Winter Park-Maitland observer
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00140
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park FL
Publication Date: 8/6/2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates: 28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613
System ID: UF00091444:00140

Full Text



Winter Park / Maitland


Volume 21, No. 32
407-740-0401 www.FirstColonyBank.net


FIRST COLONY-

-l -BANK
Your Real Hometown Bank
On Hwy 17-92 in Maitland
>LEN- Member FDIC


Mark on history


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK - THE OBSERVER
Col. Jack Morrison, who served in World War II, maintains that one of his men fired the last shots over Japan on Aug. 6, 1945.


Comm(n-, B n LJ I E)........A2
Business Briefs.... ...... A3
City Talks.............A5
Play On! ............ ..A12
Legals ..............A13
Marketplace............A14
Games.............. A15


KRISTY VICKERY
OBSERVER STAFF
It's August 6, 1945 in the
heart of WWII's conflict on
the Japanese front. A bomb
is about to explode that
will level a city and change
the course of history. High
in the skies above,- Col.
Jack Morrison is leading 16
fighter planes on a rocket
and strafing attack over the


ravaged country's southern
coast.
The 2,000 horsepow-
er F4U-4 Corsairs roared
across the skies filled with
eight rockets, 400 rounds
of .50-caliber ammunition.
and six machine guns.
Morrison, 92, Who was
a major in Marine Squad-
ron VMF-223 on Okinawa
remembers this particular
day for one reason. It was


the day the final shots of
World War II were fired and
President Harry S. Truman
ordered the nuclear attack
on Hiroshima.
On Aug. 15, six days after
the nuclear attack on Naga-
saki, Japan surrendered.
"My question is who fired
the final shots of World War
II?" Morrison asked.
> turn to VETERAN on A4


50&+ tax
Member FDIC


COMMERCE NATIONAL
BANK & TRUST
On the comer of 17-92 & Orange Avenue.
407-622-8181 * www.CNBT-FL.com


Teen shot,

killed by

police
JENNY ANDREASSON
OBSERVER STAFF
An 18-year-old was shot and
killed by Maitland Police on
Monday morning, Aug. 3, af-
ter he reportedly stabbed his
mother multiple times.
In the 911 call released
Tuesday, Di-
ana May, 60,
. tells dispatch-
ers she needs
,-. an ambulance
because she's
been stabbed
by her son, Al-
exander May,
May and he is look-
ing for another
weapon to further hurt her.
"My son is psychotic," she
said. "I should have taken
him to hospital I guess... I
can't believe he stabbed me,
but he stabbed me with a
butter knife."
According to the incident
report, police received an
emergency call at 7:30 a.m.
from a home on Dommer-
ich Drive regarding a fight
between the mother and
son. Diana told officers that
Alexander was stabbing her
with a butter knife, before
he picked up a barbecue
fork.


> turn to SHOOTING on A4


More musical chairs for police


JENNY ANDREASSON
OBSERVER STAFF
Another of Winter Park's
finest will join the Maitland
Police Department on Mon-
day.
Bill McEachnie, a 36-year
veteran of the Winter Park
Police Department, has ac-
cepted a job as deputy chief
of investigations in Mait-
land.
McEachnie and Maitland


Police Chief Doug Ball, for-
mer chief of Winter Park,
both volunteered to retire
from Winter Park in April
to help City Manager Randy
Knight cinch up the bud-
get. Ball received a $109,000
early retirement bonus, a
$100,000 yearly pension
and a $290,000 lump sum.
McEachnie received an
$86,000 bonus, an $89,000 PHOTO COURTESY OF THE CITY OF MAITLAND
Maitland Police Chief Doug Ball, center, swore in two deputy chiefs on Monday, Aug.
> turn to POLICE on A4 3, Bill McEachnie and Dave Manuel. McEachnie formally served the city of Winter Park.


0 94 9 22 95 6 42 2


Fairwater Dental Group
Dr. Gene T Jacobs is moving to a new state-of-the-art facility, located at
Fairbanks & Edgewater, directly across from Subway
NEW PATIENTS
NACCEPTED ' I407-299-4412
IT a # I H IOur current location is at 4460 Edgewater Dr. (Just north of Fairbanks.


Ce
't� . 0







Page 2 Thursday, August 6, 2009 Winter Park / Maitland Observer


News




Road repaving could fall to axe


ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER.STAFF.

Roads may get bumpier in
Winter Park if the City Com-
mission decides to do less
repaving to save money.
At one point two years
ago the city had been repay-
ing nearly 10 miles of road
per year. Now the city is pav-
ing only 5.5 miles per year,
and the results are becom-
ing more obvious, Mayor
Ken Bradley said at a July 27
budget meeting.
"I think people are go-
ing to be seeing a lot more


potholes around the city,"
he said. "And I think that's
symbolic."
In a budget struggle to
keep essential services, road
repaving had become a low-
er priority, Commissioner
Phil Anderson said.
"We haven't laid off any
firefighters; we haven't
laid off any policemen; we
haven't laid off any parks
workers. This is important,
but not more important
than public safety," he said.
"We're beating ourselves
up because we've cut back
down to 5.5 miles, and that's


just bull. We preserved our
services through tough eco-
nomic times."
Commissioner Margie
Bridges expressed fear that
the road repaving schedule
could be cut short indefi-
nitely due to a shrinking
budget.
"If you said to me that it's
only for this year because
the Commission is commit-
ted to bringing it back up
again, that's fine," she said.
"But that's not what I hear. I
want to make sure our roads
are paved."
To return to the city's


past level of repaving it
would cost about $295,000,
City Manager Randy Knight
said.
Bradley entertained the
idea of looking for other
ways to cut the budget in
order to maintain the roads
better. The city's image was
at stake, he said.
"If you're coming to this
city, you're going to expect
excellent fire, excellent po-
lice, paved roads and excel-
lent parks," he said. "To add
another couple hundred
thousand dollars to pave
a few more streets could


make a huge difference in
the life of our city."
The budget meeting was
just one in a series in which
the city is discussing its
2010 budget, while dealing
with a shrinking level of tax
income to pay for it.
Anderson said that a cut
like road repaving shouldn't
stress the Commission as
much .as other issues, but
that the city needs to find
money wherever it can.
"If we're going to relax,
this isn't the year to do it,"
Anderson said.


Panel discusses real estate ups and downs


CARMEN CARROQUINO
GUEST rr ,- - ,-

Packed into an elegant room like
well-dressed sardines in a can, a
panel of leading industry officials
got together to discuss the present
and future state of Florida's real es-
tate market.
The July 28 panel discussion,
titled "Central Florida: Where It Is,
Where It Is Headed," was hosted by
.the International Council of Shop-
ping Centers Orlando Local Pro-
gram Committee and moderated
by John Crossman of Crossman &
Company.
With themes of building rela-
tionships to overcome real estate
troubles and getting creative with
vacant spaces to save money, Cross-
man said to invest in people in these
trying economic times. He posed
the question: "If you can't invest in
relationships, what can you invest
in?"
The event, held at the Village at
Lake Lily in Maitland, featured pan-
elists Randy Anderson, chairman of
the UCF Real Estate Department;
Chris Brockman, a partner at the
Holland and Knight law firm in Mai-
tland;. Lonnie Peterson, chairman
of Cuhaci & Peterson architects in
Baldwin Park; and Declan Reiley,
vice president of business develop-
ment for the Metro Orlando Eco-
nomic Development Commission.


In a general consensus among
panelists that Central Florida is not
among the hardest-hit areas for
real estate woes, Reiley said that
"although we aren't in our hay, the
sky isn't falling; it may just be a lit-
tle lower." He continued to say that
numbers are good despite the cir-
cumstances.
Reiley and the Economic Devel-
opment Commission have created
more than 1,000 jobs in the Central
Florida area and are still opening a
few new projects, but are focusing
on projects coming in the next cou-
ple of years.
In looking at what some would
call the "death of the mall," Brock-
man said that we can't afford to
have property just sitting around
collecting dust.
With a combination of the words
"mall" and "evolution," Crossman
jokingly coined the word "mallu-
tion" to be used as the next phase
for mall properties that want to sur-
vive extinction.
Brockman opted for alternative
and more creative, non-traditional
uses for empty spaces, like keep-
ing the front of buildings in retail,
but utilizing the back for other
businesses like the Village at Lake
Lily property, which features retail
shops and restaurants on its exte-
rior and apartment and condomin-
ium living on its interior.
Peterson agreedwith Brockman's


-: E N . CA bminoUINU - ; .
The Village at Lake Lily was completed in Maitland this year. It was originally slated to contain condos.


view of vacant spaces as multi-pur-
pose and multi-functional opportu-
nities, as it was one of the themes of
the night. Peterson cited "remodel,
renovate and reuse", as a mantra to
follow. .
When it came to strengthening
relationships, Brockman used the
example of a tenant and landlord
to get his point across.
He said, "The tenant you have is
the best type to have," explaining
that keeping and building relation-
ships with clients is easier than find-


ing new ones. Brockman sent the
message that servicing and working
with one another will make things
better in the coming years.
The panelists spoke hopefully
about the future of the real estate
market and said that consumers
don't need to keep throwing away
good money, but instead need to
find creative ways to save.
Brockman said for right now,
"It's save your way to survive, not
save your way to prosperity."


Community


The Winter Park High School Sound
of the Wildcats Marching Band is
soliciting donations to purchase
a trailer to be used to transport the
band's equipment to football games,
competitions and other events. The
band, including color guard, has in-
creased in numbers from 148 mem-
bers two years ago to over 230 mem-
bers this year. Any donation would be
appreciated and tax deductible.
For more information on how you
can donate, please contact Joel
Moody, director of bands at 407-622-
3209 or by e-mail at joel.moody@
ocps.net; or Heather Buchanan, pub-


lic relations communications chair
for the WPHS band at wphs_band_
comm@yahoo.com.

The Polasek Museum seeks new
volunteers. Volunteer receptionists,
docents, gardeners, special events
volunteers, sculpture cleaners and a
gift shop coordinator are sought for
the 2009-2010 season. New volun-
teer.positions include a receptionist,
docents, gardeners, sculpture clean-
ers, etc.
In retum for their services, Polasek
volunteers are able to learn about the
life and works of Albin Polasek, at-


tend field trips and special presenta-
tions throughout the region, receive
invitations to special events and have
the satisfaction of being an important
part of one of Winter Park's cultural
treasures. New volunteers are asked
to call 407-647-6294 to set up a
training date and time.

Marshall & llsley Corporation (M&I)
has honored Loren Stanford with a
2009 Wings Award, recognizing her
dedication to serving the local com-
munity. "Wings," which stands for
Worthy Individuals Noted for Gener-
ous Service, is an annual program


that honors M&l employees for their
commitment and dedication as vol-
unteers in the community. M&I will
donate $500 to the Orlando Science
Center in Stanford's name.

Patrick Gaughn, a resident of Win-
ter Park, is spending the summer
interning for Conventures, Inc. in
Boston working in the public- rela-
tions/event planning/marketing field.

An Antique Tool Show will be held
from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday,
Aug. 15. The Mid-west Tool Collectors
Association and the Maitland Histori-


cal Society will host the event. Gen-
eral admission is $2. The event will
be held at the Maitland Civic Center,
located at 641 S. Maitland Ave. Call
Paul Mikula at 407-365-4686.

Making music for charity's sake,
the Encore! Cast Choir and Orches-
tra, a volunteer ensemble of nearly
300 Disney Cast Members, struck
a high note by raising a record
$35,000 for United Arts of Central
Florida. To learn more, visit www.en-
corecentral.org.


Page 2 TusaAgs ,20


Winter Park / Maitland Obse~rver







Winter Park I Maitland Observer Thursday, August 6, 2009 Page 3


Baldwin Park

Community Update

BY PAT JONES-PETRICK
MERCHANT'S ASSOCIATION


August to be a busy one


Wow, the month of July has
been hot and hoppin' here
in Baldwin Park!
. During July the Baldwin
Park Merchants hosted sev-
eral entertaining events.
The July -9 Art Stroll of
Baldwin Park was a huge
success with more than 50
artists painting and sculp-
turing live down New Broad
Street. Live music through-
out the evening made the
Art Stroll most enjoyable. Lo-
cal artists not only displayed
their work for viewing plea-
sure, but were able to sell
their artwork which says art
is alive and well in Baldwin
Park! Pedicabs transport-
ed people throughout the
Downtown Village Center
to create a festive evening.
The Baldwin Park Merchant
Association, The Arts Hub
and Images Auto Spa spon-
.sored the event.
The Baldwin Park Mer-
chant Association and Bull-
Fish hosted a "Business Af-
ter Hour" on July 23. There
were more than 80 attend-
ees from local businesses
from the Village Center, the
Neighborhood Offices and
the Live/Work businesses on
Lake Baldwin Lane. The new
Baldwin Park brochure was
unveiled and was very well-
received with plenty of in-
terest in the 2009/2010 edi-
tion already in production.
Attendees showed great en-
thusiasm for what has been
accomplished in Baldwin
Park thus far in 2009 and
for the upcoming events for
the remainder of the year. It
was a great opportunity for
business neighbors to meet,
socialize and network.


On July 31 Trish's Teas
hosted their Victorian After
Dark series from 6 p.m. to 9
p.m. featuring a viewing of
short films. The film "Coffee
or Tea" was filmed in Trish's
Teas by a group of talented
individuals from FullSail.
The story titled "Coffee or
Tea" was written by Andrew
Stoneham and will be en-
tered in an upcoming En-
zion Theater competition.
The screening of the film
was followed by a dialogue
with the writer/director ses-
sion, which provided great
fun for attendees to interact
with the Arts.
Now for August's activi-
ties!
Many of the merchants
will .be hosting summer
camps, art classes, dance
classes, story hour and kids
night out for the little ones
throughout the month of
August. So so check the cal-
endar of events for local
Baldwin Park activities.
On Aug. 19 at 9:30 a.m.
and 6 p.m., Tiny Toes Chil-
dren's Shoe Store will host
Kindermusik Playdate.
Space is limited to 12 chil-
dren per class and a com-
pleted registration form will
hold your spot. For more
info contact Kelly Johnston
at Tiny Toes Children's Shoe
Store at 407-228-2100.
Let's not forget the big
kids!
BullFish will be hosting a
couple of events in August:
On Aug. 7 from 5 p.m. to 8
p.m. itwill host "ANight with
the Dolly Mamas" to benefit
Easter Seals, and on Aug. 28
from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. it will
host "Dog Days of Summer


Wine and Beer Tasting" to
benefit the Sebastian Haul
Fund. BullFish is located at
4899 New Broad St., and
can be reached at 407-894-
3474.
Trish's Teas will be host-
ing a "Make-Your-Own
Purse" party on Aug. 20
from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Seat-
ing is limited so be sure to
reserve a spot by calling
the tea shop. Trish's Teas is
located at 4844 New Broad
St. and can be reached at
407-896-3155.
"Movie Night on the
Green" takes place at dusk
in the Village Center Court-
yard on the fourth Thurs-
day of every month. Each
month a local Baldwin Park
Merchant sponsors the
Movie Night which allows
the merchant to promote
their business throughout
the evening. July's Movie
Night sponsor was TinyToes
Shoes. Unfortunately, we
had to cancel due to rain so
check out the Web site for
the re-schedule date. Aug.
27 will be the date of the
next Movie Night, featuring
"Charlie and the Chocolate
Factory" with sponsorship
provided by BullFish and
Trish's Teas. Visit www.bald-
winparknetwork.com for
movie details.
Be sure to check out the
Baldwin Park Merchant
Association August Calen-
dar of Events to see what's
scheduled. For more infor-
mation on Baldwin Park
activities visit www.bald-
winparknetwork.com.
The next Art Stroll of
Baldwin Park is titled "To-
tally Tubular" and will be
held Oct. 16 from 6 p.m. to
9 p.m. Outr"Totally Tubular"
event has LocoMotion Bikes
donating bike frames with
local artists painting them
for charity. Decorated bike
frames will be auctioned/
raffled off with proceeds
going to Audubon Elemen-
tary School for much need-
ed art supplies. You won't
want to miss it.


Business


NAI Realvest recently negotiated a new lease for
10,069 square feet of retail space at Lake Howell Plaza,
located at 5445 Lake Howell Road in Winter Park.

Operation Bright Eyes is designed to maximize the
eyes and ears of Bright House Networks field service
representatives and other employees to easily identify
suspicious behavior and to quickly report criminal activi-
ties to the proper authorities.
Each of the company's more than 3,000 employees will
receive crime-watch training 'designed by Central Florida
Crimeline. Employees will also be equipped with a com-
prehensive list of emergency numbers to call. Current and
new employees will receive the training.

Debbie Lombardi Hill was elected- into the American
Heart Association Greater Southeast Affiliate board of
directors. She is slated to Chair the Strategic Health Ini-
tiatives Committee for the board during the association's
2009-2010 fiscal year.

Local attorneys Merrell Bailey, Hallie Zobel and David
Pilcher hosted a grand opening celebration and ribbon


cutting for their new law firm Bailey Zobel Pilcher, located
at 610 S. Maitland Ave.

Cuhaci & Peterson Architects, LLC, the Baldwin Park
based architectural firm, was recently awarded a
contract to design the South Lake Family Health Center
in Groveland off of State Road 50 and Groveland Farms
Road. The 13,650 square-foot facility is being developed
by Community Health Centers Inc. Construction of the fa-
cility is expected to start before the end of the year.

Hoyman Dobson is expanding its Winter Park office by
moving to the Baldwin Park Village Center irn Orlando. The
new office, located at 4767 New Broad Street, opened for
business on August 3.

Elizabeth Manno, Mary Stuart Day, Megan Cross, Jerry
Oiler and Sharon Helsby from Fannie Hillman and As-
sociates were awarded the "Five Star: Best in Client
Satisfaction" designation by Florida Homebuyer Orlando.
This award was based on client-satisfaction surveys sent
to 20,000 individuals.


FACEL


IFTS


FOR YOUR HOUSE!

Let MJS, INC. Designers/Planners
turn your current house into a DREAM HOME!
250 N Wymore Rd. Winter Park, FL 32789
Member American Institute of BDilding Design
407-629-671 1


Buy2

months

Get 2

months

FREE


Winter Park
Jazzercise
125 N. Interlachen Ave.
Winter Park
407-321-7761
www.jazzercise.com


Brandywine Square

* Courtyard Shopping * Sidewalk Cafe *
Located Just 10 Steps North of the Morse Museum
Brandywine Deli Cida's of Winter Park Antiques
-:,.. i . ,i:, wit-,,-, , ,liurq on the Avenue
t I|'.'y'' '!; t i3 " h, ', 1 ,, I, Tnr. I ,,I,,,al :ii ,i i.:, ,i:.17 riln ru Q l,ry rniju-.
[j iJh.Iul F 3 A, rue jrunCI e ,:,II -, I ne ."l H.3, ly Huj,, :n
, .-,,n, c,.,:,i,|.,,,ae ' 407.644-5635 407.657-2100

Family Comics & Cards Essence COMING SOON!
Salon & Day Spa Ultimate Fitness
. Ip.. '.T I 'iuy . .i , ..~a M ri,,i - .Fi,'L - �i by Yatska
," ,',,] * ,' , , '* I ' i f -li n :,,,,,- .f 1!a,,i-.W v , ini
","""'"1 " ' 407.629-2588 J 8.-:.'1i

COMING IN JULY! Winter Park Hair Studio Park Avenue Jewelers
Mauruarend Fine *" ,. i. I .. ,. i ,,.
Arts Gallery *, .

O' Spae- Thimble Works Grace Clinic
Avi e Chnshan C,.,ounseling
" i" Alle alr, ,n..:.n , for all )1
407-657-5555 or Winter Pa . ..
4 - 4 6 "- .'5I40 7 6 2 9'76 9 9 i7l l "....... .
07- . ,.. I.IIJ.


I


Thursday, August 6, 2009 Pg


Winter Park / Maitland Observer







Page 4 Thursday, August 6, 2009 Winter Park / Maitiand Observer


VETERAN I Mayflower resident dedicated 28 years to military


< continued from the front page

After much calculation, Morrison
believes the final shots were possibly
fired from one of the Corsairs he led
on the morning of Aug. 6.
"We were about 400 nautical miles
from Okinawa, one way," he said. "And
our time on the target, as I recall, was
about 9:30 in the morning on the 7th
(according to Japan time, which was
the 6th our time)."
He said the final shots fired were af-
ter the hydrogen bomb was dropped
on Hiroshima, at approximately the
time he remembers.
"When we got back to our base in
Okinawa, after about a five-and-a-
half hour flight - 800 miles up and
back - later that day President Tru-
man had announced the H-bomb
had been dropped on Hiroshima
that morning," he said. "So, shortly


after that the military authorities in
Okinawa indicted there would be no
more strikes on Japan."
It was unknown to Morrison that
the H-bomb was going to be dropped
at approximately the same time
he was on his air strike. He said he
thought it was just coincidental.
Although Morrison did not realize
it until some time after the war, he be-
lieves that the final shots had to have
come from one of his pilots that day.
"I submit that the final shots of
WWII were performed by the 16 pi-
lots of VMF-223 led by me, Col. Jack
W. Morrison," he said.
Although Morrison was never rec-
ognized with this honor, Gen. John
Raaen said he believes it is quite pos-
sible Morrison and his pilots could
have been the ones who fired the fi-
nal shots and vividly remembers how
much the end of WWII meant to him.


"It was a big celebration," Raaen
said. "It meant a lot to all of us who
celebrated - the wives because their
husbands weren't going back, and
their husbands because they weren't
going back."
As the anniversary of the end of
World War II approaches he proudly
reflects on the 28 years he dedicated
to his country.
"I flew the Corsairs about 1,200
hours, and did two tours of duty," he
said. "I have flown about 56 different
models of Navy and Marine aircraft,
including jets."
For Morrison the end of WWII will
be a day he will never forget. Although
he is leading a much quieter life than
he once led at the Mayflower Retire-
ment Community in Winter Park,
with his wife of 62 years, the flights of
his past are never far in his memory.


POLICE I Having Winter Park alum in Maitland may improve agency cooperation


< continued from the front page

pension and a $190,000
lump sum.
Ball took the top-cop
job in Maitland. on the
same day, replacing retiring
Chief Gary Calhoun, while
McEachnie began enjoying
his retirement, taking a trip
across the U.S. with his wife.
Meanwhile, in Maitland,
the PD's director of support
services retired and its ac-
creditation manager took
a job in Seminole County,


giving Ball the chance to
reorganize. He created two
deputy chief positions, one
for operations and one for
investigations, essentially
splitting the department in
two; a move he said will im-
prove efficiency.
When McEachnie saw
the job posting, he jumped
at that chance to work with
Ball again - and with an-
other Winter Park alum,
City Manager Jim Williams.
"My intention was to re-
tire," McEachnie said. "My
wife asked me, 'Are you


sure you want to go back to
work?'"
At age 55 with 36 years of
local experience and a new
police station coming on-
line in November, .McEach-
nie said he couldn't pass up
the opportunity to see what
he can bring to Maitland. He
will be sworn in on Monday
along with Dave Manuel,
who is being promoted
from senior commander to
deputy chief of operations.
The deputy chief of in-
vestigations position's sal-
ary was advertised - both


internally and externally -
at $56,588 to $86,216 annu-
ally. McEachnie will make
$80,473, the exact amount
that was budgeted for the
retired director's position,
Ball said. "There's no bud-
getary impact."
Both Ball and McEachnie
said McEachnie's joining
of the Maitland force will
only improve the ability for
Winter -Park and Maitland
to work together. Winter
Park's police chief deputy
chief worked under Ball
and McEachnie for their en-


tire careers, so they already
have a strong relationship.

"I see it as a win-win for
everybody," Ball said.
Winter Park Chief Brett
Railey agreed.
"With the great personal
and professional relation-*
ship this brings to the top
managers of both agencies,
joint opportunities will
present themselves for co-
ordinating our law enforce-
ment efforts," Railey wrote
in an e-mail.


SHOOTING I 911 call recounts moments leading up to officer-involved shooting


< continued from the front page

Officer Steve Mendez fired his
gun three minutes after police ar-
rived on scene, killing. Alexander,
police said. Diana May was admit-
ted to the hospital with multiple
stab wounds to her torso. Her con-
dition listing was upgraded from
critical to stable on Tuesday.
In the 911 call audio, Diana tells


the dispatcher that she is bleeding
badly from her arm and her son is
looking for another weapon.
"Stop it!" Diana is heard saying.
"He's got something else! Stop it!
... I can't believe he did this. I don't
know what's wrong with him."
The dispatcher tells her to lock
herself in a room and asks if there
are any guns in the house, and Diana
says no. Seconds later she screamed


"Don't do it! Don't do it! No!" and
there is the sound of phone keys
being pressed and then the line is
disconnected.
Maitland Police Officer Michael
Lozada, who escorted the fire de-
partment into the home, wrote
in a report, that blood was "every-
where."
"Upon my arrival to the bed-
room, I noticed even more blood


... inside the bathroom I observed
two bodies laying on the floor in a
pool of blood," he wrote.
Officer Mendez has been placed
on administrative leave, which is
standard protocol. The Florida De-
partment of Law Enforcement was
still investigating the case as of 5
p.m. Tuesday.
Alexander graduated from Win-
ter Park High School in May.


SWinter Park/Maitland

Observer


PUBLISHER
Kyle Taylor
407-563-7009
kyle@observernewspapers.com

ASSOCIATE EDITOR
Jenny Andreasson.
407-563-7026
jennya@observemewspapers.com

DESIGNER
Stephanie Erickson
407-563-7040
stephanie@observernewspapers.com


Established.in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster
CONTACTS


REPORTERS
- Jenny Andreasson
407-563-7026
jennya@observernewspapers.com

Isaac Babcock
407-563-7023
isaacb@observernewspapers.com

LEGALS I CLASSIFIED
Jonathan Gallagher
407-563-7058
legal@observernewspapers.com


COPY EDITORS
Jonathan Gallagher
jgallagher@observemewspapers.com

Jenny Andreasson
jennya@observernewspapers.com

COLUMNISTS
Chris Jepson
Jepson@MediAmerica.us


Volume 21, Issue Number 32


Josh Garrick
407-304-8100

ADVERTISING SALES
Tracy Craft
407-515-2605
tcraft@observemewspapers.com


Louis Roney
LRoney@cfl.rr.com


Member of: P.O. Box 2426 1500 Park Center Dr.
* Florida Press Association Winter Park, FL 32790 Orlando, FL 32835-5705 -USPS 00-6186
* Maitland Area/Winter Park/ ISSN 1064-3613
Goldenrod Chamber of Commerce www.wpmobserver.com I 407-563-7000 I e-mail: editor@observernewspapers.com ISSN 1064-3613
Publisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor. Submission does not guarantee publication. All rights reserved.
Winter Park / Maitland ObserverO 2009


WE




Mr. Paul S. Williams,
45, of Orlando, Fla. died
Tuesday, July 28, 2009.



Mrs. Madeline J.
Brown, 83, of Oviedo,
Fla. died Wednesday, July
29, 2009.



Obituary informa-
tion was obtained from
Golden's FuneralHome
in WinterPark.


Published Thursdav. Ainu t 6 .200Q


--~I


I UUIKUINUU I NIUIOUU~v PUMUOL Us ALUUZ


Page 4 Thursday, August 6, 2009


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


i







Winter Park / Maitland Observer Thursday, August 6, 2009 Page 5


Aug. 7 City Comission
work session
There will be a City Com-
mission Work Session on
Friday, Aug. 7, from 8-9:30
a.m. in City Hall Commis-
sion Chambers to discuss
the FY 2010 budget.
The public is invited to
attend, however no public
comment will be taken.

Aug.10 CRA
agency meeting
There will be a CRA Agency
meeting on Monday, Aug.
10, at 2 p.m. in City Hall
Commission-Chambers.

City Commission
meeting topics
There will be a City Com-
mission meeting on Mon-
day, Aug. 10, at 3:30 p.m.,
in City Hall Commission
Chambers. Below are a few
topics of interest:
MAYOR'S REPORT:
-Proclamation - Full
Sail's 20th Anniversary.
-Fireman's Fund Insur-
ance Heritage Grant pre-
sentation.
-The role of chairperson.
-2009 Mayor appoint-
ments.
CONSENT AGENDA:
-Approve the minutes of
7/27/09.
-Approve award of debris
monitoring services to Beck
Disaster Recovery, Inc.
-Approve award of Cady
Way restroom project to
C&S Technical Resources,
Inc.
-Fleet Peeples Park "Ap-
peal" from Ms. Bonnie Jack-
son.
ACTION ITEMS REQUIR-
ING DISCUSSION:
-A potential ordinance
establishing succession of
alternates on boards and
commissions which can


have quasi-judicial and
land development duties.
(Pending response from At-
torney General's office.)
-Potential ordinances)
creating the number of
regular members on boards
and commissions which
can have quasi-judicial du-
ties. Also, the elevation of
current alternates to regu-
lar members as part of the
initial transition. (Pending
response from Attorney
General's office.) (NOTE:
This item has been tabled
from a previous City Com-
mission meeting with both
a motion and second.)
-Resolution 1978-07:
The policies governing the
City Commission meetings.
-City Attorney selection.
-Possible rezoning of the
current post office property
back to the public, quasi-
public.
-Seeking an extension or
modification of the agree-
ment with the post office.
-Proposed use of the post
office property.
-Post office zoning
change. (Mayor Bradley)
-Post office possible re-
location sites/fund raising.
(Commissioner Dillaha)
PUBLIC HEARINGS:
-Resolution - Setting
forth the city's intent to use
the uniform ad valorem
method of collection of
a non-ad valorem assess-
ment for properties within
the Forrest Hills Plat abut-
ting Fawsett Road, Glencoe
Road, Dana Way, Lake Chel-
ton Circle, Rockwood Road
and West Reading Way, to
fund the installation of un-
derground electrical/BHN
facilities.
-Appeal of MFT Enter-
prises of Winter Park Inc.
contesting the city building
and zoning official's inter-
pretation and enforcement


of Article III, "Zoning" of
Chapter 58 of the city's
Land Development Code
regarding the provisions of
Section 58-64 for noncon-
forming uses relating to the
denial by the city for the
use of the property at 2190
W. Fairbanks Ave., zoned
C-3, for the sale of motor
vehicles as applied to the
provisions of the code re-
garding nonconforming
uses.
-First reading of the ordi-
nance to adopt new public
notice and adoption proce-
dures for Comprehensive
Plan amendments and also
adopting an updated Public
Participation Plan.
-Second reading of the
ordinance to adopt new
public notice procedures
for annexations to the City
of Winter Park.
NEW BUSINESS (CITY
COMMISSION):
-Charter review. (Mayor
Bradley)
-Winter Park city perfor-
mance indicators. (Mayor
Bradley)
You can find the Com-
mission's full agenda and
information on specific
agenda items by logging on
to the city's official Web site
at www.CityofWinterPark.
org and clicking on Gov-
ernment > City Commis-
sion > Packets.

Decontamination
equipment in city
On Friday, Aug. 7 at 10 a.m.,
the City of Winter Park
will demonstrate how its
partnership with Aero-
Clave LLC can help stop
the spread of disease and
infection. According to the
Center for Disease Control
and the U.S. Department
of Health and Human Ser-
vices, healthcare-associated
infections (HAIs) such as
MRSA and other contagious
viruses and bacteria:
-are one of the leading,
most preventable causes of
morbidity and mortality in
U.S.;
-are the cause of over
100,000 deaths per year;
-can cost in excess of $45


The City of Maitland has ex-
celled at keeping our com-
munity moving forward,
even in the worst of times.
Maitland has kept projects
moving ahead with the
completion of The Village
at Lake Lily, the anticipated
completion of the Meta-
vante building in Maitland
Center, and the completion
of the extensive renova-
tions of the magically trans-
formed 'Q' apartments.
These projects, along


with others currently un-
der construction, such as
Maitland Concourse South
on Maitland Boulevard,
will help bridge the gap
between the worst of times
and better times ahead.
Although employment will
get worse before it gets bet-
ter, there is hope that this
current economic crisis is
turning.
Maitland's strategic
planning throughout the
years has prepared us for


this moment. We have
brought forth a balanced
budget that will not raise
our tax rate and will lower
the property tax burden to
our residents.
But, although our city is
committed to keeping proj-
ects moving forward that
will positively impact our
revenue base, political and
economic forces are mak-
ing it increasingly difficult
to sustain our financial suc-
cess over time.
Tax reform, welcomed
by our taxpayers, could
not have ever anticipated
the looming crush the
economy has suffered over
the past year. Rollbacks,
Amendment 1, and caps in
residential and commercial
properties have strained
the revenue sources for
most municipalities and
counties at a time when
they can least afford the hit.
Maitland has literally


hundreds of millions of dol-
lars of projects that will be
completed this year, and
the anticipated affect on
our tax base was expected
to come next. Back when
projects such as The Village
at Lake Lily were approved,
the justification in part, was
that the City would realize
the tax boost when they
were completed.
The realities of today
are such that-projects like
The Village and the 'Q' will
take many more months
and probably years before
all the apartments will be
leased. But property tax
revenues are based on as-
sessments which take into
account the level of income
being driven by the prop-
erty as of January 1. And
given a cap in property tax
assessments of non-home-
steaded property of ten
percent, the tax benefit to
our city may not be realized


in its entirety next year, and
will most likely take ten
years to realize the financial
gain, when the entire ben-
efit was originally expected
in one.
Maitland has succeeded
in protecting our quality of
life in every way by keep-
ing our taxes low and by
continuing to move proj-
ects forward that will have
a positive impact on our
financial future. We have
done a great job at bridg-
ing the gap by keeping our
projects moving forward in
anticipation of timely addi-
tional revenues. I just hope
the bridge we are standing
on reaches all the way to
the other side.

Call City Hall at
407-539-6200 and visit us
at ItsMyMaitland.com


Maitland City Talk
lBl BY DOUGLAS T. KINSON
MAYOR


Bridging the financial gap


billion per year.
The revolutionary new
system that AeroClave has
produced can mitigate this
threat of HAIs and even
contagious pathogens such
as H1N1 influenza (swine
flu) to our city's first re-
sponders, hospitals, health
care workers and citizens.
This is accomplished
through the complete de-
contamination of both
the interior and exterior
of large assets such as air-
planes, ambulances, emer-
gency vehicles, police cars
and hospital rolling stock,
such as stretchers and
wheelchairs, in less than
two hours.
AeroClave's system can
save billions of dollars in
stopping the spread of
HAIs, it allows leaders to
take a proactive approach
to global healthcare, it in-
creases preparedness for
pandemic influenza and
bioterrorism, and protects
the health of emergency
personnel, patients and
hospitals.
For more information,
please visit AeroClave's of-
ficial Web site www.Aero-
Clave.com.

Quarterly fuel
adjustments
Effective Aug. 1, the city's
fuel adjustment (for the
August - October quarter)
was raised an average of
.447( per kWh, which will
increase residential bills
by about 2 percent and
commercial bills by 3 to 4
percent depending on con-
sumption.
Historically, the city has
adjusted fuel adjustment
charges annually. In order
to more quickly adjust to
changes in fuel cost and to
minimize dramatic changes
to our customers' bills,
the city will make fuel ad-
justments quarterly. Fuel
revenues are used solely to
cover city fuel expenses.

Winter Park hosting
reach out event
The city is hosting an infor-


national back-to-school
kick-off event on Saturday,
Aug. 15, from 10 a.m. to
2 p.m., at the Winter Park
Community Center Pool,
located at 721 W. New Eng-
land Ave.
There will be games, mu-
sic, a moonwalk, commu-
nity center construction in-
formation and registration
for the back to school drive
on Aug. 22 - a necessity in
order to participate.
For more information,
please call 407-599-3275.

Community Center
construction
The city has begun prepara-
tions for the construction
of a new community cen-
ter. Beginning Aug. 18, all
structured programming
will be moved to the Azalea
Lane Recreation Center lo-
cated at 1045 Azalea Lane.
The pool will remain open
weekends only during Au-
gust and the gym and ten-
nis courts will remain open
until mid-November. By
December, all areas of the
community center will be
completely closed due to
construction.
A new school bus stop
will be determined at a lat-
er date. Killarney Elemen-
tary bus stop will now be at
Hannibal Square Heritage
Center. For all other school
bus stop locations, please
contact Orange County
Public Schools.
At Azalea Lane, the game
room will be open Mon-
day thru Friday, 6-9 p.m.;
Saturday and Sunday 1-6
p.m. Azalea Lane will re-
main available for rental
opportunities during this
time period. For questions
regarding the community
center or the temporary re-
location of the community
center programs to Azalea
Lane, please call 407-599-
3275.

Call City Hall at
407-599-9933 and visit us
at CityofWinterPark.org


Thursday, August 6, 2009


Winter Park/ Maitland Observer


I


Page 5












Lifestyles



ai�tl .o -.l a .s '. l,-.f.... sf
..- . .... -, -U., I w JL " ,- . . . ..- . r,-.l. ' -lk"-" . '. " : .


KARE.IMCENANY-PHILLIPS


RoMI t heI n


The-viewfromn thewidefront . Maitland Historical Society can conduct a lecture and book
porch of The Cottage at Lake be reached at www.maitland- signing. RSVP 407-644-2451
Lily :'as serene, beckoning history.org or 407-644-2A51.
visitors to leave the rush .
of( SlHiowayY 17-92 and At 5:30 p.m. on Sept. 15 at the
retur :to a genteel time of Upcoming September Events: Maitland Historical Museum,
quiet gatherings and simple .. At noon on Sept. 9 at The Cot- there will be a Maitland Cham-
ire'xatlon.. . tage at Lake Lily, the Society ber of Commerce Business
SFragrant magnolia and will introduce the new book After-Hours and the Telephone
gardenia trees,statelypalms, "Images of America: Maitland" Museum grand re-opening.
oaks and colorful gardens - a pictorial history of Maitland Re-visit the Telephone Museum
nestled around the a lel- , a to
low cottage, while squirrels coauthored by the Society. and see its new interactive ex-
played on the sloping lawn Lead author Leslie Poole will hibit components.
and ducks waddled by Lake
Lily's bubbling fountain.
The Maitland Historical
Society unveiled the cottage
- the city's newest project - .
at a private viewing Wednes- Outreach programs visit- attended the Sunday MI -.
day, Aug. 5, where about 50 " ing schools with "Carpen- larid.. Farmer's - Mariet:.
invited guests celebrated the, ter Crew on the Go" and walked up the brick .1t
renovation up close. . a Maitland history. sleuth and front steps, paused i
Executive Director An-... programsponsoredby the the.pb and'pe
drea Bailey Cox said the city-. . Rot - o.:, -
Lowned cottage, which was









ite e9Hhsigcill be essedin c weeru aqua 1 ow Museum "t ade f eAiv fc at ve the
-'sed by':th;e, civic. paint fro chair railing thu ence co.mp,.shed it wt e see
61galizatil)ris aLd pste^ ceiling balanced with Musentand th e C fty a Jar5e job and i see� it .oUNei ecftoh .of
rentals such s. b l p hltv wainscoting dowin to Shiop Museunm.- Complted from begLn- *: kt ltc :a^ mu-
bysho tcad l dark wood floors, Light MEIS co^d ts several.n*g to cid was very re- *.& 4 dNnd
celebrrtons, the _ Citi et Aed in from the French educational programs in- wai-dng Beat sabe .!. 'b^ i^ibe nich
isaad Iwto a and windows a- clding Victorian eas de- TheMailandtr
ed with tie bcJ floor- signed for. children ay*1 fqr Isc *
7!res whe a kitch- adults a0d thiaa
sl rage aett e ank Crew progratn w .ie* kid







ein beautiful Central Florida. Established in 1999, with a vision for






I ttlT "TO Pt.OYI "TIl 0 KI Y providing our clients un-parallel professionalism, quality, and trust in
de L....,-. _






















the building industry. Our clients can rest assured, knowing that by
S-. ' choosing us, their project is being built by, The best hands in the
Piano Viol , Cello Guita business." We provide a wide range of building and building related
S' ..services for projects of varying scope, size, budget , and complexity.
l s..reputation was built by our clients. Posey Contracting Group,.










Sr om . experience the passionate pursuit of building excellence





FOR INFORMATION & REGISTRATION
"- w- t,- w-a.. d .. .. ...TA


I W-1


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Paae6 ThrdaAqut6,20


10ai an ,


IL q


WWW. LJZLJAL.LL)BAL;LNNL' LLj-l- .%-AALV






VVIIILI dl./ I lYIdlLIlu.a stJUd;,lvagr;e


G.O.



.Fa ily


For Greater Orlando's -


The summer of tiny artists


Happenings at the Maitland
Public Library (501 S. Maitland
Ave.):
Storytime for Babies & Toddlers
will be held at 10:30 a.m. on
Thursday, Aug. 6.
Second Saturday Program: End
of Summer Fun will be at 4 p.m. on
Saturday, Aug. 8. End the summer
with ice cream. Registration is
required.
Bedtime Stories & Crafts will be
held at 7 p.m. on Monday, Aug. 10.
All ages are welcome.
Storytime for Preschoolers will
be held at 10:30 a.m. on Tuesday,
Aug. 11.
-Making Shadow boxes with
Madeleine" will take place from
1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. on Tuesday,
Aug. 11. Participants will provide
personal treasures to represent
their subjects in a memory shadow
box. Basic supplies furnished.
Registration is required.
Culture Club: Canada will be
held at 4 p.m. on Wednesday,
Aug. 12. First-graders and up
participants will learn about the
country of Canada. Registration is
required.

Events at the Orlando Science
Center (777 East Princeton St.):
The Adventures of Mr. Potato
Head is open through Aug. 16.
Join Mr. Potato Head for a Spud-
tacular adventure in Ihis hands-on
exhibit. The spud that everyone
loves will lead guests on numerous
fun and educational activities and
adventures designed to develop
school readiness and academic
skills for young children. It is based
on developmental milestones set
by the National Association for the
Education of Young Children and
national academic standards. Call
407- 514-2000 or visit www.osc.
org for more information.
Rock N' Roll Laser Lights Show
called "Light Up Your Night" is
held every Saturday through Aug.
22. The laser light shows playing
from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. features
classic rock content that may not
be suitable for children ages 11
and younger. Parental discretion
is advised. Please be aware that
these shows are very loud. Ear
plugs are available from the show
attendants. There is also a family-
. friendly show at 6 p.m. entitled
Cozmic Kidz Lazer Jam. Call 407-
514-2000 or visit www.osc.org
for more information.
For information on Orlando
Science Center School Break
Camps & Classes contact their
Education and Public Outreach
Department at 407-514-2112, or
e-mail classesf''osc.org.


BRITTNI JOHNSON

Think your child
could be the next
Picasso? Let them
spend the rest of
summer and their
after-school hours
honing their skills
at one of the area's
art centers. Classes
focus on everything
from clay sculpting
to graphic design
with programs for
every age. Check out
some of the places
happy to help your
child cover your
fridge with paint-
ings and grace your
shelves with vases:
The Maitland Art Center,
located at 231 W. PackWood
Ave., is hosting an art camp
for children ages 6 through
12. The instructors will be
teaching pottery, painting,
photography, illustration
and multicultural art. "We
have good teachers and
a good variety of classes,"
said Ann Colvin, education
coordinator for the center.
The Weeklong'camp session
"is on the week of Aug. 10
and is from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
The price for the camp is
$225 a week for Art Center
members and $250 a week
for nonmembers. Contact
Coh'in at 407-539-2181 or
acolvin@itsmyma it land.
corn to register your child.
For more information, visit
www.maitlandartcen ter.
org.


The Crealde School of
Art, located at 600 Saint
Andrews Blvd. in Winter
Park, is offering several'art
camps for children ages 5 to
17. The classes range from
painting, drawing, creat-
ing clay sculptures and car-
toon drawing. "Our classes
are small, so kids get lots of
individual attention," said
Robin Berrie, marketing
manager for Crealde. The
camps are from Aug. 24 to
Oct. 3. Most are on Satur-
day, though some are of-
fered on weekdays during
after school hours. The cost
ranges from $90 to $155 for
members and $110 to $175
for non members. For more
information, visit www.cre-
alde.org. To register your
child, call 407-671-1886 or
- e-mail Vivian Blanford at
vblanford@crealde.org.
The Artistic Hand Gal-
lery, located at 353 N. Cen-
tral Ave. in Oviedo, hosts a
variety of weekly classes for
children ages 5 and up and


their parents. The classes
include painting and draw-
ing, working with clay and
a class specifically for par-
ents and their children to
work together on art. Del
Seaman, the owner of the.
gallery, said that his'parent
and child classes set him
apart from other places of-
fering instruction. "It gives
a parent the chance to
work with their child on. a
creative level - they learn-
so much about their child."
The classes .are sLx weeks
long and begin on Sept. 14..
The cost for classes start at
$125. To register your child
and for more information,
call Seaman at 407-366- -
7882.
The Casselberiry Art
House, located at 127 Quail
Pond Circle. offers sev-.:
eral art classes this fall for
children ages 6 to 12. The'
classes are six weeks long,.
start at $50 for the whole
session, and include paint-
ing, drawing and cartopn-


S, ISAAC BABCOCK- , I .
It's time to get creative, with classes being offered for kids all over Central Florida, providing summer fun plus artistic learning.


ing. "We have top notch in-
structors and we keep the
cost down, making art af-
fordable to take," said Linda
Moore, recreation coordi-
nator for the art house. The
first classes.start on Aug. 4
and go through September.
For m6re in formation visit
www.casselberryorg or call
407-262-7700, ext. 1301.
The Arit Studio of Lake
Mary-School of ArM, wlocat-
ed at 241 N. Country b
Road. hosts a. variety -of
weekly classes for children
ages 5 and up. The classes
include painting, drawing.
cartooning and graphic de-
sign. The classes are all year
long, an.tmoQnthjy sessions
are 4$108 for elementar y-
aged children and $130 for
Older childrenn. ' he ex-
posure I: unlimited," said
ownerStclath aiore. "We
oarnifnue t0? 1plere .Iw
optJ <,lesy . a d .tech
niques with the ihi~dren.-'
For mor inifotratldn and
to register you chid, vift
www. artstudiolakemiary.
com or call:407-330-1134.
The Sparldk! Family En-
-richment Cenzter, located
at 5965 Red Bug Lake Road
in Winter Springs, is of-
:fering a general art after-
school class on Wednes-
days. The class will focus
on first drawing with pen-
cil and gradually move up'
to oil pastels, watercolors
And more. The session is six
weeks long. starts on Aug.
26, and costs S12 a class. Yobu
may attend all or just one of
the classes. "Our teacher is
nurturing and understand-
ing of the children - she
really pulls the creative side
out of them," said Megan
Tingle, office manager for
the center. For more infor-
mation and to register your
child, visit www.sparkec.net
or call 40--0-9-'-75.


I


Thursday, August 6, 2009 Pg


Mlintor PXiri / Miitlinrl (-)bprvpr


F









THRIVE @ 55 AND BEYOND!



1 rik 7 server


W


BRITTNI JOHNSON
GUEST REPORTER

Barbara Barila used the large
space in front of the projec-
tion screen as if it were a real
bowling alley, taking long,
quick strides, tiny remote
held in both hands close to
her chin as if it were a real
bowling ball. Her arm fol-
lowed through, ending in a
straight aim for the middle
pin. All 10 toppled on the
screen.
"I can see how it could be
addictive," Barila said.
Barila was participat-
ing in a new program at
the Maitland Public Library
specifically for seniors. The
library set up a Nintendo
Wii - a video game console
that transforms the player's
physical movements into
virtual ones with a remote -
on a large projection screen
with lots of room to move.
At first Barila looked at
the small, white remote


ii gets

with a bit of uncertainty
as she received instruction
from a teen volunteer. But
once she figured out what
button to push, her real-life
experience in bowling was
all she needed to snag her
first strike. Barila jumped
and cheered, the remote in
a grip no teenager a quarter
her age could break.
"At first I was afraid and a
little apprehensive; there's a
fear of failure," Barila said.
"But then I was getting into
it. I liked the challenge."
This was the second time
the library hosted Wii for se-
niors, an idea Public Servic-
es Librarian Melissa Phillips
came up with after hearing
about its popularity at se-
nior centers. Plus, many of
the library's patrons are se-
niors, so she recognized a
need for more senior pro-
gramming at the library.
"It's a fun thing for them
to feel active and alive,"
Phillips said.


seniors moving
r


U I UUUU Y L 'n J� I Ul- 10IUtrnUflU.UUi- MUbupKV
Video games are no longer child's play, with seniors getting in on the fun, playing Nintendo to improve mobility and coordination.
That activity is what to get up, get moving, and Phillips said that at one
many are buzzing about. participate in things they
The Wii is a way for seniors otherwise wouldn't. > turn to WIl on next page


Prepare your estate


before it's too late


ROBYN SIDERSKY

When a loved one is lost, the last
thing anyone wants to deal with is
a mountain of paperwork.
Avoid this by getting your affairs
in order before it's too late, said At-
torney Hallie Zobel, of Maitland-
based firm Bailey Zobel Pilcher
PLC. Zobel identified four key doc-
uments families need to fill out to
ensure a smooth process.
When someone is sick, they are
able to grant "power of attorney".
to someone else. This person is able
to handle the sick person's affairs
- including legal and financial
matters.
When someone is unable to
make medical decisions, a "health
care surrogate" is appointed to
make those decisions for them.
Alivingwill is also necessary. This
instructs family members about a
person's wishes when they are not
of sound mind and cannot make
their own decisions concerning
their health. This specifies whether
a doctor should keep a person alive
artificially or let them go.
The last document - and pos-
sibly the most important one - is
the will. This spells out the person's
final wishes when it comes to all of
their property.
Zobel said this document should
be as specific as possible to avoid
misinterpretation when the time
comes to read it.
Also, it's never too early to start
planning. In fact, financial planner
Scott Cadwell said a person should


start when they begin working and
building a family.
It's key to build a relationship
with your attorney and a financial
planner, he said.
Cadwell said a will and other
documents should be updated ev-
ery two to five years, and with every
life change.
One of the main issues he sees
is people trying to work things out
themselves. This is dangerous, he
said, because there are always pit-
falls.
There are a few specific tips he
offered for families when planning.
They should be sure that all assets
are titled correctly to avoid having
to go through the state where mat-
ters could be handled in court.
He also said to be sure the bene-
ficiaries are listed everywhere nec-
essary; this includes banks. If your
bank has merged with another - a
plausible occurrence in this eco-
nomic climate - make sure all in-
formation is updated.
Everyone who is granted a status
- beneficiary, power of attorney,
health care surrogate, etc. - should
know where they stand and have
copies of important paperwork.
Communication can be the big-
gest obstacle in estate planning.
Everyone - including the attorney
and certified financial planner -
needs to communicate to make the
process run smoothly.
"The bottom line is that it's im-
portant to make certain that both
generations are talking to each
other," Cadwell said.


"Niovng To To The Mayflower
Is An Investment In Peace Of Mind"


.tor Ann and Donald Paulsen,
The Mayflower means peace of
mind. "We wanted to make
our own plans for this next
phase of our lives, rather than
depending on our children,"
says Ann. "With healthcare
costs going up, moving to
The Mayflower was definitely
a good investment for our


5�� '.?t*:


future. In a troubled economy,
who knows what long-term
care is going to cost several
years from now?"
.If you're looking at retirement
living options, take a look at
The Mayflower It's a good
plan for the future.
Call today to secure a spot
on our waiting list.

(407) 67241620




THE NIAYFLO\FR
A Plan I'.r t, Future
1620 Mayflower Court
Winter Park, Florida 32"92
www.themavyflower.com
;,-, - ,,,;.


W"`-~-~- -I- - I - - I


Page 8 Thursday, August 6, 2009


Winter Park / Maitland Observer







Winter Park / Maitland Observer ThursdayAugust 6, 2009 Page 9


Canes can raise risk of painful falls


by Matilda Charles

Seniors who use walkers or canes have
a much greater risk of injury from falls
than those who don't use them. A survey
of hospital emergency-room records of-
fers some statistics:
-Injuries involving walkers accounted
for 87 percent of falls. Canes accounted
for 12 percent.
-Women had more injuries than men,
and walkers were the worst culprits: 78
percent of women were injured in walker
falls, versus 22 percent of the men.
-A third of those injured in a fall end-
ed up being admitted to the hospital.
-Sixty percent of the falls happened
at home, and there were five times more
falls from tripping than from slipping.
Here are some steps to reduce the risk
of a fall, even if you don't use a walker or
a cane:
- Get your eyes checked at least once
a year. As our vision changes, what once
worked in our homes might be danger-


ous to us now.
* Don't let newspapers or books stack
up by the reading chair. Keep things off
the floor and keep paths cleared of any-
thing you have to step around or over.
* Use double-sided tape to hold down
scatter rugs. (Best bet: Get rid of them.)
* Increase the lighting in your home,
and turn on a lamp at the wall switch by
the door instead of walking into a dark
room.
* Wear sturdy shoes. Slippers can be
slippery.
One big problem with falls is that the
first one sets up a fear of falling again.
That in turn may limit mobility and exer-
cise, which in turn decreases our flexibil-
ity and strength - which can cause even
more falls.
The best bet, then, is to avoid that first
fall. If you need help clearing out your
space or making changes, ask for it.
Matilda Charles regrets that she cannot personally an-
swer reader questions, but will incorporate them into her
column whenever possible.
Write to her in care of King Features Weekly Service, P.O.
Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475, or send e-mail to
columnreply@gmail.com. Copyright 2008 King Features
Synd., Inc.


Senior


In July 7-Eleven convenience
stores launched a new military vet-
erans franchise program that offers
discounted franchise fees to retired or
separated veterans of the U.S. Armed
Forces who have been honorably
discharged from the service. Quali-
fied veterans who become first-time
7-Eleven franchisees will receive a 10
percent discount on the initial fran-
chise fee for the first 7-Eleven store
they franchise. This discount can
range from $1,000 to about $35,000,
depending on the store. Retail loca-
tions available for franchising are
available in 30 states across the U.S.
Visit www.franchise.7-eleven.com for
stores available for franchising.
Avalon Park Group has set its sights
on developing a model facility in its
town center for adult independent
and assisted living, with construc-
tion expected to start early next year.
The first phase will include 140,000
square feet of space with 130 living
units at a cost of about $21 million.
Ultimately the facility will
include 265,000 square feet of space
at an estimated cost of $35 million.
Cuhaci & Peterson Architects, LLC of


Bulletin


Orlando has been named the proj-
ect's architect, and SanMar Manage-
ment Associates of New York City will
provide operations and management
services.
The Maitland Senior Center will
serve as a counseling site for the
Florida Department of Elder Affairs'
SHINE (Serving. Health Insurance
Needs of Elders) program beginning
Friday, Aug. 14. The program will help
elders make informed decisions about
their health insurance. For the grand
opening, SHINE volunteers will be on-
site to deliver a special presentation,
provide assistance and more from 1
p.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the Maitland Se-
nior Center, 345 S. Maitland Ave. Call
407-539-6251 for more information.
Drs. Rob Winter and Manuel Perez
are pioneering a cutting edge,
minimally invasive treatment for a
deadly type of vascular disease in
central Florida. Abdominal aortic an-
eurysms (AAA) are the 13th leading
cause of death in those 55 years and
older. With 17 percent of the Florida
population over 65 years, this is a top
concern.


?
''
$1
"
ti ?"ttt?
" "


< continued from last page
Wii meeting, a woman that
had never played or seen a
Wii got five straight strikes
when she tried bowling.
"She was very excited,"
Phillips said. "She used to
bowl, but had to give it up
because the balls got too
heavy for her."
This is a way for seniors
to get active not only physi-
cally, but mentally as well.
"It keeps their minds ac-
tive because- they're learn-
ing new things," Phillips
said. "You know what they
say: If you don't use it you
lose it."
It's also a way for seniors
to socialize.
"I think it's a great social
tool, especially for older
folks that don't have mobil-
ity," Barila said. "The possi-
.bility of older folks getting


together, having fun and
getting their spirits up -
what a wonderful thing."
Phillips said that it's a
way for seniors to connect
with their grandchildren.
"Theywanted to see what
their grandchildren were
talking about ... now they
can play games together,"
she said.
Helen Jones, president
of the Winter Park division
of the AARP, said that while
she's an avid tennis.player,
it's not easy to find partners
or make time for it. When
she visits her daughter and
grandchildren, though, they
can play Wii together with-
out even having to leave the
house.
Barila agreed about the
convenience of the Wii.
"You can play baseball
when it's raining outside,"
she said.


S v n CoI'
-a aii I I .Uian-,
of Ov-e- m
~ u,-AM-


.3 . '.4


Located on a beautiful campus setting, our two Savannah Court communi-
ties provide full assisted living services while Savannah Cottage offers a
secured residence for those with memory loss.


* Restaurant Style Dining Experience
* Vibrant and Extensive Activities Program
* 24/7 Well Trained and Caring Associates
* Laundry, Housekeeping and Linen Services
* Individualized Services and Care


y f.

E Cal -stdy. so


Where hospitality is truly
a way of life!


JAWTNN N(6OURT
ASMS irrl) LIVING lItlSI11tN( .


395 Alafaya Woods Blvd., Oviedo, FL 32765
407-977-8786
ALF License No. 9235, 9308; 9307


-M\AV ANl NA' f TbI :-
MEVMORY CA)�I R ilKS r.I I*


ENJOY EXPERT CARE AND VALUE

Physicians and Nurses

Doctors of Audiology than
any other Hearing Care
Provider in America!
1. Over 5000 Doctors of Audiology are
w n- our nation's formally trained Hearing
Care Professionals.
2. Physicians recognize formal training
improves health care.
3. Physicians recommend consumers
seek Audiology care from Licensed
Audiologists.
S 4. Why settle for less? Visit
www.NowiHear.com.


An exceptional hearing
experience no longer needs
to be expensive!
Starting at

$1299
For open fit and custom models.


Melissa S. Riess, Au.D.
Doctor of Audiology


Hearing Associates
of Central Florida is
the Exclusive
AuDNet Hearing
Center of
Excellence in
Orlando.


-/
Please call today -
for the kind. of hearing ,
test your medical doctor
would want you t1 have!


/


1460 Lake Baldwin Lane

Baldwin Park


407-898-2220


ASSOCIATES.
OF CENTRAL FLORIDA


www.OrlandoHears.com


w acvound 7vwiane. �5z,*,:m -Cate. �c,,ad 2X/'


Mbu are alwa) s welcome ai Sa vannah Cow t and Cottage of Oviedo


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Thusda, Agus 6,200 'Page 9


www.savannahcourtoviedo.com







ra u in I ThI IrdIvE AiiJ t 8W, 20 Wite r


Cinema


Coming Aug. 14


'Ponyo'


Coming Aug. 21


'Shorts'


Coming Aug. 28


'Halloween II'


Culture
worthy of your calendar


Sculptures and Broadway


Meet Sculptor Doug Hays
On Wednesday, Aug. 12, the
public is invited to meet
with sculptor Doug Hays
for a chance to ask ques-
tions about how he works,
to bend and sculpt steel
into contemporary works
of art. The informal "meet.
and greet" will feature six
sculptures (of horses) cre-
ated by the artist during
the past year - sculptures
that were inspired in part
by a grant from United
Arts. The showing, free and
open to the public, will in-
clude a work on loan from
a private collection and
will represent the first (and
perhaps only) time that all
six of the equine-themed
sculptures will be shown
together.
Linda Pinto, chair of the
recent Equine Exhibit at
the Museum of Florida Art,
said, "Doug Hays' skill as
a sculptor infuses life into
cold, hard metal - trans-
forming these materials
into elegant representa-
tions of horses in all their
nobility. We have been hon-
ored to have Doug's cre-
ations as featured works in


our Equus exhibitions."
Hays' most famous work
is a 14-foot-tall Blue Heron,
which has become an icon
in the city of Eustis. Placed
in a public park, the sculp-
ture has become a commu-
nity icon and a gleaming
example of the manner in
which art can change the
life of a community.
Hays will be at Millenia
Fine Art on Wednesday, Aug.
12, from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.
The event is free. Please call
407-304-8100 to RSVP.

Broadway melodies
In the first of a new series -
that promises to be "a trib-
ute to the most brilliant
composers of the Broadway
theatre," Brian and Melissa
Minyard - both of whom
have performed on Broad-
way - will bring their
voices and talents to The
Plaza Theatre on Saturday,
Aug. 15.
The new series, aptly
called Broadway at the Pla-
za, begins with music by the
songwriting duo who basi-
cally "created" the Broad-
way musical. Including
music from "Oklahoma,"


"The Sound of Music," "Car-
ousel," and "The King and
I," the evening will feature
the much-loved music of
Richard Rodgers and Oscar
Hammerstein.
While Brian and Melissa
(and family) live here in Or-
lando, they have both per-
formed on Broadway and
in traveling shows. They
say, "We are two performers
who usually have to go out
of town to do something
on this level, but we're here
- creating this for our own
community, reintroducing
this much-loved music to
our friends and neighbors.
We would love to reach all
the people in Orlando who
love this kind of music, in-
vite them to grab a glass of
wine and just sit back and
listen."
Brian and Melissa will be
joined on stage by singers
Kevin Kelly and Lisa Rock
as well as child performers
from Next Generation Kids.
Performances are at 4
p.m. and 7 p.m. on Saturday,
Aug. 15, at The Plaza The-
atre. Call The Plaza Theatre
box office at 407-228-1220
or visit www.theplazathe-
atre.com.

Break out the bubbly
Big-time congratulations
are in order for Roy Alan
and his amazing crew at
the Winter Park Playhouse.
The opening they have set
for Friday, Aug. 14, is cer-
tainly the most important
opening night ever for this
"home-town" Winter Park
theater company.
After sharing a facility
for seven years and regu-


larly selling out the charm-
ing and inventive perfor-
mances they produced on a
tiny stage, The Winter Park
Playhouse is expanding and
moving into its own space
at 711-C Orange Ave. in
Winter Park. If the address
is familiar, it's because it is
adjacent to the theater's
former home, but the new
theater has a larger stage,
142 seats, a permanent box
office, dressing rooms, ex-
panded restrooms, and a
lobby with a piano bar and
cabaret area. Adding to the
cause for celebration, we
send a "tip of the hat" to the
West Orlando Rotary Club,
who stepped up to help
renovate and build the new
theater space.
And what better way
to celebrate this open-
ing night than to perform
the crowd-pleasing hit
musical that opened the
company's first theater? "I
Love You, You're Perfect,
Now Change," by Joe DiPi-
etro and Jimmy Roberts,
is called "Seinfeld set to
music," dealing, as it does,
with the truths and myths
behind contemporary rela-
tionships.
With performances
scheduled from Aug. 14
through the 30th, we have
plenty of opportunity to
visit the new space and
congratulate Roy Alan
(who will also be on stage).
Call 407-645-0145 or visit
www.winterparkplayhouse.
org.

Grease is definitely the
word!
For straightforward Broad-


'The Time Traveler's Wife'
PG-13


way musical fun, "Grease"
is definitely the word. The
musical has been on and off
Broadway since 1972, and
the latest revival was born
out of a TV talent competi-
tion which drew 90 mil-
lion viewers weekly, and
allowed America to vote for
its favorite contestants to
play the lead roles of Sandy
and Danny on Broadway.
Directed and choreo-
graphed by two-time Tony
Award-winner Kathleen
Marshall, this version also
includes "American Idol"
winner Taylor Hicks in the
role of the "teen angel." As
the winner of season five of
"Idol," you might say Hicks
won his role on TV as well.
Unless you've been liv-
ing on Mars for the past 20
years, you know the story of
"greaser" Danny Zuko and
his on-off relationship with
sweet, blond Sandy. The
new production has added
songs from the 1978 mo-
tion picture including "San-
dy," the Academy Award
nominated "Hopelessly
Devoted to You," "Grease,"
and "You're the One that I
Want" (both of which were
No. 1 hits on the Billboard
Top 100 chart) in addition
to the songs made famous
by the original stage pro-
duction.
This "new and im-
proved" version of "Grease"
opens at the Carr Perform-
ing Arts Center on Aug. 25
and runs through Aug. 30.
Tickets are on sale at all
Ticketmaster locations, on-
line at www.Broadway-

> turn to GARRICK on A14


A showcase of this week's releases,
and a look ahead to upcoming movies.


Winter Park/ Maitland Observer


Na i husav A st6 20










Opinion/


Where is Henry Hyde when
you need him? You re-
member OH!-Henry don't-
cha? He was one of those
earlier Republican purity
boys who hypocritically
thought, "Gollleee Gomer,
President Clinton shore
is nasty for having sex in
the White House and not
with his wife." Whoops, it
turned out that randy OH!-
Henry had a nine-year af-
fair (while married) with
Cherie Soskin (also married
and a mother of three chil-
dren). Oh my! OH!-Henry!
This is what OH!-Henry
said about Bill Clinton
during the president's im-
peachment trial: "What we
are telling you today are
not the ravings of some vast
right-wing conspiracy but
a reaffirmation of a set of
values that are tarnished
and dim these days, but it is
given to us to restore them
so our Founding Fathers
would be proud." Un-huh.
This from a guy who carried
on an affair with a married
woman and literally "kept"
her in a Chicago apartment.
Ha! Too funny.
Hyde was once the dar-
ling of the religious right
and the anti-abortion
movement. Hyde spon-
sored an amendment in
1976 that prohibited fed-
eral funding for abortions.
We wouldn't want impov-
erished women having the


option of reproductive
choice now would we? After
all, America requires poor
women having children
they cannot afford and/or
do not want to care for.
The original Hyde
Amendment wouldn't even
pay for abortions for raped
women or if the mother
was at medical risk. Values,
don't-cha see, values.
Let's briefly examine
what exactly is the implica-
tion of the Hyde Amend-
ment. Rather than identify
it as a restriction on using
federal tax dollars to under-
write abortions, let's frame
it this way: The government
is doing "X." "X" could
be anything the govern-
ment does. Building dams.
Funding Medicare. Fixing
bridges. Paying salaries. Un-
derwriting AIDS research.
Anything the government
funds. But let's say you
don't like it. Not only don't
you like it, but folks just
like you don't like it either.
I don't want my federal tax
dollars paying for that "X,"
you say!
So a congressman or
senator nobly steps up and
announces, "Let's have an
amendment to the yearly
appropriations bills that re-
stricts funding for "X." And
voila, you have the Hyde
Amendment. I am so liking
this idea. You don't like spe-
cific spending allocations


Perspectives

by..


by the federal government
because you are morally of-
fended? Well, I certainly get
that. Being morally offend-
ed and all. My goodness, if
poor women have access to
reproductive choice, what
next?
What is the argument
for limiting reproductive
choice (abortion rights)?
The argument is that all life
is sacred. Period. End of sto-
ry. No negotiation. That's
it. And just because that
in America it is a woman's
legal (Constitutional) right
to own her body (imagine
that!) and to make pri-
vate decisions regarding it
doesn't mean I (the morally
aggrieved taxpayer) should
have to underwrite (fund)
her abortion because she is
impoverished. That is the
argument. Correct? Please
write me if my understand-
ing of the argument for the
Hyde Amendment is incor-
rect.
To recapitulate: "X" is le-
gal. The government funds,
through allocations of pub-
lic tax dollars, "X." Yet, "X"
morally offends you. Con-
gressman passes amend-
ment to appropriations bill
saying that because "some"
are morally offended, the
government will not fund
"X."
OK. I am equally morally
offended by America's nev-
er-ending war. I am mor-
ally offended that Midwest
farmers can dump pesti-
cides and fertilizers on their
lands such that the runoff
pollutes our drinking water
and puts a 200-square-mile
plume of death (via the
Mississippi River) into the
Gulf of Mexico. I am mor-
ally offended that mining
corporations can, with
impunity (and immunity),
blow the hell off mountains
and dump the refuse into
streams and valleys, pollut-


ing everything below. I am
morally offended that Con-
gress has a health care plan
for themselves that is un-
available to all Americans.
I am morally offended that
our congressmen and sena-
tors are uniformly smarmy
bootlicks for corporate spe-
cial interests. I am morally
offended that developers
have and continue to have
more of a say on how the
State of Florida is developed
than the citizenry at large.
I am morally offended that
anti-abortionists care more
for a dot-sized (.) fetus than
they do for American chil-
dren already born, existing
in poverty. I am morally of-
fended that Americans do
not insist that the nation
discuss the implications of
500 million of us (projected
population) at the trough
demanding services, con-
suming the environment. I
am morally offended that
we'll subsidize arenas for
billionaires yet cut fund-
ing for public school art. I
am morally offended that
Germans spend $85 per
capital for art and culture to
America's $6 per capital (see
NEA spending on the arts).
I am morally offended that
we subsidize farmers for
not growing crops or that
we forever fund yet another
boondoggle weapons sys-
tem. I am morally offended
that our federal watch-
dog agencies are "in bed"
with corporations (food,
pharmacological, military
vendors, etc.) that they are
supposedly monitoring
on behalf of "our" welfare.
I am morally offended by
religious fanatics who are
more concerned with life in
the ever-after than with the
quality of life now, here on
dear 01' Mother Earth.
You know what doesn't
morally offend me? When a
woman exercises her right


> JEPSON
Chris Jepson's opinions are made
independently of the newspaper.
Write him at jepson@MEDIAmerica.us.


Letters to


Cash for clunkers program
could get $2B
On June 24 the president signed
the Consumer Assistance to Re-
cycle and Save Act of 2009 into law,
now more commonly referred to as
the C.A.R.S. Act. The purpose of this
federal legislation was to create
a temporary program within the
National Highway Traffic Safety Ad.
ministration that would allow an
owner of a motor vehicle meeting
certain requirements to trade in
the vehicle and receive a monetary
credit from the dealer to put to-
ward the purchase or lease of a new
motor vehicle that also met certain
requirements.
One billion dollars has already
been allocated by the federal gov-
ernment with a proposed $2 bil-
lion more to help consumers buy
or lease more environmentally
friendly cars, while also providing
a way to "energize" the economy
through increased auto sales. If the
additional $2 billion is approved by
the U.S. Senate this week, consum-


ers will be able to continue to enjoy
this opportunity to trade in their
cars.
The car up for trade must have
a combined fuel economy of 18
s miles per gallon or less, must be
less than 25 years old, and have
a clear title. The car or truck you
trade in will then be destroyed to
- ensure it cannot be resold. You can
receive a rebate of either $3,500 or
$4,500 depending on the type of
vehicle you trade in and the differ-
. ence in the fuel economy between
the two.
The new vehicle cannot be more
than $45,000; however, it can be a
foreign or domestic car or truck.
Please note for cars, the fuel econ-
omy must be at least 22 miles per
gallon; for trucks, the fuel economy
must be at least 18 miles per gallon,
with some exceptions for certain
types of trucks. The vehicles can be
purchased or leased.
Interested parties can partici-
pate in this program between now
and Nov. 30 or until the allocated


funds are no longer available. This
is an excellent opportunity for
those who are currently looking for
a new, more fuel efficient car. Any
questions may be referred to my
office at 407-884-2023 or you can
contact your local congressman or
congresswoman's office about this
federal opportunity.
. - State Rep. Bryan Nelson

New watchdog site for Maitland
There is a new Maitland Web site
where almost the entire source
of information on the site comes
from Maitland city documents,
Freedom of Information requests
and audio from city recordings; it's
www.maitland-confidential.com.


The Web site was assembled by
concerned citizens who believe in
a fully open city government. The
city keeps citizens informed of all
of the great things that are happen-
ing - programs available, places
to go, things to see and do in Mait-
land. However, there are too many
pieces of information that are kept
from the public or are just hard to
find that affect your taxes, schools,
traffic congestion, growth, crime
and many other conditions.
The site offers a place for citizen
comments. Please report any mis-
takes or inaccuracies so they can be
corrected.
- Bill Kahn


Se


vIg, 0, M
F, I an opinto'n,\'.''''\',,
in, riting and send your thoughts
ssociate editor Jenny Andreasson at
editor@observernewspapers.com


and freedom to do what
she damn well pleases with
her body. I guess I'm just an
old fashioned kind of guy.
Freedom. It means people
will do things that morally
offend you. Grow up.
If sanctity of life is the ar-
gument, surely sending our
boys to certain death (loss
of life) in the Middle East (If
it's Tuesday, it must be Af-
ghanistan!) would demand
equal outrage from the
pro-life crowd. Is not the
meaningless loss of life (in-
nocence) their argument?
Well, apply it where it
counts. Consistency would
go far in authenticating the
pro-life argument about
the sanctity of life.
Let's get the heck out of
the Middle East. Now! Noth-
ing we do there is contrib-
uting to our safety at home.
And we are sanctioning the
murder of innocence. Our
boys. How moral is that?
How complicit are we? You?
Me?
How about a Hyde
Amendment for that? No
more money for endless
war.
OH!-Henry! Alas, he's
deceased. No doubt, OH!-
Henry is in heaven with
his wife and lovers (he had
more than one affair).
Is there any congress-
man with a conscience
tired of America's foreign
policy ofnever-ending war?
I think not. And it is to
our deep moral chagrin
that there isn't.


OH!-Henry!


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Thursday, August 6, 2009 Pae1






Paqe 12 Thursday, August 6, 2009 Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Play On!
"**~ ~ *"
, "


Conservative
Cultural Commentary
By Louis Roney
Distinguished Professor Emeritus, UCF
2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award
Assisted by beloved wife Joy Roney

Huhnchen Junior
in the Big Apple
My name is Joseph
Merkele.
I am old. My wife
Sondra and I live in a nice
apartment uptown near
Columbia University.
We live ...! That's the
most important thing to us.
I have known much, and
forgotten much. But there
are things which will never
leave my memory even
though I would rejoice if I
could forget them.
I, like most other hu-
man beings, have known
much of good. And I have
known much evil, some of
it surpassing anything one


encounters in literature or
theater.
Our son is a violinist in
the New York Philharmon-
ic. "Our daughter, the law-
yer," is - well, a lawyer.
We enjoy listening to the
beautiful fiddle music that
Peter plays.
Lili helps us with our
lease and taxes when she's
needed, which is rarely.
I was born in 1919 after
World War I. I remember
during the 1920s hearing
the grown-ups around me
bemoaning the post-Treaty-
of-Versailles conditions in.
Germany, and the inflation
that was making our money
well-nigh worthless.
I was, and am, a secular
Jew coming from a family
of that background. Our
beliefs stress non-exclusive
brotherly-love, and rule
out sins of greed, hate and
violence. Our common
legacy is that of Beethoven,
of Goethe, Brahms, Schiller,
Einstein, Heine, and Thom-
as Mann.
In Gymnasium (high
school) in Ludwigshafen,
I studied to be a research
chemist. My studies were
almost as demanding as
those in a U.S. university.
I had planned to go on to
Heidelberg University to
complete my formal educa-
tion.
Sondra and I had fallen
in love in Gymnasium,
where, at lunch time, we sat


and ate "Brot und Wurst"
on the banks of the broad,
fast-flowing Rhein.
On weekends, we ped-
aled to the Odenwald,
parked bikes, and took
long Spaziergainge on an-
cient paths through rolling
meadows and forests.
In those days Germans
heaved contented sighs and
sensed that things were get-
ting "good" again.
If we had only known
that our real Hell was soon
to come. The intimidating
face and voice of Adolf Hit-
ler had convinced many in
Germany that he "held the
answer" to all of our prob-
lems. From the beginning,
I did not believe a word the
man said...
My friends all called me
Hiuhnchen Junior (Chicken
Little) because I warned
them that this Hitler-Devil
might cause the sky to fall
on us.
Hitler never received
more than 27 percent of
the vote. He managed to
squeeze into power with a
barrage of "big lies" promis-
ing to "change" Germany
for the good of us all.
You know what hap-
pened ... Dark clouds hung
over Germany after 1933.
It took time to realize the
nature of the monster who
had taken over our Father-
land. His whole bizarre en-
tourage rose with him into
awful power. Soon he had a


private civilian army of his
own.
Kristallnacht, November
1938, (Broken Glass Night)
when the whole Hitler
"Thugocracy" attacked Jew-
ish homes, stores and syna-
gogues, left me, at 18, a Jew
with a bleak future.
Most of us had at some
time thumbed through
"Mein Kampf" and found it
a hard-to-believe terrifying
bad dream.
"There are horrific things
in this book," said my uncle,
Wolf Stein. "There are also
bad things in the Torah, the
Bible, and the Koran" said
his wife.
Too many Jews smiled,
saying such things as, "Ger-
many won't listen to this
Verriickter (lunatic). Let
him rave! Everything will
come out all right in the
end, you'll see!"
Such cock-sureness was,
late in the game, only whis-
tling in the dark...
Always in my mind lived
a constant fear, that this
insane creature would carry
out his evil plans.
Many Jews could have
escaped with their lives and
possessions intact, but they
loved Germany and refused
to admit the realities of
Hitlerism - they waited!
It's amazing how people
will not listen to what they
don't want to hear.
Sondra fled to Portugal
where she had an uncle


who welcomed her. We
married years later in New
York.
In December 1939,1 I had
to put on a "J"-shirt, and
live in a labor camp, under
armed guard. From that
day, I never saw any of my
family again.
One night I hid myself
under rotting garbage in a
big refuse can. This repug-
nant act launched my long
odyssey to freedom from
the Nazis, although reach-
ing freedom in America
was to ask even more. For
months I wandered at night
southeast through the Eu-
ropean countryside, until
- at last! - I crossed the
border into Greece!
Many kind and humane
Greeks helped me on my
way with food, clothes, and
odd jobs for which they
paid me in Greek money.
As soon as I had a
chance, I climbed aboard
a Greek ship using the an-
chor chain as a ladder and
stowed myself away until
we were a day at sea, and
headed for Cuba.
Now, after all these years
in America, I am puzzled to
find myself impersonating
Hiihnchen Junior, all over
again!
In Germany in the 1930s,
when I first shouted "The
sky is falling!" no one


> turn to RONEY on page A14


'WEATHER

THRSAY AG ST ,09SATRDTSOMS


p p g B


77� 900
6 a.m. I 3p.m.


770
S6a.m.
Friday


TODAY: Scattered
thunderstorms with a
high near 92. Southeast
wind around 10 mph. Rain
chance 60 percent.


THI WEE
IN HISTORY


ta U.S . eore


UV INDEX I


FD' CA T 3D I

S MORNING LOW 770
DAYTIME HIGH 91 0

Sunrise Sunset 50% chance Wind
6:50 a.m. 8:11 p.m. of rain ESE 8 mph



/ . MORNING LOW 77�

aft DAYTIME HIGH 900

Sunrise Sunset 30% chance Wind
6:51 a.m. 8:10 p.m. of rain ESE 7 mph



MORNING LOW 76�
~' .DAYTIME HIGH 900

Sunrise Sunset 30% chance Wind
6:51 a.m. 8:10 p.m. of rain SSW 6 mph


THE VIEW FROM YOUR NECK OF THE WOODS











1 1 i : YOUR NAME HERE, FROM YOUR CITY
Want to see your picture in The Observer? Please e-mail it to editor@
observernewspapers.com. Files should be at least 1MB in size. Please
include as much information about the picture as possible, for example
where the image was taken, what time and who is in it.


NATIONAL


City
Seattle


Friday Sat.
59/71 59/72


Los Angeles 62/76 62/79


City
Atlanta
Chicago


Friday Sat.


72/91
73/86


72/92
74/93


MARINE FORECAST
Cocoa Beach tide schedule
Time Low High,
Saturday 3:40 a.m. 9:50 a.m.
Aug. 8 3:53 p.m. 10:08 p.m


Sunday 4:14 a.m. 10:30 a.m.


Aug. 9


4:29 p.m. 10:43 p.m.


FLORIDA FORECAST


city
Jacksonville
Miami
Tampa
Pensacola


Friday Sat.
78/91 79/93
80/89 80/89
78/91 78/91
78/90 80/90


INTERNATIONAL


City
London
Paris


Friday
59/72


Sat.
58/69


60/80 56/74


Houston 76/96 78/95 New York 65/80 70/78


- 10
S Extreme


.


Winter Park /Maitland Observer


Page 12 TusaAgs ,20


Tokyo 7/84 786











................ ...............:...'.......................".:....
..t


uij ()]L


jL;L . 1 , I I' u11 ,h c.p,L1'I' I 1 .- 11r Irj i ll i ..
FLORIDA.
CASE No. 2008CA007357
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR OP-
TION ONE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2007-1 ASSET
BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-1,
PLAINTIFF,
VS.
ANN HOGSETT MAY, ETAL.
DEFENDANTSS.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 15, 2009 in
the above action, I will sell to the highest bidder
for cash at Seminole, Florida, on Aug. 20, 2009,
at 11:00 AM, at Room S201 of Courthouse - 301
N. Park Ave., Sanford, FL 32771 for the following
described property:
LOT 13, BLOCK D, SOUTH PINECREST, AC-
CORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 10t, PAGES 9 AND
10 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF SEMINOLE
COUNTY FLORIDA.

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the is pendens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale. The Court, in its dis-
cretion, may enlarge the time of the sale. Notice
of the changed time of sale shall be published as
provided herein.
Dated July 20, 2009
MARYANNE MORSE
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By Mary Stroupe
Deputy Clerk of the Court

NOTICE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT OF 1990
Administrative Order No, 08-01
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to
the provision of certain assistance. Please contact
Court Administration at The Seminole Civil Court-
house, 301 N. Park Avenue, Suite 301, Sanford,
FL 32771-1292, (407) 665-4227 within 2 working
days of your receipt of this notice. If you are hearing
or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 or 711.
7/30, B/6

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 9th JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 2008-CA-30320-0
ANDOVER LAKES PHASE I HOMEOWNERS
ASSOCIATION, INC.,
Plaintiff,
v.
BRANDON R, RICE and TRACEY J. RICE; NEW
CENTURY FINANCIAL SERVICES, INC.; and JOHN
DOE and JANE DOE,
as unknown tenants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Default
Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above
styled cause in the Circuit Court of Orange County,
Florida, I will sell the property located in Orange
County, Florida, described as:

Lot 41, Andover Lakes, Phase 1 -B, according
to the plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
39, Pages 111 and 112, of the Public Records
of Orange County, Florida.
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for
cash, in the Orange County Courthouse,' 425 N.
Orange Avenue, Orlando, Florida 32801, at -11:00
a.m. on the 18th day of August, 2009. Any person
claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, it
any, other than the property owner as of the date
of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to
a Final Judgment entered in this cause on July
13,2009.
Witness my hand and the seal of this Court on
the 13 day of July, 2009.
LYDIA GARDNER
CLERK OF COURTS
By: Attorney

In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities
Act, persons with disabilities needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding
should contact Court Administration, at 425 N.
Orange Avenue, Orlando, Florida'32801, telephone
(407) 836-2303, not later than two (2) days prior to
the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-
955-8771, or Voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida
Relay Service.
7/30, 8/6

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2009-GP-1307
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JOSHUA L. OAKES
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Joshua L.
Oakes, deceased, whose date of death was June
9; 2009, is pending in the Circuit Court for Semi-
nole County, Florida, Probate Division, the address
of which is P. 0. Box 8099, Sanford, FL 32772-8099,
The names and addresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER.THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OFTHE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is July
30,2009.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Catherine E. Davey
Attorney for Sharon Oakes
Florida Bar No. 0991724
Post Office Box 941251
Maitland, FL 32794-1251
Telephone: (407) 645-4833
Fax: (407) 645-4832
Personal Representative:
Sharon Oakes
170 Pinecrest Drive
Sanford, Florida 32773
7/30,8/6

Notice Under Fictitious Name Act
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned,
pursuant to the "Fictitious Name Statute", Chapter
865.09, Florida Statutes, will register with the Divi-
sion of Corporations, Department of State, State of
Florida, upon receipt of proof of the publication of
this notice, the fictitious name, to wit:
Green Water Systpms
under which the undersigned expects to engage in
business at
9271 Northlake Parkway, Orlando, FL 32827
and that the party Interested in said business enter-
prise is as follows:
Carlos A. Morell
Dated at Orange County, Florida this 6th day of
August, 2009
8/6


I'i.. 11 i 'I i.r r I '111", I , ,' J JI , ' I 'l ll i, 1 -.II I 11
CASE NO.: 2008-A0' IO: N..
WATERFORD LAKES COMMUNITY-ASSOCIATION,
INC.,
Plaintiff,
v.
SANDRA SHIELDS and JOHN DOE and JANE DOE,
as unknown tenants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on the 18th day of
August, 2009, at 11:00 a.m., at room 350 ot the
, .,,,-, ,,,,, ,-,,,i, 425 N. Orange-Avenue,
, i,,. , ,. , ::: O undersigned Clerk will
offer for sale the real estate described as follows:
Lot 2, WATERFORD LAKES TRACT N-11,
PHASE ONE, as recorded in Plat Book 32,
Page 86, of the Public Records of Orange
County, Florida.
' together with all structures., improvements, fixtures,
and appurtenances on said land or Used in conjunc-
tion therewith.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale. .
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to
a Final Judgment entered in this cause on July
15,2009.
DATED this 15th day of July, 2009
Alex C. Costopoulos, Esq.


If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to to the provision of certain assistance. Please
contact Court Administration at 425 North Orange
Avenue, Suite 2130, Orlando, Florida 32801, tele- !
phone (407)836-2303, within 2 working days of
your receipt of this Summons; if you are hearing
impaired, call 1-800-955-8771; if you are voice
impaired, call: 1-800-955-8770.
7/30,8/6

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA, PROBA1 E I
DIVISION i
CASE NO. 48-2009-CP-001571-0
IN RE: Estate of
ALICE G. SHAW
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration ofthe estateof ALICE G.SHAW,
deceased, whose date of death was November 9,
2008, File Number 48-2009-CP-001571-0, is pend-
ing in the Circuit Court for Orange County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of which is 425
North Orange Avenue, Room 340, Orlando, Florida
32801. The names and addresses of the Personal
Representative and the Personal Representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice has been
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against the
decedent's estate must file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME i
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED,
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MOREAFTERTHE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is
July 30, 2009.
Attorney tor Personal Representative:
KENNETH F. MURRAH
Florida Bar No,: 0057494
Murrah, Doyle and Wigle, P.A.
P.O. Box 1328
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 644-9801
Personal Representative:
JUDITH G. OLIVER
2251 Chippewa Trail
Maitland, Florida 32751


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No,. 2009CP1290
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARY EDNA DODD
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Mary Edna
Dodd, deceased, whose date of death was July 3,
2009, and whose social security number is XXX-
XX-0357, file number 2009CP1290, is pending in
the Cir.. .'' ..un i' . -.,.T,,,',,. iE,'. r Fi,.,, ,) i ,:,
bate D..,.r, r,,- o,0,3. .,i .nn.r ....1 .i..
Avenue - PO. Box 8099, Sanford, Florida 32771. The
names and addresses of the personal representa-
tive and the personal representative's attomey are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having clainis or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
I ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OFTHE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
- The date of first publication of this notice is July
30,2009.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Daniel J. LeFevre
Florida Bar No. 046209
1491 W. Fairbanks Avenue
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone: (407) 647-3975
Personal Representative:
Basil C. Dodd, 11
1424 Dodd Road
Winter Park, Florida 32792
7/30, 8/6


Notice Under Fictitious Name Act
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned,
pursuant to the "Fictitious Name Statute", Chapter
865.09, Florida Statutes, will register with the Divi-
sion of Corporations, Department of State, State of
Florida, upon receipt of proof of the publication of
this notice, the fictitious name, to wit:
Winter Springs Soccer
uider which the undersigned expects to engage in
business at
1052 Willa Springs Drive, Winter Springs, FI 32708
and that the party interested in said business enter-
prise is as follows:
Greg Brick, Joe Avallone, Terry Garzon
FC United LLC
Dated at Seminole County, Florida this 6th day of
August, 2009
8/6


,'hi ,Iii ' ,i "lJ, i I I i Ii - '., ': 'T ' i. i ij.I 1, -1 1,h .,-

WATERFORD LAKES COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION,
INC.,
Plaintiff,
v.
DANA MARTIN, and JOHN DOE And JANE DOE, as
unknown tenants,
Defendant.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on tIhe 18th day of
August, 2009, at 11:00 a.m., at room 350 of the
Orange County Courthouse, 425 N. Orange Avenue,
Orlando, Florida 32801, the undersigned Clerk will
offer Ior sale the real estate described as follows:

Lot 72, Watertord Lakes Tract N-23A, accord-
ing to the plat thereof, as0 recorded in Plat
Book 38, Pages 123 and 124, of the Public
Records of Orange County, Florida.
together with all structures, improvements, fixtures,
and appurtenances on said land or used in conjunc-
tion therewith.
Any person claiming an interest in- the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to
a Final Judgment entered in this cause on July
14,2009.
DATED this 14th day of July, 2009
Alex C. Costopoulos, Esq.

If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please
contact Court Administration at 425 North Orange
Avenue, Suite 2130, Orlando, Florida 32801, tele-
phone (407)836-2303, within 2 working days of
your receipt of this Summons; if you are hearing
impaired, call 1-800-955-8771; if you are voice
impaired, call: 1-800-955-8770. 7
7/30, 8/H

IN THE COUNTY COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 08-CC-1552
DIVISION: 72
ENCLAVE AT ' MAITLAND HOMEOWNERS
ASSOCIATION, INC.,
Plaintiff,
v.
ROXANNE RAZZANI-ELLIS, MICHAEL F. ELLIS, and
JOHN DOE and JANE DOE,
as unknown tenants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on the 25th day of
August, 2009, at 11:00 a.m., at room 350 of the
Orange County Courthouse, 425 N. Orange Avenue,
Orlando, Florida 32801, the undersigned Clerk will
offer for sale the real estate described as follows:
Lot 106, ENCLAVE AT MAITLAND, accord-
ing to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 57, Pages 58 through 64, of the Public
Records of Orange County, Florida.

together with all structures, improvements, fixtures,
and appurtenances on said land or used in conjunc-
tion therewith.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to
a Final Judgment entered in this cause on July
21,2009.
DATED this 21st day of July, 2009
Matt G. Firestone, Esq.
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please
contact Court Administration at 425 North Orange
Avenue, Suite 2130, Orlando, Florida 32801, tele-
phone (407)836-2303, within 2 working days of
your receipt of this Summons; if you are hearing
impaired, call 1-800-955-8771; if you are voice
impaired, call: 1-800-955-8770.
8/6, 8/13

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 9th JUDICIAL -
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 08-CA-9818-0 #39
WATERFORD LAKES COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION,
INC.
Plaintiff,
v.
SHARON MONROE, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
SHARON MONROE, and JOHN DOE and JANE DOE,
as unknown tenants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on the 28th day of
August, 2009, at 11:00 a.m., at room 350 of the
Orange County Courthouse, 425 N. Orange Avenue,
Orlando, Florida 32801, the Clerk of Court will offer
for sale the real estate described as follows:
Lot 47, Huckleberry Fields N-2A, according
to the plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
h 17, Page 23, of the Public Records of Orange
County, Florida.


tion therewith.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the lis pendens, must tile a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to
a Final Judgment entered in this cause on July
28, 2009.
DATED this 28th day of July, 2009
Matt G. Firestone, Esq.
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please
contact Court Administration at 425 North Orange
Avenue, Suite 2130, Orlando, Florida 32801, tele-
phone (407)836-2303, within 2 working days of
your receipt of this Summons; it you are hearing
impaired, call 1-800-955-8771; If you are voice
impaired, call: 1-800-955-8770.
8/6, 8/13

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
SALE BY CASH AUCTION
THE FOLLOWING UNITS
On August 25, 2009, at Assured Self-Storage, Inc.
to the highest bidder for cash, items contained in
the following units:
B1029 - Division of Alcohol & Tobacco -
Business Items
B1032 - Division of Alcohol & Tobacco -
Business Items
01026 - Joshua Foster - Household Items
C1061 - Luis Maldonado - Household Items
Cl 1127 - Robert Reich - Household Items
C1120 - Robert Reich - Household Items
D1038 - Jacqueline Berry - Household Items
D2149 - Jacqueline Berry - Household Items
C1048 - Bertha Allen - Household Items
P0136 - Bruce Trick - 1978 Seacraft Cutty, HIN#
5EC00360478
00066 - Francisco Rodriguez - Vehicle Trailer
02090 - Jarvis Watkins - Household Items
P0123 - Joseph Capelletti - 1992 Ford Mustang,
VIN# 1FACP42E9NF111276
C1129 - Assured Self-Storage - Pool Tables
TO BE HELD AT
510 DOUGLAS AVENUE
ALTAMONTE SPRINGS, FL
ON AUGUST 25, 2009
AT 10:00 A.M.
ASSURED SELF-STORAGE, INC.
Assured Self-Storage, Inc. reserves the right to bid
and to refuse or reject any and all bids.
H8/6, /13


irj ii-i: ir i: II 1 ii T .I i iioh: ri i. iiii.
I , I f ,II I ,II .1- "6'1 . I" , . .
IN RE: ESTATE OF
TAVISH LEVELLE THOMPSON
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate ofTavish Levelle
Thompson, 'deceased, whose date of death was
February 24, 2007, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Orange County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 425 North Orange Avenue, Suite
340, Orlando, FL 32801. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice is required
to be served must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is
Aug. 6, 2009.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Catherine E. Davey
Attorney for LaWanda Thompson
Florida Bar No. 0991724
Post Office Box 941251
Maitland, FL 32794-1251
Telephone: (407) 645-4833
Fax: (407) 645-4832
Personal Representative:
LaWanda Thompson
2310 Academy Circle West #307
Kissimmee, Florida 34744
8/6,8/13

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE.DIVISION
File No. 48-2009-CP-001421-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
KENNETH WILLIAM BLAIN
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Kenneth
William Blain, deceased, whose date of death was
August 25, 2006, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Orange County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 425 North OrangeAvenue, Suite
340, Orlando, FL 32801. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice is required
to be served must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM. -
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE,
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is
Aug. 6, 2009.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Catherine E. Davey
Attorney for Marie J. Blain
Florida Bar No. 0991724
Post Office Box 941251
Maitland, FL 32794-1251
Telephone: (407) 645-4833
Fax: (407) 645-4832
Personal Representative:
Marie J. Blain
4752 Pilgrims Way
Orlando, Florida 32808
8/6, 8/13

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 48-2009-CP-001483-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JOSE NICHOLAS PERRY .
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
- , - , .1 . .- , - ,'r ,1 . r, - .1:t II,
.1 " i,,.- ,,,,,, in the Circuit Court for Orange
County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of
which is 425 North Orange Avenue, Suite 340,
Orlando, FL 32801: The names and addresses of
the personal representative and the personal repre-
sentative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice is required
to be served must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is
Aug. 6, 2009.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Catherine E. Davey
Attorney for Jeanine Ortiz
Florida Bar No. 0991724
Post Office Box 941251
Maitland, FL 32794-1251
Telephone: (407) 645-4833
Fax: (407) 645-4832
Personal Representative:
Jeanine Ortiz
2025 Buchanan Bay Circle #101
Orlando, Florida 32839
8/6, 8/13












WPMOBSERVER.COM


Ifl H I- r.,l _ .,,i .i 1 F T i-- F 17 'l.l - rr i .11.1(1i 1:1.1 _
i. t i I I T , i:r . .Iii ii rj
U.A. NO.: 209-DR-32- 1il]
NOTICE OF ADOPTION PROCEEDING
TO: "JOHN DOE", BIRTH FATHER:
You are hereby notified pursuant to SC Code Ann.
Sec. 63-9-730, that adoption proceedings have
been initiated under the above-referenced case
number involving a child of whom you have been
named the biological father, which child was born
on May 28, 2004. YOU ARE FURTHER NOTIFIED AS
FOLLOWS:

of Court at 139 East Main Street, Lexington, South
Carolina 29072, notice and reasons to contest, in-
tervene, or otherwise respond;
2.That the Court must be informed of your cur-
rent address and of any changes in address during
the adoption proceedings; and
3.That failure to file a response within thirty
(30) days of receiving notice constitutes consent
to adoption of the child and forfeiture of all rights
and obligations that you may have with respect to
the child.
Raymond W. Godwin, Esq.
1527 Wade Hampton Blvd.
Greenville, SC 29609
(864) 241-2883 (Phone)
(864) 255-4342 (Facsimile)
ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFFS
Greenville, South Carolina
July 21, 2009
8/6, B/13, 8/20


fiTO








-t. O



.N jq nin 4
0*


STOP LEG CRAMPS

BEFORE THEY STOP YOU.


1 s i '. .." ,rn. 10, he lp r i 1,:,-. :, :. T. .

















Get local news from a local source! Receive

The Observer weekly for only $30/year!

subscribe@observernewspapers.com




CITY OF WINTER PARK
S401 Park Avenue South
Winter Park,:Florida 32789

a . NOTICE OF EQUALIZATION HEARING
,0 , KEYES AVENUE PLUG-IN
ranzMve enmwr WINTER PARK, FLORIDA
Dear Property Owner;
Notice is hereby given that a public equalization hearing will be held on August 24, 2009, at 3:30
p.m., at the Commission Chambers, City Hall, 401 Park Avenue South, Winter Park, Florida, by the City
Commission of the City of Winter Park, Florida, sitting as an equalizing board to hear any and all com-
plaints regarding the special assessments described in Resolution No. 2024-09 of the City Commission
adopted on June 22, 2009 (the "Assessment Resolution") related to the undergrounding of electric/
CATV facilities east of Keyes Avenue, west of Park Avenue, south of Stovin Avenue and north of Webster
Avenue, in the City of Winter Park, Florida (the "Project").
All affected property owners have a right to appear at the hearing and to file written objections with the
City Commission within 20 days of the date of the first publication of this notice.
The Project is more particularly described in plans and specifications on file with the City.
It is proposed that the assessments for the undergrounding of electric/CATV facilities in the total
amount of $74,976.00 to.be paid in 10 equal annual installments, commencing with the tax bill for the
calendar year 2009 or in full at the option of the property owner. Assessments will be assessed on an
estimated unit cost of $3,259.00 per parcel among the respective parcels of land east of Keyes Avenue,
west of Park Avenue, south of Stovin Avenue and north of Webster Avenue, specially benefited thereby,
all as more particularly set forth in the Assessment Resolution.
All interested persons are advised that the description of each property to be assessed and the amount
to be assessed to each parcel or piece of property may be ascertained from the preliminary assess-
ment roll on file at the office of the City Clerk of the City of Winter Park, Florida, at City Hall, 401 Park
Avenue South, Winter Park, Florida.
It is the intention of the City Commission to adjust and equalize all assessments on a basis of justice
and right, following the hearing, and adopt a final assessment roll to be recorded in the Official records
of Orange County, Florida, which shall constitute a lien on all property so assessed, coequal with
all state, county, district and municipal taxes, as provided in Section 170.09, Florida Statutes, and
pursuant to which the.assessments will be collected by the Tax Collector of Orange County, Florida,
together with such taxes.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the City Commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he/she will need a record of the proceedings, and for such
purpose he/she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. (Section 286.0105, Florida
Statutes)
Persons with disabilities needing assistance to participate in any of these proceedings should contact
the City Clerk's office, (407) 599-3277, at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting.
8/6, 8/13


CITY OF WINTER PARK
401 Park Avenue South
Winter Park, Florida 32789

CITY OF WINTER PARK
NOTICE OF INTENT AND
cnincecr mnnrm NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
Notice is hereby given that the City of Winter Park intends to use the uniform method for collecting
special assessments within the platted area defined as Fawsett Road, Glencoe Road, DanaWay, Lake
Chelton Circle, Rockwood Road and West Reading Way (all within Forrest Hills plat BK K PG 90 as
recorded in the public records of Orange County, Florida), within the municipal boundaries of the City of
Winter Park to fund the City's undergrounding of the neighborhood electrical/BHN facilities.
Notice is further given that the City Commission of the City of Winter Park, Florida will hold a Public
Hearing at the City Commission Chambers, City Hall, 401 Park Avenue South, Winter Park, Florida
32789 at 3:30 p.m. on August 10, 2009 to consider adoption of a Resolution expressing its intent to
use the uniform method for collecting the assessments levied against certain properties along Fawsett
Road, Glencoe Road, Dana Way, Lake Chelton Circle, Rockwood Road and West Reading Way.
"If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he/she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, he/she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based." (ES. 286.0105)
"Persons with disabilities needing assistance to participate in any of these proceedings should contact
the City Clerk's office (407-599-3277) at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting."
Cynthia S. Bonham, City Clerk
7/16, 7/23, 7/30, 8/6


vvWnter Pardk / Maitland U bustve


Thursday, August 6, 2009 Page 13


I_ _ I_ _I _ _ _I


I


XA/.. . - , /XA ; n


7/30,8/6







Paae 14 Thursday, August 6, 2009


Marketplace


REALTORS:
Licensed Real Estate Professionals needing
to earn additional income. Become a
part time or full time loan officer. Control
your own closings. Gain access to
hundreds of mortgage programs. Save
your clients thousands of dollars. Call
Maitiand Mortgage Lending Company
(407)629-5626

ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVE
Account Representative needed to work
on behalf of our company. 18+ needed
and must have computer skills. Accounting
experience needed. Any job experience.
Email to mclarkemploymentl111@gmail.
com for more information.

CDL-A DRIVERS WANTED
Drivers: Top Pay & Excellent Benefits running
Flatbed OTR! Must have CDL-A, 2yrs OTR
exp & pass DOT physical. Purdy Brothers:
800-745-7290






WINTER PARK CONDO
Winter Park - 2 bedroom / 2 bath - deluxe
upstairs condo. Water / Sewer and interior
pest control included, near Hospital.
Laminated floors, new refrigerator, new
dishwasher, newA/C, washer/dryer. Master
bedroom looks over a beautiful inner court
yard with mature trees. $950.00 / month.
Please contact Deanna Campos, Realtor, to
view at 321-663-2837 Or deannacampos@
earthlink.net



FOR RENT
Oviedo Office Space, great frontage. 750
to 1,050 sf available. $1,070 to $1,350 per
month. 1401 Broadway St. Contact Megan
at (407) 687-3524..

OVIEDO OFFICE FOR RENT
Oviedo Office for rent. 1,640 sq. ft., $14/
sq. ft. + tax, no CAM. Reception, kitchen,
conference offices. Near 417 Red Bug exit.
815 Eyrie Drive. Call 407-365-3490.




YARD SALE- .
SALE! Sat. & Sun. 8/8 & 8/9,9-2.841 Mojave
Trail in Dommerich. TEACHER Materials,
seasonal decorations, plants, crafts, jewelry,
household items. Contact Denise Jensen,
407-644-1953, djensens3@yahoo.com




Reading volunteers NEEDED - Jackson
Heights Middle School in Oviedo is looking
for adults who are interested in serving as a
Reading Mentor to assist students who are
reading below grade level. Volunteers work
one-on-one with an assigned student before
school for 30 minutes, one or more times
a week through the end of the school year
to build fluency and comprehension skills.
Sessions are from 8:30-9:00 ap., M-F.
Please contact Connie O'Hanlon for more
information, 407-365-7585.


HANDYMAN/CARPENTRY
Let me take care of the chores you-don't
have time to do - yard work, carpentry,
painting, (whole house of interior rooms),
driveways, repairs, pressure washing, and
more. No job too small. Local. Prompt.
Affordable. Call Scott at 321-460-3905.




DETOXIFICATION EBOOK
(4) Detoxification Ebook - Super Sale: $7.99
each. http://www.ebook-detox-patches.
org/order.html. How to Detox for Overnight
Pain Relief. Flatter Tummy - Colon Cleanse.
Reclining Detox - Migun Thermal Bed. 500
+ Uses for Apple Cider Vinegar. Carol Miller,
(407) 970-1483








Log on to WorkforceCentralFlorida.
corn where you can ente.rthe Job Title
in the "Search For Jobs" box to see
more information on these jobs and
search thousands of additional openings
throughout Central Florida, at NO COST.
Apply by following the directions listed. For
further help visit the WORKFORCE CENTRAL
FLORIDA Orange County Office at 5166 East
Colonial Drive or call (407) 531-1227.

Warehouse Associate
Job Description: Responsible for performing
varied complex tasks and assists in
advanced tasks as part of training and
development. Resolves routine questions
and problems, and refers more complex
issues to higher levels. Work Monday-Friday;
8:00am-5:00pm.
Pay Rate: $25,000.00-$29,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9411778

Optical Laboratory Technician
Job Description: Responsible for cutting,
grinding, and polishing eyeglasses, contact
lenses, or other precision optical elements.
Assembles and mounts lenses into frames
or processes other optical elements. Work
Monday-Friday, 8:00am-5:OOpm.
Pay Rate: $9.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9418536

Instructor for Certified Nursing Assistant
Job Description: Responsible for instructing
students for medical assistant profession.
Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number. 9365884

Front Office Manager
Job Description: Responsible for managing
all aspects of the front office areas which
may include guest registration, bell services,
business center, telephone services,
concierge services, and guest reservations.
Ensures guest satisfaction and adheres to
all brand standards/desk merchandising.
Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9419022

USewing Machine Operator
Job Description: Responsible for fabricating
residential and commercial awnings and
canopies using industrial machines. Work
Monday-Friday, 7:00am-3:00pm.
Pay Rate: $10.00-$13.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9418311


Field Interviewer
Job Description: Responsible for
interviewing individuals by telephone or in
person to obtain information on issues that
will affect social policy. Administers carefully
developed and field-tested questionnaires
to respondents. Work days and hours may
vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9418569

Dispatcher
Job Description: Responsible for answering
incoming and outgoing emergency and non-
emergency telephone lines and coordinating
resulting requests for service utilizing a
System Status Plan. Receives reports and
keeps activity logs and records. Utilizes
computer aided design (CAD) computer
data entry and performs other, duties to be
assigned. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $11.25-$12.95 per hour
Job Order Number: 9419960

Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT)
Administrator
Job Description: Responsible for maintaining
the electronic funds transfer (EFT) donations
processing system including new gift
entry and changes to records. Provides
customer service for EFT donors and staff
or ministries receiving or making EFT
donations. Researches and answers high
volume of questions related to bank account
contribution processing from individual staff,
ministry representatives, and donors via
mail, email, fax, and phone calls. Contacts
donors and staff via memo and telephone
regarding questions and problems with EFT
donations. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $12.15 per hour
Job Order Number: 9411609

Maintenance Supervisor
Job Description: Responsible for working
along with and directing a team of
maintenance professionals to ensure the
community is in excellent condition for
our residents. Attends to residents' needs
and manages service requests/apartment
turnovers to ensure the work is performed
timely, while adhering to the company's
standards and managing the budget.
Identifies and diagnoses problems and
performs a variety of service requests. Work
days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $20.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9418622

Business Analyst
Job Description: Responsible for designing
data security systems. Follows data security
procedures and adjusts computer operation
system. Checks hardware or software to
determine reliability and evaluates computer
system user requests-or requirements. Work
days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $17.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9418687

Outpatient Substance Counselor
Job Description: Responsible for counseling
individuals on substance abuse. Completes
and maintains accurate records of cases
on file. Work' Monday-Saturday, hours may
vary.
Pay Rate: $9.00-$11.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9392559

Mechanic
Job Description: Responsible for repairing
diesel trucks. Changes oil and fixes trucks.
Fixes and changes brakes/tires.. Responds
to road calls and works in garbage trucks.
Work Monday-Friday, 8:00am-4:00pm.
Pay Rate: $15.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9413026

Electro-Mechanical Assembler
Job Description: Responsible for performing
both repetitive and non-repetitive work on
boards, frames, modules, and cables. Works
from drawings, diagrams, and instructions.
Makes continuity checks on work and
conducts, inspections on own work. Work
days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $14.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9420635

Office Assistant
Job Description: Responsible for word
processing, data entry, mail merge and other
clerical duties. Assists with the maintenance
of the fund raising database and assists
with annual fund mailings. Sends fund
raising acknowledgment mailings based on
company procedures, ethics, standards and
policies. Performs other duties as assigned.
Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $11.45-$12.02 per hour
Job Order Number: 9419588

Pipe Layer
Job Description: Responsible for reading,
understanding, and interpreting project
plans. Surveys and lasers layouts and is
the lead person on pipe crew. Installs water
and sanitary pipe, sets laser, prepares pipe,
and reinforces concrete pipe and structures.
Muds and cuts concrete pipe, trenches
slopes, and performs incidental work items
and duties included within other crafts.Work
days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $12.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9418105


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Anchor/Reporter
Job Description: Responsible for collecting
and analyzing facts about newsworthy
events by interview, investigation, or
observation. Reports and writes stories for
television. Checks reference materials such
as books, news files, and public records
in order to obtain relevant facts. Conducts
taped or filmed interviews or narratives.
Determines a story's emphasis, length, and
format, and organizes material accordingly.
Work days and hours.may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9411012

Customer Service/Food Coach
Job Description: Responsible for interacting
with customers to provide information on
products and services. Processes orders,
handles customer inquiries, and performs
other duties that may be assigned. Work
Monday-Friday, 8:QOam-6:00pm.
Pay Rate: $30,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9419623

Account Executive
Job Description: Responsible for launching,
marketing, and selling advertising for
Spanish language, multi-cast channel.
Responsible for agency/local direct revenue
generation and serves as the stations
ambassador to the community. Sells or
solicits advertising, including graphic art
and advertising space for TV advertising
time. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $9.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9420708

Mail Sorter
Job Description: Responsible for pulling
stamped mail from a machine and placing
it in organized boxes. Organizes mail by zip
codes and performs other duties that may be
assigned. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $8.50 per hour
Job Order Number: 9421918

Scheduling Coordinator
Job Description: Responsible for setting
up classes and communicating with
Home Office scheduling. Posts schedules
on bulletin boards and documents
communication related to: students.
Maintains schedules for each class and
assists students with scheduling conflicts.
Tracks retakes and retake charges prior to
scheduling retake. Prepares and processes
student inquiries to double classes. Works
unscheduled list to ensure student is
scheduled in a course, maintains course
density on a 3 week rotation, and notifies
students of any course cancellation. Work
days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9421369

Repair Technician
Job Description: Responsible for parts
receiving, unserviceable parts disposition,
and electronic test equipment maintenance
work. Performs system repair work and
electronic tests. Troubleshoots and repairs
electronic-components for which the repair
station is rated (60%). Ensures that all
applicable work orders, inspection forms,
and return to service documents are filled.
out properly and on time. Documents repairs
.performed daily and submits, reports. to
Supervisor. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $14.00-$14.65 per hour
Job Order Number: 9421109







- Crosword -
Answers
Solution time: 21 mins.


- Weekly SUDOKU
Answer


1 4 9
2 6 7
5 3 8
6 7 2
3 9 4
8 1 5
9 5 6
4 8 1
7 23


2 3 6
4 5 8
7 9 1
5 4 3
1 8 7
9 6 2
3 7 4
6 2 91

8 15


RONEY I Warning signs

< continued from page A12

listened.
Does cautioning ever do any good?
Does anyone hearken to even the loudest
Cassandra? Do well-meant caveats penetrate
the human skull? Must we finally use the farm-
er's two-by-four to get the mule's attention?
Santayana's "Those who have not learned
from history are doomed to repeat it" has a
deeper meaning to those who have lived his-
tory and don't wish to repeat it!
A sentimental song, "That Old Feeling,"
sings that recurring feelings are reproduced by
recurring stimuli. These days, I have the feel-
ing that I have "been here before." Is deja vu
just a nagging disappearing act that plagues us
older minds?
There's concern in my mind today as I
wonder what's abroad in this land. Is there a
sound in the air of new ambient discord that
vies with cliched old repugnant anti-Semitism?
Greed, hate and violence seem tod often.
to target human good. Do things ever simply
"work out all right in the end?"
Does "man is a political animal" imply
that "kill or be killed" is innate in the human
psyche? Similar moral parallels often end in
paradoxical confrontation.
Little tyrants intimidate in playgrounds;
king-size models do it in armies, ships, penal
institutions - even in classrooms.
Is evil in our beloved America even now
conniving to bring the sky down upon our
unwary heads?
Are my feelings of Angst reasonable? Or am
I just foolish old Chicken Little, shouting
vainly into the wind, once again ...
What can I, tell you?



GARRICK I Calendar

< continued from page A10

AcrossAmerica.com, or by calling 800-982-
2787.

A must-see ...
One of the finest art exhibit-installations
ever at the Orlando Museum of Art (OMA) is
still there through Oct. 4.
If you have not yet seen the "walk-through"
exhibit called Stories of the New World by
glass artist Therman Statom, you definitely
want to. Because he works mostly in glass and
mirrors (he paints, as well), the experience
is to literally walk through a work of art. It's
sophisticated on all levels and yet works beau-
tifully for children.
Statom enjoys challenging his audience to
look at glass in new ways, and he is a pioneer
in the use of glass for sculpture and room-
size installation art. As you walk through the
room, you'll be surprised to see yourself head-
ing in your direction from several odd angles.
While the artist uses Ponce de Leon's 1513
search for the Fountain of Youth to explore
themes of hope, discovery and destiny, I tell
my friends that a visit to the exhibit is as close.
as we will ever come to visiting Dorothy's
fictional City of Oz. The exhibit covers 5,600
square feet of the OMA's galleries, including a
walk through a mirrored maze and a blown
glass sculpture. "Awesome" is the word used by
most kids who've seen it ... and you still have
a few days left to take the kids before school
starts.
Open Tuesday through Sunday, the Orlando
Museum of Art is located in Loch Haven Park
at 2416 N. Mills Ave. Call 407-896-4231 or visit
omart.org.


Winter Park

Office Space for Lease
($20 per square foot)


Call Marsha at 407-741-8684

For more information














votes." might want to consider the
Before he became a fast- whopper recently brought The average American,
Cost-cutting is nothing food titan, the founder of in by a Florida man. It will eat approximately 60
/ - UT TRUO E new in the airline industry. Taco Bell operated a hot- seems that while fishing quarts of popcorn this year.:
' U Way back in 1987, Ameri- dog stand. in the waters off the Pan-
can Airlines was looking to handle, Rodney Salomon ***
By Samantha Weaver pinch a few pennies. One If you're overdue for a snagged a test missile. Al-
of the measures the carrier snack right now, you might though he wanted to keep Thought for the Day: "His-
It is not known who made decided on was to elimi- be hearing borborygmi - the missile as a souvenir, tory is the version of past
the following sage obser- nate one olive from each the growling sounds made the authorities insisted that events that people have
vation: "Conscience is the salad served to passengers by an empty belly. the MacDill Air Force Base decided to agree upon." -
still, small voice which tells in first class. This seemingly Bomb Squad dismantle it. Napoleon Bonaparte
a candidate that what he is minor move saved a total Next time you're planning Talk about the one that got
doing is likely to lose him of $40,000 that year. on taking a fishing trip, you away! � 2009 King Features Synd., Inc.


ARIES (March 21 to April
19) Technology snafus tax
your patience. But before
you throw that computer
or other bulky hardware.
into the trash, take a deep
breath and call someone
knowledgeable for help.

TAURUS (April 20 to
May 20) Don't be too upset
if your generosity goes
unappreciated. These things
happen, and rather than
brood over it, move on. A
new friend could open up
some new possibilities.

GEMINI (May 21 to June
20) A loved one helps you
get through an especially
difficult emotional situation.
Spend the weekend
immersed in the body and
soul restorative powers of
music and the other arts.

CANCER (June 21 to July
22) You are pretty much in
charge of what you want to
do this week. However, it
might be a good idea to keep
an open mind regarding.
suggestions from people you
know you can trust.

LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22)
Another chance to shine
(something always dear to
the Lion's heart) might be
resented by others. But you
earned it, so enjoy it. The
weekend brings news about


a family member.

VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept.
22) A suggestion that never
took off could become viable
again. Dust it off, update it
if necessary, and resubmit
it. In your personal life, a
new relationship takes an
"interesting" turn.

LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct.
22) Confronting a new
challenge to your stated
position could work to
your advantage by settling
all doubts once you're able
to present a solid defense
backed up by solid facts.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to
Nov. 21) You enjoy doing
nice things for others. But
this is a good time to do
something nice for yourself
as well. You might want to
start by planning a super-
special getaway weekend.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22
to Dec. 21) Some changes
you feel you need to make
might be reasonable and
appropriate. But others
might lead to new problems.
Think things through
carefully before you act.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22
to Jan. 19) Good instincts
usually keep the sure-footed
Goat on the right path. So,
what others might see as
stubbornness on your part,'
in fact reflects your good
sense of what is worth
supporting.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20
to Feb. 18) A period of


introspection could lead to
some surprising conclusions
- and also equally surprising
changes - invivolving a number
of your long-held positions on
several issues.

PISCES (Feb. 19 to March
20) The financially practical
Pisces might want to take a
sensible approach to spending
as well as investing. Being
prudent now pays off later. A
romantic situation moves into
another phase.

BORN THIS WEEK:Your
sense of curiosity keeps you
continually alert for what's
new about people, places
and things.
0 2009 King Features Synd., Inc.





by Linda Thistle

1 4 6 7
6 5 3 1
8 7 1 2
2 5 4 9
9 8 6 5
8 5 2 4
9 31 . 4 1
1 2 7 5
7 2 8 4
Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way
that each row across, each column down and each
small 9-box square contains all of the
numbers from one to nine.


* Moderate * * Challernging
***-HOO BOYI
0 2009 King Features Synd., Inc.


I _____ Kia rosswordFfF


ACROSS
1 Saxophone
range
5 Nov. follower
8 Impale
12 Benefit
13 "- Yankee
Doodle
Dandy..."
14 Ocean
motion
15 Farmland
measure
16 Ross and
backup-
18 Looseleaf-
. paper holder
20 Lucky dice
rolls
21 Prison, in
Portsmouth
23 Shriner's cap
24 2007 comedy
movie
28 Nary a soul


31 -out a
living
32 Le Pew and
Le Moko
34 Convent
dweller
35 Catherine -
-Jones*
37 Quash
39 Tokyo's old
name
41 Actress
Gilpin
42 Straying
45 Some
hosiery
49 Imagined
51 Press
52 Map
53 Past
54 One billionth
(Pref.)
55 Longings
56 Director
Howard


57 Radiate 24 "- you!"
25 Guitar's
DOWN island kin
1 Common 26 Barrie boy
rhyme 27 Trust
scheme 29. Greek
2 Places consonants
3 Undecided- .30 Navy rank
4 Nervous (Abbr.)
5 Strips . 33 .Agile
6 Ostrich's 36 Tweaks
cousin 38 Angering
7 Uppercase 40 Yoko of
8 Spielberg or music
Bochco 42 Catch sight
9 Eastern or of
Pacific, e.g. 43, Hold the
10 Mideast gulf scepter
11 Harry's first 44 Despot
lady 46 Exam format
17 Ump 47 Admonition
19 O.K. Corral to Nanette
VIP 48 Winter
22 Drink, as a forecast
puppy might 50 Id
counterpart


I HOCUS -SIF


S .BY
HENRY BOLTINOFF


o 0
OO^?


.ieicil u! u!eljno jGMo IS *9 -6u!ssw si tLsipd~oS S
Iaulls~ ieUi ewqieWe '9t, '6ulssIw 9! moq spwo ' -Ce6uol s!
.qeq s~woyj - -p ows! t~jeq elqqnq jo xoe -L :seouajewG!(


� 2009 King Features Synd., Inc.


1. Basset Hound
2. Black & Tan Coonhound
3. Bloodhound
4. Bluetick Coonhound
5. Boxer
6. Bullmastiff
7. Dogue de Bordeaux
8. English Bulldog
9. English Setter
10. French ' listed
Bulldog alphabetically
Source: "Planet Dog: A Doglopedia"

� 2009 by King Features Syndicate, Inc.
World rights reserved.





Winter Park/ Maitland Observer


Thurday Auust6, 009 Page 15


- - -^j %OdW,






IA I 18 Tusa Auaust 6. 2


Calendar


Join us at the Orlando Museum of
Art's first Thursday event, "Found,"
from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Aug. 6, to
meet artists who create unconven-
tional works from found objects -
whether it is one object or an assem-
blage of multiple objects.
For more information, call 407- ,
896-4231 ext. 260, or visit www.
OMArt.org.
Bowling for Charity with Gold Coast
Greyhound Adoption of Winter Park
will be held from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.
Saturday, Aug. 8 at Bowl America, lo-


cated at 1111 Fairbanks Ave. in Win-
ter IPark.-
Two games of bowling, shoe rental,
four raffle tickets and a celebration
cake will be included for $15. For
more information, contact GCGA at
407-620-8906, goldcoastgreyhound-
events@yahoo.com or visit www.
goldcoastgreyhoundsorlando-.com.
A reception from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. on
Sunday, Aug. 9 will showcase the
works of Nancy Gonzalez displayed
at the University Club of Winter Park.
For more information, call the club at


407- 644-6149.
Happenings at the Maitland Public
Library (501 S. Maitland Ave):
Florida Highwayman artists exhibit
with be held at 2 p.m. on Thursday,
Aug. 6. From the 1950s through the
1980s a group of African-American
artists painted landscapes of serene,
undeveloped Florida.
Knit & Crochet Club will be held at
7 p.m. on Aug. 6.
PC Academy Internet: Part 1, the
"Visible" Web will be held from 10
a.m. to 11:30 a.m. on Monday, Aug.


10. Registration is required.
Scrapbook Club will be held at 7
p.m. on Tuesday, Aug. 11. Bring pic-
tures and supplies and spend some
time with fellow scrap-bookers.
Peter Kessler, renowned broad-
caster and golf historian will em-
cee the Aug. 11 session of the Win-
ter Park Country Club Golf Lecture.
Ladies professional golfer Charlotte
Campbell will be the guest at 6 p.m.,
on Tuesday, Aug. 11 at 761 Old Eng-
land Ave. in Winter Park.
For more information contact the


Winter Park Country Club Golfshop at
407-599-3339. A portion of the $10
ticket will go to the Arnold Palmer
Hospital for Children.
Casa Feliz Historic Home Museum
is closed in August. "Music at the
Casa" Sunday Open House fall con-
cert series begins on Sept. 6 at 656
Park Ave. N. The concert will feature
Daniel Flick, classical violinist. The
event is free to the public, donations
are accepted. Contact Angela Roark,
assistant director, at 407-628-8200,
ext. 3 or casafeliz2@earthlink.net.


WUOF OAN

FM 89.9 ORLANDO


The Learning Tree is a Ministry of
First Baptist Church of Winter Park


"Rooted grounded
in Jesus Christ. "
(407) 628-17
www.FBCWinterF


We offer Full-Day Infant Care and Childcare Year-
Round, Preschool Classes and much more!
Now Accepting Enrollment for ,Full-Day Summer Camp (K5-Completed 3rd Grade)
Established in 1973 - we are celebrating 36
years of service this year.
761 1021 New York Avenue N.,
Park.org Winter Park, Florida 32789


We are licensed Through Department of Children and Families(C070RO 154)


Visit Our Winter Pa~rk Store.
2069 Alcuma Ave.

230
~~~*Moma Ave.~
4.z


Ia


BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR




ONE ITEM
Limited time sale! Stop in now!
SR.tail orders by cast, cIeck cr crediraj d orly. I-: i. power
scooters, eseat lifl chairs, s,. ls .' . ,aii.-v w c riI ,es e:.ms. -ib
custom. speciai orders and insurant.c -t',-,..ar'ons. Fo th *r N oor;' n;.
apply. Previous orders [c'ludf.i Cannot be c'jmrne. ned'. I e
IScfju 'lf,. COupor, i .i n. o c a '. iiK )i� .


Code FLORIDASENIORL!VING
Coupon Expires 9-30-09
-ffj� A - GM


I


--


*Yrow D iabete.s
Headquarters
*Pow'e Sc~oote-rs
*W'c, In chairs


*y






*Wound. Care


* Adult Diaper
Home Delivery
Program

* Bath Safety
Equipment
* Oxygen
'Supplies

* Hospita Beds
* And So Much
- More!


BINS N'S
Home Health Care Centers


Call Us

407.679.2135


Visit Us on the Web @

www.Binsons.com


1


.. BEEN IN AN AUTO ACCIDENT?

" YOU DON'T HAVE TO-LIVE WITH THE PAIN
* Neck Pain
* Headaches
* Middle and Lower Back Pain
* Shooting Pain Down Arms or Legs
. Numbness and Tingling of Hands or Feet
* Just Plain Old Aches and Pains
;'* . *.^' ^ - These are among the many conditions treated well with chiropractic care!
, . TRY CHIROPRACTIC!


Dr. Frank T. Comparetti, D.C.
1850 Lee Rd, Suite 324 Winter Park, FL 32789
A 407-951-8349


CUT OUT
AND SAVE


m


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Pa 1 husay Agst6 20


�~~




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2011 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated May 24, 2011 - Version 3.0.0 - mvs