Winter Park-Maitland observer
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00141
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park FL
Publication Date: 8/13/2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates: 28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID: UF00091444:00141

Full Text




Winter Park/ Maitland


Volume 21, No. 33
407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.net


FIRST COLONY

BANK
Your Real Hometown Bank
On Hwy 17-92 in Maitland
LENDER.. Member FDIC


Thursday, August 13,2009


504+ tax
Member FDIC


COMMERCE NATIONAL
BANK & TRUST
On the comer of 17-92 & Orange Avenue.
407-622-8181 * www.CNBT-FL.ecom
i i io i 'd


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK - THE OBSERVER
Winter Park's downtown Post Office could make way for a park expansion after the City Commission voted to go forward
with drawing up pians for a transplanted Post Ohice. In two weeks citizens will get a look at how it could affect Central Park.


' : ..'. .. ....... A5

tyT ..... A6
y On ......... . . -
dgais.. ...... . A 3
s.... . ... A14
ames-., . . . ... . , . .. . ,A15


ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER T,-

Winter Park inched closer
to having a bigger Central
Park on Monday, as the City
Commission voted to pur-
sue drafting, plans to move
the city's Post Office distri-
bution center to a new lo-
cation.
That relocated Post Of-
fice would free up space to
allow the city.to expand its
Central Park into a space to
be vacated by a then-bull-
dozed property adjacent to
the park.


Estimates for a new fa-
cility are in the $4 million
range, according to City
Manager Randy Knight. All
of it would be paid for by
donations, rather than tax-
payer money.
"Central Park is the
crown jewel of Park Av-
enue, and Park Avenue is
the crown jewel 6f Winter
Park," Mayor Ken Bradley
said, talking up the park's
importance as a center-
piece to the city's image.
Just to the west of the
park's northern half is a
parcel of land that had been


,occupied by the city's cen-
tral post office for decades.
But that's land that some
on the Commission said
would be better served as
an extension to the park.
Extending the park into
that space would involve
demolishing or moving the
Post Office's retail and dis-
tribution centers and bull-
dozing a parking lot cur-
rently used to store dozens
of mail delivery vehicles.
The space that would be
freed for additional park
> turn to POST OFFICE on A4


City may

absorb

enclave
ISAAC BABCOCK

Residents of a tiny enclave
surrounded by Winter Park
stayed silent at the July 27
City Commission meeting as
their future within or with-
out the city came closer to
being sealed.
For years the residents of
Stonehurst Drive and Kings
Way on the south side of
Winter Park had existed in
their own world, encapsu-
lated on all sides by the city,
but always remaining in Or-
ange County limits, paying
Orange County taxes.
"It doesn't make sense
to have this [enclave] com-
pletely surrounded by Win-
tef Park," city planning di- ,
rector Jeff Briggs said.
Fears of paying for ex-
pensive sewer hookups and
sidewalks kept many resi-
dents from agreeing to be
annexed into the city. Twen-
ty-two homes would be af-
fected if the neighborhood
were to be absorbed by Win-
ter Park.
In past annexations the
city had promised to install
city sewer systems.
"We've annexed com-
munities who desired sew-
> turn to ENCLAVE on A5


Winter Park YMCA looks to expand


JENNY ANDREASSON
S: " STAFF
The YMCA's members want more
parking, a second pool and bigger
locker rooms. The Winter Park facil-
ity, which is seeing a decline in mem-
berships, is attempting to give them
what they want, while trying to keep
its neighbors happy.
Thd facility got the go-ahead in
1996 to add about 3,000 square feet
for new locker rooms but didn't have
the funding in place at the time. Now


it's submitted a proposal to do the
locker rooms in addition to adding a
zero-depth pool and about 50 park-
ing spaces to the popular community
center.
The project has been likened to the
Carlisle condominium and retail proj-
ect that embroiled the city in lawsuits
for years, but Dan Ickes, executive
vice president of operations for Cen-
tral Florida YMCA, said that's not a fair
comparison.
"This is not rocket science," he said
> turn to YMCA on A4


PHOTO COURTESY OF YMCA - THE OBSERVER


Take advantage
of historic
low rates!
Call Sue
TODAY!


0 94922 95642 2


FIRST


FL


n L . NI)lN(1 1 N! (1'C()PORA I'l ()N


-..


C-i
PLa

G.a


02
CS
[Li
CS
4...l r-~
I -
'-4
CS
4-4 C-'
-~ c~
CS

~ C,'


p


RIDA


--


----- ----- -�- ---~1111111.. -----


- ;di- I--- �--- --


228 Park Ave. Nortl Suite J
Winter Park, PC
L.iconsect Co.rrespondent,
Lender,

,407-647--5323;1�






Page 2 Thursday, August 13, 2009 Winter Park / Maitland Observer




News




When is it time to stop driving?


ABRAHAM ABORAYA
GUEST REPORTER

On May 29, a 78-year-old
man hit and killed a wom-
an crossing Howell Branch
Road at State Road 436.
According to witnesses,
the driver stopped, walked
back to the scene, and then
a few minutes later, drove
off, before witnesses tracked
him down.
Some groups in Central
Florida are pointing to simi-
lar accidents and asking the
question: When is it appro-
priate for seniors to stop
driving?
While the 78-year-old
man wasn't at fault for hit-
ting thewomanwho fell into
the road, police said that he
will face criminal charges
for leaving the scene.
Sgt. Kim Montes, spokes-
woman for the Florida
Highway Patrol, said he may
have been scared or he may
have gotten confused at the
situation.
"There comes a time
when senior. drivers need
to find alternative methods
of travel," Montes said. "We
run into this situation some-
times. We take for granted
that you can just jump, into
the car and go. They value
their independence."
In 2007, the National
Highway Traffic Safety In-
stitute reported that drivers
65 years old and older make
up 14 percent of all traffic
fatalities, 14 percent of all
vehicle occupant fatalities
and 19 percent of all pedes-
trian fatalities. In Florida,
11 percent of all fatal traf-
fic crashes involved a driver
older than 65.


The hit-and-run story
is not an isolated incident.
Recently, an 84-year-old in
Melbourne told police she
was confused by construc-
tion and went the wrong
way on Interstate 95 in Palm
Bay - a road with a 70mph
speed limit.
The event caused a three-
car accident and sent three
people to the hospital with
minor injuries, but no fatali-
ties.
So what do you do if you
think a loved one may be an
unsafe driver? The National
Safety Commission recom-
mends a number of steps,
starting .with talking about
it and suggesting limits on
night driving and long trips.
They also recommend
driving with the person you
are concerned about and
making notes, and even go
as far as to suggest an in-
tervention or simply taking
the keys if things get too
dangerous.
But Dale Gardner, a Win-
ter Park business man, has a
different idea: Hire a com-
panion.
"Most (seniors) are not
'ready to put down the keys
and stop driving," Gardner
said. "It seems to be, usually,
the adult children who are
saying to the parent, 'Let's
find some alternatives for
you.'"
Gardner opened Senior
Helpers in May of last year,
and, while he didn't want to
disclose how many clients
he had, said he keeps about
150 companions in his pool.
The cost for the service av-
erages about $16 an hour, he
said, although the cost can
vary.
Gardner got into the busi-


jazris21














DAYgg


American Association of Retired Persons (AARP)
provides the following warning signs:

* Feeling uncomfortable and nervous or fearful
while driving
* Dents and scrapes on the car or on fences, mail-
boxes, garage doors, curbs etc.
* Difficulty staying in the lane of travel
* Getting lost
* Trouble paying attention to signals, road signs and
pavement markings
* Slower response to unexpected situations
* Medical conditions or medications that may be af-
fecting the ability to handle the car safely
* Frequent "close calls" (i.e. almost crashing)
* Trouble judging gaps in traffics at intersections
and on highway entrance/exit ramps
* Other drivers honking at you and instances when
you are angry at other drivers
* Friends or relatives not wanting to drive with you
* Difficulty seeing the sides of the road when look-
ing straight ahead-
* Easily distracted or having a hard time concentrat-
ing while driving
* Having a hard time turning around to check over
your shoulder while backing up or changing lanes
* Frequent traffic tickets or "warnings" by traffic or


ness because his mother-
in-law, who lived with him
and his wife, was sick for a
long time with emphysema.
When things started getting
bad, they hired a compan-
ion to help out.
Companions don't just
drive the elderly around.
They can plan meals, do
light house work, make sure
the client is taking their
medicine, and give family
members-who may live out
of state peace of mind.
While driving isn't always
the No. 1 reason families
come to Gardner, he said it's


99 For the rest
of the year
plus joining fee


Unlimited classes
now through the
end of the year


Bring a friend.
Share the savings.

Winter Park Jazzercise
407-321-7761

Valid only on August 17, 2009. Joining
fee applies. New customers only at
participating locations.
No refunds or cash value.
Other restrictions may apply.

jazzercise.com . (800)FIT-IS-IT


law enforcement officers in the last year or two

The child, relative or caregiver concerned about the
safety of an older driver should follow these steps:
* Start a dialogue with the older driver expressing
your concerns
* Suggest that the driver limit their driving to avoid
night driving or long trips.
* Review any medications or medical issues that
could diminish the driver's reflexes and vision or
stress causing issues that could affect their driving
behavior.
- Travel along with the older driver and either vid-
eotape or keep notes of missed signs, near misses,
confusion etc. Unless you need to intervene to
prevent a collision, don't comment during the drive;
it will only make the driver more nervous. Review
your findings after the trip.
* Consult with the driver's doctors to see if any
medical issues may limit the driver's abilities to
drive safely.
* Hold an intervention with family members and
concerned friends to try to convince the driver to
voluntarily stop driving.
* If all else fails and you feel the situation is too
dangerous, take the keys and remove the car.


usually near the top of the
list.
"Most of our clients have
broader needs than that,
but that's one of the main
ones," he said.
As the baby boomer pop-
ulation continues to age, the
demand for home health
care options will continue
to rise, Gardner said. He said
companions are matched
with clients, and that they
try to keep that relationship
intact for a long time.
Joyce Heinemann, who's
been a companion for about
a month now, said she finds


it to be very satisfying work.
She works for about six
hours a day taking care of
two elderly sisters, driving
them to and from the bank,
grocery store, or doctor's of-
fice.
Before this, she took care
of her mother for a number
of years.
"She was in a nursing
home and she was abused,"
Heinemann said. "There
was nobody there for her,
so I find it very rewarding
to be able to come here and
help."


ReSt re
'nnew



We carry brand new and gently used furniture,
appliances, building materials and more -
all for 20-60% less than competitors'prices!

Open Tuesday - Saturday, 9 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
2105 N. Orange Blossom Trail near Princeton St.
Call today: (407) 426-7192




*Bring in this coupon to receive 25% off any item.
One coupon per customer.

100, ofproits support


Howdo ou now


..noticed




.**:. here
*9#











407-515-2605
tcraft@observernewspapers.com






LVVoIILcI IVIL IiUJL.still gt tt



Locals still got that swing


ISAAC BABCOCK


Down a back alley around
a corner of burnt red brick
walls, a peppy staccato
drumbeat creeps out into
the atmosphere of a warm
Friday night, pulling curious
passers-by toward a dizzy
underworld that perished
nearly a century ago.
The gravity grows stron-
ger as the music gets louder.
About 9 p.m. a skinny kid in
black wingtip shoes can't
resist any longer. He checks
his gold pocket watch at
the darkened doorway
and steps into a room full
of half-dressy misfits who
wrap him up and spin him
through the dancing days of
prohibition's seedy past.
. "Once you start doing
this, it's hard to stop," said
Tom Carroll, barely out of
his teens and dressed in a
striped -polo, chinos and
Chuck Taylors and stand-
ing at the door to another
world. Outside it's just an-
other hot night at the Uni-
versity of Central Florida.
Inside, they're partying like
it's 1929.
Blasting out through
MP3s and digital amplifiers,
jazz-infused bongo beats
and massive brass bands
drunk on mint juleps and
high on the rush of Ameri-
ca's longest-running under-
ground soiree tear a musical
swath through the night,
sweeping up eager revelers
in the gin-soaked wake of
dance-fueled delirium on a
well-worn glossy floor.
This is swing dancing's
golden era, stuck on repeat
- and minus the gin.
If you haven't heard of
America's first love affair
with countercultural sub-
version, check Benny Good-
man on Wikipedia. Booze
got banned, but gangsters
and music kept the party.
going. Peppy beats, toot-
ing horns and thick strung
upright bass set a young
generation to a jitterbug-
ging rhythm as America got
a taste of a hedonistic good
life before the Great Depres-.
sion stole it all away.
Fast-forward about 65
years and everything old is
new again. Obscure bands
like The Cherry Poppin'
Daddies, The Brian Setzer
Orchestra and The Big Bad
Voodoo Band leapt from
the woodwork in the mid-
1990s, hit the charts and
fired up a swing dance res-
urrection, prying it from the
shadows and into the lime-
light. Comatose for decades,
swing suddenly hit the big
time somewhere between
Nirvana and the Spice Girls.
"It's always been there,"-
longtime swinger Hurley
Francois said. "But when
the revival happened, it was
like a catapult."
The fervor that drove the
resurrection as far as the big
screen in "Swingers" and hit
dance clubs in every corner
of America sizzled for half
a decade. Swing suddenly


found a new fan club, just
as America's wallets swelled
and the spirit of the '20s
roared back to life.
That's when Kim Rana-
chowski, a pretty twenty-
something in short brown
hair, tight blue T-shirt and
bluer jeans, got started.
"I always wanted to do
this," she said. "When I first
went out there, I said'I don't
know how.' It didn't mat-
ter. That first night, I was
hooked."
Ten years later, she still is,
twirling across a dance floor
as her feet skip twice to ev-
ery twist of her hips moving
in and out of a spotlit cir-
cle on the floor. That kind
of passion flits around the
room with all the fire of a
3010 beat-pet-minute Lindy
Hop.
, The swing era is still alive
in Orlando, and its heart
beats inside the UCF Swing
Knights. The growing club
has taken an eccentric affin-
ity for all the good things, to
come from the days when
Al Capone ruled the speak-
easies and keeps the dance
floor warm until the early
morning.
Inside the walls of Edu-
cation Complex room 174,
austere, white-tile ceilings
and mirrored walls house a
backroom countercultural
epicenter turned 80 years
forward in time. The wood
floor still lets chromed
shoes jump and jive, and
the music is as upbeat and
infectious as it was days be-
fore Wall Street came crash-
ing down.
On that constantly vi-
brating floor, two pairs of
fleet feet wrapped in match-
ing white sneakers bounce
back and forth in perfect
synchronous as "Sing Sing
Sing" builds to a frenzy and
threatens to envelop the
room. . Two young danc-
ers, each wearing the same
loose camel khakis and


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK - THE OBSERVER
Swing dancers fan the flame of a forgotten era at UCF, where the sound and rhythm of the 20s comes alive twice a week.


white Ts, mirror each other
in fast-kicking double-time
rhythm, readying for a com-
ing frenzy.
Suddenly he's grasping
her hands and flinging her
airborne in an impromptu
acrobatic ballet that sends
her feet into orbit toward
the ceiling. Time moves
slowly for just a moment
before she touches down.
Back on planet Earth, she
steps back in time like she'd
never left the ground.
Five years ago Francois,
in his trademark newsboy
cap, was spinning around
on this same dance floor,
shaking out a jittery, mes-
merizing Charleston that
would eventually win him
.a national title - and he
won't tell you about that
unless you ask. He's just here


F A C E L I F T S

FOR YOUR HOUSE!

.Let MJS, INC. Designers/Planners
turn your current house into a DREAM HOME!
250 N Wymore Rd. Winter Park, FL 32789
Member American Institute of Building Design
407-629-6711








I wQ -r -To PLciVy -rHe Suz.u i ,lCA.|

Piano J Violin " Cello- J Guiifa J




SAGIES 3 - UP
Call 407-628-5214
SOR INFORMATION & REGISTRATION
| WWWsuZUKIMUSICINScnurE.COM Ma.Iand,,FL


for the dancing, and for him
that never stops.
"He's here every week,"
Carroll said. "We've got a lot
of regulars who never miss a
dance."
And outside these walls,
they're spreading the gospel
of swing wherever some-
body will listen and shake
it.
Funny thing: it's working.
The misfit swing kids have
successfully turned some of
the downtown dance clubs
into swing clubs, danc-
ing onto the floor to the
rhythm of swing, and hop-
ing others will join in. It's
changed the atmosphere
inside clubs instantly, if only
* for a few moments until the
big band music runs dry or
the energy stalls. The con-
fused bystanders who get


curious enough often find
themselves taking the ride
back to UCF the next Friday
night. And they're packing
the dance hall.
"This is actually a slow
night," Carroll said, looking
over his shoulder and into a
room of constantly moving
bodies nearing 100 strong.
A rival dance in Tampa
stole away half the crowd
for a special engagement.
"On any other Friday night
there might be 200 people
in here."
But even if there were
only 10, these swingers
don't seem to care. As long
as the music is playing, the
dancing never dies.
"It becomes about love,"
Carroll said. "I'll be doing
this for a lifetime."


Brandywine Square

* Courtyard Shopping * Sidewalk Cafe *
Located Just 10 Steps North of the Morse Museum

Brandywine Deli Cida's of Winter Park Antiques
i:,,ij :,, w,,-ti 'j;i . auri, on the Avenue
ri' : I l) rV A'.,nu."i 'i ,, Th 1, l :.. r; rT, r Ou,'hry Aiifru: H
L,:lJijJiri t'Pirk A%., nuij I ' ril[ i':,llM'ii.'.'i l� - O Dv Hirly H J. l . :,)-r
..bi r,,-,j : M, 1,l 1 ,,,, . r 4"l'.l." l .'" '�' .41 .7" n'c' i"2100

Family Comics & Cards Essence COMING SOON!
,,, :.. . Salon & Day Spa Ultimate Fitness
. ,, ,,,, ,, , . :,,,, .,, , " " ' ,' .. ,i by Yatska
iC ' ' '] i... - ... '""' JO . -. i

COMING IN JULY! Winter Park Hair Studio Park Avenue Jewelers
M auruarend Fine ,*H ,. . h..,hi Ii'. .i, I, .iT, i.nl,
Arts Gallery *r.i ,. T,, / ,-,., , o .
Office SpaJc Grace Clini c

Thimble Works s Clin
valable! fiChnstan Counseling
I , I ,, |,,,n , |,',r 3 1l ,:,| ... , , . .... . ' . . ...I. "11 ... ... . .H."........
r 1071-657-5555 or Winl r Pir- h ki,... 1q .i n.f
n-' . - 17 o'1O7 407-629-7699 ..".i" ..


_ ~ _II_ ~_-~-------~---------------------------


Thursday, August 13, 2009 Pg


Willntpr PDirk / Mniitl~ind h.-;(-rve


v







IanA 4 Thursday.A ,3 0n P M a O e


POST OFFICE I The distribution center may move


< continued from the front page


land would be between 1 to 2 acres, extend-
ing the park's recently built West Meadow
northward.
None of those plans are set in stone, as
the Commission's vote to create a sche-
matic for a possible replacement library as
well as to extend a contract to purchase the
land did not specify how the vacated Post
Office property would be used.
During the Commission meeting Mon-
day, commissioners discussed possibly
building a new library on the site, though
some downplayed that idea.
"We can build another library any-
where," Commissioner Beth Dillaha said.
"But there's only one place we can add onto
Central Park."
Even after parkland was laid onto the
newly vacated land, a library could still be
built there in the future, Knight said.
the city had previously entered into a
contract with the Post Office that would al-
low the city to take over the land if it built


a replacement Post Office. That agreement
was part of negotiations for the Carlisle
development project on the current Post
Office property, which the city paid nearly
$4 million to stop. The Commission voted
Monday to extend that agreement until
February 10, 2010.
With the U.S. Postal Service planning to
downsize the current Post Office and pos-
sibly move or shutter an estimated 3,000
postal facilities nationwide, the property
may be in limbo, Knight said. So far the car-
rier has not indicated which facilities would
be closed or moved.
In the meantime the city is already mov-
ing on drawing up plans for a modified
postal facility that would be moved to the
north end of the current property, freeing
up the south end for possible park expan-
sion.
Those plans would be presented at the
next Commission meeting on Aug. 24. On
Sept. 14 the Commission will discuss final-
izing a fundraising committee to finance
the deal.


Getting to


know your neighbors




--4


PHOTO COURTESY OF SUZANNE KOSMAS
U.S. Rep. Suzanne Kosmas says hello to Winter Park Fire
Chief Jim White at a National Night Out event last Tuesday. The
nationwide event was designed to increase neighborhood safety
through communication and awareness.


YMCA I Execs gauge neighbors' reactions


< continued from the front page

at a community meeting held Monday to
discuss the project. "We're not building a
six-story building."
But neighbors might have the ammu-
nition they need to stop the project in its
tracks. The 1996 development agreement
that approved the 3,000-square-foot ex-
pansion included a stipulation that it would
be the last time the facility on North Lake-
mont Avenue would ask to expand.
"It was either sign it or don't do any-
thing," Ickes said. He said they .are asking
to do what was approved in '96 - with the
pool fitting into the prior approved expan-
sion - and adding additional parking.
Terry Hotard, who was on the City Com-
mission in 1996, said the '96 development
agreement will be used against the YMCA
during public hearings in September for the
new proposal. He doesn't think the officials
should let it delay the project, and that the
YMCA is now a much better neighbor than
it used to be.
"I hope the City Commission ... don't say
no to this project, bring solutions to it," Ho-
tard said.
YMCA Winter Park Executive Director
Bud Oliver said he's walked the neighbor-
hood surrounding the Y and he's heard
more positive feedback than negative.
"We want to make sure we are a good
neighbor," he said.
The second pool was originally approved
by the Planning and Zoning Commission in


'96 but was pulled from the project before
it went to the City Commission. It would fit
on the Y's current property, adjacent to the
current pool.
The parking lot is proposed to be extend-
ed over a current retention pond and onto
two Y-owned lots along Palmer, leaving a
buffer between the lot and the residential
neighborhood, Oliver said. The YMCA re-
cently repurchased the lots, which it owned
in the 1980s.
It currently has 139 parking spaces, and
Oliver said that doesn't come close to ac-
commodating its 6,000 members.
"I've had the pleasure of listening to a
number of members who have told me
how bad the parking is here," Oliver said at
a community meeting held to discuss the
project on Monday.
The existing pool is 4 feet at its shallow-
est, making it difficult to teach children how
to swim and for seniors to get in and out.
With the kids out of the main pool, there
would be more room for lap swimmers and
water aerobics.
"Kids have a hard time in the pool with-
out clinging to the side," Oliver said.
The Planning and Zoning" Commis-
sion will hear the proposal at 7 p.m. Tues-
day, Sept. 1, and a recommendation will be
made to the City Commission on Sept. 28.
The YMCA will host three additional com-
munity meetings at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday,
Aug. 13, and Monday, Aug. 17, and at 10 a.m.
Saturday, Aug. 15.


Winter Park / Maitland

Observer


Published Thursday, August 13, 2009


PUBLISHER
Kyle Taylor
407-563-7009
kyle@observernewspapers.com

ASSOCIATE EDITOR
Jenny Andreasson
407-563-7026
jennya@observernewspapers.com

DESIGNER
Stephanie Erickson
407-563-7040
stephanie@observernewspapers.com


Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster
CONTACTS


REPORTERS
Jenny Andreasson
407-563-7026
jennya@observernewspapers.com

Isaac Babcock
407-563-7023
isaacb@observernewspapers.com

LEGALS I CLASSIFIED
Jonathan Gallagher
407-563-7058
legal@observernewspapers.com


COPY EDITORS
Jonathan Gallagher
jgallagher@observernewspapers.com

Jenny Andreasson
jennya@observernewspapers.com

COLUMNISTS
Chris Jepson
Jepson@MediAmerica.us

Louis Roney
LRoney@cfl.rr.com


Josh Garrick
407-304-8100

ADVERTISING SALES
Tracy Craft
407-515-2605
tcraft@observernewspapers.com


Member of: P.O. Box 2426 1500 Park Center Dr.
* Florida Press Association Winter Park, FL 32790 Orlando, FL 32835-5705 USPS 00-6186
* Maitland Area/ Winter Park/ ISSN 1064-3613
Goldenrod Chamber of Commerce www.wpmobserver.com I 407-563-7000 I e-mail: editor@observernewspapers.com
Publisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor Submission does not guarantee publication. All rights reserved.
Winter Park! Maitland ObserverO 2009


WE -MM ERGG,


Ms. Rena Hunter, 80, of Winter Park, Fla., died Fri-
day, July 31, 2009.

Mr. Lee D Williams, 70, of Oviedo, Fla., died Sun-
day, August 2, 2009.

Obituary information obtained from Golden's Fu-
neralHome in Winter Park.


Symphony of sound


PHOTO BY ABRAHAM ABORAYA - THE OBSERVER
The Bach Festival Orchestra wowed the crowd in Winter Park
last week, filling the room with the sound of Mozart's "Requiem."


Volume 21, Issue Number 33


~-i--- 111111


Winter Park /Maitland Observer


Pae4 hrsa, uus 3,20





IV V P.I l I /I MCI a/ ObVe.er..urda..Augst.1.20... .e.


Business


Dr. Yasser Khaled is the newest member of
the Florida Center for Cellular Therapy, part
of the Florida Hospital Cancer Institute. He joins
Dr. Vijay Reddy and Dr. John Edwards.
Khaled has a clinical interest and advanced
training in the research and treatment of pa-
tients with multiple myeloma, a cancer of the
white blood cells.
Palmer Electric Company, located in Winter
Park, promoted Robert K. Vaughn to vice.
president of the commercial division. In his
new management role, Vaughn is responsible
for daily operations of the commercial division
including customer service, business develop-
ment, pre-construction services, field installa-
tions, qOality control and project commission-
ing.
Julie Bombardo, a longtime veteran of the
telecommunications industry, has joined the
real estate sales team at Kelly Price & Com-
pany in Winter Park.
Bombardo, who spent 15 years as a mar-
keting and management executive with Sprint
Nextel Corporation in Maitland, is the newest
addition to the independent real estate bou-
tique.


Stone Tile Direct announced the grand
opening of its new 1,000-square-foot luxury
Design Center in Winter Park. Catering to the
professional trade, this location will provide
complimentary installation drawings and sam-
ple boards at the client's request. The studio
will also offer a large selection of Italian glass
mosaics and unique stone sinks.
Keene Construction Company of Maitland
completed La Piazza, a new Publix-anchored
shopping center in Ave Maria, Fla., near Naples.
The center consists of a 30,907-square-foot
Publix Super Market and 8,485 square feet of
additional retail space. Keene has constructed"
over 140 Publix stores for the Lakeland-based
grocery giant.
RLF, a leading Winter Park-based architec-
ture, engineering and interior design firm,
announced that Interior Designer Jamie
Warner passed the National Council for In-
terior Design Qualification examination and
has received her professional license for inte-
rior design. Warner has worked in RLF's Interior
Design department for the last two years.


Community I


Allianz Life Insurance Company of North
America announced a $5,000 Allianz Heri-
tageSM Rewards grant to the Maitland Fire
Department. The fire department will use the
grant to purchase EMS Airway Suction and fire-
fighter rehabilitation equipment. The check will
be presented to Maitland Fire Department Fire
Chief Ken Neuhard during a special event on
Aug. 13 at 2 p.m. at Maitland Fire Department
Station # 47, located at 1847 Fennel Street.
"This grant will allow us to upgrade and
maintain equipment needs and requirements
that assist us in pre-hospital conditions and
situations," said Neuhard.
Rep. Bryan Nelson announced that the Or-
ange Blossom Express Rail initiative re-
ceived favorable reviews from Metroplan Or-
lando.The Metroplan Orlando Board is expected
to include this project in the cost-feasble aspect
of their Year 2030 Long Range Transportation
Plan on Aug. 12. The Orange Blossom Express
will be one of three rail projects included in this
important plan for the region."I am extremely
pleased about the positive development for the
Orange Blossom Express and it is my sincere
hope that we will continue moving forward with
this great momentum," said Nelson.
The Winter Park High School Sound of the


Wildcats Marching Band is soliciting dona-
tions to purchase a trailer to be used to trans-
port the band's equipment to football games,
competitions and other events. The band, in-
cluding color guard, has increased in numbers
from 148 members two years ago to over 230
members this year. Any donation would be ap-
preciated and tax deductible.
For more information on how you can donate,
please contact Joel Moody, director of bands at
407-622-3209 or by e-mail at joel.moody@
ocps.net; or Heather Buchanan, public relations
communications chair for the WPHS band at
wphs_band_comm@yahoo.com.
The Polasek Museum seeks new volunteers.
Volunteer receptionists, docents, gardeners,
special events volunteers, sculpture cleaners
and a gift shop coordinator are sought for the
2009-2.010 season. New volunteer positions in-
clude a receptionist, docents, gardeners, sculp-
ture cleaners, etc.
In return for their services, Polasek volun-
teers are able to learn about the life and works
of Albin Polasek, attend field trips and special
presentations throughout the region, receive
invitations to special events and have the satis-
faction of being an important part of one of Win-
ter Park's cultural treasures. New volunteers
can call 407-647-629 + to set up training.


ENCLAVE I Residents given options
< continued from the front page to annex it without a referendum
from the residents. Briggs said he
ers and we haven't done that yet, believes none of the homeowners
ers and we haven't done that yet," have agreed to be annexed as they
Mayor Ken Bradley said. "Weqere would be blamed for a forcible an-
to get that done." nexation of the other homes.
The city had contacted residents nex Con of themmission passed a reso-
a year ago to ask if they'd like to be- lution July27 clearing the air about
come part of the city, but several fears the homeowners had ex-
declined inimediately. After some pressed. The city would give up 15
persuasion, only two homeowners feet of right of way to homeowners,
remain opposed to the annexation, as the county had been using an
though only five homeowners have unusually wide right of way along
agreed to sign for annexation. the roadway in front of houses. The
The rest remain neutral on the change would effectively increase
issue, fearing reprisal from the two homeowners' property by 15 feet.
dissenting neighbors, Briggs said. If Sidewalks would become an op-
only one homeowner were to sign tion for homeowners along the
up for annexation, it could open streets in question. The Commis-
the door for the city to forcibly sion assured homeowners that
annex the remaining property. By they wouldn't be mandatory.
law if a city surrounds an enclave "We're giving them the option to
of less than 10 acres, it is allowed choose," Briggs said.e option to
choosee" Briggs said.




In the article "Mark on History" published Aug. 6, it was incorrectly stated that a hydro-
gen bomb was dropped on Hiroshima in 1945. It was an atomic bomb.


Case No: 99-DEA-355396; Case No: 00-CRS-200500; Case No: 99-FBI-001716

DRUG DEALERS SEIZED ASSETSUPFORAUCTION.

JEWELRYSEIZED FROM NARCOTICS DEALERS, FINE ART FROM
DALI, CHAGALL, PICASSO AND OTHER FLASHY ITEMS TOBE
LIQUIDATED PIECE BYPIECE REGARDLESS OF COST OR VALUE
TOGETHER WITH GENERAL ORDER MERCHANDISE.


4 -~
* ~1*'- ~ *


I.
,1


* r. r


LOCATION:

WINTER PARK

CIVIC CENTER


WINTER
PARK, FL

1050 West Morse Blvd
Call 407-599-3341 for
Directions.


.^-... ' J,,_.


ARM


THIS WILL BE AN EVENT NOT TO BE MISSED! A COMPLETE
LIQUIDATION OF OVER 2 MILLION DOLLARS WORTH OF
MERCHANDISE INCLUDING....
Marble top bombed cabinets, Chippendale chairs and sideboards, large bronze foun-
tains, bronze and crystal chandeliers, handwoven Oriental rugs in all sizes including
fine Persians for the collector, lithographs from Dali, Chagall, Picasso and others,
French living room sets, mahogany armoires, bronze figurines and wildlife, French
and English writing desks, Italian tapestry's, oil paintings, antiques from Europe
and the Orient, Tiffany style lamps, mahogany and wrought iron beds, porcelain
vases and bowls, gilt framed mirrors, diamond, emerald, sapphire and ruby rings,
Rolex watches, bracelets and necklaces including a large selection of estate pieces.
Merchandise shown is for descriptive purposes only, inventory changes weekly.
THIS IS A PRIVATELY HELD AUCTION AND IS NOT
AFFILIATED WITH A GOVERNMENT AGENCY.
FREE ADMISSION * Terms: Cash, Check; Charge. Items Subject to error or
omission * 15% Buyers Premium * For Information Call 678-680-5400 or
visit www.seizedestates.com * License #AB2686, Auctioneer # AU2762

* Uii;{ ANj FURa iTUREi#j: NTIQU[ i I NEA RT
BB iJEWLY*fTE^TLRUSeBRNE


~ -~1111


Thurday Auust 3, 009 Page 5


Winter Park/i Maitlandl Observer


I


P.







dy ITa rvAi 1j 3 2 flWinterParkMIObserver


Our city expressed good
wishes and good luck to
two of our longtime protec-
tors in the city. of Maitland
on Monday night, Tony C.
Merola and K-9 Officer Alix.

Tony Merola retires
Tony Merola served the city
of Maitland, Fla., for more
than 28 years. He began his
career with the Maitland
Police Department as a
reserve officer in 1980 and
became a full-time patrol-
man in 1981, was promoted
to lieutenant in 1990, and
promoted to commander
in 1998.
Tony received a Bachelor
of Arts Degree from the
University of Central Flori-
da, and is a graduate of the
Federal Bureau of Investiga-
tion National Academy.
Tony was instrumen-
tal in obtaining several
Florida Department of Law
Enforcement grants for
the city of Maitland Police


Department; forging a part-
nership with the University
of Central Florida for a re-
cords management system,
and overseeing the city's
radio system contracts.
Tony was a member of
the Maitland Police Depart-
ment S.W.A.T. Team, served
as the Department's armor
officer, and has demon-
strated his skills and dedi-
cation in numerous proj-
ects that enhanced the effi-
ciency of the Police Depart-
ment. During his tenure
with the Maitland Police
Department Tony gained
the confidence, friendship,
and respect of all those who
came to know and work
with him.
Tony has performed his
duties with efficiency, en-
thusiasm and loyalty during
these years of service to the
city of Maitland. During
his acceptance speech he
thanked his peers, staff, and
members of Council for


Maitland City Talk
BY DOUGLAS T. KINSON
MAYOR


Goodbye to our protectors


their support and leader-
ship.
Tony exemplifies the
type of officer we would all
want protecting us and the
kind of person we would
strive to become. Best
wishes in all you do, Tony.
You have made a difference
in our community and you
will be missed.

K-9 officer Alix retires
In addition to the recogniz-
ing Tony's retirement, we
also had the pleasure of
recognizing the effort of
Alix,'a German Shepherd
trained as a police dog. Alix
was born in Germany and
brought to Florida in 1999.
Alix began his career
with the Maitland Police
Department on March 1,
2000, and was assigned
to Sergeant Christopher
Ohalek, his partner and
trainer. He completed more
than 2,000 training hours
that included tracking,
building searches, article
and evidence searches, area
searches, criminal appre-
hension, handler protec-
tion, tactical obedience,
performance under gun
fire, helicopter deployment,
waterborne apprehensions
and a specialty in narcotics
detection where he held a
local and national certifica-
tion.
Alix contributed to
more than 137 building


searches, 201 tracks, 108
area searches, 67 public
relations demonstrations,
nine crowd control calls,
811 drug searches with 682
search confirmations (84 -
percent accuracy), 58 crim-
inal apprehensions, 12 of
which were physical (bites).
He has sacrificed a great
deal as he has undergone
several surgeries and minor
injuries, all in the duty of
protecting the citizens of
Maitland.
He was one of the last
true "aggressive alert"
narcotics detection dogs
in the tri-county area and
will be forever known by
more than 20 law enforce-
ment agencies, including


the state attorney's office,
as the "dog who opened car
doors."
Alix is enjoying retire-
ment by eating, sleeping
and playing right alongside
his partner and owner, Sgt.
Christopher Ohalek. As a
moment of his years of
service, Alix was presented
a plaque with his badge,
which I am sure will hang
proudly, right above his-
water bowl. Many thanks
to Alix and Ohalek for their
many years of dedication
to police work in the city of
Maitland.

Call City Hall at
407-539-6200 and visis ut
at ItsMyMaitland.com


Has your bank changed the "Refreshing
rules on.your credit card?. alternative to

Try our If conventional
Fixed Rate VISA. banking."

407-831-8844 G u Stilte.s 9405 S. Highway 17-92
W-VI/W.gulfstatesmorg CRED'IT UNION Maitland, FL 32751


City Commission
meeting highlights
The City Commission met
on Aug. 10 at 3:30 p.m.
in City Hall Commission
Chambers. Below are a few
highlights regarding deci-
sions that were made:
Action items requiring
discussion:�
-The potential ordinance
establishing succession of
alternates on boards and
commissions which can
have quasi-judicial and
land development duties
was tabled to await a re-
sponse from the Attorney
General's office.
-The potential
ordinances) creating the
number of regular mem-
bers on boards and com-
missions which can have
quasi-judicial duties. Also,
the elevation of current
alternates to regular mem-
bers as part of the initial
transition was tabled to


await the response from At-
torney General's office.
-The discussion regard-
ing Resolution 1978-07:
The policies governing the
City Commission meetings
were moved to discuss at a
work session. The date of
that work session has not
yet been set.
-The City Commission
approved the selection of
Brown, Garganese, Weiss &
D'Agresta to serve as next
fiscal year's city attorney
firm pending negotiation
of a contract.
-The City Commission
denied the request to hear
an ordinance related to the
possible rezoning of the
current post office property
back to the public, quasi-
public.
-The City Commission
approved to seek an exten-
sion or modification of the
agreement with the post
office.
-The proposed use of the


post office property was
approved contingent upon
the approval of conceptual
plans and fundraising.
-Moving the retail com-
ponent of the post office
with its required parking to
the "arrowhead" (one acre)
or northern-most portion
of the existing post office
property.
-The city will agree to
provide 1-2 acres at the
Morse Boulevard/Denning
Drive site for the new post
office distribution center in
exchange for the existing
post office site.
-Agreement that no tax-
payer funds will be used
for this initiative. Funds
necessary will be provided
through private donations.
-Appointing Commis-
sioner Phil Anderson to
be the city liaison with the
post office representatives
on negotiating modifica-
tions.
-Moving forward imme-
diately with the initiative
with Commissioner Beth
Dillaha proposing a fund
raising committee structure
for implementation of the
fund raising campaign.
Public hearings:
-The resolution setting
forth the city's intent to use
the uniform ad valorem


method of collection of
a non-ad valorem assess-
ment for properties within
the Forrest Hills Plat abut-
ting Fawsett Road, Glencoe
Road, Dana Way, Lake Chel-
ton Circle, Rockwood Road
and West Reading Way, to
fund the installation of un-
derground electrical/BHN
facilities was approved.
-The appeal of MFT En-
terprises of Winter Park
Inc., contesting the city
building and zoning of- ,
ficial's interpretation and
enforcement of Article III,
"Zoning" of Chapter 58 of
the city's Land Develop-
ment Code regarding the
provisions of Section 58-64
for nonconforming uses
relating to the denial by the
city for the use of the prop-
erty at 2190 West Fairbanks
Ave., zoned C-3, for the sale
of motor vehicles as ap-
plied to the provisions of
the code regarding noncon-
forming uses was tabled.
An amended ordinance
to adopt new public notice
and adoption procedures
for Comprehensive Plan
amendments and also
adopting an updated Public
Participation Plan will be
heard at the next City Com-
mission meeting.
The second reading of


the ordinance to adopt new
public notice procedures
for annexations to the city
of Winter Park was ap-
proved.
A full copy of the Aug. 10
City Commission minutes
will be available on the
city's official Web site at
www.cityofwinterpark.org
the week of Aug. 24, pend-
ing approval by the City
Commission.

Ice rink gets first
approval at CRA meeting
The Community Redevel-
opment Department pro-
posed to the CRA the place-
ment of an ice skating rink
in downtown Winter Park
during the holiday season,
contingent upon the rink
being located in the West
Meadow of Central Park.
The proposal will be up
for approval on Aug. 24.

Aug. 20 City Commission
work session
There will be a City Com-
mission work session on
Thursday, Aug. 20, at 8:45
a.m., in City Hall Commis-
sion Chambers to discuss
the Charter review.
Call City Hall at
407-599-9933 and visit us
at CityofWinterPark.org


t ,� ..: .< :e - - - - - - ,& .. .. E. su. -. . � - ,
'- * i , 'L , , CITY OF MAITLAND
Maitland Mayor Doug Kinson poses with new retiree Alix, a K-9 officer with nine
years of service. Police Commander Tony Merola also retired after 28 years.


pDnpR Thrda.Auut 3 20


Winter Park/ Maitland Observer






Winter Park / Maitland Observer Thursday, August 13, 2009 Page 7





Lifestyles

Th. g o.... ... . ..u.'.. .. .. e. ooig .








cows. milked for the.day, or as an awesome gift ... no The fresh milk go,:s <,
_ -TheJ erseys-' ir


side pastures giving lovPS that e itself." r oom where it is coIled . he
lI.LfL .'.. supportive',".OavA...G,-nilksincecop ke."-,.
Their warm milk was Said. "Ourrounded by housing to bulk lank. hen i's piped
precisely cooled, cooked, developmen, ts, ther land to an appetizer, rahe immp b ac late cheese- .
cows, ilkyor as an awesome gift... no The fresh mil. g.c' / .

curdled and po urnfined in lake- one ever sered a farmstead's like making lately too a where the
side pastures. giving love itself." room where itis cooled in'


cheese wheels. whet theyareraisingtheir Greens and their appren-
Now it will age in a cli- you family. Everyone tice Leah Steele, a UCF stu-
mate controlled cave as lo- benefits: Tho cows enjoy a denpt, create the cheese.
cal chefs await the finished much longer life, the neiigh- " t's, tool to. work with.. .
artisanal product - not borsk appreciate boarding the animb4kto mnake foqd,-
bleu cheese from a French their horses nearby and Steele said.;':.. . - ..
village, but Bleu Suhshine waste is composted so farm They .monitor w id. stir, ,
Cheese from Winter- Park odors are minimal. a complicated bre ofen-o -'T,. KAREN MCENANY-PHILLIPS - .
Dairy" just off' Hpwell Bessie and Molly are two zyrties staier cultures, pH . Apprentice cheesemaker Leah Steele carries a cheese wheel at Winter Par
Branch Road- . of tje nine "Jersey girls" levels, flavoring.. .rennet Dairy, a smai cheese-making company hidden along Howell Branch Road.
David Green's family who 'supply five gallons of curds and whey in the 80:
has owned the eight.acres milk, daily and three gaI- . gallon vat which cooks for cheese takes on various farmers market booth. "It's
of unincorporated.. Semi- tons in the summer. t is a it day. It's then poured.,into colors as it ages. the best bleu cheese we've
nole County land for four breed known for tolerating- round contalrf"s called "No two wheels are ex- ever had, mild and addic-
generations and enjoyed heart and producing milk ;hoops which are flipped . acythe sane,"said Green tive. We love it on tomatoes
a thriving citrus business high on butter fat conteL several t.imessthet i readied "..jathi unique like at snow- from our garden."
-until hard freezes ended Winter Park Dairya thie or the brine'bath and th flak . ; ExecuEiveChefPaulPlay-
the groves in thdie. mid- first 'raw mik .dairy to be cheese cave. . T . < u Sunshine Cheesi is er of Old Hickory Steak-
1980s. David and.hi l Wife licensed in Florida and the . The cave teperatt thsok at the Winter Pak and hose in the Gaylord Palms
Dawn, attempted to ,raIse frst ew dairy farmnbthilt in stays at, 55 .degrees ando fMaitland farerss omarets. Resort uses Bleu Sunshine
beef cattle but felt more a &deade using small scale holds shelving urnit, s. "My wife add.I!u6re foo4-, Cheese.
alignedwith. adairy boera- dairvequipment frRm Hol- cheeses at various stagesof les and. we situmrbled" oh "We built an entire reci-
tion, which they tegan,;18 'landL. . . aging. The cave floor is kept heir, cheese, about two pe (ugly ripe tomatoes and
montisago. - The cows ep up to. wet-io mnalntain hmidity . nont ago W ter Park Vidalia onions) around this
"Cheese makingi..s a the taassic tili paotm r t i.Veung c�se i s liit yel reside , hMwupl said
Sancient art and it's great n wiele the.a ilker , sits on a .Ilow while the rind of older when he .stopped byy the > turn to JERSEY on Afl





1460 Lake Baldwin Ln Suite A Orlando, FL 32814 1407-898-22201 1-877-769-2047 (fax)
Melissa S. Riess, Au.D. Seeks Outstanding People with Hearing Loss from Central Florida for
National Aware Program
Do you know someone with a hearing loss whose accomplishments and contributions distinguish then as role models:
Dr. Riess of Hearing Associates of Central Florida is seeking outstanding individuals from the Central Florida region with
any degree of hearing loss to nominate for a national awards program that honors people with hearing loss who make a
difference inrtheir schools, communities or the world. The 2009 Oiticon Focus on People Awards, which celebrates itseaa e.
eleventh year in 2009, is designed to help eliminate outdated and hurtful stereotypes that discourage people from
seeking professional help for their hearing loss. For Dr. Riess, the program is an excellent way to demonstrate that
hearing loss does not limit a persoA's ability to achieve, contribute and excel. " t
"The negative stereotypes associates with hearing loss may explain why many people with hearing loss wait an average
of 10 years before obtaining a hearing solution despite the incredible advances of recent years," says Dr. Riess. "In fact, . o t, e ., o
studies have proven that untreatedhearing loss can lead to depression, social isolation and an overall diminished quality
of life."
Dr. Riess encourages anyone who knows of an outstanding person with. hearing loss to contact her at Hearing Associatesd .. e ,-o b e.
of Central Florida, 407-898-2220 or via the website at www.IOrlandoHears.com.
The Oticon Focus on People program offers awards in five categories: Student-for young people with hearing loss, agesC
6-21 who are full time students; Adultswith hearing loss, ages 21and above; Advocacy, for adults ages 21mand above
with hearing loss who actively volunteer their time in advocacy or support efforts for the hard-of-hearing and deaf
community; Practitioner, for hearing care professionals who are currently in practice; and Pediatric Practitioner, for
pediatric hearing care professionals in school or clinical settings.
First place category winners will receive a $1000 award and a $1000 donation by Oticon to a not-for-profit cause of their
choice. Second place winners will receive $500 and third place winners will receive $250. All nominees, regardless of
whether they are selected as category winners, will receive a Certificate of Recognition.
Deadline for nominations is September 21, 2009.









Suand 7teatuent. Sound Care. Sound sialsoarence r FM 89 .9 ORLANDO
of life-4

Dr.~~~~~i nis rnorgsayn h nw fa usadn esnwt ern 0st otc e tHaigAscae







Paae B Thrdy uis 3 09WntrPr atadOsre


Rock N' Roll Laser Lights Show
called "Light Up Your Night"
is held every Saturday through
Aug. 22. The laser light shows
playing from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m.
feature classic rock content that
may not be suitable for children
ages 11 and younger. Parental
discretion is advised. Please be
aware that these shows are very
loud. Ear plugs are available from
the show attendants. There is also
a family-friendly show at 6 p.m.
called Cozmic Kidz Lazer Jam.
Call 407-514-2000 or visit www.
osc.org for more information.
For information on Orlando
Science Center School Break
Camps and Classes contact their
Education and Public Outreach
Department at 407-514-2112, or
e-mail classes@osc.org.


W. OaF Mcti !e, M1.S1 . 's
_ ._ T and' snorkeli;finrh
.sp3prlnS^anC o
+''- O" ia B-- .:p.pular acti i t ie- ol ted
S, :t^ the .-park. The entrance,:
"Ri 4d! i prf. - fee -r the park is $3 for
folrt htlir,.+ky,.ng p.and" crs with two people in-
-I back idg';.Opiots side and $5 for cars with 3
-:-f ,caf1pOing includ- a; full. o6'more people inside. The
..ac iity campground. and -:park is open from 8 a.m. to
primitive. camping areas. - p.m. Visit "e. parks and
Canoe and kayak rentals recreation page. of www.
are available for a fee. The orangecountyfl.net or call
entrance fee for the park 40"-889-4179 for more in-
is 56 for cars with two to formation.
six people inside. The park
is.. ppen from 8 a.m. to sun- Moss Park, located at
down, 365 days a year. Visit 12909 Moss Park Road in
w. _W .floridastatepaiks. Orlando, has a beach, pic-
dog/wegki.wasprings or cal jnic areas, camping, two.
407-884 2008 for more in- playgrounds and t rails- to
formation - explore, The. park hosts a,
- wilderness navigation - a


-:....


The Si er Springs Nture Road 426
Park, located at 55.6.E. Sil- camping
ver Springs Bld in Silver watching,
Springs, offers a variety of ing, hikh
things t6ldo. There's a glass trails.toex
bottrtiomboat tour on Silver portunity
River that takes you on all the structi
of the seven major spring joy nature
formations at the headwa- said Jim 1
ters where riders will see manager I
many of species of fish as park is op
well as alligators, clams, to sunset.
crawfish, shrimp, snails and services p-
turtles. There's also wildlife nolecount
exhibits featuring-aligators; 407-349-0
and bearis,.ides and botani- formation
cal gardens. G -. e..ldm -. -

,; .-,-:..:::'-<- ., ,, ...- *-'* " . A - . -:-,' ":


children nainfd il
rides shows.and
s p_1anyconcert

wsiyveksprings.
: 352- 23,2 1
iforimati5n5 7�

Wifde4 ess Area,
t 3501. County
in Geneva, has
fishing, bird
horseback rid-
ng, and biking
plore."It's an op-
to get away from
hired stuff and en-
e at your leisure,"
Duby, a program
for the Area. The
pen from sunrise
Visit the leisure
age of www.semi-
yfl.gov or call
3959 for more in-

*. ' . " ' . -, ':;, " .
.*- ": " ' . . .....


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Paqe 8 ThrdyAuut1,20






WitrPr atadOsre TusaAgs 3 09 Pg


Cinema


Coming Aug. 21


A showcase of this week's releases,
and a look ahead to upcoming movies.


'TeTieTrvler' 00e. ;


'Inglorious Basterds'


'Halloween II'


Coming Sept. 4


'Extract'


Coming Sept. 11







'Whiteout'


:dse.n's "The Little
d onyo" is the
,fa young and overea-
idfish and her quest to


Coming Aug. 21


'Shorts'
PG


Calendar


An Antique Tool Show will be held
from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday,
Aug. 15. The Mid-west Tool Collectors
Association and the Maitland Histori-
cal Society will host the event. Gen-
eral admission is $2. The event will
be held at the Maitland Civic Center,
located at 641 S. Maitland Ave. Call
Paul Mikula at 407-365-4686.
The Maitland Public Library, 501 S.
Maitland Ave., will host the follow-
ing events this week:
-From 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. on
Thursday, Aug. 13, the Library will
host a Chili Cook-off.
Taste the best chilis made in Mait-
land. All library patrons donating a pot
of their favorite chili have a chance
to win a fabulous prize in one of five


categories: Hottest, Mildest, Most
Unique, Best Veggie, Meatiest. Come
celebrate good books with good food
and support your library too!
Prices are 25 cents per taste, $1
per cup of chili, and $5 for all you
can eat. All proceeds to benefit the
Friends of the Library.
-From 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Friday,
Aug. 14 and Aug. 21, the computer lab
is open -free of charge, no signups,
or time limits.
-At 1:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 14, the
library will host "Fall Gardening with
Ed Thralls". Ed Thralls is from the Or-
ange County Extension Office. Learn
the basics of vegetable gardening in-
cluding soil preparation, adjusting soil
pH, fertilizing, irrigation, pests and
diseases. Registration is required.


-At 1:30 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 15,
the Library will host "Computerizing
your photos with Phil Chien". A Com-
puter expert will show you how you
can digitize your photos and put them
on your computer. Take your collec-
tions of photos and bring them into
the 21st century. Once your photos
are digitized you can improve their
appearance, add captions and other
information and send them to your
friends via e-mail and the Internet
-From 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. on
Aug. 21, the Maitland Fire Department
will be on hand to do blood pressure
checks.
On Saturday evenings through Aug.
22, from 7 to 10 p.m., at the top of
the Orlando Science Center, 777 E.


Princeton Street, there is the perfect
opportunity to immerse yourself in
another world. The aluminum-domed
Crosby Observatory atop Orlando Sci-
ence Center houses one of Florida's
largest publicly accessible refractor
telescopes and it's now open. As-
tronomy experts and volunteers will
be on hand in the Crosby Observatory
to make sure-you get the best view
possible. In addition to the spectacu-
lar sky-watching, enjoy a wonderful
celestial view of downtown Orlando
at sunset. Access to the Crosby Ob-
servatory is included with your eve-
ning admission to the .Orlando Sci-
ence Center, which also includes one
rock and roll laser light show in the -
Dr. Phillips CineDome. Tickets are
$13 for adults and $7 for youth (ages


3-11). Please visit www.osc.org or
call 407-514-2000.
Four Rivers Smokehouse is a proud
sponsor of the upcoming March of
Dimes. 17th Annual Mud Volleyball
Tournament, to be held on Saturday,
Aug. 22. Pit Boss John Rivers will be
dishing up his tempting barbeque to
feed the hungry, muddy participants.
The event will take place at, the Lee
Vista Center, located .off of Semo-
ran Boulevard in Orlando. In 2008 it
generated close to $200,000 for the
cause, which featured more than 150
corporate teams wallowing in two to
three feet of mud. For more informa-
tion, please call 407-474-8377.


Ziploc Roofing Construction and Repair

Serving Central Florida for 20 years


No job to big
or small

FREE
ESTIMATES
A-,/ r


After


407-267-3091
Michael Pabalis
pabalismichael@hotmail.com


Residential and Commercial


SUBSCRIBE

Tj I
ODAYO



Call us at 407-563-7000
or e-mail us at
subscribe@observer
newspapers.com


Thurday Auust 3, 009 Page 9


Winter Park / Maitland Ob~server










Opinion/


A singular lack of imagination


I seldom resist. Come again,
please? There are certain
"types" of zealots that I
siniply love to engage. Non-
gun-totin' Bible-thumpers
for sure. I was walking
down Bull Street in Savan-
nah last Saturday and ahead
of me 20 or 30 yards was a
nattily turned-out (bow tie
and straw hat) gentleman
carrying a sign asserting
that Jesus saves. I actually
heard this individual before
I saw him. He was shout-
ing some arcane Biblical
verse and that salvation is
the only answer. I quickly
matched his enthusiasm for
the subject.
Of late I've been mulling
over whether Christianity
is actually monotheistic or
polytheistic. If Jesus is, in
fact, the son of God, well,
right there Christianity is
polytheistic. Which seems
at odds with the claims of
monotheism asserted by
the various mainstream
religious denominations.
Throw in the Holy Ghost
and, my goodness, it's a ver-
itable family. I am unsure of
the logic of it all, but I once
had a priest try to explain
it to me and what I gath-
ered, after all was said and
done, is that God, Jesus and
the Holy Ghost are, simply
put, one and the same, just
variations on a theme.
I'm such a literalist I
don't see how Christianity
can claim to be monothe-


istic with the tagline "son
of God" so ubiquitous. It
seems to me, just the casual
observer, to be a family af-
fair.
That's the burning ques-
tion on my mind when I see
the Answer Man just ahead.
I match the volume of his
voice with, "I have one
question!" I repeat it several
times before he turns and
cagily eyes me and it's as if
I'm looking in the eyes of a
raging John Brown.
He said, "One question."
I could not immediately
determine whether he is
asking me if I have but only
one question or what ques-
tion is it.
So I quickly posed it as
succinctly as I could: "If
Jesus is the son of God, is
Christianity monotheistic
or polytheistic?" The ques-
tion obviously didn't regis-
ter and he continued spew-
ing his rather repetitious
canned presentation on
the value of salvation and
its importance if heaven
is to be achieved. And on
he went, ranting his non-
sense. He went his way, and
I mine.
Savannah is, to use an
over-used expression, abso-
lutely charming. Bull Street
is perhaps one of the best
10-12 block walks in Amer-
ica. I'm serious in that acco-
lade. It's gorgeous. A couple
of years ago I took the train
from Winter Park to Savan-


nah. That is an experience
I recommend. This time I
drove, stopping for a brief
respite on Jekyll Island in
Georgia. If you drive and
stay slightly ahead of the
pace (speed) of interstate
traffic, it's only a four-hour
drive, a chip shot of a trip.
I stayed at a bed and
breakfast called the Dresser
Palmer House, which I
highly recommend. They
have a great, friendly, intel-
ligent, warm management
team. You can contact
them at info@dresserpalm-
erhouse.com. I parked my
car and didn't drive for
three days.
What you do in Savan;
nah is walk, peruse, eat,
drink and chat. And then
do it some more. And re-
peat. The Savannah College
of Art and Design has been
an unbelievable boost to
that city. If the number of
buildings with SCAD signs
on them are any indica-
tion, they're taking over the
town. And how wonderful.
SCAD has several public gal-
leries and of course, there
is the Jepson Art Museum.
Many art galleries. Art, ar-
chitecture and history. That
is Savannah. And walking
Bull Street is just the sub-
lime icing on the cake. Two
great restaurants to recom-
mend as well - Elizabeth
and 700 Drayton are first-
rate dining.
They have a great num-
ber of antique shops, too.
I had a disappointing
conversation with one par-
ticular shop owner, disap-
pointing in the sense of the
hopelessness that America
now finds itself in the Mid-
dle East. I'm chatting up
the owner and I quickly
determine he's owned his
shop in Savannah for six
years but before that he had
a shop in a remote corner
of Virginia. He loves Savan-
nah and I asked him, what


did he do before antiques?
He said he was an army
medic. And I immediately
think "Ho-boy, he'll be a
good person to ask, 'What
do you think of our war in
Afghanistan?'"
"Well," he said, "It's bet-
ter to fight'um there than
here (America)." You could
have picked my lower jaw
off the floor.
"Fight whom?" I asked.
'The Taliban."
"The Taliban didn't at-
tack America, al-Qaida did."
"They're the same," he
said.
"No, they are not the
same. The Taliban want to
run Afghanistan as some
religiously repressed 12th-
century enclave, under
Sharia law." I then asked,
"How will we know when
we win?"
No response to that
question, just a reiteration
of, "Regardless, we have to
fight'um there."
"For how long? Forever?"
"Yea, forever," he says de-
terminedly.
America at war forever.
Isn't that a prospect? For-
ever at war. How can such a
future have become Amer-
ica's reality? Forever at war.
I recommend the nation
re-read George Orwell's
"1984." In that bleak ac-
count, the world is reduced
to just such a scenario, of
perpetual war and conflict.
All for questionable, un-
clear objectives. No, actu-
ally; to war is to control.
Why does America have
any troops in the Middle
East? Why? China doesn't
have any armed forces in
the Middle East. Why then
does America? And what
does China pay per barrel
of oil? What? The same as
America?
I guess America pays sur-
taxes. Huh? Surtaxes you
ask? We pay with American
tax dollars and with dead


and wounded American
servicemen. Crude oil was
$71 a barrel (on Aug. 10).
That is what China pays.
America pays $71 a bar-
rel plus nearly a trillion
tax dollars for our recent
wars, plus more than 4,000
dead servicemen, plus tens
of thousands of horribly
wounded servicemen who
will require public support
the rest of their lives, plus
the troops who will some-
day, if not now, have post-
traumatic stress disorder.
That is some costly surtax
America pays. To what end?
Ironically enough, to
fuel (Get it? Fuel.) America's
never-ending war. I thought
with the election of Barack
Obama (I had fundraisers
in my home for his elec-
tion) that he was a man of
a markedly different stripe.
Yes, I like his intelligence
but his vision is turning out
to be that 6f just another
low-flyin', high-talkin' poli-
tician. This last election was
about so much and we are
going to, inevitably, settle
for so little. You can feel it.
It is palpable.
We have a singular lack
of imagination, we Ameri-
cans. You hear it on the
streets, ranting about salva-
tion, in shops mindlessly
recycling the simplicity
of the never-ending war
and we witness it in our
president who recycles old
economics (and advisers)
as new and battles on in the
Middle East as though there
is no legitimate alternative
but to war. Sigh.
. I think I'll return to Sa-
vannah, and so might you,
where beauty, art and ar-
chitecture reign forever. Or,
seemingly so.


> TJEPSON
Chris Jepson's opinions are made
independently of the newspaper.
Write him at jepson@MEDIAmerica.us.


Letters to


White Paper on cultural partner
funding issues in Maitland
History
The city has four cultural part-
ners. They are:
Partner / FY2009
-Maitland Public Library,
$657,684 or 54 percent
-Maitland Art Center, $309,000
or 26 percent
-Maitland Historical Society,
$182,911 or 15 percent
-Performing Arts of Maitland,
$58,900 or 5 percent
Each year city staff prepares a
balanced budget for presentation
to Maitland City Council. Staff
works with each partner to work
out a contribution amount that
staff will be able to put in its budget
presentation. This year staff asked
the partners to take a 5 percent cut
in funding based on the amounts
they received last year. All four
partners complied with this staff
request. Staff provided a balanced
budget to Council.


In the July 27 Council meet-
ing a decision item was to review
funds made available to PAM-
from 2006. Listen to the minutes
here: http://www.itsmymait-
land.com/meeting_recordings.
aspx?a=viewPost&PostID= 10361
Twenty-one citizens spoke in
support of PAM and requested the
funds be made available for this
performance partner.
The motion had no action taken
on it, but while Council didn't take
back its 2006 gift, it didn't say it
wouldn't in the future.
This meeting (held Monday, Aug.
10) had a new item, requesting a 40
percent reduction in the MAC 2010
request, on top of the 5 percent
they had already provided.

Analysis
The cultural partner model
works in our town since these part-�
ners get interested people to do-
nate their time to a cause they love
and work for..


We could never afford the ser-
vices these folks provide nor could
we provide the staff focus to get the
job done as effectively as they are
doing it.
Times are tough, and they will
get tougher. Should the city cut its
involvement now to "save money"?
If we want these partners to be
there, then we must support them
in the hard times as well as the
good. Fair weather friends do not
create the sustained opportunity
for producing the kind of programs
that last the lifetime of the city.
It is even more important to
fund these partners in the hard
times so they can provide us cheap,
local entertainment while we can't
afford to go to the ritzy.entertain-.
ment at more expensive venues. At-
tendance is up at all of these events
and in great part because they pro-
vide a real solution to a real need
now.
The bottom line is this: Maitland
has built these partnerships over


a very long time. If we shut down
our contributions to these part-
ners ($50,000 reduction for PAM's
$58,000 budget; $125,000 reduc-
tion to MAC's $309,000) we will
lose the very resource that we were
trying to interest in performing
this function in the first place.
MAC needs your support. But
each of us needs to decide now,
what do we want for our future?
The citizens that involve them-
selves in these groups do it to serve
their fellow man. They devote a lot
of effort to the various groups. We
need to support them and stand up
now for them if we want them do-
ing this for us in the future.
Please express your thoughts
directly to City Council. You can at-
tend the next Council meeting on
Aug. 24 or e-mail them.
-Jeff Flowers, founder of the
Performing Arts of Maitland,
Maitland City Councilman

> turn to LETTERS on next page


Winter Park/ Maitland Observer


Page 10 Thursday, August 13, 2009










LETTERS I Correction: H-bombs followed A-bombs by seven years


< continued from last page

Atomic bomb,
not hydrogen
I did enjoy the article "Mark on
history" (published in the Observer
on Aug. 6) very much and am glad


attention is given to deserving par-
ticipants of our armed forces as in
this case. I did note that there were
a couple of inaccurate items in the
article. One, is that the F4U-4 Cor-
sairs carried 400 rounds of ammo
for each of four guns and 350 for


each of the two outboard ones.
More importantly, the H-Bomb was
not used in August 1945, it was two
A-Bombs. The H-Bomb was not
tested by the U.S. until November
1952..
I point this out mainly because


as we incorrectly state history, we
begin to change it for future read-
ers. I enjoy the publication and
look forward to reading it each
week. Thank you.
-Jim Thomas


JERSEY I Slow Food movement quickly gaining momentum in Central Florida


< continued from page A7

cheese," he said. "My staff
even visited the dairy."
The Slow Food movement
began in Italy in the 1980s
and is active in more than
100 countries. It promotes
sustainability, stewardship,
eco-friendly processes and
food quality, taste and tra-
ditions. David Green is vice
president of Farmer Rela-
tions for Slow Food Orlando


",.,
W.'** ^


and works to empower and
connect local farmers with
their communities.
Player's restaurant sup-
ports the Slow Food move-
ment, which links restau-
rants and chefs to local
farmers from whom they
buy fresh daily.
- "Our kitchen was built
small intentionally so we
cannot store large quanti-
ties of food," Player said.


Lanmr


Winter Park Dairy
David & Dawn Green
4501 Howell Branch Road
in Winter Park
407-671-5888
www.winterparkdairy.com
Cheese@WinterParkDairy.com


To learn more
about the Slow Food movement
go to
www.slowfoodorlando.org


Old Hickory Steakhouse
407-586-1600
www.gaylordpalms.com


These days, you don't have to cut your Internet to cut your bills. Go with EMBARQ' High-Speed Internet
and you can save up to $350 a year vs. cable. That's right. It's $350 a year you don't have to spend. Join the
world of high-speed savings with EMBARQ.

The speed you need for better ;.- v''., .. sharing, gaming and more.
* Unlike cable, your connection isn't shared, which means your speed at 3am
is the same speed you get at 7pm.
* Your connection to our network is 100% yours, 100% of the time.
* It's consistently fast all day, every day, backed by our fiber-optic network.
* Plus, you get award-winning virus and spyware protection.
* FREE modem (shipping and handling fee applies).


Call 866.948.6104,
click embarq.com
EMBARQG or visit an EMBARQ Store.


'. ofertas en espaniol marque al 866.948.6104.



Offer ends 9/30/2009. The monthly rate of 14.95 requires a minimum service commitment of twelve (12) months and subscription to qualifying EMBARQ* calling plan. Rate applies to up to 768 Kbps High Speed Internet service. $15 activation
I i.i 11 , , . I ,,I r , ,,, ,,~e - , recurring charges based on an average of several cable companies' monthlv eltimn cl Jrges Sa qs comparison based on inba ' promotional at e t for 168 Kbps High Speed
S .... I i i i . . . . . i 7 ... i " available everyvwhol Ne Reidenlal Hil Speed Internet customers only IMBARQ may dant ge or cane
II. puter and th equipment hmtatos. Internetcn*ework conge-
ton, and the speed of the websites you connect to on the Internet Professional installation of modem or loutei kits is available for an additional fee. Modem -Wnthout credli approval, customer wi l t. e di'ed $99 99 loI modem 02009 Ceniurelrf , Inc All Rigjhis Resei. d, The
name EMBARQ and the jet logo aoe trademarks of CenturyTel, Inc All other marks are the property o their respective owners


M -


Thurday Auust 3, 009 Page 11


Winter Park / Maitland Observer






Page 12 Thursday, August 13, 2009 Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Play On!




I t ..-


Conservative
Cultural Commentary
By Louis Roney
Distinguished Professor Emeritus, UCF
2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award
Assisted by beloved wife Joy Roney

Women!
By a guy who
knows 'em

Imay not know rocket
science ... but I know a
helluva lot about wom-
en.
There's not a thing about
the little darlings that I
don't understand.
A woman's good looks
have deceived me a few
times ... Let's see, there was �
that time in kindergarten
at Spring Street School, and
a few times along the way
through the sixth grade.
But those don't count.
After all, I was just a kid and
had not yet gotten used to


the wiles of the feminine
sex.
Until high school I had
no trouble at all... that is
until my parents let me use
the car on dates.
But let's skip all that -
after all, I was so happy to
be driving that I never no-
ticed the back seat. I guess
my love of cars stunted my
imagination.
In college, I met girls
who were intellectual com-
petition and kept me off
balance as a Don Juan until
I knew that my graduation
was in the bag for sure.
My mother had talked
to me until she was blue
in the face: "Wait until you
get married," she said, as
she painted scary scenarios
where I might end up a
married man at 17.
I was never KO.'d by
our minister's abstinence
warnings aimed at me as I
yawned in the front pew.
I hadn't yet watched the
TV preacher whose Adonis-
son was wowing his father's
co-eds with his own TV
sermons. Adonis-son was
canned for romancing avid
young admirers. He was
then reinstated, after much
embarrassing lachrymose,
repentant TV wailing.
Anyhow, I was a schol-
arship student at a tough
university, and postponed
lots of treats my classmates
were having second help-
ings of. In my Dream World,


I was to be educated, rich,
and ready to give the pretty
gals a break. It didn't turn
out exactly that way. Noth-
ing ever does, does it?
But I found women not
really complicated.
The trouble is, after
years to become an opera
star with a bachelor pad, I
couldn't find women who
were desirable and single
or without a history of di-
vorces and with present
companions who had big-
ger biceps than mine!
I realized I had inad-
vertently become too per-
snickety and must lower
my sights or be holding my
hubristic head alone, out in
the cold.
The damsels I frequent-
ed, alas, were turning me
off for a variety of reasons
that were not unreasonable
from where I stood.
One gal I had warmed up
to went to the ladies room
three times in every restau-
rant we visited. I thought
of giving her the name of
my nephrologist. I was on
the verge of handing her
a note with his name and
phone number before she
darted out to the loo again.
As I handed her the note,
she pulled out a pack of
cigarettes, lit up, and blew a
blast of tobacco smoke that
invaded my virginal lungs.
"Sorry," she said, "this time
I just couldn't wait to get to
the ladies room. I've tried


everything to stop smok-
ing, but I just can't do it. My
doctor's given up on me."
My next date had every-
thing going for her until I
noticed that although she
was drinking club soda, she
came back from the ladies
room a little wobblier each
time. She opened her purse
wide to retrieve a tissue and
I spied a sleek silver flask.
My next romantic target
was a tall, handsome dish
who wore tailored suits. I
inquired into her favorite-
perfume. She said, "Evening
in Minsk. I can get it for
you." She produced an or-
der blank. I choked slightly.
"Just sign at the bottom
of this form. You see I'm
an Amway salesman. And
I'm happy to open your ac-
count."
The most beautiful girl I
ever took out left her purse
open on a chair by her, in
a restaurant. I saw a bill
sticking out from Sasoon's
Beauty Salon in the amount
of $281. "What did you
do today?" I asked. "Well,
I shopped all morning at
Saks and Bergdorfs and
stopped by my hair dresser
on the way here for a facial
and other trifles. I do that
three times a week."
I was losing faith, until I
met Cherie la Cherie, who,
before we got too far along
the road to amorous bliss,
told me she owned a Madi-
son Avenue shop where she


worked six days a week,
and was making a killing.
She was successful and had
no spare time. Why would
she need a nebbish like me
looking for a girl with time
to make whoopee?
I ran into a buzz saw on
my next try, when I told a
striking premature white-
hair that I was looking
forward to a house in the
suburbs - with kids. She re-
coiled, sputtering, "Having
kids raises hell with your
figure! Why would any sane
gal do that to herself?"
After telling the next
female that I had always
dreamed of marriage with
a honeymoon at the Grand
Canyon, she looked at the
floor, took a deep breath,
then muttered, "I get car-
sick, and I can't stand even
getting into an airplane
with my fear of heights."
How about our just walk-
ing through the park to the
Carlisle for our honeymoon
dinner, kiddo?
I kept plowing forward
though barren distaff fields,
until a promising candidate
had a near hemorrhage as I
flipped my TV onto the Su-
per Bowl game. "Don't tell
me you're another stupid
football nut," she bellowed,
pulling her mink jacket
back over her shoul-



> turn to RONEY on page A14


A III A S n,


TEMPRU


77� 87�
6a.m. I 3p.m.


770
I 6 a.m.
Fri 3v


TODAY: Scattered
thunderstorms with a high
near 89. South wind near
6 mph. Rain chance 40
percent.


THI WEEK


.p ser ..inthesouhen
4ta. Tepeoea
4,,- 9 aeivdt~a6


UV INDEX U


-10
l Extreme


/, ' MORNING LOW 77�

DAYTIME HIGH 900

Sunrise Sunset 40% chance Wind
6:54 a.m. 8:05 p.m. of rain SE 6 mph



MORNING LOW 76�
!


,*" DAYTIME HIGH

Sunrise Sunset 40% chance
6:55 a.m. 8:04 p.m. of rain


Wind
E 7 mphi


I M Low"76'o
. MORNING LOW 760


DAYTIME HIG

Sunrise Sunset 40% chance
6:55 a.m. 8:03 p'm. of rain


;H 890

Wind
ESE 9 mph


NATIONAL
City
Seattle
Los Angeles
Houston


MARINE FORECAST
Cocoa Beach tide schedule
Time Low High
Saturday 9:22 a.m. 2:45 a.m.
Aug. 15 9:59 p.m. 3:55 p.m.


Sunday 10:29 a.m. 3:57 a.m.


Aug. 16


11:04 p.m. 5:01 p.m.


FLORIDA FORECAST
City Friday Sat.
Jacksonville 77/88 77/89
Miami 81/89 81/89


Tampa
Pensacola


77/89 77/88
77/86 76/86


INTERNATIONAL


Friday Sat.
54/68 55/68
61/80 60/75


City
Atlanta
Chicago


Friday Sat.
70/82 .69/84
67/85 70/87


75/95 76/94 . New York 68/80 69/83


City
London
Paris
Tokyo


Friday Sat.
62/70 59/69
59/83 59/82
76/85 76/83


THE VIEW FROM YOUR NECK OF THE WOODS











- '......'i . , , YOUR NAME HERE, FROM YOUR CITY!
Want to see your picture in The Observer? Please e-mail it to editor@
observernewspapers.com. Files should be at least 1MB in size. Please
include as much information about the picture as possible, for example
where the image was taken, what time and who is in it.


Page 12 ThrdyAuut1,20


Winter Park /Maitland Observer


0 li~









Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Thursday, August 13, 2009 Page 13


IN THF: I'HI1II T t'1 ' I ll T l: 'lli Il fji, : 1 i,., i)" J .
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 48-2009-CP-1553-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
TAVISH LEVELLE THOMPSON
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Tavish Levelle
Thompson, deceased, whose date of death was
February 24, 2007, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Orange County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 425 North Orange Avenue, Suite
-340, Orlando, FL 32801. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on wh(.r :, . ... . i. this notice is required
to be served ..... i ii- ii..-. claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF'THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is
Aug.6, 2009.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Catherine E. Davey
Attorney for LaWanda Thompson
Florida Bar No. 0991724
Post Office Box 941251
Maitland, FL 32794-1251
Telephone: (407) 645-4833
Fax: (407) 645-4832
Personal Representative:
LaWanda Thompson
2310 Academy Circle West #307
Kissimmee, Florida 34744
8/6,8/13

IN THE COUNTY COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 08-CC-1552
DIVISION: 72
ENCLAVE AT MAITLAND HOMEOWNERS
iilnl iin

V.
ROXANNE RAZZANI-ELLIS, MICHAEL F. ELLIS, and
JOHN DOE and JANE DOE,
as unknown tenants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on the 25th day of
August, 2009, at 11:00 a.m., at room 350 of the
Orange County Courthouse, 425 N. Orange Avenue,
Orlando, Florida 3280, Florida 2801, the undersigned Cler will
offer for sale the real estate described as follows:
Lot 106, ENCLAVE AT MAITLAND, accord-
ing to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 57, Pages 58 through 64, of the Public
Records of Orange County, Florida.

together with all structures, improvements, fixtures,
and appurtenances on said land or used in conjunc-
tion therewith.
Any.person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to
a Final Judgment entered in this cause on July
21,2009.
DATED this 21st day of July, 2009
Matt G. Firestone, Esq.

If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please
contact Court Administration at 425 North Orange
Avenue, Suite 2130, Orlando, Florida 32801, tele-
phone (407)836-2303, within 2 working days of
your receipt of this Summons; if you are hearing
impaired, call 1-800-955-8771; if you are voice
impaired, call: 1-800-955-8770.
8/6, 8/13

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No.48-2009-CP-001421-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
KENNETH WILLIAM BLAIN
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Kenneth
William Blain, deceased, whose date of death was
August 25, 2006, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Orange County, Florida, Probate Division, the
S address of which is 425 North Orange Avenue, Suite
340, Orlando, FL 32801. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on Whom a copy bf this notice is required
to be served must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is
Aug. 6,2009.

Attorney for Personal Representative:
Catherine E. Davey
Attorney for Marie J. Blain
Florida Bar No. 0991724
Post Office Box 941251
Maitland, FL 32794-1251
- Telephone: (407) 645-4833
Fax: (407) 645-4832

Personal Representative:
Made J. Blain
4752 Pilgrims Way
Orlando, Florida 32808
8/6, 8/13

Notice Under Fictitious Name Act
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned,
pursuant to the "Fictitious Name Statute", Chapter
865.09, Florida Statutes, will register with the Divi-
sion of Corporations, Department of State, State of
Florida, upon receipt of proof of the publication of
this notice, the fictitious name, to wit:
Zippy Reviews
under which the undersigned expects to engage in
business at
1640 Chatfield Place, Orlando, Florida 32814,
Orange County
and that the party interested in said business enter-
prise-is as follows:
Pamela Scala and Daniel Scala
Dated at Orange County, Florida this 13th day of
August, 2009
8/13


I i TIF i i i,)li T. l iTii,ill. i i TH lt lrliH I 11.1111 i.
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.:07-CC-21432
WINDTREE GARDENS CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION,
INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
FANNIE NEBLETT,
Defendant.
NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
Notice is given that pursuant to the Default Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 5, 2009,
in Case No. 07-CC-21432, of the County Court in
and for Orange County, Florida, in which WINDTREE
GARDENS CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, INC., is
the Plaintiff and FANNIE NEBLETT is the Defendant,
Lydia Gardner, Clerk of County Court, will sell to
the highest and best bidder for cash at the Orange
County Courthouse, 425 North Orange Avenue, Suite
350, Orlando, Florida, at 11:00 a.m., on September
3, 2009, the following described property set forth
in the Order of Final Judgment:
Unit W101, WINDTREE GARDENS
CONDOMINIUM, PHASE SIX, together with an
undivided interest in the Common Elements,
according to that certain Declaration of
Condominium, amendments, exhibits and
obligations thereto as recorded in Official
Records Book 3374, Page 1; Official Records
Book 3415, Page 2386; Official Records
Book 3417, Page 2790; Official Records
Book 3427, Page 2109; Official Records
Book 3430, Page 2356; Official Records
Book 3464, Page 1831; Official Records
Book 3483, Page 282; Official Records Book
3483, Page 363; Official Records Book 3484,
Page 849; Official Records Book 3516, Page '
112; Official Records Book 3571, Page
2270; Official Records Book 3651, Page
541; Official Records Book 3557, Page 445;
and Resolution of Amendment as recorded
in Official Records Book 4289, Page 2009,
all in the Public Records of Orange County,
Florida.
a/k/a
Unit W-101, WINDTREE GARDENS
CONDOMINIUM PHASE SIX, together with
an undivided interest in the common ele-
ments according to that certain Declaration
of Condominium amendments, exhibits and
obligations thereto as recorded in O.R. Book
3374, Page 1; O.R. Book 3415, Page 2386;
O.R. Book 3464, Page 1831, O.R. Book
3483, Page 282; O.R. Book 3483, Page 363;
O.R. Book 3484, Page 849, O.R. Book 3516,
Page 112, O.R. Book 3557, Page 445, O.R.
Book 3571, Page 2270; and O.R. Book 3651,
Page 541 all in the Public Records of Orange
County, Florida.
Any Person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
JEFF A. STONE, ESQUIRE
CLAYTON & MCCULLOH
1065 Maitland Center Commons Blvd.
Maitland, Florida 32751
(407) 875-2655
,r ,' n,. rJ, w. ,,,',,, i I iu i..' i ,')Aug .
I1" . ..tl " ,,- ',N , ,' , I. : 1 .M." ,I I ,, o L,:,-I, ,-,

IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO
NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION .IN ORDER TO
PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE
ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION
OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT COURT
ADMINISTRATION, 425 NORTH ORANGE AVE., ROOM
2130, ORLANDO, FL 32801, TELEPHONE: (407) 836-
2303 WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT
OF THIS NOTICE.OF SALE; IF YOU ARE HEARING OR
VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 1-800-955-8771.
8/13, 8/20

IN THE COUNTY COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 2008-CC-9899
WINDWARD PLACE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION;
INC.,
Plaintiff.
vs.
JOAO S. CALEGARI.
Defendant,
RE-NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
Notice is given that pursuant to the Final Judgment
of Foreclosure dated March 4, 2009, in Case No.
2008-CC-9899, of the County Court inland for
Orange County, Florida, in which WINDWARD PLACE
HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., is the Plaintiff
and JOAO S. CALEGARI are the Defendant, Lydia
Gardner, Clerk of County Court, will sell to thie high-
est and best bidder for cash at the Orange County
Courthouse, 425 North Orange Avenue, Suite 350,
Orlando, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on August 27, 2009,
the following described property set forth in the
Order of Final Judgment:
Lot 63, Windward Place, according to the
plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 16,
Pages 95-97 of the Public Records of Orange
County, Florida.

Any Person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
DATED: 7/28/2009

JEFF A. STONE, ESQUIRE
CLAYTON & MCCULLOH
1065 Maitland Center Commons Blvd.
Maitland, Florida 32751
(407) 875-2655
Attorneys for Plaintiff

Publication of this Notice on Aug. 13, 2009, and Aug.
20, 2009, in the Winter Park-Maitland Observer.
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO
NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO
PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE
ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION
OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT COURT
ADMINISTRATION, 425 NORTH ORANGEAVE., ROOM
2130, ORLANDO, FL 32801, TELEPHONE: (407) 836-
2303 WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT
OF THIS NOTICE OF SALE; IF YOU ARE HEARING OR
VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 1-800-955-87,71.
8/13, 8/20


NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
SALE BY CASH AUCTION
THE FOLLOWING UNITS
On August 25, 2009, at Assured Self-Storage, Inc.
to the highest bidder for cash, items contained in
the following units:
-B1029 - Division of Alcohol & Tobacco -
Business Items
B1032 - Division of Alcohol & Tobacco -
Business Items
D1026 - Joshua Foster - Household Items
01061 - Luis Maldonado - Household Items
C1127 - Robert Reich -.Household Items
01120 - Robert Reich - Household Items
D1038 - Jacqueline Berry - Household Items
D2149 - Jacqueline Berry - Household Items
C1048- Bertha Allen - Household Items
P0136 - Bruce Trick -1978 Seacraft Cutty, HIN#
5EC00360478
00066 - Francisco Rodriguez - Vehicle Trailer
02090 - Jarvis Watkins - Household Items
P0123 - Joseph Capelletti - 1992 Ford Mustang,
VIN# 1FACP42E9NF111276
C029 - Assured Self-Storage - Pool Tables
TO BE HELD AT
510 DOUGLAS AVENUE
ALTAMONTE SPRINGS, FL
ON AUGUST 25, 2009
AT 10:00 A.M.
ASSURED SELF-STORAGE, INC.
Assured Self-Storage, Inc. reserves the right to bid
and to refuse or reject any and all bids.
8/6, 8/13


IIl Ti I I"I I.I.II I I' II, Ih T l:Ill i.luI rh .llE .Lil.rif .
1:L I i l ,J I. i: lilu ; Tl: i ), I l. l i lrl

IN i:� 1: Hi e il: 1 ,, .
JASON ANTHONY BLAKE
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Jason
Anthony Blake, deceased, whose date of death was
September.19, 2006, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Orange County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 425 North Orange Avenue, Suite
340, Orlando, FL 32801. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice is required
to be served must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF.THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is
Aug. 13, 2009. -
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Catherine E. Davey
Attorney for Dorothy E Yee
Florida Bar No. 0991724
Post Office Box 941251
Maitland, FL 32794-1251
Telephone: (407) 645-4833
Fax: (407) 645-4832
Personal Representative:
Dorothy F. Yee
635 Rob Roy Drive
Clermont, Florida 34711
8/13, 8/20

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File Number: 2009-CP-1285
IN RE: ESTATE OF
Nancy Louise Kroenke,
Deceased,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Nancy Louise
Kroenke, deceased, whose date of death was May
26, 2009, is pending in the Circuit Court for Semi-
,-,,:,i,- ,.,-r , ,, , ,,;., F .i. i, 0 , .;,,,, it - . address
,i nr i,, i: ,. 1 b... . , : i,i,.,,h...1 1. u " -8099.
The names and addresses of the Personal Repre-
sentative and the Personal Representative's attor-
ney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliq-
uidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHSAFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against the
decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent
or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with
this court within 3 months after the date of the first
publication of this notice.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVEANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DOECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is
8/13/09.
Personal Representative:
Zachary Kroenke
329 ParkAvenue North, 2nd Floor
P.O. Box 880
Winter Park, FL 32790
Nancy S. Freeman
Attorney for Personal Representative
Florida Bar No. 968293
Winderweedle, Haines, Ward & Woodman, P.A.
329 ParkAvenue North, 2nd Floor, PRO. Box 880,
Winter Park, FL 32790
Telephone: (407) 423-4246
8/13, 8/20

STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA
IN THE FAMILY COURT OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, COUNTY OF LEXINGTON
C.A- NO.: 2009-DR-32-1111
NOTICE OF ADOPTION PROCEEDING
TO: "JOHN DOE", BIRTH FATHER:
You are hereby notified pursuant to SC Code Ann.
Sec. 63-9-730, that adoption proceedings have
been initiated under the above-referenced case
number involving a child of whom you have been
named the biological father, which child was born
on May 28, 2004. YOU ARE FURTHER NOTIFIED AS
FOLLOWS:
1. That within thirty (30) days of receiving notice
you shall respond in writing by filing with the Clerk
of Court at 139 East Main Street, Lexington, South
Carolina 29072, notice and reasons to contest, in-
tervene, or otherwise respond;
2.That the Court must be informed of your cur-
rent address and of any changes in address during
the adoption proceedings; and
3.That failure to file a response within thirty
(30) days of receiving notice constitutes consent
to adoption of the child and forfeiture of all rights
and obligations that you may have with respect to
the child.
Raymond W. Godwin, Esq.
1527 Wade Hampton Blvd,
Greenville, SC 29609
(864) 241-2883 (Phone)
(864) 255-4342 (Facsimile)
ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFFS
Greenville, South Carolina
July 21, 2009
-8/6, 8/13, 8/20

Notice of Public Auction
Pursuant to Ch 713.585(6) F.S. United American Lien
& Recovery as agent with power of attorney will sell
the following vehicles) to the highest bidder subject
to any liens; net proceeds deposited with the clerk
of court; owner/llenholder has right to hearing and
post bond; owner may redeem vehicle for cash sum
of lien; all auctions held in reserve
Inspect 1 week prior @ lienor facility; cash or ca-
shier check; 15% buyer prem; any person inter-
ested ph (954) 563-1999
Sale date September 4 2009 @10:00 am 3411 NW
9th Ave Ft Lauderdale FL 33309
20918 2006 Isuzu vn#: JALB4B1657008900 lienor:
central florida auto repair 1779F s obt Apopka fl
407-880-8221 lien amt $6314.21
sale date September 11, 2009 @ 10:00 am 3411
NW 9th ave #707 Ft Lauderdale FL 33309
20940 2003 Honda vin#: 1HGCM66583A092191
lienor: jr's auto air 605 w 27 st Sanford fl 407-302-
9590 lien amt $7229.48
20941 2000 Chrysler vin#: 2C3HE66G7YH319757
lienor: value auto painting & body work maaco auto
painting 917 mercy dr Orlando ft 407-297-8551 lien
amt $2433.93
Licensed & bonded auctioneers flab422 flau 765
&1911
8/13


ill THE I. I: i 'l IIT r10I.ll IliF T:HE ')IrIl, l[ll l i_.
I" Ih .I T i 1i"i i 1 .1 iI ill li r i r, l i ll :
r'.'"TE f O' ' i.'T- i, i ' r1' i .11)r, r, .: i.'aT irri
INC.
Plaintiff,
v.
SHARON MONROE, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
SHARON MONROE, and JOHN DOE and JANE DOE,
as unknown tenants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on the 28th day of
August, 2009, at 11:00 a.m., at room 350 of the
Orange County Courthouse, 425 N. Orange Avenue,
Orlando, Florida 32801, the Clerk of Court will offer
for sale the real estate described as follows:
Lot 47, Huckleberry Fields N-2A, according
to the plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
17, Page 23, of the Public Records of Orange
County, Florida,
together with all structures, improvements, fixtures,
and appurtenances on said land or used in conjunc-
tion therewith.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to
a Final Judgment entered in this cause on July
28, 2009.
DATED this 28th day of July, 2009
Matt G. Firestone, Esq.

If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you; to the provision of certain assistance. Please
contact Court Administration at 425 North Orange
Avenue, Suite 2130, Orlando, Florida 32801, tele-
phone (407)836-2303, within 2 Working days of
-your receipt of this Summons; if you are hearing
impaired, call 1-800-955-8771; if you are voice
impaired, call: 1-800-955-8770.
8/6, 8/13

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
CASE No. 2009CA001007
BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLD-
ERS OF MASTR ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-2,
PLAINTIFF,
VS.
MICHELLE E. MITCHELL, ET AL.
DEFENDANT(S).-
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 26, 2009 inI
the above action, I will sell to the highest bidder
for cash at Seminole, Florida, on Oct, 1, 2009, at
11:00 AM, at Room S201 of Courthouse - 301 N.
Park Ave., Sanford, FL 32771 for the following de-
scribed property:
Unit 37-E, Destiny Springs, a Condominium,
according to the Declaration of Condominium
thereof, as recorded in Official Records Book
1337, Page 1890, Public Records of Seminole
County, Florida, and all recorded and unre-
corded amendments thereof. Together with
an undivided interest or share in the common
elements appurtenant thereto.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale. The Court, in its dis-
cretion, may enlarge the time of the sale. Notice
of the changed time of sale shall be published as
provided herein.
Dated Aug. 5, 2009
MARYANNE MORSE
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By Selene Worley
Deputy Clerk of the Court
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to
the provision of certain assistance. Please contact
Court Administration at The Seminole Civil Court-
house, 301 N. Park Avenue, Suite 301, Sanford,
FL 32771-1292, (407) 665-4227 within 2 working
days of your receipt of this notice. If you are hearing
or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 or 711.
8/13, 8/20

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File Number: 2009-CP-001491-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARY MORAVETZ,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of MARY
MORAVETZ, deceased, whose date of death was
September 28, 2008, is pending in the Circuit Coart
for Orange County, Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 425 N. Orange Avenue, Suite 340,
Orlando, FL 32801. The names and addresses of
the Personal Representative and the Personal Rep-
resentative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliq-
uidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against the
decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent
or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with
this court within 3 months after the date of the first
publication of this notice.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is
8/13/09.
Personal Representative:
WILLIAM J. MORAVETZ
329 Park Avenue North
RO. Box 880
Winter Park, FL 32790
Vanessa J. DiSimone
Attorney for Personal Representative
Florida Bar No. 0043713
Winderweedle, Haines, Ward & Woodman, P.A.
329 Park Avenue North, P.O. Box 880, Winter Park,
FL 32790
Telephone: (407) 423-4246
8/13,8/20

Notice of Public Auction
Pursuant to Ch 715.109 FS and/or 83.801 and/or
677.210 FS'etal United American Lien & Recovery
as agent with power of attorney will sell at public
auction the following property(s) to the high-
est bidder subject to any liens for the purpose of
satisfying claim of lien and/or disposition of aban-
doned property(s); owner/lienholder may redeem
.property(s) for cash sum of lien; all auctions held
in reserve
Inspect 1 week prior @ lien facility; cash or cashier
check; 15% buyer prem; any persons interested ph
(954) 563-1999
Sale date August 28 2009 @ 10:00 am 3411 NW
9th Ave #707 Ft Lauderdale FL 33309
1869 1974 Ford Falcon 2dr vin#: 4H17S132736
tenant: southern auto brokers
Licensed & bonded auctioneers flab422 flau 765
&1911
8/13, 8/20


II TMi1 i. uiiirjT', (IIIHT ii THE ifjrlTH jin.U, IDtL.
|in'HI| |T i , siO fnifi iiH,, " r F i ti r ar, if.: 3i a
.A i: sIit' Cie ti C l l' Fin l:ci .
enc e IHvi " Si t.icul b" a'.:Ir:'
HOMEOWNERS' ASSOCIATION, INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MICHELLE PINSKY,
Defendant,
NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
Notice is given that pursuant to the Final Judgment
of Foreclosure dated June 23, 2009, in Case No.
07-CC-17689, of the County Court in and for
Orange County, Florida, In which MEADOW CREEK
AT MEADOW WOODS ASSOCIATION, INC., is the
Plaintiff and MICHELLE PINSKY is the Defendant,
Lydia Gardner, Clerk of County Court, will sell to
the highest and best bidder for cash at the Orange
County Courthouse, 425 North Orange Avenue,
Suite 350, Orlando, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on August
25, 2009, the following described property set forth
in the Order of Final Judgment:
Lot 163, Meadow Creek, according to the
plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 44,
Pages 58-62 of the Public Records of Orange
County, Florida.
A/K/A
Lot 163, MEADOW CREEK, according to the
plat there of as recorded in Plat Book 44,
Page 58, of the Public Records of Orange
County, Florida
DATED 7/30/2009
JEFF A. STONE, ESQUIRE
CLAYTON & MCCULLOH
1065 Maitland Center Commons Blvd.
Maitland, Florida 32751
(407) 875-2655
Attorneys for Plaintiff

Publication of thisNotice onAug. 13, 2009, and Aug.
20, 2009, in the Winter Park-Maitland Observer.
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO
NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO
PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE
ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION
OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT COURT
ADMINISTRATION, 425 NORTH ORANGE AVE., ROOM
2130, ORLANDO, FL 32801, TELEPHONE: (407) 836-
2303 WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT
OF THIS NOTICE OF SALE; IF YOU ARE HEARING OR
VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 1-800-955-8771. .
8/13,8/20

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 48-2009-CP-001483-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JOSE NICHOLAS PERRY
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Jose Nicholas
Perry, deceased, whose date of death was May 16,
2007, is pending in the Circuit Court for Orange
County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of
Which is 425 North Orange Avenue, Suite 340,
Orlando, FL 32801. The names and addresses of
the personal representative and the personal repre-
sentative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice is required
to be served must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE COE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is
Aug. 6, 2009.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Catherine E. Davey
Attorney for Jeanine Ortiz
Florida Bar No. 0991724
Post Office Box 941251
Maitland, FL 32794-1251
Telephone: (407) 645-4833
-Fax: (407) 645-4832
Personal Representative:
Jeanine Ortiz
2025 Buchanan Bay Circle #101
Orlando, Florida 32839
8/6, 8/13


ill THITE IRii.IT I i I.IT Ii.h i R 1 :R-,Ria E rinr.rI
FLO-II^l.l m n. ATT I: :liur liri
H.i. rj.. i:,. . N)II 1.1r . I _ " 1.1

CARLUS LIL-THURSTON PATTERSON, 11
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Carius Lil-
Thurston Patterson, II, deceased, whose date. of
death was July 30, 2008, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Orange County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 425 North Orange Ave.,
Suite 340, Orlando, FL 32801. The names and
addresses of the personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the dededent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice is required
to be served must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE.FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT.FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is
Aug.13, 2009.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Catherine E Davey
Attorney for Verdia Ann.Patterson
Florida Bar No. 0991724
Post Office Box 941251
Maitland, FL 32794-1251
Telephone: (407) 645-4833
Fax (407) 645-4832
Personal Representative:
Verdia Ann Patterson
4433 Beaumont Drive
Orlando, Florida 32808
8/13, 8/20


Ap.


CITY OF. WINTER PARK
401 Park Avenue South
Winter Park, Florida 32789

NOTICE OF EQUALIZATION HEARING
KEYES AVENUE PLUG-IN
.; .r.-....'"-'" WINTER PARK, FLORIDA
Dear Property Owner;
Notice is hereby given that a public equalization hearing will be held on August 24, 2009, at 3:30
p.m., at the Commission Chambers, City Hall, 401 Park Avenue South, Winter Park, Florida, by the City
Commission of the City of Winter Park, Florida, sitting as an equalizing board to hear any and all com-
plaints regarding the special assessments described in Resolution No. 2024-09 of the City Commission
adopted on June 22, 2009 (the "Assessment Resolution") related to the undergrounding of electric/
CATV facilities east of Keyes Avenue, west of ParkAvenue, south of Stovin Avenue and north of Webster
Avenue, in the City of Winter Park, Florida (the "Project").
All affected property owners have a right to appear at the hearing and to file written objections with the
City Commission within 20 days of the date of the first publication of this notice.
The Project is more particularly described in plans and specifications on file with the City.
It is proposed that the assessments for the undergrounding of electric/CATV facilities in the total
jl" l,,".lli ..I [ 'J " -r m . I .ll, .,h . i, I , 3 f1"1 h , I, '. .. 1 61 ,,', . ....T,.. .T ".. ,.,� ',l h. I I I.,,111... 1.=

estimated unit cost of $3,259.00 per parcel among the respective parcels of land east of KeyesAvenue,
west of Park Avenue, south of Stovin Avenue and north of Webster Avenue, specially benefited thereby,
all as more particularly set forth in the Assessment Resolution.
All interested persons are advised that the description of each property to be assessed and the amount
to be assessed to each parcel or piece of property may be ascertained from the preliminary assess-
ment roll.on file at the office of the City Clerk of the City of Winter Park, Florida, at City Hall, 401 Park
Avenue South, Winter Park, Florida.
It is the intention of the City Commission to adjust and equalize all assessments on a basis of justice
and right, following the hearing, and adopt a final assessment roll to be recorded in the Official records
of Orange County, Florida, which shall constitute a lidn on all property so assessed, coequal with
all state, county, district and municipal taxes, as provided in Section 170.09, Florida Statutes, and
pursuant to which the assessments will be collected by the Tax Collector of Orange County, Florida,
together with such taxes.
it a person decides to appeal any decision made by the City Commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he/she will need a record of the proceedings, and for such
purpose he/she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. (Section 286.0105, Florida
Statutes)
Persons with disabilities needing assistance to participate in any of these proceedings should contact
the City Clerk's office, (407) 599-3277, at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting.
8/6, 8/13











VIST'S OLIE1



WPMOBSEVER. CO


V V I I ILC�t I C Ilk / IVICL ILI l JU �"-







1 ayj 1, * Aigi. 1. ?l Wint, er ark/ML Iaitld Oberve


Marketplace


REALTORS:
Licensed Real Estate Professionals needing
to earn additional income. Become a
part time or full time loan officer. Control
your own closings. Gain access to
hundreds of mortgage programs. Save
your clients thousands of dollars. Call
Maitland Mortgage Lending- Company
(407)629-5626
ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVE
Account Representative needed to work
on behalf of our company. 18+ needed
and must have computer skills. Accounting
experience needed. Any job experience.
Email to mclarkemploymentl111@gmail.
com for more information.
- CDL-A DRIVERS WANTED
Drivers: Top Pay & Excellent Benefits running
Flatbed OTR! Must have CDL-A, 2yrs OTR
exp & pass DOT physical. Purdy Brothers:
800-745-7290
P/T TOUR GUIDE
MAITLAND HISTORICAL SOCIETY
Part-Time Docent/Tour Guide Needed for
Maitland Historical Society's Museums.
4-8 hrs/weekly. Sunday required. Prior
experience in a museum preferred.
Bachelor's Degree Preferred. Please send
letter and resume to PO Box 941001,
Maitland, 32794 or jnash@maitlandhistory.
org. Contact Jill Nash, Education and Public
Programs Manager, jnash@maitlandhistory.
org


HANDYMAN/CARPENTRY
Let me take care of the chores you don't
have time to do - yard work, carpentry,
painting, (whole house or interior rooms),
driveways, repairs, pressure washing,, and
more. No job too small. Local. Prompt.
Affordable. Call Scott at 321-460-3905.
TAYLOR'S LAWN SERVICE
Dependable & Reasonable price lawn
caretrimming & garden tilling. Free
estimates. Phone Russel Taylor 407-260-
5240. Laboys@aol.com



DETOXIFICATION EBOOK
(4) Detoxification Ebook - Super Sale: $7.99
each. http://www.ebook-detox-patches.
org/order.html. How to Detox for Overnight
Pain Relief. Flatter Tummy - Colon Cleanse.
Reclining Detox - Migun Thermal Bed. 500
+ Uses for Apple Cider Vinegar. Carol Miller,
(407) 970-1483



Reading volunteers NEEDED - Jackson
Heights Middle School in Oviedo is looking
for adults who are interested in serving as a
Reading Mentor to assist students who are
reading below grade level. Volunteers work
one-on-one with an assigned student before
school for 30 minutes, one or more times
a week through the end of the school year
to build fluency and comprehension skills.
Sessions are from 8:30-9:00 a.m., M-F.
Please contact Connie O'Hanlon for more
information, 407-365-7585.


WINTER PARK CONDO
Winter Park - 2 bedroom / 2 bath - deluxe
upstairs condo. Water / Sewer and interior
pest control included, near Hospital.
Laminated floors, new refrigerator, new
dishwasher, new A/C, washer / dryer. Master
bedroom looks over a beautiful inner court
yard with mature trees. $950.00 / month.
Please contact Deanna Campos, Realtor, to
view at 321-663-2837 Or deannacampos@
earthlink.net


FOR RENT
Oviedo Office Space, great frontage. 750
to 1,050 sf available, $1,070 to $1,350 per
month. 1401 Broadway St. Contact Megan
at (407) 687-3524.
OVIEDO OFFICE FOR RENT
Oviedo Office for rent. 1,640 sq. ft., $14/
sq. ft. + tax, no CAM. Reception, kitchen,
conference offices. Near 417 Red Bug exit.
815 Eyrie Drive. Call 407-365-3490.





- King Crossword -
4nsier.i
Solution time: 27 mins.











Weekly SUDOKU
Answer


Get local news from a
local source! Receive
The Observer weekly
for only $30/yearl
subscribe@
observernewspapers.com


RONEY I Tales from the black book


< continued from page A12

-ders.
My next possible wedding-ring
recipient had grammar problems,
and I vacated her life the second
time she said, "for you and I" ...
A gorgeous redhead once asked
me if I shared her mania for the
music of Hindemith, Stockhausen
and Cage? "I listen to them 10
hours a day, " she said. "I am so
damn sick of Beethoven, Puccini,
Verdi and Mozart, aren't you?"
I offered little resistance to a
Mississippi girl, who dialected me
with "Lawd have mercy! I am an
unregenerate rebel to the bone, but
just don't tawk to me about turnip
greens or corn bread, I never could
cotton to 'em!"
The next beauty in my long
safari came out to the pool at the
country club clad in a thong, peri-
od! In my heart the "thong" ended
and no melody lingered on.
One dazzling brunette told me
she lived in her apartment with
a full-grown male tiger who had
never bothered any of her guests.
"Does he like men?" I asked.


"I don't know that yet," she said.
I chose not to pursue the matter.
My shrink took a shine to me.
She suggested that I take up psy-
chiatry. We could then share con-
jugal couches and shrink heads at
400 bucks a throw, with a conjugal
bed as lagniappe. I, the incipient
shrink, shrank out, on the double.
A lively exercise lady palled on
me when she named every muscle
above my waist in Latin and told
me she'd soon whip me into shape.
At 7 one morning I walked
with my dog into a building on
West 75th and saw a girl sitting
in the lobby. A pretty girl. Turns
out she was waiting for the same
pianist friend I was. I drove us the
250 miles to Williamsport where
the comely lass sang a smashing
concert. My dog loved her at first
sight. He was a smart dog, and I
listened to him. Before I got to
know women too well to continue
admiring them from afar, I latched
onto a quality gal willing to put up
with a strike-out Romeo like me.
That was 30 years ago.
My dog was right!


Case No: 99-DEA-355396; Case No: 00-CRS-200500; Case No: 99-FBI-001716

DRUGDEALERSSEIZEDASSETS UPFORAUCTION.


JEWELRY SEIZED FROM NARCOTICS DEALERS, FINE ART FROM
DALI, CHAGALL, PICASSO AND OTHER FLASHY ITEMS TO BE
LIQUIDATED PIECE BYPIECE REGARDLESS OF COST OR VALUE
TOGETHER WITH GENERAL ORDER MERCHANDISE.


, .


LOCATION:

WINTER PARK

CIVIC CENTER


WINTER

PARK, FL

1050.West Morse Blvd
Call 407-599-3341 for
Directions.


� , , _


THIS WILL BE AN EVENT NOT TO BE MISSED! A COMPLETE

LIQUIDATION OF OVER 2 MILLION DOLLARS WORTH OF
MERCHANDISE INCLUDING....
Marble top bomb cabinets, Chippendale chairs and sideboards, large bronze foun-
tains, bronze and crystal chandeliers, handwoven Oriental rugs in all sizes including
fine Persians for the collector, lithographs from Dali, Chagall, Picasso and others,
French living room sets, mahogany armoires, bronze figurines and wildlife, French
and English writing desks, Italian tapestry's, oil paintings, antiques from Europe
and the Orient, Tiffany style lamps, mahogany and wrought iron beds, porcelain
vases and bowls, gilt framed mirrors, diamond, emerald, sapphire and ruby rings,
Rolex watches, bracelets and necklaces including a large selection of estate pieces.
Merchandise shown is for descriptive purposes only, inventory changes weekly.
THIS IS A PRIVATELY HELD AUCTION AND IS NOT
AFFILIATED WITH A GOVERNMENT AGENCY.
FREE ADMISSION* Terms: Cash, Check, Charge. Items Subject to error or
omission * 15% Buyers Premium * For Information Call 678-680-5400 or
visit www.seizedestates.com * License #AB2686, Auctioneer # AU2762


Winter Park

Office Space for Lease
($20 per square foot)
Directly on Park Avenue
with attached garage


Call Marsha at 407-741-8684
For more information


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Pnnp 14 Thursdav. Auaust 13, 200






Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Thursday, August 13, 2009 Page 15


G . Games


Strange
BUT TRUE

By Samantha Weaver

It was American comic-
book artist, publisher,
writer and editor Bernard
Bailey who made the fol-
lowing sage observation:
"When they discover the


center of the universe, a
lot of people will be disap-
pointed to discover they
are not it."

In Alfred Hitchcock's
iconic 1960 film "Psycho,"
that creepily realisticlook-
ing blood in the famous
shower scene was actually
chocolate syrup.

The Q-Tip brand of cot-
ton swab was originally


marketed under the name
"Baby Gays."

Do you know anyone who
is xanthodontous? If so,
you might want to refer
them to someone special-
izing in cosmetic dentistry.
"Xanthodontous" means
"having yellow teeth."

You might be surprised to
learn that a Boeing 747 jet
is longer from wingtip to


wingtip than the distance
of the Wright Brothers' first
airplane flight.

Evidently, pop star Chris-
tina Aguilera is popular in
Russia. In 2005, one man
wanted her to perform at
his wedding so badly that
he paid her $2 million to
sing just three songs.

Legislators in Michigan
thought it necessary at one


point to pass a law making
it illegal to be drunk on a
train.



Thought for the Day: "Per-
fect valor is to behave,
without witnesses, as one
would act were all the
world watching." - Fran-
cois, duc de La Rochefou-
cauld
� 2009 King Features Synd., Inc.


ARIES (March 21 to
April 19) Dealing with a
difficult person can be the
kind of challenge you Aries
Lambs love. Or it could be an
energy-draining exercise in
futility. Be certain your goals
are worth your efforts.

TAURUS (April 20 to,
May 20) The Divine Bovine
might be seeing red at having
your crisis-resolution efforts
overlooked. But others know
the truth, and they can be
expected to step forward
when the time comes.

GEMINI (May 21 to June
20) You should be well on
your way to finally making
that important decision.
Having the support of loved
ones will help when crunch
time comes. Keep a positive
attitude.

CANCER (June 21 to July
22) Feeling uneasy about a
move might not mean you're
having a case of Cancerian
wavering. It could be your
inner sense is warning you
to reassess your situation
before taking action.

LEO (July 23 to Aug.
22) Your pride could get in
the way of admitting you
might have erred. Best to
'fess up now before a small
mistake turns into a big
misunderstanding. Make the


ACROSS
1 Spasm
4 Greenish-
blue
8 - Bader
Ginsburg
12 Historic time
13 Mandlikova
of tennis
14 Birthright
barterer
15 Gilligan,
notably -
17 Immediately
upcoming
18 Veer
19 Bullwinkle's
foe
20 Emulate da
Vinci
22 Sketch
24 Shrek is one
25 Us
29 25-Across,
e.g.
30 Corridors


weekend a special family
time.

VIRGO (Aug. 23 to
Sept. 22) Trying to please
someone with a less-
than-glowing opinion of
something you value could
be a waste of time. If you like
it, stay with it. The week's
end brings an answer to an
old mystery.

LIBRA (Sep. 23 to Oct.
22) There might be time
to make a change. But be
honest with yourself: Is it
what you really want, or
one you feel pressured into
making? Your answer should
determine your next move.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23
to Nov. 21) Change is
dominant, but so is caution:
Proceed carefully, checking
each step along the way to
avoid encountering any
unwelcome surprises that
might be lurking along your
path.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22
to Dec. 21) It could be a
mistake to rely on someone
to keep his or her promise
without checking out
previous performances.
What you learn now could
save you from a painful
lesson later.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22
to Jan. 19) Taking a stand
on an issue you feel is too
important to ignore could
inspire others to follow suit.
The weekend is a good time
to socialize with old friends
and make new ones.


- King Crossword
31 Lubricant DOWN
32 Courtroom 1! Sleuth, for
punishment short
34 They give a 2 A Gershwin
hoot . brother
35 Forest trek 3 Rigid
36 Breathless- 4 Graph
ness? 5 Exhibit ennui
37 Bottom point 6 Literary .
40 Detail, for collection
short, 7 Aye undoer
41 Out of the 8 Fame
storm 9 Addict
42 Unable to 10 Urban
show transport
versatility 11 Shacks
46 Czech or 16 Melody
Pole 19 Ovine
47 -Session with vocabulary
a shrink 20 Spacecraft
48 Vast expanse compart
49 Stevenson ments
villain 21 Chills and
50 Make- fever
. meet 22 "La - Vita"
51 X rating?


23 Legislation
25 Tug hard
26 Sad
27 Marathon
fraction
28 "Born Free"
lioness
30 Estate
recipient
33 Rob
34 Mostly
Mideastern
cartel
36 Mimics
37 Doggerelist
Ogden
38 Partner in
crime
39 Out of play
40 Tafer
42 Commonest
English word
43 Thither
44 Witness
45 Erstwhile
M&M's hue


TI


-I


AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb.
18) Your sensitive nature
gives you an insight into the
problems of someone close
to you. Your offer of support
could be just what this person
needs to start turning his or her
life around.

PISCES (Feb. 19 to March
20) Financial matters continue
to need more analysis than
usual. Use caution with
investment possibilities. A
personal relationship might
take an turn by week's end.

BORN THIS WEEK:You
appreciate the wonders of the
world and enjoy sharing your
delight with others.
0 2009 King Features Synd., Inc.


by Linda Thistle

2 9 4
8 2 7
9 5 1 6
3 9 1
4 5 3
1 4 7
5 7 1
2 1 6
1 6 5
Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way
that each row across, each column down and each
small 9-box square contains all of the
numbers from one to nine.


* Moderate * * Challenging
*** HOO BOY!
02009 King Features Synd.. Inc.


� 2009 King Features Synd., Inc.


0 cs-ou


BY-
HENRY BOLTINOFF


-JlleUWs 1! Ue9l uo Mopu!M '9 'Bu*sslw s5! ueo lued
l-WS9 *jaun i ei peq'sn~q 't, 6ulsstw si -491 uo asnoH -C
bulssltu si qnjo I4100 -? pappu we sie un i souj-


� 2009 by King Features Syndicate, Inc.
World rights reserved.


)MM@n'Ri no nn mf�iffl(�


I - -


I














The Chamber is having a little work done...
And we wantyou to be one of the first
to benefit from r!

Please join our Co-Hosts:


Greenberg
Traurig


T" E MAYFLOWER


chART
IONDA '"',' * <.' "< , .


For a special Business .Afterhours!
Be the first to check out our fresh Cook and
discover the new opportunities for our -Members

Thursday August 20th
5:30-7:30 p.m.
W hiter Park W elbomn e Center
151 W estLyn an A-.nue
W inter Paik, FL 3 2 7 8 9
(Parkidg a ]vaibb atthe
Fameas eiM arket& CityHall)

* Enjoy cm plin entaiy drbks & hours dioeuvres
* Network w ith cmn m unity 3adems
* $5 frMembers/ $15 frNonMembe r


NoW Srving Mornin' Munlhis


Sat. $un.

1:00am - 12:00pm


Vj~uana V5oa~fa~t



gr C~hros





f~roa~fast Tacos


Ere~rch Toast



tMornin'





tmimosa5


$2.oo MAimo0a6


$ummtrnin flM. in Vornton ?rl

(401) fj~~


Noma Mc. in Ointro ar�


S . ?.












"Moving

Is An Investm(

For Ann and Donald Pau
The Mayflower means peo
mind. "We wanted to mak
our own plans for this ne:
phase of our lives, rather
depending on. our children
says Ann. "With healthcar
costs going up, moving to
The Mayflower was defin
a good investment for our



. . . " -


5.J
* .-*, . . .,:

-v ' !-^ '?.


44h
- Al. .~


To The Mayflower
ent In Peace Of Mind"


lsen,
ace of
ke
xt
than
n,"
re

itely
.r


.6


future. In a troubled economy,
who knows what long-term
care is going to cost several
years from now?"
If you're looking at retirement
living options, take a look at
The Mayflower It's a good
plan for the.future.
Call today to secure a spot
on our waiting list.

(407) 672-1620




THE MAYFLOWER
A Plan for the Future"'
1620 Mayflower Court
Winter Park, Florida 32792
N www.themayflower.com IC


ORL ANDX)




Observ~er


CT\
0
0
r-^
So
0
&
fs.
a
5
0-.
^
00

^


- --- ------


--


Winter Park/ Maitland Observer


Paae 16 hrdvAfs 1,20


,, ^.: ^,=
,. _ %i -&6ii


owii


"rk~C*




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2011 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated May 24, 2011 - Version 3.0.0 - mvs