Winter Park-Maitland observer
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00144
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park FL
Publication Date: 7/2/2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates: 28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID: UF00091444:00144

Full Text





Winter Park / Maitland


Business Briefs.............AS
City Talks...............A8
Community Bulletin........ A5
Play On!..... ......A16
Legals................A17
Marketplace............A18
Games................A19


Thursday, July 2, 2009
inyBank.net
Locally owned.
qY Locally produced. o

K Widely read. On
407
www.WPMObserver.com
Rlember FDIC



Rockin' on the 4th


ARCHIVE PHOTO BY CAROLE ARTHURS
Elvis shook the floor at Winter Park's Olde Fashioned 4th of July Celebration in Central Park last year. It's back again this
year, filling the streets of Winter Park with patriotic cheer, music and bicycles as a parade makes its way down Park Avenue.


JENNY ANDREASSON
- FRF TR S i.-.:
Star-spangled banners will
wave proudly in the air Sat-
urday as families celebrate
the nation's Independence
Day.
Some will watch a pa-
rade of children pedal their
bikes. Some will sing along
to live music while others
will enter the local apple
pie-baking contest.


Grills will sizzle and
smoke with standard
American fare - hamburg-
ers, hot dogs and corn-on-
the-cob - washed down
with a cold beer or a coke.
After stomachs are filled
and grills are cool, Ameri-
cans' eyes will turn to the
night sky, where explosions
of light will ignite and fiz-
zle, each one more vibrant
than the last.
Here are some of the


ways you can spend this
year's Fourth of July:

Winter Park
The city of Winter Park
will host its Olde Fash-
ioned 4th of July Celebra-
tion from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Saturday, July 4 at Central
Park. The Bach Festival Or-
chesta and Choir will per-
form. There will be horse-
> turn to FIREWORKS on A7


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discussion

delayed
JENNY ANDREASSON

A scheduled vote on
amendments to the
Maitland Town Center
development agreement
has been postponed after
the developer said he needs
more time.
Two work sessions have
been canceled and the
decision item has been
pulled from the Maitland
City Council's July 13
agenda, leaving Councilman
Phil Bonus calling for input
from the citizens regarding
a project that "cannot ever
materialize as planned."
Bob Reese, president of
Brossier Co., told the Council
on June 22 that he wouldn't
have the bonding in place for
the new fire station before
the Council was asked to
vote on amendments to the
Town Center agreement.
"The July 13 deadline is
premature," City Attorney
Cliff Sheppardsaid."Bobwill
not have the construction
drawings done to get the
bond in place."
The fire station and the
Town Center projects are
interwoven. In April, the
Council, in a split vote,
> turn to BROSSIER on A6


More animals being left behind


RACHEL MURPHY
GUEST REPORTER
Loud barks echoed off the
concrete walls of the Or-
ange County Animal Shelter
on Monday as John Panetti
sauntered through with his
wife and two grandchil-
dren.
"I have never seen so
many animals here," Panet-
ti, 67, said.
Vanessa Bouffard, mar-


keting and public relations
spokeswoman for Orange
County Animal Services,
confirmed Panetti's obser-
vation.
The Orange County Shel-
ter, which was designed to
house as many as 250 ani-
mals, has seen a 12 percent
increase in owner surren-
ders since July 2008, ac-
cording to a report provid-
ed by Bouffard.
"We are definitely see-


ing an increase in animals,"
Bouffard said.
Panetti, a resident of Or-
ange County who has pre-
viously adopted several cats
from the shelter, said the
center's burgeoning popu-
lation concerns him. He
fears many cats and dogs
are being turned in because
many people have lost their
jobs and can no longer af-
ford them.
From June 2008 until


May 2009, the Seminole
County Animal Shelter, lo-
cated in Sanford, has seen
an increase in the intake of
animals. More than 8,000
animals entered the shelter,
and of that number, 5,208
were euthanized.
"Likewise, around that
time, we began to notice an
increase in the number of
adoptions and individuals

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NDews ret

Dawgs return to winning ways


ISAAC BABCOCK


The Diamond Dawgs have
caught fire in the last week,
winning two of the last three
games as they surged their
way through the weekend
on offensive firepowerr'
But that didn't stop Cler-
mont from dousing them
on Sunday with a 6-3 win.
The Dawgs managed to
climb in the league stand-
ings despite the weekend
loss, inching closer to the
Florida Collegiate Summer
League-leading DeLand
Suns. They Dawgs entered
the week nine games out
of the league lead, and only
one game shy of Clermont.
That's a big improvement
from the start of the year,
when the Dawgs had slid to
a dozen games behind the
Suns in a little more than
two weeks on the field.
A slashed team ERA in
the last week helped. The
Dawgs started last week
with an ERA hovering near
6.50. Last- week's games
saw more control from the
mound and a drop to 5.17


for the season.
In the meantime the
Dawgs continued to show
dominance on defense,
leading the league in field-
ing percentage at .958.
An unlikely offensive


hero emerged from the
Dawgs' pitching staff last
week, as Anthony Figliolia
went on a tear, jumping his
batting average to a league-
leading .368. Teammate
Michael Brennan isn't far


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407-951-8349


behind with a .318 average. leading Suns at home, then
"Figs" maintained his domi- travel to Clermont at 7 p.m.
nance on the mound, with on Saturday. They return
a 1.72 ERA after 15 irnings, home against Sanford at 1
with only 3 earned runs. p.m. Sunday.
At 7 p.m. this Friday, July
3, the Dawgs play the league-






Bible Classes - 9-00 a m. Sunday& :15 Wednesday


5410 Lake Howell Road
Winter Park


Gary W. Summers, preacher
407-657-0657


Professional Contract Services, LLC


Licensed & Insured


Construction Management Services


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Build Turn key
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Winter Park


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Residential and Commerical


PHOTO -Y ISAAC BABCOCK - THE OBSERVER
Strong pitching helped drop the team ERA to near 5.00 as the Diamond Dawgs surged last weekend, winning two of three games and climbing closer to Clermont.


L I


r-


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Paoce 2 ,TusaJl ,20





VVWIIt I k /IiMc/ IObserver Thursy Jy 2


Pilots of the


airwaves


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK-.-- THE OBSERVER
Emergency radio operators worked 24 hours straight in a competition across the nation last weekend.


ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF

It's 8:32 p.m. Saturday and the
sun's about to disappear beyond
the black cloak of tree line on the
west end of Winter Springs' Central
Winds Park. Nine hundred and sev-
en miles away, 60 pounds of metal
are rocketing across the dome of
the Earth, northeast-bound in a
hurry, just as J.D. Smith awaits a
date with destiny.
"Any minute now, it'll start talk-
ing," Smith says.
Crouched on a park bench under
an awning, Smith sits in a gray cap
tracking a ghost on the horizon.
Seconds later, that speeding hunk
of metal wakes with a kiss from the
setting sun and its haunting signal
says hello once more, just as a sti-
fled grin broadens Smith's face.
Reaching for signals in the sky,
Americans by the tens of thousands
took to the radio airwaves in syn-
chronous- Saturday through Sun-
day. For 24 hours they shook hands
through the air, said hello, and a
quick goodbye, all in seconds at a
time as they raced to connect with
as many other radio operators as
their dialing fingers could get their
hands on.
This was all just a test, but the
worst kind. For guys like Bob Ma-
hon, cooped up and transmitting
for hours inside trailer the size of
a large refrigerator, the hypotheti-
cal is dead serious. A disaster has
just wiped out the electrical grid.
The cell phone towers are useless.
That's when the hams take to the air
and save the day, setting up disaster
communications across the area.
But on the last weekend of June ev-
eryyear, they go global, challenging
amateur radio clubs worldwide to
see who's the great communicator
on the airwaves.
Smith was looking a bit farther,
as his fingers clicked on his laptop
keyboard and spun a radio dial, and
a robotic satellite antenna in a golf-
cart-sized-trailer spun its metal
booms searching for a signal. He's
only going to get one chance to say
hello to a once-dead satellite and
maybe find somebody on the other
side of the globe, and that window
is only 12 minutes long. Mind set in
tunnel focus, his.restless eyes kept
watching the skies.
ELO's "Calling America" could
very well be the theme song play-
ing up the montage here. Smith's
voice is out in space trying to talk
to someone. On the other end he
hears "five-o calling," and he's in
business, using an ancient solar-
powered satellite as his personal
telephone.
Twenty-eight years ago, Oscar


Seven was a dead hunk of alumi-
num. But in 2002, it became some-
thing of folklore to some unusual
men and women who pilot the
airwaves across the atmosphere.
After being dead for 21 years, Oscar
Seven squawked back to life, as a
once-dead battery finally broke its
connection, and its spreading solar
wings were fired up by the sun.
And at 8:36 p.m., after frantic
spinning of a dial by satellite track-
er Dave Jordan's hand, the Lake
Monroe Amateur Radio Society was
on the air with a radio that predat-
ed disco.
Score 100 points for the LMARS
team. They were competing for
points across the country, with Ca-
nadians, and with countless oth-
ers on other parts of the globe,
but what's competition without
rivalry? They wanted to beat every-
body in the points chase, including
the Orlando Amateur Radio Club
across the county line.
Perhaps looking for a topograph-
ical advantage, the OARC group
had changed locations, no longer
stringing 300-foot antennas across
empty cow pasture. They'd taken
the dusty road out of Chuluota and
headed west for the Central Florida
Fairgrounds' wide-open fields.
Sensing a challenge, the LMARS
team just added more firepower,
hoisting a 50-foot crane antenna
over the treetops and unfurling
computer-guided satellite trackers
to boost their chances of racking
up contacts.
Somewhere around dinnertime
a dozen or so Boy Scouts showed
up and sent the park's average age
plummeting southward. For life-
long radio operator Rick Harrelson,
that's a good sign. Most of his fel-
low hams have long since outlived
a hint of gray. Though young by the
group average, Harrelson sports a
shock of white hair.
"We're still trying to get kids out
here, because we just keep getting
older," he said. "The younger people
are just into computers. Thankfully
we have that."
None of the kids stick around for
the swarms of mosquitoes in the
night. By Sunday morning, every-
body's still alive, but the clicks on
the Morse code are coming slower,
and a few voices have gone hoarse.
Two hours before powering
down, Jordan got lucky. Some-
where 200 miles above, astronaut
Bob Thirsk said hello from the In-
ternational Space Station, and Jor-
dan was on the other end of the
line. Score another 100 points.
"It's a long wait for something
like that," Jordan said. "But even
with just 30 seconds of talking, it
feels great."


Case No: 99-DEA-355396; Case No: 00-CRS-200500; Case No: 99-FBI-001716

DRUG DEALERS SEIZED ASSETS UP FORAUCTION.
JEWELRY SEIZED FROM NARCOTICS DEALERS, FINE ART FROM
DALI, CHAGALL, PICASSO AND OTHER FLASHY ITEMS TO BE
LIQUIDATED PIECE BYPIECE REGARDLESS OF COST OR VALUE
TOGETHER WITH GENERAL ORDER MERCHANDISE.


A;


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I?3~


LOCATION:

WINTER PARK
CIVIC CENTER


WINTER
PARK, FL

1050 West Morse Blvd
Call 407-599-3341 for
Directions.


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French living room sets, mahogany armoires, bronze figurines and wildlife, French
and English writing desks, Italian tapestry's, oil paintings, antiques from Europe
and the Orient, Tiffany style lamps, mahogany and wrought iron beds, porcelain
vases and bowls, gilt framed mirrors, diamond, emerald, sapphire and ruby rings,
Rolex watches, bracelets and necklaces including a large selection of estate pieces.
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omission * 15% Buyers Premium- For Information Call 678-680-5400 or
visit www.seizedestates.com * License #AB2686, Auctioneer # AU2762
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Thursday, July 2, 2009 , ag


Winter Park / Maitlandc Observer


blr7






I 2. 209WinterParkIMaitgandObser


Winter Park
Winter Park


June 19 to June 25


Criminal Mischief
An unknown suspect drove a vehicle
through the fence of a school and did "do-
nuts" on the soccer field at 2400 block Cady
Way on Friday, June 19.

An unknown suspect broke into a rear win-
dow at 400 block Country Club Drive, activating
the audible alarm system. The suspect signed
a waiver of prosecution. The incident occurred
on Sunday, June 21.

An unknown suspect intentionally damaged
the victims' motorcycle at 1400 block Norfolk
Ave. on Saturday, June 20.

Residential Burglary
An unknown suspect entered a carport


and stole blue and silver men's Model 26
Schwinn bicycle, which had a dog walker
attached to it. The incident occurred at 1600
block Carollee Lane on Saturday, June 20.

An unknown suspect forced open kitchen
French doors and stole fine jewelry along
with a Raymond Well women's gold watch at
1100 block N. Park Ave. on Monday June 22

An unknown suspect entered a fenced-in
back yard at 600 block W. Comstock Ave.
and stole a Silver Men's Mongoose bicycle
with black stripes and a broken right petal. The
bicycle has a front and rear light affixed to it as
well. The incident occurred on Monday, June
22.


Commercial Burglary
An unknown suspect pried open a rear
metal roll-up window; stole several cases
of candy and damaged the freezer door. The
incident occurred at 100 block Perth Lane on
Thursday, June 25.

Vehicle Burglary
An unknown suspect broke into the rear
driver's side window of a vehicle and stole a
stand up lamp at 1900 block Aloma Ave. on
Sunday, June 21.

An unknown suspect entered an unlocked
vehicle and stole a full set of Ping golf clubs
at 600 block Blairshire Circle on Monday, June
22.

An unknown dark-skinned male (possibly


Hispanic) broke a front passenger window
and stole a Garmin GPS unit. The suspect
was wearing gloves and fled the scene in a
blue Toyota. The incident occurred at 2000
block Mizell Ave. on Wednesday, June 24.

An unknown suspect pried open a front pas-
senger window of a vehicle, but stole nothing.
The incident occurred at 700 block Margaret
Square on Wednesday, June 24.


SHELTER I More pets suffer abandonment, and adoptions aren't keeping up


< continued from the front page

surrendering their animals,"
Seminole County Animal
Services Manager Morgan
Woodward said.
Bouffard said the animal
intake number goes up from
year to year as the popula-
tion increases, and she also
attributes the increase to
the economic downturn.
Panetti agrees. "The eco-
nomic times - people aren't
working, and when it comes
down to it, an animal is an
extra," Panetti said.
Challenging that per-
spective was Sue Hennessey,
a 61-year-old volunteer at
the Orange County Animal
Shelter.
During this economic
downturn, she said, pets can
offer people a sense of com-
fort. "It is somebody that
doesn't want anything but
love and food," Hennessey
said.
Hennessey began volun-
teering at the shelter five
weeks ago, after being laid
off from her job.
"They are comforting be-
cause, when you are laid off,
it can be a blow to your self-


esteem," Hennessey said.
"Animals don't want any-
thing but love aild they can
help relieve stress."
She said that the increase
in pets is a day-to-day situ-
ation. Hennessey said that
during her four-hour shift
two weeks ago, she adopted
out two cats and four kit-
tens, but during her next
shift did not see any adopt-
ed.
According to the Humane
Society of the United States,
6 million to 8 million dogs
and cats enter shelters each
year, and of those, 3 million
to 4 million are euthanized.
Cathy Hude, a volunteer
at the SPCA of Central Flor-
ida, said that the No. 1 rea-
son people surrender their
pets is that they are moving.
The second reason is that
they have lost their home,
which she said is a result of
the tough economy.
"They dump them here,"
Hude said. "Foreclosure has
put a lot of pets in here. We
think of them as children,
and people wouldn't just
give up their children."
Beginning in October
2008 and ending March


PHOTO BY RACHEL MURPHY - THE OBSERVER
An abandoned cat waits in a cage for a new home at the Orange County animal shelter, which euthanized 5,208 pets last year.


2009, the Orange County
Animal Shelter saw an 8 per-
cent increase in the number
of abandoned pets.
Bouffard strongly advises
people not to abandon their
pets, and not even list them
on a Web site such Craig-
slist.
"If you can find the ani-
mal a loving home, that is
great," Bouffard said. "But


don't put it up on Craigslist
or give it to a stranger be-
cause you don't know what
could happen to the ani-
mal."
Woodward advises peo-
ple to think "very thorough-
ly about their pets," and said
that the cost of animal care
can be very expensive.
Woodward offers this ad-
vice to people who can no


longer maintain their pets:
"Find a family member or
friend to take the animal,
and if they are unable to
take care of it, bring it to the
SPCA or Animal Services,"
he said. "Don't be ashamed.
We do out best to try and
work with rescue groups to
try and find good homes for
these animals."


SWinter Park / Maitland

Observer


PUBLISHER
Kyle Taylor
407-563-7009
kyle@observernewspapers.com

ASSOCIATE EDITOR
Jenny Andreasson
407-563-7026.
alexb@observernewspapers.com

DESIGNER
Stephanie Erickson
407-563-7040
stephanie@observernewspapers.com


Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster
CONTACTS


REPORTERS
Jenny Andreasson
407-563-7026
jennya@observemewspapers.com

Isaac Babcock
407-563-7023
isaacb@observernewspapers.com

LEGALS I CLASSIFIED
Jonathan Gallagher
407-563-7058
legal@observernewspapers.com


COPY EDITORS
Jonathan Gallagher
jgallagher@observernewspapers.com

Jenny Andreasson
jennya@observernewspapers.com

COLUMNISTS
Chris Jepson
Jepson@MediAmerica.us

Louis Roney
LRoney@cfl.rr.com


Josh Garrick
407-304-8100

ADVERTISING SALES
Tracy Craft
407-515-2605
tcraft@observemewspapers.com

INTERN
Carmen Carroquino


Member of: P.O. Box 2426 1500 Park Center Dr.
* Florida Press Association Winter Park, FL 32790 Orlando, FL 32835
* Maitland Area/ Winter Park/
Goldenrod Chamber of Commerce www.wpmobserver.com I 407-563-7000 I e-mail: editor@observernewspapers.com


USPS 00-6186
ISSN 1064-3613


Publisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor Submission does not guarantee publication. All tights reserved.
Winter Park / Maitland Observer) 2009


Published Thursday, July 2, 2009


Volume 21, Issue Number 27


Winter Park/ Maitland Observer


Pae husdv Jlv2 20











Business


First National Bank of Central Flor-
ida has appointed Daniel Yalango
Assistant Vice President/Senior
Credit Analyst for their Winter Park
office.
The Florida Supreme Court, the Young
Lawyers Division of The Florida Bar
and the Florida Pro Bono Coordina-
tors Association recently recognized
Hallie L. Zobel, Esq., partner of Bailey
Zobel Pilcher PLC, for her outstanding
pro bono service in 2008.
Ms. Zobel was commended for her
dedication to serving the poor, less
fortunate and marginalized members
of the community. Her selfless at-
titude and desire to provide fair and
just treatment for all people was ac-
knowledged and praised.


Urban Trust Bank (UTB), a federally
chartered, community-oriented
bank headquartered in Central
Florida, today announced the elec-
tion of William Miller, CPA and Pres-
ident of Moore Stephens Lovelace,
P.A., to their Board of Directors.

The Central Florida office of
SIKON Construction Corporation,
one of the nation's leading com-
mercial contractors, complet-
ed the new multimillion-dollar,
110,000-square-foot BJ's Whole-
sale Club at 2577 S. Highway 27 in
Clermont, in Lake County. The project
was designed by Dalpos Architects,
Syracuse, NY. Led by Steve Gorac-
zkowski, CEO, SIKON Construction
Corporation is a full-service general


contractor and construction man-
ager specializing in mixed-use, office
buildings, retail, restaurant and other
commercial projects. SIKON's Cen-
tral Florida office is located at 500 N.
Maitland Avenue, Suite 303, Maitland.
Call 407-644-4447 for more informa-
tion.

NAI Realvest recently complet-
ed the $1,000,000 sale of the
10,723-square-foot Whistle Junc-
tion restaurant facility located at
4551 13th St. in St. Cloud.
Paul P. Partyka, principal and man-
aging partner at NAI Realvest, who
represented the seller Sovereign In-
vestment Company of Palo Alto, Ca-
lif., said the property was purchased
by Melbourne-based Sooner Invest-


ment.

Commuters and college students
who've been thinking about own-
ing one of those gas-efficient new
scooters have a friend at Ride
Green Scooters on Fairbanks Ave. in
downtown Winter Park. Ride Green is
launching a new rental division so you
can try out a new scooter before you
buy. Brian Schwartz, owner and prin-
cipal at Ride Green Scooters, said the
$50 daily rental fee offers an afford-
able way to find out how much fun
a scooter can be. Ride Green Scoot-
ers offers new scooters that range
in price from $900 to luxury ver-
sions priced at more than $17,000,
Schwartz said.
The multi-family division of Palmer


Electric Company has secured a
contract for just over $300,000 for
electrical services and lighting for
the 78-unit assisted living facility at
LifePointe Village at Orlando, a senior
living complex under development
in Orlando. Under its contract with
general contractor Allen & O'Hara
Construction Co. LLC of Olive Branch,
Miss., Palmer is providing site and
building electrical contracting, and a
fire alarm system for the three-story,
70,000-square-foot facility. Show-
case Lighting & Home D6cor Center,
Palmer Electric's sister company, is
providing lighting fixtures. The project
is scheduled for completion in Febru-
ary 2010.


Community


U.S. Congressman John L. Mica (R-7th
District) today announced that the House of
Representatives gave initial Federal approval to
funding for the City of Maitland for the purchase of
upgraded law enforcement computer systems.
The House passed its version of the
FY2010 Commerce, Justice and Science
Appropriations bill includes $400,000 for
Maitland to upgrade their Public Safety Radio
System and provide Mobile Data Terminals. This
Federal funding will enhance law enforcement
and emergency operations capabilities in
the community. These appropriations are
subject to approval in 'the U.S. Senate.

Orange County Mayor Richard Crotty, One
Heart- Many Hands founder and President Gary
Morsch and General Secretary forthe International
Church of the Nazarene David Wilson, officially
opened One Heart Many Hands 2009 Monday
at a home near South Orange Blossom Trail. The
five-day, 1600-volunteer strong service project
includes repairs and renovation at the homes
of 100 elderly, disabled, single-parent families
and others with special needs. Pine Hills, Holden
Heights along the South Orange Blossom Trail,
and sections of West Orlando between South
John Young Parkway and South Kirkman Road
are the primary service areas for horie-based
projects. Volunteers will also clean and do general
maintenance work at city and county parks.
The kick-off took place at the home of Willie
Rhodes, one of 100 One Heart - Many Hands'
project sites. Rhodes' home of 17 years has never
been renovated to accommodate his wheelchair.


'By the end of this week, the home will have wider
entryways, a handicap accessible bathroom and
kitchen and new appliances donated by The
Home Depot on Lee Road in Winter Park.
One Heart - Many Hands started in earnest
last summer when staffers moved to Orlando to
begin forging partnerships with local government
and business. Since then area businesses and
agencies have contributed more than $350,000
in cash, grants and in-kind donations to the
project.
One Heart Many Hands' sponsors include
Orange County's ReNew Grant Program, Marmac
Concord, Inc., The Morsch Law Group, Florida
Hospitals, The Home Depot, The Home Depot
Foundation, The JayMor Group; Purdy Corp.,
Winn-Dixie, Contractor Equipment Rental, 84
Lumber, Mid Florida Tech, Valencia Community
College, Wendy's, Darland Bakery, Selma's
Cookies, Subway Restaurants, Harvest-Time
International, Sysco Corp, Merita Bread, Coca
Cola, and Orange County Fire Rescue. For more
information visit OneHeartManyHands.com

Representative Bryan Nelson hosted a
community leadership forum about the "Orange
Blossom Express Rail" Initiative at 7 p.m. on
Wednesday, June 24 in the Apopka City Hall
Chambers.
The Orange Blossom Express Rail would run
from downtown Orlando to Tavares and would
provide a public transportation alternative
to driving on U.S. Highway 441. Currently,
passenger trains are being utilized for dinner
and transportation to and from Magic Games,


making this transportation alternative a relatively
easy upgrade to commuter rail. For directions or
more information, please contact Representative
Bryan Nelson's office at 407-884-2023.

Park Plaza Gardens Restaurant & Cafe in
Winter Park has introduced a new smaller,
smarter portioned menu that's designed for lite
bite-- dining and a healthier pocketbook.
Ron Schwartz, a principal of the Park Ave.
establishment that has served three generations
of discriminating diners, said menu entrees now
offer many half portions or reduced portions at
reduced prices. Schwartz said heaping portions,
was one of the big dining trends until a series of
reports from the U.S. Surgeon General warned


of the health implications from overeating. Park
Plaza Gardens located at 319 Park Ave. S. has
new summer hours.
The street side cafe, which opens at 11
a.m. daily, 10 a.m. Sunday, will close at 10
p.m. instead of noon on Monday, Tuesday and
Wednesday during the summer. The dining room
will be closed Sunday and Monday nights, but
.will still open for Sunday Brunch 11 a.m. to 3
p.m., and for lunch Monday through Saturday 11
a.m. to 2:30 p.m. and dinner Tuesday through
Saturday 6 to 10 p.m.


W'T/- 1460 Lake Baldwin Ln- Suite A* Orlando, FL 32814
ASSO CIATES 407-898-2220 -1-877-769-2047 (fax)

Melissa S. Riess, Au.D. Seeks Outstanding People with Hear-
ing Loss from Central Florida for National Aware Program
Do you know someone with a hearing loss whose accomplishments and
contributions distinguish them as role models: Dr. Riess of Hearing Associ-
ates of Central Florida is seeking outstanding individuals from the Central
Florida region with any degree of hearing loss to nominate for a national
awards program that honors people with hearing loss who make a differ-
ence in their schools, communities or the world. The 2009 Oticon Focus
on People Awards, which celebrates its eleventh year in 2009, is designed
to help eliminate outdated and hurtful stereotypes that discourage people
from seeking professional help for their hearing loss. For Dr. Riess, the
program is an excellent way to demonstrate that hearing loss does not limit
a person's ability to achieve, contribute and excel.
"The negative stereotypes associates with hearing loss may explain why
many people with hearing loss wait an average of 10 years before obtain-
ing a hearing solution despite the incredible advances of recent years,"
says Dr. Riess. "In fact, studies have proven that untreated hearing loss can
lead to depression, social isolation and an overall diminished quality of life."
Dr. Riess encourages anyone who knows of an outstanding person with
hearing loss to contact her at Hearing Associates of Central Florida, 407-
898-2220 or via the website at www.OrlandoHears.com.
The Oticon Focus on People program offers awards in five categories:
Student-for young people with hearing loss, ages 6-21 who are full time
students; Adults with hearing loss, ages 21 and above; Advocacy, for adults
ages 21 and above with hearing loss who actively volunteer their time in
advocacy or support efforts for the hard-of-hearing and deaf community;
Practitioner, for hearing care professionals who are currently in practice;
and Pediatric Practitioner, for pediatric hearing care professionals in school
or clinical settings.
First place category winners will receive a $1000 award and a $1000
donation by Oticon to a not-for-profit cause of their choice. Second place
winners will receive $500 and third place winners will receive $250. All
nominees, regardless of whether they are selected as category winners,
will receive a Certificate of Recognition.
Deadline for nominations is September 21, 2009.


Winter Park / Maitland~ Observer


ThurdayJul 2, 009 'Page 5






Page 6 Thursday, July 2, 2009 Winter Parl / Maitland Observer


BROSSIER

< continued from the front page
agreed to let Reese rebuild
the fire station on its
current site - within the
Town Center district -
necessitating amendments
to the overall development
agreement.
The fire station plans
can't move forward until
the agreement is modified.
"We have a chicken and
an egg," Reese said.
Reese wrote in a letter to
CRA Director Verl Emrick


Developer says he needs time


on June 16 that he hopes
to have the site plan for
the fire station completed
by July 30, and then the
payment and performance
bond will be issued in mid
or late August.
"The bonding companies
are not writing these things
as they did two years ago,"
Reese said at the June 22
meeting.
Reese said the delay
"should have a minimal
effect" on his ability to
complete the fire station by


July 2010.
Councilman Phil Bonus
has scheduled an "open
discussion" about the
project plans for 5:30
Sunday, July 12, at the
Maitland Senior Center at
345 S. Maitland Ave.
"Learn about what is
happening (and what is
not happening) with your
bond money and your city
land," Bonus writes in his
announcement.
Bonus was out of
town during the June 22


meeting, but he requested
a statement be read in
his absence. Mayor Doug
Kinson declined to read the
full statement, citing that
parts of it were "subjective"
and "disrespectful."
The Observer obtained
a copy of the statement
through a public*. records
request. In it, Bonus
wrote that Reese has not
assembled all the land
required to build the Town
Center, a four-block mixed-
use development, and that


he is financially unstable.
"Much of what he has
assembled is in default, and
subject to forfeiture, or is
actually owned by others
and is now for sale, making
it unavailable to our project
anyway," Bonus wrote.
Reese dismissed Bonus'
claims during the meeting.
"That is 100 percent
false," Reese said. "I have the
same land under contract
as I had before."


Orange school days stretch to seven periods


CARMEN CARROQUINO
GUEST REPORTER

Budget cuts to the Orange
County Public School Sys-
tem haven't kept Winter
Park High School from add-
ing new courses - and an
extra class period to make
the best use of them.
In a May 11 letter to par-
ents, Dr. William R. Gordon
II, principal of Winter Park
High School, announced
the change that Winter Park
High School will be moving
to a seven-period school
day starting in August.
Maitland Middle School
and Glenridge Middle have
also made the change to a
seven-period school day,
joining Evans and Apopka
High School along with
others.
With the introduction of
35 new courses in the arts,
social sciences, and physical
education, Gordon hopes
to broaden the curriculum
with this seventh period.
Gordon decided to go
ahead with the change be-
cause of other schools par-
ticipating in this option,
like all of Seminole County
middle and high schools.
He says making room for
the additional period will
benefit students.
"The time allotted to
this extra period will create
an infrastructure for more


credit retrieval, plus give
students the opportunity to
gain additional practice for
the FCAT," Gordon said.
Dr. Judy Cunningham,
deputy Superintendent for
Instruction and Curriculum
Services for Orange County
Public Schools, said the im-
plementation of a seventh
period is not mandatory in
the Orange County Public
School system, but it is a
trend that several schools
in the area have been fol-
lowing for the last two to
three years.
"The rationale [for the
seventh period] is to give
students more options for
courses," Cunningham
said. "As the state mandates
more remedial courses for
students not scoring well
on FCAT, students have few-
er options for electives. The
seventh period also gives a
student a chance to make
up a failed course during the
school year if necessary."
Regardless of whether
the seventh period is used to
advance a student or catch
them up, teachers are being
asked to do more, without
getting paid any extra.
Gordon says that teach-
ers still have the same work
day, but are just incorporat-
inig a little more.
The addition of a seventh
period will help keep classes
at 25:1 schoolwide teacher/
student ratio, which is re-


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK - THE OBSERVER
More schools are catching on to a trend of seven class periods, which helps stretch budgets and broaden educational choices.


quired by state law.
Cunningham says that
teachers will teach six out
of the seven periods, with
one period for planning.
Dr. Cathy Pope, area su-
perintendent for north Or-
ange County, said if seven
periods prove to be cost ef-
fective, other Orange Coun-
ty schools could follow suit
because of impending bud-


A'A> I l Mw ill l
For more information, contact:
www.GuaranteedToSellYourHomelnl20Days.com
Robert F. Picheny Realtor Southern Realty Enterprises, Inc.


get cuts.
She says that it's impor-
tant to engage the commu-
nity in School Board deci-
sions for the change to hap-
pen.
Principals who chose to
implement a seventh peri-
od into their curriculum do
so with the budget money
they are allocated, which
means no additional spend-
ing, Cunningham said.
Moving back to the origi-
nal start and stop time, the
seventh period will be made
up of an estimated five min-
utes being taken off the six
remaining classes.


The Winter Park High
school day will begin at
'about 7:30 a.m. with class
length at 49 minutes on
Monday, Tuesdays, Thurs-
days and Fridays, and 41
minutes on Wednesdays to
accommodate the early re-
lease time.
Gordon has received
largely positive feedback
about the seventh period
switch.
"People [parents, faculty
and staff] are behind us and
understand what we are try-
ing to do."


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Winter Parl / Maitland Observer


Page 6 Thursday, July 2, 2009







VVinll IAI aIlVl dl td A llU ;c L t T y/2/Jl v i .


Baldwin Park

Community Update
BY LUKE PETERSON
BALDWIN PARK
MERCHANT ASSOCIATION PRESIDENT


It's summer festival season


Summer is officially here
and the past month of June
kicked off some fabulous
summer activities here in
Baldwin Park.
During June the Baldwin
Park Merchants rolled out
their Loyalty Program with
much success. The IBaldwin
Park Loyalty Program is the
merchants' way of saying
"Thank you, we appreciate
your business".
In these tough economic
times, we want our loyal
customers to know we value
their business and appreci-
ate their choosing Baldwin
Park as a shopping/dining
destination. When you see
the Loyalty Program em-
blem in the merchant win-
dow, you will know they are
participating in the Baldwin
Park Loyalty Program. Par-
ticipating merchants will
provide a special offeringor
discount for customers that


present the Loyalty Card.
If you don't have a Loyalty
Card just drop by a Baldwin
Park merchant and pick up
your FREE Baldwin Park
Loyalty Card. Visit www.
baldwinparknetwork.com
for a listing of the merchant
offerings.
We hosted the ARTY-
gator Crawl on June 19th
which was truly a fun family
event. The Crawl featured
kid's activities, a scavenger
hunt, live music. The local
merchants offered specialty
foods and drinks centered
on the ARTYgator theme.
Raffles items were donated
by the local merchants with
gift certificates donated for
$1,000 shopping spree. In
addition to the ARTYgator
Crawl, the Audubon Elemen-
tary School created a new
3-D gator called "Art Edu-
Gator". A pair of 3-D glasses
are needed to view the ga-


tor's special messages. The
gator was painted by 900
elementary school students
supervised by art teacher E.
Ann Mount. Principal, Trev-
or Honohan was on hand
during the ARTYgator Crawl
to share the 3-D experience
with the community. Don't
forget, ARTYgator will be on
display in the Baldwin Park
Village Center thru October
2009, so be sure to join us in
the upcoming festivities.
On June 26th Trish's Teas
hosted plein air artist and
member of the Central Flor-
ida Watercolor Society Sy
Rosefelt. Mr. Rosefelt's work
is not only highly regarded
in Central Florida, but also
in San Francisco and Mil-
waukee.
On June 27th Merrig-
an's Boutique hosted "Sex,
Drugs, & the Economy",
a fashion show at Roxy's
Nightclub. In the-realm of
the true fashion show genre
there was a special VIP Sec-
tion for Merrigan's custom-
ers, which added to the
excitement for Merrigan's
Baldwin Park customers.
The fashion show benefited
the Dress For Success orga-
nization.
As the business commu-
nity continues to grow we
were pleased to have an-
other new merchant open-
ing their business in the


Baldwin Park Village Cen-
ter. BullFish's soft opening
was Friday, June 19th. Bull-
Fish has evolved into a life-
style concept store and has
expanded their aviation
collectibles, food and wine
section, green products, ca-
sual clothing and gifts & sta-
tionery. The Baldwin Park
Community welcomes Bull-
Fish to Baldwin Park.
Now for July's activities!

Many of the merchants
will be hosting summer
camps, art classes, dance
classes, story hour and "Kids
Night Out" for the little ones
throughout the month of
July. So check the Calendar
of Events for local Baldwin
Park activities.
Let's not forget the big
kids! On July 9th the Bald-
win Park Merchant Associa-
tion will host the Art Stroll
of Baldwin Park from 6-9
p.m. The Art Stroll will be
a collection of local talent
exhibiting their work and
creating art live for the ulti-
mate visual experience. Lo-
cal merchants will be offer-
ing food/drink specials and
entertainment in the Village
Center. Sponsors for the Art
Stroll are the Baldwin Park
Merchant Association, The
Arts Hub and Images Auto
Spa.
On July 31st Trish's Teas


will host their Victorian Af-
ter Dark series from 6-9 p.m.
This month's venue will fea-
ture a showing of short films.
The film "Coffee or Tea" was
actually filmed in Trish's
Teas by a group of talented
individuals from Full Sail.
For the July 31st screening,
the film will be shown fol-
lowed by a "Dialogue With
The Writer/Director" ses-
sion, so you won't want to
miss this fun opportunity to
interact with the Arts.
"Movie Night On The
Green" takes place at dusk
in the Village Center Court-
yard on the 4th Thursday of
every month. Each month
a local Baldwin Park Mer-
chant sponsors the Movie
Night which allows the
merchant to promote their
business throughout the
evening. June's Movie Night
sponsor was New Broad
Street Realty. July 24th will
be the date of the next Mov-
ie Night, featuring Bedtime.
Stories with sponsorship
provided by Tiny Toes. Visit
www.baldwinparknetwork.
corn for movie details.
Be sure to check out the
Baldwin Park Merchant As-
sociation July Calendar of
Events to see what's sched-
uled. For more information
on Baldwin Park activities
visit www.baldwinparknet-
work.com.


FIREWORKS I Independence Day celebrations across Central Florida


< continued from the front page

drawn wagon rides and the
annual children's bicycle
parade. Hot dogs, water-
melon and beverages will
be served at 11 a.m. Admis-
sion to the Charles Hosmer
Morse Museum of American
Art is free that day from 9:30
a.m. to 4 p.m. Call 407-599-
3275 for more information
on the-city celebration.

Altamonte Springs
The city of Altamonte
Springs is hosting its 14th
Annual Independence Day
Celebration, "Red Hot and
Boom," at Cranes Roost Park
on Friday, July 3. The event


features live entertainment
by XL106.7 Radio, children's
activities, vendor booths
and a 25-minute fireworks
display. Some of the artists
scheduled to appear include
Jessie James, We the Kings,
Matt Nathanson, Kevin Ru-
dolf and Parachute. Festivi-
ties will begin at 4 p.m. and
end at 11 p.m. Fireworks are
at 9:30 p.m. For more infor-
mation call 407-571-8857.

Orlando
The city of Orlando will host
"Fireworks at the FountAin"
from 4. p.m. to 10 p.m. July
4 at Lake Eola Park, 195 N.
Rosalind Ave. Live enter-
tainment begins at 4 p.m.


and will include the K92FM
"Colgate Country Show-
down" at the amphitheater
and classic rock on the 96.5
WHTQ stage. Then at 8 p.m.,
as a prelude to the fireworks
finale, enjoy the Orlando
Concert Band performing
in the amphitheater. There
will be a 15-minute fire-
works show that will begin
at 9:15 p.m. Commercial
vendors will be displayed
throughout the park and
assorted food and beverage
refreshments will be avail-
able for purchase.


Celebration
The town of Celebration will
host its annual "A Flashback
4th of July" featuring Mi-
chael Andrew & the Atomic
Big Band from 5 p.m. to 11
p.m. on July 4.
The event, at the Celebra-
tion Town Center, will be an
All-American celebration
set to a big band-era theme.
The Swing Knights, a col-
legiate swing club, will per-
form, as well. A parade will
occur at 5 p.m. Live musical
performances are from 7 to
9 p.m. A themed fireworks
spectacular will begin a 9
p.m.


Avalon Park
The Avalon Park community
will host a Fourth of July cel-
ebration beginning at 5 p.m.
at 13001 Founder's Square
Drive. It will be complete
with an apple pie bake-off,
hot dog-eating contest,
bounce park, live entertain-
ment and fireworks, which
are at 9 p.m.


I I'


Call Today: (407) 293-8890


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Maitland City Talk
BY DOUGLAS T. KINSON
MAYOR


Keeping safe on the Fourth


I love fireworks; my family
loves fireworks. We will see
multiple fireworks displays
this coming Fourth of July.
But I remember when I
was a teenager, one Satur-
day, my older brother came
racing into our house with a
friend of his screaming, his
face charred beyond nor-
mal recognition. I will never
forget it. His friend wanted
a bigger bang than a fire-
. cracker would create, so he
took an entire block of fire-
crackers, split them open,
set the powder in a pile, and
tried to light it. It blew up in
his face as he lit the match.
Bart Wright, assistant
fire chief, is normally one
of the funniest guys I know,
but playing with illegal fire-
works is dangerous for ev-
erybody involved. Thank


you, Bart, for shedding light
on the seriousness of this
matter. Your passion for
our community and our
residents is evident in every-
thing you do - including
the following article.
- Mayor Doug Kinson

Fireworks - Fun for many
or danger to all?
The fireworks safety issue
has been ignited now for
many, many years. The issue
is very difficult and complex
for legislators and fire of-
ficials across this state and
nation. - Nevertheless, it is
the consumer to whom we
address this piece. Currently
in Florida, there are no such
things as legal fireworks,
that is to say, those things
that go "boom," "bang" and/


I


or that leave the ground fol-
lowing an explosion.
To emphasize the issue
adequately, we invite our
readers to consider some of
the National Fire Protection
Association's (NFPA) data
to further underscore why
fire officials in this state
must not only embrace that
prohibition, but also must
remain opposed to the le-
galization of consumer fire-
works.
At NFPA.org we read the
following quote: "The Alli-
ance to Stop Consumer Fire-
works is a group of 22 health
and safety organizations,
coordinated by NFPA, that
urges the public to avoid the
use of any form of consum-
er fireworks and instead to
enjoy displays of fireworks
conducted by trained pro-
fessionals. Each July Fourth,
thousands of people, most
often children and teens,
are injured while using con-
sumer fireworks. Despite
the dangers of fireworks,
few people understand the
associated risks - devas-
tating burns, other injuries,
fires and even death."
This is not some un-
founded partisan petition
based upon one's sole dis-
like of consumer fireworks.
No indeed, but it is a parti-
san appeal nonetheless -


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City Hall closed on July 3
Please note that City Hall
will be closed on Friday, July
3, in observance of Indepen-
dence Day. We will reopen at
8 a.m. on Monday, July 6.

Olde Fashioned 4th of July
Celebration
The city of Winter Park,
EMBARQ, and the Charles
Hosmer Morse Museum of
American Art present the
Olde Fashioned 4th of July
Celebration on Saturday,
July 4, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.,
in Central Park. Thanks to
support from the Morse
Foundation, the Bach Festi-
val Orchestra and Choir will
perform patriotic favorites.
Festivities will include
live patriotic music, horse-
drawn wagon rides and
much more. Hot dogs, wa-
termelon and beverages
will be served at 11 a.m.
Children's activities will in-
clude fun-filled games and
the annual children's bicy-
cle parade.
Families and friends are


ter Park City Talk
BY RANDY KNIGHT
Cm' MANAGER

also invited to attend the
Independence Day Open
House at the Morse Mu-
seum. The museum, which
houses the world's most
comprehensive collection
of work by American artist
Louis Comfort Tiffany, will
provide free admission to
its galleries from 9:30 a.m.
to 4 p.m.
On behalf of the city of
Winter Park, best wishes to
everyone for a very safe and
happy 4th of July holiday.

Online energy audit
With air conditioners run-
ning at-maximum capacity
this summer, electric bills
will climb. It's a great time
to remind customers of the
free online energy audit
provided by Energy Depot,
which helps residents learn
how to better manage their
energy use.
Energy Depot is a set of
online tools and resources
to help you better manage
your home energy use and
costs. It's a one-stop re-
source for energy informa-


tion - and it's free.
Use Energy Depot to:
- Receive a personalized
energy profile with an esti-
mate of your energy costs
for each home energy sys-
tem/appliance.
- Learn specific things
you can do to reduce energy
use and how much you can
save.
- Complete-a do-it-your-
self home energy audit and
receive your report online.
-Quickly estimate the
annual energy use and cost
of home energy systems and
appliances with the Energy
Calculator.
To take advantage of this
resource, visit the city's Web
site - CityofWinterPark.
org - and click on Depart-
ments > Electric Utility >
Online Energy Audit.

Ask Winter Park
The city of Winter Park of-
fers an exciting feature on
its Web site called Ask Win-
ter Park. This feature pro-
vides citizens with a simple
way to access city informa-
tion any time of the daywith
just a click of a mouse.
Residents can ask a ques-
tion, find the answers to
frequently asked questions,
or submit a service request
through this new program.
Residents can search a
knowledgebase library in


the information center for
answers, and if they are un-
able to find what they are
looking for, they can post
questions to be added to the
knowledgebase library.
The service center of Ask
Winter Park also allows resi-
dents to submit a service
re .uest to the city, such as
reporting a streetlight out-
age or requesting a pothole
to be filled.
The service center then
captures, routes, manages,
searches and reports on all
service requests that are'
submitted. Both the resi-
dent and city staff will have
the ability to track the status
of the service request.
This service will create a
convenient form of com-
munication between the
city and its residents. If you
would like to ask a question,
search through the knowl-
edgebase library or submit a
service request, please visit
CityofWinterPark.org and
click on the Ask Winter Park
icon on the home page.

Protect your electronics
from lightning surges
Lightning causes millions
of dollars in damage to ma-
jor home appliances and
sensitive electronics every
year. Lightning can gener-
ate surges that travel over
phone lines, cable and pow-
er lines straight into your


home. With Winter Park's
Surge Protection Program,
you can protect your home
appliances and electronics
with state-of-the-art equip-
ment.
Our two-stage protection
includes both meter-based
and plug-in devices. When
used together, they offer
unmatched protection, and
peace of mind.
Meter-based protector -
Installed behind your elec-
tric meter, the meter-based
protector diverts the larg-
est portion of a surge safely
into the ground, protecting
major appliances such as air
conditioners and refrigera-
tors. Installation includes
a free outdoor electrical
grounding inspection and
any necessary repairs.
Plug-in protector - Even
with our powerful meter-
based protector, small surg-
es can pass into interior wir-
ing or enter through your
phone, cable or satellite
lines. These surges can be
deadly to sensitive electron-
ics such as computers, TVs
and DVD players.
Don't wait to see the dam-
age a surge can cause. For
information on enrolling in
Winter Park's Surge Protec-
tion Program, simply call
toll-free 1-866-548-3419.

Visit the city's Web site at
CityofWinterPark.org


how so? In that it's made up
of people, on both a profes-
sional and private platform,
who recognize the inherent
dangers of fireworks. Those
partisans put aside personal
preferences and feelings
and focus on what is clearly
in the best interest of public
health, safety and welfare.
Why is that so important?
NFPA's report tells us the
following:
In 2004, fireworks start-
ed an estimated 1,600 struc-
ture fires and 600 vehicle
fires that were reported to
local fire departments.
These fires resulted in 20
civilian injuries and $21 mil-
lion in direct property dam-
age. There were no reported
civilian deaths.
In 2005, 10,800 people
were treated at hospital
emergency rooms for fire-
works-related injuries.
More than half (54 per-
cent) of 2005 fireworks in-
juries were burns. Contu-
sions and lacerations were
second (29 percent), and
were twice as common as
burns when the injury was
to any part of the head or
face, including the eye.
Hands or fingers were the
part of the body injured in
30 percent of the incidents.
In 24 percent of the cases,
the eye was involved; other


parts of the face or head ac-
counted for 20 percent of
the injuries.
The affects of consumer
fireworks are endless as well
as indiscriminate. People,
homes, land areas both de-
veloped and undeveloped
and yes, even livestock are
subject to these effects.
I implore the citizens of
Florida as a whole to be safe
by having nothing to do
with fireworks aside from
that which is approved by
the State Fire Marshal's Of-
fice. More than 10,000 visits
to hospital emergency de-
partments is not entertain-
ment that is without signifi-
cant risk!
Please visit NFPA at www.
NFPA.org and our own
SFMO's Web site - www.
myfloridacfo.com/sfm/
FireworksEnforcement_
Guide.htm - for the facts
and let all public service
personnel, and especially all
elected officials, know that
we are opposed as constitu-
ents to consumer fireworks
in this state. Yes indeed, we
do recognize that consumer
fireworks are actually mas-
querading as fun, but are a
danger to all.
- Bart Wright, assistant fire chief


Winter Park / Maitland Observer






\WiinteP.r Rk / Ma7itland Observer


Thursday, July 2, 2009 Page 9


v


CARMEN CARROQUINO


Flames licked at what was
already ash on Cold Spring
Harbor in 1957, the after-
math of destruction of Louis
Comfort Tiffany's grandiose
country estate.
The fire burned at Laurel-
ton Hall for three days-- no
rain in sight to extinguish
what could not be replaced
- prolonging the destruc-
tion by what seemed like
slow-moving flames.
Charred and shattered
pieces of his craftsman-
ship would have been lost
beneath the ash and black
residue of the Long Island
house in ruin if it were not
for Hugh F. McKean and
his wife, Jeannette Genius
McKean, granddaughter
of a Winter Park museum's
namesake.
Both walked among the
rubble with preservation in
mind to showcase the works
of art from the estate that
was Tiffany's vision come to
life. But most of his vision
disappeared into clouds of
smoke and ash like the fac-
tory chimneys of the Indus-
trial Revolution of Tiffany's
day.
Celebrating Tiffany and
other artists of his time,
the Charles Hosmer Morse
Museum of American Art
is opening its doors to the
public for free from 9:30
a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, July
4 in conjunction with Win-
ter Park's "Olde Fashioned
July 4 Celebration" in Cen-
tral Park.
Jennifer Thalheimer, cu-
rator of the Morse Museum,


9
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PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK - THE OBSERVER
Surviving artwork from Louis Comfort Tiffany's collection sits in a new exhibit at Winter Park's Morse Museum, which will be open for free to the public on Saturday.


said that Laurelton Hall was
Tiffany's legacy and cele-
brated his love of art in dif-
-ferent mediums.
"Tiffany's estate was im-
portant to him and gives a
personal depiction of who
he was as a man, artist and
architect," Thalheimer said.
"His most cherished pieces
were found in his home."
The Laurelton Hall ex-
pansion plans are now fea-
tured in the museum along
with the exhibit, "The Vir-
tues of Simplicity: American
Arts and Crafts."


The Virtue of Simplic-
ity exhibit keeps in tradi-
tion with the time period of
the Industrial Revolution,
where Thalheimer says the
movement in art was a "re-
action" toward it.
The reaction focused to-
ward the dependence on
machines replacing man
and his intricate and honest
craftsmanship that made
no two pieces alike.
Simple pieces, with sim-
ple flat lines can be found
in the intimate yet spacious
exhibit..Plain wooden fur-


niture, with simple unifying
detail-work can be found
against ordinary home ob-
jects with monochromatic
colors, native materials and
medieval influences. Go-
ing back to a simpler time
where arts and crafts didn't
consist of child's play, the
exhibit contrasts the rustic
and idyllic workmanship
against the mass produc-
tion age.
Thalheimer says that the
American Arts and Crafts
exhibit really
depicts regional


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identification and sensibili-
ty of environment by show-
ing how the movement oc-
curred in America and Great
Britain.
Besides the Virtues of
Simplicity exhibit, a vi-
gnette of glassware from the
late 19th century and early
20th century is also on dis-
play. Encased in a clear glass
room, a dining room of its
time showcases glassware
as a conversation starter
and the intricacy of how
> turn to TIFFANY on A14


Win tickets to see

DEMI LOVATO


* 7-.


Email tcraft@observemewspapers.com to be
entered In the drawing. Drawing will be held
July 14. Winner's will be notified by
phone/e-mail, and announced in the July 16
issue bf The Observer and July 24 issue of
The Voice


~'""'~; " "'


Lifestyles




Living history from a shattered past






rdyn if TuhI Ira t .IitLv %uly r -, Winter Park I Mailan Observir


* ~ 'C'


�TcI11


E is for entrepreneur


Maitland Public Library Events
(501 S. Maitland Avenue)
Call 407-647-7700 for more
information:
-Culture Club - Vietnam will
be held at 4 p.m. on Wednesday,
July 8. This program is offered to
children in elementary and middle
school, who want to learn about
different cultures from around
the world. Hear stories, make a
special craft and try some ethnic
food. Registration is required
-Be Creative-Special Library
Summer Reading Program
will take place at 2:30 p.m. on
Thursday, July 9. Yow Dance
Company will perform.
-Bedtime Stories and Craft
program for all ages will be held
at 7 p.m. on Monday, July 6.
-Preschool Stories and Craft
Ages 36 months to 5 years will
be held at 10:30 a.m. on Tuesday,
July 7.
-Baby / Toddler Story Time and
Craft will be held from 10:30 a.m.
to 11 a.m. on Thursday, July 2.
-Be Creative-Summer Reading
Program will take place at 2:30
p.m. on Thursday, July 2.,
Stories, crafts and fun with a
creative weekly theme
-Reading Buddies will take
place at 4 p.m. on Thursday, July
2. Earliest readers through fifth
graders will read to each other
and play reading games.

Orlando Museum of Art Summer
Programs (2416 North Mills
Ave.) Call 407-896-4231 for
more information:
Enjoy a Night at the Orlando
Museum of Art from 6 p.m. to 8
p.m. on July 17, July 31, Aug. 14,
Sept. 25 and Oct. 9. Parents, drop
off your children ages 5-12.Art will
come alive with gallery exploration
and fun art activities and they can
enjoy a pizza dinner. Registration
required by the Wednesday
prior to this new Friday evening
program. Cost is $15, with a $5
extended care option until 8:30
p.m. Please call 407-896-4231
x258 for reservations.
Storybook Tours at 1: 30 p.m.
Son July 25 and Aug. 15. Treat your
family to story time in the OMA
galleries this summer followed by
a related art making activity. The
cost is $10 per adult, $8 per OMA
member, the first child is free and
$3 per additional child.

Join us for a fun-filled evening
of free food, drinks, frozen
treats, games, water slide, and
a DJ as we entertain you just
for being a JCC member at the
JCC Maitland Campus from 4:30
p.m. to 7 p.m. on Tuesday, July
14. RSVP is required. Attendance
is limited to the first 150 people,
so sign up soon for this free event.
RSVP online at www.orlandojcc.


KAREN McENANY-PHILLIPS
(-' - I, STAFF

Winter Park designer Ellie
Saylor has turned her love of
animals and art into a fami-
ly business, creating custom
T-shirts for children.
A whimsical green ga-
tor surrounded by blue wa-
ter and sky adorns her first
' shirts underlined by "A is for
Alligator". Monkey and El-
ephant drawings are ready
for production.
By the way, Ellie starts
first grade at English Estates
Elementary in August.
"Drawing is just fun," El-
lie said. "I drew the alligator
in art class."
Ellie's mother, Retse Say-
lor, said her daughter has
been coloring since age 1.
"She could identify logos
at such an early age," she
said. "Drawing is her favor-
ite thing. Basically all you
need to give her is paper and
markers and she's happy."
Talent seems to run in
the family, as Ellie's parents
are both graphic design-
ers. Retse has more than 10
years of design experience
in Orlando and graduated
with honors from Auburn
University.
"Ellie has her baby dolls
but her birthday presents
are usually art supplies,"
Scott Saylor, Ellie's father,
said.
Ellie said she is always
thinking about things to
draw, as she lugs around
her round plastic container
packed with markers. "Pink
and purple are my favor-
ites."
Retse comments as a
mother and a professional:
"Ellie does the best when she
uses her imagination and
makes it up herself. When
she decides what she wants
to draw it's always better."
Ellie's 4-year old brother,


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK - THE OBSERVER
First-grader Ellie Saylor and her brother Gray, 4, are making art and turning it into a T-shirt business that's caught on at school.


Gray, helped color the Mon-
key design, but according to
his mother he prefers cars
and action figures.
The Saylor kids enjoy a
creative play area with a
wood drawing table for El-
lie, space for Gray to play
with cars and puzzles and
a wall cubbie that holds
toys and supplies. Ellie and
Gray's art is clipped along
the walls, but because there
is limited space, when a new
project goes up, another
comes down.
The Saylors have lived in
Winter Park for five years
and support art and design
in the community. '"We want
to teach Ellie to give back,
so $1 from each T-shirt sale
will go to The Foundation
for Seminole County Pub-
lic Schools. We hope this
will help keep art in our
schools."


Donations to the founda-
tion support programs such
as scholarships, classroom
grants, recognition and
rewards for students and
teachers.
Ellie says her friends'
think it is "cool" that she
designs T-shirts. They're not
alone.
Winter Park mother Jes-
sica Lucyshyn purchased
three alligator shirts for her
younger children.
"The kids love the fact
that a kid drew the picture
on them," Lucyshyn said.
"My kids are 7 months, 2 and
5 years and they like wear-
ing shirts that match. I love
that part of the proceeds go
toward funding art in Semi-
nole County schools."
What letters are next?
The Saylors are working on
B and C.
"We have a special request


for Car, so we might do a C
animal later," Retse said.
Retse watches the Say-
lor artistic legacy continue
through Ellie and her mark-
ers. "I see myself all over
again. All I ever wanted to -
do was draw. I can't imagine
doing anything else."


T-shirt art

View shirts and art on-
line at http://retsede-
signs.storenvy.com/
products
T-shirts sizes 6 months
to six years $14.95
For more information
on The Foundation for
Seminole County Public
Schools go to
http://www.scps.kl2.
fl.us/foundation
or call 407-320-0196
.1


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PDnpl Tusdv.J v2 20







Winter Park / Maitland Observer Thursday, JuIy2, 2009 Page 11


S. 557 7 .




Observer
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Keep the flame burning


ROBYN SIDERSKY
GUEST ' :

Andy and Glenda Marshall, of Ocoee, have
been married 45 years and maintain some-
thing many couples their age struggle with
- romance and intimacy.
Research shows that sexual activity oc-
curs in 73 percent of people aged 57-64,
53 percent in ages 65- 74, and 26 percent
in age 75 and older.
Dr. Arthur Hall, who has a family and
geriatric practice in Orlando, led a presen-
tation in May entitled "Sex and Seniors:
Promoting Sexual Health and Wellness in
Older Adults."
The goal of the workshop was to pro-
mote health and wellness in seniors and
open up discussion of the topic.
"So often this topic is brought up as a
patient is leaving the office," Hall said.
He said patients often have questions
about supplements and medication and
their influence on sexual behavior.
The Marshalls, patients of Hall, said they
are comfortable asking him questions.
One of the common misconceptions,
Hall said, is that people think that once
they're past a certain age that they need to
give up sexual behavior because it's inap-


propriate. Instead, he said that it's part of
life and humans are designed to maintain
sexual behavior as long as they live.
Each generation has its own interpreta-
tion of how it's supposed to act, but there
are also similarities in their attitudes.
Hall said in his presentation that "de-
pression era" attitudes and "boomer era"
attitudes about some topics dealing with
sexual behavior are the same. In both
groups, 78 percent agreed that extramari-
tal affairs are inappropriate. Also, both
groups felt that today's pop culture places
too much emphasis on sex.
However, a large majority of the boom-
ers felt comfortable with sex outside of
marriage, while only about 43 percent of
the depression era generation did.
Andy Marshall said he went to the pre-
sentation to learn about the aging process
and about "getting old" so there are "no
surprises."
A patient of Hall's for more than a de-
cade, Marshall said Hall is very good with
his patients.
"He does a good job in the physical
exam," Marshall said. "He gives you the op-
portunity to bring up issues you would not
have thought about."
> turn to INTIMACY on A13


Fix your car, or send it

to the junkyard?


A growing number of people are
finding that the economy has them
debating whether it's best to buy
a new car or repair the one they
have. If you are trying to decide be-
tween buying and repairing, here
are some tips that may help:

Comparing costs
It is typically less expensive in the
long run to repair the vehicle you
already own rather than purchas-
ing a newer one. Financing even a
$2,000 repair typically means lower
payments (or similar payments for
a shorter time) than those incurred
when purchasing a newer vehicle.

The 50-percent rule
After receiving the estimate of a
major repair, consider the "50-per-
cent rule." When the cost of a need-
ed repair approaches 50 percent of
the vehicle's value, it is time to seri-
ously consider replacing it.

Reliability and
maintenance history
The best way to know a vehicle's
condition is by maintaining it on
a regular basis and using the same
repair shop. If a repair shop knows
the service history of a vehicle, con-
sumers can look to its technicians
for guidance on when their vehicle
likely will need major repairs.
"Following the vehicle manufac-
turer's maintenance recommenda-
tions can greatly increase the life
span of vehicle," said John Nielsen,
director of AAA Approved Auto Re-
pair and Auto Buying.


PHOTO COURTESY OF NAPSA
Experts say the best way to know a vehicle's
condition is by maintaining it on a regular basis
and using the same repair shop.
Cosmetics
The cosmetic condition of a ve-
hicle can greatly affect its value
and a motorist's desire to hold on
to it. Motorists should take a criti-
cal look at their vehicle for signs
of wear and tear and evaluate how
important their vehicle's cosmetics
are to them.

Lifestyle
Changes in lifestyle can be a large
factor in changing vehicles. Family
size, commute length, recreational
usage and business needs are all
legitimate reasons to consider pur-
chasing a newer vehicle that is bet-
ter suited to a consumer's driving
routine.
> turn to REPAIRS on A13


As an experienced financial
planner, Elizabeth Brothers
understands the importance of
anticipating change and taking
control wherever you can. That's
why she moved to The Mayflower.
"In financial planning, it's
important to know you have some
control over medical costs," she
says. "A continuing care retirement


community like The Mayflower enables
you to do that. But don't wait too
long - or you won't be able to enjoy
all the benefits a CCRC has to offer."
If you 're looking at retirement
living options, take a look at
The Mayflower. It's a good plan
for the future.
Call today to secure a spot on our
waiting list.

(407) 672-1620




PIl: NM.VT,,-LO\\'IR
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"Change Is Inevitable,
But You Can Manage It
To Your Advantage."


S ; Thursday, July 2, 20091 Pagq-1 IT.


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


PHOTOC COURTEtSY OF- ISTOCKPHOTO.CIOM


~L"]I~~







Page 12Thursday, July 2, 2009 Winter Park / Maitland Observer


by Matilda Charles

Having trouble sleeping?.
Many of us do as we get
older. The solution might
be as simple as wearing a
certain type of goggles.
Researchers have known
for a long time that seniors
have trouble sleeping, and
they know why: Our eyes
change, and during the day
-we don't get enough "blue"
light, one of the colors in
the natural light spectrum.
That blue light affects our
circadian rhythms - our
natural 24-hour cycle of
wakefulness and sleep. If
we don't get enough of it,
our sleep suffers.
This is apparently a big
problem in nursing homes
and medical facilities
where the type of light-
ing is chosen for safety. It
doesn't promote proper
sleep patterns, however,
and can cause serious sleep
disruptions for those who
stay there, especially those
who are unable to get out
in sunlight.
A 2005 study of patients
in a longterm facility tested
whether exposure to the


blue light would increase
the length of time the pa-
tients would stay asleep.
They were checked and
found to be asleep 90
percent of the time, as op-
posed to 67 percent of the
time for those who hadn't
had the light treatment.
Over the years, scientists
have been experiment-
ing with different types
of lighting devices. Until
the glasses came along,
research was done with
specially built light boxes.
That meant a patient had
to sit in front of it for the
prescribed few hours.
I've seen photos of these
goggles. They look a lot
like regular glasses with a
thin bar of blue light across
the top that shines down
around the eyes.
These goggles aren't
ready just yet. More testing
has to be done. But I sus-
pect the lines will be long
when they do come out.
Matilda Charles regrets that she can-
not personally answer reader ques-
tions, but will incorporate them into
her column whenever possible.
Write to her in care of King Features
Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475,
Orlando, FL 32853-6475, or send
e-mail to columnreply@gmail.com.
Copyright 2008 King Features Synd.,
Inc.


Senior


Habitat for Humanity Orlando's ReStore is a
22,000-square-foot retail facility that sells quality
new and used surplus building materials, appliances,
furniture and other household products to the public,
for a fraction of the original cost (anywhere from 30-
70 percent off retail). Inventory is donated by individuals,
as well as manufacturers, contractors and stores that
supply overstocked and discontinued items. A large per-
centage of the stock includes brand new items - not yet
available in stores.
Located at 2105 N. Orange Blossom Trail near West
Princeton Street, the Habitat Orlando ReStore opened in
2002 and is operated by staff and volunteers who over-
see day-to-day operations, such as checking in donated
items, organizing shelves, assisting customers and com-
pleting transactions. Hours are Tuesday through Saturday
from 9 a.m. until 4:30 p.m.
To learn more about the Habitat Orlando ReStore and
for information about donating items, please call (407)
426-7192 or e-mail sjones@habitat-orlando.com.
The Center for Independent Living in Central Florida
(CIL) has been awarded a grant of $21,300 from the
Community Foundation of Central Florida to increase
independence for people with disabilities by building
wheelchair ramps and providing batteries for electric
wheelchairs. This project is funded by a grant from the
Winter Park Community Foundation funds of the Com-
munity Foundation of Central Florida Inc.
Established in 1994 to advance local philanthropy


Bulletin


while responding to community needs and supporting
charitable organizations, the Community Foundation ful-
fils its mission by managing and investing donor funds;
connecting people with causes they feel passionate
about and empowering donors to make informed deci-
sions through research and evaluation. Today the Com-
munity Foundation has assets of more than $36 million
and has made grants of more than $21 million.
Congresswoman Suzanne Kosmas (FL-24) voted to
pass a series of bills that will improve benefits for
America's men and women in uniform. These bills will
ensure a cost-of-living adjustment for veterans' disabil-
ity compensation, increase transparency in the veterans'
health care budget, improve and expand health care for
female veterans, and provide easier access to scholar-
ship information. The House of Representatives approved
the bills by wide margins.
Earlier this year, Kosmas co-sponsored a series of bi-
partisan bills that will protect and improve benefits for
Florida's veterans and military personnel, one of which,
the Veterans Health Care Budget Reform and Transpar-
ency Act, was included in the package that passed the
House last month.
The Faith House of Winter Springs Assisted Living
Facility opened Thursday, June 25 at 415 David St.,
Winter Springs, 32708. For more information, call 407-
327-2051.


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Siaurpotry of


--


� Page 12 Thursday, July 2, 2009


Winter Park/ Maitland Observer


Riffik I w~�


i,






Thursday, July 2, 2009 Page 13


Paying up for veterans exposed to radiation


by Freddy Groves

If you were an Atomic Veteran
and were sworn to secrecy about
the atomic blasts you witnessed be-
tween 1945 and 1962, that secrecy
oath has been rescinded. And, if
you have service-related medical
issues because of that service, you
might be due compensation.
In 1990, Congress passed the


Radiation Exposure Compensation
Act and the requirement for secre-
cy was voided while compensation
was established. Unfortunately this
has stayed under the veil for a long,
long time.
The Radiation Exposure Com-
pensation Program has a Web site:.
www.usdoj.gov/civil/torts/const/
reca. Look the site over carefully
- the compensation qualification
requirements are strict if you want
to apply.
There are applications to fill out,
of course, and you'll need a lot of
documentation to support your
claim, especially medical evidence.


But the check you could receive is
significant, depending on your par-
ticular service. You could receive:
* $50,000 if you worked down-
wind of weapons testing in certain
parts of Nevada, Utah and Arizona.
�* $75,000 if you participated on-
site in the weapons tests in Nevada,
Pacific, Trinity or South Atlantic.
* $100,000 if you were a urani-
um miner or millworker in a num-
ber of states.
Additionally, if you are the child
or spouse of an Atomic Veteran
who has died from those service-
related medical problems, the
check would come to you as com-


pensation for your loss.
There is another site you need
to look at, too: National Associa-
tion of Atomic Veterans, Inc. (www.
naav.com). This is a comprehensive
site, and I suggest you make it your
first stop. Read the specific duties,
dates and locations that may-qual-
ify you as an Atomic Veteran. Ac-
cording to NAAV, there are 195,000
of you who might not know about
the oath and the compensation.
Write to Freddy Groves in care of King Features
Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL
32853-6475, or send e-mail to columnreply@
gmail.com.
Copyright 2008 King Features Syndicate, Inc.


INTIMACY I Intimacy for seniors can exist outside the bedroom, doctor says


< continued from page All

Marshall's wife agreed.
She said she always has a list
of questions when she goes
to visit Hall.
Hall's best advice for'
older couples is to seek ad-
vice from their doctor when


they have questions.
"Be straight up," he said.
"Talk about it. Do research."
He encourages his pa-
tients to do their own re-
search in addition to talk-
ing to him. When they have
questions about supple-.
ments such as Viagra, while


REPAIRS I Maintenance is key


< continued from page All

Outside factors
Several outside factors
may impact the decision
between repairing and re-
placing a vehicle, such as
reduced pricing and special
offers from manufacturers.
A vehicle that could become
a valuable classic might be


worthy of extraordinary re-
pairs and maintenance.
If you decide to go with a
major repair, be sure to use
a qualified and trustworthy
auto repair facility. A list-
ing of AAA Approved Auto
Repair shops is available at
AAA.com/repair.
Courtesy of NAPSA


* Up to 24 Hour Care
* Meal Preparation Experienced Caregivers
* Errands/Shopping Thoroughly Screened
* Hygiene Assistance
* Light Housekeeping & Laundry
* Medication Reminders
* Rewarding Companionship

407-236-9997
vi


Place Proof.

Add a pic. Pay,
Running a CLASSIFIED Has
Never Been So Easv! .


See for yourself at:


www.WPMObserver.com www.SeminoleVoice.com


he gladly answers questions,
he directs them to Web sites
such as www.consumerlab.
com. The site has indepen-
dent test results of products
for consumers and doctors.
Another suggestion Hall


had in regards to intimacy
was for couples who may
not be able to be active in
the bedroom. For example,
if one partner is in the hos-
pital, the other can still be
intimate by visiting and do-


ing something as simple as
holding their hand.


i
~ ~


Pat Greany, Ph.D.
entomologist, boating enthusiast, former proton -therapy patient

Proton therapy can destroy
hard-to-reach tumors in the prostate
while producing fewer side effects.

The University of Florida's powerful new weapon against cancer- attacks
tumors with optimum doses of radiation that spare healthy tissue.This
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To learn more about the only proton therapy center in
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and neck, lung, brain and pediatric cancers, please visit
www.floridaproton.org/prostate, or call us at (877) 686-6009.

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__ � __


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


www.Seminolevoice.com


www.WPMObserver.com






Page 14 Thursday, July 2, 2009 Winter Park / Maitland Observer



Cin e A showcase of this week's releases,

C inem a and a look ahead to upcoming movies.


Coming July 15


'Harry Potter and the
Half-Blood Prince'

Coming July 17


.ODenina next week


Coming July 24


Coming July 31


'I Love You, Beth Cooper'
PG-13


U


TIFFANY i

< continued from page A9
the wealthy dined on these
dishes.
Catherine Hinman, direc-
tor of public affairs and pub-
lications, says the Laurelton
Hall exhibit should hope-
fully break ground this sum-
mer behind the museum on
Canton Avenue. The exhibit
is tentatively scheduled tb
open in winter 2011.


Morse Museum

Jeannette Genius McKean (1909-1989) founded the
Museum in 1942 on the Rollins College campus, naming
it the Morse Gallery of Art in honor of her grandfather,
Chicago industrialist and Winter Park philanthropist
Charles Hosmer Morse.
She appointed her husband. Hugh F. McKean (1908-
1995), as director until his death in 1995.
The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art
houses the world's most comprehensive collection of the
works of Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848-1933) including
Tiffany jewelry, pottery, paintings, art glass, leaded-glass
windows, lamps, and the chapel interior he designed for
the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago.
Call 40"'-645-5311 or visit www.morsemuseum.org
for more information.


Calendar


Maitland City Councilman Phil Bo-
nus will host a town hall meeting
for Maitland residents at 5:30 p.m.
on Sunday, July 12 at the Maitland
Senior Center at Quinn Strong Park.
Questions, opinions, concerns and
comments are welcomed regarding
the Maitland Town Center project.
Call Phil Bonus at 407-694-8737 or
e-mail him at pbonus@itsmymait-
land.com for more information.

The Charles Hosmer Morse Muse-
um July events are all free to the
public. Visit www.morsemuseum.org
for more information or call 407-645-
5311.
-Celebrate Independence Day
at the Morse Museum from 9:30
a.m..to 4 p.m. on.Saturday, July 4.
The Museum is open and free on
Independence Day in conjunction
with the City of Winter Park's "Olde
Fashioned July 4th Celebration" in
Central Park.


-Take a Free Summer Family Tour
at the Morse Museum from 10 a.m.
to 11 a.m. on Tuesday, July 7. Visitors
will receive a 45-minute tour through
Morse Museum galleries. Space
is limited; advance reservations
required. For more information e-mail
education@morsemuseum.org.
-From 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. on
Friday, July 10 enjoy Friday Family
Film day at the Morse. Guests are
treated to a short film, art activity
and gallery tour in this 90-minute-
program. Space limited; advance
reservations, required. E-mail
education@morsemuseum.org or
call 407-645-5311, ext. 117 for more
information.

-Maitland Public Library Events
(501 S. Maitland Ave.) Call 407-
647-7700 for more information for
these events:
-The Friends of the Maitland Library
Weekly Small Book Sale will be held


from 10 a.m. to noon on Wednesday,
July 1 and July 8.
-Computer time: work on resume,
job applications, or applications for
financial assistance use the MPL
computer lab from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
on Friday, July 3.
-The Library is closed on Saturday,
July 4, Independerce Day.
-PC Academy: Intro to the PC will
be held from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. on
Monday, July 6.
Topics include: cleaning your
computer, hard drive utility and virus
protection. Registration required.
-PC Academy: Computer Q-and-A
will be held from 7 p.m. to 8:30
p.m. on Tuesday, July 7. Registration
required.
-Wii Gaming for seniors will be
held from 1: 30 p.m. to 3 p.m. on
Wednesday, July 8.
Do you enjoy being active? Then
stop by the library and try out a few
Wii Sports games. Find out what your


grandkids are playing. The game
spotlighted this month is MarioKart.
-The Knitting and Crocheting Club
will be held from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
on Thursday, July 9.
All levels welcome to spend time
with fellow crafters.

The Your Adult Club Socials are
sponsoring an Aloha Serenade from
7 p.m. to 10 p.m. on Friday, July 17.
Hudson Bay will be playing and light
refreshments will be available. Ha-
waiian type attire will be appropriate.
Donations are $4 for members and $5
for non-members. Friday dances are
held each week at the Mark Street
Senior Complex at 99 Mark St. For
further information, please call John
at 407-889-4047

The Military Retired Officers Wives
Club, where Active Duty Wives are
welcome, is meeting for lunch to
discuss mutual interests on the third


Tuesday of each month, September
through May at 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
at the Elks Club, 12 N. Primrose Dr.,
in Orlando. For more information con-
tact: Margie Simmons at 407-977-
0516 or Ellen Paul at 407-696-4809.

The Orange County Health Depart-
ment is offering immunizations to
children 2 months to 18 years of
age at no charge during the "Back-
to-School Immunization" event.
This event will take place from July
6 through August 8 every Monday
through Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 3
p.m. at the Central Florida Learning
Community Center located at 1200
W: Colonial Drive in Orlando. This site
will also be open on Saturday, July 11
and AOg. 8 from 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.











Opinion/


Perspectives

by...


Cha! Cha! Cha!


Ah, those Cha-cha-ritas of
Argentina! You know the
ones. Of exquisite tan lines,
curved hips and magnifi-
cent succulent parts. "I just
met a girl named Maria!"
Parts ain't just parts to the
governor. "Parts" had the
governor waxing e-mail el-
oquent on country western
songs, the pleasures of trac-
tor riding and the virtue of
"scoops" of dirt. "Maria!"
Oh, I so don't want the San-
ford affair to end. "Maria!"
I've decided America
does indeed need an "In
Defense of Marriage Act."
Yes, from Republicans. Ha!
These guys are too funny.
By now everyone has heard
the tale of South Carolina
Gov. Mark Sanford and the
Cha-cha-rita named Ma-
ria from Argentina. I am _
reminded of the song by
"Queen" that goes, "Anoth-
er One Bites the Dust."
Speaking of which I was
in New York City last week
-and there was a gay rights
parade commemorating
the Stonewall riots. This
event took place 40 years
ago and is considered a key
moment in the beginning


of civil rights for America's
gay citizens. In the parade I
saw a sign that read, "Mark
Sanford. Just another poli-
tician with a conservative
mind and a liberal penis."
It was credited to TV come-
dian Jon Stewart. Ha!
The best joke I've heard
on the governor and the
Cha-cha-rita had the punch
line that goes: "It shows just
how far Republicans will go
to win the Latin(a) v6te!"
Maria! Ha! "I just met a girl
named Maria." So vote for
me!
I'm in New York for a
week and this story breaks
on Republican virtues,
what? You've not heard of
Republican virtues? Oh,
puhleese! C'mon! Repub-
lican virtues are the ones
where you stand looking so
smug and holier than thou
with one hand on your hip
and the other hand is shak-
ing its finger in your face
and all you hear is "Thou
shalt not!"
Examples: Thou shalt
not run up humongous
budget deficits. That one is
forever owned by George
Bush. Thou shalt have


your children forever ab-
stain from unmarried sex.
Sarah Palin. Thou shalt not
"boink" a woman (Or man!
Ha!) other than one's wife.
So many Republicans own
this one. Sanford, John
Ensign, David Vitter, Larry
Craig. My, my. Too many to
list.
So virtuous! Me thinks
you boys doth protest too
much. It gets better..
This is what Gov. Sanford
said about Bill Clinton's af-
fair when he was a smug,
sanctimonious congress-
man from South Carolina,
"I think it would be much
better for the country and
for him personally (to re-
sign)... I come from the
business side," he said. "If
you had a chairman or
president in the business
world facing these allega-
tions, he'd be gone."
Uh, governor, I've yet
to hear your resignation.
What? You're now King
David? I so love these Bible
quoting fools, nay, hypo-
crites.
And what tragically hap-
pens to this grand spec-
tacle? It's upstaged by Mi-
chael Jackson's death. The
Sanford ordeal could have
gone on for weeks. Drip.
More revelations of dalli-
ances on the public dollar.
Drip. More steamy e-mails.
Drip. Pictures and "no com-
ments" from the Argentine
Cha-cha-rita. Drip. More
goofy press conferences
where the governor apolo-
gizes to Tiny Tim, football
coach Steve Spurrier and
Mother Teresa. Drip. John
Deere asks the governor for


an endorsement. Drip,
And Jackson up and
dies. Is that fair? To Far-
rah Fawcett? We are such
a superficial culture. And
don't-cha just love it! We
have this torrid little story
of hot thighs and hotter
sighs featuring a beautiful
Argentine Cha-cha-rita of
"magnificent parts" with
a little, strutting, tin-horn
American governor from
some Southern third-world
state (see health and edu-
cation statistics on South
Carolina) a major conser-
vative spokesman for Re-
publican Party values who
once demanded Clinton's
resignation, a hypocrite of
"Biblical" proportions who
now equates himself with
King David of Old Testa-
ment fame and all this is
taken off page one by the
untimely death of some .
"Tickle me Elmo under the
blankets," pill-popping, al-
leged pedophile who last
. had a hit song, what, a de-
cade or so ago?
Go figure. I remember
being in Quebec in 2006
when the Republican Party
Mark Foley humiliation
broke and how I so relished
that scandal, too. It was
delicious. Oh, thank you,
God, for bringing low those
who mock your word so!
Ha! I don't buy any of the
"mocked God" inanity oth-
er than don't point fingers .
and claim virtue when your
feet are made of rapidly dis-
solving clay.
Swaggart, Baker, Foley,
Craig, Palin, Vitter, Sanford,
Ensign. On and on. They are
all-of-the-same sanctimo-


nious, falsely pious ilk.
None of this, none of it
would have lasted more
than a day or two if San-
ford hadn't been a self-
righteous, finger-pointing
"thou shalt not" hypo-
critical, holier-than-thou
Republican. None of it. It
would have come out that
Sanford was indiscreet and
we all would have wished
him and his family well in
their recovery as a family
unit. If that is to be.
Folks, we are all adults
here. Or, at least I hope
we are. We need to mind
our own business. Merci-
fully so. We don't need to be
concerning ourselves with
who is exchanging bodily
liquids with whom. That is
so passe.
But about those "mag-
nificent parts," governor?
Indeed. Photos? Ha!
It's a human train wreck
we watch with splayed
fingers - made doubly in-
triguing by earlier claims of
virtue and undone by the
most reprehensible of hu-
man vices - hypocrisy.
The Republican Party
is loaded with hubris and
hypocrisy. Decouple those
two qualities from your
Party and you will regain
relevance.


A KJEPSON
Chris Jepson's opinions are made
independently of the newspaper.
Write him at jepson@MEDIAmerica.us.


Letters to


Praise the current mayor too
I applaud Commissioner Beth Dil-
laha's June 25 letter ("Giving credit
where due") recognizing and prais-
ing Sherry Gutch for her efforts
as CRA director. And while I don't
begrudge the commissioner want-
ing to give the past-Mayor David
Strong credit for the Park Avenue
Area Revitalization Study, I would
like to see her stay more in the
present and show some praise for
our current mayor's accomplish-
ments and continuing effort to
address one of his key campaign is-
sues - the city's finances.
For example, his proactive re-
sponse and action in addressing
the "negative watch" rating for the
city's revenue bonds, resulting in
Fitch Ratings confirming our A+
rating and changing the "negative
watch" to "stable outlook" for the
water and sewer utility.
And what about the mayor's es-
tablishment of an ongoing 90-day
planning process that includes a
quarterly budget review? Designed
to make sure the city's goals and
objectives are not lost in the shuffle
of day to day priorities (like dog
parks), the process is another ex-
ample of his, as promised, business-
like approach.
And as he continues to sup-


port the "Planning the Possibil- side of the tracks. In the 1960s,
ity" discussion with an emphasis Morse Boulevard wasextended
on the best use of facilities such through the park connecting the
as City Hall, the Library, and city- east and west portions of the bou-
owned properties, let's hope when levard.
it comes to supporting the will of In recent years with the devel-
the people, Commissioner Dillaha opment of businesses and many
remembers to follow the wisdom new residential units in Hannibal
of her own words: "Collectively, we Square, it would seem appropriate
are much stronger than we are in- to have a mirror image of the park
dividually." on the west side of the tracks with
I'm sure Mayor Bradley would Central Park tying the town togeth-
welcome her support! er. In the past City Commissions
had seen opportunities, and they
-Ed Sabori acted on them; when the Gentile
Winter Park Packing House property and the
Amtrak Station became available
Time to move on Post Office plans they bought them. That has en-
Now is the time to follow through abled the city to protect the exist-
with the purchase of the Post Of- ing park and to lay the groundwork
fice property. In 1881, the founders for expansion.
of Winter Park laid out the town The expansion would add green
with sites for businesses, churches, space which would fit in with the
schools, residences and Central "green initiative" sweeping the
Park. Their plan was similar to country. The green space would
that of a New England town with a involve more trees and grass, which
town square. They hoped to attract would help our environment in
wealthy northerners who would the future. It would add additional
spend their winters here. It worked, space for some of the large events
and it has been attracting people of that take place in the park, and it
all walks of life ever since. would give the west side of town a
In the beginning, the railroad view and a share of the park, rather
tracks were a barrier between the than the possible view of buildings
east and west sides of town. Even that could become a barrier once
the train station was on the east more.


Please consider the many posi-
tive outcomes that will result frqm
the purchase of the existing Post
Office property and how it will
benefit Winter Park citizens today
and in the future. The unanimous
support of this project by the com-
missioners will unify the commu-
nity. The funding will be provided
by private donations. Everyone in
Winter Park could help to achieve
this goal. Both children and adults
who spend time in Central Park
and different community groups
and businesses could be involved.
Many families with small children
gather in the park on Saturday
mornings on a regular basis. No
matter where you live in Winter
Park, Central Park is the heart of
the city.
All Winter Park citizens would
feel a sense of accomplishment for
having added this valuable asset
to our town. The City Commission
will be remembered for having
taken steps to ensure that this op-
portunity was not lost. Think of
the wonderful celebration that we
could have in the park when we
have reached our goal.

-Ann Saurman
Winter Park


Thursday, July 2, 2009 Pae1


Winter Park /i Maitland Obse~rver


I







P~rne 16 Thursday. July 2, 2009 Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Play On!


Conservative
Cultural Commentary
By Louis Roney
Distinguished Professor Emeritus, UCF
2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award
Assisted by beloved wife Joy Roney

Azara
(fiction)
zara Nazimova sat
down on the glider
on my porch. She
looked out across the water
toward Martha's Vineyard.
Azara's dramatic Turk-
ish profile had softened -
in the nine years since she
and I last sang together
in the Berlin Stdidtische
Oper. In several countries
and languages, Azara and
I were a popular pair in
"Aida," "Otello," "Tosca,"
"Lohengrin," "Fidelio,"
"Freischiitz," "Tarinhiuser"


and some other operas that
need voices with big ranges
and plenty of dramatic
power.
We both had trained in
Italy and sang German with
Italian bel canto vocal tech-
nique.. Our German col-
leagues envied us, but could
never imitate us. The Ger-
man press called us "well-
matched" even "adored."
We were both people of
above average physical
energy, and got along well
with each other personally,
and artistically.
We were great colleagues.
But it stopped right there.
There was an air of mys-
tery about Azara that al-
ways made her formidable
in my eyes. That fact put
the brakes on any impulse
I might ever have had to let
our relationship become
closer than what it was
on the stage. God knows, I
wooed gals who couldn't
match Azara in looks or
brains. But smart singers
learn that it's harder to find
a good partner in the opera
house than in the bedroom.
Zeroing in on one per-
son to play both those roles
in your life usually ends as a
fiasco,, with art as the loser.
In the Theaterkantine,
Azara had tried a couple of
times to talk to me about


her religious beliefs. She
seemed hipped on the oc-
cult overtones of Zoroas-
trianism, and had an obses-
sive need to identify good
and evil in all the people
she knew.
Spooky, ideological
things like that don't inter-
est me much. The Golden
Rule I can understand. But
all I ever learned from re-
ligion is to give the other
guy a fair shake. I don't un-
derstand - or need - the
hocus-pocus.
Azara had always felt
that she was a good person,
and that she was ordained
to fight against evil wher-
ever she could.
I left the porch long
enough to get a nice bottle
of Bordeaux and two glass-
es. When I came back I sat
down next to Azara on the
glider. After we exchanged
a few pleasantries, she be-
gan to unburden herself
about the things that had
happened in her-life since
we sang love duets with
* each other in Europe.
"I had never thought
about teaching singing,"
she said. "But the night I
sang my 50th performance
of'Rosenkavalier', this man,
Leo Montague, an opera
impresario and university
professor from the United


States, was at the stage
door. He wanted to talk
with me."
When I heard Azara say
the name of the university,
I interjected, "That's hands-
.down the best voice faculty
in the U.S.! All former opera
stars. Not a degree higher
than a Bachelor's, and all
the pragmatic vocal know-
how in the world. These
people show their students
exactly how it's done, and
how to make a real career."
"Well," Azara said, "Leo
and I became lovers, natch.
I joined the faculty there, as
you may have heard. They
gave me carte blanche to
sing opera whenever and
wherever I wanted. So I was
able to 'guest' as Ariadne
in the Met, the Countess in
Dallas, Senta in L.A. - and
some other stuff I had on
the books."
"I wish I.could hear you
sing somewhere, Azara," I
said.
"Well, I still sing some
roles damned well. I'm even
doing Carmen for the first
time. I'll soon be 38, you
know."
I smiled at her ease in
slicing 10 years off her age
- which was about the
same as mine.
Azara told me Leo had
this young soprano he was


training. The girl didn't
know any of the dramatic
repertoire he had sched-
uled in the opera house
where he was director. Leo
put her with .coaches to
teach her the roles, two
Italian: Tosca and Aida, two
German: Lohengrin and
Der Freischutz, and two
French: Les Troyens and
Carmen.
She went on, "A year later
I had signed to live and
teach there, and to sing all
those operas - all thepre-
mieres and six performanc-
es of each.
"But I never received a
copy of my contract - Leo
always had an excuse.
"One day I came into the
opera office, and demanded
my contract, as otheiopera
companies wanted me.
"Then I realized that this
b@#$%@d had gotten me
to commit to his whole sea-
son," she almost screamed.
"I was the 'cover'-the in-
surance policy for his suc-
cess, while behind my back,
he was romancing this up-
and-coming young b@#$h
who was learning my reper-
toire. I hate him!"
"Why bother about him,


> turn to RONEY on page A18


WEATHER

THRSAY JUY 5 00 SATTEED -TRS I WID, W12Mr *`�$


IT PRUS WI


770 87�
6a.m. I 3p.m.


770
6 a.m.
Friday


TODAY: Scattered
thunderstorms with a high
near 92. West southwest
wind around 10 mph. Rain
chance 40 percent.


8
S Very High


MORNING LOW 77�

-, DAYTIME HIGH 900

Sunrise Sunset 40% chance Wind
6:32 a.m. 8:27 p.m. of rain WSW 6mph



./ - MORNING LOW 77�0

DAYTIME HIGH 890

Sunrise Sunset 40% chance Wind
6:32 a.m. 8:27 p.m. of rain WSW 6 mph



MORNING LOW 77�
DAYTIME HIGH 91 0

Sunrise Sunset 40% chance Wind
6:33 a.m. 8:27 p.m. of rain WSW 8 mph


NATIONAL


Seattle
Los Angeles
Houston


Friday Sat.
60/88 62/83
63/78 63/76
77/93 77/96


City
Atlanta
Chicago
New York


Friday Sat.
70/90 72/90
64/83 63/78
* 65/78 63/78


MARINE FORECAST
Cocoa Beach tide schedule
Time Low High
Saturday 12:07 a.m. 6:02 a.m.
--July 4 12:24 p.m. 6:51 p.m.
Sunday 12:54 a.m. 6:49 a.m.
July 5 1:09 p.m. 7:34 p.m.

FLORIDA FORECAST


City
Jacksonville
Miami
Tampa
Pensacola


Friday Sat.
79/94 80/96
79/90 79/88
77/89 78/90
80/94 81/94


INTERNATIONAL
City Friday Sat.
London 62/77 60/74
Paris 59/79 58/77
Tokyo 72/79 73/81


UV INDEX


IN HISTORY
OnJuy ,175 tre
pepewr ile.n i


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Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Thursday, July 2, 2009 Page 17


S# iNotices


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in THE i II , I.r .i.Fil T l.l` ' EMirj fl.E iJI r .T
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2009CP1095
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JOANNE HARPER NORRIS
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of
Summary Administration has been entered in the
estate of JOANNE HARPER NORRIS, deceased,
File Number 2009CP1095, by the Circuit Court
for Seminole County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 301 N. Park Avenue, Sanford,
Florida 32771; that the decedent's date of death
was November 19, 2008; that the total value of the
estate is $100 and that the names and addresses
of those to whom it has been assigned by such
order are:
Name / Address
DAVID T. NORRIS as Trustee of the NORRIS
FAMILY REVOCABLE TRUST, dated July 22, 1996 /
914 S. Main Street, Hopkinsvllle, KY 42240
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and
persons having claims or demands against the
estate of the decedent other than those for whom
provision for full payment was made in the Order
of Summary Administration must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE.
ALL- CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE
TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is
July 2, 2009.
Attorney for Person Giving Notice:
Matthew H. Roby
Attorney
Florida Bar No. 0505641
831 West Morse Boulevard
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone: (407) 647-8065
Fax: (407) 647-5766
Person Giving Notice:
David T. Norris
914 S. Main Street
Hopkinsville, Kentucky 42240
7/2, 7/9

INTHE COUNTY COURT OF THE 9th JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 09-CC-257
WATERFORD LAKES COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION,
INC.
Plaintiff,
v.
EDWARD A. HEFLIN, JR., TRACI LEE PINA a/k/a
TRACI PINA, ROOSEVELT DAYMON, JR,, ERNEST
LYNCH, JAMES CLONINGER, ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, and JOHN DOE and JANE DOE,
as unknown tenants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on the 14th day
of July, 2009, at 11:00 a.m., at room 350 of the
Orange County Courthouse, 425 N. Orange Avenue,
Orlando, Florida 32801, the undersigned Clerk will
offer for sale the real estate described as follows:
Lot 76, HUCKLEBERRY FIELDS TRACTS N-9
AND N-10, UNIT TWO, according to the plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 26, Pages
98 and 99, of the Public Records of Oranos
County, Florida.
together with all structures, improvements, fixtures,
and appurtenances on said land or used in conjunc-
tion therewith.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to
a Final Judgment entered in this cause on June
9, 2009.
DATED this 9th day of June, 2009
LYDIA GARDNER
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: Norma J. Felshaw
Circuit Court Seal
As Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please
contact Court Administration at 425 North Orange
Avenue, Suite 2130, Orlando, Florida 32801, tele-
phone (407)836-2303, within 2 working days of
your receipt of this Summons: if you are hearing
impaired, call 1-800-955-8771; if you are voice
impaired, call: 1-800-955-8770.
6/25, 7/2
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2009-CP-718-0
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF
OMA LEE COTHRON
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: -
You are hereby notified that an Order of
Summary Administration has been entered in the
estate of OMA LEE COTHRON, deceased, File
Number 2009-CP-718-0, by the Circuit Court
for Orange County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 425 N. Orange Ave., Orlando,
FL 32901,; that the decedent's date of death was
March 25, 2009; that the total value of the estate
is $54,518.57 and that the names and addresses
of those to whom It has been assigned by such
order are:
Name /Address
TOMMY J. WEST / 3131 Jean Ave, Invemess,
FL 34450
Shirley F. Cooper / 404 W. Welch Rd., Apopka,
Florida 32712
Stella R. Wright / 5633 Watercrest Dr.,
Greensboro, NC 27407
ALL INTERESTED.PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and
persons having claims or demands against the
estate of the decedent other than those for whom
provision for full payment was made in the Order
of Summary Administration must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE
TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is
June 25, 2009.
Attorney for Person giving Notice:
Marie T. Blume
Attorney
Florida Bar No. 0493181
P.O. Box 2763
Inverness, Florida-34451
Telephone: (352) 726-7778
Fax: (352) 726-7798
Person Giving Notice:
TOMMY J. WEST
3131 Jean Ave
Inverness, Florida 34450
6/25, 7/2


IJ -THf I inr'l il It llh T Ij.1 THl Ih ifi H r ll 1 iis 1 1
CIRCUIT, ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA, PROBATE
DIVISION
CASE NO. 48-2009-CP-001283-0
IN RE: Estate of
THOMAS E POLLOCK, JR.,
Deceased,.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of THOMAS F.
POLLOCK, JR,, deceased, whose date of death was
June 8, 2009, File Number 48-2009-CP-001283-0,
is pending In the Circuit Court for Orange County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is
425 North Orange Avenue, Room 340, Orlando,
Florida 32801. The names and addresses of
the Personal Representative and the Personal
Representative's attorney are set forth below,
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice has been
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent'and other
persons having claims or demands against the
decedent's estate must file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WIUL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is
June 25, 2009.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
KENNETH F. MURRAH
Florida Bar No.: 0057494
Murrah, Doyle and Wigle, P.A.
P.O. Box 1328
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 644-9801
Personal Representative:
KENNETH F. MURRAH
1601 Legion Drive
Winter Park, Florida 32789
6/25, 7/2



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File Number: 48-2009-CP-1223-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
James Knox Rush a/k/a James K. Rush,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of James Knox
Rush a/k/a James K. Rush, deceased, whose date
of death was May 6, 2009, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Orange County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 425 North 'Orange Avenue,
Room 340, Orlando, FL 32801. The names and
addresses of the Personal Representative and
the Personal Representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliq-
uidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other crodiors f the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against the
decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent
or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with
this court within 3 months after the date of the first
publication of this notice.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice
is 6/25/09.
Personal Representative:
Randolph J. Rush
329 Park Avenue North, 2nd Floor
P.O. Box 880
Winter Park, FL 32790
Lance A. Ragland
Attorney for Personal Representative
Florida Bar No. 0122440
Winderweedle, Halnes, Ward & Woodman, P.A.
329 Park Avenue North, 2nd Floor, P.O. Box 880,
Winter Park, FL 32790
Telephone: (407) 423-4246
6/25, 7/2




IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
CASE No. 2009-CA-4248-14-K
HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS
TRUSTEE UNDER THE POOLING AND SERVICING
AGREEMENT DATED AS OF DECEMBER 1, 2005,
FREMONT HOME LOAN TRUST 2005-E,
PLAINTIFF,
VS.
DEJAN PELES, ET AL.
DEFENDANTSS.
NOTICE OF ACTION
To: Melisa Peles
RESIDENCE: UNKNOWN
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 1003 Stout Court, Oviedo,
FL 32765
AND TO: All persons claiming an Interest by, through,
under, or against the aforesaid defendantss.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to fore-
close a mortgage on the following described prop-
erty located In Seminole County, Florida: ,
Lot 11 of ALAFAYA WOODS PHASE IX, according to
the plat thereof as recorded In Plat Book 36, Page(s)
1 through 4, of the Public Records of Semlnole
County, Florida.
has been filed against you, andlyou are required
to serve a copy of your written defenses, If any, to
this action, on Gladstone Law Group, P.A., attorneys
for plaintiff, whose address Is 101 Plaza Real South,
Suite 219, Boca Raton, FL 33432,;and file the origi-
nal with the Clerk of the Court, within 30 days after
the first publication of this notice, either before or
immediately thereafter, otherwise a default may be
entered against you for the relief demanded In the
Complaint.
This notice shall be published once a week for
two consecutive weeks In The Winter Park-Maitland
Observer.
DATED: June 24, 2009
MARYANNE MORSE
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Linda Passow
Deputy Clerk of the Court
If you are a person with a disability who needs any
accommodation in order to participate in this pro-
ceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the
provision of certain assistance. Please contact the
ADA Coordinator, Ms. Stacy Brady at 2825 Judge
Fran Jamieson Way, Viera, FL 32940; telephone
number 321-633-2171 two (2) working days of
your receipt of this notice; if you are hearing im-
paired, call the Florida Relay Services at 1-800-
955-8771 (TTY); if you are voice impaired, call the
Florida Relay Services at 1-800-955-8770
7/2, 7/9


S Ij THE I I "IFIIl u IT 'i l,, iilT ,iF IHE Ij H r j li H ll. . l_ i
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 08-CA-13257
Division 32A
TRUSTCOT'ANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ALFREDO GALLEGOS and DORA GALLEGOS,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice Is hereby given that on the 18th day of
August, 2009, at 11:00 a.m. In Room 350 of the
Courthouse of Orange County, Florida, 425 S.
Orange Avenue, Orlando FL 32801 the undersigned
Clerk will offer for sale the following described
real property:
LOT 211, PARK MANOR ESTATES, SECTION 10,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 4 PAGES 60, PUBLIC RECORDS OF
ORANGE COUNTY FLORIDA.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to
the Final Judgment of Foreclosure in Civil Case
No. 08-CA-13257 Division 32A now pending in the
Circuit Court in Orange County, Florida.
In accordance with the Americans With
Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing
a special accommodation to participate in this pro-
ceeding should contact Court Administration at 37
North Orange Avenue, Suite 1130, Orlando, Florida
32801, telephone number 407/836-2050, not later
than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hear-
ing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V)
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, If any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.
Dated this 24th day of June, 2009.
Lydia Gardner
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Corine Harry
Civil Court Seal
As Deputy Clerk
JEFFRY R. JONTZ
SWANN & HADLEY, P.A.
Post Office Box 1961
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 647-2777
Facsimile No.: (407) 647-2157
7/2, 7/9
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO,: 2009-CP-0605
IN RE: ESTATE OF
WILLIAM SUNDAY YOUNG,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of WILLIAM
SUNDAY YOUNG, deceased, File No.2009-CP-0605,
whose date of death was January 12, 2009, is
pending in the Circuit Court for Seminole County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which
is301 North Park Avenue, Sanford, Florida 32771.
The names and addresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against the decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice is required
to be served must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER
THE TIME OF FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PE-
RIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702, FLORIDA
STATUTES, WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITH-
STANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER
THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is June
25. 2009.
Grace Anne Glavin, Esq.
GRACE ANNE GLAVIN, P.A.
1340 Tuskawilla Road, Suite 106
Winter Springs. FL 32708
Telephone : (407) 699-1110
Fax:(407) 699-1165
Florida Bar # 350605
Attorney for Personal Representative
Rebecca E. Davidson, Personal Representative
647 David Street
Winter Springs, FL 32708
6/25,7/2
NOTICE OF SALE OF MOTOR VEHICLE
Pursuant to Florida Statute 713.585, Mid-Florida
Lien And Recovery, will sell at public sale for cash
the following described vehicles located at lienor's
place to satisfy a claim of lien. 1997 ISUZU VIN:
462CK58V6V4312509. Lien Amt:S2764.04. Lienor/
COTTMAN TRANSMISSION CENTER 8250 S HWY
17-92 FERN PARK, FL 407-331 -6211. 2006 SUZUKI
VIN: "JS1GT76A162105832. Lien Amt:$1812,88.
Lienor/EXECUTIVE AUTO SERVICE 207 E PAL-
METTO AVE LONGWOOD, FL 407-767-0688. 2004
LANDROVER VIN: SALNY22204A299684. Lien
Amt:$725.00. Lienor/LAND ROVER ORLANDO 2.65
NORTH HIGHWAY 17-92 LONGWOOD, FL 407-695-
9100. Sale Date: July 20, 2009, 10:00 AM. At Mid
Florida Lien & Recovery 3001 Aloma Ave. Winter
Park FL 32792. Said vehicles may be redeemed
by satisfying the lien prior to sale date. You have
the right to a hearing at any time prior to sale date
by filing a demand for hearing in the circuit court.
Owner has the right to recover possession of vehicle
by posting a bond in accordance with ES. 559.917.
Any proceeds in excess of the amount of the lien
will be deposited with the Clerk of Circuit Court in
the county where the vehicle is held.
7/2


I .N THE I IFi i llT iii I ill THi l Hli. HTIlf-jrirH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO.: 2009-CP-0940
IN RE: ESTATE OF
RITA V. PAGNOTTA,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of RITA V. PAG-
NOTIA, deceased, File No.2009-CP-0940, whose
date of death was February 1, 2009, Is pending
in the Circuit Court for Seminole County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of which Is 301 North
Park Avenue, Sanford, Florida 32771. The names
and addresses of the personal representative and
the personal representative's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against the decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice is required
to be served must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER
THE TIME OF FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PE-
RIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702, FLORIDA
STATUTES, WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is June
25, 2009.
Grace Anne Glavin, Esq.
GRACE ANNE GLAVIN, P.A.
1340 Tuskawilla Road, Suite 106
Winter Springs, FL 32708
Telephone : (407) 699-1110
Fax: (407) 699-1165
Florida Bar # 350605
Attorney for Personal Representative
Carol Brown, Personal Representative
3251 Deer Chase Run, Longwood, FL 32779
6/25,7/2
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
You are hereby informed that the City Council of the
City of Maitland, Florida, will hold a Public Hearing
on the following proposed ordinance: �
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MAITLAND,
FLORIDA, AMENDING THE OFFICIAL ZONINGMAP, A
PART OF CHAPTER 21 OF THE MAITLAND CODE OF
ORDINANCES, BY CHANGING THE ZONING CLASSI-
FICATION OF PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN, FROM
MORC, MIXED OFFICE RESIDENTIAL COMMERICAL
DISTRICT TO PD, PLANNED DEVELOPMENT DIS-
TRICT; FROM PD, PLANNED DEVELOPMENT DIS-
TRICT TO PD, PLANNED DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT;
TO OBTAIN APPROVAL OF A FINAL DEVELOPMENT
PLAN IN ORDER INCORPORATE SAID PROPERTY AS
A PLAY AREA/PLAYGROUND FOR THE EXISTING ELE-
MENTARY SCHOOLAND PROVIDING REQUIREMENTS
AND APPROVALS FOR THE PLANNED DEVELOP-
MENT DISTRICT; AND AMENDING REQUIREMENTS
AND APPROVALS WITHIN A PLANNED DEVELOP-
MENT ZONING CLASSIFICATION; AND PROVIDING
AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
The Public Hearing will be held at 6:30 P.M., or
as soon thereafter as possible, on Monday, July 13,
2009, in the Maitland City Hall Council Chambers,
1776 Independence Lane, Maitland, Flonrida, 32751.
A copy of the proposed ordinance is available in
the office of the City Clerk for inspection. Interested
parties may appear at the hearing and be heard with
respect to the proposed ordinance.


need to ensure that a verbatim record of the pro-
ceedings is made, which record includes the testi-
mony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be
based. Persons with disabilities needing assistance
to participate in any of these proceedings should
contact the City Clerk's office (407-539-6219) 48
hours in advance of the meeting.
CITY OF MAITLAND
Maria T.Waldrop, CMC
City Clerk
7/2
NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION
Pursuant to Ch 713.585(6) F.S. United American Lien
& Recovery as agent with power of attorney will sell
the following vehicles) to the highest bidder subject
to any liens; net proceeds deposited with the clerk
of court; owner/lienholder has right to hearing and
post bond; owner may redeem vehicle for cash sum
of lien; all auctions held in reserve
Inspect 1 week prior @ lienor facility; cash or ca-
shier check; 15% buyer prem; any person inter-
ested ph (954) 563-1999
Sale date July 24 2009 @ 10:00 am 3411 NW 9th
Ave Ft Lauderdale FL 33309
20766 2004 Chevrolet vin#: KL1TD52644B120000
lienor: rs tradelink usa discount tires 1202 lee rd
Orlando fl 407-298-2663 lien anrt $2774.50
20767 1993 Nissan vin#: 1N4BU31F3PC238876
lienor: cartune automotive svcs 9800 s orange ave
Orlando fl 407-888-2582 lien amt $2365.51
20768 2002 Pontiac vin#: 1G2NF52F52C142076
lienor: jcr auto body & collision 5625 edgewater dr
Orlando f 407-291-7740 lien amt $5873.00
20769 1991 Lexus vin#: JT8UF11E3M0076591
lienor: jcr auto body & collision 5625 edgewater dr
Orlando fl 407-291-7740 lien amt $4202.00
sale date July 31 2009 @ 10:00 am 3411 NW 9th
Ave #707 Ft Lauderdale FL 33309
20788 2002 Toyota vin#: JT3GH20V820043305
lienro: haina autobody repair & sales 1326 35 st
#101 orlando fi 407-835-6992 lien amt $5941.00
20789 2000 Ford vin#: 1FMYU60X2YUAO7412
lienor: automex group 11114 satellite blvd Orlando
fl 407-854-5434 lien amt $2703.03
Licensed & bonded auctioneers flab422 flau 765
& 1911
7/2


1il THE I.I.I I i.i 1.C fr ri-m rasnr F i.IIIrNT
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2009-CP-1227-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JOHN REGINALD CHAPMAN
Deceased.
NOTICE.TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of John Reginald
Chapman, deceased, whose date of death was May
20, 2009, and whose social security number is XXX-
XX-1198, file number 2009-CP-1227-0, Is pending
in the Circuit Court for Orange County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of which is 425
North-Orange Avenue, Room 310, Orlando, Florida
32801. The names and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice is required
to be served must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against dece-
dept's estate must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is
July 2, 2009.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Kenneth R. Marchman
Florida Bar No. 098705
Hunter & Marchman, P.A.
1330 Palmetto Avenue
Winter Park, FL 32789
Telephone: (407) 647-6900
Personal Representative:
LaNorris Chapman
2533 Cromwell Road.,
Norfolk, Virginia 23509
7/2, 7/9
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA,
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 48-2009-CP-000795-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF MABEL
R. FURR a/k/a MABEL ANNETTE FURR,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of MABEL R.
FURR A/K/A MABEL ANNETTE FURR, deceased,
whose date of. death was February 15, 2009; File
Number 48-2009-CP-000795-0, is pending in the
Circuit Court for ORANGE County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 425 N. Orange
Avenue, Orando, Florida 32801. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attomey are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served, must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733,702 OF THE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET'
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED..
The date of first publication of this notice is: July
2,2009.

RICHARD A. LEIGH, ESQUIRE
Attomey for Personal Representative
Florida Bar No. 119591
Swann & Hadley, PA
1031 W. Morse Blvd., Suite 350
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone: 407-647-2777
NANCY LITTLETON
Personal Representative
50989 US Hwy 27, Lot 274
Davenport, Florida 33897


iii THE1 i.ir i.lli '01.iRnT 01.:1 'EMirJNI iLE il'.i0ifi
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
FRile No. 2009-CP-0912
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF -
SONIA BOSQUE-MERCADO
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Sonia
Bosque-Mercado, deceased, whose date of death
was January 17, 2009, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Seminole County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which Is P. 0. Box 8099, Sanford, FL
32772-8099. The names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the personal representa-
tive's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OFTHE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is June
25,2009.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Catherine E. Davey
Attorney for Joise Franchesco Ramos
.Florida Bar No. 0991724
Post Office Box 941251
Maitland, FL 32794-1251
Telephone: (407) 645-4833
Fax: (407) 645-4832
Personal Representative:
Joise Franchesco Ramos
10476 Riva Ridge Trail
Orlando, Florida 32817
6/25,7/2

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
-*ASE NO.: 2009-CP-0978
IN RE: ESTATE OF
IRWIN DONALD GLENER,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of IRWIN DON-
ALD GLENER, deceased, File No. 2009-CP-0978,
whose date of death was February 10, 2009, is
pending in the Circuit Court for Seminole County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is
301 North ParkAvenue, Sanford, Florida 32771. The
names and addresses of the personal representa-
tive and the personal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against the decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice is required
to be served must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER
THE TIME OF FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedents
estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOTFILED WITHIN THE TIME PE-
RIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702, FLORIDA
STATUTES, WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is June
25,2009.
Grace Anne Glavin, Esq.
GRACE ANNE GLAVIN, P.A.
-: l it .,. :. iii h.:,.. s t .r'u 106
P,,-,r , *j. ,''-' I. ,:; -"',
Telephone : (407) 699-1110
Fax: (407) 699-1165
Florida Bar #350605
Attorney for Personal Representative
Peter C. Glener, Personal Representative
1459 Southwind Drive
Casselberry, Florida 32707
6/25,7/2


CITY OF WINTER PARK
401 Park Avenue South
Winter Park, Florida 32789

: PUBLIC NOTICE


NOTICE is hereby given that the Board of Adjustment of the City of Winter Park; Florida on Tuesday
July 21, 2009 will hold a Public Hearing at 5:00 PRM. in the Commission Chambers of City Hall. At
that time, the following variance from Article Ill "Zoning" of the Winter Park Land Development Code
will be heard:
#1 Request of Brian Gruber for a variance from Section 58-82 "General provisions" paragraph (p) to
allow a 4 foot wood fence to remain in a front yard setback area along the side lot line, in lieu of the
maximum permitted height of 3 feet,
Property described as: Plat Book A, Page 67 & Plat Book B, Page 86, Lot 7, Block 32 as recorded in the
Public Records of Orange County, Florida
Located at 466 Carolina Avenue Zoned: R-1A
/St Stephanie J Edsall
Stephanie J Edsall
Board Secretary
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, he may need to ensure that a verbatim record is made, which record includes the testimony
and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. (FS. 286.0105)"Pearsons with disabilities needing
assistance to participate In any of these proceedings should contact the Board of Adjustment Secretary
(407-599-3237) at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting.
7/2

CITY OF WINTER PARK
401 Park Avenue South
Winter Park, Florida 32789

PUBLIC NOTICE
an ncecaao mat
NOTICE Is hereby given that a public meeting as required by Section 58-491 of the Land Development
Code will be held by the Historic Preservation Commission of the City of Winter Park, Florida on Monday,
August 3, 2009 at 7:00 p.m. in the Commission Chambers of City Hall, 401 Park Avenue South, Winter
Park, Florida, to present Information and receive comments on the following item:
The National Register of Historic Places nomination for an area of downtown Winter Park generally
bounded by the south side of Canton Avenue on the north, portions of Interlachen Avenue on the east,
the east side of New York Avenue on the west, and the north side of Comstock Avenue on the south.
All interested parties are invited to attend and be heard, Additional information will be available in the
Planning Department office so that citizens may acquaint themselves with each Issue and receive
answers to any questions they may have prior to the meeting. Planning Department (407) 599-3498 or
via email at Lhayes@cityofwinterpark.org.
NOTE:,If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, he may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings Is made, which record
Includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. (F.S. 286.0105)
Persons with disabilities needing assistance to participate in any of these proceedings should contact
the City Clerk's Office (407-599-3277) at least 48 hours In advance of the meeting.
/s/: Cynthia S. Bonham, CMC
City Clerk


CITY OF WINTER PARK
401 Park Avenue South
Winter Park, Florida 32789

PUBLIC NOTICE


Notice Is hereby given that public hearings will be held by the City Commission of the City of Winter
Park, Florida, on Monday, July 13, 2009, at 3:30 p.m. In the Commission Chambers of City Hall, 401
Park Avenue, South, to consider the following:
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF WINTER PARK, FLORIDA, AUTHORIZING THE REFUNDING OF ALL
THE OUTSTANDING ELECTRIC REVENUE BONDS, SERIES 2005A AND SERIES 2005B, OF THE CITY;
PROVIDING FOR THE ISSUANCE OF NOT EXCEEDING $60,000,000 ELECTRIC REFUNDING REVENUE
NOTES AND/OR BONDS OF THE CITY TO TEMPORARILY AND PERMANENTLY FINANCE THE COST
THEREOF; PROVIDING FOR THE PAYMENT OF SUCH NOTES AND BONDS FROM THE NET REVENUES
DERIVED FROM THE ELECTRIC SYSTEM OFTHE CITY; AUTHORIZING THE SUSPENSION OR TERMINATION
OF INTEREST RATE SWAP AGREEMENT PAYMENTS RELATED TO THE REFUNDED BONDS, UNDER
CERTAIN CONDITIONS; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF WINTER PARK, FLORIDA, AUTHORIZING THE REFUNDING OF ALL
THE OUTSTANDING WATER AND SEWER REVENUE BONDS, SERIES 2004, OF THE CITY, AND THE
ACQUISITION AND/OR CONSTRUCTION OF ADDITIONS, EXTENSIONS AND IMPROVEMENTS TO THE
WATER AND SEWER SYSTEM OF THE CITY; PROVIDING FOR THE ISSUANCE OF NOT EXCEEDING
$50,000,000 WATER AND SEWER REFUNDING REVENUE NOTES OF THE CITY FOLLOWED BY THE
ISSUANCE OF NOT EXCEEDING $57,000,000-WATER AND SEWER REVENUE BONDS AND/OR LEASE-
PURCHASE OBLIGATIONS OF THE CITY TO BE APPLIED TO FINANCE THE COST THEREOF; PROVIDING
FOR THE PAYMENT OF SUCH OBLIGATIONS FROM THE NET REVENUES DERIVED FROM THE WATER AND
SEWER SYSTEM OF THE CITY; AUTHORIZING THE SUSPENSION OR TERMINATION OF INTEREST RATE
SWAP AGREEMENT PAYMENTS RELATED TO THE REFUNDED BONDS, UNDER CERTAIN CONDITIONS;
AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
All interested parties are Invited to attend and be heard. Additional Information Is available In the City
Clerk's office so that citizens may acquaint themselves with each issue and receive answers to any
questions they may have prior to the meeting. "If a person decides to appeal any decision made by
the Commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he/she will need
a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, lie/she may need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings Is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based." (FS. 286.0105) Persons with disabilities needing assistance to participate in
any of these proceedings should contact tihe City Clerk's office (407-599-3277) at least 48 hours in
advance of the meeting.
/s/ Cynthia S. Bonham, CMC, City Clerk
7/2


_J '`-" " L J ~~~- ^^~~ ~'-` I~^"-' ~ ~ r--------------- 1~~~~


�_ II








Paae 18 Thursday, July 2, 2009 Winter Park / Maitland Observer


REALTORS:
Licensed Real Estate Professionals needing
to earn additional income. Become a
part time or full time loan officer. Control
your own closings. Gain access to
hundreds of mortgage programs. Save
your clients thousands of dollars. Call
Maitland Mortgage Lending Company
(407)629-5626
ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVE
Account Representative needed to work
on behalf of our company. 18+ needed
and must have computer skills. Accounting
experience needed. Any job experience.
Email to mclarkemploymentl111@gmail,
corn for more information.





FOR RENT
Oviedo Office Space, great frontage. 750
to 1,050 sf available. $1,070 to $1,350 per
month. 1401 Broadway St. Contact Megan
at (407) 687-3524.
OVIEDO OFFICE FOR RENT
Oviedo Office for rent. 1,640 sq. ft., $14/
sq. ft. + tax, no CAM. Reception, kitchen,
conference offices. Near 417 Red Bug exit.
815 Eyrie Drive. Call 407-365-3490.
WINTER PARK
OFFICE SPACE FOR LEASE
Directly on Park Ave, with attached parking
garage. Call Marsha at (407) 741-8684 for
more info. "



CEMETERY LOTS
Glen Haven Memorial Park, Winter Park, FL.
Garden of Tribute; Section R lot 27 D Spaces
1 & 2. $1,200 for both. Contact: 407-758-
5946.



Reading volunteers NEEDED - Jackson
Heights Middle School in Oviedo is looking
for adults who are interested in serving as a
Reading Mentor to assist students who are
reading below grade level. Volunteers work
one-on-one with an assigned student before
school for 30 minutes, one or more times
a week through the end of the school year
to build fluency and comprehension skills.
Sessions are from 8:30-9:00 a.m., M-EF
Please contact Connie O'Hanlon for more
information, 407-365-7585.



DETOXIFICATION BOOK
(4) Detoxification Ebook - Super Sale: $7.99
each. http://www.ebook-detox-patches.
org/order.html. How to Detox for Overnight
Pain Relief. Flatter Tummy - Colon Cleanse.
Reclining Detox - Migun Thermal Bed. 500
+ Uses for Apple Cider Vinegar. Carol Miller,
(407) 970-1483







- King Crossword -
Ans ers
Solution lime: 25 mins.


1 i i _L F:







F , E T , I . n . . . . .


-- Weekly SUDOKU


3 5
1 9
6 4
4 7
8 1
5 2
7 8
9 3
2 6


Answer
9 1 2
4 5 66
3 8 7
5 6 1
2 7 3

6 3
7 2 8

195


HANDYMAN/CARPENTRY
Let me take care of the chores you don't
have time to do - yard work, carpentry,
painting, (whole house or interior rooms),
driveways, repairs, pressure washing, and
more. No job too small. Local. Prompt.
Affordable. Call Scott at 321-460-3905.



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
CASE No, 2009CA000163
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY AS
TRUSTEE FOR HSI ASSET SECURITIZATION COR-
PORATION 2006-OPT2 MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-OPT2,
VS.
LEWIS BRONSTEIN, ET AL,
DEFENDANTSS.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 11, 2009 in
the above action, I will sell to the highest bidder
for cash at Seminole, Florida, Fon July 14,2009 at
11:00 AM, at Room S201 of Courthouse - 301 N.
Park Ave., Sanford, FL 32771 for the'following de-
scribed property:
Lot(ls) 188, HOLLOWBROOK WEST PHASE IV,
according to the plat thereof, recorded in Plat
Book 36, Page(s) 77-79, of the Public Re-
cords of Seminole County, Florida.
Any person claiming an interest In the surplus from
the sale, If any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens must tile a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale. The Court, in its dis-
cretion, may enlarge the time of the sale. Notice
of the changed time of sale shall be published as
provided herein.
Dated June 12,2009
MARYANNE MORSE
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By Ceil V. Ekern
Deputy Clerk of the Court


Marketplace


Gladstone Law Group, P.A.
Attorney for Plaintiff
101 Plaza Real South, Suite 219
Boca Raton, FL 33432
Telephone #: 561-338-4101
Fax #: 561-338-4077
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to
the provision of certain assistance. Please contact
Court Administration at The Seminole Civil Court-
house, 301 N, Park Avenue, Suite 301, Sanford,
FL 32771-1292, (407) 665-4227 within 2 working
days of your receipt of this notice. If you are hearing
orvoice impaired,call 1-800-955-8771 or711.
6/25,7/2


RONEY I Exotic Azara

< continued from A16

Azara?"
"He lied and hurt me. This evil Satan took
advantage of a good person. Every night, I aim
my lethal telepathic thoughts at him."
"Does Leo know you're hexing him?"
"He knows damn well. He's scared silly. The
evil in him is killing him. He is sick inside."
Six days later, I read in The Times that
Leo Montague had died of a sudden seizure
- cause unknown. I breathed easier when
I recalled that Azara and I were never lov-
ers, despite how torrid we were onstage. She
merely loved to sing with me. But. I lay awake
that night trying to remember if I had ever
outshined her .when we were singing together.
Did I ever upstage her? Did I ever hold a
high C a smidgen longer than she did?
I couldn't recall a single unpleasant
moment I'd ever had with her.
All was going smoothly in my life until
Azara showed up unannounced at my place
one day. She brought along a bottle of fine
Turkish red. She was wearing tight black silk
pants and a revealing pink blouse. Soon, we
were on my porch, and she was gazing across
a small table at me. She took a swallow of
wine and nailed me with her eyes.
"Do you know, silly boy, that I just real-
ized-something? After singing with you for
eight years, and having some pretty tiresome
affairs with a slew of dull businessmen..." She
stopped.
"Yes?" I said.
"The fact hit me hard that it was you all
the time, Schatzi. Ijust adore you!" She got up,
came around and planted a passionate kiss on
me that would have made any audience gasp.
Let me say right off that I have nothing at
all against a hot steamy romance with a saftig
Zoroastrian beauty.
I am, after all, a tenor!
But, pal, how can I "play" the hero opposite
Azara in a real-life opera where everything's
gotta be "hunky-dory," and any casual trace
of evil in me may land her whammy on me -
even if I am just thinking evil-minded? I tell
you, I'm scared!


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SEMINOLE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE No. 2009CA366914
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY,
AS TRUSTEE IN TRUST FOR THE BENEFIT OF
THE CERTIFICATE HOLDERS FOR ARGENT SE-
CURITIES TRUST 2005-W2, ASSET-BACKED
PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2005-
W2,
PLAINTIFF,
VS.
ABRAHAM POLANCO, ET AL.
DEFENDANTSS.
NOTICE OF ACTION
To: Abraham Polanco
RESIDENCE: UNKNOWN
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 3000 Springdale Blvd.,
Apt. V305, Palm Springs, FL 33461
AND TO: All persons claiming an interest
by, through, under, or against the aforesaid
defendantss,
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to
foreclose a mortgage on the following described
property located in Seminole County, Florida:
LOT(S) 116, SANFORD PLACE, ACCORD-
ING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 33, PAGES) 33, 34, 35,
OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF SEMINOLE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
has been filed against you, and you are required
to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any,
to this action, on Gladstone Law Group, P.A.,
attorneys for plaintiff, whose address Is 101
Plaza Real South, Suite 219, Boca Raton, FL
33432, and file the original with the Clerk of
the Court, within 30 days after the first publica-
tion of this notice, otherwise a default may be
entered against you for the relief demanded in
the Complaint.
This notice shall be published once a week
for two consecutive weeks in the Winter Park-
Maitland Observer, Seminole County.
DATED: Ju ,e ).5.9200
MARYANNE MORSE, CLERK
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Carol Moore
Deputy Clerk of the Court
NOTICE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT OF 1990
Administrative Order No. 08-01
It you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in Order to participate In
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost
to you, to the provision of certain assistance,
Please contact Court Administration at The
Seminole Civil Courthouse, 301 N. Park Avenue,
Suite 301, Sanford, FL 32771-1292, (407) 665-
4227 within 2 working days of your receipt of
this notice. If you are hearing or voice impaired,
call 1-800-955-8771 or 711.
7/2,7/9


... ,.


.et



* u1.


LOCATION:

WINTER PARK

CIVIC CENTER



WINTER

PARK, FL

1050 West Morse Blvd

Call 407-599-3341 for
Directions.



~-. -, L l jt ;_
. y(ff^^"


IMF


'A


THIS WILL BE AN EVENT NOT TO BE MISSED! A COMPLETE

LIQUIDATION OF OVER 2 MILLION DOLLARS WORTH OF

MERCHANDISE INCLUDING....

Marble top bomb cabinets, Chippendale chairs and sideboards, large bronze foun-

tains, bronze and crystal chandeliers, handwoven Oriental rugs in all sizes including
fine Persians for the collector, lithographs from Dali, Chagall, Picasso and others,

French living room sets, mahogany armoires, bronze figurines and wildlife, French

and English writing desks, Italian tapestry's, oil paintings, antiques from Europe

and the Orient, Tiffany style lamps, mahogany and wrought iron beds, porcelain

vases and bowls, gilt framed mirrors, diamond, emerald, sapphire and ruby rings,

Rolex watches, bracelets and necklaces including a large selection of estate pieces.
Merchandise shown is for descriptive purposes only, inventory changes weekly.

THIS IS A PRIVATELY HELD AUCTION AND IS NOT

AFFILIATED WITH A GOVERNMENT AGENCY.
FREE ADMISSION * Terms: Cash, Check, Charge. Items Subject to error or
omission * 15% Buyers Premium * For Information Call 678-680-5400 or
visit www.seizedestates.com * License #AB2686, Auctioneer # AU2762

E RPEANFU NIUR pANTpUS FNEAR

EW LY RINALR GS9BR N E


-|














Case No: 99-DEA-355396; Case No: 00-CRS-200500; Case No: 99-FBI-001716


DRUG DEALERSSEIZEDASSETS UP FORAUCTION.

JEWELRY SEIZED FROM NARCOTICS DEALERS, FINE ART FROM
DALI, CHAGALL, PICASSO AND OTHER FLASHY ITEMS TO BE
LIQUIDATED PIECE BYPIECE REGARDLESS OF COST OR VALUE
TOGETHER WITH GENERAL ORDER MERCHANDISE.


Winter Park /Maitland Observer


Page 18 TusaJl ,20


I


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VVwIIILntI I-K/ Ivla AlilA LkuLc, bi vI


Fii&Games


lAm i~w~ ~m ~p~jc~ 1li~3


Strange,
BUT TRUE

By Samantha Weaver

It was American astronaut
Buzz Aldrin, the second
man to set foot on the
moon, who made the fol-
lowing declaration: "I be-
lieve that every human has


ARIES (March 21 to April
19) Get your facts together
and become familiar with
them before you have to face
up to that interview. The
better prepared you are, the
easier it will be to make that
important impression.

TAURUS (April 20 to
May 20) New information
might warrant changing
your mind about a recently
made decision. Never mind
the temporary confusion it
might cause. Acting on the
truth is always preferable.

GEMINI (May 21 to
June 20) Creating a loving
atmosphere for those you
care for could pay off in
many ways. Expect to hear
some unexpected but very
welcome news that can
make a big difference in your
life.

CANCER (June 21 to July
22) Stepping away from an
old and seemingly insoluble
problem might be helpful.
Use the time to take a new
look at the situation and
perhaps work out a new
method of dealing With it.


a finite number of heart-
beats. I don't intend to
waste any of mine running
around doing exercises."

If you're like the average
American, you will spend
approximately 8,760 hours
of your life - that's one
full year - just watching
commercials on TV.,

You may be surprised to
learn that the first Caesar


what is currently doable. The
rest will follow.

VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept.
22) A setback is never easy
to deal with. But it could
be a boon in disguise.
Recheck your proposal, and
strengthen the weak spots.
Seek advice, from someone
who has "been there and
done that."

LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct.
22). Coming up with a new
way of handling a tedious
job-regulated chore could
lead to more than just a
congratulatory memo once
the word reaches the "right
people." Good luck.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to
Nov. 21) What you might
call determination someone
else might regard as
stubbornness. Look for ways
to reach a compromise that
won't require a major shift of
views on your part.

SAGITIrARIUS (Nov. 22
to Dec. 21) You're still in
a vulnerable mode vis-a-vis
"offers" that sound too good
to be true. So continue to
be skeptical about'anything
that can't be backed up with
provable facts.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22
to Jan. 19) Thrift is still
dominant this week. What
you don't spend on what you
don't need will be available
for you to draw on should a
possible (albeit temporary)
money crunch hit.


salad was actually created
in Tijuana, Mexico.

Every seed you find inside
an apple has a genetically
different makeup from ev-
ery other seed in the apple.

According to the Oxford
English Dictionary, the
word that has the largest
number of different mean-
ings is "set" - it takes 26
pages to detail them all.


Feb. 18) Staying close to home
early in the week allows for
some introspection about your
social life. Sort out your feelings
before rejoining your fun-time
fellows on the weekend.

PISCES (Feb. 19 to March
20) It can be a bit daunting as
well as exciting to find yourself
finally taking action on a long-
delayed move for a change.
It helps to stay with it when
others rally to support you.

BORN THIS WEEK:
Your love of home and
family provide you with the
emotional support you need
to find success in the outside
world.
@ 2009 King Features Synd., Inc.




by Linda Thistle

3 1 2 7 6
74 8
6 4 8 9
9 5 2 8
1 7 35
5 2 9 6
8 1 3 5
57 ,8 4
2 1 3 7
Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way
that each row across, each column down and each
small 9-box square contains all of the
numbers from one to nine.
DIIIFICLTISWEEK:


According to the record-
keepers at Guinness, Rob-
ert Ardito holds the world
record for the most punch-
es thrown in a minute: 702.

In Pennsylvania, a man was
stunned when he returned
home one day to find a
deer taking a bubble bath.
It seems that the unfortu-
nate animal had stumbled
into the house and in its
frenzy to find a way out


I HOCUS-F


again, ended up in the
bathroom, where its antics
accidentally turned on the
water and knocked over a
bottle of bubble bath.


Thought for the Day:
"Politeness is the art of
choosing among your
thoughts."- Madame de
Stael

� 2009 King Features Synd., Inc.


BY
HENRY BOLTINOFF


Find at least six differences in details between panels.

S11 f1


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I


Thursday, July 2, 2009 Pae1


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Page 20 Thursday, July 2, 2009


Brandywine Square

* Courtyard Shopping * Sidewalk Cafe
Located Just 10 Steps North of the Morse Museum


Brandywine Deli
Enjoy eating outside on
beautiful Park Avenue. Buffet
catering specialist since 1972

Family Comics & Cards
Follow the exploits of your favorite
comics from yesterday and today
Trading cards for every tasle'

COMING IN JULY!
Mauruarend Fine
Arts Gallery
321-282-6780



407-657-5555 or
407-467-5397


Cida's of Winter Park
Cida's of Winter Park featuring
The Original Consignment
Collection.
407-644-5635
Essence
Salon & Day Spa
Hair-Manicures-Pedicures-Nail
Exlensions-Facials-Wa.xng
407-629-2588

Winter Park Hair Studio
*Hair culs/ Harr styling at
407-629-5106
eHair Loss
eMassage Therapy al
407-443-1305

Thimble Works
Alterations for all of
Winter Park
407-629-7699


Antiques
on the Avenue
Ouality Antiques
Owned by Hardy Hudson.
407-657-2100
COMING SOON!
Ultimate Fitness
by Yatska
407-782-9171

Park Avenue Jewelers
Diamonds. Gemstones.
Gold & Silver Jewelry.
Custom Design.
Repairs done on premises.

Grace Clinic
Christian Counseling
Ohffering Hope P H-eaiing through
Reodmplive Rlatlrionships Oni;ring
Mental He atlf i .unseling
407-539-0047


scoot"Mw;,.- N*.
...~ - N----------'.~s4~~iAllA


-earn. Create. By


The Craft SuperShow is
a crafter's dream come true.
t Miss It!.
C* rafting demonstratIlhs, make-n-takes
and exhibits
* Unique craft supplies and gift items to buy
* Family fun and entertainment
SChildren under 10 admitted free
� Workshop classes and events
* Promotions, prizes and giveaways


. . . . ........ . . .... .. . .. .... ..... Oll
... S' AUgust 1

ra getbun, or
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ltwwwla, -Or"'Showwco
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'Ceaft s bblCtAl.4;bby Asscmc;afiar. ifte
n'009rprofit Qrganizaltion ded�qated to: r by industry


Visit Our Winter Park Store
2069 Aloma Ave.
.............. w -


BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR


ONE ITEM
U Limited time sale! Stop in now!
* Retail orders by cash, check or credit card only. Excludes power
scootes. seat tfit chairs, sale items, wellness supplements, web,
custom, special orders and insurance transactions. No other discounts
apply. Previous orders excluded. Cannot be combined with other
discounts. Coupon has no cash value.


Code FLORIOASENIORUVING
Coupon Expires 7-31-09
- - - -i


_. . J


T ^Aloma Ave.


* Your Diabetes
Headquarters
* Power Scooters
* Wheelchairs
* Lift Chairs ,
* Masectomy
Supplies
* Ostomy
Supplies
* Wound Care


2


-3
P.


* Adult Diaper
Home Delivery
Program
* Bath Safety
Equipment
* Oxygen
Supplies
* Hospta Beds
* And" h
More! '


BINSAN'S
Home Health Care Centers
,,.t9;,-- Ci, - ;


Call Us

407.679.2135


Visit Us on the Web @

www.Binsons.com


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CUTOUT
AND SAVE
u.


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


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