Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00089
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate Title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park, FL
Publication Date: June 3, 2010
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates: 28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00091444
Volume ID: VID00089
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613

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Winter Park / Maitland


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Glitz and glamour


It's fashion
The Mayflower hosted a
fashion show with looks
from Patchington.
Page 9


4Rivers explosion
The owner of the popular
barbeque eatery searches
for a second location.
Page 12



Letters to the editor
"The recent action of the
Parks Commission illumi-
nates a serious flaw in the
proposed revised animal
ordinance..."
Page 18


0 94922 95642 2


High-speed

rail funded
ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF
While Winter Park wait-
ed for a response from Or-
ange County's attorneys
regarding amendments to
an agreement over funding
of the SunRail system, more
than $66 million in high-
speed rail funding arrived
in the state's coffers May 27.
"It's going to be a big eco-
nomic shot in the arm for
Tampa and Orlando," Or-
ange County Commissioner
Bill Segal said. "It means a
lot of progress for Central
Florida."
That money was the first
installment of a $1.3 billion
federal contract earmarked
for Florida's high-speed rail
system, spanning between
Orlando and Tampa.
The first installment of
federal money will pay for
part of the design and right-
of-way purchasing for the
rail system, which will run
through the median of In-
terstate 4. The current ver-
sion of the high-speed rail
plan would not include a
stop in Winter Park.
Meanwhile, Winter Park's
City Commission is waiting
> turn to RAIL on PAGE 4


Mayor critical of board's proposal

City Commission will discuss banning animal-centered events near Central Park


TINA RUSSELL
OBSERVER STAFF
Winter Park's Parks and Rec-
reation Commission sent a
letter to the City Commis-
sion on May 26 asking it not
to allow animal-centered
events near Central Park.
The city's mayor is balking
at the recommendation.
Residents and dog-lovers
crowded the Parks Com-
mission meeting to express
distaste for the letter. But
when the board motioned
to send the letter without
public input, the crowd
quickly diminished.
Now the ball is in the
City Commission's court.
The Parks and Recre-
ation board is requesting
special event permits only


be issued if the event is
consistent with the current
animal ordinance that pro-
hibits dogs "on any street,
right of way, or sidewalk ad-
jacent to Central Park that
is closed to vehicular traffic
during any special event."
Winter Park Mayor Ken
Bradley said he feels the
Parks and Recreation board
is creating a situation ver-
sus making suggestions to
fix a problem.
"They told us they were
suggesting adjustments to
the policy, and it sounds
like, the way I am reading it,
that they are trying to en-
force something that is very
predatory," Bradley said.
He said he takes per-
> turn to DOGS on PAGE 2


PHOTO BY TINA RUSSELL -THE OBSERVER
Winter Park resident Rick Frazee expresses his thoughts regarding the letter Park
and Recreation sent to the City Commission. Comment was taken after the vote.










Smiles for miles

8,000 attendees expected at annual event for special needs children at Lake Eola on Saturday, June 5

SARAH WILSON ized services geared toward
OBSERVER STAFF the needs of the VIPs and
their families.


Imagine football fanatics
finding out the Super Bowl
will be held in their home-
town every year from now
on now say you told them
tickets, concessions and
entertainment at the event
would all be free. Can't fath-
om their excitement?
Diane Hayes can.
For her and her three
daughters, each with spe-
cial needs, their Super Bowl
equivalent is the Make 'm
Smile community festival.
"We put it on our calen-
dar, and it's something for
our girls to look forward to
all year long," Hayes said.
"It's the Super Bowl for our
family. It's the biggest thing
of the year."
The Make 'm Smile event
is dedicated to celebrating
kids with special needs -
known as VIPs who live
in the Orlando community.
The festival will be held this
year from 7:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
on Saturday, June 5, at Lake
Eola Park in downtown Or-
lando.
The event features a Bud-
dy Stroll in which VIPs and
their family are buddied-
up with a "typical" family
from the community for a
walk around the lake. Set up
around the lake are games,
food, music and other types
of entertainment, free to
all in attendance, as well as
providers offering special-


Hayes said each year she
attends the festival, she dis-
covers a service that ben-
efits her children. These
services range from an or-
thodontist who could cater
to the needs of her autistic
daughter Molly, to a sum-
mer camp that all three of
her daughters could attend
and thrive.
The event is presented
by Nathaniel's Hope, a non-
profit organization dedicat-
ed to helping children with
disabilities and their fami-
lies. The organization was
founded by Marie and Tim
Kuck in memory of their
son Nathaniel, who was
born prematurely with mul-
tiple special needs. In honor
of Nathaniel and all others
who have lost children with
special needs, families who
attend Make 'm Smile can
release a butterfly in tribute
to their loved ones.
When the festival started
eight years ago, Marie Kuck,
the executive director of
the event, said it began as
a "grassroots" event with
about 600 attendees. This
yearshe anticipates between
7,500 and 8,000 attendees.
With this growth, the need
for funding and donations
has grown as well. Nathan-
iel's Hope accepts dona-
tions and holds fundraisers
to support Make 'm Smile as
well other events they host


PHUUUUUHITa Y U NAI mtANItL'S vUPEt
A VIP participant poses with Elmo, Cookie Monster and Bo Outlaw from the Orlando Magic at last year's Make 'm Smile event.


throughout the year. These
including Caroling for Kids,
during Christmastime; Bud-
dy Break, a free respite care-
service offered yearlong;
and a VIP Birthday Club.
Kuck said the current
economic troubles have put
some strain on this year's
fundraising, noting it's tak-
en multiple sponsors to do
what one sponsor had done
in previous years.
"It is a little bit harder to
elicit some of those things
because the economy has


been rough on people, so
we just have to work a little
harder," Kuck said.
Dianne Brown, who
has also attended Make 'm
Smile with her son Daniel,
who has special needs, since
it began, said watching the
growth of the event first-
hand has been amazing, but
she is not surprised by its
success. "Coming to some-
thing like this is every kid's
dream," she said.
Diane Hayes agrees. "It's
great that every single place


we stop there celebrates
our children's abilities," she
said. "No one looks at them
different they're the ones
who are the same there and
those of us who are typical
are the ones who are differ-
ent that day."
And to her, Brown and
Kuck, the ability to give
that gift to their children,
and the rest of the special
needs community, is more
valuable than any sporting
event.


DOGS I City commissioner says Parks Commission is just doing its job


< continued from the front page

sonal offense to what he de-
scribed as a feeling that the
board is trying to get rid of
dogs in Winter Park. "From
the actions of the Parks and
Recreation board, I question
if they want this to be a dog-
friendly city," Bradley said.
Commissioner Beth Dil-
laha said she has not re-
ceived any sort of recom-
mendation from the Parks


and Recreation board, but
she looks forward to what-
ever recommendation they
give. She said it's their job
to review policies, and feels
bad that board members are
getting beaten up by folks
who have possibly miscon-
strued what the board's dis-
cussion is about.
"I know there is a concern
with Central Park, which
historically has been a no-
animal park," Dillaha said.


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"There is conflict with some
events like The Doggie Door
events; we need to come up
with solutions because of its
proximity to Central Park."
At the May 26 meeting,
Parks and Recreation com-
missioner Bonnie Jackson
said, "This has nothing to
do with folks walking their
dogs down Park Avenue and
enjoying a sidewalk cafe. We
want people to walk down
Park Avenue and enjoy our
city, but we don't want them
to bring their dog to Central
Park."
Patrick Chapin, president
of Winter Park's Chamber of
Commerce, said he believes


the existing ordinance and
interpretation of it is work-
ing just fine. He said he feels
at a loss because city staff,
who manages those events,
[the Pet Costume Contest
and the Annual Spring Dog-
gie Art Festival] is not com-
plaining about the events.
"I hope the Commission
realizes the city staff inter-
pretation has been satisfac-
tory and has [organized]
those events for many
years," Chapin said. He also
said not letting the pubic
speak on the item at the
Parks and Recreation meet-
ing "was short-sighted and
wasn't very productive."


Nancy Shutts, a Win-
ter Park resident, said the
board was doing it's job. "It's
their responsibility to bring
issues that are brought to
their attention and then ask
the higher bodies, which
is the City Commission, if
something needs to be done
about it."
Mayor Bradley said his
hope going forward is to
request the board to look
at the ordinance and see if
something can be changed.
"Dog-friendly events
on Park Avenue are a good
thing, not a bad thing,"
Bradley said.


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Page 2 Thursday, June 3,2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer






Thursday, June 3, 2010 Page 3


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Neither Merrill Lynch nor its
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Incorporated (MLPF&S) and
other subsidiaries of Bank of
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I


Winter Park / Maitland Observer







Page 4 Thursday, June 3, 2010 Winter Park / Maitlanci Observer


A solution to parking pollution?


PHOTO BY TINA RUSSELL THE OBSERVER
Patrick Chapin, left, president of Winter Park's Chambers of Commerce, is a member of the Park Avenue Area Task Force, which held its first meeting on Tuesday, May 25 at City Hall.

Members of the Park Avenue Area Task Force like the idea of SunRail passing through Winter Park


TINA RUSSELL
OBSERVER STAFF
The Park Avenue Area As-
sociation Task Force had
its first, official meeting on
Tuesday, May 25 to discuss
the Park Avenue Strategic
Plan that is comprised of six
goals designed to help bring
traffic to the businesses of
Park Avenue and Hannibal
Square.
With the recent plans for
the SunRail to stop in Winter
Park, it could help patrons
easily get to the downtown.
One goal of the task force is
to implement a parking and


wayfinding program.
"I think the SunRail is
going to be great for every-
body," Grant Leibell, a rep-
resentative on the Park Av-
enue Area Task Force said.
"With parking being a situa-
tion that we are going to try
to correct on Park Avenue,
it gives people a means to
get here, shop and not have
to worry about parking is-
sues."
Woody Woodall, a small
property owner on the Task
Force, also expressed his de-
light for the SunRail.
"It's inconceivable for
me to believe that anybody


would allow the SunRail to
come through and not stop
in Winter Park."
The other five goals the
task force plans on tack-
ling are: branding and mar-
keting of Park Avenue and
Hannibal Square; foster-
ing and cultivating existing
businesses; identifying and
recruiting new businesses;
increasing maintenance
and aesthetics; enhancing
the Park Avenue-area ex-
perience for the customer
and creating a business im-
provement district.
Woodall, owner of Briar-
patch, said the SunRail


would be beneficial, be-
cause many of his employ-
ees could take the SunRail
to work, which would elim-
inate those cars from the
streets of Winter Park.
Patrick Chapin, president
of the Winter Park Cham-
ber's of Commerce, said it's
perfect timing that three big
projects the strategic plan
of the task force, the Sun-
Rail coming through Winter
Park, and plans for the Rol-
lins Inn project are align-
ing at the same time to help
create better marketing for
Winter Park as a special des-
tination for visitors from all


over.
He said it will bring posi-
tive opportunities to the
central business district, and
it would allow more people
to experience Winter Park
and Park Avenue.
"To comment specifi-
cally to the issue of crime,
there has been studies done
that show no correlation
to a stop on a commuter
rail station to increasing or
decreasing crime," Chapin
said.
The task force's next
meeting will be held on
June 15 at 2 p.m.


RAIL I County commissioner says city has to pay for own station and insurance


< continued from the front page

for word from the county on
which changes to a funding
agreement between Winter
Park and Orange County
they'd be willing to accept.
"I haven't heard anything
from them yet," Commis-
sioner Beth Dillaha said.
According to Winter Park
City Attorney Larry Brown,
a meeting will be set up be-
tween the city and the coun-


WF 8elJZ? a







FM 89m9 ,lumO


ty within the next few weeks
to discuss the changes.
Some residents had pre-
viously expressed fear that
the city may not get a rail
stop at all if the two com-
missions couldn't come to
an agreement.
At a May 24 meeting,
when the City Commission
voted to send an amend-
ed agreement to Orange
County in hopes of modi-
fying their current SunRail


funding agreement, some
residents discussed the pos-
sibility of rail improving
property values along the
corridor.
Segal said both systems
will be a boon for Central
Florida, and that he's push-
ing to keep Winter Park on
track to be included with
the SunRail system.
"I want to make sure
Winter Park has a station,"
Segal said. "I know we'll


work with them in any way
we can to make them feel
comfortable."
According to Rollins Col-
lege professor Bruce Ste-
phenson, connecting rail
with the city could pay divi-
dends in property values. He
cited differences in proper-
ty value changes in his own
properties in Winter Park
and in Portland, Oregon,
which has a commuter rail
system.


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"You'll begin to see the
money that we will make,"
he said, citing that real es-
tate values near commuter
rail systems dropped less
and recovered more quickly
than those that were not
near commuter rail. "We
have an opportunity here,
looking toward the future."
He pleaded with the city
to not sour its relations with
Orange County and to go
forward with including it-
self in commuter rail, recall-
ing more than 100 years of
Winter Park's history built
around the railroad.
"We have an amazing his-
tory that we are apt to turn
our back on," he said.
The city can opt out of
SunRail after seven years.
Segal said he did not have
any news on whether the
county had any decisions
about Winter Park's amend-
ments to its agreement
with the county for sharing
funding costs and liabilities
for SunRail. He did know
what the county would not
change in the agreement.
"We will not assume any
payment for their station,
and we're not going to as-
sume liability for their sta-
tion," Segal said. "They can
opt out if they want."


Page 4 Thursday, June 3,2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer





Thursday, June 3, 2010 Page 5


Lift limit on terms?

Maitland mayor termed-out, may resign on Friday for county seat


JENNY ANDREASSON
OBSERVER STAFF
Maitland has the most re-
strictive term limits in the
Orlando area, and some on
City Council want to change
that.
City Clerk Maria Waldrop
did a survey of the surround-
ing counties and cities and
found that all of their elect-
ed officials can serve three
consecutive terms or more,
and some don't have limits
at all. Winter Park commis-
sioners are limited to four
consecutive terms, while
there are no term limits in
Orlando, Altamonte Springs
and Apopka.
Mayor Doug Kinson,
who's in his second and fi-
nal term and is running for
the Orange County Com-
mission District 5 seat, said
cities as small as Maitland
and Winter Park, where elec-
tions are decided by a few
hundred votes, shouldn't
have term limits.
"A candidate can go door-
to-door and make up the
difference and win an elec-
tion," he said at the May 24
City Council meeting.
Kinson stopped short of
saying he would have ran
for another mayoral term if
allowed, instead of aiming
for the county seat.
"In my situation, my de-
cision of my future would
have been impacted if I was
not term-limited in the city
of Maitland," he said.
If he qualifies for the
county election, his mayor-
al term will be cut short by
more than a year. Under the
city's charter, the vice may-
or would fill out the rest of
Kinson's term and a citizen
would be appointed to fill
the vice mayor's seat.
Kinson must resign by
Friday, June 4 in order to
qualify for the county race,
but the resignationwouldn't
take effect until January.
To change the city's term
limits, a referendum must
be approved by voters. The
city is also considering ask-
ing voters to make another
charter change allowing
for a special election for the
mayor's position instead of
the vice mayor taking over
for 15 months.
Council members Bev
Reponen and Howard
Schieferdecker said they
supported reviewing the
term limits section of the
charter.
"It's puzzling to me why
term limits are so short be-
cause there is a learning
curve for these positions,"
Schieferdecker said.
Reponen said it's odd that
Maitland and Winter Park
officials serve three-year
terms while Orange Coun-
ty, Casselberry, Apopka and
Orlando all have four-year
terms. Altamonte Springs
commissioners serve two-
year terms, but there are


PHOTO BY JENNY ANDREASSON -THE OBSERVER
Maitland City Councilman Howard Schieferdecker takes his oath of office in April,
as his family looks on. In Maitland and Winter Park, officials are limited to two terms.


no term limits. "It's a good
thing to consider," she said
of the review.
Councilman Phil Bonus
said he supported a char-
ter review commission that
would examine the whole
charter instead of just term
limits. "It seems a little self-
serving," he said of having
such a narrow focus. "I'm
not opposed to having oth-
ers consider it."
Pavilion moves
to workshop
Also at the May 24 meet-
ing, City Council discussed
the former Councilman
Jeff Flower's offer to donate
$250,000 for a performing
arts pavilion at Lake Lily
Park.
"It's a donation but it's
a donation with a bunch
of strings attached to it,"
Schieferdecker said.
In exchange for the mon-
ey, Flowers wants the city to
forgive the $50,000 advance
that it gave the Performing
Arts of Maitland, a nonprof-


it he founded.
Schieferdecker said the
city should host a workshop
that includes the public
and Flowers "to vet this out
and come up with tentative
terms."
Bonus was confused be-
cause Council directed the
Parks and Recreation Advi-
sory Board to gather input
and bring it back to Council.
"We send it to you and you
send it back to us?" he said.
"It's like a hot potato."
Board chair Susan Greco
said the board needs more
information about the fund-
ing and process before it
can inform the public about
the project. "Like who's go-
ing to own it, is it limited to
Lake Lily? Flowers has said,
'If I don't like it I'm going to
pull the plug."
City Council directed
Greco to schedule an initial
workshop to have the pub-
lic weigh in on those ques-
tions, along with Flowers. A
date has not yet been sched-
uled.


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Winter Park / Maitland Observer










Business Briefs


Following a nationwide search,
the University of Central Florida has
selected renowned researcher and
academic leader Tony Waldrop as its
new provost.

Realvest Development is expanding
its commercial development services
to offer third-party construction proj-
ect management, ranging from com-
plete site and facility development to
construction of interior improvements
and tenant build outs for owners and
tenants.

Lynne Frederick, president/CEO of
Massey Communications, has an-
nounced the promotion of Lauren
Leetun, APR, to director of Client Ser-


vices.


Aloma Commerce Center, located
at 2785 Wrights Road near Aloma Av-
enue in Oviedo, recently negotiated a
new three-year lease agreement for
950 square feet of commercial space
to Lens Depot, Inc., a camera retailer
and repair store.

Ronald W. Lowry, AIA, was recently
appointed to the Central Florida Veter-
ans Memorial Park Foundation Inc.'s
Board of Directors. Lowry is currently
Chairman of RLF, a leading Winter
Park-based architecture, engineering
and interior design firm. RLF will pro-
vide design services for the Veterans
Memorial, which will be located adja-


cent to the Orlando Veterans Medical
Center at Lake Nona, currently under
construction.

Fifth Third Private Bank recently
appointed Trey Tolbert-Thompson as
the vice president and wealth man-
agement advisor for private banking
clients in Winter Park. In this role, he
will provide strategic investment and
financial guidance to high-net-worth
clients.

Mattamy Homes U.S. Group, the
U.S. Division of Canada's largest
homebuilder, received the first place
award for its model home at The En-
clave at Lake Jean in East Orlando
during the 2010 Central Florida Pa-


rade of Homes.

Demonstrating its home build-
ing versatility, Musgrave Building &


Restorations, Inc. earned top honors
in two separate and distinct catego-
ries in this year's Parade of Homes.
The remodel of a Winter Park home
earned them a first place.


Community Bulletin


Orange County's top high school
athletes were honored Wednesday,
May 26, at the Bright House Sports
Network Breakfast of Champions
at Bright House Networks Stadium
on the University of Central Florida
campus. A total of 32 athletes from
throughout the Orange County School
District received special medals for
being selected as the best male and
female players in their respective
sports. The Orange County award re-
cipients include:
Boys Basketball: Austin Rivers, Win-
ter Park High; Girls Basketball: Alexis
Prince, Edgewater High; Girls Cross
Country: Shelby Hayes, Winter Park
High; Girls Golf: Brandi Rodriguez,
Winter Park High; Boys Lacrosse: Will
Rotatori, Lake Highland High; Girls
Lacrosse: Kelly Thayer, Edgewater
High; Boys Swim & Dive: Harrison


Curley, Winter Park High; Girls Swim
& Dive: Chelsea Britt, Lake Highland
High; Boys Tennis: Matt Saltsgaver,
Winter Park High; Girls Tennis: Caitlin
McGraw, Winter Park High; Girls Track:
Shelby Hayes, Winter Park High; Boys
Water Polo: Ory Tasman, Winter Park
High; Girls Water Polo: Nicole Tobin,
Winter Park High; and Boys Scholar
Athlete: Patrick Mputu, Winter Park
High.

During a typical school year, the
Holocaust Center in Maitland hosts
thousands of student visitors, most
of whom come as part of class field
trips. The school coming from the
greatest distance, however, was
the group that visited on May 26. A
dozen middle-school students travel-
ing from St. Mary's School in Kodiak,
Alaska made a half-day stop at the


Center. Known as St. Mary's Adven-
ture Learning Team, they planned to
visit the Center after reading about it
on the National Geographic Traveler
Web site. According to Principal Josh
Lewis, they raised money all year in
order for the students to have one
extended educational field trip, which
also included places such as Gator-
land and theme parks.

Rasmussen Inc., a premier learning
organization, has expanded its Orlan-
do office as rising enrollment num-
bers have placed increased demands
on student support teams. With this
growth, Rasmussen has welcomed 85
new employees to the central office
over the last year, and has announced
its search for more than 40 qualified
professionals to fill additional faculty,
admissions, information technology
and marketing positions. Candidates
interested in any of the available po-
sitions may submit a resume, or learn
more about the opportunities with
Rasmussen at www.Rasmussenlnc.
com or by e-mailing CorporateRe-
cruiter2@Rasmussen.edu.

The Orlando Museum of Art (OMA)
announced its participation in Blue
Star Museums, a partnership with the
National Endowment for the Arts and
Blue Star Families to offer free admis-
sion to all active duty military person-
nel and their families from Memo-
rial Day through Labor Day 2010. For


more information, please visit www.
BlueStarFam.org.

Florida jumped 20 places to rank
12th in the nation among the most
bicycle-friendly states, according to
the League of American Bicyclists.
The Bicycle Friendly States program
ranks states based on a 95-item
questionnaire that evaluates a state's
commitment to bicycling and covers
six key areas: legislation, policies
and programs, infrastructure, educa-
tion and encouragement, evaluation
and planning, and enforcement. For
more information about the 2010 Bi-
cycle Friendly State Rankings, please
go to http://www.bikeleague.org/
programs/bicyclefriendlyamerica/bi-
cyclefriendlystate/.

Mitchell's Fish Market, which is


opening in the Winter Park Village on
June 14, is hiring for 115 positions,
including various servers, cooks and
general utility workers. Those inter-
ested should apply in person at 460
N. Orlando Ave. from 10a.m. to 6 p.m.
Call 407-339-3474 or visit Mitchells-
FishMarket.com for more informa-
tion.

Lots of Kids (LOK) a baby-sitting
co-op, is looking for new members
in College Park, Winter Park and Or-
lando. LOK members do not charge
each other for babysitting, instead
they trade babysitting hours. How-
ever participation in the exchanges
is not required for membership. If you
would like to join the group, e-mail
lotsofkids.lok@gmail.com. Yearly
dues are $12 a year per family, pro-
rated at $1 a month.


O b Winter Park / Maitland

Observer


Published Thursday, June 3, 2010


PUBLISHER
Kyle Taylor
407-563-7009
kyle@observernewspapers.com

MANAGING EDITOR
Jenny Andreasson
407-563-7026
jennya@observernewspapers.com

DESIGNER
Eric Sly
407-563-7054
erics@observernewspapers.com


Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster


REPORTERS
Jenny Andreasson
407-563-7026
jennya@observernewspapers.com

Isaac Babcock
407-563-7023
isaacb@observernewspapers.com

LEGALS I CLASSIFIEDS
Ashley McBride
407-563-7058
legal@observernewspapers.com
classifieds@observernewspapers.com


CONTACTS


COPY EDITORS
Ashley McBride
amcbride@observernewspapers.com


Megan Stokes
megans@eosun.com

COLUMNISTS
Chris Jepson
Jepson@MediAmerica.us

Louis Roney
LRoney@cfl.rr.com


Josh Garrick
joshgarrick9@gmail.com

ADVERTISING SALES
Tracy Craft
407-515-2605
tcraft@observernewspapers.com

SUBSCRIPTIONS I CIRCULATION
Jennifer Cox
407-563-7073
jcox@golfweek.com

Interns
Sarah Wilson and Tina Russell


Member of: P.O. Box 2426 1500 Park Center Dr. USPS 00-6186
Florida Press Association Winter Park, FL 32790 Orlando, FL 32835-5705 ISSN 1064-3613
Maitland Area/ Winter Park/
Goldenrod Chamber of Commerce www.wpmobserver.com I Phone: 407-563-7000 I Fax: 407-563-7099 I editor@observernewspapers.com
Publisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor. Submission does not guarantee publication. Columnists' opinions are made independently of the newspaper. All rights reserved.
Winter Park/Maitland ObserverO 2010


Volume 22, Issue Number 22


Page 6 Thursday, June 3,2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer





Thursday, June 3, 2010 Page 7


Summer leagues take the field

After high school and college seasons end, be sure to catch these sports filled with up and comers


ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF
Looking for some high level
sports action this summer?
Look no further than two
leagues that have turned the
summertime lull in Central
Florida sports into a fan's
paradise.

Baseball's future stars
The crack of the first bat is
almost here, and it's music
to Florida Collegiate Sum-
mer League vice president
Rob Sitz's ears. Baseball sea-
son is coming back to Cen-
tral Florida, and it starts to-
night at Sanford Memorial
Stadium.
But America's Pastime is
spreading well beyond San-
ford for this season, and one
of the ever-restless FCSL's
longest-lived teams is back
for its seventh season right
in the heart of Winter Park.
The Winter Park Dia-


mond Dawgs have been
with the league since its
quiet beginnings in 2004.
Only the Sanford River Rats
survived the ensuing waves
of change that shook the
league, which is partially
funded by Major League
Baseball, over the past six
seasons.
And in those seasons,
the Dawgs have rightfully
emerged as a consistent
competitor near the top of
the ladder.
A big part of that suc-
cess will return to the dia-
mond this season. Anthony
Figliolia has taken on the
persona of the FCSL's Babe
Ruth, batting an incredible
.398 last season while carry-
ing a 2.93 ERA as one of the
league's best starting pitch-
ers.
He'll help lead the Dawgs
on offense and pitching, as
well as playing outfield on
his days off the mound.


Chandler Jagodzinski's
cannon struck out 49 bat-
ters in 46 innings last year,
and he'll hope to beat that
record this time around
as another top pick in the
starting rotation.
UCF catcher Ryan Breen
is gunning for the starting
catching spot on the Dawgs'
lineup, bringing a prolific
bat to the plate. The fresh-
man has 57 hits with the
Knights this season.

Soccer on a
national scale
The Central Florida Kraze
have a new home and a new
home in the United Soccer
Leagues' Premier Develop-
ment League at the same
time.
The Kraze have been
strong competitors in the
PDL since their inception
in 1998. The team won the
national championship in


ARCHIVE PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER
The crack of wooden bats fills stadiums throughout Central Florida at Florida Colle-
giate Summer League games, which feature college stars looking to make the majors.


2004.
But despite carrying over
a few players from some
of their strongest seasons,
the Kraze are coming off
their worst showing since
their inaugural year. They
placed 6th in the Southeast
Division last year out of 8
teams.
But things have changed


Effective June 1, 2010, Zahra Promes, MD, is pleased to
announce the opening of her new Internal Medicine practice
in Winter Park, Florida. Former patient medical records will
be maintained at Barimo Family Practice at 483 North
Semoran Boulevard in Winter Park, Florida or Zahra Promes,
Internal Medicine at 201 N. Lakemont Avenue, Suite 700.
If you have any questions, please contact Barimo Family
Practice at 407-678-2400 or Zahra Promes, MD at
407-644-3726.

Barimo Family Practice
483 North Semoran Boulevard
Winter Park, FL 32792

407-678-2400

Zahra Promes, MD
Internal Medicine
201 N. Lakemont Avenue
Winter Park, FL 32792

407-644-3726


already for the Kraze. Four
games into their 2010 sea-
son, they're 3-0-1 thanks to
a brick wall defense and the
top offense in the division.
Boasting an array of in-
ternational stars and a fast-
paced offense, the Kraze
will battle their perennial
rival Bradenton at 7 p.m.
Saturday at Showalter Field
in Winter Park.


0





get !
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: advertise
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contact tracy
407-515-2605
tcraft@observernewspapers.com


407.284.7898


Residential, Estate, and Commericial properties
Maintenance Serv .
Laihscaoi


Winter Park / Maitland Observer










Putting community in Winter Park

A 38,000-square-foot, $9.1 million community center is being built at the former center's site


CARMEN CARROQUINO
GUEST REPORTER
Putting the sense of community in
Winter Park, the new $9.1 million
community center will offer resi-
dents new and improved programs
and recreation activities for the
whole family.
Being built from the ground up
on the existing site, the center, an-
ticipated to be completed by next
spring, will cover the spectrum of
activities and programs offered in
the old community center built in
1971, ranging from new youth and
teen programs to an even more ac-
tive senior program.
Located at 721 W. New England
Ave., the new 38,000-square-foot
facility an increase of 16,000
square-feet from the old center, will
include four multipurpose rooms,
separate rooms dedicated to teens,
children and seniors, a gaming area,
computer lab, fitness room, a multi-
depth swimming pool to accommo-
date all ages and abilities and a reg-
ulated-size gymnasium for sporting
events all state-of-the-art.
Ronald Moore, assistant director
of the Parks and Recreation division
of Winter Park, said the old center
didn't accommodate the growth of
participants well, nor did it allow
for multiple events and programs
to be run at the same time because
of its design.
"The old one did not accommo-


Baseball
Tyler Marincov,
Timber Creek HS
Boys Basketball
Austin Rivers,
Winter Park HS
Girls Basketball
Alexis Prince,
Edgewater HS
Boys Bowling
Benjamin Hritz,
Boone HS
Girls Bowling
Rachel Sather,
Cypress Creek HS
Boys Cross Country
John Logan Hines,
Boone HS
Girls Cross Country
Shelby Hayes,
Winter Park HS
Flag Football:
Hannah Schaible,
Dr. Phillips HS


Football, Defense
Hasean Clinton-Dix,
Dr. Phillips HS
Football, Offense
Trevor Siemian,
Olympia HS
Boys Golf
Joey Petronio,
Olympia HS
Girls Golf
Brandi Rodriguez,
Winter Park HS
Boys Lacrosse
Will Rotatori,
Lake Highland HS
Girls Lacrosse
Kelly Thayer,
Edgewater HS
Boys Soccer
Adrian Rivera,
Timber Creek
Girls Soccer
Lindsey Rice,
Apopka HS


bright house
NETWORKS


RENDERING
This is a digital mock-up of the new Winter Park Community Center, which will include a gaming area, comic
date, space-wise, what we wanted old facility where surveillance cam-
to accomplish," Moore said. "It was eras couldn't see.


outdated and contained operation-
al flow issues too that presented
problems for us like how to staff it
and provide a safe environment for
everyone."
Moore said growing security is-
sues was also a problem in the old
facility. He said a number of hidden
areas and blind spots existed at the


Promising a more user-friendly
facility with ample space, Moore
said the new facility is an updated,
bigger and better version of the old
one, saying that there will be desig-
nated space for every activity and no
limit to the type of programs they
can do and how many at a time.
Expanding off of their traditional
summer and afterschool programs
for children and seniors, Moore
said he and the Park and Recre-
ation division are in the planning
and programming process of de-
ciding what the budget for the
center will be and what new pro-
gram changes and additions will
be made.
He said by the end of the sum-
mer they'll know more.
Clarissa Howard, director
of communications for Winter
Park, said the number one goal of
the CRA strategic plan for 2008
through 2011 is the renovation/
rebuilding of the Winter Park


Softball
Brittany MacFawn,
Timber Creek HS
Boys Swim & Dive
Harrison Curley,
Winter Park HS
Girls Swim & Dive
Chelsea Britt,
Lake Highland HS
Boys Tennis
Matt Saltsgaver,
Winter Park HS
Girls Tennis
Caitlin McGraw,
Winter Park HS
Boys Track
Marvin Bracy,
Boone HS
Girls Track
Shelby Hayes,
Winter Park HS
Boys Volleyball
Christian Franceschi,
Bishop Moore HS


Girls Volleyball
Kelly Merideth,
First Academy
Boys Water Polo
Ory Tasman,
Winter Park
Girls Water Polo
Nicole Tobin,
Winter Park
Boys Weightlifting
Tommy Leslie,
Apopka HS
Girls Weightlifting
Niaja Griffin,
Wekiva HS
Wrestling
Fox Baldwin,
Lake Highland
Boys Scholar Athlete
Patrick Mputu,
Winter Park HS
Girls Scholar Athlete
Nathalia Bailey,
University HS


* CENTRAL FLORIDA
SPORTS COMMISSION


www.brighthouse.com


COURTESY OF WANNEMACHER JENSEN ARCHITECTS
puter lab, swimming pool and more.
Community Center.
"The center is widely recognized
as an integral component of com-
munity life," she said. "A new or ren-
ovated community center contrib-
utes not only to the quality of life of
the residents, but also to the envi-
ronment, economic prosperity, so-
cial development and the creation
of a community focal point."
On Jan. 2 5, the CRA authorized an
ordinance and the bonding of $8.1
million to rebuild the Winter Park
Community Center on its existing
site in Hannibal Square where the
CRA will then fund the additional $1
million needed for the project from
cash available in their budget.
Demolition of the old facility is
now complete and materials are be-
ing recycled. Turner Construction
will build the new center.
Dori DeBord, director of the
community redevelopment agency
of Winter Park, said the new com-
munity center is "crucial because
it brings a sense of place to Winter
Park."


Bright House Networks

Congratulates the

Bright House Sports Network

2010 Breakfast of Champion

Award Recipients


Page 8 Thursday, June 3,2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer





Thursday, June 3, 2010 Page 9


B r














us on
tihheri
-. 3].


Join us for our 8th Annual


-J~aNt


Saturday, June 5t
Lake Eola | DowntI
7:30am 1:00pmi


ndo


ON EVENT DAY...
1. Come as our VIP KID & be our honored guest
/ Come as a BUDDY and be a friend "
3. Come as a VOLUNTEER and serve at the festival Celebrating VIP Kids!
0 VIP Kids are any kids O Buddies are individuals, O Variety of volunteer op-
with special needs which couples and/or families that portunities are available:
includes any physical, cogni- want to "Be a Buddy" and engage Buddy Photos, Food & Drink,
tive, medical or hidden disabil- in friendship with a VIP Kid and Greeters, Stage, Set up. To see
ity, chronic or life-threatening their family. Buddies will be "bud- a complete list and to pre-reg-
illness, or those who are medi- died up" with VIP Kids & families ister (mandatory) check us out
cally fragile. This day is for you! to stroll around Lake Eola. online.
info or provide financial donation go to www.NathanielsHope.org or cal 407-857822Honorary Co-Chairs
Orange County Mayor
Richard T. Crotty
%' & Pam Crotty
le Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer
E & Karen Dyer


Winter Park / Maitland Observer







Page 10 Thursday, June 3, 2010 Winter Park / Maitlanci Observer


Being elected as mayor
of the city of Maitland
has been one of the most
rewarding experiences
of my life. It has taught
me to deal with difficult
situations with dignity and
respect and has made me
realize that decisions are
never about the individual
elected officials, but more
about the needs and desires
of residents throughout a
community.
On Friday, June 4,1 I will
decide whether to submit
my letter of resignation in


order to run for Orange
County Commission,
District 5. Florida's Resign
to Run Law mandates
that one cannot hold two
elected positions at the
same time. In order to
run for one position, one
must resign effective the
date the next position
would be occupied, which
in my case would be Jan.
4, 2011. Further, notice
must be made effective 10
days prior to the first day
of qualifying for the new
position, which is June 4.


This is a very difficult
decision for me. One which
was further complicated
by the city of Maitland's
charter, which states that
elected officials can only
serve two three-year terms.
In my case, continuing to
serve as mayor was not an
option available to me.
My letter of resignation,
if submitted, will result in
my leaving my mayor's post
on Jan. 4, 2011, at which
time the vice mayor will
move to the mayor's seat
and an election will be held
to fill the vacancy left by
the vice mayor in order to
fill the remaining term.
Since the person who
succeeds me as mayor will
only be in that position
for a period of 16 months,
it will take a very special,
unique person to be able
to immediately take over
as mayor, to hit the ground
running, and to keep all
of our projects moving


forward.
The decision of vice
mayor is scheduled to take
place at the second City
Council meeting in June,
at which time his/her term
could be lengthened or
shortened should he/she
eventually become mayor.
A shortened term means
that residents will not
benefit from that person's
experience for the entire
first or second term. If the
term is lengthened, the
elected official's decision
to run for a second term
would be impacted. The
best-case scenario would
have been to have a charter
that dictates a special
election to be held in cases
where the mayor is unable
to fulfill a term, or unable
to serve. The residents of
our community deserve
to have input in such an
important situation.
In any case, our next
mayor will need to be a


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Ceertn 0Yar fevc u f t t SBnig
40-3184490 S igwy 79
w wgufstae- .og CREDIT UNION.MitnF 25


CITY COMMISSION WORK
SESSION
There will be a City
Commission work session
on Monday, June 7, from
5-7 p.m., in City Hall
Commission Chambers
located at 401 S. Park Ave.
The public is invited to
attend, however, no public
comment will be taken.

CLICK IT OR TICKET!
The Winter Park Police
Department will be
joining state and local law
enforcement agencies and
highway safety groups in
supporting an aggressive
national Click It or Ticket
seat belt enforcement
campaign. Stepped-up law
enforcement activities
will be conducted during
the 2010 Click It or Ticket
mobilization period from
May 24 through June 6.
Officers will be focusing
their traffic enforcement
efforts toward unbelted
vehicle occupants around
the clock both night and
day during this time.
Buckle up!

WINTER PARK DIAMOND
DAWGS
The city of Winter Park
announces a summer of
first-rate baseball and
community-building fun
with the 2010 Florida
Collegiate Summer League
(FCSL). I will throw the first


pitch at the season opener
against the Sanford River
Rats on Friday, June 4, at
7 p.m. The game will be
played at Rollins College
Alfond Stadium, home field
of the Diamond Dawgs,
located at the corner
of Orange and Aragon
avenues in Winter Park. The
excitement will continue
through the summer as the
Diamond Dawgs host 23
games. Tickets are just $5
and kids 6 years of age and
younger are free.
Entering its seventh
season, the FCSL is a wood-
bat collegiate baseball
league showcasing many
of the top-ranked college
players in the U.S. It is
one of only nine leagues
sponsored by Major League
Baseball and has also
been named as one of the
top summer leagues in
the country by Baseball
America. In addition to
the Winter Park Diamond
Dawgs, the FCSL is
comprised of the Deland
Suns, Leesburg Lightning,
Orlando Mavericks and
Sanford River Rats.
Entertaining themes
including contests and
activities for all ages are
planned for each game.
Winter Park residents and
visitors are encouraged to
participate in the family
fun and support the
Diamond Dawgs at their
home games. Activities,
prizes and music, in


addition to the highest
caliber baseball, will
provide enjoyment for all
who attend.
Festivities for all home
single games will be begin
at 7 p.m. at the stadium.
Sunday games on June 6,
July 11 and July 25, will
begin at 1 p.m., and a
double-header game on
Saturday, July 17, will begin
at 4:30 p.m.
For additional
information, including
a complete season
schedule with game night
themes, please visit www.
floridaleague.com or call
321-206-9174.

FIRST COFFEETALK OF
2010 SERIES
If you have latte beans to
grind or simply want to
espresso your thoughts,
CoffeeTalk may be the cup
for you!
The city's first CoffeeTalk
of 2010 begins on Thursday,
June 10, featuring Mayor
Ken Bradley from 7-8 p.m.,
at the Welcome Center
located at 151 W. Lyman
Ave.
CoffeeTalk was created
to give the community an
opportunity to talk with
their city leaders in a casual
and informal environment.
Mayor Ken Bradley kicks off
the six-month series next
Thursday.
Below is the schedule for
the upcoming 2010 series.
Mark your calendars to join
your city leaders for cup of
coffee and a whole latte of
great conversation on one
or more of the following
dates:
JULY 15: City
Manager Randy Knight
AUG. 19: Vice Mayor Beth


Dillaha
SEPT. 16: Commissioner Phil
Anderson
OCT. 21: Commissioner Car-
olyn Cooper
NOV. 18: Commissioner Tom
McMacken
Special thanks to our
coffee provider, Palmano's
Roastery & Expresso Bar.

COUNTRY CLUB TEES UP
SUMMER EVENTS
The city of Winter Park
invites you to experience
one of Central Florida's
oldest and most beautiful
golf courses, the Winter
Park Country Club (WPCC),
located at 761 Old England
Ave. As mentioned in
Golfweek magazine, the
WPCC remains a classic
golf experience with the
same tight fairways and
small, domed greens that
seemed to baffle the pros.
Over the years, the historic
golf course has played host
to some of golf's greatest
legends including Ben
Hogan, Sam Snead and
Walter Hagen.
Get ready to hit the
links and tee it up at these
upcoming summer events:
-Ladies Only Scramble,
Sunday, June 6, 8 a.m. to 11
a.m.
-Women's Golf Month
Group Clinic, Monday, June
7, noon to 1 p.m.
-3rd annual Father & Son
Scramble, Sunday, June 20,
8 a.m. shotgun start
-Take Your Daughter to
Golf Week, July 5 -11
-Family Golf Week, July
19-25
In addition to
championship golf, the
club offers a full-service
pro shop stocked with all


the latest golf accessories.
The pro shop remains
competitive by offering
the best values on golf
bags, gloves, umbrellas,
hats, golf balls, apparel and
accessories.
The WPCC is open to
the public and offers junior
and family membership
packages. Special
membership rates are also
available for city of Winter
Park residents.
For complete
information regarding the
WPCC, including greens
fees, course map and
upcoming golf outings,
please visit the city's
official Web site at www.
cityofwinterpark.org >
Departments > Parks &
Recreation, or call the Pro
Shop at 407-599-3339.

NEW SUMMER
WEBISODE
Log on to the homepage
of the city's Web site and
click on the Webisode
button to watch the
city's newest summer
Webisode featuring the
city's parks. Through
a creative partnership
with Full Sail University's
SPARK program, the
Communications
Department works with
students who devote
hundreds of hours to create
these short Webisodes that
feature unique aspects
of the city. So far, three
outstanding Webisodes
have been created so you
can enjoy the city's finest
right on your desktop.

Visit the city's official
Web site at www.
cityofwinterpark. org, find
us on Facebook and follow
us on Twitter


Maitland City Talk
BY DOUGLAS T. KINSON
MAYOR


Maitland's next mayor


(ITT o~( JLI'.,IW 11H RIT4~lE
Winter Park CityTalk
BY RANDY KNIGHT
CITY MANAGER


consensus builder who is
able to bring both sides of
an issue together such that
we can move ahead with
any matter.
Our next mayor needs
to be fair and listen to all
sides of an issue, not just to
a select few.
Our next mayor needs to
be available for any matter
that comes along, no
matter the timing or length
of the meeting or event.
And finally and most
importantly, Maitland's
next mayor needs to be one
who is respectful of every
person in the process, no
matter what their belief or
action. This includes every
member of Council, every
member of staff, every
partner in our community,
and especially, every
resident who stands up to
the podium. Anybody who
can't be respectful to others
need not apply.


Page 10 Thursday, June 3,2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer






Thursday, June 3, 2010 Page 11


Calendar


The Orlando Museum of Art's 1st
Thursdays event will showcase
"Printmakers Unite!" on Thursday,
June 3 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. The OMA
welcomes visitors to experience an
evening of works by some of Central
Florida's fine art printmakers. Admis-
sion to 1st Thursdays is $10. For more
information, call 407- 896-4231, ext.
260, or visit www.OMArt.org.

The Maitland Art and History Asso-


ciation welcomes the public Satur-
day, June 5 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., to
meet the new Executive Director and
CEO Andrea Bailey Cox. The meet and
greet will be held during the Maitland
Art Center's Education Open House
at 231 W. Packwood Ave. The Open
House, held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.,
will allow the public to meet instruc-
tors, talk to students, visit classes,
and watch live art demonstrations for
free. For details call 407-539-2181.


The Friends of the Orlando Philhar-
monic Orchestra presents the sixth
annual Jeans & Jewels fundraising
event that will be held Saturday, June
5, at 7 p.m. at the Winter Park Farm-
er's Market, 200 W. New England Ave.,
Winter Park. The event will feature the
dancing hits and fashion of Motown.
For more information and reserva-
tions, call Gretchen Miller Basso at
407-896-6700, ext. 223. Reserva-
tions must be made in advance.

The Eighth Annual Make 'm Smile
event will be held Saturday, June 5
from 7:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Lake
Eola Amphitheater. The event is dedi-
cated to celebrating kids with special
needs (VIP kids) of Central Florida. The
event is free and open to the public.
For more information, or to register,
visit www.NathanielsHope.org, and
click on Make 'm Smile.

Catch the Vision for AFS Florida is
an informational event for families,
students and potential volunteers in-
terested in high school international
exchange programs. The event will be
held from 10 a.m. to noon on Saturday,
June 5, at Willow Creek Church, PCA;


4725 E. Lake Drive, Winter Springs.
For more information, visit www.afs.
org, or call 407-977-0286.

The Family Physicians Group and
Ana G. Mendez University System are
joining forces to present Central Flori-
da Prepares 2010. The event will take
place Saturday, June 5, from 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m. at Ana G. Mendez Univer-
sity System, 5601 S. Semoran Blvd.,
Orlando. Central Florida Prepares will
offer free health screenings, informa-
tion about emergency preparedness
and available community resources.
For additional information, contact
Yvonne Pearce at 407-447-4264.

The United Muslim Foundation has
partnered with First Congregational
Church of Winter Park to present a
series of thought-provoking events
about Islam and its faithful. The event
will be split into four seminars, each
at 11:30 a.m. every Sunday in June
at the Fellowship Hall, 225 S. Inter-
lachen Ave. E-mail bfulwider@fccwp.
org for more information.

The University Club of Winter Park,
at the corner of Webster and Park,
will present a lecture on Winston S.
Churchill, noted statesman and orator
on Monday, June 7 at 10 a.m. Attor-
ney John Snow, graduate of Cornell
University, will explore the early life
of this giant of a man who became
known as The Last Lion of England.

The Central Florida Anthropological
Society will welcome Patricia Urdzik,
graduate student of anthropology at
University of Central Florida, for her
presentation from her Honors in the
Major Thesis, "From the Land of the
Inca to the Land of Mickey Mouse:
The migration Trajectory of Peruvian
Women From Peru to Central Florida."
She will present on Thursday, June
10 at 7 p.m. at Leu Gardens, 1920 N.
Forest Ave., Orlando.


Alabama Oaks
of Winter Park
S ASSIST ED LIV ING


Artistree Co-op is celebrating their
artist of the month, Debbie Lippens.
The art opening and reception, which
is free and open to the public, will be
held from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. on
Thursday, June 10, at the Artistree
Co-op at 1600 Edgewater Drive in
the College Park neighborhood of Or-
lando. For more information call 407-
999-5251 or visit www.ArtistreeCo-
op.com.

The Baldwin Park Merchants Asso-
ciation and Arts Hub Florida will pres-
ent the Art Stroll of Baldwin Park from
6 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Thursday, June
10, on New Broad Street in Down-
town Baldwin Park. It is free and open
to the public. For more information,
contact Brad Biggs at 407-247-4552,
Jason Lee at 321-662-9073, or via
email at theartshubfl@aol.com.

The Central Florida Ballet will pres-
ent Gala of the Stars 2010 to conclude
the weeklong World Ballet Competi-
tion held at the Bob Carr Performing
Arts Center June 8-12. The gala will
be held at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday,
June 12. It will showcase masterpiec-
es of George Balanchine and Moses
Pendleton; a world premiere by Viktor
Plotnikov; and for the first time ever in
Orlando, a duet from the work 'Bella
Figura' of the choreographer Jiri Kyl-
lian. Visit www.wbcorlando.com for
more information.

The Central Florida Chapter of USA
DANCE will hold the Great Gatsby
Charity Ball from 7:30 p.m. to 11:30
p.m. on Friday, June 18, at the Ba-
hia Shrine Ballroom, 2300 Pembrook
Drive, Orlando. Proceeds benefit the
Bahia Shrine and its support of Shri-
ners Children's Hospitals. The event
will feature dance exhibitions by top
professionals, a silent auction, and
dance lessons followed by an eve-
ning of ballroom dancing. Tickets are
$20 at the door. Contact John Davis at
407-644-6286 for more information.


Call us for a tour
or more information
407-718-7937
1759 Alabama Dr., Winter Park
www.alabamaoaks.com


Winter Park / Maitland Observer











Lifestyles


PHOTO BY BRITTNI JOHNSON THE OBSERVER
Patrons at Winter Park barbeque eatery wait in line on a drizzling Saturday afternoon. The lines often extend out to the road.

4Rivers Smokehouse, a popular barbecue spot in Winter Park, is looking to open a second location


BRITTNI JOHNSON
GUEST REPORTER
The owner of 4Rivers
Smokehouse is looking in
several areas of greater Or-
lando to open a second lo-
cation.
John Rivers said that al-
though he's in no imme-
diate rush to get another
restaurant launched, he is
browsing for a place in four
areas: Dr. Phillips, Winter
Garden, the University of
Central Florida and down-
town Orlando.
Rivers wants a larger lo-
cation, with indoor and out-
door seating potential, and



Grab some of their
signature brisket at
2103 W. Fairbanks Ave.
in Winter Park. Check
them out on the Web at
www.4rsmokehouse.com.

Customers can also feel
good about eating at
4Rivers. More than 10
percent of the
restaurant's profits are
donated to local
charities, with
thousands raised so far.


better parking than what
he's got now. He said quality
and guest satisfaction at his
current place are what he's
focused on during this pro-
cess, which is why he's tak-
ing it slow.
"I'm not going to com-
promise what we're doing
here."
The demand for a second
restaurant is definitely there.
Rivers said his little eatery
sells about 15,000 pounds
of meat a week. On a rainy
Saturday, at least 30 people
happily lined up, most with-
out umbrellas, as a sprinkle
started. No one seemed to
notice. Perhaps they were
distracted by the delicious
smokehouse smell floating
in the air. It was Rolanda
Williams' second time at the
restaurant. She'd come back
to get another taste of their
signature brisket.
"The first time I came
here I literally waited an
hour, and it was worth every
minute," she said.
The smokehouse, which
leads with its fresh daily,
18-hour smoked brisket,
has grown a lot since they
opened in October of last
year. They've gone from a
staff of 12 to 54. They now
sell their sauce all over the
country and are starting to
package their brisket and
beans to be sold to restau-
rants, schools, convention


IT IS THE

VERY BEST
BARBECUE.
IT HAS
KILLER
GOOD

FLAVOR.
-TRUDY WILD

centers and hospitals. Riv-
ers is also building a com-
missary in downtown Or-
lando so they'll have more
production space for the
growing catering and mail-
order businesses.
Customers are happy
about the growth, especial-
ly if that brings a 4Rivers to
their town. And if not, it's
worth the travel time. Trudy
Wild, who said she brings a
new person every time she
comes to 4Rivers, drives all
the way from Longwood to
get the barbecue.
"It is the very best bar-
becue. It has killer good fla-
vor," Wild said.
"It's worth the drive,"
said Kim Holley, another
Longwood resident.
That's what Rivers loves
to hear. One of his favorite
things to do is take off his


4Rivers gear, disguise him-
self with a hat, and wait in
line so he can listen to the
customers talk about his
food. He said he's amazed by
people's reactions and the
restaurant's success so far.
"People started coming
in and it hasn't stopped,"
Rivers said. "To me, I'm still
feeding friends."
And that's part of the
success, he said. First there's
good food, then giving a
unique experience, "and
then you top it off when you


can personalize it."
He certainly does that.
In one hour, he filled cus-
tomers' iced teas, took
trays of trash, gave out free
homemade ice cream and
shared the secret to his col-
lard greens. People walked
past and stopped to shake
his hand and compliment
his food. Some he knew by
name, others he made sure
to ask.
"I love making people
happy that's always my
goal," Rivers said.


NC Creative Hair Design Salon
Hair weaving
Healthy hair care
Intensive restoration treatments
Precision cuts
Vibrant and natural hair coloring
Dreadlock start up and maintenence
Brow waxing and more...
Grand Opening Special
May 25 June 25
1/2 off all hair services
(new clients only)
Call for an appointment
407-242-7438
Get pricing or book your appointment online:
www.getyourhairdone.genbook.com


925 S. Orlando Ave Studio #10
(inside iStudio)


VISA


Page 12 Thursday, June 3,2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer






Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Family


Calendar


Motor vehicle crashes are the
No. 1 killer of teens in the U.S.,
with an average of 11 teens
dying in car crashes each day.
On Thursday, June 3, 11 teens
wearing the numbers 1-11
will line Heritage Square, 65
E. Central Blvd. in Orlando, to
represent the driving fatalities
that can be changed by the
passage of the Safe Teen and
Novice Driver Uniform Protection
(STANDUP) Act. The act would
enforce stronger uniform
Graduated Driver Licensing
(GDL) laws across the country.
For more information, visit www.
facebook.com/savel 1.

The following event is held at
the JCC Maitland Campus at
851 N. Maitland Ave. Visit www.
orlandojcc.org to register.
-School out days will be held
May 25 through June 11 from
7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. School out
days provide kids with a place
to spend time with their friends
before camp begins on June 14.

Children's programming
continues in the Maitland Public
Library, 501 S. Maitland Ave. with
new Youth Services Librarian,
Jonathan Dolce. Call 507-647-
7700 for information.
-Mondays at 7 p.m. is Bedtime
Stories.
-Tuesdays at 10:30 a.m. is
Preschool Stories.
-Thursdays at 10:45 a.m. is Baby
and Toddler Stories.

Summer classes are starting
soon at the Maitland Art Center
for children ages 6-12. There
are three sessions throughout
the summer: Session 1, June
14-25; Session 2, July 12-23;
and Session 3, July 26-Aug. 6.
Classes offered include Pottery
with Cindy McDowell, Drawing
& Cartooning with Terry Markle,
Creating Your Own Superhero,
Young Artist Drawing and Young
Artist Painting/Mixed Media. For
more information or to register,
contact Ann Colvin at 407-539-
2181, ext. 264, e-mail acolvin@
itsmymaitland.com or visit
maitlandartcenter.org.

This summer, the Morse
Museum invites families to
learn more about the life and
art of American designer Louis
Comfort Tiffany through two free
programs designed especially
for elementary-school-age
children. Beginning in June, on
eight select Tuesdays (June 15,
22, and 29; July 6, 13, 20 and
27; and Aug. 3) families can
enjoy a guided museum tour
and take home an art activity
related to the Morse's extensive
collection of works by Tiffany.
On four Fridays (June 25, July 9,
July 23, and Aug. 6) participants
can watch a short film, produce
a work of art and visit the Tiffany
exhibits as well as other galleries.
Space is limited and reservations
are required. All children must
be accompanied by a parent or
guardian. Call 407-645-5311,
ext. 136, to make a reservation
or for more information.


Thursday, June 3, 2010 Page 13


School's out, summer's in


PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE DOJO OF MAITLAND AND JCC OF GREATER ORLANDO
From left, a girl plays at the Dojo karate camp, boys relax at the pool at the Jewish Community Center in Maitland, and a boy paints at the JCC camp.

Winter Park and Maitland organizations are still enrolling for summer camp
sessions in areas such as acting, art, ballet, rowing and karate


SARAH WILSON
OBSERVER STAFF
As school winds down and
the weather heats up, sum-
mer camp sessions start in
full-swing.
For those still looking
for the perfect place for
their kids to kick back and
have some fun this summer,
here are a few local sum-
mer camps specializing in
everything from karate to
theatre.
Each camp may have a
different theme, but each
one aims to provide a safe,
entertaining environment
for Central Florida kids this
summer:

Crealde ArtCamp
Offering art-development
classes taught by profes-
sional artists, the Crealde
ArtCamp gives children the
opportunity to discover
their inner-artist with ac-
tivities including ceram-
ics, painting and drawing,
print-making, photography
and sculpture.
Regarded as Central
Florida's original arts camp,
the Crealde School of Art
in Winter Park offers one,
two, or six-week sessions
throughout the summer
for children and teens ages
5-17 beginning June 14. The
camp also hosts Summer
Saturdays with classes avail-
able in a variety of subjects


open to all ages.
At the end of the summer,
ArtCamp graduates get to
showcase their work at the
Showalter Hughes Commu-
nity Gallery.
"It's wonderful to be
part of a gallery show it's
something a lot of kids will
always remember," Market-
ing Director Robin Berrie
said.
Visit www.crealde.org for
more information.

JCC camps
Can't find that perfect camp
to meet your child's needs?
The JCC of Greater Orlando
in Maitland gives campers
the opportunity to custom-
ize their experience.
Campers decide which
classes to attend through-
out the summer. Options
include everything from ro-
botics to cake decorating.
"Explorer" campers can
attend fieldtrips twice a
week to places such as Bliz-
zard Beach and the Daytona
500 Experience for $230 per
week, or opt for "lite" camp,
in which students partici-
pate in all activities on-site
for $260 per week. Sessions
begin June 14 and are open
to all ages from infants to
teenagers.
For a full list of options
and more information, visit
www.orlandojcc.org.

Youth rowing camp


Key Features
* 12 Month Price Guarantee
24-Hour Secured Access
* Heated & Cooled Units
* Sizes Range from 4x4 to 30x20


S.00S

New Customers OnlyOffer Expires 7/31/2010.


The 30-time State Champi-
on Winter Park Crew team
is offering a "learn to row"
summer camp for those
ages 12-18.
The camp is instructed
by the woman's crew coach
and colligate alumni of the
Winter Park team.
"It can be for anyone who
wants to learn to row -
they can be novice or they
can have experience, they
can all come out and learn,"
Meggen Wilson said.
The camp offers two ses-
sions: Session 1 from June
14 to July 9; and Session 2
from July 12 to Aug. 6. The
camp is held at the Win-
ter Park Crew boathouse
on Lake Howell Mondays,
Wednesdays and Fridays
from 8 a.m. to noon. Each
session is $250. For more in-
formation, visit www.win-
terparkcrew.com.

Dojo karate camp
The Dojo of Maitland,
ranked one of the top-10
karate programs in the
state, offers a summer camp
that combines the teaching
of martial arts and the field-
trips and playtime of a typi-
cal summer camp.
Camp Director Jonathon
Luque said the camp offers
not only a fun, safe envi-
ronment for kids, but also
the discipline, fitness, self-
esteem and confidence that
can come from practicing
martial arts.
The camp begins June
11. The weekly price for at-
tending is $117, or $39 daily
with all field trips included.
Campers can look forward
to kicking off the summer
session with a trip to see the
new "Karate Kid" movie.
Visit www.maitlanddojo.
com for more information.


Summer Drama Camp
Lights! Camera! Action! The
Summer Drama Camp held
at the Calvary Assembly of
God in Winter Park gives
kids the opportunity to be
a star.
Dedicated to teaching
students how to thrive in
a creative environment,
Camp Director Lynda Stein
said her camp gives children
an artistic outlet they might
not have during the school
year.
During each session the
campers prepare for a full-
theatre production pre-
sented at the conclusion of
the camp. This year's pro-
ductions include "Fiddler
on the Roof", Disney's "The
Jungle Book" and "A Year
with Frog and Toad". The
first session begins June 7.
For more information and
pricing, visit www.summer-
dramacamp09.com.

Mini Sports Camp
Have a child who loves
sports? The Mini Sports
Camps offered by the city
of Maitland may hit you a
homerun.
The camp gives partici-
pants experience in many
different sports in four-day
"mini" sessions. There is a
one-time registration fee of
$25 and each session, start-
ing June 14 and continuing
throughout the summer,
costs $60.
The city of Maitland also
sponsors a specialized Youth
Tennis Camp. Also offered
in four-day sessions, the
camp is open to children of
all skill levels. The cost per
session is $90 for Maitland
residents and $100 for non-
residents.
For more information
on both these camps, visit
www.itsmymaitland.com or
call 407-539-0042.








l THRIVE@ 55 AND BEYOND!




SeniorOserver


PHOTO BY BRITTNI JOHNSON THE OBSEI
Suzanne Wood, one of Nancy Corse Reed's friends, admires a centerpiece with Reed's photo at the dedication, May 17. Wood said she was one of the tennis champion's few "non-tennis playing friends."

Winter Park dedicated the Azalea Lane Tennis Pavilion in memory of tennis champ Nancy Corse Reed


BRITTNI JOHNSON
GUEST REPORTER
Val Woska said that she
can still hear Nancy Corse
Reed's voice coaching her as
she chooses her serves and
return shots on the tennis
court.
"Her mission in life was
for everybody to have a


glancing knowledge, if not
a full-blown love of tennis,"
said Woska, Reed's former
student who organized the
dedication of Azalea Lane
Tennis Pavilion to Reed, who
paved the way for women
and seniors in tennis.
On May 17, a ceremony,
which included a round
robin tennis tournament,
revealed the Azalea Lane


Savnnh out adSotag
^^^^^^^^of Oviedo*


Located on a beautiful campus setting, our two Savannah Court communi-
ties provide full assisted living services while Savannah Cottage offers a
secured residence for those with memory loss.


Restaurant Style Dining Experience
Vibrant and Extensive Activities Program
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Tennis Pavilion's new plaque
with Reed's name. Around
60 of Reed's friends and,
more than anything, ten-
nis students over the years,
gathered to play tennis,
eat and remember the late
Winter Park resident and
Rollins College alumni who
inspired them to be better
players and people.
"She thought through ev-
erything she said and did -
nothing was rushed," Woska
said of Reed in life and on
the courts. "Wouldn't it be
nice in life if everybody was
so steadfast?"
Reed was a champion in
women's tennis. She won
close to 100 national and
international titles, and
throughout her life, she
ranked No. 1 in every sin-
gle's age division from 35


to 75. That's right, she was
playing tennis well into her
last days in 2009, capturing
titles and playing until just
less than a year before she
died. Tennis was her life,
and something she loved so
much she wanted to share it
with everyone.
Friends said Reed didn't
just sit back and wish people
learned tennis, she made it
happen. She was a teacher
at the Azalea Lane Tennis
Center for decades, and was
invaluable to the many she
taught.
"She really pushed them
to believe in themselves,"
said Kay Merrill, Reed's best
friend and fellow tennis
player and teacher.
Not only was she a trail-
blazer in the world of wom-
en's tennis, she was partly


r


responsible for the exis-
tence of senior women's
tennis. Reed co-founded
and was the first president
of the National Senior
Women's Tennis Associa-
tion, and she also co-found-
ed the Les Grandes Dames
Senior Women's Prize Mon-
ey Tennis Circuit.
Reed, who thought of
tennis as a lifelong sport,
wanted everyone to be
able to play. And of course,
she needed an arena her-
self. She loved competing,
and had the most amazing
concentration during the
game, Merrill said. She had
the stamina to play against
anyone, even those much
younger than her.
"It was humbling; she

> turn to REED on PAGE 17


I


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call us at 1-800-859-1550 or visit us
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Page 14 Thursday, June 3,2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


p


'I





Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Senior


In Winter Park, at the Mayflower, I
have been a participant of the Toast-
masters club for more than three
years. Within the last year, I received
the designation of Silver Advanced
Communicator.
At Toastmasters, we all grapple
with the same issue public speak-
ing. It is phenomenal to hear the
changes in people as they commit
to the program and pursue levels of
communication and leadership.
People of all ages can benefit from
Toastmasters. It will improve your
communication skills with family,
friends and associates. This happens
in a friendly, supportive atmosphere.
For a nominal fee, you can benefit
from the weekly meetings and helpful
manuals.
The Mayflower Toastmasters Club
meets Fridays from noon to 1 p.m.
Visit us to learn excellence in com-
munication and leadership skills. For
more information call 407-644-1607.
-Carolyn Behling

From the Orange County Commis-
sion On Aging Newsletter of June
2010:
-Counsel for Caregivers Seminar -


Bulletin


"You are Extraordinary by Design"
presented by Larry Witzleben at
12:10 p.m. on Thursday, June 17 at
the downtown Orange County Library,
3rd Floor, Albertson Room. To RSVP or
for more information, call 407-836-
7446 or e-mail officeonaging@ocfl.
net.
-Hurricane Expo Orange County
hosts the two-day annual Hurricane
Expo from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Fri-
day, June 4, and from 11 a.m. to 5
p.m. on Saturday, June 5, at the Fash-
ion Square Mall. For information, call
407-836-9140.
-OCAlert- Sign up for instant weather
warnings and other County emergen-
cy notices at https://ocalert.net/.
-Special Needs Registry The phone
number for Orange County's Special
Needs Registry has changed to 407-
836-9319. Or, you can dial "3-1-1".
-Brain Health Seminar Dr. Paul
Nussbaum will host a free brain
health seminar from 9:30-11:30 a.m.
on Friday, June 18, at the Winter Park
Towers. To register, call 407-843-
1910, ext. 301.

-Other News
Cool Web site www.afb.org/senior-


sitehome.asp help for seniors with
vision problems.
Statistics Visit www.cdc.gov/nchs/
data/databriefs/db31.htm to get
1999-2006 statistics on vision, hear-
ing, balance and sensory impairment
in Americans aged 70+.
Recession At www.prb.org/Arti-
cles/201 0/recessionolderamericans.
aspx, learn the effects of the reces-
sion on American households and
seniors.
Drug Prices A new AARP report finds
Medicare consumers were hit the
largest recorded spike in brand-name
drug prices over the 12-month period
ending in March 2010. www.aarp.
org/health/drugs-supplements/.
Retirement Readiness The Retire-
ment Readiness Index released a re-
port and workbook on retirement. Vis-
it, www.metlife.com/mmi/research/
retirement-readiness-index.html.
Financial Health A report reveals
that African Americans and Latinos
are particularly at-risk of poverty and
financial instability in their later years.
Visit http://iasp.brandeis.edu/pdfs/
SFSI.pdf.

-Partner Paragraph: Hispanic Health


Initiatives, Inc. is celebrating their
10th anniversary serving the health
needs of the medically under-served
populations of Central Florida. Learn
more about their classes, screening
and programs at www.hhi2001 .org.

-Did you know... In a survey of peo-
ple 70 and older, 1 in 6 had impaired
vision; 1 in 4 had impaired hearing; 1
in 4 had loss of feeling in the feet; and
3 of 4 had abnormal postural balance
testing. Source: NCHS, NCHS Data
Brief, No. 31

-Recommended Reading ... "As
Time Goes By: Boomerang Marriages,
Serial Spouses, Throwback Couples,
and Other Romantic Adventures in an
Age of Longevity." Abigail Trafford

Vietnam Veterans of America will
hold the Biennial National Leadership
Conference from August 10-14 in
Orlando. Nearly 400 Vietnam veteran
leaders will gather at the Rosen Cen-
tre to take part in seminars, meetings,
a golf tournament, and other activi-
ties, including an awards banquet.


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Thursday, June 3, 2010 Page 15

Don't rush into a Roth -
it could cost you

Over the course of my
career, I've noticed that
a new financial strategy
combined with a little
propaganda can go a long
way in shifting consumer
financial planning behav-
ior. Case and point in 2010
the Roth IRA.
Roth IRAs have become
a hot topic this year as a
result of the income limi-
tation being lifted, making
Roths a retirement savings
option for almost anyone.
But what many don't real-
ize is that rushing into a
Roth conversion (or any
financial strategy for that
matter) could potentially
cost you thousands if it's
not the best decision for
your finances or even
worse, if it's executed im-
properly.
A Roth IRA isn't right for
everyone there are some
situations where it isn't
the best savings vehicle.
For instance, if you are
retired and are in a lower
tax bracket, you may end
up paying more taxes on
the conversion than on
the withdrawals from your
other account.
If you do decide it's the
right financial move for
you, make sure you convert
the right way in order to
get the most out of your
retirement savings.
Conversion mistakes
can be costly, so be sure to
avoid the 20 percent with-
holding fee for failing to
do a direct transfer, also
known as a trustee-to-
trustee transfer. There is
a 6 percent excise tax li-
ability if you forget to take
Required Minimum Distri-
butions from existing ac-
counts before converting,
which is a common issue
for retirees; and a 10 per-
cent penalty tax for with-
drawing money from your
IRA or 401 (k) that's being
converted to cover the
conversion taxes and/or if
you're younger than 59 .
Roth IRAs can be a valu-
able estate-planning tool
for reducing estate taxes
and eliminating tax liabili-
ties on withdrawals for
heirs, but in order for this
strategy to work it must be
executed correctly includ-
ing:
-Completing new ben-
eficiary designation forms
(they don't rollover from
one retirement savings ac-
count to another);
-Clearly defining who
will receive the Roth and
what percentage they
should receive.
Roth IRA conversions
can be complicated and
costly if not done properly.
Be sure to consult a quali-
fied financial professional
to get the most out of your
Roth and retire without
worries.
-Scott Cramer,
President of Winter Park-based
Cramer & Rauchegger






Page 16 Thursday, June 3, 2010 Winter Park / Maitlanci Obseiver


Mood disorders


by Matilda Charles

The rate of those of us
having mental issues
involving anxiety seems to
decline a bit as we advance
in age. On the other hand, if
we have depression, it can
be harder to treat in seniors.
So say two recent studies.
The first study compared
people of all age groups to
see which group had more


anxiety disorders, and then
focused on older age groups
(55-64 years, 65-74 years,
75-84years and 85 years and
up) and compared them
over a 12-month period.
The results showed that,
yes, there was an overall
decline in mood disorders
as the participants aged.
Women had more disorders
than men, however.
Even though there is a
decline in mood disorders,
anxiety remains very
common, especially in
women. Right on the heels
of this study was another


concerning depression
in later life. Researchers
claimed that depression in
seniors is harder to treat,
but at least they now have
a clue as to why: Those with
depression "don't respond
normally to emotional
stimuli," such as faces that
are neutral, happy or sad.
Participants (both healthy
and depressed seniors)
were first asked to look at
pictures of other people
and rate them only by
physical features. The result
was that seniors without
depression took longer to


rate the physical features,
likely because happy or sad
expressions on the faces
affected them and delayed
a response.
Participants were then
asked to rate the expression
on the faces in the photos.
Seniors with depression
weren't distracted at
all by any expression. It
didn't matter if it was
a happy, neutral or sad
face. Additionally and
this is key depressed
seniors had a harder time
identifying which emotion
was being expressed in


the photo. Based on this
study of depression, I can
envision new treatments
using facial emotion
recognition, perhaps paired
with counseling to augment
the drugs that are typically
given.

Matilda Charles regrets that she can-
not personally answer reader ques-
tions, but will incorporate them into
her column whenever possible.

Write to her in care of King Features
Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475,
Orlando, FL 32853-6475, or send e-
mail to columnreply@gmail.com.
2010 King Features Synd., Inc.


Fiduciary program shortchanging vets


by Freddy Groves

Did you know that the
Department of Veterans
Affairs has a fiduciary
program to help veterans
handle their finances
when they can't do it for
themselves? No? Lots of
people don't.
Fiduciary representatives


can be a group such as a
nursing home or law firm,
or a family member or
someone appointed by the
VA.Atpresent, the fiduciaries
are managing the financial
affairs of more than 100,000
veterans with estate assets
of more than $3 billion.
Fiduciaries earn 4 percent
of the amount they manage.
But there are problems. A
VA Office of the Inspector
General report says that
the fiduciary program "is
not effectively protecting
the VA-derived income


and estate of incompetent
beneficiaries."
A Government
Accountability Office report
said that "insufficient
staff compliance ... hinder
VA's ability to safeguard
veterans' benefits." Lack
of accountability, late or
falsified reports, lack of
training and outright theft
are huge problems.
One thieving fiduciary,
responsible for the financial
affairs of a whopping 33
veterans, went to prison
for stealing $1 million from


those veterans. At a recent
hearing on Capitol Hill,
witnesses gave testimony
about the VA Fiduciary
Program. The speakers
covered awide range oftitles
and expertise, including the
director of audits operation
division, assistant director
for program management,
field examiner, the director
of compensation and
pension service and even
the chair of the government
relations committee for the
Gold Star Wives of America.
Coming on the heels of the


GAO and VAOIG reports,
they paint an ugly picture
about the program, but one
with hope that changes
can be made. If you want
to read the statements, go
to veterans.house.gov and
put "Examining the U.S.
Department of Veterans
Affairs' Fiduciary Program"
in the search box.

Write to Freddy Groves in care of
King Features Weekly Service, P.O.
Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-
6475, or send e-mail to column re-
ply@gmail.com.
2010 King Features Synd., Inc.


"The Mayflower Gives Us Freedom

To Pursue Our Passions"


Tom and Anna Polgar appreciate
living in a community that fosters
continuing education and gives
them freedom to pursue their
passions. Tom, a former CIA and
Army intelligence officer, heads
The Mayflower's Current Events
Club. Anna, a certified Master
Gardener, volunteers at the
Orange County Extension office.
"We love living in a community
where we can have a home and
garden without having to


worry about maintenance issues,"
the couple says. "But The Mayflower
offers far more than that. We love
the security of knowing we will
both be cared for . no matter
what happens in the future."
If you're looking at retirement
living options, take a look at
The Mayflower. It's a good plan
for the future.
Call today to secure a spot on
our waiting list.

(407) 672-1620




0
THE MAYFLOWER
A Plan for the Future-
1620 Mayflower Court
a Winter Park, Florida 32792
First www.themayflower.com


Take the Ultimate

VACATION for the

REST OF YOUR LIFE


Stop by for a visit and take home a dozen
fresh-baked Brookdale signature cookies!


Page 16 Thursday, June 3,2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer





Thursday, June 3, 2010 Page 17


Capturing a dream at any age


James Carter, 70, is learning to read with help from the Adult Literacy League and an Oviedo nonprofit


KRISTY VICKERY
GUEST REPORTER
In the back of a crowded
room, James Carter rigor-
ously studies the sentence,
slowly reading one word at
a time, "Dan-n-n picks up
the box and puts the s-s-
snake in the r-r-river."
Carter may be reading at
a first-grade level, but he has
far out-aged grade school.
He is learning to do some-
thing most people take for
granted, learning to read -
at the age of 70.
"It's been rough for me,"
Carter said. "But I think I am
doing good."
Growing up was not easy
for Carter. He started work-
ing at when he was 9, and
said he never spent a single
day in school.
"I just worked all the
time," Carter said. "I trav-
eled all around the world on
boxcars."
Carter is finally getting
the chance he never got
growing up, with the help
of an Adult Literacy League
volunteer and the Vine
Thrift Store in Oviedo.
Jim Lewis, a 70-year-old
retired English teacher who


volunteers his time at the
Adult Legacy League, has
been working with Carter
an hour and a half, twice a
week, for the last year.
"Mr. James is a client, but
he is more than that he
is certainly a buddy, and al-
though he started off really
basic he's doing very well
now," Lewis said. "He never
got to learn any comprehen-
sion skills or think quickly,
until now, so it was all about
survival... not a single day in
school for an American citi-
zen, isn't that a tragedy?"
The two began meeting
at the library, but quickly de-
cided The Vine Thrift Store,
the place that brought them
together, was better suited
for their weekly sessions.
"We decided the library
wasn't working for us, but
this (the Vine Thrift Store)
did," Lewis said. "And Cin-
dy was like the angel in the
middle."
Vine Thrift Store owner
Cindy Cook said she helped
the two become a pair after
she learned Carter, who is
known as Mr. James around
her store, could not even
read simple things like


PHOTO BY KRISTY VICKERY THE OBSERVER
Seventy-year-old James Carter practices reading, in the back office of the Vine Thrift Store in Oviedo, with his 70-year-old
teacher Jim Lewis, a retired English teacher who volunteers at the Adult Literacy League.


street signs.
"We're not angels, we are
just doing our part, and this
is just a little part," Cook
said. "If everybody would
just do a little bit, then the
world would be easier for
other people. If we just pay
attention to them and lis-
ten to them and maybe see
who they are really are, then
maybe Mr. James would
have learned to read a long
time ago."


She also said they are so
happy to be helping him,
and everyone at the store is
so proud of his progress.
"We are so excited for
Mr. James; it's like a dream
come true for him," said
Cook. "That was all he want-
ed all his life was to read and
write."
According to the Adult
Literacy League's Web site,
one in five Central Florida
adults reads at or below the


REED I 'For somebody in their 70s to ... beat a 20-year-old is pretty
< continued from page 14 Florida player. "For some- when she was diagnosed going to have to schedule it
body in their 70s to be able with cancer and had to en- around my tournaments,"
made it look effortless," said to beat a 20-year-old is pret- dure chemotherapy. She Merrill said Reed told the
Woska, who remembered ty amazing," Woska said. set the ground rules for the doctor.
when Reed played against a Merrill said tennis was chemo right away. And she was serious.
young University of Central always Reed's priority, even "If I have to do this, you're That's one thing Reed's


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fifth-grade reading level.
Carter is trying to over-
come this statistic and
live the life of he's always
dreamed of; a life not of just
survival, but of accomplish-
ment.
"I prayed all my life for
something like this to hap-
pen to me," Carter said. "My
dream's come true now."
For more information
on adult literacy visit www.
adultliteracyleague.org.


amazing'
friends said about her -
that she was very consistent
and always had an unwav-
ering opinion about every-
thing. She was a leader on
the courts and off.
"She was a central figure
and leader in our family,"
said Reed's nephew, Buddy
Corse. "And she was always
someone who had relevant
experience and something
to share."
Merrill called Reed an
"idea person" and said she
was always pushing her to
improve in tennis and life.
Suzanne Wood, who calls
herself one of the few "non-
tennis playing friends," said
the same thing about Reed.
Though most of her life was
devoted to tennis, Reed also
liked socializing and eating
with friends.
"She believed in good
food and good times," Wood
said. "She would be excited
that people she has known
are here along with her fam-
ily to enjoy a good round of
tennis and a good lunch."
Merrill believes that, too.
While the memorial service
for Reed last year was diffi-
cult for her, this dedication
is a happy moment for Mer-
rill. When she spends time
teaching at Azalea Lane, and
on the day of the dedication,
she still sees her friend of 40
years.
"I can still see her at court
10 her favorite court; I
still see her teaching the
ladies and the kids," Mer-
rill said. "She would've been
very happy about Monday."


Winter Park / Maitland Observer









Opinion/Editorial


Perspectives



Chris

Jepsonv,




At the 'crudest' level!


I know that we Americans are
duty-bound obligated to see the
cup as half full but that is not what
I see. Or, what I feel.
The BP oil spill has a dystopian
"Blade Runner" feel to it. America
has become a corporatized, mili-
tarized nation where unfettered
capitalism and "The Forever War"
are repeatedly run-up the flagpole,
and while we all mindlessly salute,
our heritage is rewritten and our
future subverted.
Author, Richard Russo observed,
"Can it be that what provides for
us is the very thing that poisons us?
Who hasn't considered this terrible
possibility?"
Most of us, that's who. We don't
question authority. We seemingly
either ignore events (cocoon) or
listen to radio wackos wax idiotic
about how if only we returned to
the core "values" of our Founding
Fathers all would once again be
right in America. What simplistic
blather. Such core values as blacks
are three-fifths a human being or
only propertied white men can
vote? Since 1848, America has been
on an imperialistic romp of his-
toric proportions. Of all the wars of
the 20th century, I would have par-
ticipated in exactly one WWII.
The "Greatest Generation" got off
easy in one regard they actually
fought in a war justified by events.
We pat ourselves on the back
and say what wonderful fellas we
Americans are. We're spreading the
benefits of democracy and capi-
talism, don't-cha see. Tell that to
the Vietnamese, Chileans, Guate-
malans or Iraqis. And now, the Af-
ghans. Tell it to the families of the
tens of thousands, nay, hundreds of
thousands of dead and wounded
Americans who died in the 20th
century for what? So that local
markets remain exploitable for the
likes of a United Fruit Company?
This is what General George
Washington "warned against"
upon leaving the presidency


in 1796: "Hence, likewise, they
[America] will avoid the necessity
of those overgrown military estab-
lishments, which, under any form
of government, are inauspicious
to liberty, and which are to be re-
garded as particularly hostile to
Republican liberty."
This is what General Dwight
Eisenhower "warned against"
upon leaving the presidency in
1961: "In the councils of govern-
ment, we must guard against the
acquisition of unwarranted influ-
ence, whether sought or unsought,
by the military-industrial complex.
The potential for the disastrous
rise of misplaced power exists and
will persist."
Both generals nailed it cold.
They called a spade a shovel and
is it any wonder we have dug such
a monstrous hole for the nation?
We're burying ourselves! We've
been sold out, folks. We've been
handed an untrue bill of goods,
that large national corporate in-
terests are necessarily America's
interests.
The BP (Big Polluter) oil spill
was avoidable. If the interests of
human beings and of the environ-
ment were of equal consideration
to corporate profits, regulatory
oversight would have been strict
and enforced. They aren't equal.
Understand that.
BP represents at the "crudest"
level what America has become.
Think of the oil plume that is con-
suming the Gulf as a metaphor for
what corporate special interests
are doing to our American repub-
lic.
And despair.



WHsJEPSON

Jepson is a 24-year resident of Florida. He's
fiscally conservative, socially liberal and likes
art. Reach him at: Jepson@MEDIAmerica.US


Play On!


Louis


Roney


Too much

money?


* Barack Obama just said that I'm
making too much money. When
I told my wife, you should have
heard what she said! When she
called Obama a "Democrat" I
thought that was bad enough, but
the word she used before "Demo-
crat" took me back to my Navy
days. I love a girl with spirit a
conservative girl!
"One of the many shallow
statements that sound good if
you don't stop and think about
it is that 'at some point, you
have made enough money.' The
key word in this statement, made
by President Obama recently, is
'you.' There is nothing wrong with
my deciding how much money is
enough for me or your deciding
how much money is enough for
you, but when politicians think
they should be deciding how
much money is enough for other
people, that's starting down a very
slippery slope. Politicians with the
power to determine each citizen's
income are no longer public ser-
vants. They are public masters. Are
we really so eaten up with envy,
or so mesmerized by rhetoric,
that we're willing to sacrifice our
own freedom by giving politi-
cians the power to decide how
much money a person can make
or keep? ... Once you buy the argu-
ment that some segment of the
citizenry should lose their rights,
because they are envied or re-
sented, you are putting your own
rights in jeopardy quite aside
from undermining any moral ba-
sis for respecting anybody's rights.
You are opening the floodgates to
arbitrary power. Once you open
the floodgates, you can't tell the
water where to go." -Economist
Thomas Sowell
My beloved wife and I have
lived for some 30 years in a nice


house in Winter Park. I won't bore
you with any details, but its more
room than any two people need.
However, recently we've ridden
around the residential area and
gotten an inferiority complex,
because we have just a regular old
doorway, where our front door is.
I've just made arrangements with
the Greek government to put a
competively impressive front on
our house an exact copy, full
size, of the front of the Parthenon
- that oughta do it!
*In 1980, after we bought
our house in Winter Park, and
moved back from New York to
my hometown, I made plans to
build a swimming pool on the
strip of land between our house
and the lake. Then one day my
cerebral beloved wife discovered
the handsome pool at the Lake-
mont YMCA not far from us. Since
then, we have been "regulars" at
the Y, and have gotten to know
Bud Oliver, Alison, Curt, and the
crew of helpful, likeable people
who run the place. We're thankful
that we don't have the trouble and
expense of taking care of our own
pool.
The Y serves a great purpose in
our lives, and is the best money
we spend per year. I hate to rec-
ommend the place only because
I wouldn't want to see it over-
crowded, but I've got to tell the
truth the Y is a real winner!


WHO RONEY

Harvard'42-Distinguished Prof, Em.-UCF
2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award
(Assisted by beloved wife Joy Roney)


Letters tothe Editor


Letter questions
city authority
The recent Winter Park
Parks and Recreation meet-
ing once again proved to be
an experience of good gov-
ernment put to bad use.
The Parks Commission
in the presence of a packed
audience and all of the ma-
jor press outlets in Central
Florida considered and
passed a motion proposing
a strict uniform enforce-
ment of the city of Winter
Park animal ordinance
prohibiting dogs in Cen-


tral Park. This motion was
passed without any public
hearing from the general
public.
Over the last 10 years,
city residents have enjoyed
many desirable pet-related
events in and around Cen-
tral Park sponsored by The
Doggie Door merchant. In
the past, the permits for
these events were issued at
the discretion of city de-
partment heads. These in-
dividuals have consistently
demonstrated they have
the professional ability to


mete out permits for appro-
priate use.
Consequently, these
events have been well-
attended by residents and
endorsed by the merchants
association as beneficial to
the viability of the Park Av-
enue business district.
Instead of being forward
thinkers and redressing an
archaic city ordinance, the
current Parks Board initia-
tive seeks to eliminate the
authority of both the city
staff and the City Commis-
sion to issue permits for


any permitted uses of areas
adjacent to Central Park for
dog or pet-related events.
The net result of the Park
board's letter of recom-
mendation, if adopted by
the Commission, would be
a complete ban of any dog-
related function either in
or adjacent to Central Park
in downtown Winter Park
without any provisions for
exception.
We can and should
support the concept of
enforcement of laws and
rules that serve to protect


our rights and enhance
the quality of life in Winter
Park. However, the laws
and rules that govern our
rights and freedoms must
be flexible enough to allow
changes to meet the spe-
cific needs of given circum-
stances.
The recent action of the
Parks Commission illumi-
nates a serious flaw in the
proposed revised animal
ordinance governing the
use of city parks in Winter

> turn to LETTERS on PAGE 21


Page 18 Thursday, June 3,2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer





Thursday, June 3, 2010 Page 19


Everyone has to eat. Of the three
basic needs of food, shelter and
clothing, a lack of food will bring
on social chaos quicker than any
governing body would care to ad-
mit. With the abundance of arable
land available for food produc-
tion in North America, we take for
granted a stable food supply for
our populations.
The foundation of any na-
tion's economy is based upon the
intelligence of its people and the
production of food, energy and
minerals derived from its land.
Food supply production in our
county requires 3 percent of our
workforce, when only a century
ago that number was closer to 30
percent. Other statistics point to
the chasm between huge indus-
trial farms (modern plantations),
employing only a few non-owner
laborers producing tons of sub-
sidized commodity crops and
the myriad of small, local market
gardeners growing limited quanti-
ties of fresh, healthy food. Think
of how many people could find
employment providing local food
if policy were changed to bump
the statistics of farmers from 3
percent to maybe 7 percent of our
workforce.
Food costs, artificially the low-
est in human history, restrict the
profitability of local agriculture.
The true price of food, if all the
real costs of production were to
be applied, would be much higher
than any public official could tol-
erate for re-election. Much of this
savings is achieved through defi-
cit spending, creating additional
expenses of interest on borrowed


money. If our national farm policy
favoring large commodity farms
really is so successful, then why do
so many people need food stamps
and assistance, suffer chronic di-
etary problems such as obesity,
and behold severe environmen-
tal damage based on industrial,
chemical farming practices?
Only during the last 100 years
of human existence has the ma-
jority of our food supply been
derived from sources further than
100 miles from home. Finding lo-
cal food is not as easy as it should
be. With the low-cost convenience
of big box shopping on every cor-
ner, planting a garden or trooping
out to the local U-Pick farm takes
time and effort.
The thin veneer of healthy
food reliability may make us feel
uneasy, but old and new solutions
abound. Luckily, the market for
food is changing as we speak. New
options for procuring food appear
everyday. From a very young age,
I was taught never to complain
without offering a solution. In the
next column, I'll discuss the many
local food alternatives to the
routine of shopping at the inter-
nationally incorporated grocery
supermarket.





ISCAREY
Tom Carey is the owner of Sundew Gardens, a
you-pick gardening business in Oviedo. Visit the
Sundew Gardens Facebook page.


Our

It's not time to forget Haiti


From my





to yours

Tom Carey&



Local food for local people


It happens all the time. Tragedy
strikes and people reach out to
help those in need so long as the
media's interest in piqued. Then,
a few weeks later, the news media
and the public forget about those
victims and move on to the next
big event.
The earthquake that hit Haiti
on Jan. 12 killed about 300,000
people and left 1.5 million people
homeless, most of whom have not
found shelter since because the
devastation destroyed many of
the island's churches, schools and
other structures commonly used
for refuge.
And now, with a hurricane sea-
son upon us that is forecasted to
be one of the most active in years,
those people still living under
tarps could be in for yet another
devastating natural disaster.
According to the Associated
Press, the spring rains that oc-
cur every year are already leav-
ing those camping out in tents
drenched and knee-deep in rain-
water, leaving them vulnerable to
a whole host of diseases. Hurricane
season started Tuesday, June 1 with
the National Oceanic and Atmo-
spheric Administration forecasting
14-23 named storms, 3-7 of which
could be major hurricanes with
111 mph winds.
But some locals have not for-
gotten our neighbors to the south.
Jami and Kevin Wray, owners of
Winter Park's Peterbrooke Choco-
latier, returned from a weeklong
stay in Haiti on Sunday.
The couple and 14 others went
with ACTS World Relief to set up
medical clinics in orphanages
and schools, mostly treating skin
conditions, infections, colds and
the flu. But perhaps the most im-
portant thing they did was train
those who will hopefully be the
future leaders of the country lo-


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iercial News Providers"
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.MAassssS^^il .0 ..^B^ t BBB


cal students and professionals in
emergency response and commu-
nity health. Although media cover-
age of the quake faded, they never
forgot about the need in Haiti.
"There's so much need there,
which makes it kind of hard to
face. Everything you do seems
like a drop in the bucket, but the
bucket has to get full somehow,"
Kevin said.
The group also tried to get the
Haitian people prepared for hurri-
cane season. The emergency train-
ing will help, but Kevin said the
biggest challenge will be getting
them out of the "tent cities" that
have formed and into solid struc-
tures. There are still no solutions in
sight.
Emily Tallman, a Peterbrooke
employee, went with ACTS to Haiti
for five days in February and also
traveled with the Wrays last week.
The most emotional part of the
trip for her was seeing the drop off
in volunteers and donations.
"It is hard for the people to see
that so much of that presence of
help has gone. I think they might
feel alone in what they're going
through," said the 35-year-old
wife and mother. But Tallman did
find it encouraging that some of
the commerce has returned to the
island and many have fallen back
into the daily grind.
The Wrays and Tallman plan on
attending at least one of the two
trips ACTS has planned for August
and October.
It is easy to forget about all the
different tragedies happening in
the world and easier yet to only fo-
cus on those that the media spot-
light. But latching on to one event
or one person in need at a time is
what can truly make a difference.
For more information about
ACTS World Relief, visit www.
actswr.org.


Winter Park / Maitland Observer






Page 20 Thursday, June 3, 2010 Winter Park / Maitlanci Obseiver


Culture
worthy of your calendar

Josh


Garrie hot ack



The arts are hot and sexy


'Chicago' (that sexy musical)
comes back to Orlando
Murder, greed, corruption, and
adultery have paved the way for
that sexiest of musicals "Chicago"
- to celebrate 13 years on Broad-
way, making the record-breaking
hit musical the sixth longest-run-
ning musical in Broadway history.
"Chicago's" "glitz and glamour" will
play at the Bob Carr Performing
Arts Centre from June 15-20. Set
amidst the decadence of the 1920s,
"Chicago" is the story of Roxie
Hart, a housewife who murders her
on-the-side lover. To avoid almost
certain conviction, Roxie hires a
slick criminal lawyer who trans-
forms her into a national 'celebrity,'
a theme that hits home big-time
in Orlando today! "Chicago" is the
winner of six 1997 Tony Awards
including Best Musical Revival and
has become a worldwide phenom-


enon with productions in 24 coun-
tries and 11 languages. Tickets can
be purchased at the Amway Arena
Box Office and all Ticketmaster
locations. Online purchases can be
made at www.OrlandoBroadway.
com or charge by phone at 800-
982-2787.

The Dali Museum becomes history
It will require a little drive, but for
true art aficionados who have a
sense of history, the Dali Museum
in St. Petersburg has announced
its final exhibit in the old building.
Called "Sharing Salvador," the ex-
hibit is open now through Decem-
ber 2010, while their magnificent
new Museum building takes shape
on St. Pete's waterfront. "Sharing
Salvador" tells the story of how
the Dali Museum and collection
came to St. Petersburg decades ago.
The exhibit presents a selection of


paintings, objects and photographs
accompanied by an historical nar-
rative, which pays homage to the
Museum's benefactors the Morse
family. Visit www.thedali.org/shar-
ing for more details. The address
is 1000 S. Third Street in St. Peters-
burg.

'The Growing Bolder TV'
makes history
The brainchild of popular Orlando
TV anchors Marc Middleton and
Bill Shafer, "The Growing Bolder
TV Show" has been selected by
American Public Television as one
of a very few new programs for
national distribution. Beginning
in September, every PBS Station in
the country will receive the show
(which originates in Orlando) in
high definition. We have watched
segments locally, learning more
about this Orlando-based TV pro-
gram that proves "it's not growing
older; it's about growing bolder."
Now Marc and Bill are asking us to
help spread the word and insure
that GBTV is on in every market in
America. Marc Middleton (14 years
at WESH TV) is founder and CEO of
Bolder Broadcasting; he currently
hosts the show. His partner Bill
Shafer, executive vice president of
the Bolder Media Group, has been
one of Florida's most honored jour-
nalists for nearly three decades.

'Hot Summer Nights'
"Hot Summer Nights!" has become


an annual art show and sale fea-
turing work from the studio art-
ists of Gallery on First in Sanford.
This year's show with a "tropical
themed reception" will open Sat-
urday, June 5 from 6-9 p.m. in the
heart of downtown Sanford. Gal-
lery on First features eight working
artist studios, which are open to
the public. Resident artists Cherie
Dacko, Stewart Jones, Cindy Sturla,
Stan Surman, Debra LaPallo Ryan,
Bob Garron, Robert Holewinski,
Sharon Rae Hyder, Lori Anne Har-
ris, and Aurore Brunet will be rep-
resented by 'sale-priced' fine art
that includes acrylics, oils, pastels,
pottery, watercolor, charcoals and
mixed media. Since the exhibi-
tion space is adjacent to the artists'
studios, visitors may view finished
artwork, as well as works currently
in progress in each artist's creative
environment. Gallery on First is
at 211 E. First Street in downtown
Sanford. Call 407-323-2774 or visit
www.galleryonfirst.com.


>WgsGARRICK

Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer, educator,
and fine art curator. He is a member of the Cu-
ratorial Council for the Museum of Florida Art.
Garrick can be reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.
com or 407-522-3906.


And don't forget to check out the hundreds of other items on sale throughout the store!


Page 20 Thursday, June 3,2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer






Thursday, June 3, 2010 Page 21


LETTERS I Commissioners see half-empty glass when it comes to commuter rail


< continued from page 18

Park. The proposed rules do
not contain the flexibility
to make permitted excep-
tions to the rules. A revision
to the animal ordinance
should be made to grant
discretionary authority to
the city manager or parks
director to issue permits for
animal events subject to fil-
ing an application and an
appropriate fee.
We'd like the City Com-
mission and mayor to know
we'd like forward thinkers
who have the vision to un-
derstand the importance of
analyzing and altering city
ordinances to meet the evo-
lution and growth of local
businesses. We also need to
reemphasize the need for
free and open discussion
by the general public at city
board meetings.
-Charles Namey
Winter Park

Speak up! Better yet -
start barking loudly!
Our Parks and Recreation
Commission recently
passed a motion proposing
a strict uniform enforce-
ment of our city's animal
ordinance that could ban
dog-centered events on
Park Avenue or streets near
Central Park in Winter Park.
This motion will be
discussed at a future Win-
ter Park City Commission
meeting.
Permits for dog-related
events both in and near
Central Park are presently
issued by city staff. The cur-


rent Park board's motion
seeks to stop this process
with no provision for ex-
ceptions.
Winter Park's animal
ordinance was originally
designed to keep dogs out
of the Winter Park Side-
walk Art Festival. The Park
Board's motion for strin-
gent enforcement of the
ordinance could now pro-
hibit many dog-centered
events in our downtown
area.
The Parks board decided
that city-run events such
as the Farmer's Market and
seasonal parades can still
allow dogs. They remain
"dog friendly". However,
two annual events run by
Park Avenue's The Doggie
Door for the last 11 years
are in jeopardy of being
prohibited by the ordi-
nance. How unfair is that?
The Doggie Door's Pet
Costume Contest and
Doggie Art Festival are
charitable events that bring
visitors and revenue to Park
Avenue restaurants and
retail stores. It would be a
shame to no longer per-
mit these family-oriented
events.
Please let your city com-
missioners and mayor
know that revisions to the
ordinance need to be made
allowing for flexibility and
fairness. Permits for Win-
ter Park animal-centered
events should be granted
at the discretion of the city
manager with appropriate
fees applied.
-Lucy Gordon


DR. ZAHRA PROMES received her medical degree from the
University of Maryland, School of Medicine and completed
an internship at the Washington Hospital Center Department
of Medicine in Washington, DC. She went on to complete her
residency at the University of Maryland School of Medicine
Hospital in Baltimore, MD. Dr. Promes is board certified in
Internal Medicine and has worked in the family practice setting
for more than 15 years. She is committed to providing quality
care to the Winter Park community.


SAME DAY
APPOINTMENTS
AVAILABLE.
Please call for an
appointment,
407-644-3726.
MOST MAJOR FORMS OF
INSURANCE ACCEPTED


Zahra Promes, MD, FACP
Internal Medicine
201 N. Lakemont Avenue, Suite 700
Winter Park, FL 32792
407-644-3726

M E KD I T A TL t 1 0 TU m A
THE SKILL TO HEAL. THE SPIRIT TO CARE.
www.fpmg.com


ri


Winter Park

Seize economic power of rail
Our Winter Park City Com-
mission continues to pon-
der the quiet evolution
of the wheel. The SunRail
commuter rail high drama
is compelling for reasons I
don't understand, but then
I don't have cable. Two
commissioners continue
to take a "glass half-empty"
approach. At the Monday,
May 24 Commission meet-
ing, one commissioner
actually said, "What if in
40 years, Park Avenue has
T-shirt shops like they cur-
rently have in Bar Harbor
(our sister city in Maine?
Who knew!). That's not ac-
ceptable!"
What is not acceptable
and becoming alarmingly
clear is that there is little
authentic interest in mov-
ing this agreement forward
at least from two commis-
sioners. What is transpar-
ently visible to even a first-
time Commission meeting
attendee (myself), is the
evasive steps taken to even
mildly consider the ben-
efits of tying into a regional
transit network. What I
find entirely myopic is the
obsession with a 3 feet by 7
feet block area of Park Av-
enue at the exclusion of the
rest of the 9-square-mile
city of 28,000 residents, all
of who could take advan-
tage of moving about our
regional community with-
out the expense of taking a
car in tow.
Transit, more than any
other single economic
driver, can add to property
values and diversify our
city's economic founda-
tion. Skilled and highly paid
employees want enhanced
quality of life: convenience,
"green" lifestyles and op-
tions to stay off the conges-
tion that is Interstate 4.
More simply, transit is an
accepted benchmark for
modern, forward-thinking
cities (yes, even cities with
historic districts).
As to comments that
one Commission cannot
obligate funds for a future
Commission: how do you
think we build roads? It
takes 7-10 years to build
a road design, right of
way acquisition, construc-
tion and then out-years
maintenance milling and
resurfacing.
Recessions happen.
Let's diversify our tax base
(rather than waving at po-
tential new city residents
and taxpayers as they pass
through Winter Park with-
out even stopping). That's
the real opt-out provision
where Winter Park loses!
The fact is that Winter Park
already has a wonderful
incentive package on the
table Winter Park won't
have to pay a dime toward
the station operation costs
until 2020, and that's only if
we haven't put a dedicated
funding source in place in
Orange County.


Imagine this: by 2015,
the Orlando-Tampa high-
speed rail line should be op-
erational. Tampa Bay-area
residents can take that line,
connect with SunRail, and
be in Winter Park in time
for lunch and shopping and
not even have to park a car.
That's economic power...
for us!
-Charley Williams
Winter Park

Invest in clean energy
This oil spill is the proof
that there is no safe oil
drilling. Now is the time to
use this horrible accident
to reflect on how much is
worth the oil we need. We
depend on the ocean for
food, oxygen and commer-
cial development.
Let's make this an op-
portunity to invest in clean
energy instead of paying
millions for oil spill clean-
ups! We already have the
technology, we just need
political will!
I want to see my child
grow into a better world. I
fear for her quality of life in
the near future! The time is
now!
-Fabiola Hansen
Winter Park

Growing a food supply
In 2008, Kibera, the largest
slum in Nairobi was shut
down, thanks to riots after
the presidential elections.
For almost a month, no
food could enter the area.
Though conditions were
prime for a food shortage,
most residents didn't go
without food. Why? Be-
cause many of them were
already growing crops on
roves, along river banks,
and even in sacks. And in-
novations like these are
happening in cities and ru-
ral areas all over sub-Saha-
ran Africa to nourish both
people and the planet.
In 2009, global chronic
hunger affected an esti-
mated 1.02 billion people.
Chronic hunger, as defined
by the United Nations Food
and Agriculture Organiza-
tion, is regularly eating
food that provides less than
1,800 kilocalories (kcal) a
day.
In comparison, Ameri-
cans on average consume
more than 3,400 kcal per
day.
Not surprisingly, women
and children account for
the highest proportion of
the chronically hungry.
For mothers, inadequate
nutrition can result in high
instances of childbirth-re-
lated death. For infants and
children, even short-term
malnutrition can result
in permanent damage to
health, brain activity, and
productivity.
Though there are many
root causes to chronic hun-
ger including the low so-
cial status of women, con-
flicts, and low agricultural
investment poverty is
almost always present. Pov-
erty affects people's ability


to buy, or grow, adequate
amounts of food, which
leads to chronic hunger. As
a result of hunger and poor
nutrition, people's produc-
tivity levels are lowered,
pushing them further into
poverty.
But the good news is that
all over Africa, people are
investing in different kinds
of agricultural innovations,
helping break the cycle by
boosting productivity, pro-
viding farmers with some
stability, and encourag-
ing the next generation to
make sustainable decisions.
Some innovations like
the International Develop-
ment Enterprises' treadle
pump target technical
problems encountered by
farmers. These tools in-
crease a farm's productivity,
while simultaneously re-
ducing the amount of labor
and time involved in daily
tasks.
Other innovations work
to address cultural issues.
Kristof and Stacia Nordin's
permaculture garden at
their home in Malawi pro-
vides an example of the
benefits that accompany
indigenous crops. Many
efforts to combat hunger
across Africa emphasize
boosting yields of staple
crops, such as maize and
wheat, over planting in-
digenous vegetables. Local
varieties, however, can be
rich in vitamins and nutri-
ents that many staple crops
lack and are often naturally
resistant to local pests and
climatic fluctuations, mak-
ing these plants important
tools in the fight against
hunger and poverty.
It's also increasingly im-
portant to provide the next
generation with the tools
to deal with the issues of
hunger and poverty. Youth
education projects such
as Uganda's Developing
Innovations in School
Cultivation (DISC) give
children nutritional guid-
ance while also instilling
a respect for agriculture.
Teaching children about
the connections between
agriculture, the environ-
ment and food security
helps create a generation of
potentially self-sustainable
farmers and consumers,
who have the potential to
make agricultural decisions
that nourish themselves,
their communities, and the
planet.
-Danielle Nierenberg, co-project
director of the Worldwatch Institute's
Nourishing the Planet www.nourish-
ingtheplanet.org project

-Stephanie Pappas, a food and
research intern from Winter Park.

Their research will culminate in
the release of the Institute's flagship
publication "State of the World 2011",
which will focus entirely on alleviating
hunger and poverty.


I I


Winter Park / Maitland Observer








Page 22 Thursday, June 3, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 9th JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 2009-CA-029754-0
STEVE J. MOORMAN, AS
TRUSTEE OF THE STEVE
J. MOORMAN REVOCABLE TRUST,
Plaintiff,
v.
DENNIS BARNES, JR.;
KAAREN NELSON;
UNC GREEN THUMB
NURSERY, INC., and
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
DENNIS BARNES, JR.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
To: THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DENNIS BARNES,
JR. (last known address 18021 Hollister Road,
Orlando, Florida 32820)
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been filed
against you by the Plaintiff, seeking to claim an
interest in, or a lien upon, and for a judicial decla-
ration of the rights of, and for foreclosure upon all
of Plaintiff's mortgage and lien rights, in relation
to the following described property in Orange
County, Florida:
Lot 4 and 5, Block 6, CHRISTMAS GARDENS
NO.2, as recorded in Plat Book P, Page 62,
of the Public Records of ORANGE County,
Florida, less that part of Lot 5 lying in the
East 1/2 of the Northeast quarter of the
Northwest quarter of Section 33, Township
22 South, Range 33 East, lying and being
situate in ORANGE County, Florida
and you are required to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on Teresa N. Phillips, Esquire,
the Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is POHL &
SHORT, P.A., 280 West Canton Avenue, Suite 410,
Winter Park, Florida 32789, on or before June 28,
2010, and file the original with the clerk of this
court either before service on the Plaintiff's attorney
or immediately thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition.
DATED this 19th day of May, 2010.

LYDIA GARDNER
Clerk of the Court
By: TESHA GREENE
CIVIL COURT SEAL
As Deputy Clerk

If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you,
to the provision of certain assistance. Please
contact Court Administration at 425 North Orange
Avenue, Suite 2130, Orlando, Florida 32801,
telephone (407)836-2303, within 2 working days
of your receipt of this Summons; if you are hearing
impaired, call 1-800-955-8771; if you are voice
impaired, call 1-800-955-8770.
5/27, 6/3


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SEMINOLE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE No. 2009CA010470
THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK
OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE, FOR CWABS, INC.,
ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-26,
PLAINTIFF,
VS.
OSCAR CAMACHO, ET AL.
DEFENDANT(S).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated Ma 21 2010 in
the above action, I will sell to the highest bidder
for cash at Seminole, Florida, on July 22 2010,
at 11:00 AM, at Room S201 of Courthouse 301
N. Park Ave., Sanford, FL 32771 for the following
described property:

CONDOMINIUM UNIT NO. 106, IN BUILDING
405, OF SERRAVILLA AT SPRING VALLEY, A
CONDOMINIUM, A CONDOMINIUM ACCORD-
ING TO THE DECLARATION THEREOF, AS RE-
CORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 6404,
AT PAGE 1324, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
SEMINOLE COUNTY, FLORIDA

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale. The Court, in its dis-
cretion, may enlarge the time of the sale. Notice
of the changed time of sale shall be published as
provided herein.
Dated MAY25 2010
MARYANNE MORSE
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By Katheryn Limback
Deputy Clerk of the Court
Prepared by:
Gladstone Law Group, P.A.
1499 W. Palmetto Park Rd, Suite 300
Boca Raton, FL 33486

If you are a person with a disability who needs
accommodation in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, for
the provision of certain assistance. Please con-
tact Court Administration at 301 N. Park Avenue,
Sanford, Florida 32771, telephone number (407)
665-4227, within 2 working days of your receipt of
this document; If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-
955-8771.
6/3,6/10




IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 2009-CA-030709-0; Division 37
TRUSTCO BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
RAMONA REYES DEACOSTA;
and JESUS DEACOSTA,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that on the 24th day of June,
2010, at 11:00 a.m. in Room 350 of the Courthouse
of Orange County, Florida, 425 S. Orange Avenue,
Orlando FL 32801, the undersigned Clerk will offer
for sale the following described real property:
Lot 40, ANDOVER CAY- PHASE 2A, according
to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book
48, Pages 77 and 78, of the Public Records
of Orange County, Florida.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to the
Final Judgment of Foreclosure in Civil Case No.
2009-CA-030709-0; Division 37, now pending in
the Circuit Court in Orange County, Florida.
In accordance with the Americans With Disabili-
ties Act, persons with disabilities needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding
should contact Court Administration at 37 North Or-
ange Avenue, Suite 1130, Orlando, Florida 32801,
telephone number 407/836-2050, not later than
seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hear-
ing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V)
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.
Dated this 20th day of May, 2010.

By: Eric Jontz
ERIC B. JONTZ, Attorney
Florida Bar No. 64905
JEFFRY R. JONTZ
ERIC B. JONTZ
SWANN & HADLEY, P.A.
Post Office Box 1961
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 647-2777
Facsimile No.: (407) 647-2157
5/27, 6/3


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 48-2010-CP-000759-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JACK A. JOHNSON, JR.
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of
Summary Administration has been entered in the
estate of Jack A. Johnson, Jr., deceased, File
Number 48-2010-CP-000759-0, by the Circuit
Court for Orange County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 425 South Orange Avenue,
Suite 340, Orlando, FL 32801; that the dece-
dent's date of death was December 8, 2009;
that the total value of the estate is $Exempt
and that the names and addresses of those to
whom it has been assigned by such order are:

Name / Address
Cynthia Lynn Tuck as Trustee of the Johnson
Revocable Living Trust / 8407 Cambay Avenue
Orlando, FL 32817

ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and
persons having claims or demands against the
estate of the decedent other than those for whom
provision for full payment was made in the Order
of Summary Administration must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE
TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is
June 3,2010.

Attorney for Person Giving Notice:
Catherine E. Davey
Attorney
Florida Bar No. 0991724
Post Office Box 941251
Maitland, FL 32794-1251
Telephone: (407) 645-4833
Fax: (407) 645-4832

Persons Giving Notice:
Cynthia Lynn Tuck
8407 Cambay Avenue
Orlando, Florida 32817

Michael Robert Johnson
3524 Heatherington Road
Orlando, Florida 32808

6/3,6/10




IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 48-2010-CP-000782-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DOROTHY M. MCGUNAGLE,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of
Summary Administration has been entered in
the estate of Dorothy M. McGunagle, deceased,
File Number 48-2010-CP-000782-0, by the
Circuit Court for Orange County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 425 N. Orange
Avenue, Room 340, Orlando, FL 32801; that
the decedent's date of death was December 27,
2009; that the total value of the estate is $5,000
and that the names and addresses of those to
whom it has been assigned by such order are:

Name / Address
Garth S. Morgan, Trustee of The McGunagle Family
Trust dtd March 21, 2000 / 5530 Manhattan Drive
Lorain, Ohio 44053

ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and
persons having claims or demands against the
estate of the decedent other than those for whom
provision for full payment was made in the Order of
Summary Administration must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED BY LAW.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE
TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is
June 3, 2010.

Attorney for Person Giving Notice:
Gregory E. Melnick, Jr.
Attorney At Law
Attorney for Petitioner
Florida Bar No. 0921386
1150 Louisiana Ave., Suite 4
Winter Park, FL 32789
Telephone: (407) 673-8033

Persons Giving Notice:
Garth S. Morgan, Trustee
5530 Manhattan Drive
Lorain, Ohio 44053
6/3,6/10




IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO.: 2010-CP-674
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DAVID OIL,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of DAVID OIL,
deceased, whose date of death was November 17,
2009, is pending in the Circuit Court for SEMINOLE
County, Florida, Probate Division, the address
of which is 301 N. Park Avenue, Sanford, Florida
32771. The names and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is
Thursday, May 27, 2010.

IAN L. GILDEN, ESQUIRE
Attorney for THERESA L. BARTON
Florida Bar Number: 321941
151 Lookout Place, Suite 110
Maitland, Florida 32751
Telephone: (407) 645-4446
Facsimile: (407) 629-0090
E-Mail: ilgilden@att.net
5/27, 6/3


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE EIGHTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO: 2008-CP-1797
IN RE: ESTATE OF
PHYLLIS G. GOODRICH,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of PHYLLIS G.
GOODRICH, deceased, File No. 2008-CP-1797,
whose date of death was June 12 2007, is pending
in the Circuit Court for Seminole County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of which is 301 North
Park Avenue, Sanford, Florida 32771. The names
and addresses of the personal representative and
the personal representative's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against the decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice is required
to be served must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER
THE TIME OF FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702, FLORIDA
STATUTES, WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is May
27 2010.

Grace Anne Glavin, Esquire
GRACE ANNE GLAVIN, P.A.
1340 Tuskawilla Road, Suite 106
Winter Springs, FL 32708
Telephone: (407) 699-1110
Fax: (407) 699-1165
Florida Bar # 350605
Attorney for Personal Representative

Grace Anne Glavin, Personal Representative
1340 Tuskawilla Road
Winter Springs, FL 32708
5/27, 6/3



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 2009-CA-014846-0; Division 35
TRUSTCO BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
GABRIEL A. AVILAand CARMEN S. JAIMEZ,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: GABRIEL A. AVILA and CARMEN S. JAIMEZ
3720 Peace Pipe Drive
Orlando, Florida 32829
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a Complaint to Establish
Lost Promissory Note and to Foreclose Mortgage
has been filed against you, and you are required
to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to
it on, Plaintiff's Attorney, whose address is: Swann
& Hadley, P.A., 1031 West Morse Boulevard, Suite
350, Winter Park, Florida 32789, and file the original
with the Clerk of the Court of Orange County either
before service on Plaintiff's attorneys, or immedi-
ately thereafter, otherwise a default will be entered
against you for relief demanded in the Complaint.
If you're a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to
the provision of certain assistance. Please contact
Court Administration at 425 N. Orange Avenue, Or-
lando, Florida 32801, Telephone: (407) 836-2000
within two (2) working days of your receipt of this
notice. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call
1-800-955-8771.
WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on this
29th day of October, 2009.

Lydia Gardner
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: CHRISTINA BUSTAMANTE
CIVIL COURT SEAL
Deputy Clerk
5/27, 6/3



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE No. 2009CA007273
BANK OF AMERICA, NA, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER
TO COUNTRYWIDE BANK, FSB,
PLAINTIFF,
VS.
FRED J. JOHNSON A/K/A FRED JOHN JOHNSON
A/K/A
FRED JOHNSON, ET AL.
DEFENDANT(S).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 21, 2010 in
the above action, I will sell to the highest bidder
for cash at Seminole, Florida, on JULY 20, 2010,
at 11:00 AM, at Room S201 of Courthouse 301
N. Park Ave., Sanford, FL 32771 for the following
described property:

LOT 109, LAKE HARRIET ESTATES, ACCORD-
ING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 12, PAGE 15 AND 16, PUBLIC
RECORDS OF SEMINOLE COUNTY, FLORIDA.

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale. The Court, in its dis-
cretion, may enlarge the time of the sale. Notice
of the changed time of sale shall be published as
provided herein.
Dated MAY25 2010
MARYANNE MORSE
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By Katheryn Limback
Deputy Clerk of the Court
Prepared by:
Gladstone Law Group, P.A.
1499 W. Palmetto Park Rd, Suite 300
Boca Raton, FL 33486

If you are a person with a disability who needs
accommodation in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, for
the provision of certain assistance. Please con-
tact Court Administration at 301 N. Park Avenue,
Sanford, Florida 32771, telephone number (407)
665-4227, within 2 working days of your receipt of
this document; If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-
955-8771.
6/3,6/10



Notice of Public Auction
Pursuant to Ch 715.109 FS and/or 83.801 and/or
677.210 FS etal United American Lien & Recovery
as agent with power of attorney will sell at public
auction the following property(s) to the highest
bidder subject to any liens for the purpose of
satisfying claim of lien and/or disposition of aban-
doned property(s); owner/lienholder may redeem
property(s) for cash sum of lien; all auctions held
in reserve
Inspect 1 week prior @ lien facility; cash or cashier
check; 15% buyer prem; any persons interested ph
(954) 563-1999

Sale date June 18, 2010 @ 10:00 am 3411 NW
9th Ave #707 Ft Lauderdale FL 33309
1993 2000 Dodge vn vin#: 2B4GP45G4YR669555
tenant: chris pesad

Licensed & bonded auctioneers flab422 flau 765 &
191111/19, 11/26
6/3,6/10


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SEMINOLE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE No. 2009-CA-009237
THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK
OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE
CERTIFICATEHOLDERS, CWABS, INC ASSET
BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-2,
PLAINTIFF,
VS.
CORNELL MCKINNEY, ET AL.
DEFENDANT(S).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated Ma 21 2010 in
the above action, I will sell to the highest bidder
for cash at Seminole, Florida, on Sept. 14 2010,
at 11:00 AM, at Room S201 of Courthouse 301
N. Park Ave., Sanford, FL 32771 for the following
described property:

ALL THAT CERTAIN PARCEL OF LAND SITU-
ATE IN THE COUNTY OF SEMINOLE, STATE
OF FLORIDA BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNAT-
ED AS LOTS 14 AND 15, BLOCK 10, THIRD
SECTION DREAMWORLD, ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 4, PAGE 70, PUBLIC RECORDS OF
SEMINOLE COUNTY, FLORIDA.

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale. The Court, in its dis-
cretion, may enlarge the time of the sale. Notice
of the changed time of sale shall be published as
provided herein.
Dated MAY24 2010
MARYANNE MORSE
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By Kathy Reddy
Deputy Clerk of the Court
Prepared by:
Gladstone Law Group, P.A.
1499 W. Palmetto Park Rd, Suite 300
Boca Raton, FL 33486

If you are a person with a disability who needs
accommodation in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, for
the provision of certain assistance. Please con-
tact Court Administration at 301 N. Park Avenue,
Sanford, Florida 32771, telephone number (407)
665-4227, within 2 working days of your receipt of
this document; If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-
955-8771.
6/3,6/10



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.: 2010-CA-009815-0
FANNIE HILLMAN,
TRUSTEE OF THE FANNIE HILLMAN
& ASSOCIATES PROFIT SHARING
ACCOUNT DATED JULY 1,1987 FBO
FANNIE HILLMAN,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CHARLOTTE JOHNSON, CHARLES RUSH, WESLEY
RUSH, PAMELAWEBB, VERA FRANKLIN, KENNETH
SOUTHWARD, UNKNOWN HEIR NO.1, UNKNOWN
HEIR NO. 2, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION
NO. 1, and UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION
NO.2,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
To Defendants, UNKNOWN HEIR NO. 1, UNKNOWN
HEIR NO. 2, and all others whom it may concern,
including all parties claiming interests by, through,
under or against Marie A. Rush and all parties hav-
ing or claiming to have any right, title, or interest in
the property herein described:
You are hereby notified that an action to foreclose
a mortgage lien on the following property in Orange
County, Florida:
Lot 17, Hamlet at Maitland, as recorded in
Plat Book 31, page 17, Public Records of
Orange County, Florida.
has been filed against you. You are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on
Timothy J. Kiley, Esquire, Winderweedle, Haines,
Ward & Woodman, P.A., Plaintiff's attorney, whose
address is 390 N. Orange Avenue, Suite 1500, Or-
lando, Florida 32801, within 30 days after the first
publication of this Notice, and file the original with
the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plain-
tiffs' attorneys or immediately thereafter; otherwise
a default will be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or petition.
Dated on May 26, 2010.
Lydia Gardner
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Kerry Brickner
As Deputy Clerk
6/3,6/10


Notice Under Fictitious Name Act
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned,
pursuant to the "Fictitious Name Statute", Chapter
865.09, Florida Statutes, will register with the Divi-
sion of Corporations, Department of State, State of
Florida, upon receipt of proof of the publication of
this notice, the fictitious name, to wit:
Central Florida Girls Youth Lacrosse
under which the undersigned expects to engage
in business at
699 Samuelson Ct,
Winter Springs, FL 32708
and that the party interested in said business
enterprise is as follows:
RS Tropical Sports, Inc.
Dated at Orange County, Florida this 3rd day of
June, 2010
6/3


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SEMINOLE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE No. 2009CA003669
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS
TRUSTEE IN TRUST FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE
CERTIFICATEHOLDERS FOR ARGENT SECURITIES
TRUST 2005-W2, ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2005-W2,
PLAINTIFF,
VS.
ABRAHAM POLANCO, ET AL.
DEFENDANT(S).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 21, 2010 in
the above action, I will sell to the highest bidder
for cash at Seminole, Florida, on July 20, 2010,
at 11:00 AM, at Room S201 of Courthouse 301
N. Park Ave., Sanford, FL 32771 for the following
described property:

LOT(S) 116, SANFORD PLACE, ACCORD-
ING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 33, PAGE(S) 33, 34, 35, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale. The Court, in its dis-
cretion, may enlarge the time of the sale. Notice
of the changed time of sale shall be published as
provided herein.
Dated MAY 25 2010
MARYANNE MORSE
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By Katheryn Limback
Deputy Clerk of the Court
Prepared by:
Gladstone Law Group, P.A.
1499 W. Palmetto Park Rd, Suite 300
Boca Raton, FL 33486

If you are a person with a disability who needs
accommodation in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, for
the provision of certain assistance. Please con-
tact Court Administration at 301 N. Park Avenue,
Sanford, Florida 32771, telephone number (407)
665-4227, within 2 working days of your receipt of
this document; If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-
955-8771.
6/3,6/10


Notice Under Fictitious Name Act
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned,
pursuant to the "Fictitious Name Statute", Chapter
865.09, Florida Statutes, will register with the Divi-
sion of Corporations, Department of State, State of
Florida, upon receipt of proof of the publication of
this notice, the fictitious name, to wit:
Mack and Son Woodworks
under which the undersigned expects to engage
in business at
501 N. Orlando Avenue
Suite 313PMB197
Winter Park, FL 32789
and that the party interested in said business
enterprise is as follows:
Thomas McFadden
Dated at Orange County, Florida this 3rd day of
June, 2010
6/3

Notice Under Fictitious Name Act
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned,
pursuant to the "Fictitious Name Statute", Chapter
865.09, Florida Statutes, will register with the Divi-
sion of Corporations, Department of State, State of
Florida, upon receipt of proof of the publication of
this notice, the fictitious name, to wit:
RC Elite Lacrosse
under which the undersigned expects to engage
in business at
699 Samuelson Ct,
Winter Springs, FL 32708
and that the party interested in said business
enterprise is as follows:
Orlando Area Elite Lacrosse, LLC
Dated at Orange County, Florida this 3rd day of
June, 2010
6/3

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2010CP0885
IN RE: ESTATE OF
CLYDE ESTELLE HOWARD MCCALL
a/k/a CLYDE MCCALL
a/k/a CLYDE E. MCCALL
a/k/a CLYDE ESTELLE MCCALL
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of CLYDE ES-
TELLE HOWARD MCCALL, whose date of death was
April 10, 2010, and whose social security number is
267-22-7187, file number 2010CP0885, is pend-
ing in the Circuit Court for Seminole County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of which is 301 North
Park Place, Sanford, Florida 32771. The names
and addresses of the personal representative and
the personal representative's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is May
27, 2010.

Attorney for Personal Representative:
IVAN MICHAEL TUCKER
Florida Bar No. 0326003
LAW OFFICE OF I. MICHAEL TUCKER, PLC
100 SunTrust Bank Building
498 Palm Springs Drive
Altamonte Springs, Florida 32701
Telephone: (407) 977-8836

Personal Representative:
Peggy Williams
225 Whippoorwill Drive
Altamonte Springs, Florida 32701
5/27, 6/3

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. : 2009-CA-25605-0; Division 32A
HANCOCK BANK, successor in interest to
PEOPLES FIRST COMMUNITY BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
FARID MAURICO COUTINHO;
LYDIA COUTINHO; JPMORGAN
CHASE BANK, N.A.; KUMAR J.
HINDUJA; PRIYA HINDUJA; and
ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that on the 28th day of June,
2010, at 11:00 a.m. in Room 350 of the Courthouse
of Orange County, Florida, 425 S. Orange Avenue,
Orlando FL 32801, the undersigned Clerk will offer
for sale the following described real property:
Lot 40, Block 2, CAPE ORLANDO ESTATES
UNIT 31A, according to the plat thereof,
as recorded in Plat Book 3, pages 110 and
111, of the Public Records of Orange County,
Florida.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to the
Final Judgment of Foreclosure in Civil Case No.
2009-CA-25605-0; Division 32A, now pending in
the Circuit Court in Orange County, Florida.
In accordance with the Americans With Disabili-
ties Act, persons with disabilities needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding
should contact Court Administration at 37 North Or-
ange Avenue, Suite 1130, Orlando, Florida 32801,
telephone number 407/836-2050, not later than
seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hear-
ing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V)
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.
Dated this 28th day of May, 2010.

By: Eric Jontz
ERIC B. JONTZ, Attorney
Florida Bar No. 64905
JEFFRY R. JONTZ
ERIC B. JONTZ
SWANN & HADLEY, P.A.
Post Office Box 1961
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 647-2777
Facsimile No.: (407) 647-2157
6/3,6/10


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
COMPLEX BUSINESS LITIGATION COURT
Case No. 09-CA-024109
Division: 32
FIFTH THIRD BANK, a Michigan banking
corporation,
Plaintiff,
v.
MPG AVAMAR, LTD., a Florida limited
partnership; CHARLES H. MONROE, III;
PRESTIGE EQUITY PARTNERS NO. 3, LLC;
IF A NAMED DEFENDANT IS DECEASED,
THE SURVIVING SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, CREDITORS AND ALL OTHER
PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER
OR AGAINST THAT DEFENDANT(S) WHO
ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, AND ALL
CLAIMANTS, PERSONS OR PARTIES, NATURAL
OR CORPORATE, OR WHOSE EXACT STATUS
IS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING UNDER ANY OF THE
ABOVE NAMED OR DESCRIBED DEFENDANTS,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final
Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-
styled cause in the Circuit Court of Orange County,
Florida, Lydia Gardner, as Clerk of the Circuit and
County Courts for the Ninth Judicial Circuit will sell
the property situate in Orange County, Florida, de-
scribed as:
A portion of the Northwest One-Quarter (NW
%) of Section 4, Township 23 South, Range
27 East, Orange County, Florida, being more
particularly described as follows:
Commence at the Southwest corner of the
Northwest One-Quarter (NW ) of Section 4,
Township 23 South, Range 27 East; thence
North 00045'03" West along the West line of
the Northwest One-Quarter (NW ) of said
Section 4, a distance of 1010.14 feet to the
Point of Beginning; thence continue North
00045'03" West along said line, 100.00 feet;
thence North 64035'14" East, 58.00 feet;
thence Easterly along the arc of a tangent
curve, being concave to the South, having
a radius of 546.62 feet, a central angle of
2721'27", an arc distance of 261.00 feet;
thence South 8803'19" East, 956.99 feet;
thence South 00027'00" East, 613.28 feet;
thence South 89053'57" West, 970.72 feet;
thence North 32005'34" West, 554.76 feet to
the Point of Beginning.
Said lands lying in the City of Winter Garden,
Orange County, Florida.
Now known as Avamar Crossing, according
to the plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
72, Pages 20 and 21, of the Public Records
of Orange County, Florida.
Less and except the following (3) parcels:
Commence at the Southwest corner of the
Northwest One-Quarter (NW ) of Section 4,
Township 23 South, Range 27 East; thence
North 00045'03" West along the West line of
the Northwest One-Quarter (NW ) of said
Section 4, a distance of 1110.14 feet; thence
North 64035'14" East, 58.00 feet; thence
Easterly along the arc of a tangent curve,
being concave to the South, having a radius
of 546.62 feet, a central angle of 27021 '27",
an arc distance of 261.00 feet; thence South
8803'19" East, 956.99 feet; thence South
00027'00" East, 226.38 feet to the Point of
Beginning; thence continue South 00027'00"
East, 346.90 feet; thence South 89053'57"
West, 69.07 feet; thence North 50000'04"
West, 226.29 feet, thence Northerly along the
arc of a tangent curve, being concave to the
East, having a radius of 87.50 feet, a central
angle of 49029'52", an arc distance of 75.59
feet; thence North 0030'12" West, 134.81
feet; thence North 8953'47" East, 272.13
feet to the Point of Beginning. (a/k/a Lot 1 of
Avamar Crossing)
and
Commence at the Southwest corner of the
Northwest One-Quarter (NW ) of Section 4,
Township 23 South, Range 27 East; thence
North 00045'03" West along the West line of
the Northwest One-Quarter (NW ) of said
Section 4, a distance of 1110.14 feet; thence
North 64035'14" East, 58.00 feet; thence
Easterly along the arc of a tangent curve,
being concave to the South, having a radius
of 546.62 feet, a central angle of 27021 '27",
an arc distance of 261.00 feet; thence South
88003'19" East, 941.99 feet to the Point of
Beginning; thence continue South 8803'19"
East, 15.00 feet; thence South 00027'00"
East, 15.00 feet; thence North 44015'09"
West, 21.65 feet to the Point of Beginning.
(Being a portion of Lot 2 of Avamar Crossing)
and
Commence at the Southwest corner of the
Northwest One-Quarter (NW ) of Section 4,
Township 23 South, Range 27 East; thence
North 00045'03" West along the West line of
the Northwest One-Quarter (NW 4) of said
Section 4, a distance of 1110.14 feet; thence
North 6435'14" East, 58.00 feet; thence
Easterly along the arc of a tangent curve,
being concave to the South, having a radius
of 546.62 feet, a central angle of 2721 '27",
an arc distance of 261.00 feet; thence South
8803'19" East, 226.72 feet; thence South
0156'41" West, 437.38 feet to the Point
of Beginning; thence South 00009'47" East,
30.00 feet; thence South 89 50'13" West,
36.50 feet; thence North 00009'47" West
30.00 feet; thence North 8950'13" East,
36.50 feet to the Point of Beginning. (Being a
portion of Lot 3 of Avamar Crossing)
at public sale, to the highest bidder for cash, on
July 26, 2010, at 11:00 a.m. at the Orange County
Courthouse, Room 350, 425 North Orange Avenue,
Orlando, Florida 32801.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
Dated: May 27, 2010.

CAREY, O'MALLEY, WHITAKER & MUELLER
712 South Oregon Avenue
Tampa, Florida 33606-2516
Ph.: (813) 250-0577
Fax: (813) 250-9898
Attorneys for Bank

By E. Ashley McRae
Florida Bar No.: 157317
amcrae@cowmpa.com

CERTIFICATE OF SERVICE
I HEREBY CERTIFY that a copy of the foregoing has
been furnished via Facsimile and U.S. Mail to Gior-
gio Vallar, Esq.1803 Briar Creek Boulevard, Safety
Harbor, FL 34695, Raandi Morales, Esq., Trenam
Kemker, PO Box 3542, St. Petersburg, Florida
33731-3542 on this 27th day of May, 2010.
5/27, 6/3


CITY OF WINTER PARK
401 Park Avenue South
Winter Park, Florida 32789

PUBLIC NOTICE


Notice is hereby given that public hearings will be held by the City Commission of the City of Winter
Park, Florida, on Monday, June 14, 2010, at 3:30 p.m. in the Commission Chambers of City Hall, 401
Park Avenue, South, to consider the following:

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF WINTER PARK, FLORIDA VACATING AND ABANDONING THE
EASEMENT OVER THE WEST SIX FEET (6.00') OF LOT 3, BLOCK "B", GREENVIEW AT WINTER PARK
PINES, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK "7", PAGE 31 & 32, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF ORANGE COUNTY, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED HEREIN; PROVIDING
AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

All interested parties are invited to attend and be heard. Additional information is available in the
City Clerk's office so that citizens may acquaint themselves with each issue and receive answers
to any questions they may have prior to the meeting. "If a person decides to appeal any decision
made by the Commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he/she
will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he/she may need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is to be based." (F.S. 286.0105) Persons with disabilities needing assistance to
participate in any of these proceedings should contact the City Clerk's office (407-599-3277) at least
48 hours in advance of the meeting.
/S/ Cynthia S. Bonham, CMC, City Clerk
6/3






Thursday, June 3, 2010 Page 23


TheMarketplace


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 48-2010-CP-954-0
IN RE: Estate of
MABEL COX AMSPOKER,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(summary administration)
The administration of the estate of MABEL
COX AMSPOKER, deceased, File Number
48-2010-CP-954-0, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Orange County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 425 N. Orange Avenue, Room
340, Orlando, Florida 32801. The names and
addresses of the petitioner and the petitioner's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate, including un-matured, contingent or unliq-
uidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is
served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against the dece-
dent's estate, including un-matured, contingent or
unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this
Court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is
May 27 2010.
Attorney for Person Giving Notice:
Edward W. Soulsby
Attorney for Petitioner
Florida Bar No. 488216
KENNETH B. WHEELER, LL.M. TAX, P.A.
1155 Louisiana Avenue, Suite 100
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone: (407) 645-1779


Person Giving Notice:
Mary F. Varnum
19158 Majestic Street
Orlando, FL 32833


5/27, 6/3


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Need A PROPERTY MANAGER?
If you need a Property Manager, we can
HELP! We will Secure a qualified tenant,
handle full accounting, act as a liason for
Tenant/Services, Inspect premises on regu-
lar basis. Call Tami Klein at 407-538-4688

Suzy M. Barnes, Realtor
321-277-2182


Altamonte Springs Mother-in-Law
Suite
One large bedroom, 850 sq. ft Full bath,
kitchen, dining room, living room Partially
furnished, utilities included 407-920-7106

Vivian Winston
407-920-7106



SOMEONE WILL BUY OR RENT
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REDUCED OR $1300.00 RENT.
Lowest Priced Home in Waterbridge. Near
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Residential Real Estate

Historically Low Mortgage Rates
FIRST FLORIDA LENDING CORPORATION.
Take advantage of historically low rates.
Call Today!

Susan Hann Jacobs
407-647-5323
Sue@FirstFloridaLending.Com


781 ARAPAHO TRL, MAITLAND
Renovated and expanded, 5/4 with
screened pool home is unique to Dom-
merich. Addition includes a family room.
The open floor-plan home has a spacious
kitchen with granite, stainless, cherry wood
cabinets, kitchen island, breakfast bar,
built-in bookcases, wood floors.

Mary Stuart Day
407-620-8683
marystuart@fanniehillman.com


900 N Park Ave, Winter Park
EXQUISITE ESTATE HOME LOCATED ON
WINTER PARK'S FINEST BRICK STREET.
THE BEAUTIFUL DETAILS ONE WOULD
EXPECT: ARCHED FRENCH DOORS,
PRIVATE TERRACES, MAHOGANY DOORS,
MANICURED GARDENS OVERLOOKING
SPLASH POOL. THE MAIN HOUSE BOASTS
4 BEDROOMS, OFFICE & CHILDREN'S
RETREAT. $2,495,000

Winter Park Land
407-644-2900
winterparkland.com


2210 Glencoe Road, Winter Park
This historic French country home and
guest house, originally owned by Dr. P.
Phillips, has been lovingly restored and
preserved by the current owner. 3,283 SF
wtih 5 Bedrooms, 4.5 Baths. Offered at
$1,345,000

Brenda Cole, Realtor
407.927.1863
info@gouldandcompany.net


390 WATERFALL LN, WINTER PARK
Steps to Park Avenue. Spacious home with
two masters. Wood floors, new carpets,
new paint, newer roof and ac. Updated
kitchen with granite & butcher block
counters & gas cooking. Master suite with
an exercise room. The backyard patio with
large swimming pool. $699,000

John McDade
407-721-7275
john@fanniehillman.com


300 Ferdinand Dr., Longwood
A beautiful 4/2 pool home in absolutely
immacuate condition, with many recent
updates including pool surface, roof, AC
plumbing and more, in Columbus Harbor
with lake access available nearby. Now
just $259,900 See it on the internet at:
www.300.CFLMLS.com.

Scott Jones
407-342-1707
orlrealty@earthlink.net


1770 FAIRVIEW SHORES DR, ORLANDO
Lake Fairview property is Key West-
inspired with flexible floor plan. Granite
and stainless kitchen, built-in eating area,
dual ovens, Built in cabinetry, wood floors,
gas fireplace and water views. Both master
suites have walk in closets and private
baths.

Mary Stuart Day
407-620-8683
marystuart@fanniehillman.com


535 N Interlachen Ave. Apt 308
Experience the charm and elegance of
Winter Park. This condo unit is just steps
away from the golf course, shopping,
dining, museums and all that Park Ave
has to offer. Owner financing available. 2
bedrooms 1 and a half baths $180,000

Winter Park Land
407-644-2900
winterparkland.com


wesi uove uonao, uonad on LaKe
Maitland
Units range from lovely 2 bdrm 1200 SF
unit up to 2500 SF penthouse. Condo fea-
tures pool/spa, picnic area, marina, fitness
center, clubhouse. $289,900-$599,000.

JoAnn Beck, REALTOR
407-629-6369


1730 Palm Ave
3 bed, 2 bath home with pool. W.P schools
district. Offered at $345,000

Rigo Rodriguez
407-256-1113
realtorrigo@aol.com


1200 Sharon Place, Winter Park
2,998 Sq. Ft Home boasts 4 Bedrooms,
3 Baths. Must see Via's home near the
racquet club. Huge backyard with pool.
Offered at $950,000

Lisa Gould
407.721.7612
lisaowensgould@earthlink.net




Winter Park: Goldenrod/University
doctor's office
5 exam rooms + extra features. Other
office units from 800 to 1800 sq ft. Nice
building. Great Prices. Call (407) 293-1934

Ann Polasek
407-293-1934


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The Issues The Questions The Discussion The People
....................................................................................................It's the place to be!
Join the Winter Park Chamber of Commerce as we host
our monthly breakfast update, featuring:

David Krepcho
President & CEO
Second Harvest Food Bank of
Central Florida
Participate in an informative discussion about the critical
food needs of our community.
Please bring a canned food item to the meeting.
All items collected will be donated to Second Harvest Food
Bank of Central Florida.
Friday, June 11, 2010
7:45 a.m. Networking/ 8:15 a.m. Program
Complimentary Continental Breakfast
Winter Park Welcome Center/ Chamber of Commerce
First-floor WPHF Community Room
151 W. Lyman Avenue, Winter Park, FL 32789
RSVP: (407) 644-8281 or e-mail chawks@winterpark. org.
The event is free and open to the public.
Presented by: Sponsored by:
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Page 24 Thursday, June 3,2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer




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