Winter Park-Maitland observer
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00162
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park FL
Publication Date: 09-17-2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates: 28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID: UF00091444:00162

Full Text




Winter Park/ Maitland


Volume 21, No. 38
407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.net


FIRST COLONY


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Central

Park's last

chance
ISAAC BABCOCK

Central Park took arioth-
er step toward expanding
Monday as the Winter Park
City Commission voted to
create a fundraising com-
. mittee to raise $4 million to
relocate the city's post of-
fice and put park land in its
place.
Time is short for the city
to mnove forward with the
plan, or the city could lose
the option to expand the
park, possibly forever.
The proposed reloca-
tion project would move
the post office to the north
side of its current property
at the corner of North New
York Avenue and West Can-
ton Avenue, freeing up two
acres of land for the adja-
cent park.
Overwhelming pub-
lic support had driven the
Commission's move to try to
raise money outside of city
funds to expand the park's
northwest corner, where
the post office now stands.
Due to a constrained budget
the Commission had voted
to not try to use city funds
to pay for the park, instead
deciding to try to solicit do-
> turn to EXPANSION on A4


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City . ....
Legas . ............... A
Marketplace ............
Games . A15

. . . . .


peace

BRITTNI JOHNSON

Central Florida will celebrate a
week of peace and awareness
through film, open dialogue and
education, kicking off with a street
fair on Sunday, Sept. 20, in Baldwin
Park.


> turn to PEACE on A4


-Sunday Sept. 20- 2nd Annual Global Peace
Street Fair and International Pet Parade for
Peace- 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on New Broad Street '
in Baldwin Park, free, green products and
programs to explore, animals to learn about
and several cultural organizations will teach at-
tendees.about their culture through art, dance,
music and sports
-Tuesday Sept. 22- Opening night outdoor
screening of "The Day After Peace" on Rollins
College's Mills Lawn, 8 p.m., free
-Wednesday Sept. 23- Winter Garden Gala


Event, reception at 6:30 p.m., screening of
"The Burning Season" at 8 p.m., reception and
film- $80, just film- $17
-Thursday Sept. 24- Outdoor screening of
"Playing for Change: Peace Through Music" in
Baldwin Park, 8 p.m., free
The 39 chosen films will be shown at various
times Tuesday through Sunday at venues in
Winter Park, Orlando and Winter Garden. The
panels will be held Wednesday through Sunday
at Rollins College. Visit www.peacefilmfest.org
for more information.


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News



City's redevelopment director quits


ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF

Winter Park is looking for
a new marketing guru af-
ter Community Redevel-
opment Director Sherry
Gutch announced her res-
ignation in late August. And
after heaping high praise
on Gutch for her efforts to


improve the city, the staff
is finding that she may be a
hard act to follow.
"It's a real loss to our city,"
Mayor Ken Bradley said of
Gutch's departure, which
will be effective Nov. 1.
She had served as a con-
sultant to the city before be-
ing hired full time two years
ago. Now Gutch said she's
getting back into the con-


suiting business - her own.
"You always hate to lose
someone of that caliber,"
City Manager Randy Knight
said. "It was very sudden,
but we're going to do our
best job to replace her with
someone who's as talent-
ed."
That replacement may
be Peter Moore, the city's
current economic devel-


opment director, who had
acted as Gutch's right hand
man in helping redevelop
the city.
"He's a very critical part
of that team," Knight said.
"He's the number guy. She
was the idea person and
public face. They were a
good team together."
Knight said that the city
should be able to handle


the transition to an interim
community redevelopment
director, but that in the
meantime, Moore will fill.
that hole.
Knight also said that
Gutch will remain with the
city to finish its strategic re-
development plan, which
she had helped author.


Wildcats win big, Saints crushed


ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF

Winter Park lit up the scoreboard
and Trinity Prep took a long bus
ride to a blowout Friday night.
But at the start of the night it
looked like both teams would be
in trouble. The Wildcats rode-into
Ocoee with an expected victory
waiting at the other end of four
quarters, but early struggles turned
a certain win into a maybe as the
Cats' Sam Richardson Was repeat-
edly hurried out of the pocket by a
ferocious Ocoee defensive line.


But the Cats (2-0) would recov-
er and then go on a tear, ripping
through the Knights (1-1) for 30
unanswered points on the way to a
33-9 blowout.
That came courtesy of Richard-
son's arm and Patrick Mputu's legs
as the duo combined for most of the
team's offense on the night. Despite
Mputu only rarely carrying the ball,
he still managed 120 yards on the
ground and picked up a touchdown
in the process.
Meanwhile Ocoee struggled after
early offensive gains and a blocked
punt that turned into a safety, and
a quickly adjusting Wildcat defense


shut them down.
Zee Ware grabbed a bit of the
spotlight with a late TD run of his
own, cementing the landslide win.
The Wildcats hadn't opened a
season with two wins in a row since
2005, when they went 12-2 on the
season.
This Friday the Wildcats return
home against Boone, kicking off at
7:30 p.m. The Braves (1-1) outlasted
Timber Creek in a close 35-28 game
last week.
The Trinity Prep Saints took a
long ride to a blowout Friday night
at the hands of Melbourne Central
Catholic, losing 49-0.


For the Saints (1-1) the momen-
tum shift takes them away from the
high they experienced from a 24-21
win over Orlando Lutheran in Week
1.
That offense the Saints had mo-
bilized so well in Week 1 seemingly
disappeared on the Hustlers' home
field, as Melbourne (2-0) blazed to
another massive victory.
The Saints hit the road again
Thursday, Sept. 17, traveling to Flor-
ida Air Academy (1-1) at 7 p.m. The
Falcons were on the winning side of
a 46-14 blowout in Week 1, but lost
16-6 to Liberty last week.


Students leave the classroom to graduate faster


MATT MORRISON
GUEST REPORTER

What if you could go to high
school, even receive college
credit, all from the comfort
of your own home?
Students at Winter Park's
Independent Education
Learning Center .are do-
ing just that, many of them
problem-learners who have
struggled to focus in a nor-
mal classroom environ-
ment.
Working with Com-
puHigh Florida, which was
recently granted approval
by the Department of Edu-
cation to educate middle
school and high school stu-
dents year-round, Winter
Park's program is a budding
system looking to expand.
Owner and Director Dan
Calleja, 34, began his career
teaching American history
at Stonewall Jackson Mid-
dle School in Orlando but
found that he was spend-
ing more time disciplining
his students than teaching
them.
He fell out of public edu-
cation and into tutoring,
when a friend came to him
looking for help with her
son who was struggling with
school.
"I told them I'd try to ed-
ucate him without having
to send him to high school,"
Calleja said. "He wouldn't
have to deal with some of
the temptations he's given
into and gotten in trouble
with."


It was in the online uni-
verse that Calleja realized
the variety of education op-
tions that were open to stu-
dents who may have trouble
with more traditional meth-
ods.
"I thought, 'There's a way
for kids to not have to go to
high school but still get their
diplomas,"' he said.
At the learning center,
students take their high
school or college-level
courses online, while re-
ceiving support and advice
from instructors working
one-on-one, or their fel-
low students. The campus
is small, with only a hand-
ful of students enrolled. The
learning center purchases
textbooks for the students
and helps them formulate
a schedule to help them get
their coursework done.
Students work with one


another and with the in-
structors in a closely moni-
tored educational environ-
ment that's designed to give
structure where it may be
lacking.
Most students have seen
an improvement of several
letter grades in their classes,
Calleja said, going from fail-
ing to receiving A's or B's.
Working through high
school and getting into
trouble in his classes, Jon
Beardsley, now -22, came
to Calleja when he was just
starting out with four stu-
dents.
"I was a smart kid, I just
didn't have any organiza-
tion," hesaid.
At the learning center
Beardsley said he found
the support he needed,
culminating with Calleja
driving him to Winter Park
High School to take his SAT.


T ,-i ".. ISAAC BABCOCK - 1'_ '.t. '":'.
Students Jessica Kiliszewski and Rachel Cahan study online to bypass the class-
room. They're part of a new program in Winter Park that's accelerating learning.


Beardsley is now a math ma-
jor at UCF looking to gradu-
ate this year.
"That was a lot better
for me than being in high
school," Beardsley said.
Eric Schlar, 24, went to
two other schools up North,
but he was unhappy. When
he moved to Florida, a lot of
his credits didn't transfer to
UCF, where he's in the Col-


lege of Business.
"I hit a roadblock with
it, but Dan really helped me
with it, tutored me through
the math and now I have
.about a year, year and a half
left at UCF," Schlar said.
The learning center, lo-
cated at 1294 Palmetto Ave.,
can be found online at www.
IndependentEduOrlando.
com.


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Winter Park /Maitland Observer


P;n 9 Tusdv Snebe 7,20






Thursday, September 17, 2009 Page 3


\Ain ntpr Pirk i /aitland OlhPsrver


Knights fall short of Southern Miss


ISAAC BABCOCK


The Knights have a new starting
quarterback in Brett Hodges, but
even his passing heroics weren't
enough to lift the University of Cen-
tral Florida football team (1-1, 0-1)
from an early deficit against the
Southern Miss Golden Eagles (2-0,
1-0).
By the time Hodges got the ball
midway through the first quarter,-
the Knights had a 14-0 scoring gap
to cover, thanks to two turnovers in
the Knights first three possessions,
the third ending in a punt.
Hodges worked quickly, handing
the ball to Brynn Harvey on a se-
ries of plays before going to' the air,
eventually marching the Knights to
the Eagles' 9-yard-line before they
were stopped short, opting for a
field goal to cut the score to 14-3.
From that point onward the
Knights were in a constant game of
catch up, as they inched closer to


the Eagles, but watched the score
slip ever farther from their grasp.
At one point at the start of the
fourth quarter, kicker Nick Cat-
toi launched a 50-yard field goal
through the uprights, propelling
the Knights to within a touchdown
of the Eagles. The Eagles quickly
scored again, finding the end zone
when the Knights frequently could
only split the uprights.
In a final effort to bring his team
within striking distance, kick re-
turner Jamar Newsome raced 89
yards down the sideline before be-
ing knoclied out of bounds at the
Southern Miss 5-yard-line. A quick
score by Rocky Ross closed the gap
to 26-19, but the Eagles kneeled out
the final minute.
The Knights return home at 7:30
p.m. Saturday against Buffalo. The
Bulls (1-1, 0-0 MAC) are coming off
a 54-27 loss to Pittsburgh last week.
The last time the Knights faced Buf-
falo in 2004 they were blown out
48-20.


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK - THE OBSERVER
Winter Springs grad Brett Hodges has shined in his first two games as UCF's quarterback.


Calendar


NAIOP Central Florida will host a
Green Summit on Friday, Sept. 18 at
the.Marriott Orlando Downtown, 400
W. Livingston Street. Registration will
be from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. Cost is $50
for members and $75 for non-mem-
bers. Visit www.naiopcfl.org. or call
the NAIOP office at 407-227-7461.

The Orange County Clerk of Courts
is hosting a Passport Fair from 7:30
a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sept. 18. at the Clerk
of Courts Downtown Office room 350
at 425 N. Orange Ave.
You must bring the following ma-
terials.
-Proof of U.S. citizenship
-Valid proof of identity
-Two color photographs.The Clerk's
Office can take your photo for $1D.
-$25 Clerk Processing fee
-U.S. Department of State fee. To
find out how much you would owe,
-please go to myorangeclerk.com, click
on Clerk Services and Passports.
For more information visit myo-
rangeclerk.com or travel.state.
gov. U.S. citizens may also obtain
passport information in English and


Spanish by calling the National Pass-
port Information Center toll-free at
1-877-487-2778.-

The Daughters of the American
Revolution will sponsor a free Ge-
nealogy Seminar, "Getting Started
with your Family History" from 10
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Saturday Sept.
19 at the Latter Day Saints Church, 45
E. Par Street, Orlando. Contact Betty
Jo Stockton at bjstock@cfl.rr.com
or 407-876-1688

From 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. on Sept 19,
the Orlando Science Center invites
you to Cocktails & Cosmos. Guests
are invited to dress in "tropical is-
land" attire. "Happy Hour" beverage
specials are available for purchase
from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. along with an
assortment of appetizers. For infor-
mation call 407-514-2000 or visit
www.osc.org.

Applications are now open to artists
for The 51st Winter Park Sidewalk
Art Festival, held March 19 to 21,
2010 in downtown Winter Park. Ap-


plication deadline is Sept. 20, through
www.zapplication.org. For more in-
formation, visit www.wpsaf;org. Con-
tact the festival by writing to P.O. Box
597, Winter Park, FL 32790-0597 or
by voice message at 407-672- 6390
or e-mail at wpsaf@yahoo.com.

The American Legion will host its
annual membership recruiting
drive "Meet and Greet Luncheon"
at the Winter Park Olive Garden, Hwy
17-92, starting at 1:30 p.m., Sunday,
Sept. 20. Call Nell at 321-303-7445
to RSVP by Sept. 17.

The Maitland Public Library at 501
S. Maitland Ave., will host the fol-
lowing events this week:
-At 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. Thurs-
day, Sept. 17 there will be a blood
pressure check by the Maitland Fire
& Rescue held in the lobby.
-At 7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 22 the
Books to Die For! Mystery Book Club
will be held at the Maitland Civic Cen-
ter, next door to the Maitland Public
Library. September's selection is Wal-
ter Mosley's "Devil in a Blue Dress."


-At 1:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept.
23 the Contemporary Authors Book
Discussion Group will be held at the
Maitland Civic Center. September's
selection is "The Help" by Kathryn
Stockett.

Enjoy an afternoon of beautiful
music at the dedication recital for the
new Yamaha concert grand piano at 4
p.m. Sept. 20 at the First Presbyterian
Church of Maitland on U.S. Highway
17-92.

The Maitland Woman's Club will
hold its Fall Antiques and Collect-
ible Sale from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. on
Saturday, Sept. 19 at the Maitland-
Civic Center, 641 S. Maitland Ave.4
For more information contact Linda
Zeitler at 4017-830-6373 or June at
407-699-5731.

Celebrate Constitution Day at
Chick-fil-A from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m.
Sept. 17.
From 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Sept. 21, 20'
percent of all Chick-fil-A sales will go
to In God We Trust. The organization


gives money to those children that
have lost loved ones in the Armed
Service.

Now in its 7th year, the Global
Peace Film Festival runs from Sept.
22-27. For more information on the
Global Peace Film Festival, visit www.
peacefilmfest.org.
On Saturday, Sept. 26, the Albin
Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gar-
dens will participate in the fifth
annual Museum Day, presented by
Smithsonian magazine. Admission is
free for Smithsonian magazine read-
ers and Smithsonian.com visitors at
museums and cultural institutions
nationwide.

During "One World, One Night", Ten
Thousand Villages of Orlando will turn
the Winter Park Farmers Market into
an international bazaar. From 6 to 9
p.m. Thursday, Oct; 1. Tickets are
$35 per person in advance and $40
at the door. For more information call
407-670-5616.


The perfect blend of art & music.



st.pet
- Florida's Annual
Street Arts Festival
- September 2b & 27



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EXPANSION I City tries to raise funds to expand Central Park before it's too late


< continued from the front page

nations.
"I found a tremendous amount
of agreement and interest that this
is a doable project," Commissioner
Beth Dillaha said of talks she's had
with local leaders and fundraisers.
Speaking in favor of the expan-
sion, spokesperson Susan Skolfield
said the time to move the post of-
fice and expand the park is now, be-
fore the city's option to convert the


post office property expires. The
city could face another large-scale
Carlisle-development situation if it
doesn't act in time to seize the post
office property.
The city only has until Feb. 20 to
raise the money to start the project,
or it risks losing the option to relo-
cate the post office.
"This is one of those once-in-a-
.lifetime chances to use green space
to generate economic. develop-
ment in our downtown area," she
said. "Losing this opportunity has a


cost. The postal service will control
the property and could possibly en-
ter into a contract to build a multi-
story building on the site."
The Commission settled on a
motion to form a fundraising com-
mittee, which would need to be ful-
ly in place by the start of October.
Mayor Ken Bradley urged the
Commission to move quickly on
the project, though he also voted
against the motion to form a fund-
raising committee.
"Having raised three times this


much in nonprofit money I'm aware
of some things, and the devil's in
the little details," Bradley said. "It's
important that we move prudently
with this."
Dillaha said that the city has to
act now, before it's too late.
"If this is the only opportunity
to do this, and we don't take action
now, then we will have wasted all
the effort leading up to this," she
said. "We need to get moving on it.
There's nothing to lose."


PEACE I Festival aims to promote social causes throughout the world


< continued from the front page

The Global Peace Film Fes-
tival began seven years ago
when a New York City-based
businessman realized that
a event of this kind would
better serve Orlando than
drown in the ocean of festi-
vals in his hometown. Nina
Streich was hired that first
year, and after the founding
founder backed out the next
year, she took over. Streich
said this festival is unlike any
other in the Orlando area.
"It's the only festival fo-
cused on the issue of peace
in this part of the country, in
Central Florida," she said.
The festival runs from
Sept. 22 to Sept. 27 and fea-
tures films with subjects
about the environment, sus-
tainability and the struggles'
and triumphs of people. The
films cost $8 per ticket and
are shown in various venues
in Winter Park, Orlando and
Winter Garden.
Rollins College graduate
Shaun Crick will be show-
ing his work-in-progress
documentary, "UNO: Harvest
of Hope Fest," which docu-
ments a music festival that


raised money for migrant
farm workers and their fami-
lies. He hopes the documen-
tary will "raise social con-
sciousness and action" about
where food comes from and
if it was gathered humanely.
Crick said that documen-
taries shown at the festival
should help the audience re-
alize that there's a problem,
and then tell them what they
can do to help solve that
problem.
"Every one of us can do
something about these is-
sues," he said.
There are also four panels
each discussing a different
topic on peace ranging from
health care -in the U.S. to
Imams and Rabbis discuss-
ing their faiths and views on
peace.
"The festival shows that
there is not one way to look
at peace," said Brian Wet-
tstein, co-owner of Bullfish,
the headquarters of the -fes-
tival.
The festival starts with its
second annual street fair in
Baldwin Park on New Broad
Street. It will feature green
products and programs to
explore, animals to learn
about and several cultural


organizations will teach at- *
tendees about their culture
through art, dance, music
and sports.
Streich hopes all the ac-
tivities, fulfill the festival's
mission: to get people more
involved and aware. She also
hopes that it serves as a call
to action.
"The purpose is to edu-
cate and inspire, to basically
inspire people to be more ac-
tive. in their community and
do what they think would
make the world a better
place," Streich said.
Crick said the Streich ac-
complishes just that.
"We say we want to open
eyes - that's what Nina
does," he said.









PHOTO COURTESY OF GLOBAL PEACE
FILM FESTIVAL
This is the seventh year of the Global
Peace Film Festival, which showcases
the environment and sustainability.


Winter Park / Maitland


Observer


News that really clicks


www.wimobserver.com


SOWinter ParkMaitland
Observer


Published Thursday, September 17,2009


PUBLISHER
Kyle Taylor
407-563-7009
kyle@observernewspapers.com

ASSOCIATE EDITOR
Jenny Andreasson
407-563-7026
jennya@observernewspapers.com

DESIGNER
Stephanie Erickson
407-563-7040
stephanie@observemewspapers.com


Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster
CONTACTS


REPORTERS
Jenny Andreasson
407-563-7026
jennya@observernewspapers.com

Isaac Babcock
407-563-7023
isaacb@observernewspapers.com

LEGALS I CLASSIFIED
Jonathan Gallagher
407-563-7058
legal@observernewspapers.com


COPY EDITORS
Jonathan Gallagher
jgallagher@observemewspapers.com

Jenny Andreasson
jennya@observernewspapers.com

COLUMNISTS
Chris Jepson
Jepson@MediAmerica.us

Louis Roney
LRoney@cfl.rr.com


Volume21, Issue Number 38


Josh Garrick
407-304-8100

ADVERTISING SALES
Tracy Craft
407-515-2605
tcraft@observemewspapers.com

INTERN
Sarah Kezer


Member of. P.O.-Box 2426 1500 Park Center Dr.
* Florida Press Association Winter Park, FL 32790 Orlando, FL 32835-5705 USPS 00-6186
* Maitland Area/ Winter Park/ ISSN 1064-3613
Goldenrod Chamber of Commerce www.wpmobserver.com, I 407-563-7000 I e-mail: editor@observernewspapets.com I


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Winter_ Par /_ Mailan Obere ThrdySpeme 7,20 Pg


Business


Jess Larson joins Winter Park
Residential Real Estate Team, Kelly
Price & Company.
At 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Sept. 16,
the YMCA of Central Florida offi-
cially opened a $7 million wellness
renovation to the Dr. P. Phillips YMCA
Family Center with an exhibit of the
first ever Dr. P. Phillips YMCA "Spin-
ning Rocks" in the new studio cycling
room. Dr. P. Phillips YMCA will now
have the largest wellness area in the
YMCA of Central Florida Association.
NAI Realvest recently negoti-
ated the $374,000 sale price for
a 1,200-square-foot office condo-
minium at Lake Mary Professional
Campus.
Richo Industrial, Inc. purchased.


suite 1021 in the building located at
1301 S. International Parkway.
Florida Realtor Magazine present-
ed its Editorial Excellence Award to
Jennifer Gonzalez during a Florida As-
sociation of Realtors luncheon.
Winter Park Land Company has
beefed up its Central Florida sales
operations with the addition of 37
agents from New York-based Brown
Harris Stevens of Winter Park. "This
infusion of experience, expertise and
market knowledge solidifies what al-
ready has been and continues to be
one of the area's strongest real estate
brands," says Pitt Warner, Broker for
Winter Park Land Company.
The Society for Marketing Profes-
sional Services recognized Micaela


Riseling as recipient of the 2009 Ris-
ing Star Award.
"The Albin Polasek Museum &
Sculpture Gardens," written by
Debbie Komanski and Karen Loud-
en, was honored on Aug. 8 at the
22nd Annual Florida Print Awards as
the Best of Category in the book divi-
sion. The book contains photographs
and narrative recounting the engag-
ing life and works of Czech-born
American sculptor Albin Polasek.
The women's boutique, Bella,
moved to North Park Avenue on
Sept. 14. "We are thrilled to be a part
of the new upsurge in shopping at the
North end of the Avenue," says owner,
Susan Johnson.


Community


The Winter Park Chamber of Commerce, as part of
their "Chamber Cares" Program presented a $12,000
check to Seniors First last week to. help provide emer-
gency meals on wheels for Winter Park seniors.-
As part of President Obama's request to renew Amer-
ica through volunteerism, seven Mr. Handyman fran-
chises in the Orlando market banded together to .donate
135 service hours to the. Orlando Union Rescue Mission
and SafeHouse of Seminole.
Orlando Sentinel columnist Greg Dawson shared his
mother Zhanna's inspiring story with a capacity crowd
at the Holocaust Memorial Resource and Education Cen-
ter in Maitland on Sept. 10. Dawson has just published a
book, "Hiding in the Spotlight," which chronicles his moth-
er's amazing escape from death during the Holocaust. In
1941, when she was 14, she and her family were rounded
up with other Jews in the small Ukrainian community of
Kharkov. Zhanna was able to escape from a march toward
death because of 6 bribe offered to a guard by her father.
She fled back to the neighborhood where her family had
lived, and was sheltered by a nearby Christian family, the
Boganchas. Zhanna's 12-year-old sister Frina, who fled


from the Nazis shortly after Zhanna's escape,-arrived at
the same family's doorstep several days later. They helped
the girls establish new identities, and arranged for them to
enter a safe orphanage where their musical talent led to
being recruited by a troupe of performers who entertained
Nazis during the war. Dawson visited the memorial at Dro-
bitsky Yar, a monument memorializing the 30,000 Jews
murdered there. On a wall displaying the names of the
dead, Dawson was shocked to find his mother listed there.
It was really then, he told listeners, that he then realized
how tenuous survival had been. Dawson discussed his
reaction to learning of his mother's story and his Jewish
ancestry for the first time as an adult. He also talked about
the genesis of the book and uncovering Zhanna's story
through a class assignment when Ron Hartle, Dawson's
daughter's social studies teacher,.-asked students to inter-
view someone about their experiences in WWII. Zhanna's
response to her granddaughter's request was a four page
letter that, for the first time, disclosed details of her life
during the Holocaust. Dawson invited Hartle to the front of
the auditorium, and presented him with a copy of "Hiding
in the Spotlight" with a personal inscription from Greg's
daughter Aimee.


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Brandywine Square

* Courtyard Shopping * Sidewalk Cafe *
Located Just 10 Steps North of the Morse Museum
Brandywine Deli Cida's of Winter Park Antiques
i:,d.3: ,, Wr..er Pa, le ru',,, on the Avenue
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[Ciw ulinjl f AiM,' iu, Burle I-,:.I r. Uinwa rly t3rl� Muylsiun
cjier,,,i a ,eatj, i ,:p 19 ? 407-644-5635 407-657-2100

Family Comics & Cards Essence NOW OPEN!
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NOW OPEN! Winter Park Hair Studio Park Avenue Jeweler
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.4oinarind Historical Society's 11th Annual Benefit Auction
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October 9 at 6:30 pm
Tickets: $45 members, $50 non-members
Tickets: 407-644-2451 or maitlandhistory.org/gala

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Rockin' and
running'













Runners by the thousands
pounded the pavement in
Casselberry for the Track
Shack Rock 'n' Run 5k on
Saturday. Live music kept run-
ners entertained at three points
along the course, which wound
its way through Casselberry
neighborhoods.


Thusda, Spteber17,200 ,Page 5


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Business






-J3 Thrdy etme 7 09WitrPr atadOsre


City Commission
meeting highlights
The City Commission met
on Sept. 14 at 3:30 p.m.
in City Hall Commission
Chambers. Below are a few
highlights regarding deci-
sions that were made:
CONSENT AGENDA:
-The minutes for the Aug.
24 City Commission meet-
ing were approved.
-The purchase of chemi-
cals for lakes treatment for
Chain of Lakes to piggyback
Lake County contract was
approved.
-Fire services billing to In-
termedix was approved.
-The Fire Union contract
was ratified.
-The request to develop
an ordinance' establishing
performance standards for
the operation of digital bill-
boards was approved.
ACTION ITEMS REQUIR-
ING DISCUSSION:
-The discussion to codify
the Code of Ethics drafted
and prepared by the Ethics
Board was tabled to a future
meeting.
-The request of Jim and
Charles Veigle to swap car
sale locations from 1234 W.
FairbanksAve.to 2250/2264
W. Fairbanks Ave. was ta-
bled.
-The Charter Review
Committee members were
approved with their first
meeting on Thursday, Sept.
17, at 6:30 p.m., at the Public
Safety Facility.
-The Central Park ex-


pension fundraising plan
was approved contingent
upon the identification of
the steering committee co-
chairs and legal counsel's
advice on the city's contrac-
tual agreements with the
committee.
PUBLIC HEARINGS:
-The second reading of the
ordinance to abandon an
electric distribution ease-
ment located at 343 Chero-
kee Lane was approved.
-The second reading of
the ordinance to vacate and
abandon the easement at
1600 S. Orlando Ave. was
approved.
-The second reading of
the ordinance to adopt new
public notice and adoption
procedures for.Comprehen-
sive Plan Amendments and
adopting an updated Public
Participation Plan was ap-
proved to be effective Mon-
day, Nov. 30.
-The adjusted city fee
schedule was approved as
presented.
The first reading of the or-
dinance to require electron-
ic filing of campaign finance
reports was approved.
-The first reading of the
ordinance -to provide the
qualification deadline to file
with the City Clerk for elec-
tions was approved.
-The first reading of the
ordinance to adopt the new
. flood insurance study and
floor insurance rate map ap-
proved by the Federal Emer-
gency Management Agency
(FEMA) was approved.


BUDGET PUBLIC HEAR-
INGS
-The first reading of the
ordinance to adopt the
millage rate at 4.0923 was
approved.
-The first reading of the
ordinance to adopt the
FY 2010 annual budget
with amendments was ap-
proved.
CITY ATTORNEY'S RE-
PORT:
-The Attorney General's
update regarding Mayoral
appointments and charter
ramifications was tabled,
awaiting a response from
the Attorney General.
-A full copy of the Sept. 14
City Commission minutes
will be available on the city's
official Web site at www.cit-
yofwinterpark.org the week
of Sept. 28, pending approv-
al by the City Commission.

City blood drive
on Sept. 21
The City- of Winter Park
partners with Florida's
Blood Centers (FBC) to pro-
vide several blood drives
each year. The next blood
drive will be held on Mon-
day, Sept. 21, from 8 a.m. to
noon, in front of City Hall
located at 401 S. Park Ave.
Donating blood is a won-
derful way to give back and
help others in their time of
need. Please join us to help
support Florida Blood Cen-
ters.

Got questions? Ask
Winter Park
The city.of Winter Park has
a resourceful feature on its
Web site called "Ask Winter
Park" that provides citizens
with a simple way to access
city information any time
of the day with just a click
of a mouse.
Residents can ask a ques-


tion, find the answers to
frequently asked questions,
or submit a service request
through this new program.
Ask Winter Park also al-
lows residents to submit
a service request such as
a streetlight outage or re-
questing a pothole to be
filled. Both the resident and
city staff will have the abil-
ity to track the status of the
request.
To access this service log
on to www.cityofwinter-
park.org and click on the
Ask Winter Park icon on the
home page.

6th Annual Family
Fall Festival
The City of Winter Park will
proudly host its 6th annual
Family Fall Festival on Sat-
urday, Oct. 31, 2009, from
11 a.m. to 2 p.m., in Cen-
tral Park. The festival is the
kick-off. event for Orange
County's Week of the Fam-
ily Celebration which runs
Saturday, Oct. 31, through
Saturday, Nov. 7, and focuses
on strengthening the com-
munity by strengthening
families. Mayor Kenneth W.
Bradley will lead the kick-
off ceremony at 11:30 a.m.
from the main stage.
The festival will offer fun
family activities including
interactive inflatables, a
children's costume parade,
old-fashioned hay rides,
cookie decorating by Young
Chefs Academy, and a rep-
tile petting zoo by Zoo Mom
Science.
As patrons are invited to
enjoy a limited supply of
free popcorn, snow cones,
cotton candy, hot dogs and
beverages, they are also
strongly encouraged to do-
nate shoes for the Week of
the Family "Heart & Sole"
shoe drive in support of Co-


alition for the Homeless of
Central Florida.
Winter. Park- Police and
Fire-Rescue departments
will offer valuable fire-safety
programs, bicycle safety tips
and free candy. The Winter
Park . Health Foundation
will also be on site to help
families establish a healthy
lifestyle through good nu-
trition, smart recipes and
healthy activities.
Don't miss "Trick or Treat
on Park Avenue" as local
merchants welcome chil-
dren with special treats at
each storefront between 11
a.m. and 2 p.m.
For more information call
407-599-3506 or visit www.
weekofthefamily.org.

Don't forget flu
shot Fridays
Flu shots will be adminis-
tered at the following times
and locations:
Flu Shot Fridays:
Now thru Friday, Nov. 27,
9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Fire Station 61 - 343 W.
Canton Ave., and Fire Sta-
tion 62 - 300 S. Lakemont
Ave.
Bonus Saturdays:
Now thru Saturday, Nov.
28,8-11 a.m.
Winter Park Farmers' Mar-
ket - 200 W. New England
Ave.
For those insured pri-
marily with Medicare Part
B, there is no charge for a
flu shot. All others will be
charged $25 for the flu shot
(cash or check only). For
additional information on
these flu shot clinics, please
call 407-599-3613.

Call City Hall at
407-599-9933 and visit us
at CityofWinterPark.org


When I first heard that
a clown convention was
coming to town, I thought
it was a joke. Then I realized
that clowns were serious
business.
The Southeast Clown
Association (SECA) held its
28th Annual Convention
in Maitland at the Sheraton
over this past week - and
I was asked to kickoff the
event. I accepted the invita-
tion, but was unsure as to
what to expect.
To my surprise when I
showed up, I was greeted
by nearly 300 gracious, per-
sonable, regular attendees
to the event, all of whom
really appreciated my at-
tendance, and could not
have been nicer. Except for
the clowns in the show that


evening, most were not in
full dress uniform. .
I'shared with the group
- my only clown story, which
was when my wife, Barbara,
was in college, she always
dreamed of one day be-
coming a clown, then she
married one and the desire
dissipated.
It was fun all the way
as we laughed and joked
around, until the parlia-
mentarian clown interrupt-
ed my speech and called
a "point of order". And as
in City Council meetings,
when a point of order is
called, the meeting is im-
mediately stopped until the
matter is resolved.
The issue was that I was
not in proper uniform. The
parliamentarian magically


presented a bright red nose
from my ear and placed it
on my nose. We laughed
some more, took some very
incriminating photos and it
was on with the show!
The evening was won-
derful and included skits,
magic and comedians,
which often brought the
entire group to tears. The
evening ended with a very
nice social gathering in one
of the many fine suites in
the hotel.
SECA was formed in
1981 and has held a na-
tional convention every
year since. It has been held
in Florida many times with
this conference to be the
very first in Maitland. SECA
includes 10 southeastern
states and is a non-profit,
non-political organization
with many hundreds of
members.
But with SECA, it's not
all fun and games. Nearly
every dollar generated from
the event was donated to a
local charity, Canine Com-
panions. In addition to
their worthwhile contribu-
tions, they also give back to
the community where they
hold their conference. They
visited a local retirement


PHOTO COURTESY OF CITY OF MAITLAND
The Southeast Clown Association descended upon Maitland last week.


home and brought joy to
many of our elder residents;
they had a kids' birthday
party where every child 4-6
years old was invited to en-
joy the clowns; and finally,
they held an incredible
clown parade with more
than 100 clowns participat-
ing. What a sight to behold!
I informed the group
that our City Council meet-
ing was on Monday, and
that I would be honored to
have all of them in atten-
dance. The parliamentar-


ian quickly noted that we
would violate their require-
ment of clowning around...
too bad they had to leave,
they just might have en-
joyed our show. So many
thanks to Chee Zee, Pinky,
Hi-D-Ho, Giggles, Peachy
Keene, Buttons, Juggles and
Sunshine for bringing a bit
of joy and laughter to my
week!

Call City Hall at
407-539-6200 and visit us
at ItsMyMaitland.com


..... Maitland City Talk
BY DOUGLAS T. KINSON
- MAYOR


Just clowning around


� �


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Pane6 ThrdySpeme 7,20











Lifestyles




Winter Park alumna on world stage


*ABE ABORAYA

Several generations of the Winter Park
High School crew team came together
Saturday to support-one of their own
who won a gold medal in Poland this
summer. Now the team's biggest star
may be Olympic-bound.
Katelyn Snyder started rowing for
Winter Park High School in 2001 and
has since moved on to the University
of Washington, where she has used up
her four years of eligibility as a cox-
swain. Saturday's pep rally event was
the culmination of several generations
getting behind a rowing program from
Florida that has produced internation-
al competitors in a decidedly northern
sport.
"She's on the top list of the elite cox-
swains in the world right now," said"
Michael Callahan, her coach for four
years at Washington. "She's going to be
very hard to replace, and we're going
to miss her."
The 5-foot-4-inch, 120-pound se-
nior who earned the nickname "Kane-
Oh," short for volcano, was originally a
soccer player until she broke her fibula
and tibia bones in her leg. When she
was looking for a sport with less con-
tact and thought about crew, her fa-
ther inspired her.
"My dad told me that I wouldn't be
able to do it because it was too hard,"
Snyder said, "and that was the clincher
for me."
The coxswain is the person at the
head of the boat keeping the rowers
in time. But the coxswain does much
more, often tweaking the team's plans
on the fly and adjusting for the race,
which means the team has to trust her
implicitly - after all, they can't see
where the boat is going.
Snyder said that while the crew
team's job is physically exhausting, her
job is a mental drain.
"Sometimes, when you talk about


A


S"


-I.


it, it doesn't sound like much," Snyder
said. "I steer the boat, and I'm there
helping run practice. You can kind of
consider it like a coach in the boat, a
coach in the water."
Callahan agreed with that assess-
ment, saying that the team would suffer
without her coaching- .in the moment.
He compared it to the place kicker on
a football team.
While many people disregard that
position, those players often end up
winning the game in tight situations
by kicking long field goals. They're also
under-appreciated.
"That's what she is - a difference-
maker between a good team and a
great team," Callahan said. "... It maybe
looks simple from the outside, but it
can be very, very sophisticated and spe-
cific. She's learning those nuances that
make the boat go a little faster and get
a tenth of a second out of the boat."
In addition to this summer's gold
medal for the 2009 Rowing World
Championships in Poznan, Poland,
Snyder has earned two golds, a silver
and a bronze in international compe-
titions alone. She also took seven gold
medals and three silver at the national
level.
During her tenure at Washington
her team won the national rowing
championship in all but one year.
"I think she may now belong to
one of the most successful classes ever
at Washington," Callahan said. "She
might be one of the most decorated
women's coxswains to come through
the University of Washington."
If Snyder makes it to the Olympics,
she'll be the coxswain for -the wom-
en's team. International rules prohibit
women from being coxswains for the
men's team. It's a change Snyder said
she's enjoying.
"I'm a girl, and I like being on the
girls' team a lot more," she said. "Well,
maybe not more, but it's a good team,
and I'm having a lot of fun."


WHEN:
Saturday, September 19th
from 9 a.m. till plants are sold!
WHERE:
Leu Gardens
1920 N. Forest Avenue, Orlando
(Signs on 17-92)

WHAT ELSE:
Door prizes, raffle items,
food & beverages

BY WHOM:
Central Florida Orchid Society

www.CFLOrchidSociety.org

For more information call
407-333-0998


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK- THE OBSERVER
Coxswain Katelyn Snlyder captured a gold medal in Poland. Now she's aiming for the olympics.


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Thursday, September 17, 2009 Pg


Winter Park /i Maitland Observer






PRAA 8� Thrdy Selme 7 09Wne Pr atadOsre


For Greater Orlando's


Keeping baby safe


The Maitland Public Library, at
501 S. Maitland Ave., will host
the following events this week:
At 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Sept.
17, there will be Story time for
infants to 36 months, held at the
Maitland Civic Center, next door to
the Maitland Public Library
At 4 p.m. there. will be Reading
Buddies. Teen volunteers are
encouraged to read to early
readers during this program.
At 7 p.m. Monday, Sept. 21,
there will be Bedtime Stories.
At 7:45 p.m. the Teen Advisory
Group will be held.
At 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 22
there will be Story time for ages
36 months to preschoolers held at
the Maitland Civic Center.

My Gym Children's Fitness
Center has just announced its
second annual national Parent's
Night Out. This fundraising event
will benefit its nonprofit division,
My Gym Challenged America. This
year's event is set for Sept. 25
at My Gym locations across the
country.
During this national Parents
Night Out event, parents drop.
their children off at local My Gym
locations for an evening of fun,
fitness, games and relays while
parents enjoy an evening off.
Please visit www.
challengedamerica.com orcontact
Joe Beaulieu at 407- 333-8069.

Experience an up-close
encounter with the lions and
tigers of the ocean when
"Sharks" comes to the giant
screen of the Dr. Phillips Cine
Dome at the Orlando Science
Center from 7-9 p.m. Saturday,
Sept. 19. The film's director of
photography, Gavin McKinney,
will be introducing the film before
each screening and be available
for questions and autographs
immediately following.
Following the premiere, Sharks
will be screened daily through
Spring 2010. The film is included
in general admission, which
is $17 for adults and $12 for
children (ages 3-11). This ticket
includes access to all exhibits,
like the new A-Mazing Sea and
other giant screen films. For
more information, please call
407-514-2145 or visit www
osc.org. For more information on
Sharks, visit the film's Web site at
www.sharksfilm.com.


KAREN McENANY-PHILLIPS


September is National Baby Safety
Month and although infant safety is a
self-evident goal, today's parents may
be overwhelmed by complicated tech-
nology or put off by expense. Five point
harnesses, adjustable reclining seats,
side impact protection, multi-position
seating, even cup holders are just a few
of the elements of the 2009 baby travel
systems that may dazzle and distract
new parents from safety functions.
Fortunately organizations such as
the American Red Cross, Consumer
Reports, Babies"R"Us, Stroller Strides,
AAA, and even your local fire depart-
ment provide plenty of resources to
keep that precious cargo safe:

Stroller tips
Strollers promote mobility and inter-
action for families but are also a com-
mon mechanism of injury according
to the Pediatric Emergency Care' Jour-
nal. Lisa Druxman, founder of Stroller
Strides, a nationally franchised stroller
workout business, stresses stroller safe-
ty in every aspect of her classes. "Stroll-
ers are a necessary piece of equipment,
however many parents operate them
haphazardly and don't realize they can


present some dangers when they're
not properly used," Druxman said in a
press release.
Experts agree on these safety tips for
strollers:
-Use the safety belt or harness to pre-
vent the child from facing backward
and tipping the stroller - no matter
how far the trip.
-Use the brake when stopped.
-Lock collapsible strollers in place
when fully opening and folding up -
keep little ones away to avoid pinched
fingers.
-Avoid hanging excess weight on the
handle-like bags, purse, or sweater -
use the below the seat area for storage.
-Never use a blanket or pillow for
extra padding - these can be suffoca-
tion hazards.
-If using a bassinet or seat attach-
ment listen for the click when attach-
ing them.
-Never leave a stroller unattended.
-Return the warranty card to be in-
formed of a recall.

Car seat tips
Automobile crashes continue to be a
leading cause of death of children -
1,600 deaths in 2007 and 200,000 in-
juries, according to AAA. Orange and
Seminole Counties publish a schedule


of car seat classes and inspections at
local fire stations - most by appoint-
ment through Safe Kids USA.
Matt Minnetto, the fire inspector
for the city of Sanford, said "Nine out
of 10 car seats are not installed prop-
erly. The biggest thing is they are not
secured in the car tightly. You need to
put your knee and some weight on the
seat when installing it, then pull the
strap or latch very tight. You shouldn't
be able to move the seat at all if you
grab it on the sides."
-If you cannot afford a car seat con-
tact your local Safe Kids coalition who
can direct you to local programs that
may provide car seats at free or reduced
cost when attending classes or at in-
spection locations. You do not have
to buy the most expensive car seat; all
seats must meet the Federal Motor Ve-
hicle Safety Standards.
-Use rear-facing car seats until
the child is at least 1 year old and 20
pounds.
-Put harnesses though slots, even or
below infant's shoulders; tighten the
harness.
-Be sure the baby's head stays in con-
tact with the seat and the baby's airway
is open

> turn to SAFETY on A10


Fall Classes and Workshop Schedule Now Online!
MaitlandArtCenter.org
Beginning Watercolor * Yoga in the Garden * Pottery
* Media Sampler * Creative Writing * Found Objects

Join us Oct 3, noon - 5 pm for a Mini-Family Photo session by Photographer, Nancy Faircloth
Call now to make your reservation 407.539.2181


-th


GOOIR


� v v - ....... J, z �


Winter Park/ Maitland Observer


Pae TusdySptmbr17 20







Wvmint cr Pir,/l / iMialitnrTS e 7P


Culture
worthy of your calendar


^^a


Stetson opens new museum


Stetson University has
unveiled a brand new mu-
seum to house the college's
extensive collection of
artwork by Oscar Bluem-
ner (1867-1938). In one of
those extraordinary stories
that happen only in the
fine art world, Bluemner's
daughter, Vera Bluemner
Kouba, bequeathed this his-
torically important collec-
tion of paintings and draw-
ings to Stetson in 1997.
Bluemner's daughter de-
voted her life to her father's
art, reaching out to Stetson,
where she had come to en-
joy the cultural offerings.
The collection had been
stored in her home, most of
the works never seen by the
art world.
While Bluemner is now
seen as a major artist in
the creation of American.
modernism, he was mostly
overlooked in his lifetime
and committed suicide in
1938 at age 70. His depic-
tions of industrial scenes
combine contemporary
artistry with empathy for
the workers. The brilliant
red in his paintings earned
him the nickname "The
Vermillionaire." Though
still largely unknown,
Bluemner has grown in im-
portance as his works have
been acquired by museums
. including the Smithso-
nian's Hirshhorn Museum
and the Whitney Museum
(NYC). Its 2006 exhibition
"Oscar Bluemner: A Passion
for Color" included works
from Stetson's collection
and played a major role in
bringing attention to him.
With the new Hand
Art Center, Stetson is now
able to exhibit the collec-
tion. "Oscar Bluemner: The
Making of an American
Modernist Painter" shows
Bluemner's transformation
from German architect to
American painter. The ex-
hibit runs through Dec. 3
at the new Art Center, 139
E. Michigan Ave. in Deland.
A second exhibit, "Gary
Bolding: Itching & Scratch-
ing, 20 Years at Stetson
University," at the Center
runs through Oct. 30. Both
exhibits are free and open
to the public. For informa-
tion, visit www.stetson.edu
or call 386-822-8920.

'Fiddler on the Roof'
at the Bob Carr
The music seems to have
always been with us, so it's
no surprise that the Tony
Award winning musical
"Fiddler on the Roof" first
opened on Broadway in
1964. Since then, its mes-
sage of the importance of
family has won hearts all


over the World. The new
production opening in Or-
lando on Sept. 29 presents
us with two very special
reasons to see it live again
or for the first time. Not
only will we have the ex-
traordinary opportunity to
see Jerome Robbins' origi-
nal Broadway direction
and choreography, but we
will see the star of the 1971
film, Topol, in the lead role.
In 1965 Jerome Robbins
won matching Tony Awards
for his direction and chore-
ography of "Fiddler". In this
tour, both are re-created by
Sammy Dallas Bayes, chore-
ographer of the Broadway
Revival.
Topol and "Fiddler on
the Roof" were both nomi-
nated for the Academy
Award for the film. Topol
won the 1972 Golden
Globe for his performance.
In 1990 Topol reprised the
role of Tevye on Broadway
(and was nominated for a
Tony Award).
This musical about love,
devotion and family is told
through unforgettable
songs that include "Sunrise,
Sunset," "If I Were A Rich
Man," and the triumphant
"Tradition." "Fiddler on the
Roof' will be at Orlando's
Carr Performing Arts Cen-
tre for one week from Sept.
29 to Oct. 4. Tickets can be
purchased online at www.
BroadwayAcrossAmerica.
com/Orlando or by phone
at 800-982-2787.

'Portraits of Hunger'
September is "Hunger
Action Month," and the
good folks at the Second
Harvest Food Bank have
come up with an art-
fully compassionate way in
which to display the "face
of hunger" through photo-
graphs. They called upon
photographers to capture
the images of Central
Floridians who are help-
ing solve the problem of
hunger in our community.
From the simple sharing
of a meal to volunteers at
a food pantry, the photos
tell of courage and survival
faced each day by the one
in eight Americans who
struggle with hunger.
The photos are now on-
line, and the Second Har-
vest Food Bank invites you
to help choose a winner by
voting for your favorite. The
photos will be showcased at
Enzian's Eden Bar in Mait-
land on Sept. 30 at 7:30 pm,
and it is my honor to be one
of the three judges who will
decide on the winning pho-
to. Some of the photos will
be made into banners to
be hung at the food bank's


warehouses with the win-
ning photo shown in their
newsletter.
You may choose your
favorite photo by going
online to www.foodbank-
centralflorida.org where
you will find "Portraits of
Hunger." Simply enter your
e-mail and click "vote." And
you may join us on Sept. .30
at Eden Bar where the "Por-
traits of Hunger" winner
will be announced along
with a display of all of the
photo entries. On that day,
your entry is a non-perish-
able food donation.
Last year, with the help
of countless donors and
volunteers, the food bank
distributed more than 21
million pounds of grocer-
ies to food pantries, soup
kitchens, women's shelters,


senior centers, day care
centers and Kids Cafes with
more than 54,000 people
receiving assistance each
week.

Beethoven's
'9th Symphony'
This is a reminder that the
Orlando Philharmonic will
begin their season with the
biggest and possibly the
greatest piece of music ever
written - "Beethoven's
Symphony No. 9". That
symphony includes the
monumental choral fi-
nale the "Ode to Joy." More
than 200 voices will join
the Philharmonic musi-
cians from the combined
choruses of the former Or-
lando Opera, the University
of Central Florida, and the


Orlando Chorale.
Conducted by Music Di-
rector Christopher Wilkins,
the program will also in-
clude Brahms' "Variations
on a Theme of Haydn." This
program takes place on Sat-
urday, Sept. 26 at 8:30 p.m.
at the Bob Carr - the first
"not-to-be-missed" perfor-
mance of the fall season.
Phone the Philharmonic's
box office at 407-770-0071,
or visit www.orlandophil.
org.


GARRICK


Josh Garrick is curator of the Mil-
lenia Fine Art gallery east of Maitland
in Orlando. He is also an art collector,
writer and photographer. Garrick can be
reached at 407-304-8100.


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Winter Park / Maitland Observer


I


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Page 10 Thursday, September 17, 2009 Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Cinema


Coming Sept. 25


'Surrogates'

Coming Oct. 2
_--T:I


'The Invention of Lying'

Coming Oct. 2


'Zombieland'


Coming Oct. 9


Sa-tewn high school
SJennifer is pos-
s by a hungry demon.
; transitions from being
Shig school vil - gor-
geus stick up and ultra-
a fl "ndal - to the real
|Y1'."...


'Couples Retreat'


Coming Sept. 25


'Fame'
PG


SAFETY I Avoid sudden infant death syndrome by keeping cribs safe


< continued from page A8

-Read car .seat instruc-
tions.
-Avoid using car seats
from yard sales, flea mar-
kets, or second-hand stores.
-Never place a rear-facing
car seat in the front passen-
ger seat.

Crib tips
-Babies should be placed in
a crib on his/her back, not
on the stomach, to prevent
SIDS (sudden infant death
syndrome) and re-breath-


ing (breathing in his own
carbon dioxide, .which can
be fatal).
-Use a firm, tight-fitting
mattress so baby cannot get
trapped between crib and
mattress. If more than two
fingers can fit between the
frame and mattress there is
risk of head entrapment.
-Check mattress sup-
ports for stability to prevent
collapse. Check hangers,
hooks, end panels and for
bent, loose, or broken sup-
port structure.
-Avoid pillows, quilts,
comforters and bumper


pads in the crib.
-Use only a fitted bottom
sheet, specifically made for
crib use.
-Use the 'soda can rule' for
slat spacing - there should
be no more than 2 3/8 inch-
es between crib slats, and no
missing, cracked, loose, bro-
ken, or improperly installed
slats or hardware.
-Avoid headboards with
cutouts - to prevent head
entrapment.
-Avoid used or antique
cribs. If you must use one
check for splinters, chipped
paint, cutouts in the head-











COi ffn @ MT] I -S,

subscribe@
observernewspapers.com


board, and be sure all hard-
ware is present to prevent it
from falling or collapsing.
-Use safe sleepwear, and
remove bottles, mobiles,
ribbons and toys.
Laureen Martinez Chief
Public Relations Officer
for Mid-Florida Red Cross
suggests anyone who is a
caretaker of a child attend
American Red Cross classes
for first aid, infant & child
CPR and Babysitting Train-
ing.
"When you are educated
how to respond to any kind


of emergency you provide
the best defense against
panicking-and are prepared
to save a child's life," she
said.
Red Cross classes are
available in Orlando, Long-
wood and Kissimmee all
year, including weekends. -
Altamonte Springs
Babies"R"Us store manag-
er Michelle Finelli invites
parents to visit her store's
"Home Safety Shop" and at-
tend'their September safety
special events.


A showcase of this week's releases,
and a look ahead to upcoming movies.


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Page 10 Thursday, September 17, 2009


Winter Park/ Maitland Observer










Opinion/


The women of our dreams


Social science affirms that
a woman's place in society
marks the level of civiliza-
tion. -Elizabeth Cady Stan-
ton

How do you get the kind
of woman you want to be
around? This is a question
which could/should be
legitimately asked of men,
too. But for this essay, I
will confine my thoughts
to what is involved, from
a societal perspective, to
achieve self-assured, confi-
dent, fulfilled women.
I was watching Bill Moy-
ers on Sept. 11 (PBS at 9
p.m.) and he had on his
program journalist Nancy
Youssef. She reports from
the Pentagon for the Mc-
Clatchy Company. She's
covered Jordan and Iraq.
She was absolutely mes-
merizing in her analysis of
events in Iraq and Afghani-
stan. Youssef was lucid, per-
ceptive, rational and ana-
lytical - an absolutely first-
rate mind. The woman ex-
udes competence, knowl-
edge and confidence. I sat
transfixed by her analysis of
our wars and our options.
When she said in passing
that her parents were from
Egypt, I inwardly gulped
and thought, "Whoa! What
would have become of


this wonderfully talented,
bright woman if she were
living in Egypt? What would
be her life options?"
If you read my column
with any regularity you
know I do not respect the
Middle Eastern "culture"
primarily for its treatment
of women. If you do not be-
lieve it takes a "communi-
ty" to raise a child, look no
further for proof than how
the Middle Eastern com-
munity raises and treats its
female citizens: Primitive,
repressed and too often mi-
sogynistic.
In America we too have
a culture that raises its
female children and fa-
cilitates their growth and
development, and it is that
environment I would like
to discuss.
My first child was a
daughter. I was quite a
young man in 1970, the
year of her birth, and I con-
fess that I had not seriously
thought about the process
of childrearing from the
context of "as the twig is
bent so grows the tree." Or,
from any context for that
matter. I had the unusual
experience of being home
with her (and in graduate
school) for the first four
years of her life. In hind-
sight, it was one of life's


incredible gifts. I matured
as much as my beloved Joc-
elyn grew. What becomes
abundantly clear to the
first-time parent is that you
want absolutely "every-
thing" for your child. And
to that end you strive.
I had a wonderful, life-
long example of what it
means to be female in
my mother. Yes, she was a
"product" of her times but
she also transcended them
(her generation's expecta-
tions of women) with drive,
ambition, determination
and intelligence. She was
a "Jiust Do It" kind of a
woman with the uncanny
ability to not lose focus of
her goals. She had her 11th
Commandment: "Thou
shall not sweat it." And, by
gawd, she lived it.
My expectations for my
daughter were initially
unspecified but I knew she
could and can do anything
she set her mind to accom-
plish. I remember an occa-
sion that makes me shud-
der today. Genuinely so.
When she was barely 3
years old, we were at the
municipal swimming pool
just before closing time.
This pool was a grand facil-
ity built in the old ways. A
deep, deep end with a high,
high, high diving board
with a ladder that went
straight up to the board.
I grew up swimming and
swam in competition for 14
years. I told Jocelyn it was
time for her to climb that
ladder and jump off the
board - that she could do it.
Over she trotted, and
with my verbal "you can
do it" encouragement she
started up the ladder. It
went straight up and my
little girl, methodically,
foot over foot, climbed up,


stretched and grabbed the
top two support rungs. She
walked to the end of the
board - by this time ev-
eryone in the pool realized
something highly unusual
was happening and liter-
ally, a hush came over the
pool - and at the end of
the board my little blond-
haired angel hesitated,
reflected and then dove in
head first. Head first! My
voice literally jumped out
of my throat.
I think that is the mes-
sage of feminism. That
females left to their own
initiative, in a societal
environment of equality,
can and will achieve their
dreams. Two things hold a
woman back from achiev-
ing her dreams - her own
inner voice telling her what
is possible and the ob-
stacles to equality a society.
imposes or constructs.
If you have the dream-
and the inner toughness
(resoluteness), what society
places in front of a woman,
at least in America today, is
often little more than low
hurdles. Unfortunate, yes,
but hey, who said life was
easy?
The inner dream and
drive component is actu-
ally, to me, the more diffi-
cult (in America) hurdle to
overcome.
Women (men, too) are
sexual objects. I could de-
vote columns to the sexual
subject/object conundrum
(the challenge as well as
the wondrous phenomena)
and how that affects our
culture and the status of
women. We want to be de-
sirable to the opposite sex
from a young age. I believe
that is a genetically driven
fact. Each culture deter-
mines what is sexually de-


sirable but there are univer-
sal standards. Regardless,
we need to say to our chil-
dren, sex is great, it's a fact
of life and appealing to the
opposite sex is normal and
part of what it's all about in
being a human being.
That said, a healthy sense
of self dictates what you
will and will not do or tol-
erate when it comes to be-
ing your own person, your
own woman.
Feminism is healthy,
good and desirable. Look at
graduate school numbers,
professional school atten-
dance and sheer workforce
percentages. All are rising,
and that is excellent for
America. What women
gain is not a loss for men.
All men gain every time an-
other woman achieves her
dreams. What is good for
the goose is, indeed, good
for the gander.
How do you get the kind
of woman you want to be
around? By expecting (edu-
cating) all parents to raise
their daughters to dream
big, equip (prepare) their
daughters to pursue their
dreams, and encourage
(and expect) them to do
just that.
How do you get the kind
of woman you want to be
around? By building a civi-
lization that ensures a cul-
ture of absolute, unequivo-
cal respect for all women
(and their aspirations) and
for the many contributions
that women bring to life.
Life. In every sense of the
word.


>. JEPSON
Chris Jepson's opinions are made
independently of the newspaper.
Write him at jepson@MEDIAmerica.us.


Letters to


More commercial development is not the answer


In your recent edition, I read an
article where Bill Donegan, the
Orange County Property Appraiser,
encouraged the Winter Park Com-
mission to do more for the mer-
chants of Park Avenue so that prop-
erty tax proceeds would go up. This
position, not new, has been broad-
ened to include all commercial real
estate, and that more commercial
real estate projects would solve all
our budget problems.
Let's explore this "fact". Real es-
tate taxes are collected to pay for
the services provided by the city
to the property. So the first point
is that we should be looking at the
"net" revenues from properties, not
the amount received.
Second, there are several cat-
egories of properties: commercial,
residential and not for profit. We
should consider what it costs to
provide services to each of these
sub-categories because it is a lot
more expensive to provide services
to the mall than the residences on
Georgia Avenue. And we provide


services to a large number of not
for profits for nothing.
Back to commercial v. residen-
tial as a better source of increased
"net" property tax proceeds. How
are these respective categories ap-
praised? Residential is on the sales
of a new or comparable property.
Yes, the Save Our Homes cap does
reduce how much this increases
annually, but it goes up in most
years. On the other hand, commer-
cial is based on income, which in
most cases is rental income. What if
there are vacancies? What happens
when the property begins to "age"
and not have all the latest decora-
tor touches? Rental income goes
down, not up. This has been the ex-
perience in Orlando and Maitland,
where the large business areas that
generated tons of money 10 years
ago are now generating less at the
same time the need for municipal
services is going up. Sidewalks and
roads need to be replaced, sewers
and street lights replaced.
What's my point? Commercial


development is not the answer to
our money woes. Quality residen-
tial, especially single family homes,
in the long run provides a stable,
increasing source of "net" property
tax revenues.
Another point is the seeming
contradiction in making more im-
provements to our commercial dis-
tricts. Supposedly these improve-'
ments increase the values of the
properties that benefit from them.
Logically this would result in an in-
crease in the property assessments
and therefore the taxes on these
properties. Unless I am mistaken,
a property owner is not going to
take this increase out of his profit
but will "pass along" the increase to
the renter in terms of higher rent.
So while the renters want reduced
rents, our actions lead to higher
rents. How does this benefit the
stores on the Avenue?
Finally, let's explore the impact
of the not for profits. There are
legitimate reasons for no taxes.
However, if the organization is


operating taxable activities, how
do we separate? These entities pay
for utilities and trash pickup. Why
not for fire service/EMS provisions?
The fact that Winter Park has one
of the finest fire/EMS departments
in Florida has to have an impact
on their property insurance rates.
I suggest we evaluate the creation
of a fire fee for everyone in Winter
Park and not continue to pay for
these services from property taxes.
Before we begin to "reshape" our
city and shift the balance between
commercial and residential prop-
erties, let's have a thorough evalu-
ation of what this really means in
terms of all the consequences -
immediate and long term. Approv-
ing and building more commercial
real estate as a panacea to our
financial woes is a misguided and
dangerous "solution".
.- Barbara DeVane.
Winter Park


Thursday, September 17, 2009 Pae1


Winter Park /Maitland Observer







Page 12 Thursday, September 17, 2009 Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Play On!


Conservative
Cultural Commentary
By Louis Roney
Harvard'42; Distinguished Professor
Emeritus, UCF; 2004 Fla. Alliance for
the Arts award
Assisted by beloved wife Joy Roney
"You are entitled to your own opinions;
you are not entitled to your own facts."
- Daniel Patrick Moynihan

Leveraging
your life
T returned to my Win-
tei Park hometown in
1980, with my b.w. in
tow, and we bought a lake-
side house'I asked her, "Do
you want a boat?"
"No," she answered, "I
want a friend with a boat."
"A swimming pool?" I
asked.
"No," she answered. "I
want a ..."
I know, I said, "... a friend
with a swimming pool!"
Such cogitation be-


speaks a riskless brand of
leverage, I suppose...
The advantages of lever-
aging seem sanguine - un-
til repayment of some kind
is inescapable.
My great-uncle taught
me an early lesson that
has stuck with me. He had
made a fortune in the '20s
by buying stocks on margin,
i.e., putting up a fraction of
their value in cash. When
the '29 crash came, he was
wiped out.
Had he owned his stocks
outright he would not have
lost everything he owned.
"Margin" lets you gamble
using someone else's mon-
ey. .
Fine as long as your luck
holds.
For more than 30 years,
my b.w. and I have lived in a
house we love.
We don't muse about the
house's value. Our house is
not mortgaged and is not
for sale. It's where we live -
it's the stage where much of
our life's little drama takes
place.
Our happiness is not af-
fected a whit by real estate
values, although some of
our acquaintances seem
perturbed regarding fluctu-
ating house-assessments.
Our present national
financial debacle, we hear,
stems from banks' having
sold mortgages to people
who should not have been
buyers - a case in which


two wrongs make a fright.
The U.S. is borrowing to
pay interest on debts in-
curred long ago.
My b.w. and I ride in a,
well-cared-for 1995 auto-
mobile, a car that still looks
"pretty" and was bought for
cash.
Could we afford a new
car? Yes.
Do we need a new car?
What for?
There's an answer that is
both safe and sane in many
situations.
B.w. and I do owe much
gratitude for kindness and
friendship extended to us
through the years, and we
try to keep such obligations
repaid.
When people remark on
my fitness at 88,1 Isay, "I'm
an old model, well taken
care of - I'm still running."
Borrowing money is
something I was taught to
eschew.
I went through universi-
ty on scholarship and after
I graduated, I signed over to
the university a portion of
my pay as a Navy lieutenant
in World War II until I had
given back the amount of
my scholarship. .
I hope other university
kids still have access to
those same funds that al-
lowed me to get my degree.
B.w. and I do not feel
comfortable owing anyone
anything except love and
gratitude.


I live in the land of the
free, and the home of the
brave.
However, my sense of
freedom depends upon my
not being brash enough to
incur debt.
The Colonial Colony
of Georgia was populated
in the 1730s by General
Oglethorpe's English Debt-
or Prisoners.
He had pointed out to
the king that their only
crime was that of debt,
and that you can't work to
pay off debts when you're
locked up in jail.
Being of old Georgia lin-
eage, I wonder how many
Georgians might now be
in shackles, if only because
of unpaid credit card ac-
counts!
As a matter of fact, a
great percentage of the
U.S. population might be
behind bars if unpaid bills
were punished as of old.
I hear radio and TV ads
inviting people who have'
large debts.($10,000 and
up) to contact a company
that promises to "get your
debts reduced 30 percent to
50 percent."
Who pays off the losses?
Quite simple, I guess: Is it
the people who pay the
high interest rates that
credit card companies
charge?
B.w. and I should, I sup-
pose, feel guilty: You see, we
never pay interest, because


we pay our credit card bills
as soon as we receive them.
If we are "taking advan-
tage," we were invited to do
so.
Is it true that President
Obama will tax us for pay-
ing our bills on time?
Obama's unprecedented
national debt-increases
force him to seek every
possible tax source, and his
minions are scouring our
economy to locate them.
Obama always tells the
truth - when it suits his
purposes.
On Sept. 9 the president
prevaricated thusly: "I will
sign no health care bill that
adds 10 cents of debt to the
nation."
Obama promises to be
the Santa Claus who will
deliver every present that
every citizen desires.
In politically-charged
times, the American pub-
lic is. wooed by every pos-
sible means that can tempt
minds that are giddy with
disarming optimism and
greed.
In "The Music Man," a
traveling salesman and con
man, "Professor Harold
Hill," attempts to make lots
of money at the expense of
a bunch of Iowans in the
early 1900s. Hill pays his
way through life by "lever-



> turn to RONEY on page A13


WEATHER


IPIjUR I I


770 920
6 a.m. I 3p.m.


760
6 a.m.
Friday


TODAY: A 40 percent
chance of showers and
thunderstorms after noon.
Partly cloudy, with a high
near 92.


-HISEE
IN HISTORY



prdue wns reach


IFIDY SCA


.1�?


MORNING LOW 760


t ,yr ., DAYTIME HIGH 91 �

Sunrise Sunset 40% chance Wind
7:12 a.m. 7:26 p.m. of rain E 10 mph

SATRA SCTTRE TST


/-"-, MORNING LOW 750


DAYTIME HIGH 91


Sunrise S
7:12 a.m. 7:


unset
25 p.m.


40% chance
of rain


Wind
SE 5 mph


, MORNING LOW 76
DAYTIME HIGH 9


Sunrisei Sunset 40% chance
7:13 a;fi. 7:24p.m.- of rain


Wind
SE 5 mph


NATIONAL


Seattle


Time
. Saturday


Low High
2:18 a.m. 8:37 a.m.


Sept. 19 2:44 p.m. 8:51 p.m.
Sunday 3:04 a.m. 9:23 a.m.
Sept. 20 3:30 p.m. 9:34 p.m.

FLORIDA FORECAST
City Friday Sat.


Jacksonville
Miami
Tampa
Pensacola


76/88 76/88-
78/88 78/88
76/90 76/90
74/85 74/86


INTERNATIONAL


Friday Sat.
55/68 58/67


Los Angeles 64/86 64/87


City
Atlanta
Chicago


Friday Sat.
67/83 68/84


City
London


59/74 58/71 Paris


Friday Sat.
55/68 55,71
55/77 50/75


Houston 73/87 74/90 New York 55/76 57/70


UV INDEX U


MARINE FORECAST
Cocoa Beach tide schedule


THE VIEW FROM YOUR NECK OF THE WOODS











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Page 12 Thursday, September 17, 2009_


Winter Pa~rk /Maitland Observer


Tokyo 6i7 ' �7


7-- 9~,


%. ^









Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Thursday, September 17, 2009


Inr rhE ,Tir:i.wi (1i.1:i l FiO IRAflrn,E i i .liT.1f
l.n hi i l: i:oliT|li l itsn l ill
Division PROBATE
IN RE: ESTATE OF
NANCY C. REED
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of NANCY
C. REED, deceased, whose date of death was
July 25, 2009, and whose social security number
is XXX-XX-5107 is pending in the Circuit Court
for Orange County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 425 North Orange Avenue,
Probate Division, Orlando, Florida 32801. The
names and addresses of the personal representa-
tive and the personal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice is required
to be served must file their claims with this Court,
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against the
decedent's estate, must file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN Section .733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MOREAFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice
is Sept. 10, 2009.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Michael L. Marlowe, Esq.
Florida Bar No. 157000
Marlowe & Weatherford, PA.
1150 Louisiana Avenue, Ste. 4
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone: (407) 629-5008
Facsimile: (407) 740-0310"


Personal Representative:
Virginia Kay Merrell
351 St. Dunstan Way
Winter Park, Florida 32792


9/10,9/17


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2009-CP-001845-0
Division: 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
YVONNE GRESS
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of
Summary Administration has been entered
or will be entered without further notice in the
estate of YVONNE GRESS, deceased, File Number
2009-CP-001845-0, by the Circuit Court for Orange
County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of
which is 425 N. Orange Ave, Suite 340, Orlando,
Florida 32801; that the decedent's date of death
was December 31, 2008; that the total value of
the estate is $25,026.80 and that the names and
addresses of those to whom it has been assigned
by such order are:
Name / Address
---.ro .Roman / 5956 BeoitirIe-Orlve #3537
Orlando,-FL 32822
Kim Reeves / 3672 Middlebrook Drive, Orange
Park, FL 32065
Lauren Gress / 5956 Bent Pine Drive #353,
Orlando, FL 32822
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and
persons having claims or demands against the
estate of the decedent other than those for whom
provision for full payment was made in the Order
of Summary Administration must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE
TIME PERIOD, ANY. CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS-BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is
Sept. 17, 2009.
Attorney for Person Giving Notice:
Matthew H. Roby
Attorney for Petitioner
Florida Bar No. 0505641 -
Roby & Roby, Attorneys at Law, P.A.
831 West Morse Boulevard
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone: (407) 647-8065
Fax: (407) 647-3880
Person Giving Notice:
Sam Roman, Petitioner
5956 Bent Pine Drive, #353
Orlando, Florida 32822
9/17,9/24

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
Fi Re Number: 2009-CP-1558-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
Elizabeth E. Parry,
Deceased.
� NOTICETO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Elizabeth E.
Parry, deceased, whose date of death was June
22, 2009, Is pending in the Circuit Court for Or-
ange County, Florida, Probate Division, the address
of which is 425 North Orange Avenue, Room 340,
Orlando, FL 32801. The names and addresses of
the Personal Representative and the Personal Rep-
resentative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliq-
uidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice Is
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against the
decedent's estate, Including unmatured, contingent
or unllquidated claims, must file their claims with
this court within 3 months after the date of the first
publication of this notice.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is
9/17/09.
Personal Representative:
Bank of America, N.A.
329 ParitkAvenue North, 2nd Floor
P.O. Box 880
Winter Park, FL 32790
Nancy S. Freeman
Attorney for Personal Representative
Forida Bar No. 968293
Winderweedle, Hailnes, Ward & Woodman, PA
329 Park Avenue North, 2nd RFoor, P.O. Box 880,
WInter Park, FL 32790
Telephone: (407) 423-4246
9/17,9/24


irj i HEtR i l.rli lt( .IlT Fi):R i . v (fl: t Iirfll
S.', 14iO - : .T_- i',i '
IN RE: ESTATE OF
FRANCISCO A. MADRIGAL
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Francisco A.
Madrigal, deceased, whose date of death was May
31, 2009, is pending in the Circuit Court for Orange
County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of
which is 425 N. Orange Avenue, Orlando, FL 32801.
The names and addresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice is required
to be served must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All. other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must flie their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH.
IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this notice is
Sept. 17, 2009.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
John G. Pierce
Attorney for Frank Madrigal
Florida Bar No. 095247
800 North Ferncreek Avenue
Orlando, Florida 32803
Telephone: (407) 898-4848
Fax: (407) 898-9321
Personal Representative:
Aida Madrigal
URB Baralt C23C2
9/17, 9/24

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2009CP001826-0
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JOAN M. KERR
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Joan M. Kerr,
deceased, whose date of death was August 3, 2009,
is pending in the Circuit Court for Orange County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which,
is 425 North Orange Ave., Suite 340, Orlando, FL
32802. The names and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice is required'o be
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM. .
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OFTHE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED:
The date of first publication of this notice is Sep-
tember 17, 2009.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Bruce R. Abernmethy, Jr.
Attorney for Duncan J. Kerr
Florida Bar No. 0357251
500 Virginia Avenue, Suite 202
Fort Pierce, Florida 34982
Telephone: (772) 489-4901
Fax: (772) 489-4902
Personal Representative:
Duncan J. Kerr
6817 Falls of Neuse Road. Suite 105
Raleigh, NC 27615
9/17, 9/24

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 48-2009-CA-002773-0
TRUSTCO BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
GUOJI ,HU, ADA GALLEGOS HU, and WOODLAND
SLAKES -PRESERVE HOMEOWNERS" ASSOCIATION,
INC.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
-Notice is hereby given that on the 8 day of October,
2009, at 11:00 a.m. in Room 350 of the Courthouse
of Orange County, Florida, 425 S. Orange Avenue,
Orlando FL 32801, the undersigned Clerk will offer
for sale the following described real property:
LOT 177, WOODLAND LAKES PRESERVE
UNIT 1B,.ACCORDING TO THE IPLAT THEREOF,
AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 59 PAGE
137 THROUGH 140, PUBLIC RECORDS OF
ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to the
Final Judgment of Foreclosure in Civil Case No.
48-2009-CA-002773-0 now pending In the Circuit
Court in Orange County, Florida.
In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities
Act, persons with disabilities needing a special
accommodation to participate In this proceeding
should contact Court Administration at 37 North
Orange Avenue, Suite 1130, Orlando, Florida 32801,
telephone number 407/836-2050, not later than
seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing
Impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V)
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Any person claiming an Interest In the surplus from
the sale, If any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the LIs Pendens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale.
Dated this 8 day of September, 2009.
By: Eric Jontz
Attorney


J YFFRY R. JUNITZ
SWANN & HADLEY, PA.
Post Office Box 1961
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 647-2777
Facsimile No.: (407) 647-2157


9/17,9/24


Notice Under Fictitious Name Act
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned,
pursuant to the "Fictitious Name Statute", Chapter
865.09, Florida Statutes, will register with the Divi-
sion of Corporations, Department of State, State of
Florida, upon receipt of proof of the publication of
this notice, the fictitious name, to wit:
kingswood enterprises
under which the undersigned expects to engage In
business at
1708 Beatrice Or
Orlando FL 32810
and that the party Interested In said business enter-
prise Is as follows:
Robert Bartlilio
Dated at Orange County, Florida this 17th day of
September, 2009
9/17


I INJ IHE "1F"41 11i i'I.iRi r If THF TiijT .11.10 i 'IAi.
i i .ii rij,:i. J .-Iri . , i i:,,iAi:'.. .I
TRUSTCO BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
STEPHANIE MUSSELWHITE, and GARY CAMARDA,
PHIL JOHNSON'S LANDSCAPE & IRRIGATION
COMPANY, INC., SEACOAST NATIONAL BANK, and
PAUL NOVAK,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that on the 1 day of October,
2009, at 11:00 a.m. in Room 350 of the Courthouse
of Orange County, Florida, 425 S. Orange Avenue,
Orlando FL 32801, the undersigned Clerk will offer
for sale the following described real property:
LOT(S) 7, BLOCK C, MAP OF EDGEWATER
TERRACE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK F,
PAGE(S) 5, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
- ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to the
Final Judgment of Foreclosure in Civil Case No.
48-2008-CA-032963-0 now pending in the Circuit
Court in-Orange County, Florida.
In accordance with the Americans With
Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing
a special accommodation to participate in this pro-
ceeding should contact Court Administration at 37
North Orange Avenue, Suite 1130, Orlando, Florida
32801, telephone number 407/836-2050, not later
than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hear-
ing impaired, (TOODD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V)
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim
within sixty (60) ays after the sale.
Dated this 2 day of September, 2009.
By: Eric Jontz
Attorney
JEFFRY R. JONTZ
SWANN & HADLEY, P.A.
Post Office Box 1961
Winter Park, Florida 32790
I Telephone: (407) 647-2777
Facsimile No.: (407) 647-2157
9/10, 9/17
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 48-2009-CP-1844-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DORIS L. SMITH
I Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
I The administration of the estate of DORIS L.
SMITH, deceased, whose date of death was Au-
gust 11, 2009; File Number 48-2009-CP-1844-0,
is pending in the Circuit Court for ORANGE County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is
425 NORTH ORANGE AVENUE, ORLANDO, FL 32801.
The names and addresses of the personal 'repre-
sentative and the personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
State on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
S".E LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands againstdecedent's
estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is:
Sept. 10,2009.
S DONALD W. SCARLETT
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Florida Bar No. 112821
Donald W. Scarlett, PRA.
1003 East Concord Street
Oriando, FL32803 -
Telephone: (407) 422-8189
CAROL A. BIRMINGHAM
2319 WEBER STREET
ORLANDO, FL 32803
9/10, 9/17

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2009-CP-1481
IN RE: ESTATE OF
GINA MARIE MENDIBURO CASDIA,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of GINA MARIE
MENDIBURO CASDIA, deceased, whose date of
death was May 15, 2009, File 2009-CP-1481,-is
pending in the Circuit Court for Seminole County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which
is Post Office Drawer C, Sanford, FL 32772. The.
names and addresses of the Personal Representa-
tive and the Personal Representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice has been served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE
LAST OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THETIME OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice Is:
Sept. 17,2009.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
DOUGALD B. LEITCH, ESQUIRE
FLORIDA BAR NUMBER: 312908
Mahaffey & Leitch
2461 West State Road 426, Suite 1001
Oviedo, FL 32765
(407) 894-2081
Personal Representative:
Carl C. Casdia
1569 Maidencane Loop
Oviedo, FL 32765
9/17, 9/24

Notice of Public Auction
Pursuant to Ch 715.109 FS and/or 83.801 and/or
677.210 FS etal United American Lien & Recovery
as agent with power of attorney will sell at public
auction the following property(s) to the high-
est bidder subject to any lens for the purpose of
satisfying claim of lien and/or disposition of aban-
doned property(s); owner/Ilenholder may redeem
property(s) for cash sum of lien; all auctions held
In reserve
Inspect 1 week prior @ lien facility; cash or cashier
check; 15% buyer prem; any persons Interested ph
(954) 563-1999
Sale date October 2, 2009 @ 10:00 am 3411 NW
9th Ave #707 Ft Lauderdale FL 33309
1881 1979 chaparral tl vin#: SMP71679 tenant
southern auto brokers or William brace
Ucensed & bonded auctioneers-flab422 flau 765
& 1911
... 9/10, 9/17


Ia THECI- IRiuiT (cri i T FI)4 iR.irA IE (r I.IFir
1|.,l 10 :IH L1 fH r-T I'll'. .I;, rJ
IN RE: ESTATE OF
VERUSHKA INES CRUZ
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Verushka
Ines Cruz, deceased, whose date of death was
June 20, 2009, and whose Social Security Number
is XXX-XX-6821, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Orange County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 425 North Orange Avenue,
3rd Floor, Room 340, Orlando, Florida 32801. The
names and addresses of the personal representa-
tive and the personal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice is required
to be served must file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and per-
sons having claims or demands against the dece-
dent's estate, must file their claims with this Court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING, THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIMS FILED TWO(2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S'DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this notice is
Sept. 10, 2009..
Attorney for Personal Representative
Robert F. Green, Esquire
Attorney
Florida Bar No. 0283932
Troutman, Williams, Irvin, Green, Helms & Polich,
PA.
311 West Fairbanks Avenue
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone: 407-647-2277
Personal Representative:
CARMEN INES SANTIAGO
2628 Woods Edge Circle
Orlando, Florida 32817
9/10, 9/17


RONEY I The joys of a debt-free life


< continued from A12

.-aging" with smiling, mendacious
charm, the payoffs he promises,
in his sales pitches. The "buyers"
of Hill's lies would surely be los-
ers in the end, were it not for the
playwright who provides a happy
ending.
Foreclosed mortgages are ubiq-.
uitous these days. Each represents
a tragedy of some description.
Many homebuyers have lied to
themselves by taking on attractive
leveraging of limited incomes.
We now know that banks have
lent money precariously in trans-
actions that later converted the
money-lending banks into real
estate owners.
Did such possible miscreant (?)
politicians as Barney Frank and
Christopher Dodd perhaps lean
on bankers to make unwise loans?,
The old axiom, "You can't get
something for nothing," has never
stopped those who wanted to
parlay nothing into something by
"leveraging" their very souls.
At the final curtain, the Devil


waits for such characters as
opera's Faust (a role I have sung)
and the rest of mankind whose
yens lure them into obligations
that destroy them.
.Charge accounts can "leverage"
one's future - or, at least, one's
peace of mind.
I guess b.w. and I-don't ptt on.
-lmuch of a show but u'ho would
gain if we appeared more a fflu-
ent" than we actually are?
In concerts, I used to sing a
Shaker hymn that goes: "'Tis the
gift to be simple, 'Tis the gift to be
free, 'Tis the gift to come down
where you ought to be. And when
we find ourselves in the place just
right, 'Twill be in the valley of love
and delight.
"What a tangled web we weave,
when first we practice to deceive."
Banks may guarantee debts for
a while, but cannot restore lost
self-esteem and reputation.
I think it was St. Paul who said,
"If I had room, and a lever long
enough, I could lift the world."
That's real leveraging!


I I


HERNANDO COUNTY

K. PRESENTS... .


SEPTEMBER

19& 20


BLUES* BREWS * BBQ & MORE!

(AT ANDERSON SNOW PARK

IN SPRING HILL - TICKETS $5.00) :j


Page 13


CITY OF \r INTERPARK
4Lu1 PaxLAente South
Winter Park, Florida 32789

PUBLIC NOTICE
in Tamr aeqLi r mneKm
Notice Is hereby given that public hearings will be held by the City Commission of the City of Winter
Park, Florida, on Monday, September 28, 2009, at 3:30 p.m. in the Commission Chambers of City Hall,
401 Park Avenue, South, to consider the following:
AN/ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF WINTER PARK, FLORIDA ESTABLISHING ELECTRONIC CAMPAIGN
REPORT FILING IN A SORTABLE FORMAT, WITH LINKS TO INFORMATION REGARDING CORPORATE
DONORS; PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF WINTER PARK, FLORIDA RELATING TO ELECTIONS; AMENDING
SECTION 42-7 TO PROVIDE THE QUALIFICATION DEADLINE TO FILE WITH THE CITY CLERK;
PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF WINTER PARK, FLORIDA, AMENDING CHAPTER 58 LAND
DEVELOPMENT CODE, ARTICLE V, "ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION REGULATIONS" SECTION
58-212, FLOOD PLAIN REGULATIONS SO AS TO ADOPT THE NEW FLOOD INSURANCE STUDY
AND FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP APPROVED BY THE FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT
AGENCY (FEMA).
All Interested parties are invited to attend and be heard. Additional information is available in the City
Clerk's office so thht citizens may acquaint themselves with each issue and receive answers to any
questions they may have prior to the meeting. "If a person decides to appeal any decision made by
the Commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or'hearing, he/she will need
a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he/she may need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based." (F.S. 286.0105) Persons with disabilities needing assistance to participate in
any of these proceedings should contact the City Clerk's office (407-599-3277) at least 48 hours in
advance of the meeting.
/s/ Cynthia S. Bonham, CMC, City Clerk
9/17


'1ai~



5 VJH r ' . , V ~ * f . .









Paae 14 Thursday, September 17, 2009


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Marketplace


REALTORS:
Licensed Real Estate Professionals needing
to earn additional income. Become a
part time or full time loan officer. Control
your own closings. Gain access to
hundreds of mortgage programs. Save
your clients thousands of dollars. Call
Maitland Mortgage Lending Company
(407)629-5626

ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVE
Account Representative needed to work
on behalf of our company. 18+, needed
and must have computer skills. Accounting
experience needed. Any job experience.
Email to mclarkemployment111@gmail.
corn for more information.

NEEDED ASAP: 3 OTR DRIVERS
Needed ASAP: 3 OTR drivers, Class A CDL,
Home time is every other weekend. Must
have OTR experience and clean MVR. Call
877-564-6628






PARK AVENUE APARTMENT
Apartment: 3 bedroom 2 bath. Park Avenue.
New carpet and paint. Includes water,
covered carport, laundry room, pest control.
No pets. $1,150/mo. 407-647-6514

WATERFALL COVE CONDOS
2 bed 1 bath. $750- $800 per month. First
month only $200. Call for appointment.
321-251-0867. Contact Sabrina Crook,
newhaven@cfl.rr.com

2 ROOM UNIT WITH
PRIVATE BATH IN PRIVATE HOME .
Winter Springs $500/month, fully-furnished,
all utilities, cable and internet included.
Small kitchen, no laundry, no pets, non-
smoker only. Also available for $150/wk.
No lease. Clean and bright. Call 407-227-
3419 anytime. Contact Cathy Colangelo,
catherine@writecreativewords.com



FOR RENT
Oviedo Office Space, great frontage. 750
to 1,050 sf available. $1,070 to $1,350 per
month. 1401 Broadway St. Contact Megan
at (407) 687-3524.

OVIEDO OFFICE FOR RENT
Oviedo Office for rent. 1,640 sq. ft., $14/
sq. ft. + tax, no CAM. Reception, kitchen,
conference offices. Near 417 Red Bug exit.
815 Eyrie Drive. Call 407-365-3490.


HANDYMAN/CARPENTRY
Let me take care of the chores you don't
have time -to do - yard work, carpentry,
painting, (whole house or interior rooms),
driveways, repairs, pressure washing, and
more. No job too small. Local. Prompt.
Affordable. Call Scott at 321-460-3905.

ATTORNEYS - PROBATE/
BANKRUPTCY / FORECLOSURE
DEFENSE
THE WINTER PARK LAW OFFICES OF ADAMS
& JAMES P.L. 415 S. Orlando Ave, Suite 1,
(next to Wendy's). 407-679-3111, www.
adamsjameslaw.com, Julie Jo Adams,
Esq., Mark Andrew James, Esq. Hours
by appointment, Credit Cards Accepted.
Contact Adams & James, P.L. 407-679-
3111, mjames@adamsjameslaw.com















DETOXIFICATION EBOOK
(4) Detoxification Ebook - Super Sale: $7.99
each. http://www.ebook-detox-patches.
org/order.html. How to Detox for Overnight
Pain Relief. Flatter Tummy - Colon Cleanse.
Reclining Detox - Migun Thermal Bed. 500
+ Uses for Apple Cider Vinegar. Carol Miller,
(407) 970-1483





Reading volunteers NEEDED - Jackson
Heights Middle School in Oviedo is looking
for adults who are interested in serving as a
Reading Mentor to assist students who are
reading below grade level. Volunteers work
one-on-one with an assigned student before
school for 30 minutes, one or more times
a week through the end of the school year
to build fluency and comprehension skills.
Sessions are from 8:30-9:00 a.m., M-F
Please contact Connie O'Hanlon for more
information, 407-365-7585.


IN THE COUNTY COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 09-CC-4788
ROYAL MANOR ESTATES PHASETWO HOMEOWNERS
ASSOCIATION, INC.
Plaintiff,
VS.
LOUISA. NIEVES and CARMEN NIEVES
Defendant.
NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
Notice is given that pursuant to the Final Judgment
of Foreclosure dated September 2,2009, in Case No.
09-CC-4788, of the County Court in and for Orange
County, F.,,; .. , .; i, iOYAL MANOR ESTATES
PHASE '- ,i',.ir.r.,.iAiik ASSOCIATION, INC.,
is the Plaintiff and LOUIS A. NIEVES and CARMEN
NIEVES are the Defendants, Lydia Gardner, Clerk
of County Court, will sell.to the highest and best
bidder for cash at the Orange County Courthouse,
425 North Orange Avenue, Suite 350, Orlaindo,
Florida, at 11:00 am., on October 6, 2009, the
following described property set forth in the Order
of Final Judgment:
Lot 2 of ROYAL MANOR ESTATES PHASE
FOUR, according to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 21 at Page 14 of the
Public Records of Orange County, Florida.
Any Person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the fis pendens must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
DATED: September 3rd, 2009
Sonia A. Bosinger,
Attorney for Plaintiff
Fla Bar No.: 0055450
Publication of this Notice on Sept. 17, 2009,
and Sept. 24, 2009 in the Winter Park-Maitland-
Observer.
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY
WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER
TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU
ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE
PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE
CONTACT COURT ADMINISTRATION, 425 NORTH
ORANGE AVE., ROOM 2130, ORLANDO, FL 32801,
TELEPHONE: (407) 836-2303 WITHIN 2 WORKING
DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE OF SALE;
IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL
1-800-955-8771.
CLAYTON & MCCULLOH
1065 Maitland Center Commons Blvd.
Maitland, Florida 32751
(407) 875-2655
9/17, 9/24









Log on to WorkforceCentralFlorida.
corn where you can enter the Job Title
in the "Search For Jobs" box to see
more information on these jobs and
search thousands of additional openings
throughout Central Florida, at NO COST.
Apply by following the directions listed. For
further help visit the WORKFORCE CENTRAL
FLORIDA Orange County Office at 5166 East
Colonial Drive or call (407) 531-1227.

Simulation Programmer/
Media Developer
Job Description: Responsible for developing
simulations of military hardware devices.
Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number 9411158

SComputer Technician
Job Description: Responsible for installing
software. Removes viruses and spy ware.
Work Monday-Saturday, 10:00am-7:00pm.
Pay Rate: $300.00-$350.00 per week
Job Order Number: 9426947


Development Engineer I1-111
Job Description: Responsible for supporting
the design teams. Challenges designs
or applications based on a non-standard
FAB process and supports design teams
to maintain a designer's toolkit software
package. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $53,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9426999

Clerical Assistant
Job Description: Responsible for entering
new listings, updating existing listings, and
uploading photos. Answers telephones,
takes messages, greets walk-in customers,
writes receipts, schedules maintenance
work orders, distributes mail, stocks work
room, and distributes signs and lock boxes.
Work Monday and Wednesday, 8:30am-
12:30pm and Friday, 1:30pm-5:30pm.
Pay Rate: $10.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9427002

Housekeeper
Job Description: Responsible for responding
to requests from guests and other
departments. Fills cart with supplies and
transports cart to assigned area. Enters
guest rooms, follows procedures for gaining
access, and ensures vacancy- before
entering. Replaces guest amenities and
supplies in rooms, replaces dirty linens and
terry with clean items, makes beds and folds
terry, cleans bathrooms, and removes trash,
dirty linen and room service items. Checks
that all appliances are present in the room
and in working order. Work Monday-Friday,
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $8.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9428205

Senior Software Engineer
Job Description: Responsible for evaluating
business requirements and developing/
implementing associated business objects.
Work Monday-Friday, 8:30am-4:30pm.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9343115

Van Driver for Child Care Center
Job Description: Responsible for transporting5
children to/from schools and other
specified locations and assisting teachers
in classrooms, as needed. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $7.50 per hour
Job Order Number: 9428451

General Office Clerk
Job Description: Responsible for answering
telephone lines, helping customers with
questions/concerns, and assisting with
billing and insurance verification. Maintains
all charts and patient information and
gives unanswered message to the General
Manager and delivery personnel. Work days
and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9427873

Financial Representative - Sales"
Job Description: Responsible for helping
clients develop and implement a plan to
provide for their financial security. Work
Monday-Friday, hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $2.4,000.00 per year plus
commission and bonuses
Job Order Number: 9418357

Inside Sales Account Manager
Job Description: Responsible for managing
the sales growth and customer development
for one thousand retail accounts. Grows
average sales per account managed across
investment categories such as ink/toner,
paper, furniture, cleaning/break room,
and copy/print centers. Utilizes internal
resources to overcome obstacles. Discovers -
and analyzes prospect's needs, determines
which features/benefits will appeal the
most to the customer, and presents those
features/benefits to the customer. Discusses
rewards premier status and meets/exceeds
productivity requirements. Work Monday-
Friday, 8:30am-5:30pm.
Pay Rate: $12.79 per hour plus commission
Job Order Number: 9424953

Graphic Artist
Job Description: Responsible for developing
models of aircraft/equipment. Creates
special effects, animation, or other visual
images using computers or other electronic
tdols and media for use in products or
creations. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9411157.

Sales Counselor
Job Description: Responsible for providing
customer service to individuals visiting the
center and selling company weight loss
products. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $9.00 per hour plus commission
Job Order Number: 9429206

Designer
Job Description: Responsible for designing
website logos and promotional materials in
2D & 3D drawings including renditions of
landscaping, pools, sod installation, retaining
walls, driveways & artistic ornaments. Work
Monday-Friday, 9:00am-5:00pm.
Pay Rate: $19.34 per hour
Job Order Number: 9428902


Call Center Sales Representative
Job Description: Responsible for adjusting
sales scripts to better target the needs and
interests of specific individuals. Answers,
telephone callsfrom potential customerswho'
have been solicited through advertisements
and conducts client or market surveys in
order to obtain information about potential
customers. Contacts businesses or private
individuals by telephone in order to solicit
sales for goods! or services or request
donations for charitable causes. Work
Monday-Friday, 10:00am-4:30pm.
Pay Rate: $9.00-$12.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9400878

Teller
Job Description: Responsible for processing
transactions accurately in accordance
with the organizations polJcies and
procedures. Identifies customer needs and'
refers financial products and services to
customers. Work Monday-Friday, 10:30am-
6:3Qpm.
Pay Rate: $9.00-$10.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9408747

- Electronic Packaging Engineer
Job Description: Responsible for supporting
design and fabrication of various equipment
for missile related hardware. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $35.00-$45.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9417373

Information Technology (IT) Technician
Job -Description: Responsible for the day-
to-day operations and procedures associate
with customer service regarding information
technology including but not limited to
trouble shooting. Provides desktop support
for all user based software while' in office
and travels to all necessary school houses,
to install electronic classrooms. Work days
and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $40,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9429623

Instructional Designer
Job Description: Responsible for working
with graphic artists, programmers, and
subject matter experts in the development
of interactive multimedia courseware.
Designs interactive training materials for a
variety of delivery systems including CD-
ROM, Internet, and electronic classrooms.
Researches and identifies data sources.
for instructional material development
and additional information needed for
instructor and participant materials. Designs
interactive training materials that include
sound instructional design methodology,
appropriate " training strategies, and
participant activities for small and large
groups. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $40,000.00 per year
Job Order Number 9429624

Accounts Receivable Clerk
Job Description: Responsible for collections
of accounts receivable in accordance with
company policy. Processes checks received
daily, mails statements to customers
at month end, and contacts customers
directly to make payment arrangements
on delinquent accounts. Reviews credit
applications and approves the appropriate
billing status of each customer. Work days
andhours may vary.
Pay. Rate: $12.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9430285

Maintenance Technician
Job Description: Responsible for painting,.
plumbing, electrical, mechanical, pressure
washing of buildings, sidewalk and
performing other duties as assigned. Work
days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $8.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9430233

Roof Cleaning Technician
Job Description: Responsible for cleaning
commercial and residential building
exteriors, roofs, and flat surfaces. Work days
and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $10.00-$12.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9429968

Customer Care Representative
Job Description: Responsible for resolving
routine, general questions/problems
submitted by customers via telephone
with limited variety following established
guidelines and standard scripts and
procedures. Utilizes all available information
to choose the solution and resolve customer
concerns and directs complex questions/
problems to, more senior staff level. Work
days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9430083

Security Officer .
Job Description: Responsible for guarding
or monitoring premises to -prevent theft.
Observes and reports incidents as they
occur. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $9.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9430095

Math Instructor/Advisor
Job Description: Responsible for teaching
mathematics to middle school and high
school aged students and providing


academic advisement to students. Work
days and hours may vary.
*Pay Rate: $35,500.00-$38,500.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9429890

Bi-National Budget Coordinator
Job Description: Responsible for developing,
analyzing, and executing budgets-to control
costs, allocate resources, and estimate
future financial requirements for bi-national
business organization with multiple and
diverse business operations. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $23.87 per hour
Job Order Number: 9429725




Log on to WorkforceCentralFlorida.
com where you can enter the Job Title
in the "Search For Jobs" box to see
more information on these jobs and
search thousands of additional openings
throughout Central Florida, at NO COST.
Apply by following the directions listed. For
further help visit the WORKFORCE CENTRAL
FLORIDA Office at 5166 East Colonial Drive
or call (407) 531-1227.

Third Party Debt Collector
Job Description: Responsible for making
outbound calls to customers to negotiate
payment of debt. Work days and hours may
vary.
Pay Rate: $10.00-$14.00 per hour plus
bonus
Job Order Number: 9427236

Accountant
Job Description: Responsible for reconciling
bank statements and credit card statements
and processing accounts payable/accounts
receivable. Establishesbudgetsandforecasts
for procurement, statements of cash flow
and profit and loss, quarterly/annual tax
filings, payroll for 25 + employees, sales
tax payable, internal controls, balance sheet
analysis, and general ledger maintenance.
Implements accounting controls, internal
controls, balance sheet analysis, general
ledger maintenance, payables management
and manages courier and- cash. Work
Monday-Friday, 9:00am-6:00pm.
Pay Rate: $40,000.00-$50,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9427668

Airplane Detailer
Job Description: Responsible for keeping
aircraft in clean/orderly fashion. AKli5ies
cleaning solvents, loads, unloads, or
stack containers/materials, and inspects
equipment or vehicles for cleanliness or
damage. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $8.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9428131

Senior Analog Design Engineer
Job Description: Responsible for designing
and developing high speed analog
circuits from specifications for electronic
assemblies. Develops and performs first
article acceptance testing to ensure correct
operation and debugs as necessary. Writes
documentation, creates schematics for
products, and provide designs to the
drafting department. Assumes the role of
project leader for assigned projects with
emphasis on analog design and oversees
budgetary process to ensure that budgets of
time and raw materials are not exceeded.
Work Monday-Friday, 8:00am-5:00pm.
Pay Rate: $65,000.00-$75,000.00 per year
-Job Order Number: 9429190





- Kg Crossword -
4nswers
Solution time: 25 mins.



I W k " --
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Weekly SUDOKU--
Answer

8 7 2 6 4 5 3 1 9


4 1 3 8 9 2 5 7 6
7 3 9 4 5 6 2 8 1
1 5 6 9 2 8 7 3 4


Winter Park



Off ice Space for Lease


($20 per square foot)


Directly on Park Avenue


with attached garage


Call Marsha at 407-741-8684


For more information


I






Winter Park / Maitland Observer Thursday, September 17, 2009 Page 15



. Games .%.


who recently completed you might not be surprised and attempted to hold
-Sl j In Thailand, it is illegal to a study on napping found to learn that the theme up the store using a Japa-
step on any of that nation's that men who nap at least park complex covers 47 nese sword. A fan of video
S FT TROi E currency. three times a week were square miles. To put the games, Boyd claimed in his
Sat a 37 percent lower risk figure in perspective, that's defense that at the time, he
By Samantha Weaver Are you a cacographer? for heart-related death. So twice the size of Manhattan believed he was an elf.
You may not be, but if you now you have an excuse Island.
It was Canadian actor and spend any time at all online to do what you want to do
comedian Leslie Nielsen you've certainly run across anyway. It's possible for a nectarine
who made the following a few. A cacographer is tree to grow from a peach Thought for the Day: "Only
sage observation: "Doing someone who can't quite If you've ever had to navi- pit, and vice versa, the madman is absolutely
nothing is very hard to do grasp, the rules of spelling, gate the transportation sure." - Robert Anton Wil-
... you never know when systems throughout Walt A man named Robert Boyd son
you're finished." Researchers in Greece Disney World in Florida, entered a lingerie shop 0 2009 King Features Synd., Inc.


ARIES (March 21 to April
19) It might not be wise
to pursue goals involving
others, unless you can stop
impulsively rejecting new
ideas. Either open your mind
or wait until next week,
when this "ornery" mood
passes.

TAURUS (April 20 to May
20) It's a good time for the
Bovine to be creative and
practical for yourself and
your surroundings. Shop
wisely, not impulsively, and
keep your Bull's eye focused
on quality, not quantity.

GEMINI (May 21 to June
20) You should feel more
--Confide nt- abc ti moving
ahead with plans that had to
be delayed by an unexpected
turn of events. Also, family
matters might need more
time than first anticipated.

CANCER (June 21 to July
22) Be considerate of others
as you move into a new area
in your professional life.
Take time to meet people
and discuss mutual goals.
The more you get to know
each other, the better.

LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22)
Creating a fuss could get
your ideas noticed quickly.
But it would be best to
present your case, and then
wait for a reaction to follow


in due course, rather than try
to force it to happen.

VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept.
22) Unkept promises might
cause plans to go awry this
week. You can grumble
about people "letting you
down" or find a way to make
the best of it and move on.
The choice is yours.

LIBRA (Sept. 23 to
Oct.22) Putting off making
a commitment early in the
week could be a good move.
Best to act when you know
you're making an informed
decision. Expect more facts
to emerge by the week's end.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to
Nov. 21) A recent act of
kindness on your part could
take on special meaning
this week. Also, look for
signs of upcoming changes
in both your personal and
professional relationships.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22
to Dec. 21) Many of the
tougher communication
barriers between you and
others in the workplace or at
home could begin breaking
down this week. Expect
some surprises to emerge.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to
Jan. 19) Your "tough love"
attitude toward someone
you care for could be
misunderstood. Try to be less
judgmental and show more
consideration in the way you
relate to that person.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to
Feb. 18) An unexpected


workplace challenge could be
daunting. But take what you
know (and you know more
than you realize) and apply it
to the problem, and you should
see positive results.

PISCES (Feb. 19 to March
20) Recent relationship
changes for both single and
paired Pisces continue to
influence much of your week.
Keep your focus on developing
the positive aspects as you
move along.

BORN THIS WEEK: You set
your goals with assurance and
influence others to follow suit.
You would be an excellent
philosopher and teacher.
� 2009 King Features Synd., Inc.




by Linda Thistle

8 5 3
5 3 2
1 9 6
9 4 2
5 8 4
2 7 61
3 7 1 2
8 2 4
9 6 1
Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way
that each row across, each column down and each
small 9-box square contains all of the
numbers from one to nine.


* Moderate ** Challenging
*** HOO BOY!
� 2009 King Features Synd., Inc.


I tou-OUS 1


-jauol si jjjNS -99 -jgMol s! ajod uo u6fS -9 u!pl!nq
olpappe 65)jq -9t, .SU!ss!W 5! OJjlwJ!W .leT 'pOppLe
s! alou 1e3!snLAJ'z lUeejajJp Si 6uiumV jL:seouaeieIji0


Kinq Crossword


ACROSS
1 Weaponry
5 "Roscoe"
8 lolani Palace
locale
12 Ayatollah's
predecessor
13 Reproductive
cells
14 Obnoxiously
proper one
15 Gilpin of
"Frasier"
16 Aviv lead-in
17 "- never
work"
18 Jaundiced
20 Creepy -
22 Lennon's
lady
23 Judge Lance
24 'That hurts!"
27 Administered
32 Dos Passos
trilogy


33 "I told you
so!"
34 Mauna -
35 Uncommuni-
cative
38 Requests
39 Court
40 Knock ('em)
dead
42 Disagreeing
45 Cantanker-
ous
49 Big rig
50 Spring mo.
52 Hip bones
53 Tehran's
country
54 Snitch
55 Void partner
56 Trig function
57 Blond shade
58 Mirth
DOWN
1 Venomous


vipers
2 Comic
Caroline
3 Crumbly
deposit
4 1862 battle
site
5 Declined
6 "Hail,
Caesar!"
7 Body powder
8 Narcotic
9 Museum
pieces
10 Mound
11 Unattractive
19 Performing
21 Disencumber
24 "- Gang"
25 Work with
26 Gotham City
villain
28 Still, in verse
29 After-taxes


value
30 "A mouse!"
31 "- Kapital"
36 Cut aid
37 Massachusetts
cape
38 Storefront
canopy
41 On the other
hand
42 Unrepaired
43 Garr or
Hatcher
44 Poet
Teasdale
46 Jewish
month
47 Anger
48 Bulldogs'
school
51 - de deux


@ 2009 King Features Synd., Inc. I I I I I I I


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Contest:
Cutest pet photo


E-mail a photo of your pet
to tcraft@observernews-
papers.com for a chance
to win 4 tickets to the
Southern Women's Show
in Orlando, Oct. 8-11.
Drawing will be held on Sept.
28 and winners notified.
Please include your name,
pet's name and type of pet.
Winning photos will be printed
in our papers.


Complete Ownership
Great Maitland Location
Integrated Medical Center


AnoherQuai yProec


er Park ' Mtaitlanc


II + ( I -


Ij J


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Page 16ThrdySetme1720




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