Winter Park-Maitland observer
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00145
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park FL
Publication Date: 7/9/2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates: 28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID: UF00091444:00145

Full Text




Winter Park / Maitland


Volume 21, No. 28
407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.net


FIRST COLONY

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Your Real Hometown Bank
On Hwy 17-92 in Maitland
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On the comer of 17-92 & Orange Avenue.
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C m i i C n


ARCHIVE PHOi BY ISAAC BABCOCK - IHE UiBSHVE
The street will flow with feet instead of cars on July 18, as restaurants and stores take over Park Avenue for a special day.


Business Briefs............ A5
Community Bulletin........ A5
City Talks................A6
Play On!...............A12
Legals................A13
Marketplace ...........A14
Games ................A15


JENNY ANDREASSON
OBSERVER STAFF
Feet will replace tires on
Saturday, July 18, when
Park Avenue's asphalt is
roped off for an all-day
street party.
Restaurants will push
their dining tables onto the
street. Merchants will line
the sidewalks with racks
of merchandise. Attendees
will shop and eat, combat-
ing the heat with misting
tents and free ice pops and
water.
"What we're doing has


never been done before,"
said Tom Harris, Park Ave-
nue Area Association presi-
dent and manager of Park
Promenade Jewelers.
The concept is not a new
one, he said, as the city clos-
es the street for its annual
Dinner on the Avenue and
for various special events
such as the Fourth of July
bicycle parade. What is dif-
ferent is that the closure
spans the whole day, 8 a.m.
to 10 p.m.
The event is a direct re-
sult of retail surveys done
by the city's consultant,


Britt Beemer. The results
were presented last month,
with one of the recommen-
dations being that the Ave-
nue close down for special
events more often.
"We're building off of
the momentum and excite-
ment of the study," Winter
Park Chamber of Com-
merce President Patrick
Chapin said.
There will be loads of
family activities, including
a DJ, a sing-along, games,
bounce houses and art

> turn to NO CARS on A3


Mayor's

first

100 days
ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF
It's been 109 days since May-
or Ken Bradley entered of-
fice, and on July 1 he gave
java drinkers his opinion
on how things were going
in the city, part of the city's
Coffee Talks series.
Bradley had few com-
plaints after having success-
fully spearheaded initiatives
to improve the city's com-
munication with business
and to begin an economic
revitalization of Park Av-
enue.
"I've been supportive of
the Avenue and the ongoing
challenges are problematic
for everyone," he said.
"I look forward to the
(economic development)
task force helping with
that."
Revitalizing Park Avenue
had been a centerpiece of
his campaign for election
leading up to his win and
March inauguration, when
he set his "Mayoral Action
Plan" into motion.
Standing inside the Win-
ter Park Welcome Center,
his talks mostly revolved
around money, and what he
and the city have done to
> turn to BRADLEY on A4


Summer interns aid non-profits


Cf)
0d
ox


II.9 I2 . 5 642 2


CARMEN CARROQUINO
GUEST 'li-i ' n

The children sat cross-legged on a
colorful rug as they fidgeted rest-
lessly, trying to contain within
their small bodies the overwhelm-
ing need to play.
Teaching assistants Philip Pri-
oleau and Yaesha Lamarque of-
fered the youngsters sweet treats
and quiet, desperate promises that
they would get to play a little later
if they managed to stay still, suc-


cessfully turning their frowns into
lollipop-filled smiles.
The Winter Park Day Nursery
staffers appreciate the extra eyes
and ears of the assistants, who are
there thanks to a summer intern-
ship program run by Workforce
Central Florida. More than 30 in-
terns were also placed at the city of
Winter Park offices.
As part of the $4.1 million stim-
ulus dollars awarded to the un-

> turn to WORK on A4


Fairwater Dental Group
Dr. Gene T. Jacobs is moving to a new state-of-the-art facility, located at
Fairbanks & Edgewater, directly across from Subway
NEW PATIENTS7-412
ACCEPTED tUs 7299 441"
Our current location is at 4460 Edgewater Dr. (Just north of Fairbanks)


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK TH IHE OBSERVE
Kennetha Anderson plays with Connor Flynn, 2, at the Winter
Park Day Nursery. She's part of a program placing young workers.


Us"l
SEE.










News



Winter Park rides roller coaster


ISAAC BABCOCK

Winter Park's disorienting roller coaster
season has seen more climbs this past week,
but the Diamond Dawgs can't shake the
specter of losing streaks that plagued them
earlier in the season.
Two wins in a row were followed quick-
ly by two losses in a row for the struggling
team, which is three games back of the sec-
ond worst team in the Florida Collegiate
Summer League, the Clermont Mavericks,
by three games.
But that's closer than they were earlier
in the season, when the Dawgs couldn't
put together even two wins in a row. The
Dawgs' only other winning streak this year
was made possible by a rained-out game
against the league-leading DeLand Suns
sandwiched between two individual wins.
A 9-6 slugfest win over Clermont in front
of the Mavericks' home crowd on Indepen-


dence Day brought the Dawgs closer to the
Mavs than they'd been in weeks. A 3-2 nail
biter win against the Rats the next day was
the first clean win streak for the Dawgs all
season.
But that high came crashing down on
Monday night, when Leesburg unloaded on
the Dawgs at home, dropping a 9-8 bomb
on them with a bottom of the ninth walk-
off win, and then adding insult to injury in
a 3-0 win later that night.
The Dawgs get a chance at revenge on the
Suns and maybe a shot at pulling even with
Clermont this weekend. At 7 p.m. Thursday
they host the Suns, then hit the road on a
three-game trip, stopping at DeLand at 7
p.m. Friday, then Clermont at 7 p.m. Satur-
day.
In the meantime Clermont's schedule
will be filled with games against the top
two teams in the league, making wins dif-
ficult and possibly opening the door for the
Dawgs to climb a rung on the FCSL ladder.


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK - THE OBSERVER
The Diamond Dawgs won two and then lost two last weekend, as they struggled
to pick up speed after a slow season start. They're closing in on Clermont.


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qpftz� ip susiness


contactt: 4.- sae Svow-

www - a a*'kinqcleathoMA?-.COrn


COME ONE, COME ALL

Councilman Phil Bonus invites you to
Maitland's First Ever (at least the first in modern history!)

Town Hall Meeting
Sunday, July 12, 2009
5:30 p.m.
Where: Maitland Senior Center at Quinn Strong Park
Why: To listen to you and exchange information

This is an open invitation to all citizens of Maitland:

Express yourselves about the Downtown project, the new
firestation and the new City Hall!

Find out what is going on, and what is not going on!


Councilman Bonus
wants your input!
Please come! Your
voice matters!!


1. Ask questions
2. Express opinions
3. Make suggestions
4. Learn about what is happening
(and what is not happening) with
your bond money and your city land
5. Make your voice heard by the
City Council!
No official city business will
be conducted.

More than one member of
the Maitland City Council
may be present.
For more information:
Phil Bonus 407-694-8767
pbonus@itsmymaitland.com


News you can use


Winter Park / Maitland


Observer


www~wpmobserver.com


Offer valid July 6th - July 16th


$40 TOTAL
July & August


gLettev 'P* VeeS,


�J~e3ette 9(esullts?


No oin. ig Fee


I


Page 2 Thursday, July 9, 2009


Winter Park/ Maitland Observer






Winter Park / Maitland Observer Thursday, July 9, 2009 Pane 3


School boards


mull tax increase


JENNY ANDREASSON
OBSERVER STAFF

The Orange County School
Board will not pursue an
optional tax that would
bring millions to the cash-
strapped school system.
Other counties, such as
Seminole, Volusia and Bre-
vard, are moving forward
with charging an extra 25
cents per $1,000 of taxable
value. But Orange leaders
say they won't do the Leg-
islature's "dirty work," as
member Christine Moore
phrased it at a meeting last
month.
Instead the Board will
scale back its school reno-
vations program funded by
a half-penny sales tax ap-
proved by voters in 2002.
Because enrollment isn't
growing at the rate it grew
during the housing boom,
there isn't an immediate
need for new, larger schools,
Superintendent Ron Block-
er said.
Because the money
comes from sales tax, the
funding pool has taken a
hit. The building program,
which is slated to be com-
pleted over 10 years, will
have an estimated $1.5 bil-
lion less than anticipated,
staff told the Board on June
15.


-.-;moo
Al " I m- I I / /




PHOTO COURTESY OF RHODES + BRITO
The Dommerich Elementary School and Maitland Middle School campus is under
way, along with the Winter Park Ninth Grade Center. Some projects have been delayed.


The optional .25 mills tax
would have raised $24 mil-
lion over two years, but it
was voted down 4-3.
"That's nickels and
dimes," said board mem-
ber Kat Gordon. "It's a stu-
pid way to fund education,
waiting on a referendum."
None of the Winter
Park- or Maitland-area
school projects - Winter
Park Ninth Grade Center,
Dommerich Elementary,
Maitland Middle School or
Edgewater High School -
face cuts because they have
already broken ground, said
Lin Wright, senior manag-
er for OCPS Construction
Communications.
The Florida Legislature
authorized school districts
this year to levy the .25 mills,
raising a $200,000 home's
property tax bill by about
$50.


The Seminole County
School Board approved its
tentative millage rates June
30, including the optional
tax, which would bring in
about $7.3 million next
year.
The one-year tax re-
quires a supermajority vote
from the board. Seminole's
vote last week was 4-1, with
School Board Member Di-
ane Bauer dissenting.
"I can't raise taxes with-
out voter approval," Bauer
said at the meeting.
Vice Chairwoman Sandy
Robinson said she didn't
want to raise taxes either,
but said it's the only way to
maintain quality.
"I feel we have to contin-
ue to do what we have done
and continue to be a high-
performing district," Rob-
inson said, "and legislators
have not made that easy."


WE MEMBEB..M.


Ms. Christine Franklin Barrington,
81, of Maitland, Fla., died Friday,, July 3,
2009.
Mr. Robert L Lee, 83, of Orlando, Fla.,
died Thursday, June 25, 2009.
Ms. Rosa Lee Turner, 75, of Orlando,


Fla., died Sunday, June 28, 2009.
Mr. Lawrence Brown, 67, of Sanford,
Fla., died Wednesday, July 1, 2009.
Obituary information provided from
Golden's Funeral Home in Winter Park.


NO CARS I Park Avenue adopts big-city practice
< continued from the front page said it will be a more fami- Park can do it."
ly-friendly version of what Chapin said he's im-
places such as New York pressed at how well the city,
displays. Popcorn Flicks in City are already doing. the Chamber and the mer-
Central Park at 8 p.m. Sat- "New York City is in the chants are working togeth-
urday will feature an inter- process of shutting down er, but one essential piece is
active version of the film streets on Saturday for shop- missing.
"Hairspray." pers, including Park and "We need the residents
Community Redevelop- Broadway," she said. "If New to come out and support
ment Director Sherry Gutch York City can do it, Winter it," he said.


.........


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Winter Park/ Maitland Observer


Thusda, uly9,200 .Page 3







Page 4 Thursday, July 9, 2009 Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Log


Commercial burglary
A person was arrested for entering a busi-
ness without permission and stealing keys
to 40 vehicles. The incident occurred at 1000
block of North Orlando Avenue on Friday, June
26.
An unknown suspect kicked in a front door
at the 100 block of East New England Avenue
on Sunday June 28, where the suspect rum-
maged through the office before taking a small
locked document safe and a bag containing
costume jewelry.


Criminal mischief
An unknown suspect threw a brick through
a window at 2300 block of Lee Road on Sat-
urday, June 27.
An unknown suspect threw a rock through
a business window located at 2600 block of
Lee Road on Monday, June 29.


Vehicle burglary


An unknown suspect stole a wallet and
keys from a victim at Rollins College gym and
used the keys to rummage through the victim's
vehicle. The incident occurred at 1000 block of
Holt Avenue on Sunday, June 28.
An unknown suspect entered a locked ve-
hicle at 1200 block of Via Salerno on Sunday,
June 28, but stole nothing.
An unknown suspect entered an unlocked
vehicle at 800 block of South Orlando Avenue
on Monday, June 29 and stole a portable bat-
tery starter, stereo amplifier and MTX speak-
ers. The suspects) also tried unsuccessfully to


Winter Park .



Winter Park


WORK I Interns in Winter Park's city offices pick up slack left


< continued from the front page

employment office, the
Summer Job Connection
Program employs 1,100
teens and young adults
across Central Florida with
35-hour-a-week, six-week-
long internships at one of
more than 200 nonprofit
employers. Interns receive
$8 an hour.
Another 100 16-to-24-
year-olds were placed at
private businesses for a 28-
week stint at the same rate.
Kim Cornett, spokes-
woman for Workforce
Central Florida, said in this
economy, finding jobs is dif-
ficult, but the program gives
young people who may have
less on their resumes a step
up.


"The program is very au-
thentic in giving people the
experience of finding a job,"
Cornett said. "Job candi-
dates mingled with poten-
tial employers in a job-fair
setting and were employed
on the spot after interviews
took place."
Anna Currie, human re-
sources manager of Winter
Park, said the city of Winter
Park has 33 interns from the
program who are working
to pick up the slack left be-
hind by city job cuts.
"They are a value to us,
but in turn it's a wonderful
experience for them," Cur-
rie said. "With the cutbacks
in personnel, we were let-
ting things slide, so it's a
win-win for everyone and
a new level of efficiency


The Summer Job Connection program offers 1,200 summer po
on a first-come, first-serve basis among 235 employers in Or
Seminole, Osceola, Lake and Sumter counties. They received
applicants this year. Visit workforcecentralflorida.com for more
nation.


reached."
Judy Nelson, executive
director of the Winter Park
Day Nursery, said their four
interns couldn't be better.
"Things have been going
well and working smooth-
ly," Nelson said. "The interns
are so impressive that we
would hire some of them be-
yond summer if they didn't
already have prior commit-
ments like school."
Prioleau, 20, and Lama-


rque, 18, both of 0
found their love of ct
to be a perfect match
Nursery.
Prioleau has some
rience in his diaper
child-rearing alreac
wakes up to his you
every morning and
work with children,
working toward bec
a pediatrician.
"I heard about th
gram through family


by layoffs
E leau said. "For me it was hard
finding a job before this, but
now this program has be-
3sitions come a doorway for helping
ange, me out with my future."
6,000 Prioleau is the only male
9 infor- working at the nursery, but
it doesn't bother him. In
fact he said it's fun.
Lamarque - who wants
rlando, to be a child psychologist -
hildren said the program has con-
for the firmed her career choice
with hands-on learning, giv-
e expe- ing her the materials to start
bag of college at South Carolina
dy. He State University this fall.
ng son "Being employed by this
goes to program is helping me to
and is bring in income, taking fi-
coming nancial pressures off my
single mom running the
ie pro- household," she said.
," Prio-


BRADLEY I Green initiatives are next on the agenda, Winter Park mayor says


< continued from the front page


balance its budgets against a falling
tide of tax income to run the city.
Absorbing the shock load of a
city whose books were in the red
took some adjusting, Bradley said.
"We've had to make a lot of tough
decisions," he said. "The city's fi-
nances were much worse off than I
thought they were."
The balance for this fiscal year
is even after some tough measures
were taken to slash costs to make
up for income shortfalls. Those in-
cluded frozen positions and even


a small number of cut positions as
City Manager Randy Knight juggled
high level staff to save money.
That included early retirements
for the city's highest ranking po-
lice officers - the chief and deputy
chief - in an effort to cut salaries
and save money on labor.
Those decisions came with little
contention from the City Commis-
sion, but on more divisive issues
Bradley found himself acting as me-
diator during many 3-2 votes, slow-
ing progress on his goal to have a
more unified Commission.
"I think there's going to be a lot


of 3-2 votes for a long time to come
there," Bradley said. "I've been very
deliberate with my decision mak-
ing. But I think some of my col-
leagues have tried to politicize a lot
of decisions."
Those issues may have slowed
down progress on some of his ac-
tion plan, he said.
"I think we've done well at bring-
ing matters to a decision, but we
could do better," he said.
"In my first 100 days of leader-
ship I think some of the decisions
have been a little slow. But we're
not going to be stymied by this."


Despite his address focusing
largely on the early accomplish-
ments of his first term as mayor,
Bradley eyed the future when talk-
ing about green initiatives to im-
prove the city's environmental im-
pact.
"I'd like to see us have a greener
energy grid," Bradley said. "But at
this point we're limited to the con-
tract we've signed. With the next
contract next May we'll start nego-
tiations to make sure we have the
ability to look at alternative ener-
gy."
4'


OWinter Park / Maitland

Observer


PUBLISHER
Kyle Taylor
407-563-7009
kyle@observernewspapers.com

ASSOCIATE EDITOR
Jenny Andreasson
407-563-7026
jennya@observernewspapers.com

DESIGNER
Stephanie Erickson
407-563-7040
stephanie@observernewspapers.com


Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster
CONTACTS


REPORTERS
Jenny Andreasson
407-563-7026
jennya@observernewspapers.com

Isaac Babcock
407-563-7023
isaacb@observernewspapers.com

LEGALS I CLASSIFIED
Jonathan Gallagher
407-563-7058
legal@observernewspapers.com


COPY EDITORS
Jonathan Gallagher
jgallagher@observernewspapers.com

Jenny Andreasson
jennya@observernewspapers.com

COLUMNISTS
Chris Jepson
Jepson@MediAmerica.us

Louis Roney
LRoney@cfl.rr.com


Josh Garrick
407-304-8100

ADVERTISING SALES
Tracy Craft
407-515-2605
tcraft@observernewspapers.com

INTERNS
Carmen Carroquino
Rachel Murphy


Member of: P.O. Box 2426 1500 Park Center Dr.
* Florida Press Association Winter Park, FL 32790 Orlando, FL 32835-5705 USPS 00-6186
* Maitland Area/ Winter Park/ SSN 1 4
Goldenrod Chamber of Commerce www.wpmobserver.com I 407-563-7000 I e-mail: editor@observernewspapers.com I N 1 4-
Publisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor Submission does not guarantee publication. All rights reserved.
Winter Park / Maitland Observer@ 2009


June 26 to July 2
punch the ignition.


Armed robbery
An unknown black male armed with a hand-
gun confronted a victim behind a business
located at 600 block of South Orange Avenue
and demanded her weekend bank deposit on
Monday, June 29. When the victim stated that
she was pregnant, the suspect punched her in
the stomach and then fled the scene east on
foot.


Published Thursday, July 9, 2009


Volume 21, Issue Number 28


I


_~_I


I


Page 4 Thursday, July 9, 2009


Winter Park /Maitland Observer










Business


NAI Realvest recently completed two lease
agreements totaling 4,067 square feet of of-
fice space at The Citadel in southeast Orlando
and at Primera in Lake Mary. Senior Associ-
ate Mary Frances West, CCIM negotiated both
transactions.
The multi-family division of Palmer Electric
Company has secured a contract for just
more than $300,000 for electrical services
and lighting for the 78-unit assisted living facill-
ity at LifePointe Village at Orlando, a senior liv-
ing complex under development. The project is


scheduled for completion in February 2010.
Four Rivers Smokehouse will open in mid-Ju-
ly at 2103 W. Fairbanks Ave. in Winter Park. The
Smokehouse take-out deli will be open for lunch
and dinner Monday thru Saturday from 11 a.m.
to 7 p.m. For more information, please call 407-
474-8377 or visit www.4RSmokehouse.com.
Cuhaci & Peterson Architects LLC, based in
Orlando's Baldwin Park, and designs more than
a million square feet of retail space annually
throughout the U.S., was recently awarded a
contract to design retail interiors at the Village
Crossroads retail center in Lady Lake.


The Central Florida office of SIKON Construc-
tion Corporation, announced the company is
wrapping up work on an addition to Simon
Property Group's Sawgrass Mills regional
mall in Sunrise, Broward County. SIKON's Cen-
tral Florida office is located at 500 N. Maitland
Ave., Suite 303. Call 407-644-4447 for more
information.
RLF in Winter Park has announced the ad-
dition of seven new employees - Donald
Deakin, Jr., Fernando Amilibia, Valerie Miller,


Chad Forsyth, Wade Aldredge, Nick Zubrzycki
and Pedro Rivera - to its team of talented pro-
fessionals. RLF also won the 2009 Keep Winter
Park Beautiful Green Award.
After combining for nearly $60 million in
property sales last year, Realtors Kelly Price &
Pamela Ryan of Winter Park-based Kelly Price &
Company were honored among Orlando Maga-
zine's Hot 100 Realtors for sales production in
2008.


Community


The Your Adult Club Socials are
sponsoring an Aloha Serenade
from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. on Friday,
July 17. Hawaiian type attire will be
appropriate. Donations are $4 for
members and $5 for non-members.
Friday dances are held each week at
the Mark Street Senior Complex at 99
Mark St. For information, call John at
407-889-4047.
Maitland Public Library (501 S.
Maitland Ave.) Events:
Open Computer Lab from 10 a.m.
to 1 p.m. on Friday, July 10. No time
limit or registration required.
Friday Afternoon Music with the


Company Players will be held at 2
p.m. on Friday, July 10.
Join us for an hour of familiar mu-
sical favorites by the Company Play-
ers' Favorites, in an old-time radio
show format.
Second Saturday Program - Cre-
ative Writing with Dale Slongwhite
will be held at 3 p.m. on Saturday,
July 11. Ages 6 and up welcome; reg-
istration required.
PC Academy: Internet: Part 1, the
"Visible" Web: Basic Internet Search-
ing will be held from 10 a.m. to 11:30
p.m. on Monday, July 13. Registration
required.


The Bach Festival Society of Win-
ter Park is pleased to announce
the addition of Grammy award-
winning clarinetist Richard Stoltz-
man to the 75th annual Bach Festival.
Mr. Stoltzman will perform Mozart's
"Clarinet Concerto" with the Bach
Festival Orchestra on Saturday, Feb.
27,2010.
Local non-profit organizations
and community collaborations
have received grant funding total-
ing $153,107 from the Winter Park
Health Foundation to establish eight
new community garden projects in
Eatonville, Maitland and Winter Park.


The grants are part of its Think-Act-
Be Healthy Communities initiative.
Launched in November 2007, the
Think-Act-Be initiative is designed to
support a variety of community proj-
ects that help make Eatonville, Mait-
land and Winter Park healthier places
to live, work and play.
Michael "Mick" Schulz, a junior at
Lyman High School, received an
invitation from the National Youth
Leadership Forum on Medicine,
which will take him to Boston, one
of the eight destination cities hosting
young scholars from across the na-
tion this summer in July.


Lisa Muran, from Crystal Beach is
up for voting at www.FuelingGood.
com to win $2,500 in CITGO gift cards.
Voting is open to the public and resi-
dents across Central Florida are en-
couraged to support this local effort.
Lisa collects donations from across
the community for an organization
called BASE Camp, which assembles
boxes of food for families with chil-
dren who have cancer. Lisa hopes to
raise enough money and food to feed
25-50 families for a week. Voting is
open until July 15 and will decide this
month's grand prize winner.


For more information, contact:
www.GuaranteedToSellYourHomeln120Days.com
Robert F. Picheny Realtor Southern Realty Enterprises, Inc.


Greenberg
Traurig

G600DMORNIG > WINHTRPARK
The issues - The Questions - The Discussion - The People
..................................................................................................... It's the place to be!

The Winter Park Chamber of
Commerce

welcomes

Mark Brewer
President and Chief Executive Officer
Community Foundation of Central Florida

Join us for a discussion with Mr. Mark Brewer to learn about
the role of the nonprofit sector in economic development
and how all three sectors (public, private, and nonprofit)
work together to build the quality of life we depend on in
Winter Park!

Friday, July 10
7:45AM - 8:15AM: Networking/ 8:15 AM: Program
Complimentary Continental Breakfast
Winter Park Welcome Center/ Chamber of Commerce
First-floor WPHF Community Room
151 W. Lyman Avenue, Winter Park, FL 32789
RSVP*.407/644-8281, ext. 3648orE-mail wpcc@winterpark.org

The event is free and open to the public.



Presented by: Sponsored by:
Greenberg Observer
iTraurig S
mCi A , ,W
- it(SIilR WF( l


It's business.


THE FAMILY WANTS ANSWERS
























Do you know this person?

During the early morning hours of July 1, 2008, our 85
year old father was attacked and sexually assaulted
while a patient at Winter Park Hospital. An FBI trained
sketch artist prepared this rendering of the person our
father identifies as his assailant. Do you know him?

If you have any information about the man in this
drawing, or any information about the sexual assault
at Winter Park Hospital, please call 321-278-0150 or
e-mail your information to
tips@winterparkhospitalassault.com


--------


Winter Park/ Maitland Observer


Thursday, July 9, 2009 Pg







Paoe 6 Thursday, July 9, 2009 Winter Park / Maitland Observer


July 9 Popcorn Flicks
The city of Winter Park and
Enzian Theater are proud to
present Popcorn Flicks in
Central Park featuring "Su-
perman II" at 8 p.m. Thurs-
day, July 9.
Bring your blanket or
chair to enjoy the movie un-
der the stars in Central Park.
Free popcorn for everyone.
For more information,
please call 407-629-0054 or
visit www.enzian.org.

July 13 City Commission
meeting work session
There will be a City Com-
mission work session on
Monday, July 13, at 2:30
p.m., in City Hall Commis-
sion Chambers to discuss
the City Commission's 90-
day action plan.
The public is invited to
attend; however, no public
comment will be taken.

City Commission
meeting topics
There will be a City Commis-


sion meeting on Monday,
July 13, at 3:30 p.m., in City
Hall Commission Cham-
bers. Below are a few topics
of interest:
Consent agenda:
-Authorize the Police De-
partment to apply for the
Justice Assistance Grant in
the amount of $37,624 to
be used to replace and en-
hance the mobile data ter-
minal computer system.
Action items requiring
discussion:
-Fleet Peeples Park Mas-
ter Plan.
-Discussion of a poten-
tial ordinance establishing
succession of alternates on
boards and commissions,
which can have quasi-judi-
cial duties.
-The elevation of current
alternates to regular mem-
bers as part of the initial
transition.
-Communityvideo show-
case program for city Web
site.
Public hearings:
-Second reading of the


Winter Park City Talk
BY RANDY KNIGHT
CITY MANAGER


ordinance relating to the is-
suance of up to $60 million
Refunding Revenue Notes
and/or bonds for the pur-
pose of refunding the out-
standing Electric Revenue
Bonds, Series 2005A and
2005B.
-Second reading of the
ordinance relating to the is-
suance of up to $50 million
Water and Sewer Refunding
Revenue Notes for the pur-
pose of refunding the out-
standing Water and Sewer
Revenue Bonds, Series 2004,
and the issuance of not ex-
ceeding $57 million Water
and Sewer Refunding Rev-
enue Bonds.
-First reading of the or-
dinance to amend Section
114-67, Speed of Boats, to
put into place an emergen-
cy no-wake zone during pe-
riods of high water levels.
Non-action items:
-City manager's report
-Budget presentation
You can find the Com-
mission's full agenda and
information on specific
agenda items by logging on
to the city's official Web site
at www.CityofWinterPark.
org and clicking on Govern-
ment > City Commission >
Packets.

July 17-19 Sidewalk Sale
and Street Party
The city of Winter Park, Park


Avenue Area Association
and the Winter Park Cham-
ber of Commerce is proud to
announce the annual Side-
walk Sale and the first-ever
Park Avenue Area Street Par-
ty beginning Friday, July 17,
through Sunday, July 19, on
Park Avenue in downtown
Winter Park.
These series of events in-
vite the community to en-
joy fun, weekend-long fes-
tivities including the annual
Sidewalk Sale, Winter Park
Sip, family-friendly events
and activities, a movie in
Central Park, and a day of
sports and science. The resi-
dential and business com-
munity comes together to
support Park Avenue and
Hannibal Square and raise
funds for "A Gift for Teach-
ing." This event was created
as a direct response to the
recommendations result-
ing from an economic de-
velopment study recently
commissioned by the city of
Winter Park.
-Friday, July 17: Sidewalk
Sale and Winter Park Sip --
A wine-tasting event in vari-
ous restaurants on Park Av-
enue and Hannibal Square
from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Wine
tasting price $20 per person.
Make your reservation at
the Winter Park Chamber of
Commerce or Tuni. Benefits
"A Gift for Teaching."


Even in the most challeng-
ing economic times, I con-
tinue to be amazed at all of
the wonderful activities be-
ing offered throughout our
city. Maitland has so many
treasures - who needs
to go to Disney World? As
you look for activities to
fill your days, I encourage
you to check out our very
own Cultural Corridor and
the wonderful summer ac-
tivities being offered in our
own backyard. Here are just
a few interesting events of-
fered through Maitland's
cultural partners:

Maitland Art Center
RS21 - the Research Studio
in the 21st Century. (Exhibi-
tion closes July 12.) Why go
to London, Miami and New
York when you can see in-
novative talents here at the
Maitland Art Center (MAC)
who are exploring the art
of now - installation and
conceptual art?
The Permanent Collec-
tion Revisited. (Opening to
the public on July 20.) In-
cluding many not-recently-
exhibited works by MAC
founder Andre Smith, this
new selection of art drawn


from the MAC's collection
features several twists. Art-
work from different eras
will be juxtaposed to reveal
new similarities and/or dis-
sonances. One entire area
will be devoted to works by
the "Bok Fellows" - the art-
ists whose residencies were
supported by Smith's great
partner, Mary Curtis Bok -
including Milton Avery, Ral-
ston Crawford and more.
More than just a patron, Mrs.
Bok was involved in the Re-
search Studio's very fabric.
There's still time to reg-
ister for August Summer
Camp. Come experiment
with art - Innovative sum-
mer camp embraces studio
arts in architecture, paint-
ing, pottery, sculpture and
multicultural art. Space
available for Aug. 10-14
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Ages:
6-12 years old. Costs: $250/
week/child or $450/week
for 2 children. Space is lim-
ited; please call Ann Colvin
for more details at 407-539-
2181 or e-mail acolvin@
itsmymaitland.com. Visit
MaitlandArtCenter.org for
more information on events
and exhibitions.


Maitland
Historical Society
The Maitland Historical
Society operates four mu-
seums in Maitland that are
open for tours from Thurs-
days through Sundays from
noon to 4 p.m. These in-
clude the Maitland Histori-
cal Museum on Packwood
Avenue, currently featuring
an exhibition on the histo-
ry of the railroad, as well as
The Waterhouse Residence
Museum, the 1884 historic
home located at Lake Lily.
The Society also offers
education programs year-
round and unique birthday
options. Birthday party par-
ticipants can enjoy a fun tea
party, or build a bird house
with a Carpentry Crew
birthday.
July 18 - Visit the Mai-
tland Historical Society's
booth at Party in the Park
at Lake Lily for an opportu-
nity to take an "Old Time"
photo. Also, check out his-
torical photos for sale. Plus,
in celebration of Maitland's
1885 incorporation, help
the Society raise $1,885 in
coins and bills for Society
programs! Bring your dona-
tion to the Society's booth
or office at Lake Lily! For
more information, call 407-
644-2451 or visit www.mai-
tlandhistory.org.

Performing Arts
of Maitland
Performing Arts of Maitland
has two new groups to in-
troduce: "MPW" - Maitland
Poets and Writers - and
"MSB" - Maitland Stage
Band.
On two Sundays a month,
MPW schedules writing


rinuI L uunUI T r E 11 rFb r ImII I LIA
A banner celebrates Maitland's cultural corridor, an area rich with art and history.


workshops in the Garden
Club Cottage at Lake Lily,
and will be featuring lo-
cal literary talent who will
perform their works at the
Farmer's Market on the
"M3" - Maitland Market
Music stage. The purpose
of Maitland Poets and Writ-
ers is to foster the growth of
literary arts in Maitland and
its surrounding commu-
nities, and not only shine
a spotlight on established
literary artists, but provide
opportunities for the public
to come and experience the
joy of creative writing. Sign
up with Vanessa Blakeslee
to explore your creative
side. Pre-registration is re-
quired. Each workshop runs
from 2:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. in
the Maitland Garden Club
Cottage. Cost: $35.
The MSB is rehearsing
every Thursday evening for
their big debut at the Mai-
tland Rotary Art Festival
Oct. 2-4. Led by retired Navy
bandleader Gary Blalock,
sax player extraordinaire,
this group will feature big
band music from Ameri-
ca's heritage. Soloists are
planned and big things are
coming to Maitland! Visit


their new Web site, www.
PAMaitland.org, or call 407-
339-5984 for more infor-
mation.

Maitland Library
Adult Summer Library Read-
ing Program, "Master the Art
of Reading." June 1 through
August 13. Registration re-
quired.
Children's Summer Li-
brary Program, "Be Creative
at Maitland Public Library."
June 8 through July 29.
Teens' Summer Program,
"Express Yourself at Mait-
land Public Library." June 8
through July 29.
Please visit www.mait-
landpubliclibrary.org or call
407-647-7700 for more in-
formation about daily pro-
grams like PC Academy, Pre-
school Stories and Crafts,
and Wii Gaming.
We look forward to see-
ing you at the many events
taking place this summer,
and don't forget to visit
www.itsmymaitland.com
for an updated list of Things
to Do in Maitland.

Call City Hall at
407-539-6200 and visit us
at It'sMyMaitland.com


-Saturday, July 18: Fam-
ily Fun Day and Popcorn
Flicks - Park Avenue will be
closed to vehicle traffic. All-
day annual Sidewalk Sale.
Fun family activities from
11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Art projects
with Crealdd School of Art.
Great musical sing-a-longs
with Mr. Richard. Drum cir-
cle provided by Ten Thou-
sand Villages. Children's
games, inflatables and
bounce houses. "Cirque'"
type performers. City tree
give-away and fire-rescue
truck display. Interactive
DJ with children's music
and special entertainment.
Cool misting tents. Popcorn
Flicks in Central Park fea-
turing "HairSpray" begin-
ning at 8 p.m. Presented by
Enzian Theatre and the city
of Winter Park
-Sunday, July 19 - A day
of sports and science activi-
ties. All-day annual Sidewalk
Sale. Sports and Science
Activities from 1 p.m. to 4
p.m. Games and activities
hosted by the Winter Park
YMCA and the Orlando Sci-
ence Center. Interactive DJ
with children's music and
bounce houses. Shop Win-
ter Park and support your
local merchants.

Call City Hall at
407-599-9933 and visit us
at CityofWminterPark.org.


A stroll down Maitland's

cultural corridor


Page 6 TusaJl ,20


~Winter Park/ Maitland Observer






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Win tickets to see

DEMI LOVATO


~f


Email tcraft@observemewspapers.com to be
entered in the drawing. Drawing will be held
July 14. Winner's will be notified by
phone/e-mail, and announced in the July 16
issue of The Observer and July 24 issue of
The Voice


'~''"' ''"'"""" ';' "'-""~*;'"'"''~ ';" "~' ""'


Thursday, July 9, 2009 Pg


Winter Nrk / Maitland Obsezrver


ii festvles







PrVv. . .29n rkM d be


G.O.


For Greater Orlando's


Master the art of giving


Camp Jam is a truly unique
option for kids aged 7 to 17
who are looking for a hands-on
"rock 'n' roll" experience with
lessons from local instructors and
rock music legends such as Pat
Travers, of the Pat Travers band,
who will teach a Master Class on
Tuesday, July 14. The camp starts
July 13 and will be held at Trinity
Prep. Visit www.campjam.com for
more information.
Special Olympics Orange County
is hosting its second annual
Summer Camp for children with
intellectual disabilities. The camp
offers four weeks of summer
activities including an array
of traditional sports activities,
along with other traditional camp
activities like arts and crafts,
dancing and field trip. The Camp
is broken into three sessions: the
first was June 22 through 26, the
second is July 6 through 10, and
the third and final session is July
13 through 17.
This year's Camp was made
possible, in part, by the generosity
of the Kingswood Manor
Homeowners Association, who
donated the use of the facilities.
For more information on how you
can support or get involved with
Special Olympics Orange County's
Summer Camp, please contact
Laurie Chmielewski at 407-484-
8308.
Maitland Public Library Events,
located at 501 S. Maitland Ave:
Baby /Toddler Story Time and
Craft will be held from 10:30 a.m.
to 11 a.m. on Thursday, July 9.
Be Creative-Special Library
Summer Reading Program will
be held at 2:30 p.m. on Thursday,
July 9. This week's theme is
dancing and Yow Dance Company
will perform.
Reading Buddies will take
place at 4 p.m. on Thursday, July
9. Earliest readers through fifth-
graders will read to each other
and play reading games.
Bedtime Stories and Craft
program will take place at 7 p.m.
on Monday, July 13. All ages are
welcomed.
Preschool Stories and Crafts
will take place at 10:30 a.m. on
Tuesday, July 14. Children aged 36
months to 5 years are welcomed.
Harry Potter Night will be
held from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
on Tuesday, July 14. Celebrate
the opening of the latest "Harry
Potter" movie the night before
at the Maitland Public Library
by dressing as your favorite
character. Visit with Hogwart's
professors, play games and have
lots of Wizardry fun! Registration
required.


KAREN McENANY-PHILLIPS

Kyle Marion spotted the
homeless man while he was
on his way to the airport
and knew exactly what to
do. He jumped from his taxi
and handed the man a $5
bill.
It had been a big day for
the Winter Park middle-
schooler. A few hours earlier
he had kicked and punched
his way to win a gold and
bronze medal at the U.S.
Martial Arts National Junior
Olympics in Austin, Texas.
Marion has been train-
ing in tae kwon do for more
than three years and credits
his instructors at the Multi-
Martial Arts Training Acad-
emy in Winter Springs for
helping him achieve more
than just gold medals.
World-class athlete and
Master-Instructor Richard
Hoehn's 20 or so camp-
ers who attend Adventure
Summer Camp at MMAT
Academy experience activi-
ties, field trips and martial
arts training - with a twist.
Each week they perform a
community service project
- portraying the martial
arts philosophy that teach-
es respect for others and
the importance of commu-
nity.
Fellow camper Colton
Blake is changing the world
this summer too - one less


Richard Hoehn, wife Sheila and
partner Nick Cervellera own
MMAT Academy, which leaches
traditional training, philosophy
and competitive training for
adults and kids 4-15 years at all
experience levels.
For more information about
MMAT Academy call 407-695-
7555 or visit them at 1425
Tuskawilla Road in Winter
Springs.
gum wrapper, plastic bag
and aluminum can at a time.
He helped pick up litter at
Red Bug Lake and Golden-
rod parks. The 13-year-old
has a first-degree black belt
in tae kwon do.
Blake admitted commu-
nity service didn't sound so
great in the beginning.
"I didn't want to do it at
first," he said, "but then I
saw how picking up litter
helps the ecosystem. I felt
I did something to change
the world."
Blake disposes of his gum
properly, but he learned
firsthand that many people
don't.
"They should put their
plastic bags or gum wrap-
pers in a trash can or wait
till they get home," he said.
Blake is looking forward
to future projects, such as
a visit to the police station


This week's art comes from art students
at Keeth Elementary in Winter Springs.


"Pink Angel"


crayon &
watercolor


Illustrated by

Savanna

Eklund,

first grade


PHOTO COURTESY OF MMAT ACADEMY
Summer campers, including KyletMarion and Colton Blake, pick up trash at a lo-
cal park. They attend a martial arts camp that integrates community service projects.


for a SWAT team tour. What
does he like about tae kwon
do? "I like being able to de-
fend myself, helping others
who can't defend them-
selves, and using theseskills
to do right."
Marion, Blake and camp-
mates also collected canned
goods for the Second Har-
vest Food Bank and clothes
for the Salvation Army.
"1 like helping people
in need; it makes you feel


"The Leap"


Tempra Paint
& Oil Pastels
Illustrated by
Kendyl Brahler,
second grade


good," Blake said.
They will be raising
money to buy toys for un-
derprivileged kids by doing
chores around the house
and neighborhood.
"It teaches them to give
back," Hoehn said. "We
hope it plants a seed in
them, gives them a sense
of pride and inspires them
to find opportunities to do
community service as they
grow up."


"A Fairy's
Garden"


watercolor
marker


Illustrated-]y
Sadie Janell,
first grade


N-







I' .,. ~.


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


PaaeI 8 TusaJl ,20


rFamail





Winter Park / Maitland Observer Thursday, July 9, 2009 Page 9


Cinema


Coming July 17


'500 Days of Summer'


Coming July 24


'G-Force'

Coming July 31


A showcase of this week's releases,
and a look ahead to upcoming movies.


r -7-7-�.,


�'-r
Consider a health savings accoun�


With the rising costs of health care, perhaps a health
savings account (HSA) could'benefit you. An HSA com-
bines a high-deductible health insurance policy with a
tax-sheltered medical savings account. You get a deduc-
tion for your contributions to the account and can take dis- i
tributions tax-free to pay unreimbursed medical expense . To
review the pros and cons of an HSA in your situation, give us a scall.
Ana Ivonne Aviles, CPA, LLC
1324 Lake Baldwin Ln, Suite B
Orlando, FL 32814
Tel: 407-228-7333
Fax: 407-228-1104
www.aiacpal.com


ThurdayJul 9, 009 Page 9


Winter Park /Maitland Observer


'I Love You, Beth Cooper'
PG-1 3


IGII Joe: The Rise


but the commonalities we
share with people around
the world. It is a testament
to the enlightened leader-
ship at our local museum
that these international
films can now be seen in
Orlando. Both entertaining
and thought-provoking,
the films come to us from
Argentina, Brazil, China,
Ecuador, Indonesia, Iran,
Kazakhstan, Macedonia,
Morocco and Mozambique.
Each filin is selected for its
authentic voice, encourag-
ing filmmaking in countries
with developing film com-
munities.
The first film, "Sleep-
walking Land," tells the
story of a young refugee
and his elderly companion
as they journey across war-
torn Mozambique in search
of the family he lost. Tickets
are $12,$7 for OMA mem-


bers. To see the full sched-
ule, visit www.omart.org.

Reep and Jackson at
Creative Spirit Gallery
Art has often expressed the
crazy duality of its kinship
with and its inherent mis-
trust of technology. Open-
ing July 10, artists Richard
Reep and Jim Jackson
will use art to explore the
chasm between our physi-
cal and virtual reality. The
artists note that technolog-
ical changes have brought
"tremors and conflicts as
we adjust to the change,"
and the exhibit will exam-
ine how we deal with these
changes.
Reep (an architect and
an artist) has exhibited re-
cently at both the Orlando
Museum of Art and the
Mainland Art Center. Found
objects make up his idea


of a city as a collection of
objects intertwined with
a web of cables and wires,
cell phones, and artifacts
from our digital age. Reep
says, "... the physical form
of a town or city may de-
cline into insignificance,
making debates about form
and style of a city obsolete."
Jackson's work as a mu-
ral artist has graced every-
thing from monumental
architecture to motorcycle
fenders. His fine art alludes
to classic pulp fiction amid
images of smashed com-
puters, cell phones and
other examples of contem-
porary life. The exhibit asks
serious questions about our
digital lives, while provid-
ing glimpses into our pos-
sible future. Creative Spirit
Art Gallery, 820A Lake Bald-

> turn to GARRICK on next page


be shown in Orlando from
July 10 through Nov. 1.
Ten feature films will
open a window into the
culturally diverse world
in which we live through
cinematic story-telling.
Put simply, as we watch
the films from this series,
we learn about different
world cultures, recognizing
not only the differences,


Exotic cinema at the
Orlando Museum of Art
Those forward-thinking
folks at the Orlando Mu-
seum of Art will stir up
the mix of art and "under-
stinding" as they preniiere
the,%.5;.*,)bal Lens Film Series
beginningJuly 10. The
films, which premiered at
the Museum of Modem
Art in New York City, will


:i:�:


Also openingr


Coming August 7


Culture


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GARRICK I Ragtime and Family Theatre Festival events to mark your calendar


< continued from last page

win Park (in Baldwin Park),
will host the exhibit from
July 10 to Aug. 1. The Open-
ing is set for July 10 from
6-9 p.m.

Theriot and Bingham at at
Avalon Island
The leading gallery in the
downtown Orlando art
scene is definitely The Gal-
lery at Avalon Island as
curated by Jeff Shonkwiler.
When he hosts a 'Third
Thursday' event, I invari-
ably begin and end my
Gallery Tour in this historic
and welcoming space. July's
'Third Thursday' Opening
(July 16) will feature two of
the area's leading artists in
their respective fields.
Keith Theriot is known,
since moving here in 2000
from an art-enriched back-
ground in New York City
and New Orleans, for his
abstracted figuration and
color field paintings. The-
riot's abstracts come to us
through collaboration with
musician Scott Robertson
who blended electronic
and Native American in-
struments for Theriot to in-
terpret visually. The results
of this collaboration will be
the focus of the work.
Glass artist Nick Bing-
ham has created his own
niche within the fine art
world of Orlando. Nick's
process is called 'fusing'. "In
fusing," he says, "you build
a work from many pieces."
The pieces (of glass) may be


shaped, colored or broken,
but the pieces work togeth-
er to create a design that is
then placed in a kiln and
brought to 1,400 degrees.
The pieces melt together
to create one piece... and
voila - a single work of art.
The exhibit will open
on July 16 and run through
August 14 at the Gallery at
Avalon Island, 37 S. Mag-
nolia Ave. in Downtown
Orlando.

Third Annual Target
Family Theatre Festival
Just in time to answer that
"What's next?" question for
the kids this summer, The
Orlando Repertory Theatre
is here with its third An-
nual Target Family Theatre
Festival. The Festival is 10
days of affordable family
entertainment with perfor-
mances by Mr. Steve from
PBS Kids, Brady Rymer and
the Little Band That Could,
Justin Roberts and the Not
Ready for Naptime Players,
Thoroughly Modern Millie,
Snack, International Pup-
pet Shows and more!
The Festival features
a free opening day cel-
ebration (July 18) with
performances, face paint-
ing, a musical petting zoo,
balloon animals, and in-
teractive activities as an
affordable way for families
to come together while
presenting acclaimed art-
ists to Central Florida,
and it does all this while
training young artists. Mr.
Steve from PBS Kids has


performed at the White
House and the Kennedy
Center; Brady Rymer was
nominated for a Grammy
for Best Musical Album for
Children; and Justin Rob-
erts received rave reviews
from The New York Times
and Newsweek and has
been featured on "The To-
day Show".
"This music is for fami-
lies who rock!" Artistic
Director Jeffrey Revels
said. "These are not the tra-
ditional toddler favorites,
but kid-friendly songs that
adults can appreciate as
well." The Festival begins
July 17 with the opening of
"Thoroughly Modern Mil-
lie" and continues through
July 26 with tickets from $6
to $12. Visit www.orland-
orep.com or call 407-896-
7365 extension 224.

Ragtime is one of the
"sounds of summer"
We can thank the Orlando
Philharmonic Orchestra


for continuing to make
fun a significant part of its
Sounds of Summer Series.
The concert set for Monday,
July 20 will feature the Red-
wing Blackbird Ragtime
Band as directed by Mark
Goldberg as part of the se-
ries highlighting musicians
of the Philharmonic in di-
verse programs. There is no
doubt that audiences will
be "toe-tappin" to this pro-
gram of original turn-of-
the-century Ragtime Band
arrangements including
Rags, Waltzes, Marches, and
Gallopes - a la Scott Joplin.
The musical roots of
ragtime were tied to planta-
tion life where there was a
popular form of entertain-
ment called the "Cakewalk"
with the birth of ragtime
set by the date of the first
published work in 1895.
The history of ragtime is
mirrored in the life of Scott
Joplin who published Orig-
inal Rags in 1899, but Rag-
time was being played long


before it was published.
Most of the composers did
not sell their works; they
were making a decent liv-
ing based on the tips they
received performing in bars
... with their more "bois-
terous" music reserved for
their own enjoyment.
The Philharmonic
promises a "boisterous"
good time, with the "toe-
tappin" taking place in
the Lowndes Shakespeare
Center, 812 E. Rollins St. in
Loch Haven Park at 7 p.m.
on Monday, July 20. Call
407-770-0071 or visit www.
OrlandoPhil.org.


> GARRICK
Josh Garrick is curator of the Millenia
Fine Art gallery east of Maitland in
Orlando. He is also an art collector,
writer and photographer. Garrick can be
reached at 407-304-8100.


Pat Greany, Ph.D.
entomologist, boating enthusiast, former proton therapy patient-


Proton therapy can destroy

hard-to-reach tumors in the prostate
while producing fewer side effects.

The University of Florida's powerful new weapon against cancer attacks
tumors with optimum doses of radiation that spare healthy tissue.This
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improving a patient's chances for a successful outcome.

To learn more about the only proton therapy center in
the Southeast and our effectiveness t eatirng prostate, head
and neck, lung, brain and pediatric cancers, please visit
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Page 10 Thursday, July 9, 2009


Winter Park/ Maitland Observer










Letters to


A tale of two cities
Sadly for Winter Park, some of our
elected officials appear to lack the
desire to achieve consensus on
city issues and projects, a goal that
previous mayors attribute to more
harmonious times in our com-
munity. Instead, opposing camps
are established, ammunition (per-
spectives, arguments, even votes,
etc.) accumulated, resulting in the
proverbial 3-2 decisions of our City
Commission. Meanwhile, the exist-
ing divisiveness only broadens and
much unnecessary time and energy
wasted on preparations to shift
this balance in future Commission
races. One current project with
profound impact on protecting our
city's character demonstrates only
too well the unwillingness of some
commissioners to reach consensus
for the good of all.
Two years ago, Winter Park's
mayor, David Strong, appointed
and charged members of an Ar-
chitectural Standards Task Force
to determine and recommend the
most prudent means of manag-
ing growth and redevelopment of
Winter Park's commercial corri-
dors while maintaining the town's
quaintness and charm. Not an easy
task, but after a year of dedicated,
diligent citizen and city staff work
chaired by one of our town's most
qualified leaders, David Lamm, this
assignment resulted in a unani-
mous City Commission approval of
the Task Force's recommendations:
to proceed in hiring a consultant to
develop a form-based code for our
town, a planning tool that takes
all questions out of what can be
developed where - determined by
what the citizens want. No more
political arm-bending, no more
abuses of code, no more shenani-
gans. Instead, development/rede-
velopment would result in nothing
more or nothing less than what
Winter Park citizens would expect
to see, structures built in harmony
with the existing landscape of our
quaint and charming town - as so
tastefully illustrated by Dan Bel-
lows' redevelopment of Hannibal
Square.
Three-quarters completed, this
project was put on hold a year ago
until the city's Comprehensive Plan
revisions were finalized. With that
task finally accomplished, Com-
missioner Karen Diebel addressed
resumption of the form-based
code project at a recent Commis-
sion meeting. One would think
the entire City Commission would
wholeheartedly embrace the ex-
pedient completion of this protec-
tive plan. Instead, from Day 1 of
the Form Based Code introduction
to our citizenry more than two
years ago (before she took office),
Commissioner Beth Dillaha, after
attending task force meetings and
public workshops, to as recently
as the last City Commission meet-
ing, still claims not to understand
form-based code. She requested
more time to "learn about it". She
even suggested alternatives, based
on far-fetched doomsday presump-
tions of what she doesn't under-


stand about the project. And, oh
yes, we really don't have the money
to complete the project now be-
cause those funds were quickly
"re-allocated" in this year's budget.
Commissioner Margie Bridges as
well, who voted for the project
initially, chimed in to postpone. If
another excuse had been handy, no
doubt they would have provided
it. Fortunately for us, our mayor
politely told Ms. Dillaha to get up
to speed on her own time and re-
quested that the city manager look
into funding options to replace the
redirected money for the project's
completion. Citizens might ques-
tion why Commissioner Dillaha,
who admits lacking understanding
of a major (and costly) city project,
wouldn't consider it prudent to
gain an understanding of the proj-
ect prior to its posted, upcoming
discussion on a meeting's agenda.
What happens when wrenches
are continually thrown into the
gears of such diversionists? Winter
Park citizens will soon find out.
Brian Canin of Canin and Associ-
ates, a civically active, longtime
Winter Park citizen as well as the
hired consultant for this project,
promptly stepped forward fol-
lowing these temporarily success-
ful ploys to postpone this crucial
project yet again, by submitting a
letter to the City Commission last
week with an offer from his firm
to proceed with completion of the
project while deferring payment
until the next budget cycle. Why?
Because, at present, our land devel-
opment code is being "rewritten"
by the Planning and Zoning Board,
and as taskforce chairman David
Lamm, consultant Brian Canin,
and Commissioners Diebel, Phil
Anderson, and Mayor Ken Bradley
have pointed out, the two go hand-
in-hand. If the remaining commis-
sioners can't think logically on this
issue, let's be thankful that com-
munity leaders such as Brian and
David can.
Perhaps both might even con-
sider running for City Commission
seats - Winter Park's citizens de-
serve more informed and qualified
leaders such as these!
Meanwhile, and equally impor-
tant, it would seem that there are
no more excuses left for the "Art-
ful Dodgers" in their attempts to
thwart efficiency and good sense
when it comes to our town's land
development/redevelopment
plans. The upcoming Commission
meetings will tell the tale.
- Patty Heidrich
Winter Park citizen
Architectural Standards Task Force member

Maitland needs an
objective town hall meeting
Maitland residents need the op-
portunity to ask questions and get
answers to what is happening with
the development of our Town Cen-
ter. Hopefully, a Town Hall Meeting
on Sunday, July 12 at 5:30 p.m. at
the Senior Center will provide this
opportunity.
City Councilman Phil Bonus
has stated that much of the prop-


erty Bob Reese was to assemble to,
meet the terms of Maitland's Town
Center development agreement is
in default or subject to forfeiture.
Reese is quoted as dismissing these
claims and saying the claims are
100 percent false.
It is time to end the long saga of
Maitland's Town Center develop-
ment and find out exactly what is
happening. Fortunately, there is a
straightforward means of deter-
mining if the developer has met
the terms of his agreement with
the city.
Under terms of the agreement,
the developer "shall acquire title to
all property and provide recorded
deeds evidencing all such acqui-
sitions no later than six months
after the effective date of the agree-
ment".
If the developer has provided
the city with recorded deeds giving
evidence he has met these obliga-
tions, then it seems Bonus owes a
profound apology to Reese, How-
ever, if Reese has not met this ob-
ligation to provide recorded prop-
erty deeds and has obfuscated this
failure, then the City Council needs
to be held accountable by the Mai-
tland community to deal with an
agreement default that could be
the forerunner of future problems
with far-reaching consequences.
The City Council cannot risk the
development of our Town Center
by exclusively putting its future in
the hands of anyone who cannot
meet the obligations of a develop-
ment agreement.
- Len Schmidt
Maitland

Column doesn't benefit
Observer readers
I hope that you can take some truly
constructive criticism from a loyal
and long-time reader. The bottom
line is that Chris Jepson's column
has to go. It is a waste of paper, ink
and money.
First of all, he has no writing
talent whatsoever. It is beyond
clear that he has trouble organiz-
ing his thoughts and developing
a coherent, well-organized and
delivered argument. Honestly, his
"arguments" are nothing more
than mere ramblings, the same
type you would hear from some
drunken malcontent at a bar. And
while most people try to ignore
drunks that in no way means that
they can't still be offensive. I know
that Jepson's column has offended
readers, and likewise I'm sure that
he has offended advertisers. And
this week's column will be the last
one that offends me, one way or
another.
Most readers, myself included,
read the Observer for its commu-
nity focus throughout. I don't read
it to get offended. Who is Jepson,
exactly? What connection does he
have with our area? What has he
done for our community that he
should be afforded a column in a
community paper? What commu-
nity organizations have honored
him with recognition? How has
he tried to make this community


better? How has he impacted it? In
the few times that I tolerated read-
ing a few of his barely coherent
paragraphs, I have never seen him
mention anything that directly af-
fects this community. This column
is of no benefit to the readers of the
Observer. Neither are the juvenile
insults directed against at least
half of the community. Since when
were community newspapers in
the shock business?
Just think about the possibilities
of that now wasted space: column
space for young, talented and up-
coming writers from local high
schools and colleges (I've read
more coherent arguments from
middle schoolers); a listing of local
volunteer opportunities (which the
Orlando Sentinel stopped publish-
ing); comics either made by local
artists or syndicated comics not
carried by the Sentinel; heck, even
more advertising will be of better
use of that space for readers. Truly,
anything would be better that this
joke of a columnist who seems to
have come from a "Saturday Night
Live" skit.
- John Bradley
Winter Park

City responsible for
utility company failures
In the city of Winter Park Update
for July/August, Mayor Ken Bradley
commented on the improved reli-
ability that the city has maintained
since taking over the electric utility
from Progress Energy.
Lightning, trees and squirrels
are the three main causes of out-
ages, and especially the momentary
interruptions. By far the majority
are trees and squirrels. After the
hurricanes we had while Prog-
ress Energy was still the energy
provider, a large number of trees
were blown down, and a large
number were trimmed. Prior to
the hurricanes, the city was very
restrictive on the amount of trim-
ming Progress Energy was allowed.
Progress Energy was allowed 3 feet
of clearance, and some trees will
grow that far in a year. There were
times that customers complained
to the city while the tree-trimming
crews were there, and the city's tree
supervisor would only let the tree
crew trim 1 or 2 feet. Since Prog-
ress Energy wanted to have good
relations with the city, it complied
with what the city's tree supervisor
ordered.
The city now maintains about
10 feet of clearance between the
lines and the wires. This not only
prevents the trees from blowing in
the lines, but also keeps the squir-
rels farther from the lines and
transformers. It also limits the in-
terval of how often the trees need
to be trimmed.
I find it ironic that the reason
Progress Energy's reliability was
worse than what the city is now so
proud, was to a large extent caused
by the city.
-Marion W. Gilliam Jr.
Winter Park resident and 35-year Florida
Power Corporation employee


444 ave n oi nin



Put it n.rtigan6sn yu touhs oasoiate editor J*:' * Lenn nra na


Winter Park/ Maitland Observer


Thursday, July 9, 2009 Pae1







raye i '' i /-JI ThI 1 J2 iv)Wnr k in O bserve


Play On!











Conservative
Cultural Commentary
By Louis Roney
Distinguished Professor Emeritus, UCF
2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award
Assisted by beloved wife Joy Roney

A killer's tale
(fiction)
W hen the cops ar-
rived at my front
door the other
evening, I greeted them
jovially, and thought they
were asking me to support
one of their good causes.
After the cuffs were on
me, I suspected something
more substantive.
At the station, under
a spotlight, I took things
much more seriously.
Officer Goode said,
"We're not happy bringing
you in, sir, just answer a few
questions, and my part-
ner, Officer Badd, will turn
down that light in your
face."


Officer Badd poked me
and said, "Roney, we're onto
you old geezers who look
innocent, and are causing
37.62 percent of the heavy
crime in our town these
days. You're at an age when
you ought think about
how much hard stir time
you can take in your lousy
shape. You better not risk a
'not guilty' plea, pal, or we'll
see that you end your days
in the clink."
"You got a job?" asked
Goode.
"Yes indeedy," I said.
"Like where. And don't
lie," snarled Badd, dislodg-
ing the toothpick in the
corner of his mouth.
"I'm a professor at the
university," I said.
"Yeah, sure. And I'm
Oprah Winfrey's sister," said
Badd.
"What do you teach?"
asked Goode.
"Today I taught lieder to
young women."
"You mean you were
teaching cheerleaders or
were you disguising Marxist
propaganda?" asked Badd.
"Lieder are part of Ger-
man culture," I said.
Badd said, "Oh-ho!
Goode, this looks bad. He's
one of those subversive old
creeps!"
I now trotted out the
name of a lawyer friend,
and asked, "Don't I get
a chance to phone my
'mouthpiece'?"


"You know the lingo all
right," said Goode.
I then tried to remember
some things I learned in
Government 2 at college.
I said, "I have the right
to face my accuser tout de
suite. Don't think I don't
know Marbury and Madi-
son."
"Rich friends will get you
nowhere," said Badd, smil-
ing sweetly.
"Besides," I lied, "My wife
is a wheel in the ACLU."
"That might help you at
the sentencing," said Badd,
putting in a fresh tooth-
pick.
I put on a pained look
and said, "If you don't let
me face right now the ac-
cuser who has framed me,
I'm going to sue you both
for nolo contender, and
nail you to the courthouse
wall by swearing I saw you
practicing habeas corpus
in a dark hallway. What dis-
gusting behavior!"
"Now, wait just a min-
ute," said Goode. "Let's cool
off and see how we can
help each other like the
true gentlemen we all are."
Later, the cops drove me
to a shopping center, where
they double-parked.
Pointing, I said, "There's
an empty parking space
over there."
"Forget it, we never use
'em," said Badd.
Goode opened the car
door and took off my cuffs.


"One false move, Longhair,"
he growled, "and you're
toast."
We walked into a store
where the manager was
waiting at the front door
and recognized me.
"Mr. Roney," he said,
"how did a nice gentleman
like you get yourself in such
a terrible mess? You cer-
tainly can't tell a book by its
cover."
Goode, Badd and the
manager led me to a check-
out register, where stood a
shapely girl with whom I
had often exchanged pleas-
antries.
Her name was Ursula
B. Strange. She was 19 and
a freshman in the high
school.
She seemed sullen, and
couldn't look me in the eye.
"Miss Strange," said
Goode, "is this gentleman
the alleged perpetrator you
heard say it?"
"Yes, Officer Goode, he's
the no-good crumb-bum,"
she said eagerly.
"When did you see him
do it?" Badd asked.
"See who?" asked
Strange.
"The professor here,"
said Badd.
"Do what?" Strange
asked.
"Whatever it is you said
he did," said Goode.
"I didn't say he did a sin-
gle thing," said Strange.
"That's strange," said


Badd.
"No, she's Strange,
Goode, I'm Badd."
"Good," said Goode.
Closing her eyes, Strange
said, "I said he said some-
thing, is what I said."
"And what was it that
you said he said?" asked
Goode.
"He said he is a double
serial killer, is what-he said."
"Think good," said Badd.
"Did anyone else hear the
alleged perpetrator say it?"
Strange said quickly,
"Yes, the lady behind him
in line, she heard him say
it. She said so. I've got her
name, address and phone
number. Me and her heard
it good and plain."
"This looks bad Prof,"
said Goode, looking at his
watch. "Come clean, we
gotta get home and eat."
"You two are so efficient!
Why aren't you captains?" I
asked.
"Proficiency exams are
tough," said Badd. "Goode
is mediocre."
"I'm not all that bad,"
said Goode.
"You're not all that good
either," said Badd.
"Will you let me recreate
the crime scene?" I asked.
"It'll take a couple of min-
utes. And I'll need to walk
around in the store."
"Go with him, Goode,"


> turn to RONEY on page A13


WEATHER
* l i e S .Illy


85� 750
3p.m. I 6a.m.
Friday


TODAY: Scattered
thunderstorms with a high
near 85. West southwest
wind around 10 mph. Rain
chance 60 percent.


THI WEE
IN HISOR
On July10, 2 05,Hr


UV INDEX U


(> .MORNING LOW 75�
_^ DAYTIME HIGH 870

Sunrise Sunset 40% chance Wind
6:35 a.m. 8:26 p.m. of rain WSW 5 mph



/ , MORNING LOW 76�
t -,3 DAYTIME HIGH 900

Sunrise Sunset 40% chance Wind
6:35 a.m. 8:26 p.m. of rain SSW 5 mph



MORNING LOW 77�
DAYTIME HIGH 910

Sunrise Sunset 40% chance Wind
6:36 a.m. 8:26 p.m. of rain WSW 6 mph


NATIONAL


Seattle


Friday Sat.
61/79 62/85


Los Angeles 62/80 65/82


Houston


74/94 74/94


City
Atlanta
Chicago
New York


Friday Sat.
69/89 72/91
70/85 67/84
66/76 70/81


MARINE FORECAST
Cocoa Beach tide schedule
Time Low High
Saturday 4:48a.m. 10:55a.m.
July 11 4:58 p.m. 11:16 p.m.
Sunday 5:25 a.m. 11:37 a.m.
July 12 5:38 p.m. 11:52 p.m.

FLORIDA FORECAST
City Friday Sat.
Jacksonville 76/86 78,78
Miami 79/90 79/90
Tampa 76/88 78/91
Pensacola 77/90 79/92


INTERNATIONAL


City
London
Paris
Tokyo


Friday Sat.
58/70 58/74
53/69 54/75
74/80 73/78


Y.~


TEMPERAT


770
6 a.m.


THE VIEW FROM YOUR NECK OF THE WOODS











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Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Thursday, July 9, 2009 Page 13


Notices


V V III LIZA Cl I r, / .,IQ'ILI Q.I..


:(5-", 4:7


Iro TMH I i" 'l.nT .1'.1- iT l F i -' ' ir: i'l F r ilrji T.
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2009CP1095
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JOANNE HARPER NORRIS
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You .are hereby notified that an Order of
Summary Administration has been entered in the
estate of JOANNE HARPER NORRIS, deceased,
File Number 2009CP1095, by the Circuit Court
for Seminole County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 301 N. Park Avenue, Sanford,
Florida 32771; that the decedent's date of death
was November 19, 2008; that the total value of the
estate is $100 and that the names and addresses
of those to whom it has been assigned by such
order are:
Name / Address
DAVID T. NORRIS as Trustee of the NORRIS
FAMILY REVOCABLE TRUST, dated July 22, 1996 /
914 S. Main Street, Hopkinsville, KY 42240
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and
persons having claims or demands against the
estate of the decedent other than those for whom
provision for full payment was made in the Order
of Summary Administration must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE
TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is
July 2, 2009.
Attorney for Person Giving Notice:
Matthew H. Roby
Attorney
Florida Bar No. 0505641
831 West Morse Boulevard
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone: (407) 647-8065
Fax: (407) 647-5766
Person Giving Notice:
David T. Norris
914 S. Main Street
Hopkinsville, Kentucky 42240
7/2,7/9

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2009-CP-1227-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JOHN REGINALD CHAPMAN
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of John Reginald
Chapman, deceased, whose date of death was May
20, 2009, and whose social security number is XXX-
XX-1198, file number 2009-CP-1227-0, is pending
in the Circuit Court for Orange County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of which is 425
North Orange Avenue, Room 310, Orlando, Florida
32801. The names and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice is required
to be served must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is
July 2, 2009.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Kenneth R. Marchman
Florida Bar No. 098705
Hunter & Marchman, P.A.
1330 Palmetto Avenue
Winter Park, FL 32789
Telephone: (407) 647-6900
Personal Representative:
LaNorris Chapman
2533 Cromwell Road
Norfolk, Virginia 23509
7/2,7/9

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
CASE No. 2009-CA-4248-14-K
Si 2HS1C BANK USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS
TRUSTEE- UNDER THE POOUNG AND SERVICING
AGREEMEwrT-DATED AS OF DECEMBER 1, 2005,
FREMONT HOME LOAN TRUST 2005-E,
PLAINTIFF,
DEJAN PELES, ET AL.
DEFENDANTSS.
NOTICE OF ACTION
To: Melisa Peles
RESIDENCE: UNKNOWN
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 1003 Stout Court, Oviedo,
FL 32765
AND TO: All persons claiming an interest by, through,
under, or against the aforesaid defendantss.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to fore-
close a mortgage on the following described prop-
erty located in Seminole County, Florida:
Lot 11 of ALAFAYA WOODS PHASE IX, according to
the plat thereof as recorded In Plat Book 36, Page(s)
1 through 4, of the Public Records of Seminole
County, Florida.
has been filed against you, and you are required
to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to
this action, on Gladstone Law Group, P.A., attorneys
for plaintiff, whose address is 101 Plaza Real South,
Suite 219, Boca Raton, FL 33432, and file the origi-
nal with the Clerk of the Court, within 30 days after
the first publication of this notice, either before or
immediately thereafter, otherwise a default may be
entered against you for the relief demanded in the
Complaint.
This notice shall be published once a week for
two consecutive weeks in The Winter Park-Maitland
Observer,
DATED: June 24,2009
MARYANNE MORSE
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Linda Passow
Deputy Clerk of the Court
If you are a person with a disability who needs any
accommodation In order to participate In this pro-
ceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the
provision of certain assistance. Please contact the
ADA Coordinator, Ms. Stacy Brady at 2825 Judge
Fran Jamieson Way, Viera, FL 32940; telephone
number 321-633-2171 two (2) working days of
your receipt of this notice; if you are hearing im-
paired, call the Florida Relay Services at 1-800-
955-8771 (TfTY); if you are voice Impaired, call the
Florida Relay Services at 1-800-955-8770
7/2, 7/9


irj THI .i-1i .11f T , 'i . .T T c : , ,l: l-[r , Jt |,Jl. I 'il. ll ,i ,.
SLi' IH ll I rAT I 'nJ[ 0 tilJ
File No,: 2009CP0757
IN RE: ESTATE OF
EUDORA H. POTTER
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of
Summary Administration has been entered in
the estate of EUDORA H. POTTER, deceased, File
Number 2009CP0757, by the Circuit Court for
Seminole County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 301 N. Park Avenue, Sanford,
Florida 32771; that the decedent's date of death
was March 23, 2009; that the total value of the
estate is $43,500.00 and that the names and
addresses of those to whom it has been assigned
by such order are:
Name / Address
DANIEL L. POTTER as Trustee EUDORA H,
POTTER REVOCABLE TRUST, dated March 18, 2004
/ 2330 Carolton Road, Maitland, Florida 32751
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and
persons having claims or demands against the
estate of the decedent other than those for whom
provision for full payment was made in the Order
of Summary Administration must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE
TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is
July 9, 2009.
Attorney for Person Giving Notice:
Matthew H. Roby, Esquire
Attorney
Florida Bar No. 0505641
831 West Morse Boulevard
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone: (407) 647-8065
Fax: (407) 647-3880
Person Giving Notice:
Daniel L. Potter
2330 Carolton Road
Maitland, Florida 32751
7/9,7/16


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
CASE No. 2009CA366914
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY,
AS TRUSTEE IN TRUST FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE
CERTIFICATE HOLDERS FOR ARGENT SECURITIES
TRUST 2005-W2, ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2005-W2,
PLAINTIFF,
VS.
ABRAHAM POLANCO, ET AL.
DEFENDANTSS.
NOTICE OF ACTION
To: Abraham Polanco
RESIDENCE: UNKNOWN
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 3000 Springdale Blvd.,
Apt. V305, Palm Springs, FL 33461
AND TO:All persons claiming an interest by, through,
under, or against the aforesaid defendantss.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to fore-
close a mortgage on the following described prop-
erty located in Seminole County, Florida:
LOT(S) 116, SANFORD PLACE, ACCORDING
TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 33, PAGES) 33,34,35, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF SEMINOLE COUNTY, FLORIDA
has been filed against you, and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to this
action, on Gladstone Law Group, PA., attorneys for
plaintiff, whose address is 101 Plaza Real South,
Suite 219, Boca Raton, FL 33432, and file the
original withthe Clerk of the Court, within 30 days
after the first publication of this notice, otherwise
a default may be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the Complaint.
This notice shall be published once a week for
two consecutive weeks in the Winter Park-Maitland
Observer, Seminole County.
DATED: June 19, 2009
MARYANNE MORSE, CLERK
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Carol Moore
Deputy Clerk of the Court
NOTICE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT OF 1990
Administrative Order No. 08-01
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to
the provision of certain assistance. Please contact
Court Administration at The Seminole Civil Court-
house, 301 N. Park Avenue, Suite 301, Sanford,
FL 32771-1292, (407) 665-4227 within 2 working
days of your receipt of this notice. If you are hearing
or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 or 711.
7/2,7/9



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA,
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 48-2009-CP-000795-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF MABEL
R. FURR a/k/a MABEL ANNETTE FURR,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of MABEL R.
FURR A/K/A MABEL ANNETTE FURR, deceased,
whose date of death was February 15, 2009; File
Number 48-2009-CP-000795-0, is pending in the
Circuit Court for ORANGE County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 425 N. Orange
Avenue, Orlando, Florida 32801. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served, must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice Is: July
2,2009.
RICHARD A. LEIGH, ESQUIRE
Attorney for Personal Representative
Florida Bar No. 119591
Swann & Hadley, PA
1031 W.Morse Blvd., Suite 350
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone: 407-647-2777
NANCY LITTLETON
Personal Representative
50989 US Hwy 27, Lot 274
Davenport, Florida 33897
7/2,7/9


irJ THI I:- '.IIIT ,i illr[ tI THE ri jtl iH l.11. 'I0 -I.
I i m . IIf iri il juo . ,. , i'),.i .i ..i wrji. L , -1iii
I " .)I,, a a i .
Division 32A
TRUSTCO BANK,
Plaintiff,
Vs,
ALFREDO GALLEGOS and DORA GALLEGOS,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that on the 18th day of
August, 2009, at 11:00 a.m. in Room 350 of the
Courthouse of Orange County, Florida, 425 S.
Orange Avenue, Orlando FL 32801 the undersigned
Clerk will offer for sale the following described
real property:
LOT 211, PARK MANOR ESTATES, SECTION 10,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 4 PAGES 60, PUBLIC RECORDS OF
ORANGE COUNTY FLORIDA.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to
the Final Judgment of Foreclosure in Civil Case
No. 08-CA-13257 Division 32A now pending in the
Circuit Court In Orange County, Florida.
In accordance with the Americans With
Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing
a special accommodation to participate in this pro-
ceeding should contact Court Administration at 37
North Orange Avenue, Suite 1130, Orlando, Florida
32801, telephone number 407/836-2050, not later
than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hear-
ing Impaired, (TOD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V)
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Any person claiming an Interest In the surplus
from the sale, It any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.
Dated this 24th day of June, 2009.
Lydia Gardner
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Corine Herry
Civil Court Seal
As Deputy Clerk
JEFFRY R. JONTZ
SWANN & HADLEY, P.A,
Post Office Box 1961
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 647-2777
Facsimile No.: (407) 647-2157
7/2,7/9


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case Number: 2009-CA-007989-0
Division: 33
TRUSTCO BANK,
Plaintiff,
v
DAVID V SMITH and ANN M. SMITH,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: DAVID V SMITH
ANN M. SMITH
14021 Portrush Drive
Orlando, FL 32828
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a Complaint to Foreclose
Mortgage on the following described real property
located in Orange County, Florida, to-wit:

LOT 100, SHERWOOD PHASE TWO, ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
37. PAGE 74-75 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF OR-
ANGE COUNTY. FLORIDA
has been filed against you, and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it
on, Plaintiff's Attorney, whose address is: Swann
& Hadley, P.A,, 1031 West Morse Boulevard, Suite
350, Winter Park. Florida 32789, on or before July
31, 2009, and file the original with the Clerk of the
Court of Orange County either before service on
Plaintiff's attorneys, or immediately thereafter, oth-
erwise a default will be entered against you for relief
demanded in the Complaint.
If you're a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to
the provision of certain assistance. Please contact
Court Administration at 425 N. Orange Avenue, Or-
lando, Florida 32801, Telephone: (407) 836-2000
within two (2) working days of your receipt of this
notice. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call
1-800-955-8771.
WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on this
29th day of June, 2009.
Lydia Gardner
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: CHRISTINA BUSTAMANTE
CIVIL COURT SEAL
Deputy Clerk
5/28,6/4


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA, PROBATE
DIVISION
CASE NO. 48-2009-CP-001406-0
IN RE: Estate of
CLARENCE E. SMITH,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of CLARENCE E.
SMITH, deceased, whose date of death was June
14, 2009, File Number 48-2009-CP-001406-0,
Is pending In the Circuit Court for Orange County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which Is
425 North Orange Avenue, Room 340, Orlando,
Florida 32801. The names and addresses of
the Personal Representative and the Personal
Representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice has been
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against the
decedent's estate must file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED,
The date of first publication of this Notice Is
July 9, 2009.

Attorney for Personal Representative:
KENNETH F. MURRAH
Florida Bar No,: 0057494
Murrah, Doyle and Wigle, P.A.
P.O. Box 1328
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 644-9801


Personal Representative:
DENNIS E. SMITH
1530 Chestnut Avenue
Orange City, Florida 32763


7/9, 7/16


RONEY I The professor and the pun


< continued from the last page


said Badd.
"Good," said Goode, taking my
arm.
I grabbed a big paper bag and
walked up the aisle with Goode.
When we returned I laid the
bag on the countertop by Strange.
"Well, think-tank," asked
Goode, "do you deny the strange
thing Strange said you said?"
"No, I said what she said I said."
"Well, that's good," said Badd.
"Now let's go to the station."
"One moment, my good man," I
said to Badd.
"I'm Badd. He's Goode,"
snapped _Badd in a huff.
"Whatever," I said. "Please let

me interrogate Strange."
"Shoot. Make it quick," said
Badd.
"Ursula, my dear, what kind of
killer do you say I say I am?"
"What's your point?" asked
Badd.
"Here's the point," I said. Lifting
the big bag, I dumped four boxes
onto the countertop.


"Teachers!" muttered Goode.
"You see," I began, "Strange had
remarked that I had bought four
of the same item. Being a profes-
sorial punster, I answered her with
a pun - a silly play on words that
I hoped would amuse her. Strange
proved the old adage that no
knowledge is a dangerous thing."
"Is that good?" asked Badd.
"Officer Badd," I said, "words
are often ambiguous."
"Bigamists? That's strange,"
exclaimed Badd.
"Not me!" said Strange.
"That's good," said Badd.
"No, I'm not one either," said
Goode.
"Strange," I said, "Be good. You
asked me what I was going to do
with the four items. I said, 'I'm
going to consume them.' Then you
said, 'Sir, all four at one time?' You
see, officers, my punch line started
all this fuss. I told Ursula, 'You may
now declare honestly to the world
that I'm a confessed serial cereal-
killer!
"I'm hooked on Wheaties!"


STOP LEG CRAMPS L M


BEFORE THEY STOP YOU. F


Calcet's triple calcium formula is
designed to help stop low calcium leg
cramps. Just ask your pharmacist. Tdp IC alcium


I 100CtellNt


NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
SALE BY CASH AUCTION
THE FOLLOWING UNITS
On July 28, 2009, at Assured Self-Storage, Inc. to
the highest bidder for cash, items containedin the
following units:
C1083 - Jacqueline Mendez - Household Items
02021 - Ronnie Cossin - Household Items
D2153 - Aileen Rivera - Household Items
D2083 - Joshua Capretti - Household Items
D1004 - Mike Williams - Household Items
D2089 - Steve & Helen Gedda - Household
Items
C1018 - Me'Chell Metcalf - Household Items
81031 -Workstream - Business Items
C1010 -Workstream - Business Items
B1018 -Workstream - Business Items
C1129 -Assured Self-Storage - Pool Tables
TO BE HELD AT
510 DOUGLAS AVENUE
ALTAMONTE SPRINGS, FL
ON JULY 28, 2009
AT 10:00 A.M.
ASSURED SELF-STORAGE, INC.
Assured Self-Storage, Inc. reserves the right to bid
and to refuse or reject any and all bids.
7/9,7/16
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2009-CP-001375-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ERNEST LEE PEGHINY, SR.
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Ernest Lee
Peghiny, Sr., deceased, whose date of death was
April 24, 2009, and whose social security number
is XXX-XX-2950, file number 2009-CP-001375-0,
Is pending in the Circuit Court for Orange County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is
425 North Orange Avenue, Room 310, Orlando,
Florida 32801. The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth below,
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice is required
to be served must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED,
The date of first publication of this notice Is
July 9, 2009.

Attorney for Personal Representative:
Kenneth R. Marchnman
Florida Bar No, 098705
Hunter & Marchman, P.A.
1330 Palmetto Avenue
Winter Park, FL 32789
Telephone: (407) 647-6900


Personal Representative:.
Melanie Louise Sabino
1807 Magnolia Avenue
Winter Park, Florida 32789


7/9, 7/16


NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Public notice is hereby given that, on the date and
at the time listed below, and continuing from day
to day until all goods are sold, we will sell at public
auction, to the highest bidder, for cash, at the ware-
house of United Stor-AlI, at 965 Semoran Blvd.,
Winter Park, FL 32792, the contents of the following
storage units containing household and/or business
goods, for rent and other charges for which a lien
on same is claimed, to wit.
DATE OF SALE: July 30, 2009
TIME OF SALE: 12:00 PM or thereafter
Mary Kay Gonzalez Pizzazz Theatrical #3 Costumes,
furniture; Rogelio Trevino #117 Household items,
Commercial equipment; Samantha D Pattway #159
Household items; Martin Lane #193, Household
items; Luis E Cordoves #387 Household items,
tools; Yamilet Rivera #406 Clothes; Burton L
Bruggeman #411 Files, Personal Items; Bernard
Cansler #556 Household items, furniture; Trang
Nguyen #653 Household Items.

Auctioneer. Storage Protection Auction Services
-license 593. The above notice is to be published
once a week for two consecutive weeks. Said sale
to be under and by virtue of the statues of the State
of Florida, in such cases made and provided.
Thank you
JORGE HITSCHFELD - PROPERTY MANAGER
7/9, 7/16


CITY OF WINTER PARK
401 Park Avenue South
Winter Park, Florida 32789

NOTICE OF EQUALIZATION HEARING
w KEYES AVENUE PLUG-IN
OwiTlTa Tira . WINTER PARK, FLORIDA
Dear Property Owner;
Notice Is hereby given that a public equalization hearing will be held on July 27, 2009, at 3:30 p.m.,
at the Commission Chambers, City Hall, 401 Park Avenue South, Winter Park, Florida, by the City
Commission of the City of Winter Park, Florida, sitting as an equalizing board to hear any and all com-
plaints regarding the special assessments described in Resolution No. 2024-09 of the City Commission
adopted on June 22, 2009 (the "Assessment Resolution") related to the undergrounding of electric/
CATV facilities east of Keyes Avenue, west of Park Avenue, south of Stovin Avenue and north of Webster
Avenue, in the City of Winter Park, Florida (the "Project").
All affected property owners have a right to appear at the hearing and to file written objections with the
City Commission within 20 days of the date of the first publication of this notice.
The Project is more particularly described in plans and specifications on file with the City.
It Is proposed that the assessments for the undergrounding of electric/CATV facilities in the total
amount of $74,976.00 to be paid in 10 equal annual installments, commencing with the tax bill for the
calendar year 2009 or in full at the option of the property owner. Assessments will be assessed on an
estimated unit cost of $3,259.00 per parcel among the respective parcels of land east of Keyes Avenue,
west of Park Avenue, south of Stovin Avenue and north of Webster Avenue, specially benefited thereby,
all as more particularly set forth In the Assessment Resolution,
All Interested persons are advised that the description of each property to be assessed and the amount
to be assessed to each parcel or piece of property may be ascertained from the preliminary assess-
ment-roll on file at the office of the City Clerk of the City of Winter Park, Florida, at City Hall, 401 Park
Avenue South, Winter Park, Florida.
It is the Intention of the City Commission to adjust and equalize all assessments on a basis of justice
and right, following the hearing, and adopt a final assessment roll to be recorded in the Official records
of Orange County, Florida, which shall constitute a lien on all property so assessed, coequal with
all state, county, district and municipal taxes, as provided In Section 170.09, Florida Statutes, and
pursuant to which the assessments will be collected by the Tax Collector of Orange County, Florida,
together with such taxes.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the City Commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he/she will need a record of the proceedings, and for such
purpose he/she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings Is made, which record
includes tile testimony and evidence upon which thie appeal is to be based. (Section 286.0105, Florida
Statutes)
Persons with disabilities needing assistance to participate in any of these proceedings should contact
tihe City Clerk's office, (407) 599-3277, at least 48 hours In advance of the meeting.
7/9. 7/16


I 9


IL---� ---- --- -..-...........---~- .......~ ~""`~ --~""""`~~"


�, I I iii�


I







Page 14 Thursday, July 9, 2009


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Marketplace


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OVIEDO YARD SALE
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419.

VENDING MACHINES
Vending machines, CASH business, 34
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Reading volunteers NEEDED - Jackson
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for adults who are interested in serving as a
Reading Mentor to assist students who are
reading below grade level. Volunteers work
one-on-one with an assigned student before
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Sessions are from 8:30-9:00 a.m., M-F
Please contact Connie O'Hanlon for more
information, 407-365-7585.






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For Sale
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Financial Aid if qualified. Call (866)858-
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AIRLINES ARE HIRING - Train for high
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Log on to WorkforceCentralFlorida.
corn where you can enter the Job Title
in the "Search For Jobs" box to see
more information on these jobs and
search thousands of additional openings
throughout Central RFlorida, at NO COST.
Apply by following the directions listed. For
further help visit the WORKFORCE CENTRAL
FLORIDA Orange County Office at 5166 East
Colonial Drive or call (407) 531-1227.

Senior Systems Engineer
Job Description: Responsible for providing
qualified systems engineering support on
hardware and software training systems
development projects. Leads teams of
engineering and technical specialists in
functional and details systems analysis of
complex military training systems. Assesses
training tasks and identifies functional
fidelity requirements for real -time
simulation of military systems as applied
to training of operators and maintainers.
Identifies functional and derived system
requirements supporting training system
design, development, test, documentation,
and fielding objectives. Work Monday-
Friday, 8:00am-5:00pm.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9410703

Accounts Receivables/Collections Clerk
Job Description: Responsible for Insurance
and patient collections, querying reports, and
billing. Resolves inappropriate payments on
outstanding balances and identifies transit
pay and non-compliance. Work Monday-
Friday, hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $13.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9413070

Landscape Supervisor
Job Description: Responsible for manpower,
equipment, and material needs for projects.
Directs projects from start to finish. Work
days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $30,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9412654

Active Server Pages (ASP) Programmer/
Developer
Job Description: Responsible for maintaining
and supporting enterprise internet, intranet,
and other applications used internally.
Enhances existing applications and creates
new. Works with other programmers and
management to ensurethat hat they have the
right requirements to complete the request
to meet the internal clients' needs. Works
with others to perform validation and testing
of enhancements and new development.
Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $35,000.00-$50,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9413018

Customer Program Manager
Job Description: Responsible for the
coordination and direction of programs and
projects affecting customer satisfaction
with their choice of systems. Reports
to Senior Management. Designs and
implements improved processes, programs,
or operational policies governing customer
relationships. Handles incoming requests
from customers and ensures that Issues
are resolved both promptly and accurately.
Develops, tracks, and reports key customer


satisfaction performance metrics. Work days
and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9415126

Senior Instructional Designer/Project
Lead
Job Description: Responsible for the
leadership of project and customer
management services. Works with clients
and manages courseware production. Work
days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9411155

Dishwasher
Job Description: Responsible for clearing
trays of leftover food, utensils, soda cans,
and loading/unloading dish machine.
Collects racks of glassware, dishes,
silverware and runs through dishwasher.
Cleans carts/modules and transports
garbage to dumpster. Maintains order and
cleanliness of work area and operates dish
machine. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $7.50 per hour
Job Order Number: 9414300

Paint Shop - Leadperson
Job Description: Responsible for painting
various products in a local production /
fabrication shop catering to the theme park
and/or amusement industry. Uses single
stage and base coat/clear coat automotive
paint system. Work days and hours may
vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9408446

Insurance Sales Agent
Job Description: Responsible for providing
ongoing service to a large number of existing
clients in a specific geographical area.
Sells and services life, health, and annuity
products for new and existing clients.
Uses laptops to access the latest clients
information, for needs based presentations,
and clients annual reviews. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $45,000.00-$65,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9371048

Medical Assistant
Job Description: Responsible for performing
administrative and certain clinical duties
underthe direction of a physician. Schedules
appointments, maintains medical records,
and performs billing/coding for insurance
purposes. Takes and records vital signs
and medical histories, prepares patients for
examination, draws blood, and administers
medications as directed by physician. Work
Monday-Friday, hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $10.00-$13.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9413085

Sales Concierge
Job Description: Responsible for sales/
concierge selling and providing concierge
services for local attractions and theme
parks in the local area. Generates leads over
the telephone. Plans packages for customers
regarding ticketing for local attractions and
theme parks and makes in/outbound calls
for follow ups. Work 8:00am-11:00pm, days
may vary.
Pay Rate: $10.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9415096

Urodynamist
Job Description: Responsible for performing
catheterizations and/or cystometrograms.
Administers local, inhalation, intravenous,
and other anesthetics and assesses the
needs of individuals, families or communities
including assessment of individuals' home
or work environments to identify potential
health or safety problems. Conducts
specified laboratory tests. Consults and
coordinates with health care team members
to assess, plan, implement and evaluate
patient care plans. Work Monday-Friday,
8:00am-5:00pm.
Pay Rate: $10.00-$15.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9411032

Tree Care Services Crew Leader
Job Description: Responsible for ensuring
equipment is properly inspected and working
properly before, during, and after each day's
work. Completes a pre-trip inspection report
and ensures the safety of pedestrians and
passing cars from falling tree debris through
proper job setup. Lays out cones, posts
"Tree Work Ahead" signs, and uses caution
tape, as well as monitoring the area during
the course of work. Understands proper
tree pruning techniques to perform various
operations. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $10.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9414587

Cook I
Job Description: Responsible for preparing
all food items and ensuring quality of food
and flow to guests. Meets with Supervisor/
Manager for daily menu specials or specific
production needs. Maintains a high level
of quality and consistency in regard to the
preparation and plating of all foods and
maintains a clean work area and sanitizes
before leaving shift. Restocks and assists
with inventory as needed. Assists Cashiers
in receiving orders from guests and collects
payments. Work days and hours may vary.


Pay Rate: $8.75-$9.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9414644

Quality Assurance Manager
Job Description: Responsible for leading a
comprehensive corrective and preventive
action program across all products.
Supervises and manages engineers and
Inspectors and performs other job related
duties as assigned. Work Monday-Friday,
8:00am-6:00pm.
Pay Rate: $80,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9414502

Common Area Attendant
Job Description: Responsible for cleaning
and maintaining the common areas of
a resort to meet property standards.
Vacuums carpets, upholstered furniture, and
draperies. Empties wastebaskets, cleans
ashtrays, and transports other trash/waste
to disposal areas. Sweeps, scrubs, waxes,
and/or polishes floors, using brooms, mops,
and/or powered scrubbing and waxing
machines. Dusts and polishes furniture and
equipment. Keeps walkways, stairs, and
all other public spaces maintained. Cleans
restroom areas, replaces paper products,
and washes windows. Work days and hours
may vary.
Pay Rate: $8.50 per hour
Job Order Number: 9414650

Erector/Iron Worker
Job Description: Responsible for installing
light /structural steel (stairs, rails, columns,
beams, joist and deck). Performs stick
welding and other job related duties as
assigned. Work Monday-Friday, 7:30am-
4:00pm.
Pay Rate: $12.00-$14.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9414483

Detaller
Job Description: Responsible for washing,
cleaning, waxing, and vacuuming interiors
of customer's, display, and stock boats.
Ensures all components are in proper
working order, inspects boat's overall
condition so that it will be acceptable to
the customer, and verifies all purchased
accessories have been installed as per the
buyers order. Moves boats in and out of
storage and transports boats around the
lot with a tractor. Work days and hours may
vary.
Pay Rate: $9.00-$10.00 per hour-
Job Order Number: 9415615

Executive Secretary/Administrative
Assistant
Job Description: Responsible for providing
administrative support. Types, collates/
copies, answers telephones, and
coordinates schedules and meetings. Types
correspondence to include word processing/
typing of letters, memos, forms, policies and
procedures (includes handling of confidential
information). Schedules and organizes
complex activities such as meetings, travel,
and management for departmental staff,
management, and/or executives. Work days
and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $12.92-$19.78 per hour
Job Order Number: 9416251

Contract Administrator
Job Description: Responsible for performing
proposal preparations and negotiations.


Coordinates and maintains status of
program issues and performs other duties
as assigned. Work Monday-Friday, hours
may vary.
Pay Rate: $50,000.00-$75,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9415982

Director of Accreditation and
Performance Improvement
Job Description: Responsible for reviewing
audit procedures in place to track
performance improvement parameters and
providing monthly status report of all active
Performance Improvement, regulatory and
grantee required activities. Develops Activity
Calendar for scheduled reviews/monitoring
of policies and procedures. Directs periodic
unannounced mock reviews of centers
to assess preparedness and develops
manage current accreditation policies and
procedures. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $25.00-$30.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9415629

Cashier
Job Description: Responsible for handling
register transactions to include cash and
creditcard transactions. Tips staffs needed
and balances the cash register at the end
of the shift. Assists other staff members
with various tasks. Work Monday-Friday,
7:00am-2:00pm.
Pay Rate: $8.50-$9.50 per hour
Job Order Number: 9416950








WelS O
-- ( Crossword -
Answers
Solution time: 25 mins.






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Answer
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200 FLORIDA HOMES
including 60 in the Orlando area

SATURDAY

AUGUST 8th * 1:00 PM
Holiday Inn Select
Orlando International Airport

Get your next home at the price you set with NO STARTING
BIDS. If you're buying your first home or your 10th, today's
housing market and low interest rates make this an ideal time
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OR CALL FOR A FREE BROCHURE

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Successful bidders will be required to put down $3,000 per property. The down
payment MUST be in the form of CASH or CASHIER'S CHECK made payable to the
bidder's name. 5% premium on each sale. All sales subject to seller's approval.
H&M A8110: B.G. Hudson, Jr. BK3006464, AU230;
RM. Harvill SL534399, DT Webb BK534398, S.W. Marshall AU2939







Winter Ialrk IMa n beeT rsyJl920 Pg


ntmkGames


BUT TRUE

By Samantha Weaver

It was comedian and TV
host Jay Leno who made
the following sage observa-
tion: "Give a man a fish and
he will eat for a day. Teach a
man to fish and he will eat


for a lifetime. Teach a man
to create an artificial short-
age of fish and he will eat
steak."

Those who keep track of
such things say that the
most popular name for pet
pythons is, perhaps unsur-
prisingly, "Monty."

You've probably heard of
haggis, the Scottish dish
that is considered (by few,


I imagine) to be a delicacy.
Unless you're a Scot your-
self, though, you probably
don't know what's in it.
Well, you may not thank
me for enlightening you,
but here's a rough descrip-
tion: Haggis consists of the
lungs, heart and liver of a
sheep, mixed with onions,
suet, oatmeal and season-
ings, then boiled inside the
sheep's stomach.


Fashion historians claim
that England's Queen Eliza-
beth I owned 3,000 of the
elaborate dresses popular
during her time.

If you're like the average
American, there are ap-
proximately 10,000 words
in your vocabulary.

The Great Pyramid of
Cheops in Egypt is so large
that its base would cover


10 football fields.



Thought for the Day: "The
reason why so few good
books are written is that so
few people who can write
know anything." - Walter
Bagehot

� 2009 King Features Synd., Inc.


ARIES (March 21 to April
19) Don't be surprised if, in
spite of your wellmade plans,
something goes awry. Your
knowledge of the facts plus
your Arian charm will help
you work it out.

TAURUS (April 20 to May
20) A personal relationship
seems to be demanding
more than you feel you're
able to give. Best advice:
Confront the issue. You
could find the situation
surprisingly easy to manage.

GEMINI (May 21 to June
20) Resist being pressured
into meeting your self-
imposed deadline. This is
important if you really feel
that taking more time to
finish a project could save
time in the long run.

CANCER (June 21 to July
22) A vacation choice seems
less interesting than when
you first made it. Could it be
a matter of the place or the
people going with you? Find
out before you consider a
change of plans.

LEO (July 23 to Aug.
22) Someone might be
overriding your Leonine
logic to get you to agree to
'"favors" you would normally
avoid. Take a new look at
.what you've been asked and
see if you've been misled.


VIRGO (Aug. 23 to
Sept. 22) Try to keep that
emerging "judgmental"
aspect in check this week.
Too many critiques on
relatively unimportant issues
could create a lot of negative
bounce-back reactions.

LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct.
22) Facing unpleasant facts
about an associate isn't easy.
But ignoring them isn't wise.
Ask a trusted (and neutral)
friend to help guide you on
what to do and how you
might do it.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to
Nov. 21) A shift in opinion
regarding a workplace
situation could go a long
way in vindicating the stand
you've taken. But be aware
that a satisfactory resolution
could still be a long way off.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22
to Dec. 21) It's not like
you to choose the easy way
rather than the right way to
do things. So, follow your
instincts and feel assured
they will lead you to the
right decision. Good luck.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to
Jan. 19) Hold off on making
a personal commitment
until you find out what it
really entails and whose
interests are actually
involved. There could be
hidden facts you need to
know.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to
Feb. 18) A new friend offers
an unexpected opportunity
that could lead to a career


change. Check it out carefully
and consider getting an
assessment from someone
familiar with this field.

PISCES (Feb. 19 to March
20) A surprising discovery
leads to mixed reactions
from those involved in the
"revelation." But as you come
to appreciate the truth, you'll
be able to also come to terms
with your feelings.

BORN THIS WEEK: Your
love of travel helps you
appreciate the wonders of
the world. You would find a
satisfying career in any travel-
related industry.

0 2009 King Features Synd., Inc.





by Linda Thistle

7 4 8 9
9 2 6 3
3 5 1 4
9 4 3 5
6 1 2 7
8 9 7 1
6 5 2 4
4 7 5 8
2 3 5 6
Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way
that each row across, each column down and each
small 9-box square contains all of the
numbers from one to nine.


* Moderate ** Challenging
** * HOO BOY!
� 2009 King Features Synd., Inc.


HOCUS-F S2A


BY
HENRY BOLTINOF


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Thursday, July 9, 2009 Pae1


Winter Palrk / Maitland Observer







Page 16 Thursday, July 9, 2009 Winter Park / Maitland Observer


The Learning Tree is a Ministry of
First Baptist Church of Winter Park

We offer Full-Day Infant Care and Childcare Year-
Round, Preschool Classes and much more!
Now Accepting Enrollment for Full-Day Summer Camp (K5-Completed 3rd Grade)

Rooted grounded Established in 1973 - we are celebrating 36
in Jesus Christ." years of service this year.
(407) 628-1761 1021 New York Avenue N.,
www.FBCWinterPark.org Winter Park, Florida 32789
We are licensed Through Department of Children and Families(C070RO 154)


4IlrA~-~


The Craft SuperShow is
a crafter's dream come true.
" ; - -,. i-- j

* Crafting demonstrations, make-n-takes
and exhibits
- Unique craft supplies and gift items to buy
* Family fun and entertainment
- Children under 10 admitted free
- Workshop classes and events
* Promotions, prizes and giveaways


Maitland Leisure Serxices Presents






Party
in the







Saturday, July 18

Lake Lily Park

6 pm


As an experienced financial
planner, Elizabeth Brothers
understands the importance of
anticipating change and taking
control wherever you can. That's
why she moved to The Mayflower.
"In financial planning, it's
important to know you have some
control over medical costs," she
says. "A continuing care retirement


mnusie pana Gcitma Pood 1Movie5 js -


community like The Mayflower enables
you to do that. But don't wait too
long - or you won't be able to enjoy
all the benefits a CCRC has to offer."
If you're looking at retirement
living options, take a look at
The Mayflower. It's a good plan
for the future.
Call today to secure a spot on our
waiting list.
(407) 672-1620



T- 1 MAYFLO\)TER
A Il.', for the Future'
1620 Mayflower Court
NWinier Park, Florida 32792
7 www.themayflower.cn om


"Change Is Inevitable,
But You Can Manage It
To Your Advantage."


I


Page 16 Thursday, July 9, 2009


Winter Park/ Maitland Observer


"


Ial ~




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