Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00081
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate Title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park FL
Publication Date: April 8, 2010
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates: 28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00091444
Volume ID: VID00081
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613

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Winter Park / Maitland


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Couture in the


Independence road
Students at a Winter Park-
area education center
make serious strides
Page 12


It's playoff time
Spring sports are headed
for the postseason with
some teams predicted to go
all the way.
Page 4


Commuter rail scam
"In Mayor Bradley's case,
the appearance of a (com-
muter rail) conflict is a
looming black cloud."
Page 16


0 94922 9564II2 2
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Rollins No.7 on

PLAYBOY
party list
JENNY ANDREASSON
OBSERVER STAFF
Rollins College is the hard-
est-partying small school
in the country, according
to the 2010 Playboy Party
Schools list.
In fact, it's No. 7 on the
magazine's top 10 list of
party schools, alongside the
University of Miami, which
came in at No. 4.
"It's not the size of a
school," the magazine
wrote about Rollins, "it's
the commotion its students
cause when they collective-
ly rage."
But officials at the oldest
postsecondary institution
in Florida dismiss the spot
on the list as meaningless.
"We don't take this rank-
ing seriously," said Rollins
spokeswoman Ann Marie
Varga. "The ranking criteria
is a farce and there's no sta-
> turn to ROLLINS on PAGE 5


Flowers takes his final bow

The term-limited Maitland councilman reflects on his six-year run with the city


KATIE KUSTURA
OBSERVER STAFF
When Jeff Flowers first be-
came involved in public
service, it wasn't entirely his
decision.
"I got talked into [the
Lakes Advisory Council] by
my 12-year-old daughter
who liked to go fishing,"
said Flowers. "I realized she
wouldn't be able to go fish-
ing much longer with the
quality of water that our
lakes had."
After his first term had
finished, he decided to run
for a second term.
"I felt like I needed to
continue my work because
things were half-started,
and I wanted to complete as
much as I could," he said.
Mayor Doug Kinson,
who met Flowers on Coun-
cil, said he was very pleased
that Flowers had decided to
run for a second term.
"Those who truly have a
passion for the community
choose to run for a second


PHOTO BY KATIE KUSTURA THE OBSERVER
Outgoing Maitland City Councilman Jeff Flowers will be celebrated at City Hall on Monday. Howard Sheiferdecker will take over his Council seat.


term," Kinson said. "Thank
goodness he did it because
Maitland benefitted as a re-
sult."
Now the man who has
served on the Maitland City
Council for six years will
step down to make room
for incoming Councilman


Howard Scheiferdecker on
Monday, April 26. Though
he's content to be finished,
he said there are certain
things he'll miss about serv-
ing the city, such as the staff
members.
"I've learned to really re-
spect the people that make


our city governments work
and function," Flowers said.
"We've got some really dedi-
cated people ... and I've got-
ten a chance to become per-
sonal friends with a number
of them."
Something he won't miss
> turn to FLOWERS on PAGE 5







Page 2 Thursday, April 22,2010 Winter Park / Maitlanci Observer


A mosaic to bind a community

Dommerich Elementary artwork will be unveiled at the school's dedication ceremony on April 29


KATIE KUSTURA
OBSERVER STAFF

When Dommerich Elemen-
tary School relocated, Jane
McCann knew it needed
a little something extra
to make it feel more like
home.
"I was trying to think of
service projects that would
connect the old Dommer-
ich to the new Dommer-
ich," said the fourth-grade
teacher.
After doing some re-
search and applying for the
Darden Restaurants Foun-
dation grant, which she re-
ceived, she came up with
the idea of creating a mosa-
ic, but not just any mosaic.
"We used to have a lot of
wildlife on our campus, but
because of all of the con-
struction it chased away
all of the wildlife," McCa-
nn said. A wildlife mosaic
would be a great way to liv-
en up the new building, she
decided.
Remembering that artist
Lynn Tomlinson had com-
pleted mosaic projects at
Hannibal Square and Trinity
Prep, she invited Tomlinson
to get involved. Tomlinson
signed on as the lead artist
for the project that would
showcase not only local
wildlife, but a slice of the
Dommerich community.
"I always like in my proj-
ects to build in some oth-
er kind of learning, so it's
about the process," Tomlin-
son said. "It's about learning
how to do a mosaic."
True to this concept,
Dommerich faculty, staff,
students, parents and other


PHOTO BY KATIE KUSTURA THE OBSERVER
Mark Barrette glues mosaic tiles to a wall at the new Dommerich Elementary, where a group of volunteers came together to decorate the school with a familiar theme.


community members came
together to make the mo-
saic, from start to finish.
"Primarily, it was to build
relationships, so children
would feel connected and do
better in school, and parents
would be more involved in
the school and community
members would feel more
connected to our Dommer-
ich community," said Mc-
Cann. "It's amazing to see all
the people that have been
involved. It's far bigger than
I ever, ever imagined it."
Thanks to tile donations
from Archie Vandermast,
Jennifer Reichardt, Jill Cot-
ton, Lynn Tomlinson and
SoCo Interiors, the students
had plenty to work with.
Their involvement was key,
so McCann and Tomlinson
turned to the students for


their input. After deciding
what types of plants and
animals were important to
recognize, fifth-grade stu-
dents drew the pictures,
while the younger students
cut the figures from clay.
The pieces were glazed and
fired and glued on the pan-
els, primarily by students in
third and fourth grade.
Parent and volunteer
Mark Barrette played a key
role in the project by help-
ing coordinate volunteers
and in the actual creation
of the mosaic with his con-
struction experience and
work with tile. His daughter
Emma, who is in the fourth
grade, designed a portion of
one of the panels that shows
the life cycle of a butterfly.
She did this from drawings
of photos that were taken


of a butterfly's lifecycle that
happened in her own back-
yard.
Even the plant life in the
piece has a back-story.
"We have magnolias that
are symbolic of the magno-
lia tree that used to be in the
front of the old Dommerich
building," said Matthes. "An-
other part that I love about
the project is that it re-
ally brings in the history of
Dommerich. It incorporates
both the old and the new,
and it's a beautiful bridging
of all of that."
Fifth-grader Joseph Avila
said he was pleased at the
way the school was present-
ed in the mosaic.
"I like the one with the
school the best because it
looks like our school," he


said. "It really represents
how Dommerich is because
it's a friendly place to be."
Avila's role in the project
included glazing the leaves
and cleaning up the grout
work.
"It's just so beautiful,"
said Matthes. "Now when
people come in the office
and come in the lobby, they
can see this beautiful work
that's done by everybody."



The mosaic will be un-
veiled to the public at the
Dommerich Elementary
dedication ceremony at
10 a.m. on Thursday, April
29. For more information,
visit www.des.ocps.net.


Page 2 Thursday, April 22, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer




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Playoffs under way in sports

Winter Park water polo could go all the way this Friday, but lacrosse teams fell in their playoff bids


ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF

WINTER PARK
Boys baseball
The Winter Park baseball
team dropped a close
one to Cypress Creek last
Wednesday, falling 4-3 at
home. After facing Winter
Springs at press time, they'll
travel to Dr. Phillips for a
showdown April 22.

Boys lacrosse
The Winter Park boys la-
crosse team made it all the
way to the second round
of the FHSAA finals before
bowing out just before
the championship. They
fell 10-5 to Lake Highland
Prep Thursday to end their
strong 18-2 season. Leading
into the final game, they
hadn't lost since February.

Girls lacrosse
The girls lacrosse team also


bowed out against Lake
Highland, falling 17-8 in
the playoffs. The girls finish
their season 7-6 overall.

Water polo
Winter Park's highly ranked
water polo team hit the
water Wednesday night at
press time for the district
tournament at Winter Park.
They played West Orange
in the first round, but with
a win, they may square off
with rival Bishop Moore at
7 p.m. Friday night. Only
the winner advances to the
next round of the playoffs.

TRINITY PREP
Tennis
Trinity Prep's top player
won't be playing the re-
gional or state champion-
ships after opting to play
in a California tournament
instead.
Maci Epstein, who is the
team's top seed as a sopho-


more, has been with the
Saints since middle school,
but has chosen not to com-
pete with her team follow-
ing its district champion-
ship last week.
She'll be playing in the
U.S. Tennis Association's
National Spring Champion-
ships in Southern Califor-
nia.

Softball
The Saints softball team is
heading into districts this
week, with the opener at
Trinity Prep at press time,
and the championship
game at 5 p.m. Thursday.
The Saints were 11-11
heading into the postsea-
son, but had suffered a re-
cent string of losses against
East Ridge and two distant
Florida teams.
The Saints advanced to
the state semifinals last sea-
son before falling to Bolles
3-1.


ARCHIVE PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER
On a skid from recent losses, the Winter Park baseball team is looking to turn its sea-
son around before district playoffs next week. They play Dr. Phillips April 22.


Knights chase Owls to no avail

While UCF baseball was losing its third conference series of the year, Rollins swept Eckerd


ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF
For the third time this season, the
Knights won one and lost two of a
three-game series against a Confer-
ence USA foe. This past weekend
they fell to Rice, dropping their
overall record to 24-14 and 6-6 in
the C-USA.
A big eighth inning in the third
and deciding game of the series
ended the Knights chances of tak-
ing their second conference series
of the year. That's because the Owls
went on a five-run rally to open up
a massive lead on the Knights, who
were unable to catch up in the bat-
ter's box. The Owls would win 13-
8.
But the loss didn't come without
some offensive heroics by some key
Knights hitters. Left fielder Chris
Duffy went 3-for-5 with 3 RBIs in
the game, including his 14th double
of the season. Second baseman Aus-
tin Johnston hammered his third
homer of the season on the way to
a 2-for-4, 2 RBI game. Beau Taylor
went 3-for-5 with 2 RBIs also.
The pitcher's mound wasn't as
much fun for the Knights, who


were shelled over the course of
nine innings. They would need
eight pitchers to finish the game,
with Bryan Brown maxing out at
two innings, giving up two earned
runs in the process. StarterJoe Rog-
ers only lasted an inning, giving up
5 hits and a run.
The Knights hit the road for a
three-game series in Charleston,
W.V., against Marshall, starting at
2:05 p.m. Friday. They'll return April
30 to host Memphis.

Rollins
The Tars jumped to 29-15 on the
season and 11-7 in the Sunshine
State Conference after sweeping
Eckerd in a three-game series in St.
Petersburg.
The final 12-5 win marked the
third time in the series that the Tars
would score double-digit runs.
Providing most of the firepower
for the Tars was first baseman Kev-
in Mager, who blasted a grand slam
in the sixth inning to help start an
eight-run rally.
On Friday the Tars travel to face
Barry. On April 30 they return to
host Palm Beach Atlantic.


Bacon places top


25 in the world


BRITTNI JOHNSON
GUEST REPORTER
The Exploding Bacon Ro-
botics team, which went to
the FIRST Robotics Champi-
onship in Atlanta this past
weekend, made it to the top
24 out of 80 teams in their
division. The team was also
in the top four finalists for
the Imagery Award. Though
the team didn't win this


year, they had a great time
at the championship.
"They were fine; we had
such a good season," said
mentor Wendy Austin. "We
couldn't be happier if we
won."
The Bacon team is always
looking for new members,
so interested high school
students should check out
their site: www.exploding-
bacon.com.


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER
Despite strong hitting from both teams, Rollins' pitchers held Eckerd just enough for a big three-game
sweep last weekend. This weekend they travel to face Barry before returning against Palm Beach Atlantic.




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Page 4 Thursday, April 22, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


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Thursday, April 22, 2010 Page 5


Legislature sent back to square one

Teachers, parents, even the Orange County School Board cheer after Crist vetoes merit pay bill


ROBYN SIDERSKY
GUEST REPORTER
Gov. Charlie Crist has vetoed Senate
Bill 6, the bill that would change the
way teachers in Florida are paid to a
merit-pay system.
In a press conference last week,
Crist said he made the decision to
veto over concerns of content.
Teachers across Central Florida
have rallied in opposition to the bill,
flooding Crist's office with phone
calls and e-mails.
OnApril 13, more than 150 teach-
ers and parents rallied at the Semi-
nole County Education Complex, as
cars on Lake Mary Boulevard passed
by and honked in support.
"We are pleased with the deci-
sion," Regina Klaers, spokeswom-
an for Seminole County Public
Schools, said. "I know they have
expressed that if a revised plan is
submitted in the future, we would
look forward to working with our
teacher organizations for details on
any kind of future plan."
"We are so excited," said Judy
Wiant, of the Seminole County
Council of Parent Teacher Associa-
tion. "I think enough of us actually
contacted the governor to let him
know this is our preference for him
to veto it, that it was not a good bill,
and I think he saw that."


Parents and teachers weren't the
only ones cheering about the gov-
ernor's veto the Orange County
School Board was supportive of the
decision as well.
"The governor's veto now allows
legislators, teachers and school dis-
trict administrators to come togeth-
er to work on a merit pay plan that
has a chance at success," said Daryl
Fynn, vice chairman of the Orange
County School Board. "Senate Bill
6 and House Bill 7189 was an un-
funded mandate, challenged local
control and pitted school boards
against teachers.
"The veto gives both sides of the
issue the opportunity to bring clari-
ty to several worrisome parts of the
bill, collaborate with teachers and PHOTO BY ROBYN SIDERSKY -THE OBSERVER
local district officials and, hopeful- Teachers, students and parents rally at the Seminole County Education Complex on April 13 in protest of
ly, identify a funding source." Senate Bill 6, which was vetoed on Thursday by Gov. Charlie Crist.


The main issue many teachers
had with the bill was that their pay
would be based on the success of
their students instead of on experi-
ence and higher education degrees.
"What's happening is, he's going
to drive teachers out," said Oviedo
High School teacher Erica Segrest.
"To base someone's pay on some-
one else's abilities doesn't seem
right to me," said Christina Morris
Smith, a teacher at Sanford Middle
School.


Some teachers even said the bill
would drive them out of the state.
"I don't want to teach to a test,"
said Jill Iracleanos, who's finishing
her education degree at the Univer-
sity of Central Florida. "I'm willing
to move. I won't be able to teach au-
thentically."
"Anybody who can get out of
education will," said Karen Dod-
dridge, a teacher at Lake Brantley
High School. "No young person will
be foolish enough to go into it [edu-


cation]."
Crist vetoing the merit pay bill
won't be the end of education re-
form. Teachers said they're open to
new ideas, as long as lawmakers go
about it the "right way."
"It's imperative that teacher in-
put be invited when developing a
successful merit-pay system," Flynn
said. "The issue isn't going away.
Both sides must come to the table
to work together to achieve a work-
able system."


ROLLINS I Professor says Playboy rankings link drinking with sex;


< continued from the front page

tistical validity."
This isn't the first time
Rollins has appeared on the
list. In 2002, Rollins came in
at No. 3, Playboy spokesman
Steve Mazeika said. Last year,
Playboy did a top 25 list and
Rollins was No. 17.
Varga said the college's
2002 ranking was the result
of a fraternity prank and has
since stayed on the maga-
zine's radar.
"Fraternity guys did a
write-in campaign in 2002,"
said Rhona Ovist, associate
professor of sociology and
women's studies at Rollins.
"The comments were very
degrading to women."
This year's application
for the Top Party Schools
list included four determin-
ing questions: Why is your


school a party school? Best
party (and why)? Hottest
group of girls (and why)?
Anything else we should
know?
"They're linking drink-
ing with sex and the sexu-
alization of young girls, and
they're not saying at all how
they came to decide," Ovist
said.
Mazeika said Playboy's
editors, with input from the
magazine's campus repre-
sentatives, models, photog-
raphers, online voters and
student readers, determine
the rankings. He said the list
is meant to be a "lightheart-
ed feature" that doesn't pro-
mote underage drinking
and partying.
"It highlights schools
where students can receive
an excellent education
while maintaining a safe,


-

Ovist said media out-
lets have been picking up
the list and running with it
as "a truth," and not offering
any criticism. It perpetuates
the stereotypes of the "hy-
permasculine man" and the
"hypersexualized woman,"


she said.
"It's all about selling raun-
chy magazines and beer and
liquor," she said.
Mazieka said the list, and
Playboy as a whole, is not
tarnishing women's images.
"Playboy has been instru-
mental in defining accept-
able boundaries of sexual-
ity, and images in Playboy
are romantic, respectful and
healthy," he said.
Florida State University
and the University of Flor-
ida have also made the list,
but UCF hasn't, he said.
University of Miami fell
from the top party school
to No. 4 this year, and the
editors seem to attribute it
to pressure from school of-
ficials.
"But being named our
[No. 1] party school became


mag disagrees
a bit of an albatross, and the
man soon ramped up mel-
low-harshing," the maga-
zine wrote.
Rollins students are like-
ly getting similar criticism
from the school's leaders.
"When I saw the ranking,
I thought, oh boy, here we
go again," Ovist said. "The
trustees must love this. All
the work we do trying to
create positive images and
Playboy goes calling us the
party school."
Rollins' Varga said the
school has other rankings
to focus on.
"We are consistently
ranked first in the South in
our category by U.S. News
& World Report that we
take seriously," she said.


FLOWERS I Pavilion donation offer causes firestorm for term-limited official


< continued from the front page

is the sniping debate.
"It's very unproductive,"
he said. "It's not conducive
to find out the best solu-
tions."
One member of council
who did not always see eye
to eye with him is Council-
man Phil Bonus.
"Probably the only divi-
sive topic in recent memory
is the downtown develop-
ment project with Brossier,"
Bonus said.
However, the project cur-
rently on everybody's mind
is the performing arts pavil-
ion. Flowers wants to donate


$250,000 for the pavilion
that he'd like to see built at
Lake Lily Park. In exchange,
he wants the city to forgive
the $50,000 advance that
it gave the Performing Arts
of Maitland, which Flowers
founded.
Bonus said he finds the
whole thing curious.
"I think I have to sepa-
rate enthusiasm for a venue
such as that, at some place at
some point in the city, from
the way it was presented,"
said Bonus. "I found it curi-
ous that we would engage in
dozens of public workshops
and meetings to analyze
what to do with downtown
and how to activate our


parks ... and yet, he never
mentioned it."
The pavilion has bare-
ly been mentioned at the
most recent City Council
meetings. That the pavilion
was not discussed at an ear-
lier date, and the financial
aspects of the project have
been the primary causes for
concern.
"There's no special ben-
efit I'm achieving by giving
away my money," said Flow-
ers, who thinks the pavil-
ion would encourage more
community gatherings. "I
don't define the tax laws,
the IRS does."
Although the pavilion


was on the agenda for the
April 12 meeting, there was
not as much time to discuss
the project as Flowers would
have hoped for. The city
plans to schedule a work-
shop. He said he intends to
remain involved by attend-
ing meetings and pushing
forward with the project.
Kinson said he is thank-
ful that Flowers wants to
give Maitland such a gift.
"The donation actually
gets lost between the lines,
and we really need to step
back and look at it for what
it is," said Kinson. "It would
be very unfortunate if peo-
ple looked at Jeff Flowers in
simply the light of whether


or not they want a pavilion.
He's meant much more to
the city than a pavilion."
With work to be done on
the pavilion project, Flow-
ers will still be a busy man
about the community. Now
that his term is finished, the
man who founded the Per-
forming Arts of Maitland
will continue to work with
the arts as a member of the
Youth Symphony Board.
"I performed in the Or-
lando Youth Symphony
when I was a youth, and I'm
looking forward to bringing
as much expertise to that as
I can," said the viola player.


Winter Park / Maitland Observer










Business Briefs


Zyscovich Architects, the national-
ly-renowned architecture and urban
planning firm with offices in Miami,
Orlando, West Palm Beach and New
York City, has welcomed Sean Tracy,
AIA, to its staff in the Orlando office.

Former Orange County Sheriff Kev-
in Beary has joined the Center for
Security Solutions as an independent
security consultant.

The Central Florida office of SIKON
Construction announced the compa-


ny has commenced work on the new
$5 million Publix at the Galleria Mall
in Fort Lauderdale located at 2501 E.
Sunrise Blvd.

This month the Publix Super Mar-
ket in the Aloma Shopping Center in
Winter Park will be demolished. Con-
struction will immediately begin on a
new 47,000-square-foot facility in the
same location. The new Publix, which
should reopen before the end of this
year, will include a liquor store.


Stevens, Inc. a Winter Park architec-
ture and construction company spe-
cializing in industrial and factory use
facilities has secured a contract with
Affordable Tire of Orlando to provide
design build services for a new tire
recycling facility.

RLF, a nationally recognized architec-
ture, engineering and interior design
firm located in Winter Park, Florida,
recently appointed Scott Fote, PE,
LEED AP, to vice president.


Mattamy Homes will start construc-
tion of a second phase devlopment
with 10 new city homes at Baldwin
Park City Homes before May 1.

Lennar's Central Florida division
has appointed Michelle Pearsall, vice
president of sales for the Davenport,
Orlando and Winter Park regions.

James M. Spoonhour, a partner with
Lowndes, Drosdick, Doster, Kantor &
Reed, PA. recently won the Winter
Park Croquet Club's singles champi-


onship.

BauerFinancial, Inc., Coral Gables,
Florida is proud to bestow its high-
est 5-Star Superior rating upon Gulf
States Credit Union in Maitland. In
fact, this marks the 79th consecutive
quarter that Gulf States Credit Union
has earned this distinction.

Hong-Ting Chen has been named
Member of the Year by the Central
Florida chapter of Women's Transpor-
tation Seminar (WTS).


Community Bulletin


PHOTO COURTESY OF FLORIDA
Park Maitland School students donated gifts to the Florida Hospital for
as part of their "Q" then "U" grammar lesson.


The students of Park Maitland
School enjoy an annual tradition that
helps them learn an important rule
of grammar "Q" then "U." Every
year pre-kindergarten students at-
tend the wedding of these two let-
ters to symbolize that they always
stick together in words like quick and
quack. As expected at a wedding, the
students and their parents bring a
gift. However, these gifts are donated
to Florida Hospital for Children. After
school, several students and par-
ents volunteered to bring the gifts to
the hospital. The students met with
Florida Hospital for Children Child Life
specialists to deliver the presents. For
more information on how to donate to
Florida Hospital for Children, please


call 407-303-5600 ext. 110-7475.

BASE Camp Children's Cancer
Foundation, www.basecamp.org,
announced today that the Winter Park
Celebrity Waiter Luncheon sponsored
by Fleming's Prime Steakhouse and
Leadership Winter Park Class XX,
raised more than $11,000. This sig-
nature event has played a key role in
raising funds for BASE Camp's hos-
pital programs in these challenging
times. BASE Camp's next Celebrity
Waiter Luncheon is coming up May
21 at Bella Collina. To get involved in
our upcoming luncheon please con-
tact Rachel at Rachel@basecamp.
org.


Golden Corral proudly announces
that loyal patron Charles Stritmater
of Winter Park was randomly select-
ed as a $1,000 winner in a drawing
held by Golden Corral Corporation
and Empathica, a customer service
survey company and sweepstakes
sponsor. To enter the contest, simply
send complete contact information to
Golden Corral Customer Satisfaction
Survey Sweepstakes, c/o Empathica
Inc. 511 Avenue of the Americas, #40,
New York, NY 10010.

Bill Segal is releasing five years of
personal tax returns for he and his
wife, Sara. The records go back to
Segal's first year in office, 2004. The
release is by far the greatest financial
disclosure ever made by a candidate
for Orange County Mayor. Any mem-
ber of the media wishing to inspect
the tax returns may contact the cam-
paign office at 407-644-3832.

The Goldenrod Chamber is open-
ing its sponsorship opportunities for
this year's Tastefully Goldenrod, Food
Tasting and Silent Auction event held
June 11. Now is the time to reserve
your spot on the list! Opportunities
include a corporate sponsorship for
$500, which includes a corporate
table with signage and reserved
seating for eight people. In addition,
your company logo will appear on


PHOTO COURTESY OF BRION PRICE PHOTOGRAPHY
Orange County commissioner and mayoral candidate Bill Segal put a pie in the
face of Orlando Sentinel Taking Names columnist Scott Maxwell for a charity event.


all printed material sent out in con-
junction with the event. Table spon-
sorships are also available for $200,
which includes a reserved table with


signage for eight people. Contact Ex-
ecutive Director Darlene Dangel at
407-677-5980.


A caption accompanying the "Portraits of Florida" photo spread in the April 15 Observer omitted the artist's name. Jim Wilson was the artist exhibiting at
the pARTicipation exhibit at the Maitland Art Center main gallery from March 26-April 18.



SWinter Park/ Maitland

Observer


PUBLISHER
Kyle Taylor
407-563-7009
kyle@observernewspapers.com

MANAGING EDITOR
Jenny Andreasson
407-563-7026
jennya@observernewspapers.com

DESIGNER
Eric Sly
407-563-7054
erics@observernewspapers.com


Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster
CONTACTS


REPORTERS
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407-563-7026
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407-563-7023
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LEGALS I CLASSIFIEDS
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legal@observernewspapers.com


Volume 22, Issue Number 16


CLASSIFIEDS LISTINGS
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407-563-7058
classifieds@observernewspapers.com

COPY EDITORS
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COLUMNISTS
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407-522-3906

ADVERTISING SALES
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407-515-2605
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Katie Kustura
Intern


Member of: PO. Box 2426 1500 Park Center Dr. USPS 00-6186
* Florida Press Association Winter Park, FL 32790 Orlando, FL 32835-5705 ISSN 1064-3613
* Maitland Area/ Winter Park/
Goldenrod Chamber of Commerce www.wpmobserver.com I Phone: 407-563-7000 I Fax: 407-563-7099 I editor@observernewspapers.com

Publisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor Submission does not guarantee publication. All rights reserved.
Winter Park/Maitland Observer 2010


THE DAVEY TREE EXPERT COMPANY
Discover The Davey Diference.
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Published Thursday, April 22, 2010


Page 6 Thursday, April 22, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer





Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Thursday, April 22, 2010 Page 7


Brandywine Square
* Courtyard Shopping Sidewalk Cafe *
Located Just 10 Steps North of the Morse Museum
Brandywine Deli Cida's of Winter Park Antiques
Cida's of Winter Park featuring On the Avenue
Enjoy eating outside on The Original Consignment Quality Antiques
beautiful Park Avenue. Buffet Collection. Owned by Hardy Hudson.
catering specialist since 1972 an7-Ria4-R An7_7-1 olmnn


$949,000 $
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1 31"


Event Mrketing Powered By MA ENG 02010rRepsentations c oteleduponasco lystatig tationofthedevelope co station,
ACCELERATED DRECORS make fe ce to the b d to do cents quid by Section718.503 Florida Statues, to be provided by a develop
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Page 8 Thursday, April 22,2010 Winter Park / Maitlanci Observer


Maitland City Talk
BY DOUGLAS T KINSON
MAYOR


Perspectives on a

new council


This spring will bring new
beginnings to the city of
Maitland. Along with the
challenges of balancing our
upcoming budget, of appro-
priately planning for our
downtown and west side, of
expanding our parks system
and of connecting our path-
ways, comes a new Maitland
City Council, readied to
move Maitland forward to
the next level.


Bev Reponen
With the challenges that
Maitland faces this year, it
is critical that we have city
representatives who are
knowledgeable and experi-
enced to be able to address
the challenges we face. I


thank Councilwoman Re-
ponen for her past commit-
ment to our city, but even
more so, in her decision to
run for and succeed in se-
curing a second term.
Besides her three years in
dealing with complicated
budgets, Bev brings with her
a dedication and passion
unmatched by most who
represent a community. Her
diligence by which she pre-
pares for any matter before
our Council is impressive
and results in a better deci-
sion, whether I agree with
her or not.
Bev's commitment to our
community is evidenced
through her leadership
with the Interim Improve-


ment Committee, whose
purpose is to beautify our
city in light of vacant and
neglected properties scat-
tered throughout. I recently
attended one of her meet-
ings and was impressed by
the degree to which the
group is committed to mak-
ing Maitland a better place
for our families.
In the end, Maitland has
benefitted in many ways
from Councilwoman Re-
ponen's background and
experience. Our city will be
more presentable, our lakes
will be cleaner, our environ-
ment more protected, but
most importantly, I believe
our residents feel like they
have more of a voice in gov-
ernment as a direct result of
her efforts.


Howard Schieferdecker
Howard Schieferdecker rep-
resents the type of dedicat-
ed residents our city needs.
His willingness to serve his
community is evidenced in
his commitment to being
involved through Planning
and Zoning. His background
in all aspects of real estate
uniquely qualifies him to
tackle the tough and press-


ing matters of planning and
redevelopment that Mait-
land faces today.
I was fortunate to have
met with Howard prior to
his making the decision to
run for Council. I was im-
pressed to find that his pri-
mary priority, like mine, was
to his family. Second, I could
tell he was the type of per-
son who could look at com-
plicated matters budget,
planning, development or
otherwise in an objective
manner that would lead our
city in the right direction.
And finally and most
importantly, even though
Howard had not served one
meeting on Council, his
words in our recent strate-
gic planning session could
not have been more on the
mark: "A representative of
a community is nothing if
he cannot respect residents
of our community, manag-
ers and staff within the city,
and just as importantly, oth-
er members of the board on
which he sits."
Respect for all involved
will lead us to the right
and proper decisions, as it
will create an environment
where everybody feels com-


FIXEDRatesAltratiet




40-81884 45A.Hihwy179
w gs g CREDIT U IOM it F


APRIL 26 CITY COM-
MISSION MEETING TOP-
ICS OF INTEREST
There will be a City Com-
mission meeting on Mon-
day, April 26, at 3:30 p.m.,
in City Hall Commission
Chambers. Below are a few
topics of interest:
BOARD UPDATES:
Parks & Recreation Com-
mission.
MAYOR'S REPORT:
-Presentation of the Tree
City USA and Growth Award
-Mayoral appointments
-Repaving of General
Rees Avenue
CITY MANAGER'S REPORT:
Report on cost of expanding
the East Morse Boulevard
streetscape project east of
Interlachen Avenue
CITY ATTORNEY'S RE-
PORT:
-Tolling Agreement
ACTION ITEMS REQUIRING
DISCUSSION:
-Extension of Conditional
Use for the Morse Boule-
vard/Pennsylvania Avenue
Parking Garage


-Discussion and adoption
of FY 2011 budget goals
-Post office extension
PUBLIC HEARINGS:
-Adjustments to the city fee
schedule.
-Resolution Defining
the Economic Develop-
ment/CRA Department as
the city's local Economic
Development Agency (in-
cluded for approval is the
endorsement of the State
Qualified Targeted Industry
program [QTI]).
-Resolution Accepting
and approving the city's por-
tion of the Orange County
Local Mitigation Strategy.
-Second reading of the
ordinance authorizing the
refunding of the outstand-
ing Park Avenue Improve-
ment Revenue Bonds, Se-
ries 1998; providing for the
issuance of not exceeding
$3 million Park Avenue Re-
funding Improvement Rev-
enue Bonds, Series 2010.
-Second reading of the
ordinance changing the Fu-
ture Land Use Designation
of Commercial to Central
Business District at 301 W.
New England Ave.


-First reading of the ordi-
nances changing the exist-
ing zoning designation at
the following four proper-
ties:
400 W. New England Ave.
463 W. New England Ave.
535 W. New England Ave.
227 E. Hannibal Square
-First reading of the or-
dinances requested by the
city of Winter Park for the
United States Post Office
property located at 300 N.
New York Ave.:
1. Changing the Future
Land Use Designation of
Central Business District to
Open Space and Recreation
2. Changing the Zoning
Designation of Commercial
(C-2) District to Parks and
Recreation (PR) District
3. Changing the Future
Land Use Designation of
Central Business District to


Institutional
4. Changing the Zoning
Designation of Commer-
cial (C-2) District to Public,
Quasi-Public (PQP) District
5. First reading of the or-
dinances requested by the
city of Winter Park for the
West Meadow property:
6. Changing the Future
Land Use Designation of
Institutional to Open Space
and Recreation for the West
Meadow property at 150 N.
New York Ave.
7. Changing the Zoning
Designation of Public, Qua-
si-Public (PQP) District to
Parks and Recreation (PR)
District for the West Mead-
ow property at 150 N. New
York Ave.
8. Vacating that portion
of the platted right-of-way
of West Park Avenue be-
tween the West Meadow
and Central Park.


CITY COMMISSION REPORTS:
Commissioner Dillaha
-Denning Drive construc-
tion site parking garage
-Lee Road medians im-
proving a gateway
-Changing the way Com-
mission meeting agendas
and agenda packets are
configured (for ease in
downloading and viewing,
particularly by the public).
You can find the Com-
mission's full agenda and
information on specific
agenda items by logging on
to the city's official Web site
at www.cityofwinterpark.
org and by clicking on Gov-
ernment > City Commission
> Packets.
Visit the city's official
Web site at www.cityofwin-
terpark.org, find us on Face-
book and follow us on Twit-
ter.


-H RI UIEI6 "t 6 Hn E
FIR[ E [5(t Kts R Fl NT


PHOTO COURTESY OF THE CITY OF WINTER PARK
The Winter Park Fire Rescue Department celebrated its 110th birthday on Friday, April 16 with a small gathering of officials.


(ITToI~UCLTUM E 1NRIT
Winter Park CityTalk
BY RANDY KNIGHT
CITY MANAGER


fortable to voice their opin-
ions. Without the input of
our residents, and respect-
ful dialogue between staff
and Council, effective deci-
sions are impossible.
Many thanks to both Bev
and Howard for your com-
mitment to our city.


Get involved run for
Maitland's City Council!
Within the next year,
there will be many opportu-
nities to serve on Maitland's
City Council. My hope is
that dedicated, passionate
residents who long to make
a difference in their com-
munity will decide to serve
at another level, and run
for office in the city of Mai-
tland.
Should you feel this
might be something you
are interested in, please
do not hesitate to contact
me at any time. Should you
wish to meet to discuss your
future serving Maitland,
please contact Maria Wal-
drop, City Clerk, to schedule
an appointment. She can be
reached at 407-539-6219. I
look forward to our future
discussions.


Page 8 Thursday, April 22, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Y






Thursday, April 22, 2010 Page 9


Calendar


At 7 p.m. on Thursday, April 22, the
Winter Park Institute welcomes the
creator of the phrase 'virtual reality,'
Jaron Lanier, to the Tiedtke Concert
Hall at Rollins College. The free event
is open to the public. For more infor-
mation, call 407-691-1995 or e-mail
winterparkinstitute@rollins.edu

Friday, April 23-25, the 33rd annual
Greek Festival will be in full swing
at the Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox
Church, located on the corner of Ora-
nole Road and Wymore Road. Festival
hours are Friday 4-11 p.m., Saturday
11 a.m. to 11 p.m. and Sunday 11
a.m. to 6 p.m. Admission tickets are
$3. For more information, visit www.
orlandogreekfest.com.

Come join the Boys & Girls Clubs
of Central Florida on Friday, April 23
for Celebrate the Children 2010 at the
Orlando World Center Marriott, 8701
World Center Drive. There will be fine
dining, live and silent auctions and
entertainment. For information about
sponsorships or purchasing a table,
contact Pamela Sible at 407-841-
6855 or e-mail PSible@BGCCF.org.

At 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, April 24,
and at 3 p.m. on Sunday, April 25,
the Bach Festival Choir and Orches-
tra will bring film scores to life from
such movies as Star Wars and Indiana
Jones. The performances will be held
in Knowles Memorial Chapel at Rol-
lins College, 1000 Holt Ave., Winter


Park. Tickets range from $20 to $50,
depending on seat location. Call the
box office at 407-646-2182 or visit
www.bachfestivalflorida.org.

On Sunday, April 25, Friends of First
Response-Maitland will host their
second annual kickball tournament at
Keller Baseball Fields. For more infor-
mation, call 407-629-7091.

The second Winter Park Paint Out
will be held Saturday, April 24 through
May 1, where 26 professional artists
will be painting outdoors around Win-
ter Park. Their works will be available
for purchase throughout the week
and at a ticketed reception at the
Polasek Museum. The reception will
be from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Saturday,
May 1, and all of the artists will be
there. Advance tickets cost $25. For
more information, call 407-647-6294
or visit www.winterparkpaintout.org.

From 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday,
April 24, the Center for Contempo-
rary Dance will present a free nutri-
tion workshop led by Certified Holistic
Health Counselor Zuleida Aleman-
Herba. The workshop is designed to
educate young dancers and parents
about healthy eating behaviors for
dancers. The workshop will be held at
the Center for Contemporary Dance,
3580 Aloma Ave. Suite 7, Winter Park.
Please R.S.V.P. by calling 407-695-
8366 or e-mail events@thecenterfor-
dance.org.


The Holler-Classic Winter Park
Job Fair will be held from 4-7 p.m.
on Wednesday, April 28, in the Win-
ter Park Library Community Room,
460 E. New England Ave. Winter Park
residents will be given hiring priority.
All applicants will have a brief, on-
the-spot interview. Visit www.holler-
classic.com for job descriptions and
information on benefits.

On Thursday, April 29, the Holocaust
Memorial Center will host its annual
Dinner of Tribute at the Rosen Plaza
Hotel. The evening will honor Gov-
ernor Bob Graham, Florida's former
governor and U.S. Senator, who is
now actively involved in international
diplomacy and world peace. Reser-
vations are still being accepted. For
more information, call 407-628-0555
or visit www.holocaustedu.org.

Join the Orlando Business Journal
7:30-9 a.m. on Friday, April 30 for the
SunRail power breakfast. Keynote
speaker Representative John Mica
will discuss job creation, construc-
tion and other economic development
opportunities. The breakfast will be
held at the Citrus Club, 255 S. Orange
Ave., on the 18th floor, Downtown Or-
lando. For reservations, visit Events.
bizjounrals.com/11451 or contact
Kelly DiCristina at 407-649-8470 or
kdicristina@bizjournals.com

From 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Friday,
April 30, the Orlando Garden Club will


host the Spring Game Day and lun-
cheon at 710 E. Rollins St. There will
be games, prizes and food. For tickets,
call 407-645-4381 or e-mail orland-
ogardenclub@yahoo.com. Seating is
limited. Please reserve your seat by
April 23.

Central Florida residents are invit-
ed to enter their four-legged friends
in the Third Annual Doggie Derby at
Baldwin Park, 1913 Meeting Place,
Orlando. The derby will be held from
9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, May 1.
The cost is $15 per dog. The derby
is held on the same morning of the
renowned Kentucky Derby. The event
will also raise money for CCI assis-
tance dogs whose costs exceed. For
more information or to pre-register,
visit www.bpdoggiederby.com.

College film students and profes-
sional filmmakers from all over Cen-
tral Florida will come together on May
1 for the second annual Orlando 24
Hour Film Festival. Participants have
24 hours to write, film, edit and di-
rect a three to five minute short film.
Visit www.orlando24hourfilm.com for
more information.

Orange County Animal Services will
hold its annual Adopt-a-Thon from 10
a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, May 1. The
event will feature free food and bev-
erages, educational workshops and
exciting prize giveaways. The event
will take place at Orange County Ani-


mal Services located at 2769 Conroy
Road, Orlando. For more information,
call 407-254-9150 or visit www.oc-
netpets.com.

The Orange County Retired Educa-
tors Association will meet at noon
on Thursday, May 6, for their Annual
Spring Luncheon, College Park United
Methodist Church, 644 W. Princeton
Street, Orlando. Cost is $12. Reserva-
tions required by May 3. Call 407-
644-7092.

On Thursday, May 6, Joseph Riley,
longtime mayor of Charleston, S.C.,
will be the keynote speaker at Casa
Feliz's annual James Gamble Rogers
Colloquium on Historic Preservation.
The keynote address, titled "Building
and Sustaining a Beautiful and His-
toric City: Everyone's Responsibility,"
will be held at the Winter Park Farm-
er's Market at 7 p.m. Following Mayor
Riley's talk, Casa Feliz will sponsor a
candlelight walking tour of downtown
Winter Park, with stops in Central
Park, Greeneda Court and Osceola
Lodge. Cost for attending the speech
and tour is $15; cost for the speech
only is $5. Attendance is limited.
Tickets may be purchased by calling
407-628-8200, ext. 1, or by e-mailing
casafeliz@earthlink.net.


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Unlimited Calling plan. Listed rate applies to up to 768 Kbps High-Speed Internet service. An additional monthlyfee (including professional installation, if applicable) will apply to customer's modem or router. Terms and Conditions- Residential customers only. All products and services
listed on this form are governed by tariffs, terms of service, or terms and conditions posted at centurylink.comrn ("Website"), incorporated here, and provided to customer by the CenturyLink local operating company serving their location. Taxes, fees, and surcharges-Applicable taxes, fees, and surcharges include
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Winter Park / Maitland Observer








Lifestyles a


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK- THE OBSERVER
Piles of stolen luggage remain as a reminder at the Auschwitz concentration camp in Poland, the final stop for many Jews murdered during the Holocaust. Thanks to help from strangers, many escaped death by hiding during the war.


Concerned about

Identity Theft?
Proper disposal of documents
can help reduce your risk.








Commerce National Bank & Trust is providing
FREE SHRED SERVICE
Enjoy snacks and beverages while
your items are shredded.
Invite family and friends to take advantage
of this free service. Everyone is welcome!


Wednesday, April 28th
10:00 12:00
1201 South Orlando Avenue
in Winter Park
(corner of 17-92 & Orange Avenue)
Member
MeFD I Limit 6 boxes per person. To arrange for larger quantities, EUHOU
F DIC please call Pat Sideman at 407-622-8181 ext. 101. LENDER


WANT A FREE

MATTRESS?

RELAX IN COMFORT

Winter Park Village Seminole Towne Mall
5 shops down from Brio's Upstair's outside of Dillard's
407-628-5657 407-302-2090

DO YOU SUFFER FROM?


LACK OF RESTFUL SLEEP ?
LOWER BACK PAIN ?
NECK OR SHOULDER PAIN ?
TOSSING AND TURNING ?
SLEEP APNEA ?
ACID REFLUX ?


If you don't hurt when you go to bed
But you wake up hurting...
Your bed is to blame

A New Bed Today will Change all of your Tomorrow's


Page 10 Thursday, April 22, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer





Thursday, April 22, 2010 Page 11


Jewish Community Center recounts the

risks taken by Holocaust rescuers


ISAAC BABCOCK and
CARMEN CARROQUINO
THE OBSERVER
Blinded by the night, Beylya Aleynik-
ova tramped through a thickly snow-
covered field to escape the Nazis in
March of 1942. For several days pre-
ceding her escape, the 65-year-old
Russian Jew hid in an oven in a ghetto
near Tolochin, 250 miles east of Po-
land.
But her escape was
short lived, as she
pushed her frail
frame step by
sinking step in
search of salva-
tion in Ivash-
kevich, just to
the other side
of that starlit
frozen field.
S She died of a
heart attack
before reach-
ing the town in
the distance.
Though she


would die alone that night, Aleyniko-
va's was not a lonely fate.
"More than 70 years ago, the world
went dark..." Stanlee Stahl, executive
vice president for the Jewish Founda-
tion for the Righteous said.
But on those bitter cold nights of
a relentless winter in Eastern Europe,
some would survive to see daylight
again. And for many, help came from
unlikely places.
Before a packed Jewish Commu-
nity Center in Maitland on April 11,
Stahl wove a few more threads into
the evolving history of the holocaust,
telling some of the untold tales of sur-
vival and courage in one of the world's
darkest moments.
Yom Hashoah sprang from the
ashes of WWII as Holocaust Remem-
brance Day, a mournful recollection
of the horrors of that time vivified by
a celebration of the courage of those
who risked their lives to fight back.
As the Nazis ransacked Polish
homes, rounding up Jews and ship-
ping them into concentration camps
where many would lose their lives,


some friends and neighbors opened
their homes as secret shelters. Many
knew they would be killed if the Nazis
discovered their acts of defiance.
"Not only having the courage to
care, but having the courage to act,"
Stahl said of those brave few.
Non-Jews created hiding places for
their hunted neighbors wherever they
could find, and where they hoped the
Nazis would never look.
A Romanian baker hid four Jews
from the German Gestapo in his
cramped, middle oven, careful never
to use it.
Jews made "careless choices" when
they entered the ghettos. Death was
the penalty to all involved if a non-
Jew was suspected of helping Jews out
in any way.
"A kilo of sugar, a liter of Vodka or
a pair of boots would be given (to the
person who outed his neighbor) be-
cause that's how much they thought a
Jew's life was," Stahl said.
Rescuers came from all walks of
life, ranging from the well-educated to
> turn to RESCUE on PAGE 15


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Page 12 Thursday, April 22, 2010 Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Family


Calendar



Come interact with Mother
Nature professional storyteller at
the Eighth Annual Children's Art
Festival at 10 a.m. and 11 a.m. on
Saturday, April 24, at the Maitland
Art Center, 231 W. Packwood Ave.
For information, call 407-539-
2181.

The city of Winter Park will
proudly present the Winter
Park High School "Parade of
Champions" on Saturday, April 24,
to celebrate the school's amazing
student accomplishments during
the 2009-2010 school year. The
parade will begin at 9:15 a.m.
at the intersection of Park and
Whipple avenues and will head
south on Park Avenue to Morse
Boulevard, ending in Central Park.
Winter Park Mayor Ken Bradley,
WPHS Principal William R. Gordon
and Orange County Commissioner
Bill Segal will be present to
congratulate the students at 10
a.m. from the Central Park main
stage. For specific information
regarding the Winter Park High
School "Parade of Champions,"
call 407-599-3334.

Israel Independence Day
presented by the Roth JCC will be
held from 3-8 p.m. Sunday,April 25
at the Jewish Community Center of
Greater Orlando, 851 N. Maitland
Ave. It's free but certain activities
have a nominal cost. Contact Julie
Varkonyi at 407-645-5933 or visit
www.israeldayorlando.org.

Audition materials for the 2010-
2011 season with the Florida
Symphony Youth Orchestra (FSYO)
are now available for download
from www.fsyo.org. Applications
are due by Wednesday, April 28.
For more information, call the
FSYO office at 407-999-7800.

On Thursday, April 29 from
11:30 a.m. to 12:50 p.m., the
kindergarten class at St. Margaret
Mary Catholic School will host the
Second Annual Kindergarten Dime
Bake Sale. The children will use all
of the proceeds from their bake
sale to assist in the relief efforts
for the school's sister parish, St.
Joan of Arc School in Haiti. Only
dimes may be used for purchase.
Visit www.smmknight.org for
more information.

From 1-5 p.m. on Thursday, April
29, The Hebrew Day School will
hold a Nutrition and Fitness Expo
in the school's multipurpose room,
851 N. MaitlandAve., Maitland.The
Expo, which is open to the public,
will feature an "ask the expert"
area, where leading physicians
from the community will be on
hand to provide information and
hands-on activities. Call Shari
Wladis at 407-647-0713 for
details.

Princeton House Charter School
is completing its 12th successful
year as an Orange County Charter
School for autistic children and is
currently accepting registration
for the 2010-2011 school year.
Princeton House serves autistic
children in Pre-K through 12th
grades. For more information,
call the school office at 407-523-
7121.


PHOTO BY KAREN McENANY-PHILLIPS -THE OBSERVER
Emilio Rivera and teacher Melanie Thompson walk to his class at the Conducive Education Center of Orlando. Despite his muscle spasms, he can now use utensils and squeeze a juicebox.

A school just outside Winter Park helps disabled children learn to move and walk


KAREN McENANY-PHILLIPS
OBSERVER STAFF

In public school, Kody Som-
ers spent five years sitting in
a wheelchair.
"He couldn't walk, even
with a walker, and he wasn't
being challenged," said
Kody's mom, Katina.
A school counselor told
her about the Conductive
Education Center of Or-
lando on Forsyth Road, just
outside of Winter Park, and
three years later, 12-year
old Kody uses a walker with
moderate assistance.
"He loves coming to
school and has improved by
leaps and bounds," Katina
said.
Kody has lissencephaly,
a rare gene-linked brain
disorder, sometimes called
'smooth brain', where miss-
ingbrain ridges affectspeech
and cognition. Through a
McKay Scholarship, Katina
was able to send Kody to the
Conductive Education Cen-
ter, where staff tried new
things with Kody from the
beginning.
"He understands much
more than he can commu-
nicate," Katina said.
Kody is one of the 20 stu-
dents at the center, where
children with motor dis-
abilities such as cerebral
palsy are doing more on
their own through an inno-
vative program that began
65 years ago in Budapest,
Hungary.

The philosophy
Struggles, triumphs and mir-
acles happen every day in
the pumpkin-colored build-


ing where students from
4-21 years may attend day
and after school programs.
The Conductive Education
Center also hosts a summer
camp that attracts kids from
other countries.
Nearly a decade ago, cen-
ter founders Vicky and Joe
Raymond sought an alter-
native learning environ-
ment for their son Joseph,
who has cerebral palsy. They
learned about conductive
education that works on the
belief that new neural con-
nections could be formed
in children with cognitive
abilities. Conductive Educa-
tion Center incorporates so-
cial, physical and cognitive
disciplines with structured
lesson plans, challenging
the brain to find alterna-
tive paths to perform basic
movements such as sitting,
standing and walking. Stu-
dents gain skills, strength
and confidence in a group
environment. There are five
students per class led by a
trained conductor for half
the day and a special educa-
tion teacher the other half.
The Raymonds observed
a conductive education
school in Minnesota and
believed they could dupli-
cate it.
"Every parent looks for
schools and resources to
meet their child's needs,"
said Vicky, adding that Jo-
seph has learned sounds,
colors and how to make
choices. "He loves coming
to school and his body is al-
ways active."
Raymond said that when
kids aren't challenged
physically, they lose mus-
cle strength, which affects


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bone formation and devel-
opment. In a traditional
school, special needs stu-
dents often must wait for
someone to interact with
them and physical therapy
may be limited. At the cen-
ter, there is constant in-
teraction and every action
through the day is exercise,
such as washing hands,
walking to the bathroom,
sitting for lunch, holding a
cup with two hands, wiping
their mouths or transition-
ing from a walker or other
equipment.
Community support and
donations were vital in ex-
panding into the current
5,000-square-foot build-
ing. Although the center re-
ceives some state funding, it
primarily relies on commu-
nity support to pay salaries
and purchase equipment.
Director Jennifer Gase
said half of the center's an-
nual budget comes from
community support from
organizations such as Di-
PASQUA Enterprises (Sub-
way), Winter Park Construc-
tion, Bayer HealthCare Con-
sumer Care and DRZ Asset
Management.

Making strides
When 9-year-old Alexan-
dra Rivera arrived at the cen-
ter, she could not walk and
struggled to hold her head
up. She had undeveloped
motor skills and a weak up-
per body. After working for
months, she shocked her
family when she went home
for Thanksgiving in 2008
and used her walker for the
first time. Conductor Alex-
andra Gardi, one of the cen-


ter's three conductive edu-
cation teachers who trained
in Hungary with dual bach-
elor of arts degrees in con-
ductive and elementary
education, is working with
Alex on alternative arm and
leg movements. Gardi sings
with her students and en-
courages them as they crawl
from one side of the room
to the wall bars where they
pull themselves up, stretch,
squat, balance and stand.
Recently Alex was able to
stand on her knees and take
several steps another
milestone.
Gardi believes hard work,
belief in the child's abilities
and consistency are the keys
to their independence.
Founder Joe Raymond
agrees.
"Our kids worked so hard
... it was very challenging
for them. Then they began
doing things we had never
seen them do, things we
had never seen a teacher
or therapist try with them.
[The center] instilled a can-
do attitude in the children
and in us."


-offredcto


Page 12 Thursday, April 22, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer





Thursday, April 22, 2010 Page 13


Culture
worthy of your calendar







Food as a way of 'giving'

and artists in the

neighborhood


The Chef's Gala
Do yourself a favor and put
May 15 on your calendar. In
hard times, when so many
charitable organizations
need our contributions, we
have to take a hard look at
where our contributions
are given. The United Way
provides critical assistance
to 100 local service pro-
grams, and they present an
annual fundraising event
that raises fine dining to
an art-form. Each year, the
greatest annual gala event,
held to raise money for the
most respected fund-raising
organization, is the Annual
Chefs Gala benefiting Heart
of Florida United Way. More
than 20 of Central Florida's
Top Chefs from Central
Florida's finest restaurants
- will participate in the


18th Annual Chefs Gala
on Saturday, May 15 at Dis-
ney's Epcot Resort. It is the
region's premier food and
wine event, and directly
benefits Central Florida's
non-profit agencies. Hosted
by Walt Disney World Re-
sort, the evening features
five-star cuisine, fine wines,
desserts, a champagne re-
ception, a silent auction and
live music. "Chefs Gala truly
is A Tasteful Way to Make
a Difference." The event be-
gins May 15 at 6:45 p.m. at
Epcot. Visit www.ChefsGala.
org, call 407-429-2129, or
email chefsgala@hfuw.org.

Great American Pie Fest
There is another very dif-
ferent "foodie" event
coming up this weekend


- April 24-25. Forget your
diet. Crazy pie lover that
I am, I've been known to
tell friends that one of the
reasons to live in Central
Florida is the Annual APC/
Crisco National Pie Cham-
pionships held annually at
Celebration (near Disney).
At this event, while our
country's greatest pie chefs
compete for "Best Pie" in a
number of tasty categories,
the 'Never-Ending Pie Buf-
fet' is found on the beautiful
streets of downtown Cel-
ebration for those of us who
choose to make a national
pastime of eating all the pie
we can! The contest brings
in contestants from across
North America mixing
blue ribbon winners of the
past with a new generation
of pie-bakers, making this a
great family event. In addi-
tion to the never-ending pie
buffet, there is live music,
a "Kid's Creation Station,"
and a demonstration stage.
The American Pie Council
says, "However you slice it,
it's a great time." Festival
admission is free, with tick-
ets to the Pie Buffet at $10
adults and $5 ages 6 tol2.
Visit piecouncil.org

Janis lan at the Plaza
We know we've made some
social progress when we
look back on the career of
that unique singer with the
plaintive voice who intro-
duced us to the "socially


conscious" song at a time
when "protest" songs were
in vogue. I'm talking about
Janis Ian, who was 13 when
she began singing about
'forbidden' topics in 1965.
In her autobiography Soci-
ety's Child, Ian tells us she
received death threats in
response to the song of the
same name. Banned in many
markets, in 1967 "Society's
Child" reached #14 on the
Billboard Top 100, but it
was not until 2001 that "So-
ciety's Child" was inducted
into the Grammy Hall of
Fame, honoring a timeless
classic. Her most successful
single was "At Seventeen,"
released in 1975, an angst-
filled commentary on ado-
lescent cruelty. "At Seven-
teen" won the 1975 Gram-
my Award for 'Best Pop Vo-
cal Performance Female'
beating out Linda Ronstadt,
Olivia Newton-John and
Helen Reddy. Then, as an
historical side-note, Ian
performed "At Seventeen"
as the 'musical guest' on the
very first Saturday Night Live
in 1975. Ian is still touring,
and she will perform live at
Orlando's Plaza Theater on
Friday, April 30 at 7:30 p.m.
The Plaza is at 425 N. Bumby
Ave. in downtown Orlando.
Call 407-228-1220

Polasek Museum to Host
Winter Park Paint Out
Scenic Winter Park will be
the 'backdrop' for the sec-


ond Winter Park Paint Out,
an event where the public
is invited to watch 26 pro-
fessional artists painting
outdoors ("en plein air")
at various Winter Park lo-
cations. We are invited to
watch painters working and
then purchase these unique
landscapes at the Polasek
Museum. The Paint Out be-
gins as the artists fan out
throughout public locations
in Winter Park, painting and
bringing their finished can-
vases back to the museum at
the end of each day. The mu-
seum's gallery will be open
(free) between 10 a.m. and
6 p.m. to allow the public
to view and purchase paint-
ings. Artists will paint from
April 24 through May 1, fol-
lowed by an evening recep-
tion on May 1 from 6-9 p.m.
where the artists will be
present, and patrons will be
able to purchase the origi-
nal artworks. Advance pur-
chase reception tickets are
$25. The Polasek Museum is
located at 633 Osceola Ave.
Call 407-647-6294 or visit
www.polasek.org


SGARRICK
Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer,
educator, and fine art curator. He is a
member of the Curatorial Council for the
Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be
reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com
or 407-522-3906.


Let's



cDance!





BalCroom Dance Lessons

Learn the foxtrot, waltz, rumba, cha-cha and swing in the
most popular group classes in Central Florida.

Renowned instructor Stuart Nichols will teah you all the
steps in a fun, relaxing and supportive atmosphere.
Couples and singles are welcome.


Lessons start on Tuesday, May 4,
at the Winter Park Farmers' Market


SBeginners at 7:00 p.m. Intermediate at 8:45p.m.

Lessons are $80 per person each series.
Proceeds benefit Keep Winter Park Beautiful.


To learn more about the lessons or the
beautification programs organized by
Keep Winter Park Beautiful visit
www.KWPB.org r
or call 407-599-3364. T-Qr LrNU RAm[iTfl g


The 8th Annual Orlando

Cabaret Festival


April 30 May 16

Karen Akers
Mad Cow Theatre's intimate 2-the- Karen Akers
atre complex in downtown Orlando
plays host to The Eighth Annual
Orlando Cabaret Festival, April 30 -
May 16, 2010. Over 40 performances
of jazz, pop, Broadway, comedy, and
a few surprises will feature many
of Central Florida's favorite artists
along with artists from the New York KT Sullivan
Cabaret scene. This year we are
presenting three world-class head-
liners that define both classic and
contemporary cabaret at its greatest:
Karen Akers, KT Sullivan and The
Broadway Boys.

407-927-8788
The Broadway Boys

Mad Cow Theatre
In the heart of Downtown Orlando
Convenient Parking across the street in the Library Garage
105 S. Magnolia Ave, Orlando, FL www.orlandocabaret.com


I


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


0










Cinema


A showcase of this
week's releases, and
a look ahead to
upcoming movies.

Coming May 7


'Iron Man 2'


Coming May 21


'RODIn nood'


'Shrek Forever After'


T I WE KA --ENZIAN









NTiLANe -ART CENTER

CHILDREN'S

ART FESTIVAL
Saturday, April 24, 2010
10 am- 2 pm
The theme for this year is in honor of the 40th anniversary of Earth Day. We will transform
the Art Center into a visual environment focused on the green fun of our lives, recycling, found
objects, reuse and most importantly, being kind to our planet Earth.
The event is FREE for children under 12 and $4/adult.
ACTIVITIES AND ENTERTAINMENT
The public is welcome to come and experience this hands-on cultural environment.


ART ACTIVITIES:
* Crazy Green Fun House
* Have it your way with clay
* Oh my sod
* Seeds of greatness
* One potato, two potato- Printmaking
* Rock on Painting
* Earth day cookies to decorate
* Edible and butterfly garden

COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT
The Maitland Historical Society, the
Maitland Library, the Scribes of Central
Florida, Watercolor Society and Weavers of
Orlando, will also provide hands-on fun.


SPECIAL GUESTS:
* Colby Center for Dance
* Animals from the Central Florida Zoo
* Spore Project with Doug Rhodehamel
* Mother Nature Storyteller
* Van Go Mobile Art
* Chandler Performing Arts Theatre
project

ABC -ART BY CHILDREN
Coalition for the Homeless

Special Thanks to Creative Directors Sandy
Bonus and Jill Altomare for their amazing
creativity and commitment to this signa-
ture festival.


IN THE GALLERY: OIL ON CANVAS
Park Maitland School 6th grade art exhibit featuring the student's display on forced perspectives.
SPONSERED BY:

bright
house
NETWORKS
The Maitland Art Center is located at 231 W Packwood Avenue, Maitland FL 32751 407.539.2181 and is a not-for-profit educational institution operated
for the benefit and enjoyment of all who live and visit in Central Florida. The Art Center activities are sponsered in part by United Arts of Central Florida,
Inc.; by the Florida Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs and the Florida Arts Council; and by the National Endowment for the Arts. www.
maitlandartcenter,org


Page 14 Thursday, April 22, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer





Thursday, April 22, 2010 Page 15


RESCUE I Students showcased artwork that immortalized the rescues; group lit candles in remembrance


< continued from page 11

peasants. By 1939, most of the Jews
in Central and Eastern Europe had
been outed and marked. But as the
Nazis pushed toward Hitler's "final
solution" of Jewish extermination
in concentration camps, the situ-
ation grew desperate for those al-
ready marked for death by a yellow
Star of David on their lapel. If a Jew
wanted to hide, they needed a non-
Jew to help them for any chance at
survival.
"With the absence of whatever
acts these righteous gentiles pro-
vided the Jews, whether it was shel-




To learn more about the Jewish
Foundation for the Righteous,
visit www.jfr.org.

To learn more about the
Holocaust and its history,
visit The Holocaust Memorial
Resource and Education Center of
Florida at www.holocaustedu.org.


ter, papers of false identity or scraps
of food, it might have proved fatal
for the Jew no matter how insignifi-
cant the act might have seemed,"
Stahl said.
On the Sunday that Stahl spoke,
she showed the film of a rescued
Jew from Turka, Ukraine, reunited
with her rescuer for the first time in
more than half a century, bringing
many in the audience to tears.
Jim Shapiro, president of the
Holocaust Memorial Resource and
Education Center of Central Flor-
ida, located in Maitland, said the
documentary was the highlight of
the day. That's something Stahl said
the Jewish Foundation for the Righ-
teous tries to do as often as it can -
reunite the rescued with their res-
cuers.
Local students who created visual
and literary artwork on the subject
of rescue immortalized those acts.
Sixty-four students from elemen-
tary, middle and high schools were
honored for their work depicting
that rescue and sacrifice.
Then, in the Jewish Community
Center, they prayed, and lit candles
for those lost more than 65 years
ago. Illumination, Stahl said, is why
organizations such as hers continue


STAND UP

FOR THE

STRANGER,

FOR WE

ARE ALL

MINORITIES

SOMEWHERE,

SOMETIME.,
-STANLEE STAHL
to promote education and remem-
brance of the Holocaust.
The Jewish Foundation for the
Righteous cares for and provides
financial support for life to about a
1,000 Christians, Protestants, Cath-
olics and Muslims around the world
(about 14 in the U.S.), who are rec-
ognized by the Israel Holocaust Au-


thority.
Promoting the importance of
Holocaust education in schools is
the JFR's second mission.
"We're lighting a small candle
in the cave to illuminate it to the
world," Stahl said.
Pam Kancher, executive director
of the Maitland center said Stahl's
talk was "meaningful," "relevant"
and delivered the message that "we
are each other's brother's keeper."
Tess Weiss, a local Holocaust
survivor, sang high praise for the
event calling it "very moving, in-
spiring and promising." She said,
"The memory to never forget is pre-
served" because of organizations
like the JFR.
As some of that light of memory
flickered away with her final story
of rescue and survival, Stahl asked a
question: "What would you do?"
"It makes you stop and think
about the kind of person you are
and the contributions you make,"
Kancher said.
"Stand up for the stranger, for we
are all minorities somewhere, some-
time," Stahl said. "I want people to
realize that one person can make a
difference."


"AlICare When You're Not There"


Day/Week /Month
* Pet walks in AM/PM at least 20 minutes
* Feed your pet its own food in your home
* Play, love, and nurture while you're away
* Collect mail / paper
* Water plants / garden


Laurie Carter

407-790-4128
laurcar@gmail.com
Bonded / Insured


*aT4 E -3o



U C aw


FM 89. 09O

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I


I


Winter Park / Maitland Observer










Opinion/ Editorial


Perspectives

by...







The Best of Winter Park!


What better way to transi-
tion into the future than to
tip my hat to the past. Next
week begins the new, im-
proved "pithier Chris", but
the future is not here yet,
so I complete one era with
homage to those individu-
als and businesses that have
consistently provided supe-
rior service or products.
I have, intermittently, over
the decades, provided the
Winter Park community
(and Central Florida) with
my version (vision) of "The
Best of Winter Park." First,
a disclaimer or two. In all
of my recommendations, I
have personally used their
services, purchased their
products or enjoyed their
cuisine and libations. No
one asked me or anticipat-
ed I would "plug" their vir-
tues. I receive(d) no kick-
backs, discounts or "favors"
of any kind. This specific
column simply recognizes
those individuals and busi-
nesses that are consistently
exceptional. Hats off to the
following:

Best Ceramic Tile Store:
Specialty Tile Products on
Orange Avenue, in Winter
Park. No competition in
this category. Simply lus-
cious tile. Gorgeous! Great
service. Honorable. It's
worth a visit to the show-
room to drool over the
possibilities. Talk to Tracey
Miller at 407-647-9355.

Best Garden Accessory
Store: Bocelli Inc on Orange
Avenue, in Winter Park.
Store adjoins Specialty Tile
Products. Visit one, see
both. Great assortment of
ceramic stoneware and
pottery for your garden.
Unique bronze figurines of


classic nymphs, fairies, etc.
They'll plan and build your
garden, too. See Monte Liv-
ermore at 407-644-9949.

Best Artistic Craft Store:
Timothy's Gallery on Park
Avenue in Winter Park. I've
spent more money in this
store buying one-of-a-kind
jewelry and art than any
other. You can always, and I
mean always, go into Timo-
thy's and find something
for yourself or a gift for
someone special. Without
fail. It's their 20th year in
business this month! Cel-
ebrate with them. Spend.
Talk to the store manager,
Jill Daunno, at 407-629-
0707.

Best Antiques and Gotta
Haves: Antiques On The
Avenue on Park Avenue in
Winter Park. In the last year,
I purchased an exquisite
standing Victorian cande-
labra (holds nine candles)
and a not so old, hand-
painted Japanese, six-panel
folding screen. Both were
real finds but I don't know
how anyone lives with out
a candelabra, the lighting
is sublime. Great stuff! See
Hardy Hudson (doesn't the
name alone inspire you!) at
407-657-2100.

Best Fabric & Furniture Re-
upholstery Shop: Decorative
Home Interiors on Highway
17-92, Maitland. The shop
has a great fabric selection
and superior craftsman in
the backroom to rebuild
your furniture. High marks
all the way around. 407-
339-4432.

Best Granite Countertops:
Amazon Stone located on


Highway 426 in Oviedo. Ex-
quisite selection. Superior
service. Fair pricing. Con-
tact Andrea Saraiva at 321-
765-4950.

Best Ceiling Fans: Dan's
Fan City on North Semoran
Boulevard, Orlando. This
business honored its war-
ranty and replaced a fan
several years after I pur-
chased it. I like that kind of
service. Talk to Neil Sapoff
at 407-658-0771.

Best Pump Repair Busi-
ness: A&D Electric Motor &
Pump Repair in Fern Park. I
saved $200 by simply "refur-
bishing" my old swimming
pool pump. Quick, reliable
service. Talk to Al Darling at
407-331-1213.

Best Well Drilling Service:
Brothers Well Drilling. It's
kind of an esoteric busi-
ness, but when you need a
well, these are the boys for
a good drillin'. Talk to Mike
Sikes at 407-328-8221.

Best Swimming Pool Deck
Resurfacing: Deco-Crete. I
just had my deck resurfaced
and it's beautiful. Talk to
Joseph Wood at 407-733-
3252. He's a good soul and
an artiste when it comes to
decking.

Best Roofer: Batson Roof-
ing of Orlando. When's the
last time the owner of a
roofing business was up on
your roof overseeing the
job? Great pricing. Fine ser-
vice. Delivered as promised.
Good people. Call Robert
(On the Roof) Batson at
407-423-7570.

Best Floor Installer (Wood
or Tile): Allen Installation:
I've used this gentleman
for wood and tile. He's fair
on pricing and a quality
installer. Contact Josh Allen
at 497-435-1100.

Best Cabinet Makers: The
Midnight Carpenters.
These folks are artists with
wood. They just built all my
kitchen cabinets and an ex-
quisite counter that makes
my heart hum. I've known
the owner for more than


20 years as honorable
as they get. Contact Gabe
Lindsey at 321-229-6524.

Best Place to Drink Cham-
pagne in the Afternoon:
Houstons in Winter Park.
Sitting on the back veranda
is a fabulous spot in Cen-
tral Floreeeda to toss one
back. The lake, the breeze.
The birds. Even when its 90
degrees in August, it's com-
fortable (to me). Houstons
has good food, too. High
marks.

Best Bar for Atmosphere:
Dexters in Winter Park. I
liked the old bar too, but
now it's located on Han-
nibal Square. It has the
feel, sometimes, of that TV
show bar in "Cheers." It's a
friendly, happening place.
Try one of their pressed
sandwiches. Good food.
Good management.

Best Blue Cheese Burger
at a Bar: Hannibal's on
New England, Winter Park.
Consistently good burger
if you're in to that "sort" of
cuisine. Tasty spuds, too.
Nice ambiance. Good jazz
music on the weekends.

Best Barbecue: Bubbalou's
Bodacious Bar-B-Q on Lee
Road, Winter Park. Con-
sistently good food. I love
the pork sandwiches. Great
beans, slaw and fries, too.
Can't go wrong.

Best Roasted Chicken
Lunch: Antonio's in Mait-
land. "Birdy-num-num!"
As Peter Sellers might have
said. When on, this chicken
is as good an eat as there
is out there. Mmm-mmm
good.

Best Vietnamese Food: Little
Saigon on Colonial, Or-
lando. Consistently fresh.
Exquisite summer rolls. It
goes down like candy. I rec-
ommend Item 34. Substi-
tute the spring roll for more
sliced pork. Get a pot of hot
tea and you are set.

Best Day In Winter Park:
Out-of-town guests arrive
and the parks are not an
option. Here's eight hours


in Winter Park. All walking.
Do the following. Visit (in
an order of your choosing)
the Morse, Polasek and
Cornell Fine Arts Museums.
Take the boat trip on the
Chain of Lakes. Eat a light
breakfast and a late lunch.
Shop Park Avenue. Time
permitting, take a cab or
drive to the Mennello and
the Orlando Art Museums.
Cab up to Houston's for
champagne on the lake. Bid
your adieus.

Best Art Gallery In Sanford:
Jeanine Taylor Art Gallery/
Gallery on First. A sweet,
sweet gallery on First Street.
It has a Good vibe. Good
shows. Good artists. Good,
good, good!

Best Night in Sanford:
Sanford downtown has
regularly-scheduled shin-
digs that involve music,
food, art and festivity. It
has several decent res-
taurants, a wine bar (The
Sanford Wine Bar on South
Palmetto) that has an in-
timate atmosphere (with
live music) and then you
can drift (walk two blocks)
over to The Alley (a Blues
Bar on S. Park Ave., Sanford)
and dance to blues/honky-
tonk music. Sanford has a
great sidewalk along Lake
Monroe and it's a delightful
stroll.

Best Jazz Radio Sta-
tion: WUCF-FM 89.9. For
straight-ahead jazz!

Best Newspaper in Central
Florida: The Winter Park-
Maitland Observer. Peerless.

Well, that's all the room left
for this edition of The Best
of Winter Park. If you have
personal favorites, simply
write the name of your rec-
ommendation on the back
of a crispy $50 bill (That's
Grant) and send it to Chris
Jepson, c/o The Observer.
One recommendation per
$50 bill. Please. Crisp.

TALK JEPSON

Chris Jepson's opinions are made
independently of the newspaper.
Write him atjepson@MEDIAmerica.us.


Letters tothe Editor


The rail scam
As a supporter of mass
transit alternatives, I sup-
ported the exploration of
high speed and/or light
rail. However, that support
came with the expectation
that my elected representa-
tives would negotiate the
best deal and otherwise
act as good stewards of my
tax dollars. Many of the
questions and issues being
discussed now should have
arisen before any contract
was executed, and the fail-
ure to do so is not the fault


of the current commission.
However, blame will fall
squarely on their collec-
tive shoulders if they fail to
take corrective action after
being armed with critical
information demonstrating
that commuter rail is a bad
deal. In fact, the city attor-
ney's careful evaluation of
the current contract makes
the decision fairly simple;
namely, a declaration that
the contract violates the
Florida Constitution and is
unlawful ab initio.
Also, if they are contem-


plating a renegotiation of
this bad deal, they should
consider the fact that our
community continues to
languish in difficult eco-
nomic times. Another gov-
ernment project will not
benefit our economy or the
taxpayer. There is simply no
justification for commuter
rail, especially in Winter
Park, other than as a means
to expand government.
More government is not a
good idea.
Finally, there is a sig-
nificant conflict of interest


for at least one member of
the City Commission. I am
referring to the fact that
Mayor Ken Bradley has not
recused himself from this
issue when his employer,
Florida Hospital, is slated
for its own rail stop and will
directly benefit from such a
monumental expenditure
of our tax dollars. The mere
appearance of a conflict of
interest erodes the public's
confidence in our system of
government. In the mayor's
case, the appearance of a
conflict is a looming black


cloud. This is not about
mandatory recusal, which
constitutes the lowest point
of the ethics bar and should
not represent the only stan-
dard, particularly in gov-
ernment. We expect that
public servants will demon-
strate the highest level of
integrity and lead by exam-
ple. Therefore, Mayor Brad-
ley should, without ques-
tion, recuse himself from
this controversial issue.
Bonnie J. Jackson
vice chairman,
Parks & Recreation Commission


Page 16 Thursday, April 22, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer





Winter Park/Maitland Observer



Play On!
y *


Conservative commentary
& opinions of Louis Roney
Harvard'42-Distinguished Prof, Em.-
UCF
2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award
(Assisted by b.w.:Joy Roney)

"You are entitled to your own opinions-
you are not entitled to your own facts"
Daniel Patrick Moynihan

Wrongs and rights

Fate sits next to you
when you're driving a
car.
If you drive recklessly
and hit somebody, you
don't know whom it may
be.
That who could be the
variable that turns your
life's equation into an in-
soluble problem.
One evening in 1949, on
a night off between perfor-
mances as Lt. Pinkerton in
Madame Butterfly with the
Atlanta Opera Company, I
went to see a highly-touted
Italian film in a small art
theater on Peachtree Street
at 14th Street.
After the movie, when
I walked out of the the-
ater, I saw a turbulent
scene in front of me across
Peachtree Street.
Police cars were every-
where, and an ambulance,
siren blaring, was drivinay
from the scene.
A taxi stood slantwise
in the street, driver's door


Thursday, April 22, 2010 Page 17


open, front wheels against
the curb.
Two police were holding
the arms of a young man -
the taxi-driver.
A hushed gasp dominoed
through the crowd on the
sidewalk.
It's Margaret Mitchell. He
hit Margaret Mitchell...he
was driving that taxi there.
He was going like a
bat out of hell...Margaret
Mitchell had gotten out
of a car and started across
Peachtree St. She never saw
the taxi coming.
Margaret Mitchell, au-
thor of Gone With The
Wind, hung on to life
through five agonizing
days. No hope was ever held
for her recovery. She died.
Hugh Dorsey Gravitt, the
29-year-old taxi-driver, had
killed one of the most be-
loved Georgians who ever
lived.
Gravitt said she had
darted in front of the cab.
He had tried to miss her, he
said, but couldn't.
The front page of the
next days Journal-Con-
stitution gave the tragic
story the kind of space it
had given to Pearl Harbor,
and the death of Franklin
Roosevelt.
Letters to the Editor
screamed hysterically for
retribution.
Gravitt should be tried
for murder, jailed for life,
even executed.
Gravitt was, in fact,
charged with, and con-
victed of, involuntary man-
slaughter.
He served about 10
months in prison.
He had not known
Mitchell, nor had he in-
tended to kill her.
If his taxi had killed Jane
Doe, the case might have
been buried deep in the in-
ner pages of the newspaper.
Hugh Dorsey Gravitt


died at 74 in Cumming,
Georgia.
The cause of his death
was unannounced.
Gravitt's life had been
that of a recluse in the
small Georgia town.
But wherever he was,
he was known from 1949-
on simply as the man who
killed Margaret Mitchell.
Mitchell had given us
Scarlet and Rhett, Ashley
and Melanie and Tara.
All of those names, as
well as that of Margaret
herself, were immortal.
Gravitt often said, "I'd
rather it had been me in-
stead of her. It won't ever
heal."
I wonder if Gravitt ever
heard prize-fighter Joe Lou-
is' famous words," You can
run, but you can't hide...?"
For forty-five years, no
state could have been large
enough to give Gravitt a
hiding place.
And no town, even Cum-
ming, could have been out-
of-the-way enough to allow
him to escape the stare of
timeless public rage.

For four years in the ear-
ly 1940s, I was a gunnery of-
ficer in the U.S. Navy. Much
of that time I wore a Colt
.45 pistol in a holster on
my belt. Since World War
II, I have owned a small-
calibre pistol. I own a valid
license to carry a concealed
weapon. I've never carried
the weapon away from my
house. I have never fired the
pistol in all these years. I do
not expect ever to fire it.
The NRA has invited me,
through the mail, to join
that organization. I have no
interest in being a member.
For many years of my
opera-singing life I lived in
the Heidelberg area of Ger-
many. I never tried to get
a gun while I lived there. I
never felt that I needed one.


Buying a pistol or revolv-
er in Germany was a tough
proposition. Guns were
hard to come by for crimi-
nals as well as for those
who wanted to protect
themselves against crimi-
nals. While I was in Germa-
ny, small arms were almost
totally limited to police
and the military. Crimes
committed with guns were
punished by long, no-non-
sense prison sentences. As a
result, not many gun crimes
occurred among the civil-
ian population.
In Germany, slander
(Verleumdung) is a crimi-
nal offense, and a fist-fight
will land you in jail. If some-
one calls you a bad name,
you can sue him, but you
can't hit him. The Germans,
so brutal and violent in war,
are more peace-minded
than we are, in peacetime.

The only places I might
have felt uncomfortable
walking late at night were
in areas of Frankfurt, Man-
nheim, etc. where American
soldiers frequented night
clubs that provided what-
ever they were looking for.
All the above being said,
why are we any different
from Germans when it
come to gun-carrying?
Where did our special
rights come from? Do we
still need guns?
Our American history
began in violence exercised
as the only way to throw
British tyranny back across
the Atlantic. Americans
consider the colonists
who fought at Bunker Hill,
Lexington and Concord,
to be heroes. The writers
of the Constitution made
sure that future Americans
would have the right to
bear arms, not only in order
to protect themselves and
their property, but to be
musterable quickly into de-


fensive forces.
In 1812, we had another
visit from the British, dur-
ing which tete-a-tete they
burned down the White
House. We got used to
needing to outshoot those
who would take away our
freedom. In those days,
small arms were slow, hard-
to-aim, and to reload in a
duel, and were not much as
a military threat or protec-
tion. With the opening of
the West, and the advent of
the six-shooter, sidearms
became both a threat, and
the protection against
threat, among settlers and
gun-slingers moving side
by side into territories far
from law and order.
Our long, hard-to-police
borders, and our thousands
of miles of Atlantic and Pa-
cific coastline, have made
prohibitions of any kind
difficult, if not impossible,
to enforce. We couldn't
keep alcohol out of the
country during the 20s, and
we can't make a dent in
drug-traffic today. Could we
keep small arms out of the
U.S. if they were outlawed
by law? Are you kidding?
As long as a buck is to be
made by illegal importa-
tion of prohibited items,
the black-market in those
items will make million-
aires galore in our hemi-
sphere. What can we do?
Protect our borders and
airways with millions of
Armed Forces personnel?
Make tougher laws, lon-
ger sentences? Build more
jails? Educate better against
crime of all kinds? I don't
know.
Nothing has worked up
to now.
But I'm glad I can pro-
tect my wife and our home
if ever need be.


Editorial


r J"Copyrighted Material -



I Syndicated Content



Available from Commercial News Provide


. 0


jL








Page 18 Thursday, April 22, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 2008-CA-024623-0
Division: 43A
TRUSTCO BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
NATHANIEL WILLIAMS; and GLORIA WILLIAMS,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that on the 11th day of
June 2010, at 11:00 a.m. in Room 350 of the
Courthouse of Orange County, Florida, 425 S. Or-
ange Avenue, Orlando FL 32801, the undersigned
Clerk will offer for sale the following described
real property:

LOT 9, BLOCK L, LONDONDERRY HILLS, SEC-
TION TWO, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF
AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK W PAGES 149
PUBLIC RECORDS OF ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.

The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to the
Final Judgment of Foreclosure in Civil Case No.
2008-CA-024623-0; Division: 43A, now pending in
the Circuit Court in Orange County, Florida.
In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities
Act, persons with disabilities needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding
should contact Court Administration at 37 North
Orange Avenue, Suite 1130, Orlando, Florida
32801, telephone number 407/836-2050, not later
than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If
hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice
(V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale.
Dated this 8th day of April, 2010.
By: Eric B. Jontz
ERIC B. JONTZ, Attorney
Florida Bar No.133990


JEFFRY R. JONTZ
ERIC B. JONTZ
SWANN & HADLEY, P.A.
Post Office Box 1961
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 647-2777
Facsimile No.: (407) 647-2157


4/15,4/22


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 08-CA-18826
TRUSTCO BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
BRYON J. MAPUHI; HILARY L. MAPUHI; and
SUMMERPORT RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY
OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that on the 10th day of June,
2010, at 11:00 a.m. in Room 350 of the Court-
house of Orange County, Florida, 425 S. Orange Av-
enue, Orlando FL 32801, the undersigned Clerk will
offer for sale the following described real property:
LOT 117, SUMMERPORT, PHASE 2, ACCORD-
ING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 54 PAGES 104 111, PUBLIC
RECORDS OF ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to the
Final Judgment of Foreclosure in Civil Case No.
08-CA-18826 now pending in the Circuit Court in
Orange County, Florida.
In accordance with the Americans With Disabili-
ties Act, persons with disabilities needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding
should contact Court Administration at 37 North Or-
ange Avenue, Suite 1130, Orlando, Florida 32801,
telephone number 407/836-2050, not later than
seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hear-
ing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V)
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.
Dated this 13th day of April, 2010.

By: Eric Jontz
ERIC B. JONTZ, Attorney
Florida Bar No. 64905
JEFFRY R. JONTZ
ERIC B. JONTZ
SWANN & HADLEY, P.A.
Post Office Box 1961
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 647-2777
Facsimile No.: (407) 647-2157
4/22, 4/29




IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 9th JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 09-CA-14153

WATERFORD LAKES COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION,
INC.,
Plaintiff,
v.
HERNAN A. RIOS and KENDY RIOS, and JOHN DOE
and JANE DOE, as unknown tenants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on the 3rd day of
May, 2010, at 11:00 a.m., at room 350 of the
Orange County Courthouse, 425 N. Orange Avenue,
Orlando, Florida 32801, the Clerk of Courts will
offer for sale the real estate described as follows:

Lot 27, WATERFORD LAKES TRACT
N-33, according to the Plat thereof as recorded
in Plat Book 30, Pages 91-93, of the Public
Records of Orange County, Florida.

together with all structures, improvements,
fixtures, and appurtenances on said land or used in
conjunction therewith.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to a Final
Judgment entered in this cause on April 1, 2010.
DATED this 1st day of April, 2010.


Matt G. Firestone, Esq.
Florida Bar No.: 381144
Pohl & Short, P.A.
280 W. Canton Avenue, Suite 410
Post Office Box 3208
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone (407) 647-7645
Facsimile (407) 647-2314
Attorneys for Plaintiff
CERTIFICATE OF SERVICE
I HEREBY CERTIFY that a copy of the foregoing
was sent, via U.S. Mail, to: Hernan A. Rios, 8978
Arlingdale Way, Spring Valley, California 91977 and
Kendy Rios, 8978 Arlingdale Way, Spring Valley,
California 91977, on this 1 st day of April, 2010.
Matt G. Firestone, Esq.
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to
the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact Court Administration at 425 North
Orange Avenue, Suite 2130, Orlando, Florida
32801, telephone (407)836-2303, within 2 working
days of your receipt of this Summons; if you are
hearing impaired, call 1-800-955-8771; if you are
voice impaired, call: 1-800-955-8770.
4/15,4/22


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case Number: 2009-CA-25622 -0
Division 39
HANCOCK BANK, as assignee of PEOPLES FIRST
COMMUNITY BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
HAGEN PROPERTIES, LLC, a Florida limited Liability
company; DEBORAH D. HAGEN,
Individually; and TERRY D. HAGEN, Individually,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that on the 24th day of
June, 2010, at 11:00 a.m. in Room 350 of the
Courthouse of Orange County, Florida, 425 S. Or-
ange Avenue, Orlando FL 32801, the undersigned
Clerk will offer for sale the following described
real property:
LOT 1 AND THE NORTH 5 FEET OF LOTS 3 AND
4 IN BLOCKA, OF OAKDALE PARK SUBDIVI-
SION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK R, AT PAGE 6, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to the
Final Judgment of Foreclosure in Civil Case No.
2009-CA-25622-0; Division 39, now pending in
the Circuit Court in Orange County, Florida.
In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities
Act, persons with disabilities needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding
should contact Court Administration at 37 North
Orange Avenue, Suite 1130, Orlando, Florida
32801, telephone number 407/836-2050, not later
than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If
hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice
(V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale.
Dated this 6th day of April, 2010.
By: Eric B. Jontz
ERIC B. JONTZ, Attorney
Florida Bar No. 64905
JEFFRY R. JONTZ
ERIC B. JONTZ
SWANN & HADLEY, P.A.
Post Office Box 1961
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 647-2777
Facsimile No.: (407) 647-2157
4/15,4/22





























IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CaseNo.08-CA-030112
FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF CENTRAL FLORIDA,
Plaintiff,

WESCO, a Florida General Partnership;
REGINALD M. WISE, individually; SHANNON
WISE, individually; INTENT, INC.;
a Florida corporation; NEIL T. GOLTERMANN,
AS SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE FOR THE RICHARD M.
GOLTERMANN LIVING TRUST; NEIL T.
GOLTERMANN, AS SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE
OF THE RICHARD M. GOLTERMANN FAMILY
TRUST; and NEIL T. GOLTERMANN AND
DEANE A. GOLTERMANN, AS RECIPIENTS
OF THE ASSETS OF THE JOAN M. GOLTERMANN
IRREVOCABLE TRUST.
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that on the 10th day of June,
2010, at 11:00 a.m. in Room 350 of the Courthouse
of Orange County, Florida, 425 S. Orange Avenue,
Orlando FL 32801, the undersigned Clerk will of-
fer for sale the following described real property
located in Orange County, Florida:
THESOUTHEAST 1/4OFTHESOUTHWEST 1/4
OF SECTION 9, TOWNSHIP 23 SOUTH, RANGE
29 EAST, ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA;
LESS THE SOUTH 60.00 FEET FOR MILLEN-
NIA BOULEVARD RIGHT OF WAY.
LESS AND EXCEPT THE PLAT OF WESCO
SUBDIVISION AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
49, PAGES 55 AND 56, OF THE PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
LESS AND EXCEPT PARCEL 137, BEING DE-
SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
BEGIN AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF
THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION
9, TOWNSHIP 23 SOUTH, RANGE 29 EAST,
ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN
SOUTH 8942'53" WEST ALONG THE SOUTH
LINE OF SAID SECTION 9, A DISTANCE OF
75.00 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 01 18'11"
WEST, A DISTANCE OF 571.36 FEET; THENCE
RUN NORTH 0120'11" EAST, A DISTANCE
OF 350.14 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH
0518'50" EAST, A DISTANCE OF 408.87
FEET TO THE NORTH LINE OF THE SOUTH-
EAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 9; THENCE
RUN NORTH 8938'48" EAST ALONG THE
SAID NORTH LINE, A DISTANCE OF 35.00
FEET TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE
SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST
QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 9; THENCE RUN
SOUTH 0018'01" EAST ALONG THE EAST
LINE OF SAID SOUTHWEST QUARTER, A
DISTANCE OF 1328.23 FEET BACK TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
including but not limited to the realty, any build-
ing permits or developmental rights, and fixtures
located on the above described real property.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to the
Final Judgment of Foreclosure in Civil Case No.
08-CA-030112, now pending in the Circuit Court in
Orange County, Florida.
In accordance with the Americans With Disabili-
ties Act, persons with disabilities needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding
should contact Court Administration at 37 North Or-
ange Avenue, Suite 1130, Orlando, Florida 32801,
telephone number 407/836-2050, not later than
seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hear-
ing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V)
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.
Dated this 6th day of April, 2010.

By: Jeffry Jontz
JEFFRY R. JONTZ, Attorney
Florida Bar No. 133990
JEFFRY R. JONTZ
ERIC B. JONTZ
SWANN & HADLEY, P.A.
Post Office Box 1961
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 647-2777
Facsimile No.: (407) 647-2157
4/22, 4/29


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.09-CA-024109
Division: 32
FIFTH THIRD BANK, a Michigan banking
corporation,
Plaintiff,
v.
MPG AVAMAR, LTD., a Florida limited
partnership; CHARLES H. MONROE, III;
PRESTIGE EQUITY PARTNERS NO. 3, LLC;
IF A NAMED DEFENDANT IS DECEASED,
THE SURVIVING SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, CREDITORS AND ALL OTHER
PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER
OR AGAINST THAT DEFENDANT(S) WHO
ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, AND ALL
CLAIMANTS, PERSONS OR PARTIES, NATURAL
OR CORPORATE, OR WHOSE EXACT STATUS
IS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING UNDER ANY OF THE
ABOVE NAMED OR DESCRIBED DEFENDANTS,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final
Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-
styled cause in the Circuit Court of Orange County,
Florida, I will sell the property situate in Orange
County, Florida, described as:
A portion of the Northwest One-Quarter (NW )
of Section 4, Township 23 South, Range 27 East,
Orange County, Florida, being more particularly de-
scribed as follows:
Commence at the Southwest corner of the North-
west One-Quarter (NW ) of Section 4, Township
23 South, Range 27 East; thence North 00045'03"
West along the West line of the Northwest One-
Quarter (NW ) of said Section 4, a distance of
1010.14 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence
continue North 00045'03" West along said line,
100.00 feet; thence North 64035'14" East, 58.00
feet; thence Easterly along the arc of a tangent
curve, being concave to the South, having a radius
of 546.62 feet, a central angle of 27021 '27", an arc
distance of 261.00 feet; thence South 88003'19"
East, 956.99 feet; thence South 00027'00" East,
613.28 feet; thence South 89053'57" West, 970.72
feet; thence North 32005'34" West, 554.76 feet to
the Point of Beginning.
Said lands lying in the City of Winter Garden, Orange
County, Florida.
Now known as Avamar Crossing, according to the
plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 72, Pages 20
and 21, of the Public Records of Orange County,
Florida.
Less and except the following (3) parcels:
Commence at the Southwest corner of the North-
west One-Quarter (NW ) of Section 4, Township
23 South, Range 27 East; thence North 00045'03"
West along the West line of the Northwest One-
Quarter (NW ) of said Section 4, a distance of
1110.14 feet; thence North 64035'14" East, 58.00
feet; thence Easterly along the arc of a tangent
curve, being concave to the South, having a radius
of 546.62 feet, a central angle of 27021 '27", an arc
distance of 261.00 feet; thence South 88003'19"
East, 956.99 feet; thence South 00027'00" East,
226.38 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence con-
tinue South 0027'00" East, 346.90 feet; thence
South 89053'57" West, 69.07 feet; thence North
5000'04" West, 226.29 feet, thence Northerly
along the arc of a tangent curve, being concave to
the East, having a radius of 87.50 feet, a central
angle of 49029'52", an arc distance of 75.59 feet;
thence North 00030'12" West, 134.81 feet; thence
North 89053'47" East, 272.13 feet to the Point of
Beginning. (a/k/a Lot 1 of Avamar Crossing)
and
Commence at the Southwest corner of the North-
west One-Quarter (NW ) of Section 4, Township
23 South, Range 27 East; thence North 00045'03"
West along the West line of the Northwest One-
Quarter (NW 4) of said Section 4, a distance of
1110.14 feet; thence North 64035'14" East, 58.00
feet; thence Easterly along the arc of a tangent
curve, being concave to the South, having a radius
of 546.62 feet, a central angle of 27021 '27", an arc
distance of 261.00 feet; thence South 88003'19"
East, 941.99 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence
continue South 88003'19" East, 15.00 feet; thence
South 00027'00" East, 15.00 feet; thence North
44015'09" West, 21.65 feet to the Point of Begin-
ning. (Being a portion of Lot 2 of Avamar Crossing)
and
Commence at the Southwest corner of the North-
west One-Quarter (NW ) of Section 4, Township
23 South, Range 27 East; thence North 00045'03"
West along the West line of the Northwest One-
Quarter (NW ) of said Section 4, a distance of
1110.14 feet; thence North 64035'14" East, 58.00
feet; thence Easterly along the arc of a tangent
curve, being concave to the South, having a radius
of 546.62 feet, a central angle of 27021 '27", an arc
distance of 261.00 feet; thence South 88003'19"
East, 226.72 feet; thence South 0156'41" West,
437.38 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence South
00009'47" East, 30.00 feet; thence South 89050'13"
West, 36.50 feet; thence North 00009'47" West
30.00 feet; thence North 89050'13" East, 36.50 feet
to the Point of Beginning. (Being a portion of Lot 3
of Avamar Crossing)
at public sale, to the highest bidder for cash, on
June 14, 2010, at 11:00 a.m. at the Orange County
Courthouse, Room 350, 425 North Orange Avenue,
Orlando, Florida 32801.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from
thp gnlp if nny nfthr than thp prnpprtv nwnpr as nf
the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
Dated: April 8, 2010.

Lydia Gardner
Clerk of of the Circuit and County Courts
4/22, 4/29



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 48-2010-CP-419-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
RABBI LOUIS DIMPSON
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of RABBI LOUIS
DIMPSON, deceased, whose date of death was
August 27, 2009, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Orange County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 425 N. Orange Avenue, Room
340, Orlando, FL 32801. The names and addresses
of the petitioner and the petitioner's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate, including un-matured, contingent or unliq-
uidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their claims with this Court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is
April 22, 2010.

Attorney for Person Giving Notice:
Edward W. Soulsby
Attorney for Petitioner
Florida Bar No. 488216
KENNETH B. WHEELER, LL.M. TAX, P.A.
1155 Louisiana Avenue, Suite 100
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone: (407) 6451779

Person Giving Notice:
W. June Dimpson
269 River Chase Drive
Orlando, FL 32807
4/22, 4/29


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 2009-CA-030279-0
Division: 43A
HANCOCK BANK, as assignee of
PEOPLES FIRST COMMUNITY BANK,
Plaintiff,
v.
HEIDENESCHER HOMES, INC.; RICHARD E. HEIDEN-
ESCHER; and HEIDI L. HEIDENESCHER,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that on the 24th day of
June, 2010, at 11:00 a.m. in Room 350 of the
Courthouse of Orange County, Florida, 425 S. Or-
ange Avenue, Orlando FL 32801, the undersigned
Clerk will offer for sale the following described
real property:
Lots 3 and 52, BELLARIA, ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 60, PAGES 81 AND 82, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to the
Final Judgment of Foreclosure in Civil Case No.
2009-CA-32079-0; Division 43A, now pending in
the Circuit Court in Orange County, Florida.
In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities
Act, persons with disabilities needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding
should contact Court Administration at 37 North
Orange Avenue, Suite 1130, Orlando, Florida
32801, telephone number 407/836-2050, not later
than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If
hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice
(V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale.
Dated this 8th day of April, 2010.
By: ERIC B. JONTZ, Attorney
Florida Bar No. 64905
JEFFRY R. JONTZ
ERIC B. JONTZ
SWANN & HADLEY, P.A.
Post Office Box 1961
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 647-2777
Facsimile No.: (407) 647-2157
4/15,4/22



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FL
CASE NO.: 09-CA-27156-0
DIVISION: 43 A
GENERAL CIVIL DIVISION
SUNTRUST BANK,
Plaintiff,
v.
MO'MUZIK ENTERTAINMENT, INC., a Florida cor-
poration; JONATHAN BERNARD, IF A NAMED DE-
FENDANT IS DECEASED, THE SURVIVING SPOUSE,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, CREDITORS
AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER OR AGAINST THAT DEFENDANT(S) WHO
ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER
SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM
AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, AND ALL CLAIMANTS, PERSONS OR
PARTIES, NATURAL OR CORPORATE, OR WHOSE
EXACT STATUS IS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING UNDER
ANY OF THE ABOVE NAMED OR DESCRIBED
DEFENDANTS,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final
Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-
styled cause in the Circuit Court of Orange County,
Florida, Lydia Gardner, as Clerk of the Circuit Court
and County Courts in and for the Ninth Judicial
Circuit, will sell the property situate in Orange
County, Florida, described as:
Unit No. 5A of OLD WINTER GARDEN ROAD
COMMERCE CENTER, a Condominium, ac-
cording to The Declaration of Condominium
recorded in O.R. Book 7465, Page 2020, and
all exhibits and amendments thereof, Public
Records of Orange County, Florida.
at public sale, to the highest bidder for cash, on
April 30, 2010, at 11:00 a.m. at the Orange County
Courthouse, Room 350, 425 North Orange Avenue,
Orlando, Florida 32801.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
Dated: April 9, 2010.
CAREY, O'MALLEY, WHITAKER & MUELLER, P.A.
712 South Oregon Avenue
Tampa, Florida 33606-2516
Tel. 813-250-0577
Fax 813-250-9898
Attorneys for Plaintiff
By: _/s/Angela M. Covington

E. Ashley McRae
Florida Bar No. 157317
Angela M. Covington
Florida Bar No. 39625
CERTIFICATE OF SERVICE

I hereby certify that a conformed copy of the
foregoing has been filed electronically with
the Orange County Clerk of Courts by using the ECF
system; and furnished via regular U.S.Mail to Jona-
than Terrell Bernard, FCI Coleman Low, Federal
Correctional Institution, Register Number 27109-
018, P.O. Box 1031, Coleman, FL 33521; Mo'Muzik
Entertainment, Inc., 3231 Old Winter Garden Road,
Suite 5A, Orlando, FL 32805; Harold Jackson, c/o
Omega Recording Studios, 13800 Morning Frost
Dr., Orlando, FL 32828; Troy Taylor, 5218 Stacy
Street, No. 10, West Palm Beach, Florida 33417;
and Old Winter Garden Road Commerce Center
Condo Association, c/o Bruce C. Myrick, R A, 7748
Minnie Rouse Lane, Orlando FL 32835; all on this
9th day of April, 2010.
/s/
Angela M. Covington
Attorney
4/15,4/22



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 48-2010-CP-000240-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
NATHANIEL ELIJAH KEATON
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Nathaniel
Elijah Keaton, deceased, whose date of death was
January 1, 2008, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Orange County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 425 North Orange Avenue,
Suite 340, Orlando, FL 32801. The names and
addresses of the personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice is required
to be served must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is
April 22, 2010.

Attorney for Personal Representative:
Catherine E. Davey
Attorney for Catherine E. Davey
Florida Bar No. 0991724
Post Office Box 941251
Maitland, FL 32794 1251
Telephone: (407) 645 4833
Fax: (407) 645 4832

4/22, 4/29


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 48-2010-CP-000619-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DESHAY LAMAR JACKSON
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of DeShay
Lamar Jackson, deceased, whose date of death
was January 27, 2010, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Orange County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 425 North Orange Avenue,
Suite 340, Orlando, FL 32801. The names and
addresses of the personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice is required
to be served must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.

Attorney for Personal Representative:
Catherine E. Davey
Attorney for Emma Martinez
Florida Bar No. 0991724
Post Office Box 941251
Maitland, FL 32794 1251
Telephone: (407) 645 4833
Fax: (407) 645 4832

Personal Representative:
Emma Martinez
1000 Emeralda Road
Orlando, Florida 32808
4/22, 4/29




IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No.
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DONALD J. MILLER
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of DONALD
J. MILLER, deceased, whose date of death was
August 27, 2009, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Seminole County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 301 N. Park Avenue,
Sanford, FL 32771. The names and addresses of
the petitioners and the petitioners' attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate, including un-matured, contingent or unliq-
uidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is
served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate, including un-matured, contingent or
unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this
Court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is
April 22, 2010.

Attorney for Person Giving Notice:
Edward W. Soulsby
Attorney for Petitioner
Florida Bar No. 488216
KENNETH B. WHEELER, LL.M. TAX, P.A.
1155 Louisiana Avenue, Suite 100
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone: (407) 6451779

Person Giving Notice:
Dayle M. Steakley
173 Springwood Circle, Apt. C
Longwood, FL 32750
4/22, 4/29


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2010 CP 0606
IN RE: ESTATE OF
RAMONA HUNGRIA
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Ramona
Hungria, deceased, whose date of death was
March 17, 2009, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Seminole County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is P. 0. Box 8099, Sanford, FL
32772 8099. The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice is required
to be served must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is
April 22, 2010.

Attorney for Personal Representative:
Catherine E. Davey
Attorney for Daisy Rosado
Florida Bar No. 0991724
Post Office Box 941251
Maitland, FL 32794 1251
Telephone: (407) 645 4833
Fax: (407) 645 4832

Personal Representative:
Daisy Rosado
435 Notre Dame Drive
Altamonte Springs, Florida 32714

4/22, 4/29



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 9th JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 09-CA-36767
ANDOVER LAKES PHASE 3 HOMEOWNERS AS-
SOCIATION, INC.
Plaintiff,
v.
RICK L. RAMOS, and JOHN DOE and
JANE DOE, as unknown tenants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
To:RICK L. RAMOS
3030 Bellingham Drive
Orlando, Florida 32825

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a
lien on the following described property in Orange
County, Florida:
Lot 127, Andover Lakes Phase 3-A, according
to the Plat recorded in Plat Book 33, Pages
45 and 51, Public Records of Orange County,
Florida.
has been filed against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any,
to it on Matt G. Firestone, Esq., the Plaintiff's
attorney, whose address is POHL & SHORT, P.A.,
280 W. Canton Avenue, Suite 410, Post Office Box
3208, Winter Park, Florida 32790, on or before
May 17, 2010, and file the original with the clerk
of this court, Civil Division, 425 North Orange
Avenue, Room 310, Orlando, Florida 32801-1526,
either before service on the Plaintiff's attorney or
immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
DATED: April 9, 2010.
LYDIA GARDNER
CLERK OF COURTS
By: CORINE HENRY
As Deputy Clerk
In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities
Act, persons with disabilities needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding
should contact Court Administration, at 425 N.
Orange Avenue, Orlando, Florida 32801, telephone
(407) 836-2303, not later than two (2) days prior
to the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD)
1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V)1-800-955-8770,
via Florida Relay Service.
4/15,4/22


CITY OF WINTER PARK
401 Park Avenue South
Winter Park, Florida 32789
CITY OF WINTER PARK
PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE


The City of Winter Park will hold a Public Hearing on Monday, April 26, 2010 at 3:30 p.m., in the
Commission Chambers of City Hall, 401 South Park Avenue, Winter Park, Florida to consider amend-
ing the Schedule of Winter Park Service and User Fees and Charges to revise or increase fees and
charges including, but not limited to, General Government, Planning, Building and Code Enforcement,
Public Works, Public Safety, and Parks and Recreation Fees.
All interested parties are invited to attend and be heard. The proposed schedule of fees and charges
is available on the City's website at www.cityofwinterpark.org so that citizens may acquaint them-
selves with this issue and receive answers to any questions they may have prior to the meeting.
"If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Commission with respect to any matter con-
sidered at such meeting or hearing, he/she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, he/she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based." (F.S. 286.0105)
Persons with disabilities needing assistance to participate in any of these proceedings should contact
the City Clerk's office (407-599-3277) at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting."
--- /s/_ -
Cynthia S. Bonham, City Clerk
4/22





CITY OF WINTER PARK
401 Park Avenue South
Winter Park, Florida 32789
CITY OF WINTER PARK
NOTICE OF INTENT AND
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
CITTor( LNTR SSnMRITiC

Notice is hereby given that the City of Winter Park intends to use the uniform method for collecting
special assessments within the platted area defined as Temple Grove (Plat Book 6 Page 87) and
Comstock Park (Plat Book K Page 87) as recorded in the public records of Orange County, Florida,
within the municipal boundaries of the City of Winter Park to fund the City's undergrounding of the
neighborhood electrical/Bright House Networks (BHN) facilities.
Notice is further given that the City Commission of the City of Winter Park, Florida will hold a Public
Hearing at the City Commission Chambers, City Hall, 401 Park Avenue South, Winter Park, Florida
32789 on May 10, 2010 to consider adoption of a Resolution expressing its intent to use the uniform
method for collecting the assessments levied against certain properties located within the Temple
Grove subdivision and Comstock Park subdivision.
"If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Commission with respect to any matter con-
sidered at such meeting or hearing, he/she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, he/she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based." (F.S. 286.0105)
"Persons with disabilities needing assistance to participate in any of these proceedings should contact
the City Clerk's office (407-599-3277) at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting.""
/s/
Cynthia S. Bonham, City Clerk
4/15, 4/22, 4/29, 5/6







Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Thursday, April 22, 2010 Page 19


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No.
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DONALD J. MILLER
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of DONALD
J. MILLER, deceased, whose date of death was
August 27, 2009, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Seminole County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 301 N. Park Avenue,
Sanford, FL 32771. The names and addresses of
the petitioners and the petitioners' attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate, including un-matured, contingent or unliq-
uidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is
served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN
THE LATER OF3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate, including un-matured, contingent or
unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this
Court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is
April 22, 2010.
Attorney for Person Giving Notice:
Edward W. Soulsby
Attorney for Petitioner
Florida Bar No. 488216
KENNETH B. WHEELER, LL.M. TAX, P.A.
1155 Louisiana Avenue, Suite 100
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone: (407) 6451779
Person Giving Notice:
Dayle M. Steakley
173 Springwood Circle, Apt. C
Longwood, FL 32750
4/22, 4/29



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 2009-CA-25099-0
Division: 43A
HANCOCK BANK, as successor in interest to
PEOPLES FIRST COMMUNITY BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CAROL S. SAWICKI; ANNETTE J.
SAWICKI, n/k/a ANNETTE J. DAVIS;
and JOHN R. DAVIS,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that on the 21st day of May,
2010, at 11:00 a.m. in Room 350 of the Court-
house of Orange County, Florida, 425 S. Orange Av-
enue, Orlando FL 32801, the undersigned Clerk will
offer for sale the following described real property:
LOT 2, SUE HARBOR, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
4, PAGE 104, PUBLIC RECORDS OF ORANGE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to the
Final Judgment of Foreclosure in Civil Case No.
2009-CA-25099-0; Division 43A, now pending in
the Circuit Court in Orange County, Florida.
In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities
Act, persons with disabilities needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding
should contact Court Administration at 37 North Or-
ange Avenue, Suite 1130, Orlando, Florida 32801,
telephone number 407/836-2050, not later than
seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hear-
ing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale.
Dated this 14th day of April, 2010.
By: ROBERT J. FRAXEDAS, Attorney
Florida Bar No. 20888
JEFFRY R. JONTZ
ERIC B. JONTZ
ROBERT J. FRAXEDAS
SWANN & HADLEY, P.A.
Post Office Box 1961
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 647-2777
Facsimile No.: (407) 647-2157
4/22, 4/29










Need A PROPERTY MANAGER?
If you need a Property Manager, we can
HELP! We will Secure a qualified tenant,
handle full accounting, act as a liason for
Tenant/Services, Inspect premises on regu-
lar basis. Call Tami Klein at 407-538-4688

Suzy M. Barnes, Realtor
321-277-2182




SOMEONE WILL BUY OR RENT
ME NOW! ONLY $228,000. JUST
REDUCED OR $1400.00 RENT.
Lowest Priced Home in Waterbridge. Near
Schools and Hospital. Now is the Time to get
a Tremendous Deal. Call Now to See. 407
222-6763 Linda Ramey, Coldwell Banker
Residential Real Estate
(4/8, 4/15, 4/22, 4/29, 5/6, 5/13, 5/22,
5/27)


I I U I raK ve, wmier rark
Location plus! Downtown on Park Ave. Loads of
charm and move-in condition. Just steps to golf
course and shopping. $799,000.
John McDade, REALTOR
407.721.7275
john@fanniehillman.com


1558 Indian Dance Ct.
$584,900 15 BR / 3 BA I 2,952 SF, Oaks of
Maitland pool home.
Patrick Higgins
407.645.4321
www.KellyPriceAndCompany.com


541 Central Ave., Maitland
3/2 home is located in Maitland, Lake Lily area.
1950's home has been continuously updated and
maintained. The backyard is a paradise featuring:
summer kitchen, TVistereo, bar, salt-water
pool, fireplace and areas for entertaining. Filled
upgrades and move-in condition.
Tami Klein, Realtor
407-538-4688
tami@tamiklein.com


FOR SALE
1601 Palm Ave
1,876 sqft. 3 beds, 3 baths plus an office, open
kitchen to family room, 2 car garage, screen patio,
roof (09), plumbing (05), double pane windows,
freshly painted inside and out. Brick street & Large
lot 84x136. Move in ready. $299,000.
Mary Stuart Day, REALTOR
407.620.8683
marystuart@fanniehillman.com


1192 Valley Creek Run
$229,500 I3 BR / 2 BA, 1,993 SF, Adorable Lost
Creek home.
Julie Bombardo
407.645.4321
www.KellyPriceAndCompany.com


311 E. Morse Blvd. 6-10, Winter Park
2/2 with open kitchen. Screened porch with
view of pool and slight view of Lake Osceola.
Underground garage, laundry in unit. 3rd floor.
Pets allowed. Reduced to $275,000
Janis B. Fuller, REALTOR
407.247.7314
janis@fanniehillman.com



FOR SALE
1461 Palm Avenue, Winter Park
1,474 sqft. 3 beds 1 bath pool home, Updated
kitchen with granite and SS appliances, Original
wood floors, updated bathroom, double pane
windows and plantations shutters, Sun Room, &
screen patio. $275,000.
Megan Cross, REALTOR
407.353.9997
Megan@fanniehillman.com


TheMarketplace


1710 Lake Shore Dr.
$1,349,000 I4 BR / 4 BA, 4,042 SF Rose Isle
lakefront pool home.
Catherine D'Amico
407-645-4321
www.KellyPriceAndCompany.com


Alabama on Lake Maitland
Absolutely beautiful 2/2 with hardwood floors.
Great storage, inside laundry and walk-in closet.
A great lifestyle and pets are welcome. 3rd Floor
unit, only $330,000
Janis B. Fuller, REALTOR
407.247.7314
janis@fanniehillman.com


141 Trismen Terr.
$1,595,000 14 BR/3 BA, 4,748 SF with Fabulous
views of Lake Virginia.
Pam Birthisel
407-645-4321
www.KellyPriceAndCompany.com


J11 t. ivorse bilv. 1-J, winter ParK
LAKEFRONT on Lake Osceola. Updated with two
bedrooms and two baths Plus Large Office. Master
has a walk-in-closet. Includes 2 parking spaces.
2nd Floor.......Reduced to $569,000.
Janis B. Fuller, REALTOR
407.247.7314
janis@fanniehillman.com


1739 Sunset Drive, Winter Park
New construction in "Olde Winter Park". Green
home completed in 2009! This 2,600 square foot
home offers 4 bedrooms, 3 full baths and 1 half
bath. Truly a gorgeous, quality built, efficient green
home! For Sale-$755,000 I For Rent-$3,500/mo.
Linda Ivey, Realtor
407-619-0200.
lindaivey2@aol.com


1107 Shady Lane, Maitland
Magnificent 5000+ s.f. in beautiful Maitland
Forest. 5 bed / 5.5 bath home boosts wood floors,
gourmet kitchen, a fireplace, screened pool. The
WP/Maitland schools are top notch. $979,000
Bill Adams, REALTOR
407.463-9560
bill@fanniehillman.com


1431 Mayfield Ave.
$569,000 15 BR / 2.5 BA, 2,661 SF, Two-story
Winter Park pool home.
Gwyn Clark
407.645.4321
www.KellyPriceAndCompany.com


West Cove Condo, Condo on Lake Maitland
Units range from lovely 2 bdrm 1200 SF unit up
to 2500 SF penthouse. Condo features pool/spa,
picnic area, marina, fitness center, clubhouse.
$289,900-$599,000.
JoAnn Beck, REALTOR
407-629-6369


1531 Sunset Drive, Winter Park
Light & bright, custom 2-story pool home on brick
street! Downstairs Master. Family room w/fireplace
opens to patio & pool! 3 Bedrooms upstairs +
bonus room! $549,000.
Ruth Anne Arch, Realtor
407-761-2799
www.oldetownbrokers.com


Canton Ave
Best kept secret in Winter Park! 5th floor
end unit with numerous upgrades. 2 bed-
rooms, 2 baths plus glassed sun room with
storage. One block to Park Avenue shops
and restaurants. Great opportunity to own
in Downtown Winter Park. $329,000

Winter Park Land Company
407-644-2900
www.winterparkland.com


2400 Versailles Ave. WP
"Adorable" and "pristine". Located on a canopied
dead-end street. 1,324 Square feet with 3
bedrooms and 2 baths. Property has been updated
from the original and newly carpeted and painted.
For Sale $155,000. Offered by Gould + Company
Real Estate Solutions.
Brenda Cole, Realtor
407-927-1863
brendacolebc@comcast.net


4811 Saxon Drive, #B401, New Smyrna Beach
Walk out to seasonally heated pool and beach
at Seaward Condos. Terrific 3 bedroom, 2 bath
on ground level. 100 Yards from back porch to
the wide, white sand beach. Newly redecorated
and ready to move-in. Great rental unit! For Sale
-$349,000.
Lisa Gould, Realtor
407-721-7612
lisa@gouldandcompany.net


620 Darcey Dr.
$359,900 I 4 BR / 2 BA, 2,068 SF, Renovated in
Brookshire Heights.
Pamela Birthisel
407.645.4321
www.KellyPriceAndCompany.com



FOR SALE
441 E. Kings Way
$1,195,000 I4 BR/3 BA, 4,189 SF Olde Winter
Park pool home.
Kelly Price
407-645-4321
kelly@kellypriceandcompany.com


AZALEA IN THE WOOD
HISTORIC HOME On Little Lake Fairview,
the setting has wonderful oak trees, with
approx. 2.5 acres and lake frontage of
163'. The main house has 3,882 sq.ft. with
three bedrooms downstairs and three up-
stairs. Two guest apartments. $1,450,000

Winter Park Land Company
407-644-2900
www.winterparkland.com


1010 Elizabeth Drive, Winter Park
Private retreat within minutes to Park Ave. Custom
4bed 2full+ 2 half baths. Large screened and heat-
ed pool. Great home for entertaining. $699,000.
John McDade, REALTOR
407.721.7275
john@fanniehillman.com


48b Penny Lane
Gated Maitland neighborhood. Light open floor
plan. Large corner lot backs to conservation area.
Plantation shutters, ten foot ceilings. Affordable
$299,000.
John McDade, REALTOR
407.721.7275
john@fanniehillman.com



FIRST FLORIDA LENDING
Take Advantage of Historically Low Mortgage
Rates. Call Sue TODAY!
Sue Haan Jacobs
407-647-5323


851 Georgia Ave
$3,500,000 4 BR /3 BA I4,314 SF, Prestigious
Winter Park estate.
Cyn Watson
407.645.4321
www.KellyPriceAndCompany.com


100 Destiny Cove
4/3, 3384SF in gated Spring Lake Hills with lake
access. Beautifully updated. Spectacular screened
pool, gourmet kitchen and luxurious master suite.
Great value at $449,000.
Bill Adams
407.463-9560
bill@fanniehillman.com










BANKRUPTCY LAWYERS
FREE CONFIDENTIAL CONSULTATION Julie
Jo Adams, Esq.- Mark Andrew James, Esq.
-Offices: 415 South Orlando Avenue, Winter
Park. Contact: Adams & James, P.L., 407-
679-3111, mjames@adamsjameslaw.com
(online)







AJ-


LOOKING FOR A SECURE RETIREMENT?
EARN EXTRA INCOME TO:* Get out of debt* In-
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Carlos Astacio
800-221-3872
castacio@saferforyourhome.com












Log on to WorkforceCentralFlorida.com where
you can enter the Job Title in the "Search For
Jobs" box to see more information on these jobs
and search thousands of additional openings
throughout Central Florida, at NO COST. Apply
by following the directions listed. For further help
visit the WORKFORCE CENTRAL FLORIDA Orange
County Office at 5166 East Colonial Drive or call
(407) 531-1227.

Charter School Principal
Job Description: Responsible for directing and
coordinating educational, administrative, and
operational policies, programs, and activities of
public charter secondary school. Develops and
coordinates educational program of science and
mathematics-focused charter school to ensure
conformance to organizational, state and school
board standards. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $81,000.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9474021

Executive Pastry Chef/Restaurant Chef
Job Description: Responsible for training and
developing culinary associates. Assists in menu
development, maintains kitchen cleanliness and
sanitation, and works on the line in a display
kitchen. Coordinates the purchase of all food and
develops menus and maintains approved food
and labor costs. Ensures the quality preparation
of all menu items and proper handling/storage of
all food items in accordance with standards. Work
days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: Salary based upon experience
Job Order Number: 9467599





Hydraulic Hose Technician
Job Description: Responsible for performing
service calls, introducing our services to new
prospects, and following up with existing custom-
ers. Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $12.00 per hour plus bonuses
Job Order Number: 9473045
Deputy Sheriff
Job Description: Responsible for performing
law enforcement and public safety work in the
protection of life and property and the execution of
orders issued through the jurisdiction of the sheriff.
Work days and hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $36,089.00-$43,306.00 per year
Job Order Number: 9476809
Laser Operator
Job Description: Responsible for creating
programs to operate laser-beam equipment to
precision cut quartz glass. Work Monday-Friday,
6:00am-2:30pm.
Pay Rate: $15.00-$20.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9476364


c o ntin u I


RA.SA


REAL.ESTA E
continueJ


EST. lt98 --- -


MITCHELL'S


FISHMARKET
SEAFOOD RESTAURANT & BAR



Become a Seafood Expert
SFresh Food Fresh Attitude
SFlexible Scheduling Great Benefits

Opening June 2010

Hiring All Positions!

Servers, Bartenders, Hosts,

Service Assistants, Fish Cutter, Baker,

Prep Cooks, Line Cooks, General Utility


Apply in person, daily from 1 Oa 6p



Winter Park Village

460 North Orlando Avenue, Suite 122
(Apply directly across street in suite 124)
Winter Park, FL. 32789 407.339.FISH (3474)
M0


I hip a Ini^ed





Page 20 Thursday, April 22, 2010 Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Ak


'^


19


S"Copyright ed M material

Syndicated Cbntent

Available from Commercial News Providers"


I


SWiter Park/ Maitland
_bserver



4 P.M. TO 7 P.M. WEDNESDAY, APRIL 28
WINTER PARK PUBLIC LIBRARY, COMMUNITY ROOM
_______^ __ ___ ___________________' i:


Hiring for
HOLLER-CLASSIC
DEALERSHIPS
and
related companies


N ALLL
PAID TRAINING APPLICANTS
for all new hires WILL HAVE AN ON-THE-SPOT INTERVIEW


All positions have a
BENEFITS
PACKAGE
including paid vacation,
medical insurance and
retirement planning


AUTO DEALERS
JOB FAIR
Winter Park Public Library,
Community Room
460 E. New England Ave.


Hiring for dozens of
FULL-TIME
POSITIONS
in sales, customer service,
.technicians and finance


; I
; : i : i i


Page 20 Thursday, April 22, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


T,




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