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Winter Park-Maitland observer
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00182
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park FL
Publication Date: 10-20-2011
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates: 28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID: UF00091444:00182

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ursday, Oct. 20, 2011 50+ tax BUS_CARD 3.25 x 2 August 2010Grafton Wealth ManagementWilliam D. Grafton III, Sarah Grafton DeVoe William D. Grafton IV Financial Advisors (407) 646-6725 400 Park Avenue South Suite 300 Winter Park, FL 32789 Merrill Lynch Wealth Management makes available products and services offered by Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated (MLPF&S) and other subsidiaries of Bank of America Corporation. MLPF&S is a registered broker-dealer, member SIPC. Investment products: 2010 Bank of America Corporation. All rights reserved. Are Not FDIC InsuredAre Not Bank GuaranteedMay Lose Value 407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC wpmobserver.com USPS 00-6186 Publisher statement on page 4. A whistle blows and sends two dozen pairs of cleats into motion at once, tramping the grass of Eatonville. Its a cool Monday night, one week ward his team. Next Monday, Oct. 24, its game letters printed across his chest havent adorned a We are! Twenty-two voices yell back: Tars! K-9 program back to Maitland. The city will reinstate the property earned from its po lice departments participation in federal task forces. Ball said the department has the Oct. 10 meeting where City bring back the program.K-9 gapIn 2009, Maitland retired its only The response time is ex tremely slow and sometimes not available at all, Ball said. It has dents. team will be able to partner with Winter Park and Apopkas K-9 ies. well have immediate cover age provided by Winter Park or available seven days a week, he said. Fiscal support the salary of the K-9 handler and ganizations The Committee of costs, he said. the vet bills for the dog, Ball said. Page 16 Pet health care industry boomsMr. Roneys story of schoolyard any age. Page 19 d Bachs legacy The Bach Festival Societys 77th season kicks off Oct. 22 and 23 Page 10 Halloween calendar Winter Park, Maitland and Page 11 PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERRollins football players started their nal week of practice Monday, a week before the teams rst game in decades. T The T T ars last played in the fall of 1949. Please see rR OLLINS Page 2 Please see KK-9 Page 7 Game onOn 7:15 p.m. Monday, Oct. 24, the Rollins Tars Football Club will play Webber International JV at Showalter Field, 2525 Cady Way, Winter Park, in their rst game in 62 years. A tailgating party with free food and a T-shirt giveaway starts at 5 p.m. Visit their Facebook page for more information.PHOTO COURTESY OF MAITLAND POLICE DEPArR TMENT KK-9 A Alix, above, and handler SSgt. CChris OOHHalek were a team for nine years. JENNY A ANDrREASSON OObserver SStaff Maitland K-9 program returns 62 years later IISAAC BBABCOCK OObserver SStaff Rollins football gears up for its rst game, Oct. 24

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Thursday, Oct. 20, 2011 Page 2 Winter Park / Maitland Observer for a team thats had to develop faster than word has spread that it even existed.Growth spurtIn the stands at practice, three people watch from a lonely corner of the bleachers. Come 2,000. Many of them hadnt heard of the said. Eight months ago, the team didnt ex ist at all. petitioned the school to call the team an of this level, the team is expected to take care of itself. the schools, he said. nizing most of the team single-handedly. get the team whipped into shape. Sense of urgency will practice every day. And those practices are coming in earnest. Come 7:15 p.m. Oct. 24, the Tars will play Webber International since before most of the players parents were born. We get to be a part of history, Zellar said. Well be making the stands roar for three sets of positions at once, some players 29 players, with some expected to play on offense, defense and special teams, appro priately echoing the type of football played sive linemen will switch sides to play as defensive linemen. games, Simmons said. The goal is to be We treat this as if its Rollins Colleges football team, Simmons said. Its not like theyre a real football team. Thinking about the future NCAA BCS team thats 7-0 so far this sea son. draw on some of the teams past glory for those alive to remember it the Tars will have some of their former players on Then the newest generation of players will open a new page in the history books. said. We want to do something that goes down in history and wont be forgotten. Individual & Family health plans For an Instant Quote or to apply, visit our website www.HealthInsuranceIBS.com407-831-5166 Our Town(407) 366-8696 Fax (407) 359-2118 P.O. Box 4548 Winter Park, FL 32793Insertions in editions and months as shown:____Waterford Lakes ____College Park/Orlando ____Winter Park/Maitland ____Sweetwater/Heathrow ____Tuscawilla/Winter Springs ____Oviedo ____Baldwin Park/E. Winter ParkPlease initial your agreement with the following:____ I approve this ad to appear in Our Town as shown here OR ____ I approve this ad with minor changes as clearly marked (How many changes are marked? _____) ____ Phone number and address are correct I understand that payment for this ad is due per initial agreement.Signed ____________________________________We appreciate your prompt response, as our deadline is approaching.*Colors represented on this proof may not be an exact match of the colors produced when printed on our offset press.X OCT 2009 407-644-7760 407.704.1917P.O. Box 560525 Orlando, FL 32856-0525Kristy@LawHarrington.comwww.LawHarrington.com Kristy L. HarringtonAttorney at Law Attorney at Law Wendy Anderson, P.A. (407) 628-9081 407.704.1917P.O. Box 560525 Orlando, FL 32856-0525Kristy@LawHarrington.comwww.LawHarrington.com Kristy L. HarringtonAttorney at Law Kristy@LawHarrington.com Real Estate Matters & Transactions Real Estate Licensing & Disciplinary Matters Landlord/Tenant Representation Business & Commercial Matters Bankruptcy Foreclosure Assistance Collection Matters Group Presentations Entity Formation & Corporate MattersSERVICES roROLLiINsS | Tars practice every day leading up to game against Webber; theyll play Clemson on NNov. 5 CC OONTTINUEUED FROFROM FROnNT pP AGE PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERQuarterback Jeff Hoblick, top, founded the RRollins club, which now has 29 players on its roster.

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Florida Blue center floridablue.com Florida Blue A Taste of Saturday October 22nd FREE ethnic-inspired food tastings and music Face-painting and giveaways Quick health checkups with FREE health screenings FREE bone density screenings

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Thursday, Oct. 20, 2011 Page 4 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Ways to win Matt Cronin, corporate regional man ager at O,R&L Facility Services, poses with a young resident at the O,R&L/ Winning Ways basketball camp that took place during the Winter Park Community Center open house this month.Best black tieThe Alzheimers & Dementia Re source Center hosted its fth annual signature fundraising event, Black Tie from the Waist High, at the Hilton Altamonte Springs. They had more than 80 attendees and raised more than $18,000.Free room for vetsIn a campaign called B&Bs for Vets, Thurston House will join inns and bed & breakfasts nationwide in opening their doors for complimentary stays for vets on Nov. 10 in observance of Veterans Day. Thurston is already booked with a waiting list. For a com plete list of participating inns, visit BNBsForVets.org.A&H hiring Art & History Museums, Maitland is hiring a part-time museum store re ceptionist, visitor services assistant and assistant curator and registrar. Visit TinyURL.com/AHJobOpeningsBlanket collection On Sunday, Oct. 30, at 6:30 a.m. and 7 a.m., the Winter Park Sunday run ning group of the Orlando Runners Club will conduct its annual drive to collect blankets for residents of the Mens Pavilion at Coalition for the Homeless of Central Florida. Visit Or landoRunnersClub.org.Fill a wallet for a seniorSeniors First has launched its holiday gift drive: Fill a Wallet for a Senior. To donate, purchase a wallet and include $10 cash or a gift card. The drive runs until Dec. 1. For details, email mlowe@seniorsrstinc.org or visit seniorsrstinc.orgCommunity Bulletin USPS 00-6186 ISSN 1064-36131500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FLL 32835-5705 Member of: Goldenrod Chamber of CommercePublisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor. Submission does not guarantee publication. Columnists opinions are made independently of the newspaper. All rights reserved. Winter Park / Maitland Observer 2011Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munsterwww.wpmobserver.com | Phone: 407-563-7000 | Fax: 407-563-7099 | editor@observernewspapers.comP.O. Box 2426 Winter Park, FLL 32790 Published Thursday, Oct. 20, 2011 CONNTACTS Volume 23, Issue NNumber 42 PUBLISHER Kyle Taylor 407-563-7009 kyle@observernewspapers.com managingMANAGING EDITOR Jenny Andreasson 407-563-7026 editor@observernewspapers.com DESIGNER Jonathan Gallagher 407-563-7054 jgallagher@observernewspapers.com REPORTERS Jenny Andreasson 407-563-7026 editor@observernewspapers.com Isaac Babcock 407-563-7023 isaacb@observernewspapers.com LegalsEGALS | ClassifiedsLASSIFIEDS Ashley McBride legal@FLAlegals.com classieds@observernewspapers.com COPY EDITORS Isaac Babcock isaacb@observernewspapers.com Padrick Brewer COLUMNISTS Chris Jepson Jepson@MediAmerica.us LLouis Roney LRoney@c.rr.com Josh Garrick joshgarrick9@gmail.com ADVERTISING SALES ManagerANAGER Tracy Craft 407-515-2605 tcraft@observernewspapers.com subscriptionsSUBSCRIPTIONS | circulationCIRCULATION Amanda Rayno 407-563-7073 arayno@golfweek.com InternNTERN Meisha Perrin ObituariesBITUARIES obit@observernewspapers.com LLizard art Frank Lloyd Lizard was donated to Park Maitland School by Hel man Hurley Charvat Peacock Architects of Maitland. Several years ago, the company spon sored a lizard, Orlandos chosen mascot at the time, in the citys LizArt Sculpture promotion for Art in Public Places. Since they are an architectural rm, they chose to decorate the lizard as Frank Lloyd Wright, the renowned American architect. Pictured are Angelina Mastroeni and Carolyn Rogers with Frank Lloyd Lizard. Pink Out spreads In dedication to Harriett Lake, Albin Polasek Foundation trustee Ann Polasek placed a multitude of Pink Out Winter Park amingos outside of the Polasek Museum to raise awareness for breast cancer month. Show your breast cancer support by purchasing a $10 pink amingo. Visit PinkOutWinterPark. com for a list of retailers. Princess time This past Saturday, more than 150 people showed up for the Maitland Public Librarys rst annual princess tea party. Children of all ages attended and were gifted tiaras and bouquets of owers upon arrival. A live ute trio led several of the young ladies to dance and frolic around the room. A storyteller was also in attendance, gathering the group for her rendition of Cinderella. ART APPRAISAL DAY! 2011 Special EventOctober 21-23 Specials and Giveaways!300 No. Park Avenue, Winter Park, FL 32789 www.earthinspiredliving.com Find our weekly Business Briefs online at WPMObserver.com The Oct. 13 article Winter Park celebrates an era of change about the opening of the Winter Park Historical Museums new exhibit, incorrectly identied Hatties and Cottrells. The former was a clothing store and the latter was a 5&10-cent store. Correction The Oct. 13 article Talks stall on property swap incorrectly quoted Winter Park Commissioner Tom McMacken as saying Thats like blowing up shops along Park Avenue. McMacken said boarding not blowing. The article also did not clearly identify the company for which Paul Ellis is president: CNL Commercial Real Estate. Correction

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Thursday, Oct. 20, 2011 Page 5 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Are you living with Heart Failure?Local cardiologists are conducting a research study for heart failure patients. The study is a comparison of two prescription medications. You may qualify to participate in this study if you meet all study criteria, including but not limited to: You have chronic heart failure You are taking several heart failure medications You have been in the hospital because of heart failure in the past year If you qualify for this research study: Your research study medications will be given to you at no cost Any research procedure or research assessment will be provided at no cost to you A modest stipend is available to assist you in covering your travel expenses For more information, call the Florida Hospital Cardiovascular Research Department at (407) 303-7556 or email Carol Stastny their hand at a homecoming comeback Oct. Now the Cats head to East River with a 1714 loss hanging over them. scoring on long passing plays that bamboo zled the Wildcat defense. spanked East Ridge 35-7 on Oct. 7. Meanwhile, the Winter Park offense half. The second half was a different story, them went to receivers Xavier Amerson and 103 respective receiving yards. Montgomery also stole the spotlight on defense, playing as defensive back and down, falling short in their comeback. The Wildcats head to East River this week for a 7:30 p.m. Friday kickoff. The trict team the Wildcats will face so far. The game was knotted at the half before East River went on two long drives to grab the Winter Park JV falls played well on offense and made it close, to 3-2 on the season. The Wildcats got on the scoreboard in extra point to make it 21-7. Winter Park yard scoring strike. Ben-Zeev kicked the extra point. The Cats next host East River at Showal PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER TThe Wildcats head to EEast RRiver at 7:30 p.m. FFriday after losing to EEvans 17-14 on T Thursday, OOct. 13. Wild homecoming IISAAC BBABCOCK OObserver SStaff Forward fashionPHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER PP ark A A venue Fashion Weeks nale runway show was SSaturday, OOct. 15 in CCentral Park. Sc C AN HERE Use your smartphones QR R code reader app to view more photos or visit wpmobserver.com/photos/galleries

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Thursday, Oct. 20, 2011 Page 6 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Oct. 24 City Commission Meeting Topics Of InterestThere will be a City Commission meeting Monday, Oct. 24, at 3:30 Chambers located at 401 Park Ave. S. Below are a few topics of interest: Week of the Family procla mation Check presentation Friends of Fleet Peeples Park 10. and contracts (for a complete list of access the Commission Agenda Packet at www.cityofwinterpark. pay these obligations. geted Parks & Recreation De improve the golf bag storage area discussion Review and approval of the exchange agreement regarding 170 S. Knowles Ave. State legislative priorities to streamline the zoning approval process: nance revising the application ing amendments and conditional and the extension or re-establish ments to the comprehensive plan, goals, objectives and policies doc vestors, LLC, on behalf of WAWA Second reading of the ordi nance vacating and abandoning on to cityofwinterpark.org and Commission > Packets.Calling all veterans!On Friday, Nov. 11 at 11 a.m., the city of Winter Park in partnership with the Winter Park Ministerial Alliance and Winter Park Cham ber of Commerce will be present held in honor of all of the veterans of Winter Park at the new state-oflocated at 721 W. New England Ave. Calling all veterans that have (World War II, Korean War, Viet served in any military branch in The city is holding this event to Beginning at 10 a.m., attendees can gather information from a va riety of organizations and services ment of Veterans Affairs, Orlando VA Medical Center, Disabled American Veterans, Veterans of Foreign Wars, American Legion recognition of veterans according 2012 Winter Park general electionIn accordance with Winter Park Ordinance No. 2717-07, the city presidential preference primary. The city of Winter Parks gen electing a mayor. If a primary is For more election information, please contact the city clerk at 407599-3277, visit www.cityofwinter park.org and click on the Election pervisor of Elections website at www.ocfelections.comCoffeeTalk featuring Commissioner Carolyn Cooper sioner Carolyn Cooper for Cof Welcome Center located at 151 W. Lyman Ave. Special thanks to Palmanos Roastery & Espresso Bar. cil voted to adopt the FY 2012 strategic planning session held in April. City advisory boards held Improvements Program and establish time lines for the improve ments, which was adopted by the Special workshops were held to of streets, parks, physical proper ment and personnel administra tion. In addition to providing core planning session. These initiatives tions with residents, developing a West Side park, completing re lations, revising the sign code ordinance, creating a downtown, gic partners in economic develop ment, promoting green initiatives, appraiser and the millage rate set by the city. Like most com million, increased slightly at less than .1 percent. As adopted, Mai government and 0.5 mills to cover voted debt associated with city fa For additional details on the Sharon Anselmo, Director, Management ServicesCity Council Agenda of Oct. 24 Lane. Below are items that will be addressed at that meeting: Special PresentationsProclamation Week of the FamilyPublic Hearings: tland, LLC Development Agreement 02 Chapter 7.5 Land Development tial Preference Primary Consent Agenda: October 10, 2011 ditor Contract gram Agreement Arapaho Side walks gram Agreement Thistle Lane Calming DevicesDecision Item: Apartments Landscaping Discussion Item: Maitland adopts budget Maitland City Talk bBY HowardOWARD SchiCHIEfFErdRDEckCKErR MAYOR Winter Park City Talk bBY RaANdD Y KNightIGHT CITY MANAGER www.gulfstatescu.orgWe oer FREE Business Checking407-831-8844 Effective October 17, 2011 Sheila Baez-Torres, MD will be moving her practice, Neurology & Movement Disorders Assoc., from their current location to: 1685 Lee Road, Suite 210 Winter Park, FL 32789 Patient medical records will be If you have any questions, please NOTICE TO PATIENTS

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Thursday, Oct. 20, 2011 Page 7 Winter Park / Maitland Observer *Offer ends 1/28/2012. New residential High-Speed Internet (HSI) and Unlimited Long Distance or existing residential Pure Broadband customers only. Services and offers not available everywhere. Price-Lock Guarantee Offer applies only to the monthly recurring charges for the listed services; excludes all taxes, fees, surcharges, and monthly recurring fees for modem/router and professional installation. Listed monthly recurring charge of $19.95 applies to CenturyLink High-Speed Internet with speeds up to 10 Mbps and requires subscription to a CenturyLink Unlimited Calling plan. Offer requires customer to remain in good standing and terminates if customer changes their account in any manner including any change to the required CenturyLink services (cancelled, upgraded, downgraded), telephone number change, or change of physical location of any installed service (including customer moving from residence of installed services). General CenturyLink may change, cancel, or substitute offers and services including Locked-In Offer or vary them by service area at its sole discretion without notice. Requires credit approval and deposit may be required. Additional restrictions apply. Taxes, Fees, and Surcharges Applicable taxes, fees, and surcharges include a Carrier Universal Service charge, National Access Fee or Carrier Cost Recovery surcharge, a one-time High-Speed Internet activation fee, state and local fees that vary by area and certain in-state surcharges. Cost recovery fees are not taxes or government-required charges for use. Taxes, fees, and surcharges apply based on standard monthly, not promotional, rates. Call for a listing of applicable taxes, fees, and surcharges. Monthly Rate Monthly rate applies while customer subscribes to all qualifying services. If one (1) or more services are cancelled, the standard monthly fee will apply to each remaining service. High-Speed Internet Shipping and handling fees will apply to customers modem or router. Performance will vary due to conditions outside of network control and no speed is guaranteed. Direct connection and/or consistent speed claim are based on CenturyLink providing High-Speed Internet subscribers with a dedicated, virtual-circuit connection to the CenturyLink central ofce. Unlimited Calling Monthly recurring charges apply to one (1) residential phone line with direct-dial, nationwide local and long distance voice calling, including Alaska, Puerto Rico, Guam, and U.S. Virgin Islands; excludes commercial use, call center, data and facsimile services (including dial-up Internet connections, data services, and facsimile, each billed at $0.10/minute), conference lines, directory and operator assistance, chat lines, pay-per-call, calling card use, or multi-housing units. International calling billed separately. 2011 CenturyLink, Inc. All Rights Reserved. The name CenturyLink and the pathways logo are trademarks of CenturyLink, Inc. Call 855 .TRY.FIVE Click centurylink.com/ pricelock Come in For locations, visit centurylink.com/storesPara or ofertas en espaol marque al 855.879.3483. 5 years. 1 price. 0 con trac t. Guaranteed.The CenturyLink Price-Lock Guarantee CNTL11-662B_10.15x9_r1.indd 1 9/27/11 9:03 AM Savannah Court and CoeExcellence in Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation 1301 W. Maitland Blvd. Maitland, FL 32751407-645-3990www.SavannahCourtMaitland.comAssisted Living Facility License No. 8447 Skilled Nursing Facility License No. 1635096 Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above!Everyone welcome! Children come dressed in a costume for a costume contest! Pick a pumpkin from the Pumpkin PatchTreats served Please call to RSVP!A Senior Living Community where Hospitality is a Way of Life.Halloween Party Pumpkin PatchTuesday, October 25th 4 p.m. 5:30 p.m. 250 North Orlando Avenue Winter Park, Florida 32789 407.677.9777 A Premier Flooring Source nCARPETOODTONE TILELAMINATE AREA RUGINDO TREATMENT Featuring Exquisite Products for Residential & Commercial Projects Custom Design and Quality Installationn K-9 training school, has offered to train Maitlands dog free of charge, he said.Council excited theyve had with K-9s. to be training nearby alerted and shared a similar anecdote a K-9 saw the dog, I was like, Alright, Ball agreed. Well be posting the position and accepting appli cations, he added with a smile.Honoring furry ofcers wasnt active, Maitland was still cers. In April, the city dedicated its den at the Edward Doyle Police Sarge and Sivil were moved there. Alix, the former Maitland Alixs handler of nine years, that hes ecstatic that Maitland is bringing the program back. Ive been in law enforcement for 20 years, and it is the best thing kK-9 | Apopka has offered to waive the cost of training Maitlands new K-9 officer, Chief Doug Ball says CC OONTTINUEUED FROFROM FROnNT pP AGE

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Thursday, Oct. 20, 2011 Page 8 Winter Park / Maitland Observer THURSDAY Y Orange County Mayor Teresa Jacobs will speak at the Newcomers of Central Floridas Oct. 20 luncheon meeting at 11:30 a.m. at the Hilton Orlando/Altamonte Springs. Visit New comerscCFL.org The Goldenrod Historical Society hosts Sustaining Trustee Soiree on Thursday, Oct. 20 at the Goldenrod Station, 4755 N. Palmetto Ave. from 5-7 p.m. Call 407-677-5980. CoffeeTalk featuring Commissioner Carolyn Cooper is Oct. 20 at 6 p.m. at the Winter Park Welcome Center. Call 407-599-3438. SATURDAY Y The Bach Festival Society of Winter Park opens its 2011 season with the sounds of Verdis Requiem at the Knowles Memorial Chapel, Rollins College, 1000 Holt Ave, on Sat urday, Oct. 22, at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, Oct. 23, at 3 p.m. Call 407-646-2182 or visit Bach FestivalFlorida.org Subprime screens at Orlando Film Festival on Saturday Oct. 22 at 3:30 p.m. at The Plaza Cinema Caf, downtown Orlando, 155 S. Or ange Ave. Cost is $5 for a day pass. Reserve your seat at OrlandoFilmFest.com College Park JazzFest 2011 is Saturday, Oct. 22. Gates open at 5 p.m. A $5 donation from every adult is required for admission. Visit Col legeParkPartnership.com Candys Cats, a not-for-prot, no-kill cat rescue hosts Wheelin Dealin Kittens event on Sat urday, Oct. 22, from 6 to 10 p.m. at the Maitland Civic Center. Visit CandysCats.org Get away for a great cause at the third annual Island Hop for Special Olympics Florida on Saturday, Oct. 22, from 6 to 10 p.m. at Gaylord Palms. Tickets are $100 per person. Visit The IslandHop.org Cows N N Cabs a fundraiser to benet three nonprots, will be Oct. 22 from 7 to 10 p.m. at Central Park West Meadow in downtown Winter Park. This western-themed event will feature a wide variety of wine and craft beer, paired with a full culinary experience. Cost is $110 general and $140 for VIP. Visit CowsNCabs.com SUNNDAY Y The Jewish Pavilions Party in the Park is Sunday, Oct. 23, at 9:30 a.m. at Cranes Roost Park in Altamonte Springs. Proceeds benet the Jewish Pavilion. For more information visit Jew ishPavilion.org The Wine Room on Park Avenue will be hosting a wine-tasting event featuring more than 50 wines on Oct. 23 from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Tickets are limited. Visit TheWineRoomOnline.com or call 407-696-9463. MONNDAY Y Maitland Area Chamber of Commerces 14th Annual Taste of Maitland is Monday, Oct. 24. The event begins at 5:30 p.m. Visit Maitland Chamber.com WEEDNENESDAY Y 4Rivers Smokehouse celebrates its second birthday on Oct. 26 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. with free food and entertainment. JFS will hold a community meeting on Oct. 26 at 11:30 a.m. at its ofce on 2100 Lee Road to gather volunteers for a community-wide toy and food drive. Register at marni.chepenik@jfsor lando.org or phone 407-644-7593, ext. 227. The Maitland L Lake L Lily food truck event has moved to Wednesdays from 6-9 p.m. More park ing is available at the Civic Center on Wednes day nights to accommodate the growing event. Natalie Cordone, with pianist Chris Leavy, will return to the Winter Park Playhouse in her caba ret, Im N Not Here to Take N Naps; Tales of a Preschool Perfectionist, on Wednesday, Oct. 26, and Thursday, Oct. 27, both at 7:30 p.m. Call 407-645-0145 or visit WinterParkPlay house.org OCT. 27Join the Winter Park Farmers Market for Bubbles & BBQ on Thursday, Oct. 27 from 5:30 to 8 p.m. This dinner affair will be a good old-fashioned barbecue with a nod to the upscale. Tickets are $20. Visit Winterpark.org for tickets. Visit wpmobserver.com/events for more details. Send submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com Calendar Call 1.866.769.7696to place your order today!Let us Cater your next Party!pollotropical.com Visit our webpage for more info!www.NRG-DanceStudios.weebly.com Dancers Ages 2 & Up!Ballet, Tap, Jazz, Lyrical, Modern, Hip-hop, & Expressive Dance Location: Winter Park Community Center721 West New England Ave. Winter Park, FL 32789 FREE NRG-Dance Studios T-shirt and NO registration fee for the first 75 dancers to enroll! Where students transform into dancers !Meet the owner Nichole Genchi ...B.A. Dance from FIU Over 10 Years Teaching Former Miami Dolphins Cheerleader (NFL) & Panthers Ice Dancer (NHL) 1st Dance Class FREENow Enrolling!Call: (407)519-0477 Taste of Maitland, Oct. 24

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Thursday, Oct. 20, 2011 Page 10 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Lifestyles There are certain pieces of classical music Bach Festival Societys artistic director and conductor John Sinclair said nearly anyone can hear and immediately recognize in mere seconds. After just a bar or two of music, a light bulb will go off, he said, and the person might not know where the song is from, or even where theyve heard it before, but they know it. Verdis Requiem, which the Bach Fes tival Choir and Orchestra will perform to kick off its 77th season this weekend is one of those pieces, Sinclair said. Its a humongously powerful and dra matic piece, Sinclair said. Theres no drama in the way of costumes or props its in the sheer power of the arrangement. The 115-minute piece is just one of many the Bach Festival Society will put on in their 2011-2012 season. In addition to the soci etys annual Christmas presentation, and a series of world-renown visiting artists on 40 years, Sinclair said, the ensemble will feature an all-Bach Bach Festival program composed of works by the entitys name sake composer in the spring. The choir, which Sinclair said has been called a gem of the south in being up to par with world-famous ensembles elsewhere in New York, London and Vienna by a New York Times arts columnist, will continued excellence in the present and in surance of its continuance in the future as one of the longest-running Bach festivals in the country.World-class choirThe years program, he said, will reem phasize how the Bach Festival Society has grown in both skill and repertoire since it was founded in 1935 as a daylong celebra tion of composer Johann Sebastian Bachs birthday. It started as just one day, said Sinclair, who has conducted the ensemble since 1990. Then it turned into a week, and now its a whole years worth of events. Since its formation, he said, the group has recruited the best musicians and vocalists from throughout Central Florida and beyond with this years hailing from eight different counties in Florida. It is the quality of the ensemble and the music it plays, he said, that draws people in and keeps them coming back. Beverly Slaughter, the provost for Bre vard Community Colleges Cocoa campus, is in her 37th season performing with the Bach Festival Society and is one of many members of higher education who perform in the choir. Its one of those things where once you get a taste, its hard to leave, she said. Having such a great group of people sing ing great music, a choir of this caliber is Unlike other Bach-related performance organizations, or famous choirs in general that are situated in cities such as New York and Vienna, Slaughter said being located in Winter Park and drawing the crowds and attention the Bach Festival Society does, is a testament to its quality. Unlike in other places, we are unique in that often we alone are the draw for people to come out to our shows, she said. Susan Lucher, a member of the choir for seven years and a Winter Springs resident, said the few times shes been able to watch the ensemble she now plays in perform, it was like having a wave crash over her because of the sheer power of the music. You realize were every bit as good as the choirs in Boston and New York and ev erywhere else, she said. Its exciting to re alize youre part of something so good that keeps getting better.Past, present, futureTo ensure the continuing success of the the Bach Festival Society does many community-outreach programs throughout the year, Sinclair said. From its close ties to Rollins College where it practices and performs to outreach programs with both Orange and Seminole county public schools, the organization does its best to give back to the community, Sinclair said. Our idea is to keep Bach youthful, he said. Stephen Cauley, a senior voice student at Rollins, will be one of a handful of students chosen to perform with the Bach Festival Society in this years program, which he said gives him an opportunity to network with local professionals while also performing at an exceedingly high level. But the Bach Festival brings great op portunities to all students here, not just those performing, he said. Visiting artists often hold master classes with local students. To have a professional musical organi zation on campus is such a unique experience for our students, Sinclair said. It would be hard to give the number of stu dents in the community that we touch, but Oktober-feteA Community Social Beneting Presents Supported byThursday, October 27, 5:30 7:30 p.m. Winter Park Welcome Center 151 W. Lyman Avenue $10 Join the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce for a festive fall evening with friends, food and drink with all proceeds helping our community this holiday season Learn moreThe Bach Festival Societys 2011-2012 season will kick off this weekend, Oct. 22 and 23, with performances of Verdis Requiem at Knowles Memorial Chapel at Rollins College. For more information about the society, and to purchase tickets for the upcoming seasons performances, visit www.bachfestivalorida.orgARCHIVE PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER CConductor John SSinclair will lead BBach Festival SSocietys 77th season, which begins this SSaturday. Back to BachThe Bach Festival Society launches its 77th season of bringing world-class music to Winter Park this weekend SSARAH WILSON OObserver SStaff

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Thursday, Oct. 20, 2011 Page 11 Winter Park / Maitland Observer FamilyCalendar Haunted SwampEnzians Haunted Swamp: Walk of Terror tour is 8 p.m. to midnight Oct. 21-22, 28-29 and Monday, Oct. 31, from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. Enzian is also showcasing a series of scary movies. A single nights admission into the Walk of Terror is $10 when purchased in advance, $15 day of the event. Visit Enzian.org10.28Halloween PartyAnimal Hospital at Baldwin Parks An nual Halloween Party will be 2-4 p.m. Friday, Oct. 28, at their ofce at 946 Lake Baldwin Lane. Enter your pet in the costume contest. Visit www.bald winparkvet.comCostume PartyWhole Foods Winter Park is throwing a Costume Party from 6:30-8:30 Friday, Oct. 28. All proceeds from the $10 per person cost benet the Win ter Park YMCA Scholarship Fund. This is a 21+ event.Hold em & Roll emNew Hope for Kids will present Hold em & Roll em, Halloween Casinonight fundraiser, at Fields BMW (963 N. Wymore Road, Winter Park) on Fri day, Oct. 28 from 6-10 p.m. Cost for admission are $65 per person or two for $100. Call 407-331-3059 ext. 10 or visit www.newhopeforkids.org10.29 Trick or Treat on ParkHalloween Trick or Treat on Park Av enue is Saturday, Oct. 29 from 10 a.m. 1 p.m.Halloween HowlRollins Colleges Halloween Howl is Saturday, Oct. 29, from 2-5 p.m. Enjoy trick-or-treating, haunted houses, arts and crafts, carnival games, a cos tume contest and snacks and bever ages. This event is free and on Mills Lawn at Rollins, 1000 Holt Ave. Call 407-691-1250, or e-mail MHein@ Rollins.eduSpirit StrollHalloween Spirit Stroll, a costumed pub-crawl through Baldwin Parks Village Center, is 6:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 29. Advance tickets are avail able online at brightsideevents.org through Friday, Oct. 28, for $25 and will be available at the door for $35.Halloween Fun RunThe 5k Halloween Fun Run will be 8 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 29, at Mead Gar dens, Winter Park. All net proceeds benet St. Margaret Mary Churchs Haiti relief. The advance ticket cost is $20 for adults, $15 for students and $10 for children 12 and younger. Its $25 to enter the day of the event. Costumes are optional. Visit stmargaretmary.org/haitifunrun.html10.30 Trunk or TreatNorth Park Baptist Church Trunk or Treat, a fun and safe Halloween experience, will be 6-8 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 30, in the church parking lot at 2047 Prospect Ave. There will be a free bounce house, hot dogs, soda or wa ter, and candy for the kids. Visit www. northparkbaptist.orgPet Costume ContestThe 12th Annual Pet Costume Con test will be 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 30, at the Doggie Door, 329 N. Park Ave., Winter Park. There will be a large pet costume contest at 11 a.m. and a small pet contest at 1 p.m. Call 407-644-2969.Trick-or-TreatingFree Halloween Trick-or-Treat is 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Monday, Oct. 31 at Orlando Fashion Square, E. Colonial Drive at Maguire Blvd. Visit www.or landofashionsquare.com or call 407896-1132.Pumpkins & MunchkinsPumpkins & Munchkins is 6:30-8:30 p.m. on Halloween night in Shady Park in Hannibal Square (adjacent to the Winter Park Community Center at 721 W. New England Ave.) Event activities will include games, bounce houses, costume contest and Trickor-Treat Trail. Its free. Call 407-5993275. PICTURE A HEALTHIER YOUAt the Y, we are focused on improving the health and well-being of our community. Thats why we are devoted to you. Join the Y and register for our GET MOVING program by November 15th and well invest up to $200 toward your journey to a healthy lifestyle. For more information, contact:Start your journey to a healthy lifestyle. October 15 November 15, 2011WINTER PARK YMCA 1201 N. Lakemont Ave, Winter Park, FL 32792 | 407 644 1509 Visit ymcacentralflorida.com French breakfast and lunchFrench Pastries, French Baguette Sandwiches, Quiche, Soups, Salted Pound CakesNOW OPEN!906 W. Fairbanks Ave, Winter Park (corner of Denning and Fairbanks)407-975-06007:30am 2:30pm Monday-Saturday10% off with this ad Haunts around townPHOTO BY AMANDA GEORGI THE OBSERVER AActors at the EEnzians HHaunted SSwamp entertain attendees on Friday. For more events and details, scan here with your smartphones QR code reader app, or visit wpmobserver. com. Submit events to editor@ observernewspapers.comSt. Mary Magdalen Church, 861 Maitland Ave., presents CommunityFest 2011, Come On And Safari With Us! on Oct. 21-23. The opening parade is 6 p.m. Fri day night. Visit StMaryMagdalen. org The Lake Forrest Prep community garage sale beneting the fthand sixth-grade eldtrips is Saturday, Oct. 22, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 866 Lake Howell Road in Maitland. Call 407-331-5144. The Florida Water Festival, presented by the Florida Water Envi ronment Association, will be 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 22, at Harbor Park in Baldwin Park. The German-American Societys Annual Oktoberfest celebrations are 2 p.m. to midnight Saturday, Oct. 22, at 381 Orange Lane in Casselberry. Admission is $5 and children 12 and younger are free. Call 407-834-0574. Maitland presents the second ses sion of fall childrens art classes, beginning on Monday, Oct. 24. To register call 407-539-2181 or visit ArtAndHistory.org The Junior League of Greater Orlandos fourth annual Harvest Hustle 5K run/walk is at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 27, at the in tersection of New Broad and Jake streets in Baldwin Park. An afterparty and costume contest will follow. Cost is $30 on race day. Visit JLGO.org or Run4Acause. org/JLGO Popcorn Flicks in Central Park featuring National Velvet is 7-9 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 3, in Central Park in downtown Winter Park. Its presented by Winter Park and Enzian Theater to coincide with Orange Countys annual Week of the Family. There will be free popcorn for everyone. Rain date will be Nov. 17. Contact 407-6290054 or visit Enzian.org Movie in the Park featuring Mr. Poppers Penguins is 7 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 5, at Quinn Strong Park in Maitland. Bring your blan kets and chairs and the city will bring you the stars. Visit ItsmyMaitland.com for more information. The Maitland Public Library has bedtime stories for all ages at 6 p.m. every Monday. Preschool sto ry time is 10:30 a.m. every Tues day. Infant and toddler story time is at 10:30 a.m. every Thursday. Other Library events this week include Learn how honey can help your allergies on Thursday, Oct. 20, at 6:30 p.m., Free Blood Pressure Checks by the Maitland Fire & Rescue Friday, Oct. 21, at 10 a.m., LCC Social Networking series for the Older adult: Learn about Facebook on Friday, Oct. 21, at 10 a.m., and LCC Literature series: Monsters in Literature on Monday, Oct. 24, at 7 p.m. Call 407-647-7700. Send submissions to editor@ observernewspapers.com

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Thursday, Oct. 20, 2011 Page 12 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Judy Appleton Procell, who was diagnosed with breast cancer in April 2009, was still getting used to the new appearance that comes with treatment, especially not having hair. One day, though, that changed. Two years ago, despite being barely 36 hours out of sur gery, with a pink scarf wrapped around her head and wheelchair to support her, the always-tough Procell headed to the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure. That sunny day, while surrounded by dence she hadnt since she lost her long black hair, and her scarf I felt the strength of the wom en around me, Procell said. A chance diagnosisBut strength wasnt something Procell was a stranger to. Since levelheaded and decisive from cancer had come out of a family crisis. When Procells husband was laid off from his job, Procell went the route she always did in the face of trouble: She faced it head-on. In a week she would be without health insurance, so she headed to all the annual appoint ments she would have gone to in a few months, including one for her pelvic and breast exam. And thats when the nurse practitioner found a marble-sized lump in her breast. It was cancer. It was an indescribable feeling, walking around, thinking she was Conquering with knowledgeBut Procell, an Oviedo resident, tackled the diagnosis with deter mination, hope and, most impor tantly, education. A notepad full of questions greeted each doctor she spoke to, a bookshelf full of educational material still stands in her living room and she attend ed every conference, seminar and meeting she could get to. She battled and won against health insurance companies when they refused to pay, and she faced though, there wasnt an option to break down, and her life had to go on, especially for her two teenage daughters. I couldnt be weak my chil dren were counting on me, she said. Her approach to the disease was no surprise to those close to her. Ive seen her be strong her whole entire life, said Sara McGill, Procells cousin. Shes a Today shes cancer-free, after enduring four surgeries and che motherapy in eight months. And throughout her treatment and re covery, Procell has used her story and the knowledge shes gained disease. Procell said breast cancer reaches almost every person shes met, and considering the statis tics, its not hard to see why. The chance of a woman having breast cancer in her lifetime is about 12 percent, and there will be about 230,480 new cases in the U.S. this year, making it the most common cancer for women in the U.S. Those are staggering numbers, Procell said. Healing through sharing heals herself, by sharing her story with other survivors, fam ily, friends and curious strangers wherever and whenever she can. She represents strength and sur ate of the Susan G. Komen for the Cure foundation at local events where she speaks. She captivates people, said Stefanie Steele, mission manager at Susan G. Komen for the Cure of Central Florida. When I bring Judy with me it becomes real to every single person there. Procells daughter agreed. I think people connect most when you share your story, Han nah Procell said. Theres power in that. And when Procell tells her story, you see true mental and emotional toughness at work. Shes warm, but matter-of-fact there are no tears when she speaks about her experience. Her knowl edge seems endless, and her pas sion for education is clear. I always knew I was a strong woman, I just didnt know how strong I was, Procell said. Though her times of triumph outnumber them, there were moments when she felt scared and overwhelmed. One was when her husband got a job in Alaska and had to leave a week after her last surgery. I was frightened, Procell said. I was still in stitches and bandages driving him to the air port. But her community, temple con gregation and family were there to support her. For her daughter Hannah, this was a big turning point in life. She learned what not many young teens always do to appreciate her mom. Suddenly I was needed, and you cant walk away from that, Hannah said. Continuing to helpNow the mother and daughter have teamed up, going beyond the races and conferences. Hannah and Procell have designed pink Roar for the Cure shirts that Hannah is selling at Oviedo High School, where Procell graduated from and her two daughters Han nah and Sarah currently attend. At the Friday, Oct. 21, home football game they hope the crowd will pink out the game by wearing their roar shirts. Steele is always awed with the work Procell does for the cause, and said without her their mission wouldnt be as strong. She is by far one of the most amazing women Ive ever met, Steele said. She inspires me ev ery day.Healthy Living Acupuncture, herbal therapy, cupping, moxibustion, electrical stimulation, Tongue/Pulse DiagnosisSpecialize in treating pain management and stress407-429-1066spectrumwellcare@gmail.com1298 Minnesota Ave. Suite A Winter Park 25% off your rst visit with this ad! Lack of Desire or Low Energy? Testosterone Lab Work for $35 (a $240 Value) Call today for a risk-free appointment: 407-894-9959 Learn moreBuy your Roar for the Cure T-shirt at the Oviedo/Edgewater football game at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 21 at Oviedo High School, 601 King St. They cost $10. Learn moreFor more information about how you can help with the ght against breast cancer locally, visit the website for the Central Florida afliate for the Susan G. Komen for the Cure at www.komencentralorida.orgPHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERJudy Procell, left, and daughter HHannah sport their RRoar for the CCure T T -shirts. Strength and survivalOviedo breast cancer survivor Judy Procell says educating and supporting others helped in her own healing process BBRITTNI JOHNSON OObserver SStaff

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Thursday, Oct. 20, 2011 Page 13 Winter Park / Maitland Observer When most people think of emer gency preparedness, they think canned food, bottled water and generators but what about pre paring for emergencies and crises not involving the weather? Brenda Moody, assistant direc tor of Parks and Recreation for Winter Park, said often most peo ple, including herself, are not prepared to handle unexpected situa tions involving personal or loved ones health. You call 911; arrive at the hospital and then what? In 2010, Moodys husband was diagnosed with an advanced stage of lung cancer. She was com pletely unprepared as she spent his remaining days with him in hospice. I literally had nothing with me, and the last thing you want to do is leave their side to get the things you need, she said. The hospice buildings take care of the people spending their last days, but they dont provide for the families that are staying. From this train of thought, in June of this year, the Gathering Hope Foundation was formed. From toiletries to blankets, Moody wants to provide families in need with the basic things to make it through emergencies like hers, without having to leave their loved ones side. The foundation now gathers these essentials and wraps them in baskets to be delivered to local hospice care centers, Ronald McDonald Houses, and other shelters where people are in need, with the goal of each basket pro viding enough basic products for a person to be able to live for a week without having to go out for more. Originally we were just going to do hospice, but we saw such a great need and it just kind of grew, Moody said. Our main fo cus is just helping people.Finding fundsSo far the organization has donat ed 215 individually wrapped basunused hotel samples of soap and shampoo to donated puzzle books and magazines. But the things they dont get donated are paid for out of pocket by volunteers, said Dawn Payment, inventory and event management coordinator for Gathering Hope. Right now everything is very hands on, Payment said. We collect sample size stuff and all the products that go inside either we buy or people donate. Moody and Payment said theyve become mini versions of the Extreme Couponers seen ing shopping crowds to buy the supplies they need in bulk when theres a sale. We were all over the back-toschool sales, Payment said. We bought hundreds of crayons for the kid baskets, but now were running out and raising money to buy more. To raise money for more sup plies, the Gathering Hope Foun dation is holding a Rummage Sale on Saturday, Oct. 22. If we could just raise a couple hundred dollars, you dont realize how far it can go. With this it re ally doesnt take a lot of money to help the tiniest things can make a difference, Moody said.Giving backThe most important thing, Moody said, other than giving people the basics that they need, is making them feel good and special. We want it to be a personal gift, she said. The whole point is for it to be a special gift just for them, its not just things thrown in a basket. Lisa Blackwelder, director of development at the BETA Center of Orlando, which provides atrisk and teen moms a safe place to learn and care for their children, said when her girls received their baskets from Gathering Hope, It was like Easter in September! The girls got baskets with brand new toiletries, magazines and nail polish things Blackwelder said the girls often never receive, or if they do, are rarely new. When they do get new things, its typically for their children, Blackwelder said. For a stranger to think of them and give them these things, it was really spe cial. Moody and Payments goal for Gathering Hope is that people re alize this power of giving and the little things that can have such an impact on others, and for them to also realize that there is a need for the spirit of giving all year round not just during the holidays. Who would have thought, Payment asked, that toothpaste and toothbrushes could make people so happy? Dennis AllenOwner/ Administrator Its not just about getting you back on your feet. Its about getting you back to your life. HCR Healthcare, LLC Rehabilitation and Skilled Nursing Learn moreThe Gathering Hope Rummage Sale will be held Saturday, Oct. 22, from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 4325 Ivey Glen Ave., Orlando, FL 32826. For more information on the event and the foundation, visit www.gatheringhopefoundation.orgPHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Winter Park Parks and RRecreation DDirector BBrenda MMoody, left, and Dawn Payment started Gathering HHope. Preparing for lifes unexpectedWinter Park staffer turns tragedy into charity, giving baskets to those in need SSARAH WILSON OObserver SStaff

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Thursday, Oct. 20, 2011 Page 14 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Lost your job? It can make you sick or be the cue to focus on a healthier you. If you are one of the many hardworking people who are unemployed, you already know this job market isnt like it used to be. You already know unemployment can be stressful and depressing. The loss of income, loss of daily contact with coworkers, loss of social status and other changes when you go from a lifetime of working to being unemployed can take a toll on your health. It can also be a time of recharging, regrouping and reinventing yourself. Workers who lose a job are twice as likely to get high blood pressure, diabetes or heart of unemployment compared to those with jobs. The unemployed are more likely to have sleep problems; be more anxious; misuse alcohol, prescriptions and street drugs; smoke more; and eat more sugar and high fat food. Does unemployment make you sick? Or are unhealthier, less energetic employees more likely to lose their jobs and struggle to bit of both. But that doesnt have to be you. The changes in your life can lead to a new, healthier you. You have more time to focus on your self, right? Getting healthier can give you energy and that magic pizzazz that gets you hired. Sheila is one of Central Floridas misplaced workers. The depression from being home and discouraged by her frustrating job search was closing in on her. She decided it was time to get into action. She started walking, was tough, but she felt she was making progress and achieving something. Now she is walkshe rides her bike 10 to 20 miles. She has about 100 more pounds sweetest, because she learned she can do it and now she is deter mined she will be a new person. And she is so excited about being in charge that she almost bounces off the road talking about it. So where do you start? If you havent had a checkup in the past year, make an appointment today. If your job was your source of health insurance, you may be able continue that coverage if you sign up within 60 days of leaving the job through what is called COBRA coverage. Take stock of your lifestyle. Are you home too much, too close to the refrigerator, feeding your loneliness with food? Make a plan for a week of meals and satisfying meals. Learn what is healthier. Try new foods. Set some goals. Calculate your BMI at www.nhlbisupport. com/bmi/. If you are overweight (most of us dont need a calcu lose 10 percent of your weight through healthy eating and physical activity. What about exercise? You dont have to join a gym. The beautiful outdoors awaits you, on foot, on bicycle or in a host of other activities. Maitland Community Park has an exercise trail with different stations that can build your muscles in differ ent ways, with a range of levels to challenge you. Make friends with the people you meet. Now that you are liberated from your new worlds. Effective October 13, 2011 Michelle Dolske, PhD, Charles Lammers, PhD, Jodi Nadler, PhD, Anthony Logalbo, PhD, Michael Westerveld, PhD and Benjamin Johnson-Markve, PsyD are moving their practice, Medical Psychology Associates, from their current location to: 1685 Lee Rd., Suite 200 Winter Park, Fl 32789 Patient medical records will be maintained at the Telephone and fax numbers for the practice will remain the same. at 407.303.7991.NOTICE TO PATIENTS $1000 off Cannot be used with any discounts, discount plans or HMOs. Offer expires 12/21/11 Complimentary ExamIncluding Xray & PhotosWith this coupon. Not valid with other offers. Offer expires 12/21/11 Braces or Invisalign Lose your job, gain your health Dr. Nancy Rudner Lugo The Maitland resident is a nurse practitioner and President of Health Action, offering workplace health consulting and nurse coaching. Visit www.healthaction.bizWHO ISLUGO > PHOTO COURTESY OfF NANCY RUDNER LUGO MMaitland CCommunity Park has an exercise trail with a range of levels.

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Thursday, Oct. 20, 2011 Page 15 Winter Park / Maitland Observer The 24-member Orlando Bal let Company invites us to the Vampire's Ball, an evening of humorously convoluted, serious exploitation of vampires, ghouls and sexy dancing with sly refer ences to existing classical ballets and old-time vampire movies. Just in time for Halloween, and with a musical score ranging from Bach to Adele, creatures of the night come to life Oct 21-23. The haunting performance promises a new full-length ballet with choreography by artistic director innocent couple in a power-strug gle between a mad scientist and an evil vampiress. Will anyone come out alive at the Bob Carr Performing Arts Center? Visit OrlandoBallet.org. Silver alert Miss Nelson's boisterous stu dents are misbehaving again! But the students are in for a surprise when Miss Nelson is replaced by Viola Swamp, the scariest substitute teacher ever. Where did Miss Nelson go? Will she ever return? Kids love this witty musical while teachers and parents appreciate the values of respect and generosity it teaches. The Orlando Shakespeare Theater continues its Young Audiences Series with the good-at-beingbad kids of Room 207. Head back to school with Miss Nelson is Missing in performance through Nov. 19. The Shakespeare Theater is at 812 E. Rollins St. in Orlandos Loch Haven Cultural Park. Call 407-447-1700 or visit orlandoshakes.org.Addams Family national tour Now in its second year on Broadway, The Addams Family makes its Orlando debut from Nov. 1-6. Based on the quirky characters created by illustrator/cartoonist Charles Addams, Gomez, Morticia and their family combine the twisted and macabre with charm and wit. The musical features an original story The Addams young princess of darkness, Wednesday, has fallen in love with a sweet young man from a respectable family. Everything changes on the fateful night the Addams Family hosts a dinner for Wednesday's normal boyfriend and his parents. Called a classic, full-tilt, fast paced, old-fashioned musical comedy! by the Chicago Tribune, we can join the Addams Family in their glitzy-gloomy new musical at the Bob Carr Performing Arts Center. Visit OrlandoBroaway. com or call 1-800-982-2787. Feminists at Rollins CollegeIts been 45 years since the founding of the National Organiza tion for Women, and the Winter Park Institute at Rollins College will celebrate that anniversary with a series of free events on Friday, Oct. 28, and Saturday, Oct. 29. Open to the public, the events feature author Gloria Steinem, former U.S. Rep. Patricia Schroeder and Rollins College alumna and co-founder of NOW Muriel Fox. Events include: with Gloria Steinem, Friday, Oct. 28, at 7:30 p.m. at Rollins College, Alfond Sports Center Feminism, Past and Future, Saturday, Oct. 29, at 8:30 a.m. at Roll ins College, Tiedtke Concert Hall. A conversation between Gloria Steinem and Patricia Schroeder, and panel discussions including veteran feminists and student-led oral history projects. Schroeder Our Journey to Equality, Saturday, Oct. 29, at 2 p.m. at Rollins College, Tiedtke Concert Hall Feminists are Funny, Satur day, Oct. 29, at 8 p.m. at Rollins College, Tiedtke Concert Hall a collection of skits, songs and parodies addressing womens issues. Visit www.rollins.edu/wpi or Rising star The lovely and talented may be an overused expression, but its the perfect description of singer/actress Natalie Cordone, who returns to the Winter Park Playhouse in a solo cabaret act on Oct. 26 and 27. And shes witty (which is pretty much a require can tell how witty by the title of her show: Im Not Here to Take Naps (Tales of a Preschool cess story includes an MFA from UCF followed by coast-to-coast work as an actress, singer and spokeswoman. Sharing time with Off-Broadway work in New York City and here in Winter Park, audiences have been fortunate to see Natalie featured in several musicals at the Playhouse. Call 407-645-0145 or visit winterparkplayhouse.org. The Playhouse is located at 711 Orange Ave. in Winter Park. Josh Garrick The vampires are havin a ball!Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906.WHO IS GGARRICK > 1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORGTHIS WEEK AT ENZIAN SENNA Fri-Sat 3:45PM, 6:30PM, 9:15PM Sun 1PM, 3:45PM, 6:30PM Mon 9:30PM Tue 6:30PM Wed & Thu 6:30PM, 9:15PM PEARL JAM TWENTY Fri & Sat 11:59PM RED STATE Sun 10PM 13th ANNUAL MANHATTAN SHORT FILM FESTIVAL Mon 6:30PM NETWORK Tue 9:30PM 1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORGTHIS WEEK AT ENZIAN SENNA Fri-Sat 3:45PM, 6:30PM, 9:15PM Sun 1PM, 3:45PM, 6:30PM Mon 9:30PM Tue 6:30PM Wed & Thu 6:30PM, 9:15PM PEARL JAM TWENTY Fri & Sat 11:59PM RED STATE Sun 10PM 13th ANNUAL MANHATTAN SHORT FILM FESTIVAL Mon 6:30PM NETWORK Tue 9:30PM MARGIN CALL Fri Sun 3:30PM, 6:30PM, 9:30PM Mon, Wed, Thu 6:30PM, 9:30PM Tue 9:30PM Halloween Event & Ghost Tours 3rd ANNUAL HAUNTED SWAMP Fri & Sat 8PM-MID Oct Midnight Madness EVIL DEAD Sat 11:59PM Cult Classic THE TERROR Tue 9:30PM

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Thursday, Oct. 20, 2011 Page 16 Winter Park / Maitland Observer When push comes to shove and times are tough, people just want to do the best they can to be able to take care of their families, says Barbara Wetzler, president of the SPCA of Central Florida it doesnt matter whether the family members have two legs or four. Whether its through feeding their pets organic or raw food diets, treating them to massages or acupuncture, or going the extra mile to make sure their dog is in shape by enrolling them in hy might argue these days the dog days arent so bad for our furry friends. People are willing to do al most anything to keep their pets happy and healthy, Wetzler said. Whether that means splurging on unorthodox treatments or just scrounging by and seeking free or low-cost veterinary care from the SPCA, she said people want to take care of their pets, whatever the cost. In order for the SPCA to continue to offer their services to those both human and animals in need, theyre holding their annual Wiggle Waggle Walk fundraiser on Saturday, Oct. 22, from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. at Cranes Roost Park in Altamonte Springs. Different local dog-friendly businesses will set up booths around the lake to help the SPCA. Its like a party for dogs. They come and have the best time ever, and just happen to bring their people along, Wetzler said. Many local pet health care businesses have sprung up in re cent years, all with the same core mission as the SPCA: improving and caring for Central Floridas likely a local business to care for any of your animals needs. And if not, Wetzler said the SPCA is al ways there to help. Healthy from the inside outKerry Elliot, owner of Hounds & Kitties, a pet health food market located at 144 Lake Ave. in Mait land, said that as humans become more conscious of what they put in their bodies, they are also doing so for their pets. The growing popularity of ho meopathic treatments and consci entiously composed diets has had her two-year-old business hanging steady while others failed. Theres a huge community out there that really wants to do whats best for their dogs and cats Most of our customers dont make a distinction between their two-legged and four-legged children, she said. From antler and cow trachea moo tube chew toys to raw and all-natural pet food products and supplements composed of duck, venison or veal, Elliot said her store does business by offering products with the greatest health seem disconcerting to their hu man counterparts or not. Its not about you, she said, its about them. She said her store also offers an ordinary pet store, but without all the byproducts and chemicals. Other businesses, such as Pookies Pet Nutrition & Bow Wow Bakery and Woof Gang Bak ery, both in Winter Park, also fo cus on keeping pets healthy from the inside out offering natural pet food products. Our products dont cost very much more but can have tremenIf you spend a little more on food, youll end up spending less on vet bills.Staying in shapeWhether your dog is recovering from an operation or just needs fo cused exercise and training, businesses are popping up throughout needs. From bonding with your pet while doing the downward dog pose in a yoga class to treating them to a massage or an aro matherapy session, Sherri Cap pabianca the owner of the new Rockys Retreat Canine Health & Fitness Center in Orlando, said her business focuses on keeping dogs healthy in many different facets of life. We look for ways the dog can bond with the owner, she said. People want their dogs to be happy and healthy and will do almost anything to keep them that way. Rockys Retreats primary business, Cappabianca said, is aqua therapy in their complexs 4 1/2-foot-deep pools for both dogs recovering from injury and gen Hip Dog Canine Hydrotherapy & Fitness of Winter Park also through water-based exercises and swimming classes. More and more people are realizing that hydrotherapy is really good for their dogs, Hip Dog owner Beverly McCartt said. Weve been doing it for 10 years. She said her business slowed down slightly from the economy but that people keep coming back, and to encourage them to do so, shes offered discounted rate and classes. No dog is going to be de nied, she said. People sometimes take care of their dogs quality of life before their own, she said. We have to be cognizant of whats going on in their human families too.Pet Living CONTESTS REFRESHMENTS PET BUSINESSES TREATS Wiggle Waggle Walk Seminole Countys Largest Pet Walk, Saturday, October 22, 2011 9:00 AM Cranes Roost Uptown Altamonte CONTESTS REFRESHMENTS PET BUSINESSES TREATS For more information visit www.SeminolePets.com Or call (407) 248-1758 Franklins Friends ~ photo by Le Paparazzi Photography Free trial size Natures Variety Raw dietw/any $5.00 purchaseWhile supplies last. Must be presented at time of purchase. With Select coupon. One coupon per visit, per customer. Cannot be combined. Exp. Exp. 11/30/11. Two Free Natures variety dog or cat food cansw/any purchase.While supplies last. Must be presented at time of purchase. With Select coupon. One coupon per visit, per customer. Cannot be combined. Exp. 11/30/11. JOE MANNY 9/1/11 ALSO FIND US ON FACEBOOK Free trial size Natures Variety Raw dietw/any $5.00 purchaseWhile supplies last. must be presented at time of purchase. With S elect coupon. O ne coupon per visit, per customer. C annot be combined. E xp. 10/31/11. Two Free Natures variety dog or cat food cansw/any purchase. While supplies last. must be presented at time of purchase. With S elect coupon. O ne coupon per visit, per customer. C annot be combined. E xp. 10/31/11. Hounds & KittiesPet Health Food Market Where healthy is affordable407-637-2919144 Lake Ave., Maitland, FL 32751 Corner of 17-92 & Lake Ave. JOE MANNY 9/1/11 ALSO FIND US ON FACEBOOK Free trial size Natures Variety Raw dietw/any $5.00 purchaseWhile supplies last. must be presented at time of purchase. With S elect coupon. O ne coupon per visit, per customer. C annot be combined. E xp. 10/31/11. Two Free Natures variety dog or cat food cansw/any purchase. While supplies last. must be presented at time of purchase. With S elect coupon. O ne coupon per visit, per customer. C annot be combined. E xp. 10/31/11. Hounds & KittiesPet Health Food Market Where healthy is affordable407-637-2919144 Lake Ave., Maitland, FL 32751 Corner of 17-92 & Lake Ave. JOE MANNY 9/1/11 ALSO FIND US ON FACEBOOK Free trial size Natures Variety Raw dietw/any $5.00 purchaseWhile supplies last. must be presented at time of purchase. With S elect coupon. O ne coupon per visit, per customer. C annot be combined. E xp. 10/31/11. Two Free Natures variety dog or cat food cansw/any purchase. While supplies last. must be presented at time of purchase. With S elect coupon. O ne coupon per visit, per customer. C annot be combined. E xp. 10/31/11. Hounds & KittiesPet Health Food Market Where healthy is affordable407-637-2919144 Lake Ave., Maitland, FL 32751 Corner of 17-92 & Lake Ave. JOE MANNY 9/1/11 ALSO FIND US ON FACEBOOK Free trial size Natures Variety Raw dietw/any $5.00 purchaseWhile supplies last. must be presented at time of purchase. With S elect coupon. O ne coupon per visit, per customer. C annot be combined. E xp. 10/31/11. Two Free Natures variety dog or cat food cansw/any purchase. While supplies last. must be presented at time of purchase. With S elect coupon. O ne coupon per visit, per customer. C annot be combined. E xp. 10/31/11. Hounds & KittiesPet Health Food Market Where healthy is affordable407-637-2919144 Lake Ave., Maitland, FL 32751 Corner of 17-92 & Lake Ave. Hounds & KittiesPet Health Food Market www.houndsnkitties.comWhere healthy is affordable407-637-2919144 Lake Ave. in Maitland Corner of 17-92 & Lake Ave. in Village PlazaALSO FIND US ON FACEBOOK JOE MANNY 9/1/11 ALSO FIND US ON FACEBOOK Free trial size Natures Variety Raw dietw/any $5.00 purchaseWhile supplies last. must be presented at time of purchase. With S elect coupon. O ne coupon per visit, per customer. C annot be combined. E xp. 10/31/11. Two Free Natures variety dog or cat food cansw/any purchase. While supplies last. must be presented at time of purchase. With S elect coupon. O ne coupon per visit, per customer. C annot be combined. E xp. 10/31/11. Hounds & KittiesPet Health Food Market Where healthy is affordable407-637-2919144 Lake Ave., Maitland, FL 32751 Corner of 17-92 & Lake Ave. 10% off entire purchase with this adExp. 11/30/11 PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER AAndre and K K erry E Elliot, owners of H Hounds & K Kitties, a two-year-old pet health food market in Maitland, say that as people are becoming more conscious about what they put into their own bodies, they are doing the same for their pets health.Dog days start looking upIn a time when many businesses are in the doghouse, specialty pet health care services are doing better than ever SSARAH WILSON OObserver SStaff Hounds & Kitties 144 Lake Ave., Maitland 407-637-2919 www.houndsnkitties.com Pookies Pet Nutrition & Bow Wow Bakery 1980 W. Fairbanks Ave., Winter Park 407-622-7387 pookiesbowwowbakery.com Woof Gang Bakery 918 Orange Ave., Winter Park 407-647-WOOF (9663) woofgangbakery.com/locations/ winterpark.asp Rockys Retreat Canine Health & Fitness Center 2826 Shader Road, Orlando 407-295-3888 rockysretreat.com Hip Dog Canine Hydrotherapy & Fitness 4965 Palmetto Ave., Winter Park 407-760-1484 hipdog.net

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Thursday, Oct. 20, 2011 Page 17 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Photo Courtesy of Sandra Johnson PhotographyCorner of North Park Avenue & Gareld near Panera Bread in Winter Park FOR MORE INFORMATION: Please call 407-644-2969 or stop by our store at 329 Park Avenue North, Winter Park BENEFICIARY: FOUNDED & HOSTED BY BULLFISH AND pet COSTUME CONTEST FEATURING: Pet Trick or Treat in Park Avenue stores from 12noon to 3pm PLUS: Pet Related Vendors, Caricature Artist, Pet Photographer, Pet Trainers Visit us in Winter Park Premium Pet Foods Full & Self Service Groom Stylish Accessories Dog Training Classes Gourmet Dog Treats Doggie DaycareWoof Gang Bakery is an authorized dealer of the following premium pet foods, plus many more!*Offer valid until December 31, 2011Redeem this card for 1 O % Off your entire purchase! Visit us in Winter Park Premium Pet Foods Full & Self Service Groom Stylish Accessories Dog Training Classes Gourmet Dog Treats Doggie DaycareWoof Gang Bakery is an authorized dealer of the following premium pet foods, plus many more!*Offer valid until December 31, 2011Redeem this card for 1 O % Off your entire purchase! Pet Events Bringing home puppy: Tips for a successful introduction to the familyTheres no doubt a new puppy brings joy to millions of families each year. However, while bringing home a new dog is exciting, it can also be quite an adjustment period for both the puppy and his new owners. According to veterinarian Dr. Brent Mayabb, manager of education and development at Royal Canin USA, pet parents can help ease the transition with some simple steps to ensure healthy growth and development for our four-legged family members. Here are some tips to help make your new puppys transition easier for both pup and the family: Get social. Socializing your new puppy early is important to help them learn prop er behavior when meeting a new person or animal. Try to introduce your dog to 10 to 20 new people and pets (of varying ages acclimate to different sizes and temperaments of dogs and cats, as well as a variety of humans. If your dog shows signs of aggression, take them out of the situation and try again with a smaller group or in a different setting. Exercise before bedtime. As your puppy gets used to being away from its mother and pack, you may hear crying and whining at night. Try to be patient; this behav ior is natural and shouldnt last longer than a few weeks. Additionally, try keep ing your puppy busy with quick training sessions or playing with toys during the early evening hours. A worn out puppy is a quiet puppy. Pay attention to diet. Transitioning from nursing to dry food can be hard on a new puppys digestive system. Until now, food formulated for this particular stage in a dogs life was not available at your local pet store. Stick to a routine. Take your puppy out often and right before you put them in their pen or kennel before bed. Some vet erinarians estimate that for every month your puppy is in your home that is one hour they can hold it. Frequency in rou tine is very important for house training and rewarding victories during training can be key. the vet is very important. The vet will help in scheduling vaccinacance of preventative care and rabies among other diseases. Remember to bring a list of questions with you to the appointment. Family Features The SPCAs annual Wiggle Waggle Walk will be 9 a.m.1 p.m. Satur day, Oct. 22, at Cranes Roost Park in Altamonte Springs. For more information on the event, and other programs sponsored by the SPCA, visit www. seminolepets.com Candys Cats, a not-for-prot, no-kill cat rescue will be having a Wheelin Dealin Kittens event on Saturday, Oct. 22, from 6 to 10 p.m. at the Maitland Civic Center. The event will have food, wine tastings, rafe and silent auction items and casino games. For more information, visit CandysCats. org Animal Hospital at Baldwin Parks Annual Halloween Party will be 2-4 p.m. Friday, Oct. 28, at their ofce at 946 Lake Baldwin Lane. Enter your pet in the costume contest to win one of three prizes and the chance for your pets picture to be on next years yer. There will be free exams. Visit www. baldwinparkvet.com The 12th Annual Pet Costume Contest will be 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 30, at the Doggie Door, 329 N. Park Ave., Winter Park. There will be a large pet costume contest at 11 a.m. and a small pet contest at 1 p.m. Pets can trick or treat from noon to 3 p.m. Also, there will be pet-related vendors, a caricature artist, a photographer and trainers. Call 407-644-2969. University of Doglando hosts their third annual Doglympics Event in downtown Avalon Park from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Nov. 5-6. There will be dock diving, longest stay contest, Olympic ring toss, yball tournament and much more. Register at doglympicsusa.com Plan your weekend withThe Weekender!Visit eosun.com and click "Subscribe to Newsletter"

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Thursday, Oct. 20, 2011 Page 18 Winter Park / Maitland Observer When the American suffrage movement won womens right to vote on Aug. 26, 1920, feminism which is what the womens rights movement had begun to call itself in 1911 went into a kind of eclipse. Not that issues and activists were lacking. The Equal Rights Amendment to the duced in Congress in 1925 and every year thereafter for decades. Women continued their steady march into the workforce, starting businesses, joining unions, some after Pearl Harbor, enlisting in the uni formed military. All the while women were actively engaged in productive employment, they lived without statutory rights to equal pay, equal protection against layoffs, and bank and mortgage credit, which could be (and male family member agreed to co-sign or sign on their behalf. When, in the 1960s, my generation found that the vote did not guarantee treatment in the courts, we called our selves uppity women and returned to the streets, the courts, the air waves and the ballot box to produce feminisms second wave, this time not only for womens civil rights, but also calling for womens economic and political equality with men. What is the future of feminism? Since the 1960s, two generations of American youth have grown up sure of their rights, with more sharing of roles. It is tempting to believe that because sexism is now as well understood as racism, feminism has achieved its goals. But in a jobs-challenged environment, there is new urgency for bringing fami lies out of the poverty and despair that contribute to domestic violence and for young people of both sexes to recommit to womens reproductive rights, the bedrock of womens gains. After women won the vote in 1920, the authors of history books published in the s, s and s conveniently forgot to mention the Womens Rights Movement. They paired it with Prohibition as a kind of sideshow of the 1920s. And so two ignorant of feminisms leaders, its strate gies, its hopes and its dreams for American women. Forgetting wont happen again. Certain ly not in Orlando/Winter Park, thanks to a Celebration of Feminism at Rollins College on Friday, Oct. 28, and Saturday, Oct. 29, featuring second-wave icons Gloria Steinem, who founded Ms. Magazine; Kate Millett, who wrote the 1970s block buster Sexual Politics; Patricia Schroedto run for president; Terry ONeill, national president of the National Organization for Women; and two of NOWs founders in 1966: Muriel Fox, a Rollins alumna, and Jacqui Ceballos. The celebration was proposed to Rollins by Veteran Feminists of America, a nation al organization dedicated to remembering, recording and passing feminisms torch past six months, Rollins students have teamed with individual veteran feminists to record their stories. On Oct. 28-29, they will meet those and information are available by contact ing Judith Kaplan at judkap@gmail.com. In addition, the Winter Park Institute at Rollins College features a number of free events in late October featuring various feminists and authors, including Gloria Steinem. For more information about these free events, visit www.rollins.edu/wpi Sheila Tobias is vice president of Veteran Feminists of America and the author of Faces Womens Movement. Opinion/ Editorial Safe pets, safe community A celebration of American Feminism Too many people take the responsibility of pet ownership lightly. Slight errors in judgment, such as leaving a front door open a moment too long or neglecting a faulty latch on an outdoor fence, can have disastrous consequences for four-legged friends. On the loose, dogs are at risk of getting hit by a vehicle putting themselves and the motorist in jeopardy. Even dogs without a history of aggressive behavior can be capable of attacking other dogs or people when let loose. But its not just slight oversights that many pet owners are guilty of. So many people decide to forego a leash when taking their dogs outside or bring dogs with aggressive tendencies to dog parks. Experts say that education is key to keeping our furry friends and us safe. An estimated 4.7 million dog bites occur an nually, according to the American Humane Association. The Centers for Disease Control reported that 800,000 Americans seek medical attention for dog bites each year half of whom are children. Of those, 386,000 go to the emergency room and about 16 die. Simple steps can be taken to scale back the instances of dog attacks. About 92 per cent of fatal dog attacks involved male dogs, 94 percent of whom were not neutered, according to the National Canine Research Foundation. In fact, the Humane Society of the U.S. reported that unneutered dogs were 2.6 times more likely to bite than neutered dogs. MindGymOctober 3, 2011 SSHEILA T T OBIAS Guest WriterAnswers on page 20 Training and socializing a dog also reduces the risk for aggressive behavior. The American Humane Associa tion says socialization with people and other animals is especially important for puppies between 8 and 16 weeks old. AHA also recommends restraining dogs with fences and leashes but not by tethering them, which can make them feel stressed and vulnerable. More than 80 percent of dog bites treated in the emer gency room involved children younger than 15, reported the CDC. Teaching a child how to properly play with dogs, supervising the child and dog when they are interacting and teaching a child how to approach dogs can dramatically reduce the risk of an attack. The consequences of ir responsible pet ownership can go below the surface. A pet thats been attacked may become skittish and the victims owner may develop a fear of dogs. A motorist who hits a loose dog who ran in front of the vehicle has to live with that accident for a lifetime, even if it wasnt their fault. Pet ownership is increasingly viewed as a right, not a privilege. But there are severe consequences when people do not take the time to educate themselves before becoming a pet parent. What it really boils down to is being a good neighbor. An essential piece of the healthy community puzzle is safe pets. More than 80 percent of dog bites treated in the emergency room involved children younger than 15, reported the CDC. Teaching a child how to properly play with dogs, supervising the child and dog when they are interacting and teaching a child how to approach dogs can dramatically reduce the risk of an attack. Tobias

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Thursday, Oct. 20, 2011 Page 19 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Chris Jepson The contemptible calling the absurd suspect Reections: personal and mundaneMitt Romneys a good moral person, but. Pastor Robert Jeffress What to make of Southern Baptist Robert Jeffress, senior pastor of a mega-church in Dallas? I get a kick out the devout claiming to know Gods mind. The only thing bigger than Gods mind? Mans ego. Jeffress, a fervent Rick Perry-forpresident supporter, kicked up a storm by denying that Mormons are Christians. Are Mormons Christians? Lets see. Mormons believe that Jesus Christ skyrocketed across the North American continent and pole-vaulted, perhaps, sometime in the early 19th century. They believe that the angel Moroni (please, absolutely do off the Golden Plates that church founder Joseph Smith used to form the Mormon Church. Mormons baptize the dead en you get your very own planet. Nifty, huh? Women need not apply. Or, that in 1857, Mormons (disguised men, women and children who were traveling by wagon train to the west, killed Mountain Meadows in the Utah Territory. That does sound a bit cultish to me. For sure, your very own planet? You betcha! But, but, but does that make them unchristian? the kettle calling the pot black. All religion is superstition. That, in and of itself, is a self-evident truth. That doesnt make what you believe necessarily bad, just that what you believe is based on superstition. And all that that implies. Take, for instance, what we factually know about Jesus Christ. He was a Jew. He lived. He died. Few would disagree with those facts. But was he really the son of God? Born of a virgin? Walk on water? Liter ally, physically went to heaven? Or, that he died for our sins? What is attributed to Jesus wasnt actually captured on paper ion. Hmmm, do you think anything might have been exaggerated in 100 years? Lets put it to a vote! What do you mean, Jepson? Well, there were so many disagreements among early Christians as to who was Jesus (was he in fact the literal Constantine convened the First Council of Nicaea in 325 and they put it to a vote. Jesus Christs lineage was determined by vote, by lobbying. Too funny. OK, move ahead about 1,700 years and some crazed-cracker of a Southern Baptist pastor calls into question Romneys Mormonism. Wait? Why is there a What? Baptists split in 1845 over slavery and guess which way Southern Baptists went? Well, there is considerable biblical scripture, after all, in support of slavery. So Pastor Goof questions Mitt Rom neys Mormonism (by implication his Mitt Romneys a good moral person, but. He is a moral person but? But what? Lets extrapolate: Hes a good athlete, businessman, but hes a Jew. Hes a hard worker, but hes a Mexican. Hes a Christian but. and hes a religious bigot. Per illustration, there are many legiti mate reasons, folks, why America requires separation of church and state.Jepson is a 24-year resident of Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.USWHO ISJEPSON > Louis Roney Betty Wilson, wife of Sloan (The Man sent us a book Sloan wrote that we hadnt read, What Shall We Wear to This Party? and it reminded me right off the bat what a wonderful writer Sloan was. I remember Sloan at breakfast one morn ing in the Eliot House dining room at Harvard. He was reading to me from the folded papers he had in his jacket pocket. His words made me realize once and for all that a real writer is born, not made. The same is true for singers, may I add? I, who had probably been reading John Dryden or Algernon Charles Swinburne the previous night, found Sloan much to my liking with his great skill at handling modern American lingo eloquently, with never a trace of banality. Sloan spent World War II in the Coast Guard and was right at home on any kind of watercraft, having had a boat himself most of his life. As I remember, he arrived at Harvard as the skipper of his own 87-foot schooner, which he parked in the Charles River basin. Parties on Sloans boat after football games will stay in my memory forever. Sloan was gone from us all too soon, and I realize this evermore when I phone Betty, who now lives on the Virginia shore, not far from her daughter and grandchildren. After I got to know Sloan freshman year, and learned that he had gone to Phil lips Exeter Academy, I wished ardently that I had had such a preparation for a college such as Harvard. My background was Winter Park High School, buoyed by highly intelligent parents from whom I learned much at the dinner table. When b.w. and I arrived in Winter Park in 1980, Sloan and Betty were living here! Sloan and I switched gears easily and continued the friendship we had enjoyed in college many years before. We four had countless good times together and attracted a variety of sparkling friends. Before Sloan left Winter Park to go north to stay, he turned to me one day in our doorway and said, You are the best friend I ever had. My feelings for him were similar. Ive never found one like him since.Nothing is foreverAt just about the same time that Columbus crossed the Atlantic, the last remnants of the Moorish occupation were driven out of Spain. The Moors were Moslems, of course. Today Moslems are quite different to handle in this Atomic Age than in 1492. Our forebears set up a country with strict regard for freedom of religion but made no provision to deal with faiths that treat ed others without goodwill. In the face of present quasi-warlike moves against the U.S., our so-un-American president has responded with bloodless appeasement that gives much more than it gets. Obama is no Hitler, but there are tricks of the trade that all demagogues since the Ger man demon have borrowed. The big lie is a handy weapon in Obamas political arsenal, and he can prevaricate with the best Ananiases. In my 91st year, my love for my wife, my home and my country is stronger than ever. After four years in the Navy in WWII, I returned home sharing the ubiquitous joy that peace is wonder ful and its going to last forever this time! Nothing is forever, especially at 90, I remind myself. HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney)WHO IS RRONEY > Have an opinion? Send your thoughts (400 words or less) to Managing Editor Jenny Andreasson at editor@observernewspapers.comLetters to the Editor Preemptive attacks are no solutionLouis Roneys Oct. 12 article Whats our plan for Iran? is ter rible writing on several levels. In Mr. Roneys fact-free article, he bemoans the piteous percent of GDP allocated to defense. In 2010, $680 billion was spent on defense, more than six times greater than any other countrys defense budget. In 2012, we are estimated to spend $703 billion on defense, the greatest amount since World War II. After complaining about Japans cowardly attack on Pearl Harbor, Mr. Roney suggests we conduct a similar preemptive attack on Iran. Despite Mr. Roneys bloodlust for Irans annihilation, there are better methods to preventing nuclear armament. Stuxnet, a computer virus, has delayed Irans nuclear program by years without the massive civilian death toll that Mr. Roney celebrates in the Tokyo bombings of 1945. Mr. Roney questions the patriotism of Americans who dont support a preemptive war against Iran, but our last preemp tive war has cost more than 4,000 American lives and more than 100,000 civilian lives. Mr. Roneys story of school protect you from bullies; hitting Austin Mercadante Winter Park Developer petitions for Morse Boulevard propertyEds. Note: This is an email sent to Winter Park commissioners in that was also submitted as a letter to the editor. As you know, I represented one of the proposals to purchase ty. Let me reiterate that my client, Anthony Everett, and The Pollack Partners are still interested in purchasing the property to devel op a high-end, quality, residential apartment lifestyle community in Winter Park. This style of living, we believe, would be acceptable to current residents of the city who do not want ownership and are downsizing and would also attract professionals who want to enjoy the Winter Park lifestyle, such as living within walking distance to Park Avenue and having access to the amenities offered in the Winter Park Village (groceries, movies, restaurants, responsibility and cost associated with home ownership. The following was and still is our proposal: story residential apartment project at a price of $20,000 per unit for a total purchase price of $4,000,000. ry residential apartment project at a price of $20,000 per unit for a total purchase price of $6,000,000. What we are proposing to develop on this property, the city already has 3-, 4and 5-story buildings existing in the city. My client is ready to offer the city of Winter Park a contract for cash and close within 30 days after site plan approval. They are not look ing for any incentives from the they will perform with the terms of the purchase and sales agreement. To date, our proposal has been ignored by our city govern ment, which has failed to contact me or my client to further discuss our offer. I will be releasing this memorandum to various news outlets, interested groups and individuals residing in our great city. I feel that many of the citizens of Winter Park are not aware that parcel of land worth a lot of of Winter Park. In my opinion, the city should only accept an outright sale of the city property for its appraised value or nothing less than cash for the difference between the two appraised values. Should the city not be suc cessful, I respectfully request that you reconsider the offer made by my client.David A. Winters Broker, Florida Property Group

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Thursday, Oct. 20, 2011 Page 21 Winter Park / Maitland Observer SERVICE DIRECTORY PLEASE MARK YOUR RESPONSE HERE:Will you please review and respond as soon as possible? We are waiting for your approval. Please NOTE: this is NOT a second opportunity to design the ad. Redesign changes may result in additional charges. Thank you!1. Please circle A or B below: A: I approve this ad as shown here B: I approve this ad with changes as marked (How many changes are marked? _____)2. Please double check phone/address/names.Phone & address are correct (initials here) ________ With this signature, I signify my understanding that payment for this ad is due per Advertising Agreement.Signed ________________________________Since 1995(407) 366-8696 Fax (407) 359-2118 P.O. Box 4548 Winter Park, FL 32793FOR YOUR INFORMATIONThis ad will appear in these areas and months. ____Waterford Lakes__________________ ____College Park/Orlando______________ ____Winter Park/Maitland_______________ ____Sweetwater/Heathrow______________ ____Tuscawilla/Wntr Sprgs _____________ ____Oviedo__________________________ ____Baldwin/Winter Pk. East ____________X JUNE 2011 X JUNE 2011 A Better Plumber407-644-4000 X JUNE 2011 HODGES BROTHERS INCROOFING & CONSTRUCTION 25 years Antique Sales experience Serving Winter Park and Maitland for 12 years Family owned and operatedPay Top Dollar for Gold and Silver items No Up-front or Out of Pocket expense on Estate saleSandbergEstateSales.com 321-299-4179 James 407-923-5013 MargeLicensed, InsuredSandberg Estate Sales 2 Beautiful Lots in Memorial ParkGLEN HAVEN MEMORIAL PARK 2300 Temple Drive, Winter Park Section H-Love, Lot 414, Spaces 3 & 4 Valued at $5,150 eachAsking $3,500 each or $6,000 for both407-647-5932 Casting Boys & Girls, ages 4-17 years old, all ethnicities! Drake Model & Talent Agency has Opportunities for young talent to be cast at both Disney & Universal Studios!!! Call today for an appointment!Drake Model & Talent 407-339-4570 NOW Casting for Kids! Paid Jobs COASTAL CONSTRU C TIONHOME IMPROVEMENTSLIC ENSED 45 YEARS EXPERIEN CE INSUREDKITCHEN BATHROOM REMODELSWINDO WS DRY W ALL FASCIADOORS PAINT AND MORE407-325-1978HANDYMAN SERVICES AVAILA B LEJIM@COASTALCONSTRUCTIONMANAGEMENT.NET American Family Funerals & Cremations Phone (407)339 0070 Serving all of Central Florida Family Owned and Operated Se habla Espaol Alan Trueba L.F.D. American Family Funerals & Cremations Phone (407)339 0070 Serving all of Central Florida Family Owned and Operated Se habla Espaol Alan Trueba L.F.D. Cremation Services, Shipping & Monuments. Traditional, Contemporary & Veteran Services at half the price of what others would charge Donate A Boat sponsored by boat angel outreach centers STOP CRIMES AGAINST CHILDREN www.boatangel.com2-Night Free Vacation!or Car Today! 800 1 CAR L ANGE Psychic Medium & Author He has captivated audiences worldwide on his internationally acclaimed talk shows, Crossing Over & Cross Country. Dont miss this intimate evening with John Edward.Tickets: (800) 233-3123JohnEdward.net or A reading is not guaranteed. J ohn E dwardFEB 8TH 7pmHilton Melbourne Rialto Place FEB 10TH 7pmDoubletree Hotel Tampa Airport FEB 11TH 2pmCrowne Plaza West Palm Beach Hotel FEB 12TH 11am Adversing Networks of Florida Statewide advertisingone low price Plan your weekend withThe Weekender!This weekly newsletter keeps you up to date on events happening in Central Florida's cities, including Winter Park, Maitland, Oviedo, Winter Springs, Avalon Park and Waterford Lakes. Visit wpmobserver. com and click "Subscribe to Newsletter"

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Thursday, Oct. 20, 2011 Page 28 Winter Park / Maitland Observer



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ursday, Oct. 20, 2011 50+ tax BUS_CARD 3.25 x 2 August 2010Grafton Wealth ManagementWilliam D. Grafton III, Sarah Grafton DeVoe William D. Grafton IV Financial Advisors (407) 646-6725 400 Park Avenue South Suite 300 Winter Park, FL 32789 Merrill Lynch Wealth Management makes available products and services offered by Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated (MLPF&S) and other subsidiaries of Bank of America Corporation. MLPF&S is a registered broker-dealer, member SIPC. Investment products: 2010 Bank of America Corporation. All rights reserved. Are Not FDIC Insured Are Not Bank Guaranteed May Lose Value 407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC wpmobserver.com USPS 00-6186 Publisher statement on page 4. A whistle blows and sends two dozen pairs of cleats into motion at once, tramping the grass of Eatonville. Its a cool Monday night, one week ward his team. Next Monday, Oct. 24, its game letters printed across his chest havent adorned a We are! Twenty-two voices yell back: Tars! K-9 program back to Maitland. The city will reinstate the property earned from its po lice departments participation in federal task forces. Ball said the department has the Oct. 10 meeting where City bring back the program. K-9 gap In 2009, Maitland retired its only The response time is ex tremely slow and sometimes not available at all, Ball said. It has dents. team will be able to partner with Winter Park and Apopkas K-9 ies. well have immediate cover age provided by Winter Park or available seven days a week, he said. Fiscal support the salary of the K-9 handler and ganizations The Committee of costs, he said. the vet bills for the dog, Ball said. Page 16 Pet health care industry booms Mr. Roneys story of schoolyard any age. Page 19 d Bachs legacy The Bach Festival Societys 77th season kicks off Oct. 22 and 23 Page 10 Halloween calendar Winter Park, Maitland and Page 11 PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Rollins football players started their nal week of practice Monday, a week before the teams rst game in decades. The T ars last played in the fall of 1949. Please see R OLLINS Page 2 Please see K-9 Page 7 Game on On 7:15 p.m. Monday, Oct. 24, the Rollins Tars Football Club will play Webber International JV at Show alter Field, 2525 Cady Way, Winter Park, in their rst game in 62 years. A tailgating party with free food and a T-shirt giveaway starts at 5 p.m. Visit their Facebook page for more information. PHOTO COURTESY OF MAITLAND POLICE DEPAR TMENT K-9 Alix, above, and handler Sgt. Chris OHalek were a team for nine years. JENNY ANDREASSON Observer Staff Maitland K-9 program returns 62 years later ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff Rollins football gears up for its rst game, Oct. 24

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Thursday, Oct. 20 2011 Page 2 Winter Park / Maitland Observer for a team thats had to develop faster than word has spread that it even existed. Growth spurt In the stands at practice, three people watch from a lonely corner of the bleachers. Come 2,000. Many of them hadnt heard of the said. Eight months ago, the team didnt ex ist at all. petitioned the school to call the team an of this level, the team is expected to take care of itself. the schools, he said. nizing most of the team single-handedly. get the team whipped into shape. Sense of urgency will practice every day. And those practices are coming in earnest. Come 7:15 p.m. Oct. 24, the Tars will play Webber International since before most of the players parents were born. We get to be a part of history, Zellar said. Well be making the stands roar for three sets of positions at once, some players 29 players, with some expected to play on offense, defense and special teams, appro priately echoing the type of football played sive linemen will switch sides to play as defensive linemen. games, Simmons said. The goal is to be We treat this as if its Rollins Colleges football team, Simmons said. Its not like theyre a real football team. Thinking about the future NCAA BCS team thats 7-0 so far this sea son. draw on some of the teams past glory for those alive to remember it the Tars will have some of their former players on Then the newest generation of players will open a new page in the history books. said. We want to do something that goes down in history and wont be forgotten. Individual & Family health plans For an Instant Quote or to apply, visit our website www.HealthInsuranceIBS.com407-831-5166 Our Town(407) 366-8696 Fax (407) 359-2118 P.O. Box 4548 Winter Park, FL 32793Insertions in editions and months as shown:____Waterford Lakes ____College Park/Orlando ____Winter Park/Maitland ____Sweetwater/Heathrow ____Tuscawilla/Winter Springs ____Oviedo ____Baldwin Park/E. Winter ParkPlease initial your agreement with the following:____ I approve this ad to appear in Our Town as shown here OR ____ I approve this ad with minor changes as clearly marked (How many changes are marked? _____) ____ Phone number and address are correct I understand that payment for this ad is due per initial agreement.Signed ____________________________________We appreciate your prompt response, as our deadline is approaching.*Colors represented on this proof may not be an exact match of the colors produced when printed on our offset press.X OCT 2009 407-644-7760 407.704.1917P.O. Box 560525 Orlando, FL 32856-0525Kristy@LawHarrington.comwww.LawHarrington.com Kristy L. HarringtonAttorney at Law Attorney at Law Wendy Anderson, P.A. (407) 628-9081 407.704.1917P.O. Box 560525 Orlando, FL 32856-0525Kristy@LawHarrington.comwww.LawHarrington.com Kristy L. HarringtonAttorney at Law Kristy@LawHarrington.com Real Estate Matters & Transactions Real Estate Licensing & Disciplinary Matters Landlord/Tenant Representation Business & Commercial Matters Bankruptcy Foreclosure Assistance Collection Matters Group Presentations Entity Formation & Corporate MattersSERVICES ROLLINS | Tars practice every day leading up to game against Webber; theyll play Clemson on Nov. 5 C ONTINUED FROM FRONT P AGE PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Quarterback Jeff Hoblick, top, founded the Rollins club, which now has 29 players on its roster.

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Florida Blue center floridablue.com Florida Blue A Taste of Saturday October 22nd FREE ethnic-inspired food tastings and music Face-painting and giveaways Quick health checkups with FREE health screenings FREE bone density screenings

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Thursday, Oct. 20 2011 Page 4 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Ways to win Matt Cronin, corporate regional man ager at O,R&L Facility Services, poses with a young resident at the O,R&L/ Winning Ways basketball camp that took place during the Winter Park Community Center open house this month. Best black tie The Alzheimers & Dementia Re source Center hosted its fth annual signature fundraising event, Black Tie from the Waist High, at the Hilton Altamonte Springs. They had more than 80 attendees and raised more than $18,000. Free room for vets In a campaign called B&Bs for Vets, Thurston House will join inns and bed & breakfasts nationwide in opening their doors for complimentary stays for vets on Nov. 10 in observance of Veterans Day. Thurston is already booked with a waiting list. For a com plete list of participating inns, visit BNBsForVets.org. A&H hiring Art & History Museums, Maitland is hiring a part-time museum store re ceptionist, visitor services assistant and assistant curator and registrar. Visit TinyURL.com/AHJobOpenings Blanket collection On Sunday, Oct. 30, at 6:30 a.m. and 7 a.m., the Winter Park Sunday run ning group of the Orlando Runners Club will conduct its annual drive to collect blankets for residents of the Mens Pavilion at Coalition for the Homeless of Central Florida. Visit Or landoRunnersClub.org. Fill a wallet for a senior Seniors First has launched its holiday gift drive: Fill a Wallet for a Senior. To donate, purchase a wallet and include $10 cash or a gift card. The drive runs until Dec. 1. For details, email mlowe@seniorsrstinc.org or visit seniorsrstinc.org Community Bulletin USPS 00-6186 ISSN 1064-3613 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835-5705 Member of: Goldenrod Chamber of Commerce Publisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor. Submission does not guarantee publication. Columnists opinions are made independently of the newspaper. All rights reserved. Winter Park / Maitland Observer 2011 Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster www.wpmobserver.com | Phone: 407-563-7000 | Fax: 407-563-7099 | editor@observernewspapers.com P.O. Box 2426 Winter Park, FL 32790 Published Thursday, Oct. 20, 2011 CONTACTS Volume 23, Issue Number 42 PUBLISHER Kyle Taylor 407-563-7009 kyle@observernewspapers.com MANAGING EDITOR Jenny Andreasson 407-563-7026 editor@observernewspapers.com DESIGNER Jonathan Gallagher 407-563-7054 jgallagher@observernewspapers.com REPORTERS Jenny Andreasson 407-563-7026 editor@observernewspapers.com Isaac Babcock 407-563-7023 isaacb@observernewspapers.com LEGALS | CLASSIFIEDS Ashley McBride legal@FLAlegals.com classieds@observernewspapers.com COPY EDITORS Isaac Babcock isaacb@observernewspapers.com Padrick Brewer COLUMNISTS Chris Jepson Jepson@MediAmerica.us Louis Roney LRoney@c.rr.com Josh Garrick joshgarrick9@gmail.com ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Tracy Craft 407-515-2605 tcraft@observernewspapers.com SUBSCRIPTIONS | CIRCULATION Amanda Rayno 407-563-7073 arayno@golfweek.com INTERN Meisha Perrin OBITUARIES obit@observernewspapers.com Lizard art Frank Lloyd Lizard was donated to Park Maitland School by Hel man Hurley Charvat Peacock Architects of Maitland. Several years ago, the company spon sored a lizard, Orlandos chosen mascot at the time, in the citys LizArt Sculpture promotion for Art in Public Places. Since they are an architectural rm, they chose to decorate the lizard as Frank Lloyd Wright, the renowned American architect. Pictured are Angelina Mastroeni and Carolyn Rogers with Frank Lloyd Lizard. Pink Out spreads In dedication to Harriett Lake, Albin Polasek Foundation trustee Ann Polasek placed a multitude of Pink Out Winter Park amingos outside of the Polasek Museum to raise awareness for breast cancer month. Show your breast cancer support by purchasing a $10 pink amingo. Visit PinkOutWinterPark. com for a list of retailers. Princess time This past Saturday, more than 150 people showed up for the Maitland Public Librarys rst annual prin cess tea party. Children of all ages attended and were gifted tiaras and bouquets of owers upon arrival. A live ute trio led several of the young ladies to dance and frolic around the room. A storyteller was also in attendance, gathering the group for her rendition of Cinderella. ART APPRAISAL DAY! 2011 Special EventOctober 21-23 Specials and Giveaways!300 No. Park Avenue, Winter Park, FL 32789 www.earthinspiredliving.com Find our weekly Business Briefs online at WPMObserver.com The Oct. 13 article Winter Park celebrates an era of change about the opening of the Winter Park Historical Museums new exhibit, incorrectly identied Hatties and Cottrells. The former was a clothing store and the latter was a 5&10-cent store. Correction The Oct. 13 article Talks stall on property swap incorrectly quoted Winter Park Commissioner Tom McMacken as saying Thats like blowing up shops along Park Avenue. McMacken said boarding not blowing. The article also did not clearly identify the company for which Paul Ellis is president: CNL Commercial Real Estate. Correction

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Thursday, Oct. 20 2011 Page 5 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Are you living with Heart Failure?Local cardiologists are conducting a research study for heart failure patients. The study is a comparison of two prescription medications. You may qualify to participate in this study if you meet all study criteria, including but not limited to: You have chronic heart failure You are taking several heart failure medications You have been in the hospital because of heart failure in the past year If you qualify for this research study: Your research study medications will be given to you at no cost Any research procedure or research assessment will be provided at no cost to you A modest stipend is available to assist you in covering your travel expenses For more information, call the Florida Hospital Cardiovascular Research Department at (407) 303-7556 or email Carol Stastny their hand at a homecoming comeback Oct. Now the Cats head to East River with a 1714 loss hanging over them. scoring on long passing plays that bamboo zled the Wildcat defense. spanked East Ridge 35-7 on Oct. 7. Meanwhile, the Winter Park offense half. The second half was a different story, them went to receivers Xavier Amerson and 103 respective receiving yards. Montgomery also stole the spotlight on defense, playing as defensive back and down, falling short in their comeback. The Wildcats head to East River this week for a 7:30 p.m. Friday kickoff. The trict team the Wildcats will face so far. The game was knotted at the half before East River went on two long drives to grab the Winter Park JV falls played well on offense and made it close, to 3-2 on the season. The Wildcats got on the scoreboard in extra point to make it 21-7. Winter Park yard scoring strike. Ben-Zeev kicked the extra point. The Cats next host East River at Showal PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER The Wildcats head to East River at 7:30 p.m. Friday after losing to Evans 17-14 on Thursday, Oct. 13. Wild homecoming ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff Forward fashion PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER P ark A venue Fashion Weeks nale runway show was Saturday, Oct. 15 in Central Park. S C AN HERE Use your smartphones Q R code reader app to view more photos or visit wpmobserver.com/photos/galleries

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Thursday, Oct. 20 2011 Page 6 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Oct. 24 City Commission Meeting Topics Of Interest There will be a City Commission meeting Monday, Oct. 24, at 3:30 Chambers located at 401 Park Ave. S. Below are a few topics of interest: Week of the Family procla mation Check presentation Friends of Fleet Peeples Park 10. and contracts (for a complete list of access the Commission Agenda Packet at www.cityofwinterpark. pay these obligations. geted Parks & Recreation De improve the golf bag storage area discussion Review and approval of the exchange agreement regarding 170 S. Knowles Ave. State legislative priorities to streamline the zoning approval process: nance revising the application ing amendments and conditional and the extension or re-establish ments to the comprehensive plan, goals, objectives and policies doc vestors, LLC, on behalf of WAWA Second reading of the ordi nance vacating and abandoning on to cityofwinterpark.org and Commission > Packets. Calling all veterans! On Friday, Nov. 11 at 11 a.m., the city of Winter Park in partnership with the Winter Park Ministerial Alliance and Winter Park Cham ber of Commerce will be present held in honor of all of the veterans of Winter Park at the new state-oflocated at 721 W. New England Ave. Calling all veterans that have (World War II, Korean War, Viet served in any military branch in The city is holding this event to Beginning at 10 a.m., attendees can gather information from a va riety of organizations and services ment of Veterans Affairs, Orlando VA Medical Center, Disabled American Veterans, Veterans of Foreign Wars, American Legion recognition of veterans according 2012 Winter Park general election In accordance with Winter Park Ordinance No. 2717-07, the city presidential preference primary. The city of Winter Parks gen electing a mayor. If a primary is For more election information, please contact the city clerk at 407599-3277, visit www.cityofwinter park.org and click on the Election pervisor of Elections website at www.ocfelections.com CoffeeTalk featuring Commissioner Carolyn Cooper sioner Carolyn Cooper for Cof Welcome Center located at 151 W. Lyman Ave. Special thanks to Palmanos Roastery & Espresso Bar. cil voted to adopt the FY 2012 strategic planning session held in April. City advisory boards held Improvements Program and es tablish time lines for the improve ments, which was adopted by the Special workshops were held to of streets, parks, physical proper ment and personnel administra tion. In addition to providing core planning session. These initiatives tions with residents, developing a West Side park, completing re lations, revising the sign code ordinance, creating a downtown, gic partners in economic develop ment, promoting green initiatives, appraiser and the millage rate set by the city. Like most com million, increased slightly at less than .1 percent. As adopted, Mai government and 0.5 mills to cover voted debt associated with city fa For additional details on the Sharon Anselmo, Director, Man agement Services City Council Agenda of Oct. 24 Lane. Below are items that will be addressed at that meeting: Special Presentations Proclamation Week of the Family Public Hearings: tland, LLC Development Agree ment 02 Chapter 7.5 Land Development tial Preference Primary Consent Agenda: October 10, 2011 ditor Contract gram Agreement Arapaho Side walks gram Agreement Thistle Lane Calming Devices Decision Item: Apartments Landscaping Discussion Item: Maitland adopts budget Maitland City Talk BY HOWARD SCHIEFERDECKER MAYOR Winter Park City Talk BY RAND Y KNIGHT CITY MANAGER www.gulfstatescu.orgWe oer FREE Business Checking407-831-8844 Effective October 17, 2011 Sheila Baez-Torres, MD will be moving her practice, Neurology & Movement Disorders Assoc., from their current location to: 1685 Lee Road, Suite 210 Winter Park, FL 32789 Patient medical records will be If you have any questions, please NOTICE TO PATIENTS

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Thursday, Oct. 20 2011 Page 7 Winter Park / Maitland Observer *Offer ends 1/28/2012. New residential High-Speed Internet (HSI) and Unlimited Long Distance or existing residential Pure Broadband customers only. Services and offers not available everywhere. Price-Lock Guarantee Offer applies only to the monthly recurring charges for the listed services; excludes all taxes, fees, surcharges, and monthly recurring fees for modem/router and professional installation. Listed monthly recurring charge of $19.95 applies to CenturyLink High-Speed Internet with speeds up to 10 Mbps and requires subscription to a CenturyLink Unlimited Calling plan. Offer requires customer to remain in good standing and terminates if customer changes their account in any manner including any change to the required CenturyLink services (cancelled, upgraded, downgraded), telephone number change, or change of physical location of any installed service (including customer moving from residence of installed services). General CenturyLink may change, cancel, or substitute offers and services including Locked-In Offer or vary them by service area at its sole discretion without notice. Requires credit approval and deposit may be required. Additional restrictions apply. Taxes, Fees, and Surcharges Applicable taxes, fees, and surcharges include a Carrier Universal Service charge, National Access Fee or Carrier Cost Recovery surcharge, a one-time High-Speed Internet activation fee, state and local fees that vary by area and certain in-state surcharges. Cost recovery fees are not taxes or government-required charges for use. Taxes, fees, and surcharges apply based on standard monthly, not promotional, rates. Call for a listing of applicable taxes, fees, and surcharges. Monthly Rate Monthly rate applies while customer subscribes to all qualifying services. If one (1) or more services are cancelled, the standard monthly fee will apply to each remaining service. High-Speed Internet Shipping and handling fees will apply to customers modem or router. Performance will vary due to conditions outside of network control and no speed is guaranteed. Direct connection and/or consistent speed claim are based on CenturyLink providing High-Speed Internet subscribers with a dedicated, virtual-circuit connection to the CenturyLink central ofce. Unlimited Calling Monthly recurring charges apply to one (1) residential phone line with direct-dial, nationwide local and long distance voice calling, including Alaska, Puerto Rico, Guam, and U.S. Virgin Islands; excludes commercial use, call center, data and facsimile services (including dial-up Internet connections, data services, and facsimile, each billed at $0.10/minute), conference lines, directory and operator assistance, chat lines, pay-per-call, calling card use, or multi-housing units. International calling billed separately. 2011 CenturyLink, Inc. All Rights Reserved. The name CenturyLink and the pathways logo are trademarks of CenturyLink, Inc. Call 855 .TRY.FIVE Click centurylink.com/ pricelock Come in For locations, visit centurylink.com/storesPara or ofertas en espaol marque al 855.879.3483. 5 years. 1 price. 0 con trac t. Guaranteed.The CenturyLink Price-Lock Guarantee CNTL11-662B_10.15x9_r1.indd 1 9/27/11 9:03 AM Savannah Court and CoeExcellence in Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation 1301 W. Maitland Blvd. Maitland, FL 32751407-645-3990www.SavannahCourtMaitland.comAssisted Living Facility License No. 8447 Skilled Nursing Facility License No. 1635096 Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above!Everyone welcome! Children come dressed in a costume for a costume contest! Pick a pumpkin from the Pumpkin PatchTreats served Please call to RSVP!A Senior Living Community where Hospitality is a Way of Life.Halloween Party Pumpkin PatchTuesday, October 25th 4 p.m. 5:30 p.m. 250 North Orlando Avenue Winter Park, Florida 32789 407.677.9777 A Premier Flooring Source nCARPETOODTONE TILELAMINATE AREA RUGINDO TREATMENT Featuring Exquisite Products for Residential & Commercial Projects Custom Design and Quality Installationn K-9 training school, has offered to train Maitlands dog free of charge, he said. Council excited theyve had with K-9s. to be training nearby alerted and shared a similar anecdote a K-9 saw the dog, I was like, Alright, Ball agreed. Well be posting the position and accepting appli cations, he added with a smile. Honoring furry ofcers wasnt active, Maitland was still cers. In April, the city dedicated its den at the Edward Doyle Police Sarge and Sivil were moved there. Alix, the former Maitland Alixs handler of nine years, that hes ecstatic that Maitland is bringing the program back. Ive been in law enforcement for 20 years, and it is the best thing K-9 | Apopka has offered to waive the cost of training Maitlands new K-9 officer, Chief Doug Ball says C ONTINUED FROM FRONT P AGE

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Thursday, Oct. 20 2011 Page 8 Winter Park / Maitland Observer THURSDA Y Orange County Mayor Teresa Jacobs will speak at the Newcomers of Central Floridas Oct. 20 luncheon meeting at 11:30 a.m. at the Hilton Orlando/Altamonte Springs. Visit New comerscCFL.org The Goldenrod Historical Society hosts Sus taining Trustee Soiree on Thursday, Oct. 20 at the Goldenrod Station, 4755 N. Palmetto Ave. from 5-7 p.m. Call 407-677-5980. CoffeeTalk featuring Commissioner Carolyn Cooper is Oct. 20 at 6 p.m. at the Winter Park Welcome Center. Call 407-599-3438. SATURDA Y The Bach Festival Society of Winter Park opens its 2011 season with the sounds of Verdis Requiem at the Knowles Memorial Chapel, Rollins College, 1000 Holt Ave, on Sat urday, Oct. 22, at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, Oct. 23, at 3 p.m. Call 407-646-2182 or visit Bach FestivalFlorida.org Subprime screens at Orlando Film Festival on Saturday Oct. 22 at 3:30 p.m. at The Plaza Cinema Caf, downtown Orlando, 155 S. Or ange Ave. Cost is $5 for a day pass. Reserve your seat at OrlandoFilmFest.com College Park JazzFest 2011 is Saturday, Oct. 22. Gates open at 5 p.m. A $5 donation from every adult is required for admission. Visit Col legeParkPartnership.com Candys Cats, a not-for-prot, no-kill cat rescue hosts Wheelin Dealin Kittens event on Sat urday, Oct. 22, from 6 to 10 p.m. at the Maitland Civic Center. Visit CandysCats.org Get away for a great cause at the third annual Island Hop for Special Olympics Florida on Saturday, Oct. 22, from 6 to 10 p.m. at Gaylord Palms. Tickets are $100 per person. Visit The IslandHop.org Cows N Cabs a fundraiser to benet three nonprots, will be Oct. 22 from 7 to 10 p.m. at Central Park West Meadow in downtown Winter Park. This western-themed event will feature a wide variety of wine and craft beer, paired with a full culinary experience. Cost is $110 general and $140 for VIP. Visit CowsNCabs.com SUNDA Y The Jewish Pavilions Party in the Park is Sunday, Oct. 23, at 9:30 a.m. at Cranes Roost Park in Altamonte Springs. Proceeds benet the Jewish Pavilion. For more information visit Jew ishPavilion.org The Wine Room on Park Avenue will be hosting a wine-tasting event featuring more than 50 wines on Oct. 23 from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Tickets are limited. Visit TheWineRoomOnline.com or call 407-696-9463. MONDA Y Maitland Area Chamber of Commerces 14th Annual Taste of Maitland is Monday, Oct. 24. The event begins at 5:30 p.m. Visit Maitland Chamber.com WEDNESDA Y 4Rivers Smokehouse celebrates its second birthday on Oct. 26 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. with free food and entertain ment. JFS will hold a community meeting on Oct. 26 at 11:30 a.m. at its ofce on 2100 Lee Road to gather volunteers for a community-wide toy and food drive. Register at marni.chepenik@jfsor lando.org or phone 407-644-7593, ext. 227. The Maitland Lake Lily food truck event has moved to Wednesdays from 6-9 p.m. More park ing is available at the Civic Center on Wednes day nights to accommodate the growing event. Natalie Cordone, with pianist Chris Leavy, will return to the Winter Park Playhouse in her caba ret, Im Not Here to Take Naps; Tales of a Preschool Perfectionist, on Wednesday, Oct. 26, and Thursday, Oct. 27, both at 7:30 p.m. Call 407-645-0145 or visit WinterParkPlay house.org OCT. 27 Join the Winter Park Farmers Market for Bub bles & BBQ on Thursday, Oct. 27 from 5:30 to 8 p.m. This dinner affair will be a good old-fash ioned barbecue with a nod to the upscale. Tick ets are $20. Visit Winterpark.org for tickets. Visit wpmobserver.com/events for more details. Send submissions to editor@observernewspapers.com Calendar Call 1.866.769.7696to place your order today!Let us Cater your next Party!pollotropical.com Visit our webpage for more info!www.NRG-DanceStudios.weebly.com Dancers Ages 2 & Up!Ballet, Tap, Jazz, Lyrical, Modern, Hip-hop, & Expressive Dance Location: Winter Park Community Center721 West New England Ave. Winter Park, FL 32789 FREE NRG-Dance Studios T-shirt and NO registration fee for the first 75 dancers to enroll! Where students transform into dancers !Meet the owner Nichole Genchi ...B.A. Dance from FIU Over 10 Years Teaching Former Miami Dolphins Cheerleader (NFL) & Panthers Ice Dancer (NHL) 1st Dance Class FREENow Enrolling!Call: (407)519-0477 Taste of Maitland, Oct. 24

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Thursday, Oct. 20 2011 Page 10 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Lifestyles There are certain pieces of classical music Bach Festival Societys artistic director and conductor John Sinclair said nearly any one can hear and immediately recognize in mere seconds. After just a bar or two of music, a light bulb will go off, he said, and the person might not know where the song is from, or even where theyve heard it before, but they know it. Verdis Requiem, which the Bach Fes tival Choir and Orchestra will perform to kick off its 77th season this weekend is one of those pieces, Sinclair said. Its a humongously powerful and dra matic piece, Sinclair said. Theres no dra ma in the way of costumes or props its in the sheer power of the arrangement. The 115-minute piece is just one of many the Bach Festival Society will put on in their 2011-2012 season. In addition to the soci etys annual Christmas presentation, and a series of world-renown visiting artists on 40 years, Sinclair said, the ensemble will feature an all-Bach Bach Festival program composed of works by the entitys name sake composer in the spring. The choir, which Sinclair said has been called a gem of the south in being up to par with world-famous ensembles else where in New York, London and Vienna by a New York Times arts columnist, will continued excellence in the present and in surance of its continuance in the future as one of the longest-running Bach festivals in the country. World-class choir The years program, he said, will reem phasize how the Bach Festival Society has grown in both skill and repertoire since it was founded in 1935 as a daylong celebra tion of composer Johann Sebastian Bachs birthday. It started as just one day, said Sinclair, who has conducted the ensemble since 1990. Then it turned into a week, and now its a whole years worth of events. Since its formation, he said, the group has recruited the best musicians and vocal ists from throughout Central Florida and beyond with this years hailing from eight different counties in Florida. It is the quality of the ensemble and the music it plays, he said, that draws people in and keeps them coming back. Beverly Slaughter, the provost for Bre vard Community Colleges Cocoa campus, is in her 37th season performing with the Bach Festival Society and is one of many members of higher education who perform in the choir. Its one of those things where once you get a taste, its hard to leave, she said. Having such a great group of people sing ing great music, a choir of this caliber is Unlike other Bach-related performance organizations, or famous choirs in general that are situated in cities such as New York and Vienna, Slaughter said being located in Winter Park and drawing the crowds and attention the Bach Festival Society does, is a testament to its quality. Unlike in other places, we are unique in that often we alone are the draw for people to come out to our shows, she said. Susan Lucher, a member of the choir for seven years and a Winter Springs resident, said the few times shes been able to watch the ensemble she now plays in perform, it was like having a wave crash over her because of the sheer power of the music. You realize were every bit as good as the choirs in Boston and New York and ev erywhere else, she said. Its exciting to re alize youre part of something so good that keeps getting better. Past, present, future To ensure the continuing success of the the Bach Festival Society does many com munity-outreach programs throughout the year, Sinclair said. From its close ties to Rollins College where it practices and performs to outreach programs with both Orange and Seminole county public schools, the organization does its best to give back to the community, Sinclair said. Our idea is to keep Bach youthful, he said. Stephen Cauley, a senior voice student at Rollins, will be one of a handful of students chosen to perform with the Bach Festival Society in this years program, which he said gives him an opportunity to network with local professionals while also perform ing at an exceedingly high level. But the Bach Festival brings great op portunities to all students here, not just those performing, he said. Visiting artists often hold master classes with local students. To have a professional musical organi zation on campus is such a unique experi ence for our students, Sinclair said. It would be hard to give the number of stu dents in the community that we touch, but Oktober-feteA Community Social Beneting Presents Supported byThursday, October 27, 5:30 7:30 p.m. Winter Park Welcome Center 151 W. Lyman Avenue $10 Join the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce for a festive fall evening with friends, food and drink with all proceeds helping our community this holiday season Learn more The Bach Festival Societys 2011-2012 season will kick off this weekend, Oct. 22 and 23, with performances of Verdis Requiem at Knowles Memorial Chapel at Rollins College. For more information about the society, and to purchase tickets for the upcoming seasons performances, visit www.bachfestivalorida.org ARCHIVE PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Conductor John Sinclair will lead Bach Festival Societys 77th season, which begins this Saturday. Back to Bach The Bach Festival Society launches its 77th season of bringing world-class music to Winter Park this weekend SARAH WILSON Observer Staff

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Thursday, Oct. 20 2011 Page 11 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Family Calendar Haunted Swamp Enzians Haunted Swamp: Walk of Terror tour is 8 p.m. to midnight Oct. 21-22, 28-29 and Monday, Oct. 31, from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. Enzian is also showcasing a series of scary movies. A single nights admission into the Walk of Terror is $10 when purchased in advance, $15 day of the event. Visit Enzian.org 10.28 Halloween Party Animal Hospital at Baldwin Parks An nual Halloween Party will be 2-4 p.m. Friday, Oct. 28, at their ofce at 946 Lake Baldwin Lane. Enter your pet in the costume contest. Visit www.bald winparkvet.com Costume Party Whole Foods Winter Park is throw ing a Costume Party from 6:30-8:30 Friday, Oct. 28. All proceeds from the $10 per person cost benet the Win ter Park YMCA Scholarship Fund. This is a 21+ event. Hold em & Roll em New Hope for Kids will present Hold em & Roll em, Halloween Casinonight fundraiser, at Fields BMW (963 N. Wymore Road, Winter Park) on Fri day, Oct. 28 from 6-10 p.m. Cost for admission are $65 per person or two for $100. Call 407-331-3059 ext. 10 or visit www.newhopeforkids.org 10.29 Trick or Treat on Park Halloween Trick or Treat on Park Av enue is Saturday, Oct. 29 from 10 a.m. 1 p.m. Halloween Howl Rollins Colleges Halloween Howl is Saturday, Oct. 29, from 2-5 p.m. En joy trick-or-treating, haunted houses, arts and crafts, carnival games, a cos tume contest and snacks and bever ages. This event is free and on Mills Lawn at Rollins, 1000 Holt Ave. Call 407-691-1250, or e-mail MHein@ Rollins.edu Spirit Stroll Halloween Spirit Stroll, a costumed pub-crawl through Baldwin Parks Village Center, is 6:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 29. Advance tickets are avail able online at brightsideevents.org through Friday, Oct. 28, for $25 and will be available at the door for $35. Halloween Fun Run The 5k Halloween Fun Run will be 8 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 29, at Mead Gar dens, Winter Park. All net proceeds benet St. Margaret Mary Churchs Haiti relief. The advance ticket cost is $20 for adults, $15 for students and $10 for children 12 and younger. Its $25 to enter the day of the event. Costumes are optional. Visit stmarga retmary.org/haitifunrun.html 10.30 Trunk or Treat North Park Baptist Church Trunk or Treat, a fun and safe Halloween expe rience, will be 6-8 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 30, in the church parking lot at 2047 Prospect Ave. There will be a free bounce house, hot dogs, soda or wa ter, and candy for the kids. Visit www. northparkbaptist.org Pet Costume Contest The 12th Annual Pet Costume Con test will be 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 30, at the Doggie Door, 329 N. Park Ave., Winter Park. There will be a large pet costume contest at 11 a.m. and a small pet contest at 1 p.m. Call 407-644-2969. Trick-or-Treating Free Halloween Trick-or-Treat is 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Monday, Oct. 31 at Orlando Fashion Square, E. Colonial Drive at Maguire Blvd. Visit www.or landofashionsquare.com or call 407896-1132. Pumpkins & Munchkins Pumpkins & Munchkins is 6:30-8:30 p.m. on Halloween night in Shady Park in Hannibal Square (adjacent to the Winter Park Community Center at 721 W. New England Ave.) Event activities will include games, bounce houses, costume contest and Trickor-Treat Trail. Its free. Call 407-5993275. PICTURE A HEALTHIER YOUAt the Y, we are focused on improving the health and well-being of our community. Thats why we are devoted to you. Join the Y and register for our GET MOVING program by November 15th and well invest up to $200 toward your journey to a healthy lifestyle. For more information, contact:Start your journey to a healthy lifestyle. October 15 November 15, 2011WINTER PARK YMCA 1201 N. Lakemont Ave, Winter Park, FL 32792 | 407 644 1509 Visit ymcacentralflorida.com French breakfast and lunchFrench Pastries, French Baguette Sandwiches, Quiche, Soups, Salted Pound CakesNOW OPEN!906 W. Fairbanks Ave, Winter Park (corner of Denning and Fairbanks)407-975-06007:30am 2:30pm Monday-Saturday10% off with this ad Haunts around town PHOTO BY AMANDA GEORGI THE OBSERVER Actors at the Enzians Haunted Swamp entertain attendees on Friday. For more events and details, scan here with your smartphones QR code reader app, or visit wpmobserver. com. Submit events to editor@ observernewspapers.com St. Mary Magdalen Church, 861 Maitland Ave., presents Commu nityFest 2011, Come On And Safari With Us! on Oct. 21-23. The opening parade is 6 p.m. Fri day night. Visit StMaryMagdalen. org The Lake Forrest Prep commu nity garage sale beneting the fthand sixth-grade eldtrips is Saturday, Oct. 22, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 866 Lake Howell Road in Maitland. Call 407-331-5144. The Florida Water Festival, pre sented by the Florida Water Envi ronment Association, will be 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 22, at Harbor Park in Baldwin Park. The German-American Societys Annual Oktoberfest celebrations are 2 p.m. to midnight Saturday, Oct. 22, at 381 Orange Lane in Casselberry. Admission is $5 and children 12 and younger are free. Call 407-834-0574. Maitland presents the second ses sion of fall childrens art classes, beginning on Monday, Oct. 24. To register call 407-539-2181 or visit ArtAndHistory.org The Junior League of Greater Orlandos fourth annual Harvest Hustle 5K run/walk is at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 27, at the in tersection of New Broad and Jake streets in Baldwin Park. An afterparty and costume contest will follow. Cost is $30 on race day. Visit JLGO.org or Run4Acause. org/JLGO Popcorn Flicks in Central Park fea turing National Velvet is 7-9 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 3, in Central Park in downtown Winter Park. Its presented by Winter Park and Enzian Theater to coincide with Orange Countys annual Week of the Family. There will be free popcorn for everyone. Rain date will be Nov. 17. Contact 407-6290054 or visit Enzian.org Movie in the Park featuring Mr. Poppers Penguins is 7 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 5, at Quinn Strong Park in Maitland. Bring your blan kets and chairs and the city will bring you the stars. Visit ItsmyMai tland.com for more information. The Maitland Public Library has bedtime stories for all ages at 6 p.m. every Monday. Preschool sto ry time is 10:30 a.m. every Tues day. Infant and toddler story time is at 10:30 a.m. every Thursday. Other Library events this week include Learn how honey can help your allergies on Thursday, Oct. 20, at 6:30 p.m., Free Blood Pressure Checks by the Maitland Fire & Rescue Friday, Oct. 21, at 10 a.m., LCC Social Networking series for the Older adult: Learn about Facebook on Friday, Oct. 21, at 10 a.m., and LCC Literature series: Monsters in Literature on Monday, Oct. 24, at 7 p.m. Call 407-647-7700. Send submissions to editor@ observernewspapers.com

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Thursday, Oct. 20 2011 Page 12 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Judy Appleton Procell, who was diagnosed with breast cancer in April 2009, was still getting used to the new appearance that comes with treatment, especially not having hair. One day, though, that changed. Two years ago, despite being barely 36 hours out of sur gery, with a pink scarf wrapped around her head and wheelchair to support her, the always-tough Procell headed to the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure. That sunny day, while surrounded by dence she hadnt since she lost her long black hair, and her scarf I felt the strength of the wom en around me, Procell said. A chance diagnosis But strength wasnt something Procell was a stranger to. Since levelheaded and decisive from cancer had come out of a family crisis. When Procells husband was laid off from his job, Procell went the route she always did in the face of trouble: She faced it head-on. In a week she would be without health insurance, so she headed to all the annual appoint ments she would have gone to in a few months, including one for her pelvic and breast exam. And thats when the nurse practitioner found a marble-sized lump in her breast. It was cancer. It was an indescribable feeling, walking around, thinking she was Conquering with knowledge But Procell, an Oviedo resident, tackled the diagnosis with deter mination, hope and, most impor tantly, education. A notepad full of questions greeted each doctor she spoke to, a bookshelf full of educational material still stands in her living room and she attend ed every conference, seminar and meeting she could get to. She battled and won against health insurance companies when they refused to pay, and she faced though, there wasnt an option to break down, and her life had to go on, especially for her two teenage daughters. I couldnt be weak my chil dren were counting on me, she said. Her approach to the disease was no surprise to those close to her. Ive seen her be strong her whole entire life, said Sara McGill, Procells cousin. Shes a Today shes cancer-free, after enduring four surgeries and che motherapy in eight months. And throughout her treatment and re covery, Procell has used her story and the knowledge shes gained disease. Procell said breast cancer reaches almost every person shes met, and considering the statis tics, its not hard to see why. The chance of a woman having breast cancer in her lifetime is about 12 percent, and there will be about 230,480 new cases in the U.S. this year, making it the most common cancer for women in the U.S. Those are staggering num bers, Procell said. Healing through sharing heals herself, by sharing her story with other survivors, fam ily, friends and curious strangers wherever and whenever she can. She represents strength and sur ate of the Susan G. Komen for the Cure foundation at local events where she speaks. She captivates people, said Stefanie Steele, mission manager at Susan G. Komen for the Cure of Central Florida. When I bring Judy with me it becomes real to every single person there. Procells daughter agreed. I think people connect most when you share your story, Han nah Procell said. Theres power in that. And when Procell tells her story, you see true mental and emotional toughness at work. Shes warm, but matter-of-fact there are no tears when she speaks about her experience. Her knowl edge seems endless, and her pas sion for education is clear. I always knew I was a strong woman, I just didnt know how strong I was, Procell said. Though her times of triumph outnumber them, there were mo ments when she felt scared and overwhelmed. One was when her husband got a job in Alaska and had to leave a week after her last surgery. I was frightened, Procell said. I was still in stitches and bandages driving him to the air port. But her community, temple con gregation and family were there to support her. For her daughter Hannah, this was a big turning point in life. She learned what not many young teens always do to appreciate her mom. Suddenly I was needed, and you cant walk away from that, Hannah said. Continuing to help Now the mother and daughter have teamed up, going beyond the races and conferences. Hannah and Procell have designed pink Roar for the Cure shirts that Hannah is selling at Oviedo High School, where Procell graduated from and her two daughters Han nah and Sarah currently attend. At the Friday, Oct. 21, home football game they hope the crowd will pink out the game by wearing their roar shirts. Steele is always awed with the work Procell does for the cause, and said without her their mission wouldnt be as strong. She is by far one of the most amazing women Ive ever met, Steele said. She inspires me ev ery day. Healthy Living Acupuncture, herbal therapy, cupping, moxibustion, electrical stimulation, Tongue/Pulse DiagnosisSpecialize in treating pain management and stress407-429-1066spectrumwellcare@gmail.com1298 Minnesota Ave. Suite A Winter Park 25% off your rst visit with this ad! Lack of Desire or Low Energy? Testosterone Lab Work for $35 (a $240 Value) Call today for a risk-free appointment: 407-894-9959 Learn more Buy your Roar for the Cure T-shirt at the Oviedo/Edgewater football game at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 21 at Oviedo High School, 601 King St. They cost $10. Learn more For more information about how you can help with the ght against breast cancer locally, visit the web site for the Central Florida afliate for the Susan G. Komen for the Cure at www.komencentralorida.org PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Judy Procell, left, and daughter Hannah sport their Roar for the Cure T -shirts. Strength and survival Oviedo breast cancer survivor Judy Procell says educating and supporting others helped in her own healing process BRITTNI JOHNSON Observer Staff

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Thursday, Oct. 20 2011 Page 13 Winter Park / Maitland Observer When most people think of emer gency preparedness, they think canned food, bottled water and generators but what about pre paring for emergencies and crises not involving the weather? Brenda Moody, assistant direc tor of Parks and Recreation for Winter Park, said often most peo ple, including herself, are not pre pared to handle unexpected situa tions involving personal or loved ones health. You call 911; arrive at the hospital and then what? In 2010, Moodys husband was diagnosed with an advanced stage of lung cancer. She was com pletely unprepared as she spent his remaining days with him in hospice. I literally had nothing with me, and the last thing you want to do is leave their side to get the things you need, she said. The hospice buildings take care of the people spending their last days, but they dont provide for the families that are staying. From this train of thought, in June of this year, the Gathering Hope Foundation was formed. From toiletries to blankets, Moody wants to provide families in need with the basic things to make it through emergencies like hers, without having to leave their loved ones side. The foundation now gathers these essentials and wraps them in baskets to be delivered to lo cal hospice care centers, Ronald McDonald Houses, and other shelters where people are in need, with the goal of each basket pro viding enough basic products for a person to be able to live for a week without having to go out for more. Originally we were just going to do hospice, but we saw such a great need and it just kind of grew, Moody said. Our main fo cus is just helping people. Finding funds So far the organization has donat ed 215 individually wrapped bas unused hotel samples of soap and shampoo to donated puzzle books and magazines. But the things they dont get donated are paid for out of pocket by volunteers, said Dawn Payment, inventory and event management coordina tor for Gathering Hope. Right now everything is very hands on, Payment said. We collect sample size stuff and all the products that go inside either we buy or people donate. Moody and Payment said theyve become mini versions of the Extreme Couponers seen ing shopping crowds to buy the supplies they need in bulk when theres a sale. We were all over the back-toschool sales, Payment said. We bought hundreds of crayons for the kid baskets, but now were running out and raising money to buy more. To raise money for more sup plies, the Gathering Hope Foun dation is holding a Rummage Sale on Saturday, Oct. 22. If we could just raise a couple hundred dollars, you dont realize how far it can go. With this it re ally doesnt take a lot of money to help the tiniest things can make a difference, Moody said. Giving back The most important thing, Moody said, other than giving people the basics that they need, is making them feel good and special. We want it to be a personal gift, she said. The whole point is for it to be a special gift just for them, its not just things thrown in a basket. Lisa Blackwelder, director of development at the BETA Center of Orlando, which provides atrisk and teen moms a safe place to learn and care for their children, said when her girls received their baskets from Gathering Hope, It was like Easter in September! The girls got baskets with brand new toiletries, magazines and nail polish things Blackwelder said the girls often never receive, or if they do, are rarely new. When they do get new things, its typically for their children, Blackwelder said. For a stranger to think of them and give them these things, it was really spe cial. Moody and Payments goal for Gathering Hope is that people re alize this power of giving and the little things that can have such an impact on others, and for them to also realize that there is a need for the spirit of giving all year round not just during the holidays. Who would have thought, Payment asked, that toothpaste and toothbrushes could make people so happy? Dennis AllenOwner/ Administrator Its not just about getting you back on your feet. Its about getting you back to your life. HCR Healthcare, LLC Rehabilitation and Skilled Nursing Learn more The Gathering Hope Rummage Sale will be held Saturday, Oct. 22, from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 4325 Ivey Glen Ave., Orlando, FL 32826. For more information on the event and the foundation, visit www.gathering hopefoundation.org PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Winter Park Parks and Recreation Director Brenda Moody, left, and Dawn Payment started Gathering Hope. Preparing for lifes unexpected Winter Park staffer turns tragedy into charity, giving baskets to those in need SARAH WILSON Observer Staff

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Thursday, Oct. 20 2011 Page 14 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Lost your job? It can make you sick or be the cue to focus on a healthier you. If you are one of the many hardworking people who are unemployed, you al ready know this job market isnt like it used to be. You already know unemployment can be stressful and depressing. The loss of income, loss of daily contact with coworkers, loss of social status and other changes when you go from a lifetime of working to being unemployed can take a toll on your health. It can also be a time of recharging, regrouping and reinventing yourself. Workers who lose a job are twice as likely to get high blood pressure, diabetes or heart of unemployment compared to those with jobs. The unem ployed are more likely to have sleep problems; be more anxious; misuse alcohol, prescriptions and street drugs; smoke more; and eat more sugar and high fat food. Does unemployment make you sick? Or are unhealthier, less energetic employees more likely to lose their jobs and struggle to bit of both. But that doesnt have to be you. The changes in your life can lead to a new, healthier you. You have more time to focus on your self, right? Getting healthier can give you energy and that magic pizzazz that gets you hired. Sheila is one of Central Floridas misplaced workers. The depression from being home and discouraged by her frustrating job search was closing in on her. She decided it was time to get into action. She started walking, was tough, but she felt she was making progress and achieving something. Now she is walk she rides her bike 10 to 20 miles. She has about 100 more pounds sweetest, because she learned she can do it and now she is deter mined she will be a new person. And she is so excited about being in charge that she almost bounces off the road talking about it. So where do you start? If you havent had a checkup in the past year, make an appointment today. If your job was your source of health insurance, you may be able continue that coverage if you sign up within 60 days of leaving the job through what is called COBRA coverage. Take stock of your lifestyle. Are you home too much, too close to the refrigerator, feeding your loneliness with food? Make a plan for a week of meals and satisfying meals. Learn what is healthier. Try new foods. Set some goals. Calculate your BMI at www.nhlbisupport. com/bmi/. If you are overweight (most of us dont need a calcu lose 10 percent of your weight through healthy eating and physical activity. What about exercise? You dont have to join a gym. The beautiful outdoors awaits you, on foot, on bicycle or in a host of other activities. Maitland Com munity Park has an exercise trail with different stations that can build your muscles in differ ent ways, with a range of levels to challenge you. Make friends with the people you meet. Now that you are liberated from your new worlds. Effective October 13, 2011 Michelle Dolske, PhD, Charles Lammers, PhD, Jodi Nadler, PhD, Anthony Logalbo, PhD, Michael Westerveld, PhD and Benjamin Johnson-Markve, PsyD are moving their practice, Medical Psychology Associates, from their current location to: 1685 Lee Rd., Suite 200 Winter Park, Fl 32789 Patient medical records will be maintained at the Telephone and fax numbers for the practice will remain the same. at 407.303.7991.NOTICE TO PATIENTS $1000 off Cannot be used with any discounts, discount plans or HMOs. Offer expires 12/21/11 Complimentary ExamIncluding Xray & PhotosWith this coupon. Not valid with other offers. Offer expires 12/21/11 Braces or Invisalign Lose your job, gain your health Dr. Nancy Rudner Lugo The Maitland resident is a nurse practitioner and President of Health Action, offering workplace health consulting and nurse coaching. Visit www.healthaction.biz WHO IS LUGO > PHOTO COURTESY OF NANCY RUDNER LUGO Maitland Community Park has an exercise trail with a range of levels.

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Thursday, Oct. 20 2011 Page 15 Winter Park / Maitland Observer The 24-member Orlando Bal let Company invites us to the Vampire's Ball, an evening of humorously convoluted, serious exploitation of vampires, ghouls and sexy dancing with sly refer ences to existing classical ballets and old-time vampire movies. Just in time for Halloween, and with a musical score ranging from Bach to Adele, creatures of the night come to life Oct 21-23. The haunting performance prom ises a new full-length ballet with choreography by artistic director innocent couple in a power-strug gle between a mad scientist and an evil vampiress. Will anyone come out alive at the Bob Carr Performing Arts Center? Visit OrlandoBallet.org. Silver alert Miss Nelson's boisterous stu dents are misbehaving again! But the students are in for a surprise when Miss Nelson is replaced by Viola Swamp, the scariest substitute teacher ever. Where did Miss Nelson go? Will she ever return? Kids love this witty musical while teachers and parents appreciate the values of respect and generosity it teaches. The Orlando Shakespeare Theater continues its Young Audiences Series with the good-at-beingbad kids of Room 207. Head back to school with Miss Nelson is Missing in performance through Nov. 19. The Shakespeare Theater is at 812 E. Rollins St. in Orlan dos Loch Haven Cultural Park. Call 407-447-1700 or visit orland oshakes.org. Addams Family national tour Now in its second year on Broadway, The Addams Family makes its Orlando debut from Nov. 1-6. Based on the quirky characters created by illustra tor/cartoonist Charles Addams, Gomez, Morticia and their family combine the twisted and ma cabre with charm and wit. The musical features an original story The Addams young princess of darkness, Wednesday, has fallen in love with a sweet young man from a respectable family. Everything changes on the fateful night the Addams Family hosts a dinner for Wednesday's normal boyfriend and his parents. Called a classic, full-tilt, fast paced, old-fashioned musical comedy! by the Chicago Tribune, we can join the Addams Family in their glitzy-gloomy new musical at the Bob Carr Performing Arts Center. Visit OrlandoBroaway. com or call 1-800-982-2787. Feminists at Rollins College Its been 45 years since the found ing of the National Organiza tion for Women, and the Winter Park Institute at Rollins College will celebrate that anniversary with a series of free events on Friday, Oct. 28, and Saturday, Oct. 29. Open to the public, the events feature author Gloria Steinem, former U.S. Rep. Patricia Schroeder and Rollins College alumna and co-founder of NOW Muriel Fox. Events include: with Gloria Steinem, Friday, Oct. 28, at 7:30 p.m. at Rollins College, Alfond Sports Center Feminism, Past and Future, Sat urday, Oct. 29, at 8:30 a.m. at Roll ins College, Tiedtke Concert Hall. A conversation between Gloria Steinem and Patricia Schroeder, and panel discussions including veteran feminists and student-led oral history projects. Schroeder Our Journey to Equality, Saturday, Oct. 29, at 2 p.m. at Rollins College, Tiedtke Concert Hall Feminists are Funny, Satur day, Oct. 29, at 8 p.m. at Rollins College, Tiedtke Concert Hall a collection of skits, songs and parodies addressing womens issues. Visit www.rollins.edu/wpi or Rising star The lovely and talented may be an overused expression, but its the perfect description of singer/actress Natalie Cordone, who returns to the Winter Park Playhouse in a solo cabaret act on Oct. 26 and 27. And shes witty (which is pretty much a require can tell how witty by the title of her show: Im Not Here to Take Naps (Tales of a Preschool cess story includes an MFA from UCF followed by coast-to-coast work as an actress, singer and spokeswoman. Sharing time with Off-Broadway work in New York City and here in Winter Park, audiences have been fortunate to see Natalie featured in several musicals at the Playhouse. Call 407-645-0145 or visit winterpark playhouse.org. The Playhouse is located at 711 Orange Ave. in Winter Park. Josh Garrick The vampires are havin a ball! Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906. WHO IS GARRICK > 1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORGTHIS WEEK AT ENZIAN SENNA Fri-Sat 3:45PM, 6:30PM, 9:15PM Sun 1PM, 3:45PM, 6:30PM Mon 9:30PM Tue 6:30PM Wed & Thu 6:30PM, 9:15PM PEARL JAM TWENTY Fri & Sat 11:59PM RED STATE Sun 10PM 13th ANNUAL MANHATTAN SHORT FILM FESTIVAL Mon 6:30PM NETWORK Tue 9:30PM 1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORGTHIS WEEK AT ENZIAN SENNA Fri-Sat 3:45PM, 6:30PM, 9:15PM Sun 1PM, 3:45PM, 6:30PM Mon 9:30PM Tue 6:30PM Wed & Thu 6:30PM, 9:15PM PEARL JAM TWENTY Fri & Sat 11:59PM RED STATE Sun 10PM 13th ANNUAL MANHATTAN SHORT FILM FESTIVAL Mon 6:30PM NETWORK Tue 9:30PM MARGIN CALL Fri Sun 3:30PM, 6:30PM, 9:30PM Mon, Wed, Thu 6:30PM, 9:30PM Tue 9:30PM Halloween Event & Ghost Tours 3rd ANNUAL HAUNTED SWAMP Fri & Sat 8PM-MID Oct Midnight Madness EVIL DEAD Sat 11:59PM Cult Classic THE TERROR Tue 9:30PM

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Thursday, Oct. 20 2011 Page 16 Winter Park / Maitland Observer When push comes to shove and times are tough, people just want to do the best they can to be able to take care of their families, says Barbara Wetzler, president of the SPCA of Central Florida it doesnt matter whether the family members have two legs or four. Whether its through feeding their pets organic or raw food di ets, treating them to massages or acupuncture, or going the extra mile to make sure their dog is in shape by enrolling them in hy might argue these days the dog days arent so bad for our furry friends. People are willing to do al most anything to keep their pets happy and healthy, Wetzler said. Whether that means splurging on unorthodox treatments or just scrounging by and seeking free or low-cost veterinary care from the SPCA, she said people want to take care of their pets, whatever the cost. In order for the SPCA to con tinue to offer their services to those both human and animals in need, theyre holding their annual Wiggle Waggle Walk fundraiser on Saturday, Oct. 22, from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. at Cranes Roost Park in Al tamonte Springs. Different local dog-friendly businesses will set up booths around the lake to help the SPCA. Its like a party for dogs. They come and have the best time ever, and just happen to bring their people along, Wetzler said. Many local pet health care businesses have sprung up in re cent years, all with the same core mission as the SPCA: improving and caring for Central Floridas likely a local business to care for any of your animals needs. And if not, Wetzler said the SPCA is al ways there to help. Healthy from the inside out Kerry Elliot, owner of Hounds & Kitties, a pet health food market located at 144 Lake Ave. in Mait land, said that as humans become more conscious of what they put in their bodies, they are also doing so for their pets. The growing popularity of ho meopathic treatments and consci entiously composed diets has had her two-year-old business hang ing steady while others failed. Theres a huge community out there that really wants to do whats best for their dogs and cats Most of our customers dont make a distinction between their two-legged and four-legged chil dren, she said. From antler and cow trachea moo tube chew toys to raw and all-natural pet food products and supplements composed of duck, venison or veal, Elliot said her store does business by offering products with the greatest health seem disconcerting to their hu man counterparts or not. Its not about you, she said, its about them. She said her store also offers an ordinary pet store, but without all the byproducts and chemicals. Other businesses, such as Pookies Pet Nutrition & Bow Wow Bakery and Woof Gang Bak ery, both in Winter Park, also fo cus on keeping pets healthy from the inside out offering natural pet food products. Our products dont cost very much more but can have tremen If you spend a little more on food, youll end up spending less on vet bills. Staying in shape Whether your dog is recovering from an operation or just needs fo cused exercise and training, busi nesses are popping up throughout needs. From bonding with your pet while doing the downward dog pose in a yoga class to treating them to a massage or an aro matherapy session, Sherri Cap pabianca the owner of the new Rockys Retreat Canine Health & Fitness Center in Orlando, said her business focuses on keeping dogs healthy in many different facets of life. We look for ways the dog can bond with the owner, she said. People want their dogs to be happy and healthy and will do al most anything to keep them that way. Rockys Retreats primary business, Cappabianca said, is aqua therapy in their complexs 4 1/2-foot-deep pools for both dogs recovering from injury and gen Hip Dog Canine Hydrothera py & Fitness of Winter Park also through water-based exercises and swimming classes. More and more people are realizing that hydrotherapy is really good for their dogs, Hip Dog owner Beverly McCartt said. Weve been doing it for 10 years. She said her business slowed down slightly from the economy but that people keep coming back, and to encourage them to do so, shes offered discounted rate and classes. No dog is going to be de nied, she said. People sometimes take care of their dogs quality of life before their own, she said. We have to be cognizant of whats going on in their human families too. Pet Living CONTESTS REFRESHMENTS PET BUSINESSES TREATS Wiggle Waggle Walk Seminole Countys Largest Pet Walk, Saturday, October 22, 2011 9:00 AM Cranes Roost Uptown Altamonte CONTESTS REFRESHMENTS PET BUSINESSES TREATS For more information visit www.SeminolePets.com Or call (407) 248-1758 Franklins Friends ~ photo by Le Papa razzi Photography Free trial size Natures Variety Raw dietw/any $5.00 purchaseWhile supplies last. Must be presented at time of purchase. With Select coupon. One coupon per visit, per customer. Cannot be combined. Exp. Exp. 11/30/11. Two Free Natures variety dog or cat food cansw/any purchase.While supplies last. Must be presented at time of purchase. With Select coupon. One coupon per visit, per customer. Cannot be combined. Exp. 11/30/11. JOE MANNY 9/1/11 ALSO FIND US ON FACEBOOK Free trial size Natures Variety Raw dietw/any $5.00 purchaseWhile supplies last. must be presented at time of purchase. With S elect coupon. O ne coupon per visit, per customer. C annot be combined. E xp. 10/31/11. Two Free Natures variety dog or cat food cansw/any purchase. While supplies last. must be presented at time of purchase. With S elect coupon. O ne coupon per visit, per customer. C annot be combined. E xp. 10/31/11. Hounds & KittiesPet Health Food Market Where healthy is affordable407-637-2919144 Lake Ave., Maitland, FL 32751 Corner of 17-92 & Lake Ave. JOE MANNY 9/1/11 ALSO FIND US ON FACEBOOK Free trial size Natures Variety Raw dietw/any $5.00 purchaseWhile supplies last. must be presented at time of purchase. With S elect coupon. O ne coupon per visit, per customer. C annot be combined. E xp. 10/31/11. Two Free Natures variety dog or cat food cansw/any purchase. While supplies last. must be presented at time of purchase. With S elect coupon. O ne coupon per visit, per customer. C annot be combined. E xp. 10/31/11. Hounds & KittiesPet Health Food Market Where healthy is affordable407-637-2919144 Lake Ave., Maitland, FL 32751 Corner of 17-92 & Lake Ave. JOE MANNY 9/1/11 ALSO FIND US ON FACEBOOK Free trial size Natures Variety Raw dietw/any $5.00 purchaseWhile supplies last. must be presented at time of purchase. With S elect coupon. O ne coupon per visit, per customer. C annot be combined. E xp. 10/31/11. Two Free Natures variety dog or cat food cansw/any purchase. While supplies last. must be presented at time of purchase. With S elect coupon. O ne coupon per visit, per customer. C annot be combined. E xp. 10/31/11. Hounds & KittiesPet Health Food Market Where healthy is affordable407-637-2919144 Lake Ave., Maitland, FL 32751 Corner of 17-92 & Lake Ave. JOE MANNY 9/1/11 ALSO FIND US ON FACEBOOK Free trial size Natures Variety Raw dietw/any $5.00 purchaseWhile supplies last. must be presented at time of purchase. With S elect coupon. O ne coupon per visit, per customer. C annot be combined. E xp. 10/31/11. Two Free Natures variety dog or cat food cansw/any purchase. While supplies last. must be presented at time of purchase. With S elect coupon. O ne coupon per visit, per customer. C annot be combined. E xp. 10/31/11. Hounds & KittiesPet Health Food Market Where healthy is affordable407-637-2919144 Lake Ave., Maitland, FL 32751 Corner of 17-92 & Lake Ave. Hounds & KittiesPet Health Food Market www.houndsnkitties.comWhere healthy is affordable407-637-2919144 Lake Ave. in Maitland Corner of 17-92 & Lake Ave. in Village PlazaALSO FIND US ON FACEBOOK JOE MANNY 9/1/11 ALSO FIND US ON FACEBOOK Free trial size Natures Variety Raw dietw/any $5.00 purchaseWhile supplies last. must be presented at time of purchase. With S elect coupon. O ne coupon per visit, per customer. C annot be combined. E xp. 10/31/11. Two Free Natures variety dog or cat food cansw/any purchase. While supplies last. must be presented at time of purchase. With S elect coupon. O ne coupon per visit, per customer. C annot be combined. E xp. 10/31/11. Hounds & KittiesPet Health Food Market Where healthy is affordable407-637-2919144 Lake Ave., Maitland, FL 32751 Corner of 17-92 & Lake Ave. 10% off entire purchase with this adExp. 11/30/11 PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER Andre and K erry Elliot, owners of Hounds & Kitties, a two-year-old pet health food market in Maitland, say that as people are becoming more conscious about what they put into their own bodies, they are doing the same for their pets health. Dog days start looking up In a time when many businesses are in the doghouse, specialty pet health care services are doing better than ever SARAH WILSON Observer Staff Hounds & Kitties 144 Lake Ave., Maitland 407-637-2919 www.houndsnkitties.com Pookies Pet Nutrition & Bow Wow Bakery 1980 W. Fairbanks Ave., Winter Park 407-622-7387 pookiesbowwowbakery.com Woof Gang Bakery 918 Orange Ave., Winter Park 407-647-WOOF (9663) woofgangbakery.com/locations/ winterpark.asp Rockys Retreat Canine Health & Fitness Center 2826 Shader Road, Orlando 407-295-3888 rockysretreat.com Hip Dog Canine Hydrotherapy & Fitness 4965 Palmetto Ave., Winter Park 407-760-1484 hipdog.net

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Thursday, Oct. 20 2011 Page 17 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Photo Courtesy of Sandra Johnson PhotographyCorner of North Park Avenue & Gareld near Panera Bread in Winter Park FOR MORE INFORMATION: Please call 407-644-2969 or stop by our store at 329 Park Avenue North, Winter Park BENEFICIARY: FOUND ED & H O STED B Y B U LLFI SH AND pet COSTUME CONTEST FEATURING: Pet Trick or Treat in Park Avenue stores from 12noon to 3pm PLUS: Pet Related Vendors, Caricature Artist, Pet Photographer, Pet Trainers Visit us in Winter Park Premium Pet Foods Full & Self Service Groom Stylish Accessories Dog Training Classes Gourmet Dog Treats Doggie DaycareWoof Gang Bakery is an authorized dealer of the following premium pet foods, plus many more!*Offer valid until December 31, 2011Redeem this card for 1 O % Off your entire purchase! Visit us in Winter Park Premium Pet Foods Full & Self Service Groom Stylish Accessories Dog Training Classes Gourmet Dog Treats Doggie DaycareWoof Gang Bakery is an authorized dealer of the following premium pet foods, plus many more!*Offer valid until December 31, 2011Redeem this card for 1 O % Off your entire purchase! Pet Events Bringing home puppy: Tips for a successful introduction to the family Theres no doubt a new puppy brings joy to millions of families each year. However, while bringing home a new dog is exciting, it can also be quite an adjustment period for both the puppy and his new owners. According to veterinarian Dr. Brent Mayabb, manager of education and devel opment at Royal Canin USA, pet parents can help ease the transition with some simple steps to ensure healthy growth and development for our four-legged family members. Here are some tips to help make your new puppys transition easier for both pup and the family: Get social. Socializing your new puppy early is important to help them learn prop er behavior when meeting a new person or animal. Try to introduce your dog to 10 to 20 new people and pets (of varying ages acclimate to different sizes and tempera ments of dogs and cats, as well as a variety of humans. If your dog shows signs of aggression, take them out of the situation and try again with a smaller group or in a different setting. Exercise before bedtime. As your puppy gets used to being away from its mother and pack, you may hear crying and whin ing at night. Try to be patient; this behav ior is natural and shouldnt last longer than a few weeks. Additionally, try keep ing your puppy busy with quick training sessions or playing with toys during the early evening hours. A worn out puppy is a quiet puppy. Pay attention to diet. Transitioning from nursing to dry food can be hard on a new puppys digestive system. Until now, food formulated for this particular stage in a dogs life was not available at your local pet store. Stick to a routine. Take your puppy out often and right before you put them in their pen or kennel before bed. Some vet erinarians estimate that for every month your puppy is in your home that is one hour they can hold it. Frequency in rou tine is very important for house training and rewarding victories during training can be key. the vet is very important. The vet will help in scheduling vaccina cance of preventative care and rabies among other diseases. Remember to bring a list of ques tions with you to the appointment. Family Features The SPCAs annual Wiggle Waggle Walk will be 9 a.m.1 p.m. Satur day, Oct. 22, at Cranes Roost Park in Altamonte Springs. For more informa tion on the event, and other programs sponsored by the SPCA, visit www. seminolepets.com Candys Cats, a not-for-prot, no-kill cat rescue will be having a Wheelin Dealin Kittens event on Saturday, Oct. 22, from 6 to 10 p.m. at the Mai tland Civic Center. The event will have food, wine tastings, rafe and silent auction items and casino games. For more information, visit CandysCats. org Animal Hospital at Baldwin Parks Annual Halloween Party will be 2-4 p.m. Friday, Oct. 28, at their ofce at 946 Lake Baldwin Lane. Enter your pet in the costume contest to win one of three prizes and the chance for your pets picture to be on next years yer. There will be free exams. Visit www. baldwinparkvet.com The 12th Annual Pet Costume Con test will be 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 30, at the Doggie Door, 329 N. Park Ave., Winter Park. There will be a large pet costume contest at 11 a.m. and a small pet contest at 1 p.m. Pets can trick or treat from noon to 3 p.m. Also, there will be pet-related vendors, a caricature artist, a photographer and trainers. Call 407-644-2969. University of Doglando hosts their third annual Doglympics Event in downtown Avalon Park from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Nov. 5-6. There will be dock diving, longest stay contest, Olympic ring toss, yball tournament and much more. Register at doglympicsusa.com Plan your weekend with The Weekender! Visit eosun.com and click "Subscribe to Newsletter"

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Thursday, Oct. 20 2011 Page 18 Winter Park / Maitland Observer When the American suffrage movement won womens right to vote on Aug. 26, 1920, feminism which is what the womens rights movement had begun to call itself in 1911 went into a kind of eclipse. Not that issues and activists were lack ing. The Equal Rights Amendment to the duced in Congress in 1925 and every year thereafter for decades. Women continued their steady march into the workforce, starting businesses, joining unions, some after Pearl Harbor, enlisting in the uni formed military. All the while women were actively engaged in productive employment, they lived without statutory rights to equal pay, equal protection against layoffs, and bank and mortgage credit, which could be (and male family member agreed to co-sign or sign on their behalf. When, in the 1960s, my generation found that the vote did not guarantee treatment in the courts, we called our selves uppity women and returned to the streets, the courts, the air waves and the ballot box to produce feminisms sec ond wave, this time not only for womens civil rights, but also calling for womens economic and political equality with men. What is the future of feminism? Since the 1960s, two generations of American youth have grown up sure of their rights, with more sharing of roles. It is tempting to believe that because sexism is now as well understood as racism, feminism has achieved its goals. But in a jobs-challenged environment, there is new urgency for bringing fami lies out of the poverty and despair that contribute to domestic violence and for young people of both sexes to recommit to womens reproductive rights, the bedrock of womens gains. After women won the vote in 1920, the authors of history books published in the s, s and s conveniently forgot to mention the Womens Rights Movement. They paired it with Prohibition as a kind of sideshow of the 1920s. And so two ignorant of feminisms leaders, its strate gies, its hopes and its dreams for American women. Forgetting wont happen again. Certain ly not in Orlando/Winter Park, thanks to a Celebration of Feminism at Rollins Col lege on Friday, Oct. 28, and Saturday, Oct. 29, featuring second-wave icons Gloria Steinem, who founded Ms. Magazine; Kate Millett, who wrote the 1970s block buster Sexual Politics; Patricia Schroed to run for president; Terry ONeill, national president of the National Organization for Women; and two of NOWs founders in 1966: Muriel Fox, a Rollins alumna, and Jacqui Ceballos. The celebration was proposed to Rollins by Veteran Feminists of America, a nation al organization dedicated to remembering, recording and passing feminisms torch past six months, Rollins students have teamed with individual veteran feminists to record their stories. On Oct. 28-29, they will meet those and information are available by contact ing Judith Kaplan at judkap@gmail.com. In addition, the Winter Park Institute at Rollins College features a number of free events in late October featuring various feminists and authors, including Gloria Steinem. For more information about these free events, visit www.rollins.edu/wpi Sheila Tobias is vice president of Veteran Feminists of America and the author of Faces Womens Movement. Opinion/ Editorial Safe pets, safe community A celebration of American Feminism Too many people take the responsibility of pet ownership lightly. Slight errors in judgment, such as leav ing a front door open a moment too long or neglecting a faulty latch on an outdoor fence, can have disastrous consequences for four-legged friends. On the loose, dogs are at risk of getting hit by a vehicle putting themselves and the motorist in jeopardy. Even dogs with out a history of aggressive behavior can be capable of attacking other dogs or people when let loose. But its not just slight oversights that many pet owners are guilty of. So many people decide to forego a leash when taking their dogs outside or bring dogs with ag gressive tendencies to dog parks. Experts say that education is key to keeping our furry friends and us safe. An estimated 4.7 million dog bites occur an nually, according to the American Humane Association. The Centers for Disease Control reported that 800,000 Americans seek medi cal attention for dog bites each year half of whom are children. Of those, 386,000 go to the emergency room and about 16 die. Simple steps can be taken to scale back the instances of dog attacks. About 92 per cent of fatal dog attacks involved male dogs, 94 percent of whom were not neutered, according to the National Canine Research Foundation. In fact, the Humane Society of the U.S. reported that unneutered dogs were 2.6 times more likely to bite than neutered dogs. MindGymOctober 3, 2011 SHEILA T OBIAS Guest Writer Answers on page 20 Training and socializing a dog also reduces the risk for aggressive behavior. The American Humane Associa tion says socialization with people and other animals is especially important for puppies between 8 and 16 weeks old. AHA also recom mends restraining dogs with fences and leashes but not by tethering them, which can make them feel stressed and vulnerable. More than 80 percent of dog bites treated in the emer gency room involved children younger than 15, reported the CDC. Teaching a child how to properly play with dogs, supervising the child and dog when they are interacting and teaching a child how to ap proach dogs can dramatically reduce the risk of an attack. The consequences of ir responsible pet ownership can go below the surface. A pet thats been attacked may become skittish and the victims owner may develop a fear of dogs. A motorist who hits a loose dog who ran in front of the vehicle has to live with that accident for a lifetime, even if it wasnt their fault. Pet ownership is increasingly viewed as a right, not a privilege. But there are severe consequences when people do not take the time to educate themselves be fore becoming a pet parent. What it really boils down to is being a good neighbor. An essential piece of the healthy commu nity puzzle is safe pets. More than 80 percent of dog bites treated in the emergency room involved children younger than 15, reported the CDC. Teaching a child how to properly play with dogs, supervising the child and dog when they are interacting and teaching a child how to approach dogs can dramatically reduce the risk of an attack. Tobias

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Thursday, Oct. 20 2011 Page 19 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Chris Jepson The contemptible calling the absurd suspect Reections: personal and mundane Mitt Romneys a good moral person, but. Pastor Robert Jeffress What to make of Southern Baptist Robert Jeffress, senior pastor of a mega-church in Dallas? I get a kick out the devout claim ing to know Gods mind. The only thing bigger than Gods mind? Mans ego. Jeffress, a fervent Rick Perry-forpresident supporter, kicked up a storm by denying that Mormons are Christians. Are Mormons Christians? Lets see. Mormons believe that Jesus Christ sky rocketed across the North American conti nent and pole-vaulted, perhaps, sometime in the early 19th century. They believe that the angel Moroni (please, absolutely do off the Golden Plates that church founder Joseph Smith used to form the Mormon Church. Mormons baptize the dead en you get your very own planet. Nifty, huh? Women need not apply. Or, that in 1857, Mormons (disguised men, women and children who were trav eling by wagon train to the west, killed Mountain Meadows in the Utah Territory. That does sound a bit cultish to me. For sure, your very own planet? You betcha! But, but, but does that make them unchristian? the kettle calling the pot black. All religion is superstition. That, in and of itself, is a self-evident truth. That doesnt make what you believe necessarily bad, just that what you believe is based on supersti tion. And all that that implies. Take, for instance, what we factually know about Jesus Christ. He was a Jew. He lived. He died. Few would disagree with those facts. But was he really the son of God? Born of a virgin? Walk on water? Liter ally, physically went to heaven? Or, that he died for our sins? What is attributed to Jesus wasnt actually captured on paper ion. Hmmm, do you think anything might have been exaggerated in 100 years? Lets put it to a vote! What do you mean, Jepson? Well, there were so many disagreements among early Christians as to who was Jesus (was he in fact the literal Constantine convened the First Council of Nicaea in 325 and they put it to a vote. Jesus Christs lineage was determined by vote, by lobbying. Too funny. OK, move ahead about 1,700 years and some crazed-cracker of a Southern Baptist pastor calls into question Rom neys Mormonism. Wait? Why is there a What? Baptists split in 1845 over slavery and guess which way Southern Baptists went? Well, there is considerable biblical scripture, after all, in support of slavery. So Pastor Goof questions Mitt Rom neys Mormonism (by implication his Mitt Romneys a good moral person, but. He is a moral person but? But what? Lets extrapolate: Hes a good athlete, businessman, but hes a Jew. Hes a hard worker, but hes a Mexican. Hes a Christian but. and hes a religious bigot. Per illustration, there are many legiti mate reasons, folks, why America requires separation of church and state. Jepson is a 24-year resident of Florida. Hes scally conservative, so cially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.US WHO IS JEPSON > Louis Roney Betty Wilson, wife of Sloan (The Man sent us a book Sloan wrote that we hadnt read, What Shall We Wear to This Party? and it reminded me right off the bat what a wonderful writer Sloan was. I remember Sloan at breakfast one morn ing in the Eliot House dining room at Harvard. He was reading to me from the folded papers he had in his jacket pocket. His words made me realize once and for all that a real writer is born, not made. The same is true for singers, may I add? I, who had probably been reading John Dryden or Algernon Charles Swinburne the previous night, found Sloan much to my liking with his great skill at handling modern American lingo eloquently, with never a trace of banality. Sloan spent World War II in the Coast Guard and was right at home on any kind of watercraft, having had a boat himself most of his life. As I remember, he arrived at Harvard as the skipper of his own 87-foot schooner, which he parked in the Charles River basin. Parties on Sloans boat after football games will stay in my memory forever. Sloan was gone from us all too soon, and I realize this evermore when I phone Betty, who now lives on the Virginia shore, not far from her daughter and grandchildren. After I got to know Sloan freshman year, and learned that he had gone to Phil lips Exeter Academy, I wished ardently that I had had such a preparation for a college such as Harvard. My background was Winter Park High School, buoyed by highly intelligent parents from whom I learned much at the dinner table. When b.w. and I arrived in Winter Park in 1980, Sloan and Betty were living here! Sloan and I switched gears easily and continued the friendship we had enjoyed in college many years before. We four had countless good times together and attracted a vari ety of sparkling friends. Before Sloan left Winter Park to go north to stay, he turned to me one day in our doorway and said, You are the best friend I ever had. My feelings for him were similar. Ive never found one like him since. Nothing is forever At just about the same time that Colum bus crossed the Atlantic, the last remnants of the Moorish occupation were driven out of Spain. The Moors were Moslems, of course. Today Moslems are quite different to handle in this Atomic Age than in 1492. Our forebears set up a country with strict regard for freedom of religion but made no provision to deal with faiths that treat ed others without goodwill. In the face of present quasi-warlike moves against the U.S., our so-un-American president has responded with bloodless appeasement that gives much more than it gets. Obama is no Hitler, but there are tricks of the trade that all demagogues since the Ger man demon have borrowed. The big lie is a handy weapon in Obamas political arsenal, and he can prevaricate with the best Ananiases. In my 91st year, my love for my wife, my home and my country is stronger than ever. After four years in the Navy in WWII, I returned home sharing the ubiquitous joy that peace is wonder ful and its going to last forever this time! Nothing is forever, especially at 90, I remind myself. HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney) WHO IS RONEY > Have an opinion? Send your thoughts (400 words or less) to Managing Editor Jenny Andreasson at editor@observernewspapers.com Letters to the Editor Preemptive attacks are no solution Louis Roneys Oct. 12 article Whats our plan for Iran? is ter rible writing on several levels. In Mr. Roneys fact-free article, he bemoans the piteous percent of GDP allocated to defense. In 2010, $680 billion was spent on defense, more than six times greater than any other countrys defense budget. In 2012, we are estimated to spend $703 billion on defense, the greatest amount since World War II. After complaining about Ja pans cowardly attack on Pearl Harbor, Mr. Roney suggests we conduct a similar preemptive at tack on Iran. Despite Mr. Roneys bloodlust for Irans annihila tion, there are better methods to preventing nuclear armament. Stuxnet, a computer virus, has delayed Irans nuclear program by years without the massive civilian death toll that Mr. Roney celebrates in the Tokyo bombings of 1945. Mr. Roney questions the patriotism of Americans who dont support a preemptive war against Iran, but our last preemp tive war has cost more than 4,000 American lives and more than 100,000 civilian lives. Mr. Roneys story of school protect you from bullies; hitting Austin Mercadante Winter Park Developer petitions for Morse Boulevard property Eds. Note: This is an email sent to Winter Park commissioners in that was also submitted as a letter to the editor. As you know, I represented one of the proposals to purchase ty. Let me reiterate that my client, Anthony Everett, and The Pollack Partners are still interested in purchasing the property to devel op a high-end, quality, residential apartment lifestyle community in Winter Park. This style of living, we believe, would be acceptable to current residents of the city who do not want ownership and are downsizing and would also attract professionals who want to enjoy the Winter Park lifestyle, such as living within walking distance to Park Avenue and having access to the amenities offered in the Winter Park Village (groceries, movies, restaurants, responsibility and cost associated with home ownership. The following was and still is our proposal: story residential apartment project at a price of $20,000 per unit for a total purchase price of $4,000,000. ry residential apartment project at a price of $20,000 per unit for a total purchase price of $6,000,000. What we are proposing to develop on this property, the city already has 3-, 4and 5-story buildings existing in the city. My client is ready to offer the city of Winter Park a contract for cash and close within 30 days after site plan approval. They are not look ing for any incentives from the they will perform with the terms of the purchase and sales agree ment. To date, our proposal has been ignored by our city govern ment, which has failed to contact me or my client to further discuss our offer. I will be releasing this memo randum to various news outlets, interested groups and individu als residing in our great city. I feel that many of the citizens of Winter Park are not aware that parcel of land worth a lot of of Winter Park. In my opinion, the city should only accept an outright sale of the city property for its appraised value or nothing less than cash for the difference between the two appraised val ues. Should the city not be suc cessful, I respectfully request that you reconsider the offer made by my client. David A. Winters Broker, Florida Property Group

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Thursday, Oct. 20 2011 Page 21 Winter Park / Maitland Observer SERVICE DIRECTORY PLEASE MARK YOUR RESPONSE HERE:Will you please review and respond as soon as possible? We are waiting for your approval. Please NOTE: this is NOT a second opportunity to design the ad. Redesign changes may result in additional charges. Thank you!1. Please circle A or B below: A: I approve this ad as shown here B: I approve this ad with changes as marked (How many changes are marked? _____)2. Please double check phone/address/names.Phone & address are correct (initials here) ________ With this signature, I signify my understanding that payment for this ad is due per Advertising Agreement.Signed ________________________________Since 1995(407) 366-8696 Fax (407) 359-2118 P.O. Box 4548 Winter Park, FL 32793FOR YOUR INFORMATIONThis ad will appear in these areas and months. ____Waterford Lakes__________________ ____College Park/Orlando______________ ____Winter Park/Maitland_______________ ____Sweetwater/Heathrow______________ ____Tuscawilla/Wntr Sprgs _____________ ____Oviedo__________________________ ____ Baldwin/Winter Pk. East ____________X JUNE 2011 X JUNE 2011 A Better Plumber407-644-4000 X JUNE 2011 HODGES BROTHERS INCROOFING & CONSTRUCTION 25 years Antique Sales experience Serving Winter Park and Maitland for 12 years Family owned and operatedPay Top Dollar for Gold and Silver items No Up-front or Out of Pocket expense on Estate saleSandbergEstateSales.com 321-299-4179 James 407-923-5013 MargeLicensed, InsuredSandberg Estate Sales 2 Beautiful Lots in Memorial ParkGLEN HAVEN MEMORIAL PARK 2300 Temple Drive, Winter Park Section H-Love, Lot 414, Spaces 3 & 4 Valued at $5,150 eachAsking $3,500 each or $6,000 for both407-647-5932 Casting Boys & Girls, ages 4-17 years old, all ethnicities! Drake Model & Talent Agency has Opportunities for young talent to be cast at both Disney & Universal Studios!!! Call today for an appointment!Drake Model & Talent 407-339-4570 NOW Casting for Kids! Paid Jobs COASTAL CONSTRU C TIONHOME IMPROVEMENTSLI C ENSED 45 YEARS EXPERIEN C E INSUREDKITCHEN BATHROOM REMODELSWINDO W S DRY W ALL FASCIADOORS PAINT AND MORE407-325-1978HANDYMAN SERVICES AVAILA B LEJIM@ COASTALCONSTRUCTIONMANAGEMENT.NET American Family Funerals & Cremations Phone (407)339 0070 Serving all of Central Florida Family Owned and Operated Se habla Espaol Alan Trueba L.F.D. American Family Funerals & Cremations Phone (407)339 0070 Serving all of Central Florida Family Owned and Operated Se habla Espaol Alan Trueba L.F.D. Cremation Services, Shipping & Monuments. Traditional, Contemporary & Veteran Services at half the price of what others would charge Donate A Boat sponsored by boat angel outreach centers STOP CRIMES AGAINST CHILDREN www.boatangel.com2-Night Free Vacation!or Car Today! 800 1 CAR L ANGE Psychic Medium & Author He has captivated audiences worldwide on his internationally acclaimed talk shows, Crossing Over & Cross Country. Dont miss this intimate evening with John Edward.Tickets: (800) 233-3123JohnEdward.net or A reading is not guaranteed. J ohn E dwardFEB 8TH 7pmHilton Melbourne Rialto Place FEB 10TH 7pmDoubletree Hotel Tampa Airport FEB 11TH 2pmCrowne Plaza West Palm Beach Hotel FEB 12TH 11am Adversing Networks of Florida Statewide advertisingone low price Plan your weekend with The Weekender! This weekly newsletter keeps you up to date on events happening in Central Florida's cities, including Winter Park, Maitland, Oviedo, Winter Springs, Avalon Park and Waterford Lakes. Visit wpmobserver. com and click "Subscribe to Newsletter"

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