Winter Park-Maitland observer
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00175
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park FL
Publication Date: 09-01-2011
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates: 28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID: UF00091444:00175

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ursday, Sept. 1, 2011 50+ tax BUS_CARD 3.25 x 2 August 2010Grafton Wealth ManagementWilliam D. Grafton III, Sarah Grafton DeVoe William D. Grafton IV Financial Advisors (407) 646-6725 400 Park Avenue South Suite 300 Winter Park, FL 32789 Merrill Lynch Wealth Management makes available products and services offered by Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated (MLPF&S) and other subsidiaries of Bank of America Corporation. MLPF&S is a registered broker-dealer, member SIPC. Investment products: 2010 Bank of America Corporation. All rights reserved. Are Not FDIC Insured Are Not Bank Guaranteed May Lose Value 407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.netYour Real Hometown BankOn Hwy 17-92 in MaitlandMember FDIC wpmobserver.comUSPS 00-6186 Publisher statement on page 4. Page 14 News legend honoredRestoring the Gulf is critical not just to the regional economy, but also to our strength as a nation. Page 12 d Sustained futureSeven Rollins students take an eco-friendly challenge, including living with composting worms.Page 10 CalendarThe Central Florida Irish Tournament of Hurling is this Saturday in Winter Park. Page 9 Barking about the budgetCity employees could get a higher raise than expected, trees dead since the 2004 hurricane season could finally be cut down and a new dog park bathroom may be on the horizon if a Winter Park budget proposal passes on Sept. 26. Some big changes are set for the Winter Park budget for 2012, and a $100,000 cut in the tree maintenance budget could be included. With another line item adding in $85,000 to help pay for a new restroom in the off-leash portion of Fleet Peeples Parks dog park, one resident was crying foul. But city officials say that $100,000 is being diverted to a contractor to do the same thing the city would have done.New restroomNancy Shutts said she noticed that some big changes to the city budget for 2012 werent in the printed proposed budget, and that at least two commissioners dont know about the changes. One of those budget items, pledging $85,000 toward a restroom at Fleet Peeples Park, had her wondering why the city would pay so much money to a group that she said comprises mostly non-residents. Half of this new bathroom that ISAAC BABCOCK Observer StaffCity considers new restroom at Fleet Peeples dog park PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERSales prices are up in the Winter Park and Maitland areas compared to last year, according to a mid-year report.Retail reboundMaitlands non-lakefront home sales are up 32% Please see RESTROOM Page 5 When the Wildcats finished their preseason game against East Ridge at the bad end of a 3521 score, Coach Tim Shifflet didnt mind. Last season, Winter Parks football team started the same way and went 11-1. None of that matters, Shifflet said. Hes thinking about the real season. And that starts Friday night in Lake Mary. Theyre a physical team, Shifflet said of his teams first official opponent. And hes expecting a fight. How prepared the Wildcats will be remains to be seen, with some key players missing from last years lineup. Marching around the field during practice Monday, he pressed the defense to jump off the ball to stop a Rams offense that has been building for the past several seasons. Last year the Wildcats had little trouble containing opponents on the field, holding teams to an average of two TDs per game. Only in their one loss of the season, after an undefeated run through the regular season, did they finally give up more than four touchdowns. But itll take a lot of team building to live up to last seasons success, Shifflet said. And itll take time that the Wildcats might not have. What they have is star power on both ends of the field. Senior Dvario Montgomery was the Wildcats most prolific receiver last year with 1,100 yards and 13 touchdowns, and he returns for his final season. On the other side of the ball, defensive end James Washington helped turn the Wildcats into a brick wall last season. Despite a still fragile economy and the countrys blemished credit rating, many experts have faith the housing market is still moving in a positive direction. Anything thats priced right, Im getting offers on them, sometimes even multiple offers, Maitland Re/Max real estate agent Mike Rance said. Its a great time for a buyer to buy, but you have to be ready to pounce when you find the right property. Recent reports on the housing market also confirm Orange County is slowly starting to conquer recent obstacles thrown its way. According to the Mid-Year Hillman Report, home transactions for the Greater Orlando area were up 2.53 percent over a comparable period last year and inventory was reduced to a 4.7-month supply. Overall, sales and prices of existing homes in Orange and Seminole counties also performed better in some of the more established neighborhoods, particularly in Maitland, where non-lakefront home transactions climbed 32 percent. There are a lot of positive things going on, said Scott Hillman, president of Fannie Hillman + Associates, a Central Florida real estate company. Prices are up in some areas and stabilized in others, but the Please see REAL ESTATE Page 2KRISTY VICKERY Observer StaffWildcats face strong competition earlyPHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERThe Wildcats have stars, but need unity.ISAAC BABCOCK Observer Staff Please see FOOTBALL Page 7

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Thursday, Sept. 1, 2011 Page 2 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Individual & Family health plans For an Instant Quote or to apply, visit our website www.HealthInsuranceIBS.com407-831-5166 Central Floridas Largest Fine Arts Gallery221 South Knowles Ave Winter ParkMOVING SALE! 25-50% off everything in the Gallery!407-622-0102 www.FredlundGallery.comWe offer: fact that inventory is shrinking is a big deal. He also said he believes Orange County is ahead of the rest of what the nation is feeling, in terms of getting short sales and foreclosures flushed out. Michael Kidd, executive vice president of Orlando Regional Realtors Association, agreed that he is seeing fewer distressed assets dominating the marketplace and that the past six months have been a balanced market. We have seen financial institutions take a much more aggressive approach towards working with buyers and sellers, Kidd said. Theyve facilitated a much more fluent transaction then we saw in the previous two years. According to ORRAs market statistics, since January of this year, Orlandos median price has increased by 23.3 percent, bringing Orlandos overall median price to $117,000 in July. The median price is also 7.64 percent higher than the $108,700 recorded in July 2010. The market is starting to show the best signs now that Ive seen, Kidd said. Sean Snaith, director of the University of Central Floridas Institute for Economic Competitiveness, said sales are improving this year from the first quarter to the second quarter, but the key to real improvement is the labor market. The state of the housing market going forward is really intertwined with the labor market, and until we start seeing some significant job creation and see the unemployment start to make a steady decline downward, I think its going to be hard for the housing market to make a full-blown recovery, he said. Snaith said the signs of improvement are there, and the labor market will pick up, but the progress will be very slow. As long as we have high unemployment and weak job creation, we are going to continue to have problems with foreclosure, and limit potential buyers, because now it turns out you have to actually have a job to get a mortgage, so an improving labor market helps on both sides of the housing market, Snaith said. It helps boost the command and slows the growth and supplier of foreclosures, so those two markets are really tied together. But for some Orlando real estate agents, a stabilizing market is the encouragement they need. I think we are far ahead in correcting our market then those other markets around the country, Kidd said. Just six months ago, we were taking a very negative approach to talking about decreasing values in the Orlando area, and weve reversed that completely.REAL ESTATE | Economist says high unemployment and weak job creation is stifling the housing market CONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE Breakfast with the governorPHOTOS COURTESY OF GOVERNORS OFFICE AND AUDUBON PARK ELEMENTARYGov. Rick Scott, above, spent his second Lets Get to Work Day at Audubon Park Elementary School in Baldwin Park on Friday. Scott helped prepare and serve breakfast to more than 100 students. First Lady Ann Scott, top right, visited a third-grade classroom that utilizes laptops instead of pencils and papers.

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Thursday, Sept. 1, 2011 Page 3 Winter Park / Maitland Observer

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Thursday, Sept. 1, 2011 Page 4 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Get involvedThe Bach Festival Youth Choir is auditioning for new members ages 9-16. Contact Bach Festival Youth Choir conductor Devon Kincaid to schedule an audition for your student. Email youthchoir@BachFestivalFlorida.org or call 407-206-1900, extension 3312. If you wish to take part in the Winter Park Paint Out in 2012, send a letter of interest to thepolasek@winterparkpaintout.org no later than Thursday, Sept.15: Explain your interest and commitment. Include an active link to your website in the email. Attach a current resume. State Rep. Bryan Nelson is now seeking applicants for the Florida House of Representatives page and messenger program. You must live in the Orange County community and be 13-18 years old. The program is one week during the 2012 legislative session in Tallahassee. The deadline to apply is Friday, Sept. 16. Call 407884-2023.Ways to give backThe rst $10,000 raised through the Classrooms Supplies Campaign will be matched $1 for $1 by the states School District Matching Grant Program to support low-income classrooms. More than 100,000 Orange County students are on the Free and Reduced Meal Program. Invest by visiting www.foundationforocps.org The Jewish Pavilion is offering an opportunity to market your business for as little as $100. On Sunday, Oct. 23, the Pavilion will host A Walk in the Park from 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. at Cranes Roost Park in Altamonte Springs. In addition to the walk, they will be having a community expo. Visit tinyurl.com/jpwalksponsor to be a sponsor or vendor. The Internal Revenue Service is looking for volunteers to prepare simple federal tax returns from midJanuary through April 18. Almost all sites use computers to prepare and electronically transmit tax returns (ele) during daytime hours for TCE and days, evenings and weekends for VITA. You need not have any accounting experience. All thats required is a desire to help individuals who cannot prepare their basic tax returns or afford to pay a preparer. For more information or to volunteer, contact Yanina Noboa at 954 423-7626 or yanina.v.noboa@irs.govCommunity Bulletin Business Briefs USPS 00-6186 ISSN 1064-36131500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835-5705Member of: Goldenrod Chamber of CommercePublisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor. Submission does not guarantee publication. Columnists opinions are made independently of the newspaper. All rights reserved. Winter Park / Maitland Observer 2011www.wpmobserver.com | Phone: 407-563-7000 | Fax: 407-563-7099 | editor@observernewspapers.comP.O. Box 2426 Winter Park, FL 32790 Published Thursday, Sept. 1, 2011 CONTACTSVolume 23, Issue Number 35PUBLISHER Kyle Taylor 407-563-7009 kyle@observernewspapers.com MANAGING EDITOR Jenny Andreasson 407-563-7026 editor@observernewspapers.com DESIGNER Jonathan Gallagher 407-563-7054 jgallagher@observernewspapers.com REPORTERS Jenny Andreasson 407-563-7026 editor@observernewspapers.com Isaac Babcock 407-563-7023 isaacb@observernewspapers.com LEGALS | CLASSIFIEDS Ashley McBride legal@FLAlegals.com classi eds@observernewspapers.com COPY EDITORS Isaac Babcock isaacb@observernewspapers.com Padrick Brewer COLUMNISTS Chris Jepson Jepson@MediAmerica.us Louis Roney LRoney@c .rr.com Josh Garrick joshgarrick9@gmail.com ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Tracy Craft 407-515-2605 tcraft@observernewspapers.com SUBSCRIPTIONS | CIRCULATION Amanda Rayno 407-563-7073 arayno@golfweek.com OBITUARIES obit@observernewspapers.com to announce the opening of their second retail store, Big Top, a retail store where customers can design and print custom shirts on the spot. The store is located in the University Commons shopping center across from University of Central Florida. Goodwill Industries of Central Florida has hired Timothy Schaben as a loss prevention manager. Cuhaci & Peterson Architects LLC, based in Orlandos Baldwin Park, recently promoted Amy Phillips to marketing manager. Data Transfer Solutions LLC (DTS), based in downtown Avalon Park in east Orlando, has added another data collection vehicle to its existing eet. The new MAC-Van will be able to capture both video and data in a 360-degree eld of view. The vehicle uses proprietary data collection, processing and extraction software called EarthShaper. Altamonte Springs-based general contractors and construction managers Roger B. Kennedy Inc. completed the LA Fitness Hunters Creek sports club remodel and 11,000-square-foot expansion located at 12700 S. Orange Blossom Trail in Orlando. Robert W. Bowser has joined Greenberg Traurig P.A. as an associate in its Orlando of ce. Beth Norrow also joined the litigation practice group as an associate. The Central Florida of ce of SIKON Construction, Maitland, announced the completion of Lagoon Landing, Florida Keys Community Colleges rst student-housing facility, in Key Watson Realty Corp.s top salesperson for Central region in July 2011 was Diane Sterling, Maitland of ce. RLF/TranSystems LLC recently announced it was awarded a $15 million, ve-year inde nite-delivery/ inde nite-quantity contract by the Naval Facilities Engineering Command Atlantic Division. Rollins College freshmen participated in Service Philanthropy Activism Rollins College, a day when all incoming students contribute their time to community service projects throughout Central Florida. At the start of this semester, students donated time to 24 local organizations, including Fern Creek Elementary School, A Gift For Teaching, Henry Nehrling Society, The Mustard Seed and the Ronald McDonald House. From sorting school supplies and recycling mattress materials to making gift packs and landscaping, new students plunged head rst into the service-driven culture at Rollins College. Rollins gives back On Aug. 18, Buca di Beppo kicked off National Senior Citizens Day with a lunch celebration. The of cial holiday was marked with a special delivery to the Lake Mary Health and Rehabilitation Center to feed 40 seniors, including 102-yearold Caroline Gregory, a Buca di Beppo regular. Pictured from left to right are Buca di Beppo server Haley Forest, Bobby Paul Benevento, 90, and server Emmy Coonrad. Buca honors seniors The Summer of Dreams program came to a close in Orange County last week. Fifth Third Banks 10-week program which provided food, activities, transportation, school supplies and nancial counseling for parents served 1,078 homeless students in its rst year. To learn more about sponsorship opportunities or how to get involved for next year, visit TheSummerofDreams.com 1K students helped Big Top

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Thursday, Sept. 1, 2011 Page 5 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Georey Lynch, AAMS Senior Financial Advisor Brad Breuer, AWMA Managing Principal George Thiergartner Senior Financial Advisor 501 South New York Avenue Suite 120 Winter Park, FL 32789 407-764-5101 877-702-3687 Investment and Insurance Products: NOT FDIC Insured NO Bank Guarantee MAY Lose Value Wells Fargo Advisors is the trade name used by two separate registered broker-dealers: Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC, and Wells Fargo Advisors Financial Network, LLC, Members SIPC, non-bank aliates of Wells Fargo & Company. [Practice Name] is a separate entity of WFAFN. 2010 Wells Fargo Advisors Financial Network, LLC. All rights reserved. [74029-v2]A1015 Alabama Oaks offers the highest quality affordable care in the most beautiful Winter Park home-setting. Call us for a personal tour or for more information 407-434-9654 PHOTO COURTESY OF JEWISH ACADEMY OF ORLANDOMatt Eggert, Assistant Director of Technology, showed Jewish Academy of Orlando fourth-graders how to download apps to their iPads and laptops.No paper, pencils hereRESTROOM | CONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGEpeople dont need is being paid by our tax dollars, Shutts said. And that restroom, according to current plans, would be fenced entirely inside of the off-leash side of the dog park. There are better things to do than building a bathroom thats really for the dog people, Shutts said. Clearing up controversyThat concern came out of the budget work session during the City Commission meeting Aug. 22, when commissioners proposed changes to the 2012 budget. Winter Park City Manager Randy Knight said that the tree removal fund change and dog park bathroom funding are unrelated, clarifying that the tree removal budget is being diverted from funds that normally do not cover that service. It wasnt Lets cut the tree money and build a bathroom, thats just part of the process, Knight said. Confusion abounded about just how the city was paying for tree trimming and removal, as those topics dominated the budget work session. Knight said that the city had at one point ceased cutting trees in the right of way that were in homeowners yards, but that residents still expected it. Prior to 2004 we had been doing it, so theres an expectation that well continue to do it, Knight said. Playing catch upThat year was a big one for tree removals, after three hurricanes hammered Central Florida in a two-month span. Our tree crewstheyre still trying to clean up after the hurricane, Commissioner Carolyn Cooper said. Since then, the city has been working to catch up on removing dead trees a problem that continues to grow as more trees die, Knight said. Weve got about 60 dead trees out there, Knight said. Weve found more dead trees on a weekly basis. It seems to grow by three or four trees on a weekly basis. Weve been chipping away at it for the last seven years. The city planned to use the $100,000 tree removal money to pay a contractor to perform all the dead tree removals. If we hire a contractor thats focused solely on tree removal, itll get that all done quickly, Knight said. Itll release our crews to do other things. Employee raisesThe Commission also pushed for increasing employee raises from a proposed 2 percent to 2.5 percent, which Knight said he may be able to find money in the budget for by freezing positions. Thats going to cost us about $140,000, Knight said of the difference in raises. We pay for that out of what I call gapped positions. We hold positions open long enough during that year to cover the cost. The Commission will have its first reading of the proposed budget at the Sept. 12 meeting. A second reading will solidify the budget on Sept. 26.

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Thursday, Sept. 1, 2011 Page 6 Winter Park / Maitland Observer FREE ICE CREAM! ENTER TO WIN AN iPAD 2! Brad Hays casts just a silhouette as he sifts through a bin of clothes in a dimly lit sorting room while another bag comes through the back door. At the Goodwill Thrift Store along the bumpy bricks of Sanfords Third Street, the donations keep coming all day. And by the time hes sorted through 24 pounds of donations, somebody in need will have a new job, according to Goodwills new ad campaign. Its a long journey between when a donated bag of old clothes turns into a job for someone looking for work, but at the instant Hays takes the bag by the hand, hes the beginning and the end of a success story. Stepping inside the door to make her first donation, Melanie Queen unknowingly sets off a long chain of events that gives a person like Hays a job. For her, it was just a gift to a stranger. I think its a good thing to do when youre not using them (clothes), and you can give them to someone who can use them, Queen said. Bill Oakley, president and CEO of Goodwill Industries of Central Florida, said donations are Goodwills backbone. In turbulent times, when people see their neighbors struggling, they tend to be more generous, Oakley said.Job resourcesColeen Heyligar knows what its like to have to seek out a helping hand in hard times. She called Goodwill after she was laid off and she had to move into a shelter with her 13-year-old son. Its been a real stepping stone in getting where I would like to be and getting me and my son back on our feet again, she said. Heyligar started going to Goodwills Self-Sufficiency Job Center to use their resources, such as their three-day job course, and quickly found the resources she needed. I was getting interviews, but I wasnt getting the jobs, and I wanted to know what I was doing wrong, she said. It brought me a new light and gave me a fresh perspective It reshaped me and how I would like to be seen. Goodwills Self-Sufficiency Job Center is a nonprofit organization that offers job-training services for the underemployed and unemployed. In 2010, we had 1,916 job seekers come through the center and 179 were successful in that year for finding employment with 128 different employers, Oakley said. Goodwill employee Danny Butler is more than grateful for the paycheck he now receives every two weeks after struggling with unemployment for two years. This is the only place I know thats consistently hiring, Butler said of Goodwill. And theyre the ones who help people with all kinds of situations.Finance savvyThe program will begin offering classes in September and is designed to address aspects of personal finance, such as creating a spending plan, banking and credit, and building assets. Its all designed to help studentsbecome more financially stable by having better control of their money and their lives. We would like to see more people taking advantage of the services that we have so that we can help them on the road to employment, said Belinda Newkirk, a coordinator with Goodwills job center. Helping others attain their goals and live a better life is the mission of both the center and the people who use their services. Life is what you make it, Heyligar said. I had a goal in mind, and I knew where I wanted to go.Goodwill centers are open from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. For more information on Sanford Goodcall 407-936-0469.KRISTY VICKERY Observer Staff PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERColeen Heyligar got a job thanks to Goodwills employment classes. The Self-Suf ciency Center offers many free services.Goodwill reaches out to unemployedThe nonpro t job center offers training, other free resources

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Thursday, Sept. 1, 2011 Page 7 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Acupuncture, herbal therapy, cupping, moxibustion, electrical stimulation, Tongue/Pulse DiagnosisSpecialize in treating womens issues (Ex: PMS, Irregular Periods, Cramps, Infertility, Morning Sickness)407-429-1066spectrumwellcare@gmail.com1298 Minnesota Ave. Suite A Winter Park 25% off your rst visit with this ad! Let's celebrate. Join us as we bring the Winter Park community together for the grand re-opening celebration of the Winter Park YMCA. Tour our newly renovated facility and experience first hand the long history of giving, volunteerism, belonging and advocacy demonstrated by Winter Park residents for almost 50 years. Come celebrate and see how the Y contributes to making Winter Park a great place to live and a strong, healthy and connected community. PREVIEW OUR RENOVATED FACILITIES: Welcome Center | New Cycling Studio | Family Locker Rooms | Men's and Women's Locker Rooms | Social Gathering Areas | New Windows in Group Exercise Studio | Environmentally friendly features | Landscaping DATE: Thursday, September 15, 2011 TIME: 4:00 PM 7:30 PM celebration hours family friendly hours and activities adult friendly hours and activities PLACE: WINTER PARK YMCA 1201 N. Lakemont Ave Winter Park, FL 32792 PARKING: Complimentary valet parking available RSVP at our YMCA of Central Florida Facebook page. Click Events. Call Winter Park Y at 407.644.1509 or or Crosby Y at 407.644. 3606 for more information.WINTER PARK YMCA 1201 N. Lakemont Ave, Winter Park, FL, 32792 CROSBY YMCA 2005 Mizell Ave, Winter Park, FL, 32792 COME CELEBRATE BUILDING A BETTER WINTER PARK Y FOR A STRONGER COMMUNITYFEATURE ACTIVITIES INCLUDE:Live Entertainment Food and Beverages Chance to win prizes Poolside party and cookout for kids Business After Hours in Phelps Park hosted by The Winter Park Chamber of Commerce EVERYONE IS WELCOME The Knights are storming toward the start of the season with some tough questions to answer and with some big expectations to fulfill after their first bowl victory over Georgia last season. The Knights kick off their season at home against Charleston Southern at 7 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 3. But its already been a wild preseason in training. UCF football was thrown for a loop when backup quarterback and wide receiver Rob Calabrese snapped a ligament in his left knee for the second time in two seasons, possibly ending the 2011 season before it began. Now a potential redshirt senior for the 2012 season, Calabrese will once again be stepping into his role calling plays from the sidelines for rising sophomore starting quarterback Jeff Godfrey, who proved a godsend last season. As a freshman, Godfrey had stepped into a role rarely reserved for such an inexperienced player: starting quarterback. He quickly proved himself with a scrambling, option-player style that proved elusive to tackles. He also finally offered the ability to consistently gain yards through the air that the Knights had been looking for. I didnt expect to do that well, Godfrey said during UCF football media day on Aug. 5. He led the team to an 11-3 finish, including the benchmark 10-6 victory over Georgia, last season. It was a brilliant, storming drive led by Godfrey in the final quarter of the Liberty Bowl that marched the Knights 65 yards downfield to the game-winning touchdown. At a press conference during media day, Head Coach George OLeary said he was happy with the steps Godfrey has taken since his first game last season. When you look at last season and look at the film, the two things I spoke with him about his poise in the pocket and his decision making hes gotten that done, OLeary said. He understands protection better, understands coverage better. I think he works at the game. If he can play 10, 12, 15 percent better than last year, I think were gonna be a very strong offense. Young leaderTight end Adam Nissley, who saw limited receptions last season but is expected to factor big in UCFs offense in 2011, said Godfrey learned quickly in his inaugural season. I thought it might take him longer to get used to the game, Nissley said. The first game, he really surprised me. Now even more weight may be on Godfreys shoulders, as hes expected to emerge as a leader on the field at a young age. But OLeary expressed confidence in his young quarterback at the Aug. 5 press conference. Quarterbacks either command respect or they dont command respect, OLeary said. If you dont have that there, theres a problem. Hes not a big talker, its his actions. I think his leadership is improved, but hes still only a sophomore.Senior powerThat focus on leadership and team unity carried over to OLearys assessment of his upperclassmen. Ive never won unless Ive had a senior class that leads and had good chemistry, OLeary said. I was looking for leadership, and I always look at the senior class on both sides of the ball. I think defensively its still fairly young. But Darius Nall, Josh Linam and Kemal Ishmael have played a lot of downs for us. I think this group collectively is a good group. Its their football team, its their locker room, and theyve done a good job enforcing that on the young players. Its a good sign that theres a major separation between the upperclassmen and the freshmen, OLeary said. Four years ago, I couldnt say that. UCF ended last season ranked No. 21 in the AP Top 25 poll. This season, after losing eight defensive starters, theyre ranked No. 33 leading up to Week One. OLeary hinted that the Knights should be higher ranked come the end of the season. Its more important where we are in December, he said.PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERFreshman defensive back Connor Price signs autographs for fans at UCF footballs annual Fan Day on Aug. 20. They play their rst game Sept. 3 at home. ISAAC BABCOCK Observer StaffFootball kicks off Saturday Montgomery said hes expecting a challenge out of the gate against the Rams. Itll be a well-matched game, he said. Hopefully well be able to come out and compete. What that will depend on is the team finding a way to come together after losing some key players, namely quarterback Sam Richardson, who had led them to two straight postseason appearances. Obviously we miss him, Shifflet said about his departed quarterback, who led the Wildcats to an average of five touchdowns per game in 2010. Marching out onto the field Aug. 25, the Wildcats didnt have a permanent starter behind center. Now theyre hoping they do, with Orlando Freedom High transfer Asiantii Woulard, who takes the ball for the first time as an untested quarterback. Though he didnt play in the preseason jamboree game, hes been taking reps on the practice field, made a strong showing at camps in the summer time and is set to make his debut on Sept. 2. On the other end of a hopefully strong passing game, Montgomery is hoping that his new teammate will be able to connect. He throws the ball well, Montgomery said. All in all, well do alright. The Wildcats will travel a lot this season, with three of their first five games happening in enemy territory. Two of their first three are against their closest rivals, Boone and Edgewater. Ask a few players who theyre thinking about this season, and those teams rarely come outside the same sentence. Boone and Edgewater, theyre both big games, Montgomery said. Theyll bring it. For the past two seasons, the Wildcats leveraged a strong defense and an increasingly potent passing game to blow away the Braves and the Eagles, making for some early grudge matches to get the season going. Right after the Lake Mary game, the Wildcats will face their two closest rivals in back-to-back weeks. What Montgomery and Washington both agree on is that theyll be ready to play by then. Give us one more game, Montgomery said. Well realize what we have and become an impact team.FOOTBALL | Wildcats face two closest rivals back-to-back after kicking off against Lake Mary on Sept. 2 CONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE Learn moreWildcat football home schedule: Sept. 16 against Boone, Oct. 13 against Evans, Nov. 4 against Timber Creek, Nov. 11 against Ocoee. All games start at 7:30 p.m.

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Thursday, Sept. 1, 2011 Page 8 Winter Park / Maitland ObserverWith the youngsters back in school and the fall season just around the corner, the city of Maitland presents a series of events that youre going to want to note on your calendar. 35th Annual Maitland Rotary Art Festival Art Under The Stars Presented by the Maitland Rotary, this regional art festival will take place at Lake Lily Park daily from Sept. formation on this spectacular event, visit www.maitlandrotaryartfestival.com Maitland Area Chamber of Commerce th Annual Taste of Maitland Monday, Oct. 14, will be a treat for one and all when The Taste of Maitland presents numerous restaurant booths around Lake Lily for a whirlwind tour of Maitlands best in food and beverages. Beginning at 5:30 p.m., this event is clearly one of Maitlands most popular events and one of the areas best overall foodie events. For more information visit www. maitlandchamber.com Senior Health Fair The Maitland Fire/Rescue and the Winter Park Health Foundation are hosting a special free event for Seniors and Caregivers on Friday, Sept. 23, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Asbury United Methodist Church (220 W. Horatio Ave.). Featuring free screenings for footwear, balance, oxygen levels and blood glucose as well as diet and nutrition, medication, vision, and home assessments; Part B participants, this program promises to be of great value to our senior residents. For more information, please email dougdavis1357@gmail.com or call 407-924-4576. Maitland Leisure Services Movie in the Park presents Disneys Tangled. On Oct. 8 at 7:15 p.m., the city of Maitland Leisure Services Department will unveil its 2011 Movie in the Park with a special screening of Disneys Tangled. Grab a blanket or lawn chair and visit us at Quinn Strong Park between Ventris and Packwood avenues for this special evening of great family entertainment. Also, mark on your calendar that the next event will be on Nov. 5 at 7 p.m. when Mr. Poppers Penguins will be shown on our 40-foot digital screen. Art & History Museums Maitland Evening in the Grove. This evening event scheduled for Oct. 16 will honor U.S. Rep. John Mica and will take place on the Maitland Art Center campus. Make plans to attend by calling 407-539-2181. Flu Shots Maitland Fire/ tions to the general public (age 6 months and older) at the main station location at 501 E. Horatio Ave. (temporary Fire Station) daily from 8 a.m.-5 p.m., and on Sundays at the Farmers Market. The following insurances are accepted: Aetna, Cigna, Medicare Part B, Medicare RR, United Health Care, UMWA, BCBS, and Humana. (Please bring your card) The price for those without the insurance listed is $25. For your convenience, we do accept cash, credit cards and checks. Take time out of your day to protect yourself and your family Performing Arts of Maitland Performances Enjoy the music sponsored by Performing Arts of Maitland at the 35th Annual Maitland Rotary Art Festival Sept. 30-Oct. 2 featuring a 16-piece stage band, 100-piece symphony orchestra and 21 other Maitland Market musicians. Look for other free PAM events at www.PAMaitland.org Maitland Public Library to Launch the Learning Culture Center On Oct. 14 at 6 p.m., the Maitland Public Library will premiere its new Learning Culture Center. This new addition to the Library promises to enhance the services provided by the library and augment the experience of its visitors. For more information please visit www. maitlandpubliclibrary.orgChuck Jordan, director, Leisure Services DepartmentCity Council Meeting of Aug. 22, 2011The Maitland City Council met on Aug. 22 at 6:30 p.m. in the City Hall Council Chambers. Below is a synopsis of that meeting. The next regular scheduled Council meeting will be held on Monday, Sept. 12. Special PresentationMayor Howard Schieferdeckpreciation to Mr. John Lowndes for 10 years of valuable and distinguished service to the City of Maitland. Public Hearing:Adopted on second reading, Ordinance #1215 amending City Code Chapter 5, Article temporary banner signs in the citys commercially zoned districts, the CRA District and the and except from permitting and fee regulations and certain size limitations City information signs.Consent Agenda:The Council Minutes and the Budget Workshop Minutes of Aug. 8 were approved as presented. Approved contracts with Miller Pipeline Corporation in the amount of $29,618 to line 1,138 linear feet of sanitary sewer pipeline, and with CCI/Spectra Shield Liner Systems for $27,300 to seal 28 manholes. Adopted Resolution #15-2011 opposing an increase of 20,000 pounds in allowable weight for commercial trucks.Decisions:No action was taken to extend the expiration date of the North Bridge Development Agreement because the original request was withdrawn by the developer. Council directed staff to develop the FY 2012 budget using Cultural Partners contributions as follows: $425,000 for the Maitland Art & History Association, $535,000 for the Maitland Public Library and $50,000 for the Performing Arts of Maitland for a total budget of $1,010,000.00. To listen to a recording of the meeting, visit www.itsmymaitland.comMaitland fall events something for everyone Maitland City TalkBY HOWARD SCHIEFERDECKERMAYOR Flock out for Pink OutThe City of Winter Park and Winter Park Memorial Hospital are going completely PINK to help women in need for the month of September and to spread awareness for breast cancer. A special kick-off for Pink Out will happen Thursday, Sept. 1, at 10 a.m. in Central Park. Participating Park Avenue and Hannibal Square retailers will offer Pink Out apparel, merchandise, food and beverages. Winter Park Memorial Hospital Mammography Scholarship Fund, a special resource created women who cannot afford an annual mammogram. Since its inception in December 2010, the mammography scholarship fund has provided nearly 100 mammograms and has already saved seven lives from breast cancer. Your help is needed to continue the momentum of this vital resource. Simply purchase Pink Out items during the month of September or go online to make a donation. For as little as $25, you can help a woman in need get her screening mammogram and potentially save another life. Lend your support and enjoy premier shopping, succulent truly making a difference in the lives of women and their families within our very own community. For more information call 407-646-7959 or visit www.PinkOutWinterPark.com.Fiscal year 2012 proposed budgetThere will be public budget hearings on Monday, Sept. 12, and Monday, Sept. 26, at 5 p.m., in City Hall Commission Chambers to share your comments about the proposed budget and tion. Because this process is so important, I encourage all of you to attend and share your input. proposed budget on the homepage of the citys website under Info at Your Fingertips > Budget Documents.Remembering 9/11On Tuesday, Sept. 6, at 11 a.m. in the lobby of the Public Safety Facility located at the corner of Canton and Virginia avenues, the City of Winter Park will hold a special ceremony marking the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks. At this event, the city will dedicate the site and unveil the in recognition of this service and those who perished. The Winter Park Fallen Heroes Memorial will be honoring those heroes lost on Sept. 11 in addition to those public safety professionals who have paid the ultimate munity here in Winter Park. The memorial will be located at the entrance to the Public Safety Facility. All of the architectural elements included in the memorial member the tragic events of Sept. 11. The centerpiece of the memorial will feature a black granite conical stand rising from an area of crushed stone upon which an authentic artifact from the World Trade Center will be mounted. Moving away from the centermemorial walkways will be suitably engraved with local memorials sponsored through donations. Lining the bricks, brushed aluminum rails will bring focus to the two individual memorial walks. The area of the two individual entrances to both the porecognize those heroes from our local agencies who have died in the line of duty. These areas will feature the engraved logo for each agency. Much of the memorial will be at grade level with only the featured artifact stand rising approximately four feet, with the memorial walks extending 25 to 30 feet from the center. The Winter Park Fallen Heroes Memorial is truly a community project. From the approvals of both the Winter Park Public Art Advisory Board and the Winter Park City Commission to the architectural design work to the funding for the construction, local Winter Park individuals and organizations join hands to bring this memorial to life. The project was designed by John Cunningham of ACI Inc. of Winter Park, with the initial construction drawings being offered through Lance Walker of Walker Construction Inc., also of Winter Park. Finally, the project would not have been brought to design ment of the Winter Park Rotary Club. Thank you everyone for helping the city keep our heroes memory alive.CoffeeTalk featuring Commissioner Sarah SprinkelIf you have a latte beans to grind or simply want to espresso your thoughts dont forget about Commissioner Sprinkels CoffeeTalk session on Thursday, Sept. 15, from 6 p.m.-7 p.m., at the Winter Park Welcome Center located at 151 West Lyman Ave. This is your opportunity to talk to Sprinkel and ask her questions in a casual, informal environment about any city-related topics. This is one gathering you dont want to miss. Twitter. Winter Park City TalkBY RANDY KNIGHTCITY MANAGER 1300 SOUTH ORLANDO AVE MAITLAND, FL 407-629-0054 WWW.ENZIAN.ORGTHIS WEEK AT ENZIAN PROJECT NIM Fri-Sun 4PM, 6:30PM Mon Thu 6:30PM THE FUTURE Fri & Sun 1:30PM, 9:15PM Sat & Mon Thu 9:15PM DON QUIXOTE (Bolshoi) Sat 11AM

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Thursday, Sept. 1, 2011 Page 9 Winter Park / Maitland Observer CalendarTHURSDAY At 10 a.m. Thursday, Sept.1, the community ocks to Central Park to launch Pink Out Month to ght breast cancer. Proceeds from store promotions during the month will bene t the Mammography Scholarship Fund at Winter Park Memorial Hospital. The Orange County Retired Educators Association will meet at 10 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 1 at College Park United Methodist Church, 644 W. Princeton St., Orlando. Visit ocrea.org or call 407-677-0446. Anyone who has worked in education is invited to join. Orlandos Magical Dining Month, presented by Visit Orlando, showcases 60 top Orlando-area restaurants offering three-course prixxe dinners for $30 during the month of September. A complete list of participating restaurants, including RanGetsu, Chez Vincent, Lago, Luma on Park and Flemings Prime Steakhouse, is available at OrlandoMagicalDining. comFRIDAYThe Breakthrough Theatre of Winter Park, 419A W. Fairbanks Ave., will present the Reginald Rose classic drama Twelve Angry Men, directed by Sylvia Vicchiullo, from Sept. 2-19. The show will play Mondays, Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 3 p.m. Call 407-920-4034 for reservations.SATURDAYOrange Audubon Society sponsors Saturday Bird Walks at Mead Botanical Garden from Sept. 3-Oct. 29. The free twoto three-hour walks begin at 8 a.m. Loaner binoculars will be available. Volunteers have documented 164 species of birds in Mead Garden. For more information, call Dick Smith at 407-257-7361. The Central Florida Irish Tournament of Hurling is 4 p.m.-7 p.m. Sept. 3 at Island Lake Park, 1050 W. Morse Blvd. in Winter Park. Teams of seven players will be playing about 30-minute halves in a knockout tournament until one team remains. Visit www.orlando. orida.gaa.ie The Armand Marchesano Orchestra will play music for dancing from 7:30 p.m.-10 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 3, at the Beardall Center on Gore Street and Orange Avenue. There is $4 admission. Please bring a covered dish to share. Beardall also supplies coffee and desserts. For more information call 407-246-2637.SUNDAYThe Maitland Civic Center will be the host of the Maitland Coin and Currency Show from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sept. 4. The show is free to the public and free door prizes will be given out to children and adults. Thirty coin and currency dealers will be buying, selling and trading a wide variety of coins, currency and stamps. Many dealers will offer free appraisals. The Central Florida Coin Club will be providing educational information as well as signing up new members. More information about the show can be found at www.maitlandcoinshow. com or by calling 407-739-4817. Enchanted Walkabout, an educational, scienti c and magical tour of the areas of enchantment found in Mead Garden, is 9 a.m.-11 a.m. Sept. 4. The cost is $10 for adults and $5 for children ages 5-15. Visit meadgarden.org for additional information.MONDAYThere will be no garbage or recycling collection service in unincorporated Orange County on Sept. 5, Labor Day. If Monday is your garbage collection day, it will be collected on the following Thursday. If Monday is your recycling collection day, it will be collected on the next Monday.TUESDAYHospice of the Comforter, 480 W. Central Parkway in Altamonte Springs, is providing a free workshop for the community, Living with 9/11 and Other Tragedies, from 6 p.m.-7:30 p.m. Sept. 6. The workshop will address the impact of 9/11 and how the resulting emotions affect ones ability to cope with losses. Call 407-3790490 or visit HospiceoftheComforter. org The Tar ower Chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society will meet at 7 p.m. Sept. 6 at Leu Gardens, 1920 N. Forest Ave, Orlando. Don Spence, arborist, will discuss Native Trees Under Attack. He will provide an update on laurel wilt, which has caused the death of millions of redbay and avocado trees. This program is free. Call 407-647-5233.THURSDAYThe Womans Club of Winter Park will be holding the annual Membership Tea on Sept. 8 at 2 p.m. in their historic clubhouse, 419 S. Interlachen Ave. Its free. Call 407-644-2237 or visit womensclubofwinterpark.com Gardening and Design with Native Plants is 6 p.m.-8 p.m. Sept. 8 at the Winter Park Welcome Center, 151 W. Lyman Ave. Its free, but registration is required. Call 407-599-3597. Sarah Miller, director for the Florida Public Archaeology Network Northeast Regional Center, will give the presentation In Search of 16th Century St. Augustine at the Sept. 8 Central Florida Anthropological Society meeting at Harry P. Leu Gardens, 1920 N. Forest Ave. The meeting starts at 7 p.m. and is free. For more information, contact Kevin Gidusko at kagidusko@hotmail.com or 321-948-3994. Popcorn Flicks features Murder on the Orient Express from 8 p.m.-10 p.m. in Central Park.ONGOINGThe Winter Park Farmers Market is every Saturday morning from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the old train depot, located at 200 W. New England Ave. Visit cityofwinterpark.org The Maitland Farmers Market is every Sunday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Lake Lily Park. Visit itsmymatiland. com or call 407-539-6268. Food Truck Caf is every Tuesday from 6-9 p.m. at Lake Lily Park in Maitland. Zumba Fitness Class is Saturdays at 11 a.m. at Dance Centers of Orlando, 7800 S. Highway 17-92, Suite 144 in Fern Park. Cost is $7 a person. Contact Alayna Rivera at 407-408-1766. FreeWith this coupon. Not valid with other offers. Offer expires 9/30/11Bleachingwith braces or Invisalign Complimentary ExamIncluding Xray & PhotosWith this coupon. Not valid with other offers. Offer expires 9/30/11 407-381-3335 Join the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce as we host our monthly br eakfast update, featuring: Chamber Cares is a small business, community-giving program. Learn how your organization can make a difference in the 2011 campaign benefiting the Winter Park Day Nursery. Friday, September 9, 2011 7:45 a.m. Networking/ 8:15 a.m. Program WINTER PARK WELCOME CENTER 151 W. Lyman Avenue, Winter Park, FL 32789 A complimentary continental breakfast will be served. The event is free and open to the public. For information, call the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce at (407) 644-8281 or visit www.winterpark.org. Presented by: Hosted by: Sponsored by: Hurling tournament

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Thursday, Sept. 1, 2011 Page 10 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Lifestyles MENS DI V O R CE L A W F I R M The rules are simple and posted on a sign above it. Do put in banana peels, apple cores, paper, bread and laundry lint. Dont put in meat, sauces, dairy, citrus and plastic. Inside the worm compost bin, affectionately called the worm condo, red earthworms turn waste into organic soil and fertilizer used for the garden out back. Its too early to tell if anyone will put something in the wrong bin. Its only the first week of the eco-living experiment for the seven students at Rollins Colleges Mowbray House. Being the changeOverlooking Lake Virginia in Winter Park, the house is the brainchild of the studentrun organizations Eco-Rollins and the Rollins College Sustainability Program. Its doing great things for bringing awareness across campus, said resident Shan Kasal, 20, a junior biochemistry and marine biology student. People are always asking questions about it. We want them to. We want them to question what theyre doing and whats right for the environment. Eco-Rollins and the sustainability program acquired the house in the spring of 2010. Since then its been inhabited by students that believe living sustainably is the best way. For me, its really the only way (to live), said Kristin Urban, house manager of Mowbray. This house proves to college students and non-college students that you can live sustainably. You can have a rain barrel and grow your own food. You can use paint that doesnt have chemicals, and you can divert 600 pounds of waste with a worm condo. You can do this type of thing. You can live sustainably, and you can depend on yourself. Green living Every aspect of life in the house is geared toward eco-friendliness. Using compact fluorescent light bulbs, growing an organic vegetable garden out back with recycled homemade wooden plant boxes, taking shorter showers and unplugging appliances when not in use are some of the ways the students try to live sustainably. This year, the students are continuing those initiatives, such as creating a makeshift organic soap-making station in their kitchen and having a planting day in September to start their garden. They hope to get funding from the sustainability program for a solar panel to power the living room TV or refrigerator and are looking into a concept called window-farming, which uses a system of tubes to push water up, then have it drip down to water indoor plants, reusing the same water over and over again. For Megan Frederick, a 21-year-old senior biochemistry and molecular biology major and second-year resident at Mowbray, the 2,800-square-foot home is proof that college students care about environmental issues and want to be the change they envision. Just being in this sort of community makes you more aware of your environmental impact, she said. Ive become so aware of my consumption and what we can do as individuals to improve the environment. Our individual efforts are how we make up the whole.Making a differenceIn order to live in the five-bedroom, threeand-a-half-bath house, students must commit to keep up and maintain the ecofriendly practices of the house, serve as ambassadors for green living in the community and be an officer or active member of either Eco-Rollins or the sustainability program. Eighteen students applied this year. Rollins took control of Mowbray in 1958 after a former student, the Rev. Henry B. Mowbray, bequeathed his home to the school when he died. Since then, the house has been lived in by the assistant dean of the college, the dean of student affairs, the director of residential life and a sorority. It even served as a dorm for international students. For Ann Francis, club adviser to EcoRollins and manager of the sustainability program, the message is simple: Everybody can make a difference The house is embodying the reuse, rethink, reduce idea we can all live by.PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERKristin Urban, Shan Kasal, Megan Frederick, Yarissa Matos-Soto and Robert Watson show off their sustainable gardening tools in front of the Mowbray House, a ve-bedroom home on Lake Virginia. CARMEN CARROQUINO Observer StaffRollins green houseSeven students put eco-living to the test at Winter Park colleges Mowbray House Learn moreVisit www.rollins.edu/sustprog for more information on the Mowbray House and green initiatives.

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Thursday, Sept. 1, 2011 Page 11 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Family Calendar On Sept. 1, 4Rivers Smokehouse, 2103 W. Fairbanks Ave., will kick off its giveback program for the upcoming football season. Each school has a sandwich Edgewater High has the Screaming Eagle and Winter Park High has the Wildcat. 4R will donate 10 percent of these sales through Oct. 31. The Second Florida International Piano Competition is Sept. 5-11. Twenty-two worldclass pianists from around the world (18-32 years old) compete in solo performance rounds Sept. 5-8 at Trinity Preparatory School. The nals are at the Bob Carr. Visit www.FloridaPiano.org or call 407-645-2525. Wednesday, Sept. 7, is the University of Central Floridas annual Grad Fair from 4:30-7:30 p.m. at the Pegasus Ballroom in the Student Union. The Grad Fair is an open-house style event where the public can learn more about the universitys nearly 200 graduate programs. Visit www. graduate.ucf.edu/GradFair Children in pre-K through fth grade are invited to join the Childrens Choir at First United Methodist Church of Winter Park. The choir will rehearse on Wednesdays, beginning Sept. 7, from 4:30-5:30 p.m. For more information or to sign up, visit fumcwp.org/register Popcorn Flicks in Central Park featuring Murder on the Orient Express is 8-10 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 8. Bring your blanket or chair to enjoy the movie under the stars in Central Park. There will be free popcorn. Visit enzian.org The Family Course Program enables golf facilities to turn their regulation 9 or 18-hole course into a short course experience. The Winter Park Country Club is one of several area clubs that has PGA Family Course Tee Markers. Visit PlayGolfAmerica. com for more information. The Orlando Repertory Theatre presents Sideways Stories from Wayside School from Sept. 8 to Oct. 9. At this school, strange encounters and skewed adventures are on the lesson plan. Adult tickets are $17, youth (17 and younger) are $11, and seniors (55 and older) and students are $15. Call the box of ce at 407-896-7365 ext. 1 or visit www.orlandorep.com The grand re-opening celebration of the Winter Park YMCA is 4-7:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 15. Tour the newly renovated facility at 1201 N. Lakemont Ave. Visit tinyurl.com/c ymcarenovations or call 407-644-1509 for more information. The Maitland Public Library, 501 S. Maitland Ave., has bedtime stories for all ages at 6 p.m. every Monday. Preschool story time is 10:30 a.m. every Tuesday. Infant and toddler story time is at 10:30 a.m. every Thursday. Call 407-647-7700. On Sunday afternoon more than a hundred former preschoolers and kindergartners gathered inside a Maitland gymnasium to say hello again. Some of them graduated when nearby parts of Highway 436 were still paved with dirt. Others had just started their first week a few days ago. All of them had one connection, and Sunday they all came to see her. Sitting in a corner of the gym, a silver-haired woman in blue shakes hands with old friends, some for the first time in half a century. Liz Carroll remembers a little white church just a few yards from the seat where she sat Sunday morning. Its gone now, along with the restaurant that used to be where she sits, and the orange groves just up the road. But Carroll is still here at the now muchlarger First Presbyterian Church of Maitland, as dozens of friends and family mill about her on the churchs gym floor. Theyre here to celebrate the golden anniversary of the first kindergarten in the city. Fifty years ago today, in the fall of 1961, the first half dozen students walked through the doors of the Preschool at First Presbyterian Church of Maitland for the first time, and Carroll was there to meet them. The party today spilling into the churchs dining room is celebrating the school, but for most of the people here, its for the woman who started it all. The first year, I thought maybe it wouldnt work, Carroll said. Its amazing how much its grown. A parade of well-wishers stop by to shake her hand as Carroll sits at a table in the dining room, surrounded by generations of students, teachers and parents who have all been touched by the school that she built. Just about lunchtime, Rex Beech, kindergarten class of 1962, walks up to say hi, and Carrolls face lights up. What made you want to do all that? Beech joked about Carrolls risky idea five decades ago. The school started simply enough, but kept growing thanks to its founders tenacity. The second year it had nearly 20 students. Then after that, the numbers just kept climbing. It added preschool in 1965. By the time the school began to reach its peak enrollment about the year 2000, other schools had started arriving. At the biggest the school ever became, 150 students walked through the doors. Today that number is closer to 90, current director Lynn Brown said. There have only been two directors of the school at the First Presbyterian Church, and Brown is the second. She took over in 1996 when Carroll retired. Now serving on the schools board, Carroll still stops by once a month to see how things are going. And the school keeps opening its doors every year. The endearing thing is the schools connection to the community, Brown said. Central Florida is such a transitional area, but its still here. She speaks from experience. Brown started teaching at the school in 1983. This week her granddaughter Finli started preschool for the fall. Steve Hampton, class of 1971, walked up to say hi to his old teacher with his 18-month-old son, Leo, in his hands. Leo started preschool here last week. I dont think weve had a fourth generation here yet, Brown said. But were close. And she doesnt see any end to that long line of tradition here, even if she thinks shell never break Carrolls record tenure. The schools founder turned 90 in August. Its all gone by so fast, she said. On a table off to the side of the gym, a few students are scribbling thank you notes on a poster board. Theyre supposed to be for the school but, once again, theyre all for Carroll. Off to the edge, in flowing cursive, a friend thanked her favorite teacher. What a wonderful thing you started, and think of how many children you have influenced. PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVERLiz Carroll, right, founder of the Preschool at First Presbyterian Church of Maitland, is honored on Sunday at the schools 50th anniversary. More than a hundred of the schools past and present students came back to reminisce with Carroll.ISAAC BABCOCK Observer StaffOld schoolMaitland preschool alumni return to honor the woman who started it all

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Thursday, Sept. 1, 2011 Page 12 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Routines and preparedness are important for planning a childs education, but, in reality, they do not always go according to plan. Children and parents must come together on core values in the between stages of life to prepare children for school. Compassion is one value that is the most valuable of all in 2011. To help a child experience and understand compassion is key. Children do not always show compassion on the playground when someone gets hurt, or in the classroom when a classmate has trouble answering questions. As parents and teachers, it is our job to model compassion and to teach children that every individual is unique. Modeling compassion is underlined by teaching a child that every person has unique gifts, and that those gifts, whatever they may be, are given for a reason. Too often in public schools, children are just numbers, never taught that what they have to offer as individuals is important. How elementary teachers empower students with knowledge must leave room to remember that children are still children and that each child has something worth respecting and nurturing. Children come to school with disabilities, giftedness, handicaps, language barriers and emotional and social needs that are more demanding than an average healthy childs needs. Whether a childs needs are big, small or average, every child should grow to understand his or her worthiness. With so much focus on 21st-century integrated technology in classrooms and with the amount of hours children spend on computers today, lessons on basic human civility are more important now than ever before. A culture of children who rely heavily on technology is becoming dehumanized in a sense. These resources are feeding into a fast-growing culture of children who lack empathy, resourcefulness in the real world and an ability to show or understand compassion. This school year I challenge parents who are fortunate enough to share a variety of technologies with their children to take some time out of their schedules to teach children the value of the land we walk on and the air we breathe. Nature and the people around us are whats real when all else is gone. How prepared or resourceful will our children be in 30 years if another Hurricane Charley hits or if war breaks out in their neighborhoods? How compassionate will our children be in 30 years when unemployment still exists and poverty reaches someone in every childs family? In America, we are blessed with a rich land and an ability to come together to help one another. It is in our founding heritage, the Constitution and our proclamations that we are one nation under God. We must continue to enrich our childrens lives with an understanding of civility and compassion. We must teach our children strength that comes not just from knowledge but also from ingenuity, resourcefulness and hard work. In these efforts, our children will grow and prosper for the following generations. America will continue to draw people who seek refuge, love, work, liberty and prosperity. Teaching compassion at an early age will not just help them through elementary school, but it can also help children be more prepared for middle and high school when the need for compassion exists with high stakes. High school graduation and the achievements of honors students are far more competitive today than generations ago. In a time when students are graduating with GPAs greater than 4.0 and already taking college classes in high school, the pressure to be on the forefront of high achievement status may not be for all students, nor should it. Students should respect each others choices with compassion and obviously within school policies and the law. School pressures are high, many classrooms are bursting at the seams and ger. Lets teach our little ones now about them through the unknown discrepancies of school life while they learn, grow and discover how to contribute goodness to society. Windy Evans is a Baldwin Park resident and owns EVS Orlando Tutor Opinion/Editorial Letters to the Editor Flash on, driversDont forget about the oil spillMore than a year after the Deepwater Horizon well was capped, hundreds of miles of coastline in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida remain affected by oil. Communities in these states and wildlife throughout the Gulf will be affected by the oil spill for years to come. Restoring the Gulf is critical not just to the regional economy, but also to our strength as a nation. The Gulf currently supports a $34 billion per year tourism estimated $22.6 billion dollars of annual economic activity. Nine U.S. senators from the Gulf have just joined a bipartisan group cosponsoring a bill that will dedicate BPs the Gulf. Using the oil spill penalties to restore the Gulf is the fair and right thing to. I encourage our states representatives to support similar legislation in the U.S. House.Todd Weise Winter ParkBreakfast in a brown bag?Back to school means a new year of fresh faces, old friends and exciting opportunities. If you are a mom, it also means a matching pair of socks for the kids and oh yeah, feed everyone before heading out the door. While the temptation is always there to give into the plea of, But Im not hungry, Mom, the reality is that breakfast is, as they say, one of the most important meals of the day. According to the American Dietetic Association breakfast eaters are more apt to attend school and do better while there. Of course for those mornings when the schedule is not so hectic, a breakfast at the table is certainly the best option. Studies show families who eat with their children tend to have better diets overall. Sitting down to eat a meal with your child offers a wonderful opportunity to talk about the day ahead and role model good eating behaviors, such as drinking milk with meals. But for those days when a multitasking approach is required, let your drive time be dine time with these on the go breakfast options: some downtime on the weekend cooking and freezing your own convenient breakfast options, such as Breakfast lower in calories than the typical freezer variety, more economical and all the more tasty. ally wants a backseat full of bowls and spoons to clean out after morning dropoff? Ice cream cones are a fun, portable and edible way to enjoy fruit on the go. Or better yet, layer with yogurt and whole-grain cereal for a Yogurt Parfait Cone (without the extra backseat trash!) who ask to just grab something to drink rich option. Peanut butter-banana breakfast shake provides the extra boost of hunger satisfying protein to hold hungry tummies over until lunch. like an easy grab-n-go option, but is it really the most nutritious choice? Appleright extra nutrition to keep kids fueled all morning long. To read about what dairy council is doing to fuel schools and kids with great nutrition and physical activity once the car pool line is empty, visit fueluptoplay60.com. For even more tips on feeding families at home and on-the-go, be sure to follow the Florida Dairy Farmers website. Alyssa Greenstein, RD, LD/N Dairy Health and Wellness Senior Manager Dairy Council of FloridaStudents take trip around the worldGet your passports ready because the lando are going to take you on a whirlwind tour. First stop, Israel, of course, but the journey doesnt end there. The students and their integrated multicultural unit will also take you jet-setting to Compassion is an important lesson to learn, both in and out of school a local attorney prevails. What Oviedo attorney J. Marcus Jones aims to do in week is to prove that police were in the wrong for ticketing thousands of Florida warn others of speed traps. His argument is that police are misapplying a law designed to prevent drivers from installing lights on their cars that Thats the law police cite when they hand out $100 tickets to drivers who or twice to warn drivers of speed traps ahead. In effect, the police are citing drivers for making their cars impersonate police cars when the drivers were attempting to prevent the police from ever having to use theirs. Jones has done this sort of thing winning on an identical premise. And in those cases, judges have universally agreed with him from a legal perspective. Flashing your headlights to get other drivers to slow down to avoid a ticket, the judges found, was not against the law. But the issue brings up a moral dilemma that goes beyond the law itself: their headlights to warn other drivers of police speed traps ahead? Almost no other laws in this country are so universally ignored as vehicle speed laws. More than two-thirds of drivers reported that they routinely break speed limits, according to a 2002 Purdue University study. But that seems to have little effect on accident data. National Highway Transportation Safety Administration data showed speeding was a factor in less than 20 percent of accidents. A study released by a Federal Highway Administration engineer in 1990 showed that seven out of 10 drivers exceeded the speed limit and that, contrary to the prevailing wisdom at the time, the slowest 5 percent of drivers were involved in the most accidents. And motor vehicle collision deaths are at the lowest levels since 1949, according to NHTSA data from 2010, despite a massive increase in cars on the road over the course of those 61 years. Police have long maintained that ticketing dangerous drivers is done for the sake of safety. They have a point. Despite the heartening statistics mentioned above, car accidents still kill more people aged 3 to 34 than any other cause of death in America. punished with a citation to negatively reinforce your legally frowned-upon behavior. But those punishments tend to cost a lot more than the ticket price. Points on your license immediately remove your safe driver rating, which leads to increased insurance costs. If you dont want the ticket to add points and raise your insurance rates, you have to pay to take a driver improvement course. If you cant afford to pay the ticket on time, or simply forget, you will at minimum face will lose your license and have to pay yet again to have it reinstated. For drivers who make their living on the road, the result of a momentary lapse of attention to the speedometer can be much more dire, costing them their jobs for receiving a ticket that can raise the price of already far more expensive business liability insurance. All of that discomfort can be avoided, at least potentially so, by fellow drivers warning you of the speed trap ahead. You still slow down, you still become aware of police presence in the area to hopefully drive more carefully in the future, and you escape the ordeal without a ticket. Then police can turn their attention elsewhere, such as citing drivers for behavior that contributes to far more accidents, such as following too closely, aggressive driving and running stop signs and red lights. Please see LETTERS on next pageWINDY EVANS Guest Writer

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Thursday, Sept. 1, 2011 Page 13 Winter Park / Maitland Observer What could be more delightful than a literary/film masterpiece in surroundings that are themselves an impressive work of art? On Friday, Aug. 26, my b.w. and I, among some dozen others, were invited by Gene Hawkins to visit his home on Lake Maitland to see and hear an historic DVD of the 25th anniversary of the great Broadway show Les Misrables. Gene and his wife, late U.S. Sen. Paula Hawkins, built their Spanishstyle house, which incorporates scads of notable architectural features. Enjoying Les Miz in the gracious setting of such a home theater combined two arts as an unforgettable experience. She isWhen you meet my b.w., you would not think that she is an excellent housekeepWhen you meet her, you would not is. You would not think she is a whiz on You would not think she is a good You would not think she is stupid (Such is the fortunate contradictory nature of the human animal.)China growsMost of us have thought of China as a sprawling mass of people who just manage to keep body and soul together. The Chinese used to export to the U.S. the cheap little toys that we kids saw in abundance at Christmastime. Napoleon said, China is a sleeping giant When she wakes, she will shake the world. Now an awakened Chinas business is growing at nearly 10 percent. In past decades we have witnessed the exportation of our own once supreme means of production to China and other countries. And now our business is growing at less than 1 percent. Lefties who voted for Obama can now take a too much before, and setting ourselves plied our debt many times over and is still busy in his destructive ways. Federal hanky-pankyOur economic situation is befuddled to give us the most transparent government since our nation was founded has brought no clarifying enlightenment. The secret hanky-panky of Obama and Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke as to inflation may be a national wallop when fully revealed. Those who live, in part at least, on fixed incomes may be a bit queasy at seeing the results of Obamas hand on the controls of the great Washington Benevolence from which all blessings flow. Just stop and think of the fact that from this land of 300 million souls, we plucked out Obama and placed him in the Oval Office. We chose a man of practically no business experience who clearly does not believe in the freeenterprise system and seems to be doing all he can to bring the U.S. down to the level of a third world country.Own wisdomPleasing everybody has never been my farther than my arms will go. Emerson thine own self be true. Voting in a democracy, we have the chance to judge the wisdom of others, hoping that our own wisdom either equals or surpasses theirs. Changing others to suit ourselves is often disguised voluptuously, before common sense mercifully takes over and clears our heads. LouisRoney HarvardDistinguished Prof, Em.UCF 2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award (Assisted by beautiful wife Joy Roney)WHO ISRONEY >What our knowledge has wrought. Dark hints about nothing. There is that double-edged sword of modernity called medicine that offers both salvation and damnation. Of what worth is the next There is no stronger force in nature than the human will to live. Recall the scene in the movie Schindlers List when three Jewish children have been reduced to standing chest deep in the fetid, liquid excrement of a German outhouse. In order to survive for that moment. For a moment. In another distinct scene, you follow, from a safe distance, the black and white film footage of Germans violently rounding up and killing Jews. Periodically you watch as a little girl, innocence dressed in bright red, runs hither and yon, in and out of doorways, trying to escape the Holocaust. Youre aghast at the atrocity, yet youre hoping against hope that this child will somehow escape her fate. Time passes. Later you see her discarded red outline on a heap of dead bodies. So much for hope. Ive read for years that if you live long enough, every man will get prostate disease. Isnt that a comforting thought, guys? Something is inevitably going to get all of us. And it aint the boogeyman. Were saddled with a body that for thousands of years provided humans a life for about, say, 30 years. In the past, we had a life expectancy half or two-thirds of what we might experience today. There are a number of reasons responsible for todays human lifespan, and science legitimately gets our grateful tip of the hat for its many contributions. Ah, but life is not content with providing additional years without extracting its proverbial pound of flesh. There is a quid pro quo quality to human existence. What for what? Longer life versus increased uncertainty. In one of todays enduring ironies, we live longer only to wonder, Are we but one diagnosis from doom? Modern medicine is now the sword of Damocles, always hovering. That ache. That cough. That bump. That growth. That fever. That moment of forgetfulness. The doubt. The fear. I recently had a biopsy, and I will receive (supposedly) the results on Sept. 1. I say supposedly because I am now in the maw of modern medicine where one test leads to another, which in turn leads to yet another doctor and more tests. Ad infinitum. I argued (gently) with one doctor that I did not like the course events were taking. I was told that if I wanted to stay under his care, I had to do exactly as he ordered. I inwardly laughed at this man and silently said, Jawohl. And clicked my heels. Go in for one test and celebrate its results only to find later that, guess what, while eliminating that we found this. And so it goes. I was so stoked last week over how the aspiration biopsy went that within minutes of arriving home, I cracked a bottle of champagne. And giggled and laughed at my predicament. Our human condition. All I want is the 22 more years I planned for. Know what? The Hubble Space Telescope has picked up a distant rumbling from the far recesses of the universe, from the beginnings of time. Theyve determined its a laugh. ChrisJepson Jepson is a 24-year resident of Florida. Hes scally conservative, socially liberal, likes art and embraces diversity of opinion. Reach him at Jepson@MEDIAmerica.USWHO ISJEPSON >Dark hints about nothing Take it from me Mexico and Japan. In just a two-month period, theses students learned two new languages in addition to the Hebrew they learn on a daily basis, spotted new geographical locations, experienced different cultures, own familiar surroundings. One unique way they did this was through video conferencing with a Jewish Day School in Mexico, where the Jewish Academy students asked school day, family life and other relevant topics to the children. The Mexican students responded to their questions by sending their responses via video. Then, the students headed across were able to correspond with a fourthgrade Japanese student who once lived in Lake Mary but now resides in Japan. They asked him similar questions regarding his daily life and experiences living Japan as a young boy around their age. These interviews proved invaluable as we used them to compare and contrast the lives of Jewish Academy students to children around the world. Interestingly enough, there were more similarities than differences, and our students concluded that kids are kids no matter where they live, what language they speak or what clothes they wear. It was an amazing exercise to teach diversity and acceptance. The culmination for this study is a multicultural presentation in which the students showcase their learning through writing, music, poetry, art, food, etc. Leading up to the event, the from the schools upperclassmen. The seventh-graders, through their Spanpiatas and Spanish-to-English dictionaries. The sixth-graders, who also study writing haikus using the middle schoolers laptops and created a slide show to present them. In addition, the students participated in many cultural activities such as a Japanese tea ceremony, making salsa from scratch and having a guest speaker from Israel visit and make falafel with them. At Jewish Academy, learning transcends the limits of a classrooms walls. It is our aim to provide our students with knowledge and experiences that will make a lasting impression on them. Mrs. Goulds multicultural unit is a perfect example of that goal.Dori Gerber Jewish Academy of OrlandoLETTERS | CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGEEditorial Cartoon King Features Weekly ServiceAugust 29, 2011

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Thursday, Sept. 1, 2011 Page 14 Winter Park / Maitland Observer THRIVE @ 55 AND BEYOND! TV anchor Ben Aycrigg was taking a break in the stations lobby before his 6 p.m. newscast when he saw the smoke billowing into the sky. The clock read 5:30, and he knew there was no easy way to get evening news in less than an hour. But Aycrigg loved a challenge. He quickly dispatched the traffic helicopter to fly over the scene with a photographer. But the airport was too far away to get the photos in time, so he had the from the passenger seat of a heliby the station. They had the story, in about 30 minutes, all before the news trucks with satellites could send their images back to their news stations. And that was doing something really, really fast, said Aycrigg, 85, a Maitland resident. Now, that would be nothing, but then. That story epitomizes what he found most exciting in his 35-year broadcasting career. He loved the time crunch, the rush of getting news to viewers quickly and with BRITTNI JOHNSON Observer StaffOrlandos newsmanRetired WDBO anchor Ben Aycrigg honored by Winter Park High School for 35-year broadcasting career, including his coverage on the space program PHOTO BY ROGER SCRUGGSAnchor Ben Aycrigg, left, interviews Vice President George Bush at the Kennedy Space Center Press Site in 1981 for WDBO TV 6. He was considered the most knowledgeable reporter on the space program. He was one of the rst to announce the atomic bombing of Hiroshima that changed the course of history. Please see LEGEND Page 15

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Thursday, Sept. 1, 2011 Page 15 Winter Park / Maitland Observer the newest technologies and strategies possible. Man of distinctionHe was the face of WDBO-Channel 6 news (now WKMG), where he started in 1961, and was dubbed the Walter Cronkite of Orlando by many who watched him as the lead anchor on television each evening. Winter Park High School honored the 1944 graduates career last month, inducting him into the schools Circle of Distinction, which has been honoring outstanding alumni since 2006. Ed LHeureux, Circle board member who nominated Aycrigg, said its important to recognize those who meant so much to the community, such as Aycrigg, whom residents might have lost track of since he retired.The face of newsAycrigg became a celebrity in town, his daughter Elizabeth Lowe said. Then, everyone could say the unfamiliar-sounding last name, but at his start, as a Rollins College speech-student-turned-radiodrama-character, that certainly wasnt the case. In his radio debut, as the credits were being read, Ben Ay-grugg popped out of the announcers mouth. Not correct. My first appearance in broadcasting was a flop, he said with a smirk. Reporting historyBut of course that didnt last. Through the years, Aycrigg was able to interview presidents and see the first experiments in color TV. He covered the opening of Disney in Tokyo, and he was floored as his broadcast was sent around the world to the CBS station in New York City. Hes also down in history books as one of the first to announce the bombing at Hiroshima. He remembers exactly what the teletype said that day and what he read over the radio for listeners. A bomb 2,000 times as powerful as TNT was dropped on Hiroshima, Japan, he quoted himself as saying. I felt like that was part of history. What he remembers most fondly, though, is the beginning of NASAs shuttle program. When he first heard of the program, he and a photographer went to scope the area out, only to find a man and his goats as the sole inhabitants of the bare orange groves. The farmer and Aycrigg didnt know about the rocket garage being built or what would prove to be an exciting future in space for the U.S. It was very exciting to talk to these space pioneers, Aycrigg said. Family manBut beyond all the excitement of breaking news and interviewing astronauts, Aycrigg was a family man above all else, Lowe said. The whole family sia Aycrigg, inspecting her work of making him home for dinner, which he did every night before his 11 p.m. spot. I just loved seeing how he handled people, Lowe said. He is always authentic. This Central Florida legend didnt just write news, either. His children know him as the dad who wrote stories with cameos by their favorite toys and novels about the horses he rode. Safari picnics in the backyard and spending time with his wife of 56 years are also special memories Lowe shared about the man who made his family the most important part of his life. He always put his family first, she said. $100,000 $75,100 $60,906 $100,000 $100,000 $66,997 $73,026 $80,256 $86,677 $96,817 $85,199 $69,628 $100,000 $106,000 $112,360 $119,102 $126,248 $133,823 $133,823 $133,823 $136,365 $100,000 $107,000 $114,490 $131,079 $140,255 $150,073 $160,578 $171,818 $196,715 $183,845 $122,504 Which line gives you the best chance for success? According to paycheckforlife.com, three out of ve middle-class Americans entering retirement today are projected to outlive their nancial assets. Learn how to protect your retirement account from losses, maintain upside potential and maximize your lifetime income.I llustr a tion per iod: 8 -31-2000 thr ough 8 -31-2010. Each e xample sho wn assumes $100,000 initial pr emium with no withdr a w als M ar ket v alue based on the S&P 500 Index. Historical performance of the S&P 500 Index should not be c onsider ed a r epr esen ta tion of cur r en t or futur e per f or manc e of the I nde x or of an y annuit y H ypothetical inde x annuit y pr oduc t illustration assumes cr editing method of a 6% annual poin t -t o -poin t cap and annual r eset H ypothetical I nc ome R ider V alue assumes a 7% annual r a t e of r etur n f or inc ome pur poses I llustr a tion v alues r epr esen t g r oss r etur ns A ssumed annuit y r a t es and ac tual hist or ical pr ic es of the S&P 500 I nde x w er e used in this purely hypothetical example for the purpose of illustrating comparitive values and to illustrate how the Interest-Crediting Strategy might have performed using dierent assumptions but the same Index performance. Assumptions are not guaranteed. Past performance does not guarantee future results. A c cumula tion V alue S&P 500 Index Income Rider Value ONE SHOTYou only have at retirement will fall60% of Americans short. $73,026 $80,256 $69,628 of illustrating comparitive values and to illustrate how the Interest-Crediting Strategy might have performed using dierent assumptions but the same Index performance. Assumptions are not Member of(407)-644-6646www.aSafeHarbor.comBob Adams President/CEOA SafeHarbor, LLC bob@asafeharbor.comCall us or visitwww.YourLifetimeIncome.comfor your PERSONALIZED SAFE MONEY REPORT. Learn moreFor more information about the Winter Park High School Circle of Distinction Foundation, and to get a form to nominate someone, visit https://www.ocps. net/lc/east/hwp/school_info/Pages/CircleofDistinction.aspx.PHOTO BY BRITTNI JOHNSON THE OBSERVERBen Aycrigg, 85, wears his new Circle of Distinction medal at his Maitland home. LEGEND | Aycriggs debut on the radio was a flop, he says CONTINUED FROM PAGE 14

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Thursday, Sept. 1, 2011 Page 16 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Its not just about getting you back on your feet. Its about getting you back to your life. HCR Healthcare, LLC Rehabilitation and Skilled Nursing Savannah Court and CoeExcellence in Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation Care 1301 W. Maitland Blvd. Maitland, FL 32751407-645-3990www.SavannahCourtMaitland.comAssisted Living Facility License No. 8447 Skilled Nursing Facility License No. 1635096 At Savannah, it feels just like home. Its safe, convenient and the food is excellent. And of course, my mom is a huge fan of Bingo! Ernestine & her daughter Patricia Assisted Living Skilled Nursing Rehabilitation Care Variety of Apartment Suite Selections, some with Lake Views Restaurant Style Dining Laundry, Housekeeping, Maintenance Services Transportation to Outings and Medical Appointments Beautifully Landscaped Courtyard Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above. You are always welcome! A Senior Living Community where Hospitality is a Way of Life. Dennis AllenOwner/ Administrator Virgie Baker has lived through 26 presidential elections, two World Wars and the Great Depression. Her family moved to Ohio by way of horse and buggy in 1916, when she was 10. When she was 16, her and her husband bought seven acres of Ohio farmland for $1,900. In 1928, she voted for Herbert Hoover in her first presidential election. She bought her first car, a new Ford V-8, a few years later for $300. A lot has changed, she said on her 105th birthday, Saturday, Aug. 27. Baker, who is Savannah Court and Cove of Maitlands oldest resident, said turning 105 is just another birthday. But to her family, friends and the community, its cause to celebrate.Celebrating more than a centuryIts no different than turning 104, Baker said with a shrug. I dont feel any different. Im just living, enjoying life. But her friends at Savannah Court and Cove, where Baker has lived for four years, felt the milestone deserved a celebration. On Friday, Aug. 26, residents, friends, family and even Vice Mayor of Maitland Linda Frosch gathered to celebrate the occasion. When my brother said, Even the mayors coming, I thought he was joking, Bakers granddaughter Debbie Fox said. Then I walked in and saw her name tag and realized he wasnt. Frosch read a special proclamation honoring Baker. We had all the residents come down as well as all her family from different parts of the country who were there for cake and the vice mayors proclamation, said Stephen Liebscher, activities director at Savannah Court and Cove. Virgies really an inspiration on living for everyone.A long memory roadBakers memory spans periods most often recalled in history books. Prompted by Fox, after a brief pause for thought, Baker can recall dates, times and prices of things dating back to when she and her family first migrated from West Virginia to Ohio. She remembers living in Akron, Ohio, taking care of her two children and struggling through PHOTO COURTESY OF SAVANNAH COURT OF MAITLANDVirgie Baker was surrounded by friends and family at her 105th birthday celebration at Savannah Court of Maitland Friday.SARAH WILSON Observer StaffThe big 1-0-5Savannah Courts oldest resident is inspiration on living for everyone the Great Depression as her husband worked as a milkman. We never felt poor, because everyone was the same as us, she said. Everyone was just as poor as everyone else. She remembers being determined to learn how to fish like her husband so she would no longer have to stay home when he went off on fishing trips. I didnt want to stay home anymore, so I decided I was going to learn how to fish so I could go to, she said. It was those fishing trips that first brought Baker to Florida when the couple would visit Big Pine Key. She wouldnt call the state home until 2007, when she moved to Maitland to be closer to family. Ive lived a pretty good life, she said.Longevity gene poolThese are memories Fox asks her grandmother about frequently on every visit she makes down from Ohio. She hopes to preserve them for not only Bakers four greatgrandchildren and four greatgreat-grandchildren, but also for all those who come after. Once theyre gone, theyre gone, Fox said. You dont think about that, but its so important. Baker keeps active at Savannah Court and Cove by playing lots of bingo and keeping busy with the retirement homes varied activities schedule. She keeps her brain sharp by doing crossword puzzle after crossword puzzle. She stumps me most of the time, Fox said. Its amazing, everything shes got in her brain. I just wish I could crack inside that head of hers and know what she knows She knows more about life than anyone. Baker, who says theres no secret to her longevity other than maybe good genes, lived on her own in her own apartment until she was 95. And even at Savannah Court and Cove, she does as much as she can on her own. On every birthday I have, she tells me she cant believe she has a granddaughter as old as me, said Fox, 59. But I tell her I cant believe I have a grandmother whos 105 either. She stumps me most of the time. Its amazing, everything shes got in her brain. I just wish I could crack inside that head of hers and know what she knows She knows more about life than anyone. Bakers granddaughter Debbie Fox

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Thursday, Sept. 1, 2011 Page 17 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Join Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer and the Mayors Veterans Advisory Council as they host the 2011 POW-MIA Recognition Ceremony in the City Hall Rotunda located at 400 S. Orange Ave., downtown Orlando, at 10 a.m. Friday, Sept. 9. The ceremony is being conducted by the Cadets of AFROTC Detachment 159 from the University of Central Florida. The Alzheimers & Dementia Resource Center is hosting its fth annual signature fundraising event, Black Tie From the Waist High, from 6-10 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 16, featuring dinner and auctions. All proceeds bene t caregivers, who come to ADRC for resources and support. As the events name indicates, suggested attire is formal above the waist and casual wear waist down. Preregistration is required. Tickets are $100. The event is located at Hilton Altamonte Springs, 350 S. Northlake Blvd., Altamonte Springs. Contact Lorraine Gismondi at 407-843-1910 or lorraine@ADRCcares.orgMaitland Senior Center September activitiesThere are no classes on Monday, Sept. 5, Labor Day. Starting Sept. 2, join Patricio every Friday in September at 11 a.m. for Zumba Gold. This Zumba class is geared toward seniors and is a ton of fun! Cost of the class is $6 to the teacher. Join John every Monday, Thursday and Friday in September at 9 a.m. for yoga. Please wear comfortable clothes and bring your own mat. Cost of the class is $2 to the teacher. Do you like to knit or crochet? Do you like making new friends and sharing your favorite patterns? Then join our Knit & Crochet group every Monday in September at 10 a.m. Bring your current project and have some fun! Join us every Monday in September at 1 p.m. for our conversational French group. Spend some time chatting with others and making new friends. Join Suzanne every Tuesday in September at 10:30 a.m. for Line Dance Lessons. Cost of the class is $6 to the teacher. Join Esther every Tuesday in September at 9 a.m. for Tai Chi classes. Cost of the class is $2 to the teacher. Join Harvey every Tuesday in September at 10:30 a.m. for Bridge lessons. Join us every Tuesday in September at 1 p.m. for our Conversational Spanish group. Spend some time chatting with others and making new friends. Must be uent in Spanish. Join Ann every Friday in September for Recorder classes. Beginning classes are held at 12:30 p.m. and intermediate classes are held at 1 p.m. Cost of the class is $2 to the teacher. Please call the Senior Center at 407539-6251 for speci cs on this class. Join us on Tuesday, Sept. 30 at 11:30 a.m. for Brown Bag Bunko! Bring your lunch and play for fun! This event is sponsored by Visiting Angels and Colonial Medical Supplies. Please sign up to play! The Maitland Senior Center is located at 345 S. Maitland Ave. The schedule is subject to change without notice. For more information about these and any other events at the Maitland Senior Center, please call us at 407-539-6251 or visit us on the web at www.itsmymaitland.com. The Maitland Senior Center presents a program for elders on the second Friday of the month that is staffed by counselors from S.H.I.N.E. (Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders). For more information, contact 1-80096 ELDER (1-800-963-5337) or visit http://www.FLORIDASHINE.orgOrange County Commission On Aging Newsletter, September 2011Free senior pets for seniors To celebrate being honored as one of the top 50 shelters through the ASPCA $100K Challenge, the Orange County Animal Services Division is offering free adoptions of senior pets (cats and dogs age 6 and older) to individuals ages 55 and older. For more information, call 407-254-9140 or visit www.ocnetpets.com Twelfth Annual Caregiver Forum: Years of Caring Sept. 8-10 at Buena Vista Palace Resort & Spa. $75 registration. Call: 407-423-5311. Identity Theft Seminar Wednesday, Sept. 14, 8:30 a.m.-noon at the Orange County Sheriffs Of ce Sector II, 11000 Lake Underhill Road. RSVP to 407-254-7389 or Helen.Johnston@oc .net. Public Input Wanted On the Area Plan for the Area Agency on Aging of Central Florida is Friday, Sept. 23 at noon at 2100 E. Michigan St., second oor conference room. For info, call 407-514-1800. Annual Listen to a Life Essay Contest Open to youth ages 8-18 years who interview a grandparent or grandfriend about their lifes hopes, dreams and challenges. The contest starts Sunday, Sept. 11, National Grandparents Day. Get details at www.legacyproject.org/contests/ ltal.html Elder Abuse Study The MetLife Mature Market Institute just released a study that determines the extent and consequences of elder nancial abuse. Visit www.metlife.com/assets/ cao/mmi/publications/studies/2011/ mmi-eldernancial-abuse.pdf Win & Do Good contest encourages volunteers to share their inspiring stories. To sign up, go to http://aarp. promo.eprize.com/createthegood/ Visit wpmobserver.com and click on Lifestyles then Senior Observer for more event information. Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. 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Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit Us on the Web @www.Binsons.comCall Us Toll Free1 (888) BINSONS (246-7667) Your Diabetes HeadquartersAdult DiapersPower ScootersSeat Lift ChairsHospital BedsOxygenCPAPWheelchairsWalkersMastectomy SuppliesBath SafetyAnd Much More! Sterling Heights, MI43900 Schoenherr Rd. 1 (586) 737-2323Troy, MI6012 Rochester Rd. 1 (248) 828-8400Winter Park, FL2069 Aloma Ave. 1 (800) 990-9557Royal Oak, MI30475 Woodward Ave. 1 (248) 288-0440Southgate, MI18800 Eureka Rd. 1 (734) 281-1800Center Line, MI26834 Lawrence 1 (586) 755-2300Eastpointe, MI21571 Kelly Rd. 1 (586) 779-7770Locations *Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power scooters, seat lift chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web, custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon has no cash value.BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR20% OFF One Item(Cash Sale Items Only)Coupon Expires 2-28-09 Code SENIORRESGUIDE08N CUT OUT AND SAVE Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com Senior Community Bulletin

PAGE 18

Thursday, Sept. 1, 2011 Page 18 Winter Park / Maitland Observer ASSISTED LIVING RESIDENCE 395 Alafaya Woods Blvd., Oviedo, FL 32765 407-977-8786ALF License No. 9235, 9308, 9307 www.slm.net/SCOviedo1 Signature property of Located on a beautiful campus setting, our two Savannah Court communities provide full assisted living services while Savannah Cottage offers a secured residence for those with memory loss. Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above! You are always welcome at Savannah Court and Cottage of Oviedo. MEMORY CARE RESIDENCEWhere hospitality is truly a way of life! Savannah Court and Cottage ASSISTED LIVING RESIDENCE 395 Alafaya Woods Blvd., Oviedo, FL 32765 407-977-8786ALF License No. 9235, 9308, 9307 www.slm.net/SCOviedo1 Signature property of Located on a beautiful campus setting, our two Savannah Court communities provide full assisted living services while Savannah Cottage offers a secured residence for those with memory loss. Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above! You are always welcome at Savannah Court and Cottage of Oviedo. MEMORY CARE RESIDENCEWhere hospitality is truly a way of life! Savannah Court and Cottage S S S S S S S S S S Signature property of S Signature property of S S Savannah Court and Cottageof Oviedo S S S Located on a beautiful campus setting, our two Savannah Court communities provide full assisted living services while Savannah Cottage offers a secured residence for those with memory loss.www.savannahcourtoviedo.com395 Alafaya Woods Blvd., Oviedo, FL 32765407-977-8786 S S S www.savannahcourtoviedo.com S S You are always welcome at Savannah Court and Cottage of Oviedo Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above! St. Dorothy Catholic CommunityLove Without Judgment where ALL are welcome301 New England Avenue Mass: Sundays@11:00AM www.stdorothycatholiccommunity.org SAINT DOROTHY CATHOLIC COMMUNITY IS A PROGRESSIVE CATHOLIC COMMUNITY (Respectfully not associated with the Diocese of Orlando) WHERE ALL ARE WELCOME! We have continued the reformed true Catholic Tradition in the Spirit of Vatican Council II! Are you divorced, gay, a recovering Catholic, feeling disenfranchised by your present worshiping community of whatever denomination, looking for a small worshipping community where you are known and not lost in the crowd? Then you have found what you are looking for in St. Dorothy Catholic Community! What was in the air? Memory lane Inhalation injury they call it, when simple breathing is dangerous because theres some unknown toxin in the air. The New England Journal of Medicine recently reported on a study of veterans developing breathing problems after serving in Iraq and Afghanistan. Exertional dyspnea is medical lingo for shortness of breath, which is why 80 soldiers from Fort Campbell, Ky., were sent to Vanderbilt University Medical Center: They were no longer able to run 2 miles in the allotted time. After testing, half the group was diagnosed with constrictive bronchiolitis, narrowing of the airway, which is rare in healthy adults. The age range was 23 to 44, and all were fit. Some had been exposed to dust storms and burn-pit smoke. Eleven of them, however, did not have any exposure whatsoever. The results of physical examination of the chest were normal in all the soldiers, states the report. Until doctors got the lung biopsy samples, that is. All manner of gunk and goop (including lacy black pigment) were found that did not show up on scans and physical examination, with tests negative for bacteria and fungus. The study says that, yes, those who were exposed to the sulfur mine fire smoke could be expected to have the problem. But what of those who had no exposure but who still have this condition? The concern, according to the researchers, is that whatever it was that caused the condition was also present for everyone else. Since the study officially ended, nine more in the group were diagnosed with constrictive bronchiolitis. The study concludes: Additional studies are needed to evaluate the particulate matter observed in many biopsy samples obtained from these soldiers. To read the whole study, go to www. nejm.org and search for Constrictive Bronchiolitis in Soldiers Returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. Write to Freddy Groves in care of King Features Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 328536475, or send e-mail to column reply@ gmail.com. 2011 King Features Synd., Inc. Lets take a walk down memory lane, shall we? We seniors have seen a lot of changes in the world since we were born. In 1941, gas was 19 cents a gallon, which equates to $2.95 in todays money. Bread was 8 cents ($1.24 today) and milk was 34 cents ($5.29 today). The very next year, the production of autos was halted. A car cost around $800 ($12,000 today), but after we were attacked at Pearl Harbor, rationing went into effect and car owners were limited to five tires. Other things were quickly added to the rationing list: bicycles, stoves, gas, coffee, butter and sugar. Most homes had Victory gardens in the yard. In 1946, rationing finally ended, and the use of the car increased. The first drive-in bank teller opened. We had punchboards instead of lottery tickets, and Slinkys and Tinkertoys, as well as Raggedy Ann and Andy dolls. If we had a phone, it was probably on a party line, and we had a number like SYcamore 4-0160 or 0551-J1. The first computer (ENIAC) was built. It weighed 30 tons and took up 1,800 square feet. The first Roosevelt dime was issued (worth $1.20 today), and only 6,000 families owned television sets. By 1952, nearly 17 million families owned televisions and we were introduced to TV dinners. We watched the debuts of Dragnet and The Today Show, and The African Queen and Its a Wonderful Life at the movies. The Roosevelt dimes buying power went down to 83 cents. Have you considered creating a memory book for the future generations of your family? Matilda Charles regrets that she cannot personally answer reader questions, but will incorporate them into her column whenever possible. Write to her in care of King Features Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475, or send email to columnreply@gmail.com. 2011 King Features Synd., Inc. DEAR DR. DONOHUE: I have sleep apnea. Before being treated by a sleep specialist, I was very sleepy during the day and had no energy. My specialist prescribed a mask that pumps air into my nose. It helps somewhat. Later a friend told me about Provigil. It makes me feel much better, but I am not 100 percent. What else could help me? J.K. ANSWER: Apnea is Greek for no breathing. Sleep apnea is periods during sleep when a person stops breathing for 10 or more seconds. There can be five to 30 or more such spells every hour. Quite often, an apneic period is preceded by snoring that gets progressively louder and louder. At the end of the no-breathing episode, the person grunts and half-wakens and then starts breathing again. This fragments sleep and leaves the person sleepy and without energy the next day. The problem lies in a narrowed passageway for air as it travels through the throat en route to the lungs. Redundant throat tissue blocks the natural airflow. Weight loss is one way to get rid of excess throat tissue, if one is overweight. Dont drink any alcohol from the evening meal on, because it relaxes throat tissue. The mask you wear is called CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure). It delivers air under pressure so it can pass through the obstruction in the throat. Dont abandon it. You can ask your dentist about fashioning a device that keeps the jaw forward during sleep. That opens the throat too. Stick with your Provigil, since its working for you. There are a number of surgical procedures that can pare excess tissue from the back of the throat. And there is a new remedy called the Pillar Palatal Implant System. It consists of three small, plastic rods inserted into the back part of the upper palate to keep it propped up. For some, a droopy palate obstructs airflow. Since youre doing pretty well with the way things are going now, you might not want to upset things with any more treatment. DEAR DR. DONOHUE: I am a 68-year-old male in excellent health who exercises regularly, but I have trouble sleeping for more than five or six hours a night. To get the desired seven to eight hours of sleep, Ive been taking a sleep aid (diphenhydramine), and have not noticed any unpleasant side effects. Are there any long-term problems with taking this sleep aid on a frequent baANSWER: Diphenhydramine is one of the first antihistamines to be marketed. One brand name is Benadryl. Sleepiness is a side effect of most of the early antihistamines. In other words, you take the medicine for its side effect of drowsiness. Millions of people have taken this drug since it was first marketed. You can take it on a regular basis. Why are you convinced that six hours of sleep is insufficient for you? Do you feel tired during the day with only six hours? If you feel fine or if you take a nap during the day, that might be all the sleep you actually need. Dr. Donohue regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but he will incorporate them in his column whenever possible. Readers may write him or request an order form of available health newsletters at P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475. 2011 North America Synd., Inc. All Rights Reserved By Samantha MazzottaReusing Wood for FlooringQ:Ive been watching some home-improvement shows on television lately that advocate greenbuilding techniques, including reusing wood from other structures for a homes wood flooring,rather than buying new. What do you think about this trend,and how do I go about doing this? Larry in Tempe,Ariz.A:Recycled wood flooring is a good trend,in my opinion, because rather than chopping down live trees to supply the hardwood for your floor,wood from many types of disused structures or other sources of salvaged lumber can be remilled to give it a second life. There is some concern that the current stock of highquality salvaged wood will run out eventually,but no timetable has been given for that. Recycled hardwood is often of better quality than new hardwoods. Its been curing for many years,resulting in a tighter grain and more stability. Also, much of the current stock of recycled wood originally came from oldgrowth forests,most of which either no longer exist or are protected,and so youre getting high-quality denseness and stability that most new woods cant match. One thing it is not,however,is cheap. Recycled hardwood costs much more than new (Toolbase Services estimates that it runs about $5.75 to $11 per square foot,while new oak flooring runs about $3 per square foot). Recycled wood also must be installed by a professional. Despite the cost,recycled wood tends to be beautiful and durable and a nice conversation piece at parties. If youre interested in having it installed, many flooring contractors are able to procure and install recycled wood. You should check with more than one contractor,though,get estimates,and ideally work with someone who specializes in recycled wood-flooring installation. Send questions or home-repair tips to homeguru2000@hotmail.com,or write This Is a Hammer,c/o King Features Weekly Service,P.O. Box 536475,Orlando,FL 32853-6475.2009 King Features Synd.,Inc.All types of wood floors need the same type of care: Wipe up liquid spills immediately, dont use harsh cleaners or oil soaps,and sweep,dust mop or vacuum regularly to prevent grit from dulling the finish.Dogs Help Vets Cope With PTSDTheres new ammo in the hunt for a fix for post-traumatic stress disorder. For some veterans,the answers lie in dogs. But not just any dogs. Specially trained dogs are being given to some veterans suffering from PTSD,and in many cases,its working. When out in public,the dogspresence invites social conversation,yet they will place themselves physically between someone approaching and the veteran,who is likely to still be leery of contact. With the dogs,veterans find that theyre able to leave home without fear and can slowly transition to a more normal life. Many of the dogs are trained in prisons in the Puppies Behind Bars program,where they spend a year with specially trained prisoners [www.puppiesbehindbars.com]. To turn the tables a bit,a group called Paws for Purple Hearts [www.assistancedog.org] allows veterans with PTSD to become trainers for dogs that will assist veterans with physical disabilities. Run by Bergin University in California,the Paws program gives a needed sense of purpose to veterans with PTSD,as well as the grounding and self-worth that come from knowing theyre working to help someone else. In this case its a veteran with physical disabilities. For more information,call PPH at 707545-3647 ext. 28. Steps also are being taken to head PTSD off at the pass,again using dogs. Combat Stress Teams in Iraq and Afghanistan are shipped over with therapy dogs that quickly become popular with service personnel. The dogs serve,among other things,as icebreakers and stress relievers,inviting conversations that might otherwise not take place. For a real treat,do an Internet search for Boe and Budge,two therapy dogs that were sent to Iraq with a stress team. Write to Freddy Groves in care of King Features Weekly Service,P.O. Box 536475,Orlando,FL 328536475,or send e-mail to columnreply@gmail.com.2009 King Features Synd.,Inc. King Features Weekly ServiceMarch 2-8, 2009 Most Older People Have DiverticulosisDEAR DR. DONOHUE:I am a 78-year-old female,active and in good health or so I thought. I eat right and never smoked or drank alcohol. Yesterday,a colonoscopy showed severe diverticulosis. The doctor prescribed Benefiber,then left and never returned. I am stunned. What do I do now? Will I have this forever? Am I unhealthy? How does one develop diverticulosis? What the difference between osisand itis? S.K. ANSWER:Your world isnt collapsing. Youre healthy. Youll have diverticulosis forever. By age 60,half of the people in North America have it. By age 80,two-thirds have it. A diverticulum is a bulge of the inner colon lining through the colons muscular wall to its outer surface. A diverticulum looks like a small soap bubble. Its only 1/5 to 2/5 inches (0.5 to 1 cm) in diameter. You can thank our diet for diverticulosis. We refine flour and throw away its bran the outer coat of grain. In countries where whole grains (including the bran) are commonly used,diverticulosis is a rarity. Bran and other fiber hold water in undigested food. Without fiber,the food residue dries and becomes hard. The colon muscles have to generate a great deal of force to keep it moving. That force causes the colon lining to pop through the colon wall as a diverticulum. For most,diverticulosis is a silent condition that remains silent for life. For a few,the diverticulum breaks and causes a local infection in the colon diverticulitis. The pain of a diverticulitis attack is usually felt in the lower left corner of the abdomen, and sometimes people have fever and chills along with the pain. The attack is treated by resting the tract and by giving antibiotics. Were supposed to get 30 grams of fiber a day. Fruits (especially those with edible skins),many vegetables and whole-grain products are the source of dietary fiber. If people cannot get enough fiber in their diet,then commercial products like the one youre taking fill the gap. Metamucil, Perdiem,Citrucel and Fiberall are other examples. The booklet on diverticulosis explains the ins and outs of this very common disorder. To order a copy, write:Dr. Donohue No. 502W,Box 536475,Orlando,FL 32853-6475. Enclose a check or money order (no cash) for $4.75 U.S./$6 Canada with the recipients printed name and address. Please allow four weeks for delivery. *** DEAR DR. DONOHUE:My husband has chronic blepharitis and frequently develops hard buildups in both eyes that cause great discomfort. The doctor must remove them two times a month. What can be done to prevent them? S.R. ANSWER:Blepharitis (BLEF-uhRYE-tiss) is inflammation of the eyelid margins,which become red and crusty. The crust can build up into hard deposits. A twice-a-day program of lid cleansing might eliminate the crusts. Have your husband apply warm compresses (a wet washcloth) to closed lids for five to 10 minutes and then massage the lids. After the massage,he cleanses the lid margins with a cotton-tipped applicator dipped in a solution of one part baby shampoo and one part water. The doctor might have to prescribe an antibiotic ointment. *** Dr. Donohue regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but he will incorporate them in his column whenever possible. Readers may write him or request an order form of available health newsletters at P.O. Box 536475,Orlando,FL 328536475.2009 North America Synd.,Inc. All Rights ReservedHow Does Your Hospital Rate?It really DOES matter what hospital you go to when you need care. Your life could depend on it. So says the seventh annual study by HealthGrades. This is the same group that tracks doctors,hospitals and nursing homes and assigns a grade for the level of care. Its latest study reveals that your risk of death can be cut as much as 27 percent if you get your care at a Distinguished Hospital for Clinical Excellence.To get that designation,a hospital has to pass a long list of criteria. The HealthGrades Web site [www.healthgrades.com] lists by state all of the Distinguishedhospitals. You can search (for free) for grades on a given hospital for any of dozens of medical conditions. Look for Research Hospitals on the front screen of the Web site. Its when you want a full report on a hospital that you have to pay a fee. Youll also have to pay a fee to check out a specific doctor or nursing home it costs money for the report. A much easier way to check on a hospital or doctor is on the governments Health and Human Services website [www.hospitalcompare.hhs .gov]. The HHS layout lets you compare multiple hospitals,right on the same screen. The information is very comprehensive,too. For example,one question concerns the percent of surgery patients who were given an antibiotic at the right time,within one hour before surgery. This is a small detail maybe,but crucial to ones recovery. To find out if there is a Distinguishedhospital in your area,check the HealthGrades Web site and then search for details at the HHS site. Still,if youre facing a major medical issue,perhaps paying for the HealthGrades report would give you needed extra information. Matilda Charles regrets that she cannot personally answer reader questions,but will incorporate them into her column whenever possible. Write to her in care of King Features Weekly Service,P.O. Box 536475, Orlando,FL 32853-6475,or send email to columnreply@gmail.com.2009 King Features Synd.,Inc. King Features Weekly ServiceMarch 2-8, 2009 Loud snoring can signal sleep apnea Digital Mammograms Arent More AccurateDEAR DR. DONOHUE: Please tell me if a digital mammogram is a great deal better than a regular mammogram. If I need to pay part of the cost, I dont mind, if its worth it. I dont want to pay for something that is simply newer. S.P. ANSWER: With a conventional mammogram, the image of the breast is captured on film, like a photograph ic image. With a digital mammogram, the image is captured electronically on bits of computer code, like a digital camera does. The techniques for taking a digital mammogram are the same as those for a conventional one. Digital mammograms are easier to store, and digital images are available immediately but are more costly. A large study of almost 50,000 women concluded that the accuracy between digital and conventional mammograms is not significantly dif ferent. However, in women younger than 50 and in women with dense breasts, digital mammograms provide better pictures. Unless your doctor has directed you to get digital mammograms, you can rely on standard mammograms to serve you well. The booklet on breast cancer provides information on its detection and treatment. Readers can obtain a copy by writing: Dr. Donohue No. 1101W, Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475. Enclose a check or mon ey order (no cash) for $4.75 U.S./$6 Canada. with the recipients printed name and address. Please allow four weeks for delivery. *** DEAR DR. DONOHUE: For many years, I have put up with floaters. I am quite nearsighted, and my eye doctor says theyre common in nearsighted people. Last week, I saw flashes of light. I called the doctor, and he saw me that day. He told me I had a vitreous detachment. Is this serious? L.P. ANSWER: The vitreous is a thick, gel-like material that fills the back two-thirds of the eye. It provides sup port for the eye. The vitreous abuts on the retina, the sensitive layer of cells that transfers incoming images to the brain. A vitreous detachment means it has pulled away from the retina. In doing so, it stimulated the retina to cause the flashing lights you saw. The doctor made sure your retina was OK. Flashes of light also can be a signal that the retina is tearing. For the present, nothing else needs to be done. The doctor will examine you again in a few months to be positive the retina is remaining in good health. *** DEAR DR. DONOHUE: Ten months ago I had my gallbladder removed. My problem is I must still take a Lactaid pill when I eat some foods, especially dairy. Why? D.B. ANSWER: Your gallbladder stores bile made in the liver. When people eat a fatty meal, their gallbladders contract to squirt bile into the diges tive tract to aid in the digestion of fats. If the gallbladder has stones, that contraction causes abdominal pain. You should not have that pain now. A different problem centers on lactase, an enzyme that digests milk sugar lactose. As people grow older, many lose their lactase enzymes. Drinking or eating dairy products causes them diarrhea and abdominal pain. You still need your Lactaid pill to digest dairy products. This has nothing to do with the gallbladder. *** Dr. Donohue regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but he will incorporate them in his column whenever possible. Readers may write him or request an order form of available health newsletters at P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475. 2011 North America Synd., Inc. Reducing Your Risk of Alzheimers DiseaseResearch recently presented at The Alzheimers Association International Conference indicates that Alzheimers disease could potentially be prevented for millions just by reducing lifestyle risks. The lifestyle risks and the percentage of Alzheimers they are associated with are: smoking (11 percent), obesity in midlife (7 percent), diabetes (3 percent), depression (15 percent), physical inac tivity (21 percent), high blood pressure in midlife (8 percent) and low education (7 percent). Thats not to say its absolutely cer tain that these risk factors can cause Alzheimers, but scientists believe that about half the cases could be prevented. According to a paper by researcher Deborah Barnes, a professor at Univer sity of California San Francisco, a reduction of 25 percent across all the risk factors could prevent nearly a half-million occurrences of Alzheimers in the U.S. alone. These are estimates, of course, and further research has to be done. Another paper at the same conference addressed the maintenance of cognition while aging. Cognition is the mental processes, such as problem solving, memory and learning. Seniors over the age of 65 with no impairment were given a battery of tests for cognition, stress, personality traits and depression, as well as physical tests. What scientists concluded was that scoring low on trauma, depression, stress and anxiety was related to keep ing good cognitive health. They gave an example of the characteristics of coping: developing a strategy, remain ing positive, getting advice and taking action. Researchers hope to make these tests part of a Resilience Index to assess patients for risk right in the doctors office. If more incentives are needed to make changes in lifestyle, this is surely one. Be more active, quit smoking and deal with high blood pressure and youll possibly avoid Alzheimers at the same time. Matilda Charles regrets that she cannot personally answer reader questions, but will incorporate them into her column whenever possible. Write to her in care of King Features Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475, or send email to columnreply@gmail.com. 2011 King Features Synd., Inc.King Features Weekly ServiceAugust 15, 2011

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Thursday, Sept. 1, 2011 Page 19 Winter Park / Maitland Observer Joseph Omar Dr. Joseph Nuwayhid passed away Aug. 26, 2011, at his home. He was born on Aug. 2, 2003, in Huntsville, Ala. Dr. Joseph was a very special gift to all who knew him. He brought joy, compassion, laughter, jokes and enjoyed playing games with all he met. Joseph had many, many friends from the hospital, his church, community and from his classmates and staff at Joan Walker Elementary School, where he completed rst grade. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to My Healing Harmony Music Therapy and mailed to Arnold Palmer Medical Foundation at 3160 Southgate Commerce Blvd., Suite 50, Orlando, FL, 32806; or for childrens ministry to JS Resources Inc., 844 Maraval Court, Longwood, FL, 32750. Joseph is survived by his mother, Mervat Maayah Nuwayhid; brothers Jeremy Nuwayhid, 18, Jonathan Nuwayhid, 16, and Jason Nuwayhid, 14; maternal grandmother, Asma Maayah of Amman, Jordan; paternal grandmother Eva Nuwayhid of Huntsville, and many uncles, aunts cousins in Huntsville and in Amman. Joseph is predeceased by his father, Omar Richard Nuwayhid, his maternal grandfather, Asef Maayah, and his paternal grandfather, Adib Nuwayhid. Velma P. Crain, 80, of Orlando, passed away Aug. 26, 2011. She was born April 6, 1931, in Alicia, Ark., to James and Ruth (Light) Carter. She had been a homemaker. Velma is survived by her son, Ed Crain of Longwood. In loving memory of Victor Perez, husband of beloved wife Gladys Perez and four generations of loved ones. He died Aug. 26, 2011, and will be missed by many and always remembered. George Hanna, 85, of Longwood, passed away Aug. 27, 2011. He was born Sept. 10, 1925, in Birmington, Ala. to John W. and Doshie P. (McCay) Hanna. He had worked for the Road Maintenance Department for Seminole County. George is survived by his niece, Jane Yeakle, loving family and friends. There are no services scheduled. Robert Hughes Peebles, 90, of Orlando, passed away Aug. 28, 2011. He was born in Marion, Ill., on May 21, 1921. He is a retired U.S. Army veteran of World War II and the Korean War, retired from the U.S. Postal Service and a member of VFW Post #4287. He is predeceased by his son, Gary Peebles. He is survived by his wife, Gladys Peebles; daughter, Susan Peebles; grandsons Michael Flannery and Brian Flannery; and great granddaughter Emma Flannery. Friends are invited to attend a Memorial Service with Military Honors for Mr. Peebles, Friday, Sept. 2, at 10 a.m. at the Baldwin-Fairchild Funeral Home, Goldenrod Chapel, 7520 Aloma Ave., Winter Park. The family requests donations be made to Veterans of Foreign Wars, Post #4287, 3500 S. Goldenrod Road, Orlando, FL, 32822 in care of Connie Green.Obituaries To submit an obituary for publication, e-mail obit@ observernewspapers.com. The deadline is 5 p.m. Monday for Thursdays issue. With more than 60 of Central Floridas finest restaurants offering three-course $30 dinners throughout the month of September, tourists and locals alike are Orlandos Magical Dining Month. This annual celebration showcases Central Floridas chefs in our ever-more-famous dining choices. The monthlong event benefits the Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Florida with $1 from every meal donated to the organization. From Sept. 1-30, guests may enjoy exceptional dining for an exceptional price at Orlando restaurants including Emerils Orlando, Mortons Steakhouse, Ocean Prime, Capital Grille and the brand new Napa at The Peabody. Also included are Chez Vincent, Luma on Park, Le Coq Au Vin, K Restaurant, The Boheme, Seasons 52 and Todd Englishs bluezoo. Information about Visit Orlandos ing a complete list of participatOrlandoMagicalDining.comInternational Piano Competition In a performance set for Saturday, Sept. 10, at 7:30 p.m., three finalists from the Second Florida International Piano Competition will join the Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra in a concert in which each pianist will perform a concerto with the orchestra. Sept. 10 caps off an extraordifrom around the world vie for prizes totaling $40,000. The finals, held on Sept. 10 at the Bob Carr Performing Arts Centre, will feature each finalist performing a concerto to determine the winner. The Orlando Philharmonic will perform with the finalists in an evening that concludes with the announcement of the winner. A Winners Encore Recital will take place on Sept. 11 at Trinity Preparatory School. For tickets to the finals, visit TicketMaster. com. For tickets to the beginning rounds, call 407-645-2525 or visit FloridaPiano.orgSideways Stories at the RepAdapted for the stage by John Olive from Louis Sachars popular book series, this theatrical adaptation presents the best scenes from the Wayside School books. The Wayside School was accidentally constructed with 30 classrooms stacked on top of each other, including the mysterious 19th floor. From people turning into apples to talking pigtails, the students never know what to expect. As a child, I loved stories that were both bizarre and a little creepy, says director Michael Marinaccio. Hopefully, audiences from 3 to 93 will find our Wayside School to be entertaining, exciting, amusing, spooky and full of heart. The Orlando Repertory Theatre, kicks off the 2011-12 season with Sideways Stories from Wayside School, running from Sept. 8-Oct. 9. Sonnys FamSept. 24. Call 407-896-7365 or visit www.orlandorep.comTwelve Angry MenBreakthrough Theatre of Winter Park will present the Reginald Rose drama Twelve Angry Men from Sept. 2-19. This classic work of theater portrays a jury forced to consider its decision by the single dissenter who sows a seed of reasonable doubt. The judge instructs the jury to unanimously decide on a verdict of guilty or not guilty in a case where a young man may have murdered his father. The plot thickens as the jury is further instructed that a guilty verdict will be accompanied by a mandatory death sentence. In the jury room, the mens varied personalities reveal hidden fears and submission with several jurors having personal reasons for discriminating against the witness. Directed by Sylvia Vicchiullo, the play will be performed at the Breakthrough Theatre at 419A W. Fairbanks Ave. in Winter Park. Call 407-9204034 or visit breakthroughtheatre. com JoshGarrick September is dining-savings month American Family Funerals & Cremations Phone (407)3390070 Serving all of Central Florida Family Owned and Operated Se habla Espaol Alan Trueba L.F.D. American Family Funerals & Cremations Phone (407)3390070 Serving all of Central Florida Family Owned and Operated Se habla Espaol Alan Trueba L.F.D. Cremation Services, Shipping & Monuments. Traditional, Contemporary & Veteran Services at half the price of what others would charge Crain PeeblesJosh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator, and ne art curator. He is a member of the Curatorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com or 407-522-3906.WHO ISGARRICK >

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