. I consider that many in the U.S. Con gress receiving agricultural subsidy mon eys for which they vote be seen as a con 2012 is on hold while the super-committee their budget. Then both houses plan to fast-track one of most important pieces of legislation. I can only surmise that few sustainable agricultural laws will survive this cantankerous process. change are spun to a political advantage. Al Gores inconvenient truths are just the tip of a melting iceberg. Coalescing statistical trends to conduct populist polls goes far beyond a scientist doing hard research. Special interests that buy a study a larger trend, but heat islands in cities do not deny the fact that polar ice caps will melt in my lifetime. Keeping the lid on a pot of boiling frogs because corpora campaigns will only push the problems to disastrous extremes. All Im saying is to level the playing centage of the electorate, our voice must be heard through other methods. Occupy your garden, grow some of your own food and be aware, be very aware! Occupy my garden For the third year in a row, I am devoting much of my spare time (and a lot of my not-so-spare time) working for a project called Operation Gratitude. Operation seeks to lift morale and put smiles on U.S. soldiers faces by sending them care packages overseas. Operation Gratitude packages contain food, hygiene products, entertainment items, candy and personal letters of appreciation, all wrapped with good wishes of love and support. I originally heard about Operation Gratitude through a dentist who was asking children in his practice to donate the candy they collected at Halloween (or any extra candy that they didnt give out to trick-or-treaters) rather than eating it. When I learned that he wasnt just collecting the candy to save his patients teeth from too many sweets, but rather to send to U.S. troops, I decided to learn more, and ultimately started my own col lection process. As it turns out, the soldiers love get ting the care packages who wouldnt love a package from home when one is living in constant danger in places such as Iraq and Afghanistan? And reading a letter of appreciation from a U.S. citizen, usually a schoolchild, can really help keep up spirits, especially after a day of the troops not only get a sweet treat from back home, but they sometimes use the candy to barter with village children for information about hidden improvised explosive devices or the location of en emy troops. Its hard to believe, but many soldiers lives have been saved by a bag of M&Ms or a chocolate bar. For the past two years, I have col year, 2009, I collected exactly 911 pounds of candy. The coincidence of /11 was hard to ignore. My second year, 2010, I collected more than 4,300 pounds of candy, and I am hoping to collect more than 5,000 pounds this year. I dont have any family members in the military (although my grandfather served in the Army way back when before my dad was born!) So why do I work for Operation Gratitude? Simple. We have the good life here in America for one reason and one reason only: because our soldiers risk their lives, and some times give their lives, to protect our way of life. They risk their lives for us every day, away from their family and friends for months at a time, never knowing if they will make it home alive and in one piece or not. We spend our days inside air-conditioned homes and schools, ride in comfortable cars and enjoy great food every day. Our brave men and women get nothing of the sort, not to mention the risk they constantly endure of get ting shot or blown up by a rusty can or some other non-descript object that turned out to be a bomb. Perhaps even more important than our lifestyle is our freedom freedom of speech, freedom of religion, freedom to agree or disagree with our own government. We should never take any of those things for granted. My collecting candy for Opera tion Gratitude is one small thing I can do to thank our soldiers for all that they do to protect America. Drop off candy and letters of apprecia tion by Saturday, Nov. 12, to one of the following Winter Park locations: New England Ave. For further details, contact OpGratitu deOrlando@gmail.com or 407-454-0878. Andrew Weinstock, 15, lives in Winter Park and attends Trinity Preparatory School. Life-saving candy ANDREW WEINSTOCK Guest Writer Backing down the banks The word redistribution has rarely been seen in such shining light as it is at this moment. That word had morphed into a eu phemism of fear over the course of the last three decades or so. Regardless of whom you say that word to, they almost invariably fear that it means less money for them and more money for some body else. But a funny thing has hap word, at least in the past few weeks, as the mass outcry about Americas wealth and income disparity has grown louder. More and more people have started to realize that redistribution isnt some harbinger of a dystopian future where the average fam ily loses all its money to greedy homeless people living off gov ernment cheese. Redistribution isnt some hobo-enriching peril to be pre vented. Its already happened. direction than where many at the top of Americas economic food chain would lead us to believe. Its why a story Tuesday morning in the Orlando Sentinel about $5 bank fees disappearing wasnt just on the front page; it was the banner headline. Those checking and debit card fees had been put in place by many of Americas largest banks begin lighting just how broad the gap between their economic fantasy and our reality really was. The banks, already making mas money. American consumers, still struggling to make ends meet in the wake of the Great Recession, had nothing left to give. According to the economic books, our recession ended in July 2009. The word recovery began to pervade the headlines. The banks quickly resumed rak ing in billions again. But a year and a half later, most Americans are still waiting for the real recession to end, as continue to hover around 10 as high as 18 percent. Before American consum ers could get new jobs and get back on their feet again, banks hit them while they were down, instituting new fees while they were already making huge prof its. SunTrust, JPMorgan Chase, Wells Fargo and Bank of Amer ica all jumped into the feeding frenzy. In Bank of Americas case, the new fee announcement came just days after it reported a record The outcry was huge. Videos of protestors organizing and entering banks to close their accounts en masse soon hit the major networks. Bank Transfer Day Saturday, Nov. 5 was (and still is) set to see hordes of customers closing their bank ac counts and taking their money to Suddenly the banks were scrambling to cancel the fees and refund money to their customers before they withdrew all their deposits. Thats a big win for the Oc cupy Wall Street movement, which began protesting Ameri cas record income disparity and greedy banks among other things nearly two months ago. That movement has continued to grow, spawning new movements such as the aforementioned Bank Transfer Day. And with that growth, so has public support of Occupy Wall Streets message. According to a joint New York Times/CBS News poll released last week, two out of three Amer icans now believe the nations wealth should be more evenly distributed. More than half of Republicans, in a sudden break with a long history of champion ing tax cuts, now believe that the rich should be taxed more. Maybe thats a response to the growing feeling that Americas longstanding narrative of going from rags to riches through hard work has been replaced with the grim reality of an economic and political system that stacks the odds massively in favor of those who are already rich. But theres a limit to that excess, and we may have just reached a breaking point. Just as wealthy banks were deciding that we should pay more, American consumers said its time for some payback. Tom Carey GARDEN From my to yours Tom Carey is the owner of Sundew Gardens, a you-pick gardening business in Oviedo. Visit the Sundew Gardens Facebook page. WHO IS CAREY > Remember in the 1960s when smoking marijuana was considered a political statement?

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Page 11 Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Chris Jepson Louis Roney Men at some time are masters of their fates: The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, But in ourselves Cassius from Shakespeares Julius Caesar Ah, the human condition. I am of mixed emotions when assessing mankind. And why wouldnt any rational human be ing? One moment, I am upbeat, optimistic and enthralled with our species en chanted, if you will. The next, I despair at our collective stupidity. Progress may, indeed, be inexorable, but the steps, the stumbles, are oh so treacherous. What to make of our nation, of Amer ica, of us as a people? Are we (as indi vidual citizens) so incapable of discerning reality, of separating the wheat of truth from the chaff of deception that all we are as a nation is risked over meaningless slo gans, historical revisionism and lies? Are we not required to think for ourselves and in that process, to thoughtfully consider our fellow Americans? Whenever I consider an issue, I start from my ideal. A problem? What is the ideal solution? If we lived in the best of all possible worlds, would we have poor people, or the chronically ill? Would the elderly or young ever require more than what their familys could provide? Would bad luck or misfortune hobble or maim the strong? Or the vulnerable? Would not Furthermore, would women not be universally considered and respected as mens equal? Would we not, indeed, be color-blind (as in race/ethnicity/ religion)? Would not mans ecological footprint be truly green and have been so since the dawn of the industrial revolu tion? Would not mankinds population be in harmony with what Mother Earth could sustainably support? Would not our species (as individuals, nations and people) be kind, generous and tolerant with one another? No war? No poverty? Would not all our children be born loving parents in decent homes, with nutritious food, with health care and chal lenging educational opportunities? Would not all our citizens be industrious, live and die peacefully knowing their progeny will experience the same? But, alas, we do not live in the best of all possible worlds as I (or you) might imagine or create if one were a god. No, we live in this world. We live now. With all its attending sorrow, pain and suffer ing. As context and relativism are ev erything, I have the occasional reader take me to task for lauding Presidents Roosevelts New Deal efforts to help the hurt Americans experienced during the Great Depression. They will caustically and ignorantly dismiss Roosevelts (our) governments achievements by saying the New Deal was just socialism, that it accomplished nothing meaningful and it was WWII that pulled America out of the Great Depression. And I mentally shout, You ignora mus! Do you not see that Americas WWII mobilization was nothing more than a completely organized, governmentmandated social program? Everybody worked. Everybody participated. Every one had a job to do. It was complete so cialism. Orchestrated by the government, for the people. For the nation. And it was considered good. Jump ahead today, and Republicans have morphed into weaponized Keynes ians. They wail, We must save the defense budget because any cuts will be horrible, because jobs will be lost! What hypocrisy! The government can legitimately create jobs only to the extent that they are military related? Shameful. Please see the deceit in their position. Think/vote accordingly. Republican deceit. Republican shame. A billionaire Hungarian immigrant named George Soros seems to hunger for control and to see in the latent power of groups of humanity a way to serve his noxious compulsion to abolish the click. (Wonder where Soros got all his money? Wonder why he hasnt given it all away?) I wish George would tell me one country in the world that has succeeded big economically by replacing capitalism with socialism/communism. Soros or ganizations are ACORN, SEIU, MoveOn. Org and Tides Foundation, among many others he sponsors that thrive on politi cal iconoclasm. For a long time, Soros has been poking around in the U.S. looking for ways to make trouble for you and me. Why? My belief is that Soros hates us, and most everything else American. sicko. We are lucky that Soros has not yet found a personal following similar to the deluded millions who fell for Hitlers rav ings. We know that Soros has visited the meaning someone living there must be interested in what he has to say or to sell and that fact scares me a lot At this moment I am thinking of Jesus Christ, Mahatma Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Abraham Lincoln and even John F. Kennedy. These were men who meant well while on Earth and whose lives were cut short in the despicable manner that some lesser men use to remove their moral superiors. simple Austrian village that produced Adolph Hitler, destroyer of 50 million lives. Why do so many nobodies rise to such monstrous power? opera in Germany was Berlin, and I lost no time taking a taxi to see where Hitler A young pretty girl who spoke a bit of English was my guide, and showed me the cement steps up which they carried Hitlers body, along with his mistress Eva Braun after Hitler had shot them both deep in his underground bunker. All of Berlin still lay in ruins from massive American bombings. I wondered what the man who said Today Germany, tomor row the whole world would have said to the Germans if he had had to accept publicly the responsibility for the tomor row he brought them. My frulein guide was smiling and as happy as a princess as she stood among the ruins of Berlin. It seemed to me that she had stepped lightly out of history and was thinking of the boy who would join her in a beer hall later that day. After all, the only Berlin she knew was some square miles of scattered sticks and stones now being slowly put back together. Present-day American happenings are painful for an antiquated patriot to live through. I had learned from my observations of history that politicians are scoundrels, but often laughable scoundrels. Today, kid dos, politics is no laughing matter. I wonder if my happy frulein from Berlin would be smiling beside me now if she had been born in America and could see what unbridled lust and greed are busily concocting for us in this great land. Those who do not know history are doomed to repeat it. What times the next change? Jepson is a 24-year resident of Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.US WHO IS JEPSON > HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney) WHO IS RONEY > Have an opinion? Send your thoughts (400 words or less) to Managing Editor Jenny Andreasson at editor@ observernewspapers.com Tar-ic It would be hard to agree on the best college football program in Florida now that all of our traditional powerhouses have been kicked out of the top 25 for sad moment when the world sees Boise State and West Virginia towering over the University of Florida, Florida State and the University of Miami. But this years Gators seemed toothless during their four-game los ing streak, while the preseason favorite Seminoles (5-3) have apparently gone to ground in the Okefenokee Swamp and the often-puzzling Hurricanes (4-4) look more like a morning drizzle. Even the states aspirational teams dont seem to be aspiring to much, with USFs Bulls (4-3), FIUs Golden Panthers (5-3), Bethune-Cookmans Wildcats (5-3), and UCFs Knights (4-4) all struggling to avoid losing seasons. FAUs hapless Owls (0-7) have already lost that battle. If we cant determine the best team, its at least easy to identify the one with the most joy: the Rollins College Tars. After losing Monday night to Webber Inter national, the 28 members of the Rollins club football squad were ecstatic. Of course, it was also the ter Park school, which is better known for its liberal arts program and its U.S. News and World Re port ranking as the best college in the South. (President Paul Wag ner canceled the colleges football program after the 1949 season only to be permanently sacked himself the following year.) For a team with no athletic scholarships, no training table and no physical education majors or even minors the thrill of the game was all that mattered. When 6-foot, 175-pound lineman Chris Alvarez took on Webbers 6-foot-4, 350-pound Handell Orange, he may have looked like Gulliver in the land of giant Brobdingnagians. But Chris, an English major and amateur boxer, and the rest of the squad, led by founder and quarterback Jeff Hoblick, felt more like the Green Bay Packers. They are, after all, students who love athletics and were willing to raise all the funds And their fans loved the game, fore the massive Webber players wore down their opponents in the last quarter, the Tars showed their fellow philosophy and biochem majors what pure deter mination can do by intercepting three passes and making a goalline stand. The crowd erupted loudest when the team took a Actually the Rollins football tradition, which started in 1904, is older than either UFs (1908) or Miamis (1926), both of which chose what were then the mighty Tars as their opponents for their tough year for the Gators, since Rollins beat it consistently in becoming state champion in foot ball, baseball and basketball. And when George Merrick, the de veloper of Coral Gables, decided that a college might attract buy ers to his new project, he founded UM in 1925 as a little sister school to his alma mater, Rollins. In the semi-professional world of college sports where Ohio State alone spends $115 million on athletics and almost every school seems to be facing an NCAA investigation, its time to give the indomitable Tars credit for playing football purely for the joy of playing and for showing what college athletics could and should be. Maurice J. O'Sullivan Kenneth Curry Professor of Literature Rollins College Enough of land-swap half-truths Winter Parks Mayor Ken Bradley succeeded in keeping quiet the exact number of citizens who signed the petition regarding the CNL/Progress Point land swap. While 234 residents signed the petition, the mayor allowed the minutes to only read numerous signatures. There is a difference! When Commissioner Cooper spoke to correct the minutes taxpayers that want their voices heard, she was, as usual, out voted by the mayor, along with Commissioners Steven Leary and Sarah Sprinkel. Half-truths are not accurate, or of the numbers? Sally Flynn Winter Park Letters to the Editor

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Page 12 Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer The combined wisdom and technical mastery of Florida art ists Maury Hurt, Hal McIntosh roots in the iconic Andre Smiths Research Studio, established post World War I as a unique artists haven in Maitland. Those artists will be celebrated in Allegory Echoes: Hal Mcintosh, Maury Hurt, Bill Orr at the Lake Eustis Museum of Art with an opening on Friday, Nov. 4, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. The exhibit runs through Dec. 4. The human-animal con nection dominates Hurts surreal paintings. McIntosh explores the natural world with an abstract/ impressionistic touch, and at 86, Bill Orr creates dramatic, na tionally celebrated paintings of The opening is free to the public. The Lake Eustis Museum of Art is at 200 B E. Orange Ave. in Eustis. Call 352-483-2900 or visit LakeEustisMuseumofArt.org Fall Fiesta in the Park The Fall Fiesta in the Park offers an always beautiful stroll along the Lake Eola Park coupled with more than 400 juried artists in all media from ceramics to painting to handmade clothing. This event is set for Nov. 5-6, and festival promoters tell us to come hun gry, as the Fiesta offers a variety of food venues along with the art and live entertainment. Admis sion is free. Visit www.facebook. com/FiestaInThePark Chefs auction recipes Bring together top chefs from across Central Florida to show case their culinary masterpieces. Mix in a generous sampling of tails. Add in live entertainment and an auction of one-of-a-kind packages, and you have the recipe for the March of Dimes Signature Chefs Auction. Celebrating Central Florida, the event raises important dollars for the March of Dimes, the leading nancy and baby health. The event begins Thursday, Nov. 10, at 6 p.m. with a tasting event, after which guests are invited to bid on a variety of auction packages. The event will take place at the Rosen Shingle Creek Resort, 9939 Universal Blvd. For tickets, visit or call 407-599-5077 ext. 33. American Voices This concert has taken over two years to create, and the onenight-only performance will take place at the Bob Carr Performing Arts Centre on Saturday, Nov. 12, at 8 p.m. The concert is a col laboration between the Orlando Philharmonic, the Zora Neale Hurston Festival, the Association to Preserve Eatonville, the Ne gro Spiritual Foundation, the Florida Opera Theatre, composer Adolphus Hailstork, librettist Elizabeth Van Dyke and baritone James Brown III. All these tal ented people join forces to pres ent a night of authentic American music, poetry and song honoring the legacy of author Zora Neale Hurston. Visit orlandophil.org/ american-voices or call 407-7700071 Culture and Cocktails Fine art, cocktails, and art-lovers make up the happy mix as the Associate Board of the Art & His tory Museums Maitland invites us to Culture and Cocktails, the second Friday of every month event that kicks off Nov. 11 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Maitland Art Center at 210 W. Packwood Ave. in Maitland. Guests are invited to an evening of art, music, poetry, food and fun as the tel. In his collection, Patel reveals the textures of India, evocative of its ancient society and complex civilization. Big Wheel Provi sions will be on hand with their popular food truck. Admission is $5 and includes one drink ticket. Call 407-539-2181 or visit www. ArtandHistory.org Josh Garrick Icons of art in Lake Eustis Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906. WHO IS GARRICK > Waterford Lakes Town Center is located by Alafaya Trail and SR408 in East Orlando407.737.2866 TASTE OF ORLANDO 12th Annual Taste of OrlandoSaturday, November 12 11:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m. Waterford Lakes Town CenterEnjoy unlimited food sampling from more than 40 restaurants, live music, a kids entertainment area and local business expoVisit www.thetasteoforlando.com for more details.Advance wristbands are available at Waterford Lakes Town Center Property Management Of ce 413 N. Alafaya Trail Waterford Lakes Town Center Chase Bank 881 N. Alafaya Trail Gators Dockside 12248 Lake Underhill Road $10 Adults, $5 Children (10 and under) Wristbands are also available day of the event, $12 Adults, $5 Children (10 and under) MARKETING GROUPINSIGHT Media Partners include: Booths include: Sponsors include: Taste of Ad 5x8 Observer.indd 1 10/6/11 3:52 PM 1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORGTHIS WEEK AT ENZIAN SENNA Fri-Sat 3:45PM, 6:30PM, 9:15PM Sun 1PM, 3:45PM, 6:30PM Mon 9:30PM Tue 6:30PM Wed & Thu 6:30PM, 9:15PM PEARL JAM TWENTY Fri & Sat 11:59PM RED STATE Sun 10PM 13th ANNUAL MANHATTAN SHORT FILM FESTIVAL Mon 6:30PM NETWORK Tue 9:30PM 1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORGTHIS WEEK AT ENZIAN SENNA Fri-Sat 3:45PM, 6:30PM, 9:15PM Sun 1PM, 3:45PM, 6:30PM Mon 9:30PM Tue 6:30PM Wed & Thu 6:30PM, 9:15PM PEARL JAM TWENTY Fri & Sat 11:59PM RED STATE Sun 10PM 13th ANNUAL MANHATTAN SHORT FILM FESTIVAL Mon 6:30PM NETWORK Tue 9:30PM MARGIN CALL Fri 3:30PM, 6:30PM Sat Sun 3:30PM, 6:30PM, 9:30PM Mon 9:30PM Tue 6:30PM Wed Thu 6:30PM, 9:30PM Afternoon Special Screening with Band Q&A EVERYDAY SUNSHINE: THE STORY OF FISHBONE Sat 12:30PM Jewish Film FestivalIN HEAVEN, UNDERGROUND Sun 11AM DAVID Sun 1:30PMJewish Film FestivalSHOLEM ALEICHEM: LAUGHING IN THE DARKNESS Mon 4:30PM RESTORATION Mon 7PMCult Classic CAT ON A HOT TIN ROOF Tue 9:30PM Bill Orrs art in Eustis

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Page 13 Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer As the man looks at the photo of the young woman on the screen, he thinks nothing. He doesnt know her. Some students say, thats your daughter, up there, but he resists, quietly uncertain. They point to the printout of the very same pho to in his hands, telling him again. Recognition maybe, but memo ries certainly, come to him. Thats her, he remembers, he knows her name and little things about her. This man has dementia, and hes one of Winter Parks Brain Fitness Club members. He and a dozen others with Alzheimers or some type of dementia gather at the First United Methodist Church in Winter Park two days a week to exercise their minds and bodies. Director Peggy Bargmann, a regis tered nurse who has specialized in dementia for 25 years, partnered with the University of Central Florida communicative sciences and disorders masters program to form the Club in 2007. They offer brain building, physical exercise, friendship and speech therapy. Prompting conversation week, they meet with Rollins College freshman students for a photography class. The students and Brain members each have an assignment to complete, and then they discuss their photos in class. Were trying to make that con nection, Rollins student David Cottrell said. When you look at a photo, it brings you back to that moment. For the members with demen tia, that moment might not be ex actly whats in the photo they dis cuss with the students that week. Sometimes they dont remember taking the picture, but the photo almost always sparks some mem ory or conversation. Creative and critical thinking will help anyone in terms of their brain activity, said Dawn Roe, professor of the photograph-aslanguage course. Talent revealed The Brain Fitness members and students work in small and large groups, discussing what they see in the photos, the feelings they bring up and what they hope oth ers might think or wonder. Then they all come together to talk about a few featured photos. There is one of a book on a table, and they muse about where it might have been taken, at what angle, and how pretty the light hits the items sitting there. Another fea tured is one of the members tak ing a photo of himself in a mirror. They discuss contrast, light and dark. While some of the young students attentions wander, the members are completely engaged. These sophisticated trains of thought and talk take focus and attention, and thats a great brain workout, Bargmann said. A lot of [the photos] are re markable there is clarity and thought at the moment they take the photo, Roe said. Restoring worth Many members take photos theyre very proud of. One mem ber shows pictures of a beautiful sunset hes taken in his backyard, which faces a lake. The colors, pink and yellow, gleam off the water. He shows them to every one each week. The member who took a photo of himself in the mir ror takes the assignments very seriously, and has a lot of talent, Bargmann said. He is a man living with de mentia, living with so many loss es, and now, heres a new skill he has, she said. You want a sense of worth and this certainly does that. The students have learned to see that, too, with seniors strug gling against losing abilities. Its very frustrating for them, Cottrell said. Something that was so easy all of a sudden is out the window. Learning from each other And it wasnt easy for the stu surprised to hear they would be working with the Brain Fitness Club. In the beginning, members didnt remember them; now they know their names. While the room was once quiet, now it whis pers with friendly talk. Student Brad Baker said hes learned so much from the members, not just about the disease itself, but about history and life, too. Its a place for them to feel safe and accepted. I feel like thats mostly what were here for, to listen to what they have to say, Baker said. And even though this class is no miracle cure, the students said they have a strong feeling that it is helping, somehow. I feel like our time here isnt really wasted whether its big or small its still making an im pact, Cottrell said. Bargmann hears it after the class, the members tell her that go ing there two days a week makes a difference in their lives; they say its important to them, that they can focus just a little bit better. Whether we can measure that or not, its the feeling, Bargmann said. They feel hope. Thrive @ 55 and beyond! St. Dorothy Catholic CommunityLove Without Judgment where ALL are welcome301 New England Avenue Mass: Sundays@11:00AM www.stdorothycatholiccommunity.org SAINT DOROTHY CATHOLIC COMMUNITY IS A PROGRESSIVE CATHOLIC COMMUNITY (Respectfully not associated with the Diocese of Orlando) WHERE ALL ARE WELCOME! We have continued the reformed true Catholic Tradition in the Spirit of Vatican Council II! Are you divorced, gay, a recovering Catholic, feeling disenfranchised by your present worshiping community of whatever denomination, looking for a small worshipping community where you are known and not lost in the crowd? Then you have found what you are looking for in St. Dorothy Catholic Community! Learn more For more information about the Brain Fitness Club, contact Peggy Bargmann at 407-927-4380 or email BrainFitness@c.rr.com. The Club is done on a semester basis, with the photography class possibly coming back next fall. The cost of a 14week semester is $1,000, but there are scholarship opportunities. PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER A Rollins student and a Brain Fitness Club member reect on photos he took. Photographic memories BRITTNI JOHNSON Observer Staff Senior Survival SeminarBoard Certied Elder Law Attorney Kathleen Flammia will be hosting the next Senior Survival seminar in the Winter Park Public Library located at 460 E. New England Avenue in Winter Park on Wednesday, November 9th, 2011 beginning at 6:00pm. This free seminar will take place on the 1st oor in The Community Room. Attorney Flammia will discuss Medicaid Pre-Planning and Emergency Planning techniques, and will also focus on the importance of those Estate Planning documents necessary for anyone over the age of 18. Light snacks will be provided. Please call the ofce at 407-478-8700 to RSVP and visit our website at: www.ammialaw.com. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information about our qualications and experience. This brochures is designed for general information only. The information presented within should not be construed to be formal legal advice nor the formation of a lawyer/client relationship.

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Page 16 Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer You may know Orlando Sentinel columnist Greg Dawson from his consumer advo cacy column, The Last Resort, in which he helps mediate between companies and mother, Zhanna Arshanskaya Dawson, a Jewish girl from the Ukraine, was truly at her last resort from 1941-45, when she survived the Holocaust as a piano playing papers. Zhanna, who used the alias Anna Mo rozova, kept alive by playing the piano throughout European war zones. Zhanna made it through this unbearable existence by relying on the last words her father told her: I dont care what you do, just live. For his sake, and for her younger sister, Frina, who remained in her care throughout World War II, she did what was necessary to survive. Remarkably, Greg Dawson did not learn his mothers incredible story until he was an adult. In 2009, he retold her story in a book, Hiding in the Spotlight. On Sunday, Nov. 6, the documentary cuses on the Dawson familys shared expe rience, will premier at the Jewish Commu Zhannas wartime experiences and will be enhanced through discussion session from Zhanna, Greg, wife Candy and their daugh ter, Aimee. Greg explains that writing Hiding in the Spotlight presented challenges to his usually light writing style. He notes, Books about the Holocaust are usually written by survivors or historians. I wanted my moth ers story told, so I put aside my whimsi cal tone, and my wife, Candy, helped keep me in check whenever I lightened my ap proach. Gregs skill in telling the story is Amazon.com and strong reviews on the website goodreads.com At the wars end, Zhanna and Frina were rescued by Larry Dawson, the U.S. Army serviceman who liberated them. Larry planned to adopt the two sisters and bring them to America. Zhanna eventually fell in love with, and married, Larrys brother, David (a musical prodigy who graduated from The Juilliard School). Both Zhanna and Frina later attended Juilliard, despite their lack of formal education, Zhanna could not bear to share the de her children. Greg did not become aware of his mothers childhood history and heritage until he was 16 years old. The whole story did not come out until many years later, when Greg was a grown man with a family, and his daughter, Aimee, was given an as signment by her middle school teacher. Amy was asked to interview a grand parent about what life was like when they were of middle school age, Greg said. At the time, my mother was the only grand parent left. Much to his surprise, Zhanna wrote down four pages of text for Aimee, detail ing her life under the Nazi regime. Once my mother began telling her story, Greg said. She wanted everyone to know. She did a taping for Steven Spielbergs Shoah Project, and later we discussed putting to gether a book. How has the discovery of his mothers roots and her experiences during the Holo caust impacted Greg Dawson? I am more self-aware of where I come from, he said. Remember, by the time I knew the details, I was almost 30 and an established newspa per writer and family man. Zhannas situa tion was clearly way beyond what any sane person would consider The Last Resort. From the perspective of a writer, I thought my mothers history was amazing and as tonishing and worthy of the spotlight. PHOTO BY P AM RUBEN Greg Dawsons book was born out of his daughters school assignment to interview her grandma. Putting the spotlight on survival A documentary lm premieres Nov. 6 about a Jewish girls story and the affects on her sons family PAMELA R UBEN Guest Writer Learn more Sharing in the Spotlight will premier Sun day, Nov. 6, at 2 p.m. at the JCC Auditorium sponsored by the Holocaust Center of Florida. For more information, call 407-628-0555.

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Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. 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Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com ASSISTED LIVING RESIDENCE 395 Alafaya Woods Blvd., Oviedo, FL 32765 407-977-8786ALF License No. 9235, 9308, 9307 www.slm.net/SCOviedo1 Signature property of Located on a beautiful campus setting, our two Savannah Court communities provide full assisted living services while Savannah Cottage offers a secured residence for those with memory loss. Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above! You are always welcome at Savannah Court and Cottage of Oviedo. MEMORY CARE RESIDENCEWhere hospitality is truly a way of life! Savannah Court and Cottage ASSISTED LIVING RESIDENCE 395 Alafaya Woods Blvd., Oviedo, FL 32765 407-977-8786ALF License No. 9235, 9308, 9307 www.slm.net/SCOviedo1 Signature property of Located on a beautiful campus setting, our two Savannah Court communities provide full assisted living services while Savannah Cottage offers a secured residence for those with memory loss. Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above! You are always welcome at Savannah Court and Cottage of Oviedo. MEMORY CARE RESIDENCEWhere hospitality is truly a way of life! Savannah Court and Cottage S S S S S S S S S S Signature property of S Signature property of S S Savannah Court and Cottageof Oviedo S S S Located on a beautiful campus setting, our two Savannah Court communities provide full assisted living services while Savannah Cottage offers a secured residence for those with memory loss.www.savannahcourtoviedo.com395 Alafaya Woods Blvd., Oviedo, FL 32765407-977-8786 S S S www.savannahcourtoviedo.com S S You are always welcome at Savannah Court and Cottage of Oviedo Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above! Dennis AllenOwner/ Administrator Senior Community Bulletin Veterans Day events NOV. 10 The Central Florida Chapter of the First Marine Division Association invites you to a special SOS breakfast at the Best Western Mt. Vernon Inn, 110 S. Orlando Ave., on Nov. 10, at 8:30 a.m. NOV. 11 To mark Veterans Day, the Winter Park Memorial Post 112, will host an Open House from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m., on Friday, Nov. 11 at 4490 N Goldenrod Rd. Call 407671-6404 or visit WPFLPOST112. org On Friday, Nov. 11 at 11 a.m., Winter Park will present its inaugural Veterans Day Celebration in honor of all of the veterans of Winter Park at the Winter Park Community Center Ruby Ball Amphitheatre, 721 W. New England Ave. NOV. 12 Join Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer in honoring our local veterans during the city of Orlandos 2011 Veterans Day Parade on Saturday, Nov. 12, at 11 a.m. in downtown Orlando. NOV. 3 The Kinneret Council on Aging will hold a health care expo from 1-4 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 3, in the Delaney Dining Room at Kinneret Apartments, 515 Delaney Ave. Contact Leslie at 407-425-4537 or lcollin@bellsouth. net The Les Grande Dames 2011 Fall Championships featuring women ranging in age from 35 to 85 compet ing in singles and doubles tennis, is Nov. 3-6 at Winter Park Tennis Cen ter. NOV. 5 The Alzheimers & Dementia Resource Center will host its 18th Annual Caregiver Conference on Saturday, Nov. 5, at Winter Park Towers from 8:30-11:30 a.m. and 12:30-4 p.m. To register, contact 407-843-1910 ext. 301 or cindi@ADRCcares.org The Armand Marchesano Orches tra will play music for dancing from 7:30 p.m.-10 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 5 at the Beardall Center on Gore Street and Orange Avenue. Admission is $4. Call 407-246-2637. NOV. 7 Fall Health and Wellness Clinic at Life Care Center Altamonte Springs, 989 Orienta Ave is 2 to 4 p.m. on Monday, Nov 7. Call 407-831-3446. NOV. 8 Central Florida Guardianships Chapter Meeting is Tuesday, Nov. 8 at 12:30 p.m. at Savannah Court, 1301 W. Maitland Blvd. RSVP to 407645-3990 or email 5665mktg@hcrmanorcare.com NOV. 12 The Center for Independent Livings Stroll N Roll will be held Satur day, Nov. 12, at 9 a.m. at Harbor Park on Lake Baldwin. Register online at CilOrlando.org.kintera.org/StrollNRoll NOV. 17 Counsel for Caregivers Seminar Series at the Orlando Public Library, Third Floor, Albertson Room, 101 E. Central Blvd, will be Nov. 17 from 12:10 to 12:50 p.m. RSVP to ofceon aging@oc.net or 407-836-7446. NOV. 24 The Turkey Trot a 5K run/power walk and Tot Trot to benet Seniors First, is Thursday, Nov. 24, at 8 a.m. Register online at TrackShack.com Senior Center events The Maitland Senior Center is located at 345 S. Maitland Ave. Schedule is subject to change without notice. Call 407-539-6251 or visit ItsMyMaitland. com be closed Nov. 23 and 24 for the T hanksgiving holiday Zumba will now be two days a week! Join Patricio every Tuesday and Friday in November at 11:15 a.m. for Zumba Gold. Cost of the class is $4 to the teacher. and Friday in November at 9 a.m. for Yoga Cost of the class is $2 to the teacher. Knit & Crochet group ev ery Monday in November at 10 a.m. ber at 1 p.m. for our conversational French group. Must be uent in French. vember at 9 a.m. for Tai Chi classes. Cost of the class is $2 to the teacher. ber for basic Italian lessons at 11 a.m. Lessons are free. ber at 1 p.m. for our conversational Spanish group. Must be uent. ber for recorder classes. Beginning classes are held at 12:30 p.m. and in termediate classes are held at 1 p.m. Cost of the class is $2 to the teacher. the Maitland Senior Center presents free counseling about Medicare, medigap, HMOs, Medicaid, prescrip tions drug plans and long-term care. Call 1-800-96 ELDER or visit Flori daShine.org Orange County Commission On Aging Newsletter Open Enrollment for Medicare/ Medicaid is now. Call the Elder Hel pline by dialing -1-1 or 407-839HELP and ask for a Shine Counselor or visit Medicare.gov/open-enrollment. Open enrollment ends Dec. 7. Elder Conference Youre invited to a Aging with Grace conference at St. Lukes Methodist Church, 4851 S. Apopka-Vineland Road on Nov. 5, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. For info or to RSVP, contact Carol Crowley @ 407876-4991 ext 262.

PAGE 18

Page 18 Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Each year on Nov. 11, America ob serves Veterans Day and honors the men and women who have served in our nations Armed Forces. Many of our Vietnam-era veterans are now nearing retire ment age, or are already there. It is important they and other American service personnel know just what retirement ben Security as they make their future Like most of the civilian work force, all current military person nel pay Social Security taxes and earn Social Security coverage. Earnings for active duty military service or active duty training have been covered under Social Security since 1957. Also, earnings for inactive duty service in the re serves (such as weekend drills) have had Social Security coverage since 1988. In addition to regular military pay, Social Security adds special earnings credits to an individuals Social Security record when he or she serves in the military. The ex tra earnings are for periods of ac tive duty or active duty training. If, for example, a person served in the military between 1957 and 1977, he or she has been credited with $300 in additional earnings for each calendar quarter in which active duty basic pay was earned. These extra earnings may help someone qualify for Social Secu rity or increase the amount of the The number of credits an indi vidual needs to qualify for Social Security depends on his or her age depends on a persons earnings, averaged over a working lifetime. Generally, the higher a persons earnings, the higher his or her So And remember that Social Se curity is more than retirement. If a worker becomes disabled before reaching retirement age, he or she may be eligible for Social Secu workers spouse and dependent children also may be eligible for ow or widower and dependent children may be eligible for Social If you or someone you know were wounded while on active about what Social Security can do by visiting our website designed riors: www.socialsecurity.gov/ woundedwarriors. There, you commonly asked questions, as well as other useful information plemental Security Income. Veterans and others who are within 10 years of retirement age should begin planning for retire ment. A good place to start is with Social Securitys Retirement Esti mator at www.socialsecurity.gov/ estimator For more information, read our fact sheet, Military Service and Social Security, which is available on our website at www.socialse curity.gov/pubs/10017.html Blanca Taylor is a Social Security Public Affairs Specialist. Lack of Desire or Low Energy? Testosterone Lab Work for $35 (a $240 Value) Call today for a risk-free appointment: 407-894-9959 ARCHIVE PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Veterans within 10 years of retirement age should begin planning now by visiting socialsecurity.gov/estimator Veterans Day reminder: military service and social security Veterans, wounded veterans and their family members may qualify for additional benets BLANCA T AYLOR Guest Writer

PAGE 19

Page 19 Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer The number of homeless veterans doesnt seem to be getting any less. The latest homeless every night, with 135,000 need ing to spend at least one night in a shelter. But the Department of Veterans Affairs is trying to help. Recently an additional $10 million was granted to 11 states to provide more services to homeless veterans. The money is going to the National Homeless Provid ers Grant and Per Diem programs so they can continue to help mentally ill veterans, as well as homeless women veterans and others. This is on top of the nearly $60 million handed out this year. Some $3.4 billion has been earmarked for homeless programs. The VA also has launched a program to eliminate homelessness among veterans by 2015. Instead of limiting it to emergencyshelter services, its focusing on prevention itself, with employment and permanent housing as part of the long-term solution. To that end, the Department of Housing and Urban Development and VA Support ed Housing has more than 20,000 housing units throughout the country designed for homeless veterans who need support ser vices. The housing is available via Section 8 housing vouchers, and veterans with families are included. Veterans have to meet certain criteria to be eligible for the vouchers, including physical disability, substance use or mental illness. Those accepted are required to take advantage of the support services and case management, but must be able to live independently on a daily basis. If you need emergency or permanent housing help, call 1-877-4243838. There are counselors available 24/7. You can call for yourself or for someone else who might need help. Theyll ask a few questions and will have information about programs in your area. You can also go online at www. va.gov/homeless Write to Freddy Groves in care of King Features Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 328536475, or send email to columnreply@ gmail.com 2011 King Features Synd. Inc. More money to help homeless veterans Do we really need to take vitamins? By Samantha MazzottaReusing Wood for FlooringQ:Ive been watching some home-improvement shows on television lately that advocate greenbuilding techniques, including reusing wood from other structures for a homes wood flooring,rather than buying new. What do you think about this trend,and how do I go about doing this? Larry in Tempe,Ariz.A:Recycled wood flooring is a good trend,in my opinion, because rather than chopping down live trees to supply the hardwood for your floor,wood from many types of disused structures or other sources of salvaged lumber can be remilled to give it a second life. There is some concern that the current stock of highquality salvaged wood will run out eventually,but no timetable has been given for that. Recycled hardwood is often of better quality than new hardwoods. Its been curing for many years,resulting in a tighter grain and more stability. Also, much of the current stock of recycled wood originally came from oldgrowth forests,most of which either no longer exist or are protected,and so youre getting high-quality denseness and stability that most new woods cant match. One thing it is not,however,is cheap. Recycled hardwood costs much more than new (Toolbase Services estimates that it runs about $5.75 to $11 per square foot,while new oak flooring runs about $3 per square foot). Recycled wood also must be installed by a professional. Despite the cost,recycled wood tends to be beautiful and durable and a nice conversation piece at parties. If youre interested in having it installed, many flooring contractors are able to procure and install recycled wood. You should check with more than one contractor,though,get estimates,and ideally work with someone who specializes in recycled wood-flooring installation. Send questions or home-repair tips to homeguru2000@hotmail.com,or write This Is a Hammer,c/o King Features Weekly Service,P.O. Box 536475,Orlando,FL 32853-6475.2009 King Features Synd.,Inc.All types of wood floors need the same type of care: Wipe up liquid spills immediately, dont use harsh cleaners or oil soaps,and sweep,dust mop or vacuum regularly to prevent grit from dulling the finish.Dogs Help Vets Cope With PTSDTheres new ammo in the hunt for a fix for post-traumatic stress disorder. For some veterans,the answers lie in dogs. But not just any dogs. Specially trained dogs are being given to some veterans suffering from PTSD,and in many cases,its working. When out in public,the dogspresence invites social conversation,yet they will place themselves physically between someone approaching and the veteran,who is likely to still be leery of contact. With the dogs,veterans find that theyre able to leave home without fear and can slowly transition to a more normal life. Many of the dogs are trained in prisons in the Puppies Behind Bars program,where they spend a year with specially trained prisoners [www.puppiesbehindbars.com]. To turn the tables a bit,a group called Paws for Purple Hearts [www.assistancedog.org] allows veterans with PTSD to become trainers for dogs that will assist veterans with physical disabilities. Run by Bergin University in California,the Paws program gives a needed sense of purpose to veterans with PTSD,as well as the grounding and self-worth that come from knowing theyre working to help someone else. In this case its a veteran with physical disabilities. For more information,call PPH at 707545-3647 ext. 28. Steps also are being taken to head PTSD off at the pass,again using dogs. Combat Stress Teams in Iraq and Afghanistan are shipped over with therapy dogs that quickly become popular with service personnel. The dogs serve,among other things,as icebreakers and stress relievers,inviting conversations that might otherwise not take place. For a real treat,do an Internet search for Boe and Budge,two therapy dogs that were sent to Iraq with a stress team. Write to Freddy Groves in care of King Features Weekly Service,P.O. Box 536475,Orlando,FL 328536475,or send e-mail to columnreply@gmail.com.2009 King Features Synd.,Inc. King Features Weekly ServiceMarch 2-8, 2009 Recent studies show that in some cases, vi tamins actually can be detrimental to our health instead of the other way around. One reason is that so many vitamins already are put in our food and drinks, its easy to get too much. research results. Here are some samples: Vitamin E, when taken in large doses, has been shown to cause a slightly higher risk of prostate cancer, but can lower the risk for Alzheimers disease. Low vitamin D is often seen in cancer patients. Senior women might have a slightly higher risk of dying if they take certain vi tamins and supplements. Iron can increase mortality, while calcium can reduce it. Vitamin B-12 might help with memory problems. Unfortunately, vitamins and supple ments dont have to pass scrutiny in test ing, so you might not be getting what the bottle says. It could be more, or less, or the contents could be contaminated. Dont self-diagnose. If you take vita mins and supplements, or are considering If you really need to know whats in your supplements, Consumer Lab (con sumerlab.com) does testing and issues re ports. It costs $33 per year for a subscrip tion (call 888-5025100 instead of putting your credit card number on the purchase page). Theres also a free email newsletter that will tell you about warnings, recalls and reviews. To learn more about vitamins, go online (http://ods.od.nih.gov), which is part of the National Institutes of Health. On the right, look for the link to Tips for Older Supplement Users. Matilda Charles regrets that she cannot personally answer reader questions, but will incorporate them into her column whenever possible. Write to her in care of King Features Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475, or send email to columnreply@ gmail.com. 2011 King Features Synd. Inc. Nothing happened in a straight line for Jasper Jackie Smith, born in 1940 in Durham, N.C. When it came time to graduate from high school, he did so at St. Nicholas High School in Manhattan, N.Y., and soon thereafter enlisted in the Army, seeing his basic training in Fort Dix, N.J. His rst overseas deployment took him to the city of Ulm in Germany, where the U.S. armed forces were still in the process of reconstructing the city and industrial areas devastated by Allied bombing during WWII. Upon returning from Germany, Jasper enlisted in the New Jersey Police Academy in Bergen County, serving with distinction in the Englewood, N.J., police force during the next 28 years, serving the last 14 years as detective. In 1975, Jasper married his wife, Barbara, and they had one son, Jack. Smith says his career goal was to help people in the community to live under law and order and feel safe in their communities and in their homes. He recalls chasing the bad guys from New Jersey over the George Washington Bridge as far as Fort Apache in the Bronx in an effort to bring certain characters to justice, which he did many times over. Cindi Harris-Panning, executive director for Cornerstone Hospices Orange and Osceola region, indicates that many veterans and law enforcement ofcers experienced traumatic conditions that are present today, even several decades later These patients require specialized, individual needs not solely based on medical, emotional, physical, social and spiritual issues. Diagnosed with prostate cancer, Jasper is under the care of nonprot Cornerstone Hospice by his care team made up of Ann Harr, regional team manager; Fran Riggins, patient care supervisor; Sandy Mahan; Mari Fogue; home health aide Sonia Chen; social worker Mardi Weatherford-Mitchell and Chaplain Geren Baird. The Cornerstone Hospice unit is at the Winter Park Towers community by Lake Berry. Cornerstone Hospice patient, Army veteran served 28 years in New Jersey police force At the Cornerstone Hospice Inpatient Unit at Winter Park Towers, certied nursing assistant Adeline Dalexis comforts patient and U.S. Army veteran Jasper Jackie Smith, who is also a 28-year veteran of the Englewood, New Jersey police force. Smith also served as a Detective fourteen years.Cornerstone Hospice, a nonprot community-based health care organization, has provided since 1984 care and services to central Florida and Orange and Osceola patients and families experiencing life-limiting illnesses. To learn more, call 407-206-2273 or toll-free 1-800-679-6088 in Orange and Osceola counties. Also, please visit Cornerstone Hospice at www.cornerstonehospice.org Most Older People Have DiverticulosisDEAR DR. DONOHUE:I am a 78-year-old female,active and in good health or so I thought. I eat right and never smoked or drank alcohol. Yesterday,a colonoscopy showed severe diverticulosis. The doctor prescribed Benefiber,then left and never returned. I am stunned. What do I do now? Will I have this forever? Am I unhealthy? How does one develop diverticulosis? What the difference between osisand itis? S.K. ANSWER:Your world isnt collapsing. Youre healthy. Youll have diverticulosis forever. By age 60,half of the people in North America have it. By age 80,two-thirds have it. A diverticulum is a bulge of the inner colon lining through the colons muscular wall to its outer surface. A diverticulum looks like a small soap bubble. Its only 1/5 to 2/5 inches (0.5 to 1 cm) in diameter. You can thank our diet for diverticulosis. We refine flour and throw away its bran the outer coat of grain. In countries where whole grains (including the bran) are commonly used,diverticulosis is a rarity. Bran and other fiber hold water in undigested food. Without fiber,the food residue dries and becomes hard. The colon muscles have to generate a great deal of force to keep it moving. That force causes the colon lining to pop through the colon wall as a diverticulum. For most,diverticulosis is a silent condition that remains silent for life. For a few,the diverticulum breaks and causes a local infection in the colon diverticulitis. The pain of a diverticulitis attack is usually felt in the lower left corner of the abdomen, and sometimes people have fever and chills along with the pain. The attack is treated by resting the tract and by giving antibiotics. Were supposed to get 30 grams of fiber a day. Fruits (especially those with edible skins),many vegetables and whole-grain products are the source of dietary fiber. If people cannot get enough fiber in their diet,then commercial products like the one youre taking fill the gap. Metamucil, Perdiem,Citrucel and Fiberall are other examples. The booklet on diverticulosis explains the ins and outs of this very common disorder. To order a copy, write:Dr. Donohue No. 502W,Box 536475,Orlando,FL 32853-6475. Enclose a check or money order (no cash) for $4.75 U.S./$6 Canada with the recipients printed name and address. Please allow four weeks for delivery. *** DEAR DR. DONOHUE:My husband has chronic blepharitis and frequently develops hard buildups in both eyes that cause great discomfort. The doctor must remove them two times a month. What can be done to prevent them? S.R. ANSWER:Blepharitis (BLEF-uhRYE-tiss) is inflammation of the eyelid margins,which become red and crusty. The crust can build up into hard deposits. A twice-a-day program of lid cleansing might eliminate the crusts. Have your husband apply warm compresses (a wet washcloth) to closed lids for five to 10 minutes and then massage the lids. After the massage,he cleanses the lid margins with a cotton-tipped applicator dipped in a solution of one part baby shampoo and one part water. The doctor might have to prescribe an antibiotic ointment. *** Dr. Donohue regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but he will incorporate them in his column whenever possible. Readers may write him or request an order form of available health newsletters at P.O. Box 536475,Orlando,FL 328536475.2009 North America Synd.,Inc. All Rights ReservedHow Does Your Hospital Rate?It really DOES matter what hospital you go to when you need care. Your life could depend on it. So says the seventh annual study by HealthGrades. This is the same group that tracks doctors,hospitals and nursing homes and assigns a grade for the level of care. Its latest study reveals that your risk of death can be cut as much as 27 percent if you get your care at a Distinguished Hospital for Clinical Excellence.To get that designation,a hospital has to pass a long list of criteria. The HealthGrades Web site [www.healthgrades.com] lists by state all of the Distinguishedhospitals. You can search (for free) for grades on a given hospital for any of dozens of medical conditions. Look for Research Hospitals on the front screen of the Web site. Its when you want a full report on a hospital that you have to pay a fee. Youll also have to pay a fee to check out a specific doctor or nursing home it costs money for the report. A much easier way to check on a hospital or doctor is on the governments Health and Human Services website [www.hospitalcompare.hhs .gov]. The HHS layout lets you compare multiple hospitals,right on the same screen. The information is very comprehensive,too. For example,one question concerns the percent of surgery patients who were given an antibiotic at the right time,within one hour before surgery. This is a small detail maybe,but crucial to ones recovery. To find out if there is a Distinguishedhospital in your area,check the HealthGrades Web site and then search for details at the HHS site. Still,if youre facing a major medical issue,perhaps paying for the HealthGrades report would give you needed extra information. Matilda Charles regrets that she cannot personally answer reader questions,but will incorporate them into her column whenever possible. Write to her in care of King Features Weekly Service,P.O. Box 536475, Orlando,FL 32853-6475,or send email to columnreply@gmail.com.2009 King Features Synd.,Inc. King Features Weekly ServiceMarch 2-8, 2009 Plan your weekend with The Weekender! Visit wpmobserver.com and click "Subscribe to Newsletter"

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Page 20 Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011 Winter Park / Maitland Observer 25 years Antique Sales experience Serving Winter Park and Maitland for 12 years Family owned and operatedPay Top Dollar for Gold and Silver items No Up-front or Out of Pocket expense on Estate saleSandbergEstateSales.com 321-299-4179 James 407-923-5013 MargeLicensed, InsuredSandberg Estate Sales American Family Funerals & Cremations Phone (407)339 0070 Serving all of Central Florida Family Owned and Operated Se habla Espaol Alan Trueba L.F.D. American Family Funerals & Cremations Phone (407)339 0070 Serving all of Central Florida Family Owned and Operated Se habla Espaol Alan Trueba L.F.D. Cremation Services, Shipping & Monuments. Traditional, Contemporary & Veteran Services at half the price of what others would charge PLEASE MARK YOUR RESPONSE HERE:Will you please review and respond as soon as possible? We are waiting for your approval. Please NOTE: this is NOT a second opportunity to design the ad. Redesign changes may result in additional charges. Thank you!1. Please circle A or B below: A: I approve this ad as shown here B: I approve this ad with changes as marked (How many changes are marked? _____)2. Please double check phone/address/names.Phone & address are correct (initials here) ________ With this signature, I signify my understanding that payment for this ad is due per Advertising Agreement.Signed ________________________________Since 1995(407) 366-8696 Fax (407) 359-2118 P.O. Box 4548 Winter Park, FL 32793FOR YOUR INFORMATIONThis ad will appear in these areas and months. ____Waterford Lakes__________________ ____College Park/Orlando______________ ____Winter Park/Maitland_______________ ____Sweetwater/Heathrow______________ ____Tuscawilla/Wntr Sprgs _____________ ____Oviedo__________________________ ____ Baldwin/Winter Pk. East ____________X JUNE 2011 X JUNE 2011 A Better Plumber407-644-4000 X JUNE 2011 Casting Boys & Girls, ages 4-17 years old, all ethnicities! Drake Model & Talent Agency has Opportunities for young talent to be cast at both Disney & Universal Studios!!! Call today for an appointment!Drake Model & Talent 407-339-4570 NOW Casting for Kids! Paid Jobs Adversing Networks of Florida Statewide advertisingone low price BALLROOMAlabama, Georgia, Florida & South Carolina Online Bidding Available Many Selling Absolute! Nov. 14-17 & Nov. 21-22215 BankForeclosed Properties RowellAuctions.comRowell Realty & Auction Co., Inc. 10% Buyers PremiumAU 479, AB 296 800-323-8388For More Information HODGES BROTHERS INCROOFING & CONSTRUCTION

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Presented by: Hosted by: Sponsored by: Join the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce as we host our monthly br eakfast update, featuring: Gary Sain President/CEO Visit Orlando Hear the latest on tourism in Central Florida and Winter Parks role in attracting visitors to our region. Friday, November 11, 2011 7:45 a.m. Networking/ 8:15 a.m. Program WINTER PARK WELCOME CENTER 151 W. Lyman Avenue, Winter Park, FL 32789 A complimentary continental breakfast will be served. The event is free and open to the public. For information, call the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce at (407) 644-8281 or visit www.winterpark.org.