Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00080
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate Title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park FL
Publication Date: April 1, 2010
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates: 28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00091444
Volume ID: VID00080
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613

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Winter Park / Maitland


Thursday, April 15,2010


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Business Briefs .......... 7
City Talks .............. 8
Calendar of Events....... 11
Play On! .............19
Marketplace/Games ......21
Josh Garrick .............22
Cinema .................23


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Sniffing out art SunRail
questioned
ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF
A controversial commuter
rail deal between the city,
the county and the state
took center stage at Win-
ter Park's City Commission
meeting Monday, as City At-
torney Larry Brown stopped
just short of calling the Sun-
Rail funding agreement un-
lawful.
Most of the issues sur-
rounded potential liability
costs in the event of an ac-
cident on the rail lines car-
rying the SunRail system, set
to begin rolling in as little as
two years.
"It seems through the
back door the city could ar-
guably end up being asked
to pay for Orange County's
proportionate share of costs
including liability costs,"
Brown said.
Specifically he cited a stat-
ute in the SunRail deal inked
by state lawmakers in De-
cember, which Brown said
could make Winter Park's
end of the deal risky to un-
dertake.
The statute passed in De-
cember 2009 "more clearly
exposes the FDOT to very
broad liability for accidents
including accidents that
were not the fault of the

> turn to RAIL on PAGE 6


Nonprofit site plan approved

Maitland City Council, in a 3-2 vote, OKs a New Hope for Kids location on Wymore


KATIE KUSTURA
OBSERVER STAFF
As Maitland citizen Lisa Gra-
dy approached the podium,
council members and citi-
zens waited in silence. It's
been almost one year since
she lost her husband after
he dove into a raging river
to rescue their son, which
cost him his life.
Monday night Grady
stood at the podium ready
to fight for an organization
that fought for her in her
darkest days.
For four years, New Hope
for Kids, a grief counseling
organization, has sought
to construct a facility large
enough to take care of their
community. Monday night's


Maitland City Council meet-
ing brought them one step
closer to doing just that, as
Council, in a split vote, ap-
proved the site for the new
building on Wymore Road
just south of Eatonville.
"They're pivotal to our
society," said Councilman
Jeff Flowers. "We need them,
and we need to support
them."
At a meeting that was sup-
posed to address more than
just New Hope for Kids, the
Maitland community came
out in full force to support
the non-profit organization.
For almost two hours, coun-
cil members, New Hope of-
ficials and members of the
Maitland community de-
> turn to MAITLAND on PAGE 9


H-1UIu Luuhnl Y U -AmEnlUAn I-uunuAIIUIN un r UIUIUE rnvtEVnIIU
Danielle Scherrer and her mother, Michelle Scherrer attend a New Hope for Kids
event recently. The center helped Danielle cope with her family member's death.










Local heroes face-off on the field

Firefighters, police and even FBI and Secret Service join on the charitable kickball event on April 25


CARMEN CARROQUINO
GUEST REPORTER

It might seem like just fun
and games but the Friends
of First Response annual
kickball tournament has
done more than just create
a little healthy competition
between local firefighters
and law enforcement.
In fact, in 2009 some of
the $12,000 raised by the
first tournament saved the
home of a disabled firefight-
er when he could not make
the mortgage payment.
And since then, it has ful-
filled the wish lists of many
of Maitland's heroes. From
dress uniforms for the Mai-
tland Fire Department to
cozying up the Maitland Po-
lice Department with some
patio furniture, the group
has showed those first on
the scene of emergencies
that the community appre-
ciates them.
In their secondyear ofpit-
ting first responders against
one another as well as oth-
er teams for a healthy dose
of competition, Friends of
First Response, a nonprofit
organization that benefits
first responders in Mait-
land, will host its annual
kickball tournament, where
12 teams will lace up their
sneakers and kick their way
to benefit local heroes.
Maitland firefighters and
police, the Winter Park Po-


lice Department, local of-
fices of the FBI, Secret Ser-
vice, IRS, U.S. Marshals and
others around the area will
battle each other for the top
spot from noon to 6 p.m. on
Sunday, April 25 at Keller
Road Baseball Complex in
Maitland.
Linda Frosch, Maitland
city councilwoman and
founder of the nonprofit,
said the organization shows
the men and women who
risk their lives to help people
everyday how much they're
appreciated and should be
appreciated throughout the
community.
"There's always some-
thing that's not in the bud-
get that they need," she
said. "The organization just
makes their lives a little
easier by helping them out
when they need something.
It's the least we can do for
all that they do for us."
In 2008, Frosch, who has
a long history of first re-
sponders in her family, was
soon-to-be elected to her
current position and she
made it her mission to fulfill
a need among some Mait-
land firefighters.
On a visit to the depart-
ment, she noticed on the
bulletin board a wish list
of items. A need for formal
uniforms, called "dress-
blues," was at the top of the
list when Frosch recalls say-
ing, "I'll get them for you


somehow."
And she did.
That same year Friends of
First Response was started
and 29 Maitland firefighters
got their dress-blues priced
at around $500 each.
Ken Neuhard, Maitland's
fire chief, said he thinks the
organization is great for
looking after his officers and
others in a time of need.
"With budgets as tight as
they are, I'm appreciative of
their efforts to provide us
with things we otherwise
wouldn't be able to afford,"
Neuhard said.
Sgt. Louis Grindle, of the
Maitland PD, agrees and
said the nonprofit brings a
lot of positive attention to
first responders and helps
represent them in the com-
munity.
Mark Round, presi-
dent of FOFR, said that all
funds raised by the char-
ity are distributed as need
arises throughout the year,
whether it's for individuals
or whole departments.
He said the charity is a
way to "honor, support, aid
and involve first respond-
ers."
"Although they work in
the community, first re-
sponders don't always feel
like they're a part of it,"
he said. "It's important to
spend some time interact-
ing with them outside of
crisis situations and get to


PHOTO COURTESY OF FRIENDS OF FIRST RESPONSE
Last year, the Maitland firefighters were champs of the Maitland nonprofit's event.


know them for their kind-
ness and decency."
In 2009, Friends of First
Response even started host-
ing informal safety sessions
such as CPR training and fire
safety to bring community
members and first respond-
ers together.
Round said Friends has
also worked on behalf of
the Maitland PD and raised
the issue to city leaders of
the need for take-home pa-
trol cars for local officers.
He says city managers and
Friends of First Response are
looking into making that
happen for some officers.
He said he hopes to raise
more than $10,000 at the
tournament this year and
invites the community out


for a nice, family-fun day
that is sure to top last year's
event.
The Maitland firefight-
ers took home the brag-
ging rights last year over
the Maitland PD. But this
year, they're back and facing
more competition, as this
is the first year the Friends
of First Response kickball
tournament trophy will be
at stake.
Neuhard said, "The other
teams are gunning for us,
but we'll play our hearts
out."
While Grindle joked,
"Last year they put a whoop-
ing on us, but this year we
have a new police chief that
is going to hold me account-
able if we don't win."


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Page 2 Thursday, April 15, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer




Thursday, April 15, 2010 Page 3


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Nate Winters' comeback dream

Two years after losing his leg in an accident, Winter Park's star pitcher returned to a standing ovation


ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF
Two years ago Nate Winters threw
his first pitch as a varsity base-
ball player as a freshman. Monday
night, he did it again, nearly two
years after a devastating accident
took his left leg.
It had been a long road back to
the pitcher's mound after Winters
had nearly died in a boating ac-
cident in August 2008. An abrupt
turn caused him to fall from the
boat where the propeller cut his
legs so severely that he lost 80 per-
cent of his blood, his left leg, a toe
on his right foot and partially sev-
ered his right Achilles tendon.
But less than 20 months later, he
came back from all of that, pitch-
ing for the first time in a junior
varsity game against Dr. Phillips in
March. That night, as he took to the
mound, the opposing team gave
him a standing ovation.
Then all eyes were on Nate.


"After my first pitch, I was pretty
confident," Winters said. He would
go on to throw two shutout innings
against Dr. Phillips, only allowing
one hit in his comeback perfor-
mance.
Monday night, he was stand-
ing where he'd seen himself for
two years back on the pitcher's
mound in a varsity uniform.
"It's an absolute miracle," his fa-
ther, Dr. Tom Winters, said.
And in the ensuing 48 pitches
from the Wildcats' comeback kid,
a bit of his old magic came back to
the Winter Park baseball diamond.
In more than 4 innings as the start-
ing pitcher against Colonial, he al-
lowed only one run and one hit in
the longest pitching performance
he's given since 2008.
The Wildcats would eventually
lose the game 4-3, but they'd al-
ready regained a pitcher.
"I guess miracles do happen,"
Winters said.


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER
Starter Nate Winters made a big impression in his first varsity outing since 2008, giving up only one run on
one hit in more than four innings against Colonial Monday, making good on a dream to return to the mound.


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Tars avenge losses

Rollins comes back in final game against Tampa
u' M


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER
The Tars bats came back in a come-from-behind win to close out their series with Tampa on Sunday.


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six-strikeout performance to give
him the win in the final inning. Grif-
fin's record improved to 7-2 on the
season.
Some of the offensive firepower
that put the Tars over the top came
from Taylor Ferguson's seventh
homerun of the season. Ferguson
would go 4-for-4 on the day, knock-
ing in two runs.
It was the seventh inning that
changed the Tars' fortunes. They'd
been behind the Spartans since the
second inning, but a massive rally
with two outs in the bottom of the
final inning saw three runners score
to put the Tars over the top.
The Tars travel to face Eckerd in a
two-game series starting Friday at 7
p.m.

UCF Knights
The Knights are on their second big-
gest winning streak of the season
following a three-game sweep of
Southern Miss in Hattiesburg last
weekend.
That string of wins came on the
heels of a 7-3 win over USF in Tam-
pa, making their four straight wins
the longest road streak of the year.
This weekend, the Knights (22-
12, 5-4) return home with a three-
game series against Rice starting at
6:30 p.m. on Friday.


ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF
Two losses in three games put the
Rollins College baseball team in a
conference play tailspin, but they
corrected just in time with a 4-3 win
over Tampa to close out the series.
And the Tars (25-15, 8-7) turned
around their fortunes in just one
wild final inning that put them over
the top.
In the first two games of their
homestand against Tampa, the Tars
struggled offensively while giving up
double digit runs to the Spartans.
Game 1 started with a four run
first inning by the Spartans, and they
didn't let up from there, launching
into repeated rallies that piled on
the runs in a 12-4 blowout. Starter
Stephen Hiscock (5-2) picked up
only his second loss of the season
after giving up eight runs in the me-
lee.
Game 2 was only marginally bet-
ter for the Tars, who breezed through
a scoreless first inning before letting
the Spartans tack six runs on the
scoreboard in the second. The 11-5
blowout that followed included five
doubles and two homeruns by the
Spartans, who teed off on starter
Ben Blanton for seven earned runs.
But Game 3 was a gem for the
Tars, who rallied around complete
game winner Tim Griffin's five-hit,


0


Page 4 Thursday, April 15, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


. *
'*'."" *






Thursday, April 15, 2010 Page 5


Go to any bookstore and you'll
likely find a book on interpreting
dreams. Where you won't find such
literature isJacob Sheppard's book-
shelf. He'd rather illustrate them.
"They're just so interesting that
I write them down or I draw some
things," said Sheppard, who uses
his dreams as a source of inspira-
tion for his artwork.
Dreams also made the art ex-
hibit dubbed Maximum Capacity.
Located in The Villages at Lake Lily
in Maitland, Maximum Capacity
is a fine example of what happens
when you give 32 student-artists
from the University of Central
Florida about 8,000 square feet of
space and a wealth of freedom to
show off their talents.
The exhibit will be open from
noon to 8 p.m. through Sunday,
April 18, with the possibility of an
extension.
"Everything you see in this
room, in here, was built by them,
except the concrete. That's the gos-
pel truth," said Robert Reedy, UCF
professor of art. "They built the
pedestals; they built the walls; they
did all the lighting, and you're talk-
ing about people that have never
touched sheet rock and lumber be-
fore, some of them."
Before graduating, all art stu-
dents must, with the exception of
those specializing in graphic de-
sign, participate in the BFA exhib-
it/seminar. The final exhibition is
typically held in the gallery inside
the Visual Arts Building during
the week of final exams. This year,
students voted to have it at an off-
campus site with the understand-
ing they would do everything on
their own.
"We just turned 'em loose on this,
and I've never seen anything like
this in my life," said Reedy, who has
been teaching at UCF for 18 years.
Jon C. Wood, president of Ur-
banscape Properties Inc, develop-
ers of the Village of Lake Lily and


board, ner l'
Historical,
mer preside
Arts Center's A s..
Reedy decided wo
temporary home fI&
the young artists to b
community.
Once the location had be
tablished, the students had to
on everything from construct{
the walls that their artwork would
be displayed upon to obtaining the
right permits to advertising for the
exhibition.
"The hardest part was prob-
ably dealing with the bureaucracy
that's involved with everything,"
said Matthew Sutherland, one of
the artists. "I think the fire marshal
had to come out six times to cor-
rect us."
When the exhibit was complet-
ed, the students opened the doors
for a reception that ran from 8 p.m.
to midnight last Friday and drew a
crowd of more than 600 art enthu-
siasts. A second reception the fol-
lowing night also drew hundreds
of people.
"This is a huge step for all of us
in being professional artists," said
Whitney Broadaway, another one
of the 32 artists. "We're able to meet
a lot of people and a lot of potential
customers and maybe even a lucky
few of us will get some patronage
for the long term."
Fellow artist and friend Molly
Bender, who sold a piece for $800,
said she enjoyed the camaraderie
shared among the artists.
"The best part has been shar-
ing in everybody's successes," said
Bender. "Hearing that Whitney has
sold a piece is just as exciting as
when I sold a piece, so being able
to share in that joy and excitement
and see that other people are inter-
ested in anybody's work is, I think,
the best part."
For each of the 32 artists, Maxi-
mum Capacity has been a learning
experience, which is exactly what
Reedy had hoped for.
"All this kind of sprung out of a
philosophy that I'm trying to bring
back to education, which is prepar-
ing students for real world experi-
ences and entry into the business
of art," Reedy said.
"We're able to figure out how to
work in a real world environment
and all the trials and tribulations
that come with that," said Suther-
land. "After this, they're going to
have all of the BFA shows off cam-
pus just because of the learning ex-
perience. It's something that you
really can't be taught."


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK OBSERVER STAFF
One of artist Kathleen Westerfield's comic heroes leaps through the air at
the Maximum Capacity art exhibit for UCF students at The Village at Lake Lily.


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Winter Park / Maitland Observer










Park Avenue plans for the future

A new 'Party on the Park' event and a longer ice rink run are in the works for the shopping district


CARMEN CARROQUINO
GUEST REPORTER
Park Avenue business lead-
ers and board members
met Friday, March 26 to dis-
cuss strategies on how to
increase foot-traffic to the
cobbled streets of the Av-
enue.
With one new tenant,
Twenty-four Seven, a cloth-
ing store that sells custom
men's and women's wear,
and other storefronts va-
cant, members at the Park
Avenue Area Association
meeting discussed future
projects that will take place
throughout the year to de-
velop Winter Park's iden-
tity.
Patrick Chapin, president
of the of the Winter Park
Chamber of Commerce,
said, "Winter Park is focused
on building a brand iden-
tity" with events such as the
Winter in the Park event,
slated to open a week early
and stay open a week later
during the holiday season,
and the tent is already se-
cured for Winter Park fash-
ion week, held Oct. 17-23
this year.
Hillary Jovi, event coor-
dinator of 310 New Ameri-
can Cuisine, recognized the


need to have "staples" in
the Winter Park community
where people associate fun,
family events with Park Av-
enue during the seasons.
She along with Leslie
Lupo, of the Orlando Con-
vention and Visitors Bureau,
proposed a new event simi-
lar to one found at Pointe
Orlando called "Party at
the Pointe," where people
pay a flat rate of $20 to walk
through the Avenue's par-
ticipating shops and restau-
rants while sampling food
and drinks and receiving
discounts at each location.
Lupo said that the event,
called "Party on the Park",
would generate business to
the area. The event is tenta-
tively scheduled for the end
of September.
However, the "Party on
the Park" one-day or night
event could be held as soon
as this summer, based on
comments at the meeting.
One proposed theme being
tossed around was a casual
beach day.
"Any opportunities to
bring more feet to the street
for the city of Winter Park
is a win-win situation," said
Dori DeBord, director of
Winter Park's Community


Redevelopment Associa-
tion.
With bringing consumers
to the Avenue as the main fo-
cus of the meeting, DeBord
along with Winter Park City
Commissioner Beth Dillaha
and other members spoke
of also making a previously
held event months away
in the winter bigger, bet-
ter and more consistent
than last year.
Dillaha said they are
hoping next year's Winter
in the Park event will in-
clude a bigger skating rink
with the tent open on one
side so people can see in
and out. She also advocated
for a bigger holiday light-
ing package and theme paid
for by the city that remains
consistent from year to year,
in order for the event to be-
come something unique to
Winter Park.
Keeping stores and shops
open longer during the
span of the event was also
discussed.
DeBord said that the CRA
staff is putting together esti-
mates of cost, but it will be
about $200,000 for the ice
rink.
Both DeBord and Dillaha
said they felt more market-


ARCHIVE PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER
Winter Park Fashion Week organizers have already secured the tent for this year's
event, to be held in October. it will be the third year that the runway will grace the Ave.


ing is needed to help build
this event up to its full po-
tential this year. Dillaha said
Channel 6 has partnered
with Winter Park to broad-
cast a segment every week
about it.
With marketing of that
event and others being a
concern to city leaders,
DeBord spoke of the ap-
pointment of a task force to
handle not only marketing,
but the six goals city leaders
outlined in their Park Av-
enue Strategic Plan.
The issues the task force


will address are: expanding
brand and improve mar-
keting of the Park Avenue
Area; implement a parking
and wayfinding program;
nurture and cultivate ex-
isting businesses, identify
and recruit new businesses;
increase maintenance and
aesthetics; enhance the Park
Avenue Area experience and
create a business improve-
ment district.
DeBord said the mayor
will appoint the task force
members either before or at
the CRA meeting on May 10.


RAIL I Dillaha: 'This is a very bad contract on a number of levels'


< continued from the front page

government," Brown said.
"I think FDOT has passed
on that responsibility to Or-
ange County, and Orange
County has passed along a
portion of that to Winter
Park."
Some commissioners in
the past had argued that the
city should avoid entering
into its rail funding agree-
ment with Orange County
because of the financial
risks.
Commissioner Beth Dil-
laha echoed statements


that detractors of the deal
had made two years prior,
but used more forceful lan-
guage to denounce recent
changes to the agreement
that she said made the deal
even worse.
"What's been pointed
out, which we've been talk-
ing about for two years, is
this is a very bad contract on
a number of levels," Dillaha
said, pointing to a list of re-
cent payouts the city had to
make due to what she called
bad contracts.
"We've just had two in-
stances ... with the termi-


nation of the previous city
manager because of a poor-
ly-written contract that
nobody understood, and
we just had to pay $1.1 mil-
lion, which is highest in the
history of Florida, which is
nothing to be proud about,
and the Carlisle, which was
another political project ...
$3.7 million pay out," she
said.
"We're looking at this
agreement, which is a li-
ability for five generations
of Winter Park residents,
and it has been pointed out
time and time again what is


wrong with this agreement,"
she said. "And for us to just
put it off for a future con-
versation or put it off to a
future commission and say,
'You deal with the grenade
when it goes off is fiscally ir-
responsible, and I think it's
unethical. We need to deal
with what we've got before
us today. It's our job."
She called for the Com-
mission discussion, which
was only for informational
purposes on Monday, to be
turned into a workshop so
that the city may be able to
come to a decision. With an


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end of April deadline to sign
a new contract looming,
Dillaha said time was of the
essence.
"Given the magnitude
of all of this and the few
amendments that have just
come down from FDOT ...
the one in particular that
relates to the fact that if
the [operation and mainte-
nance] caps are exceeded,
then the counties are going
to have to pay those overag-
es or they're going to have to
give up some transportation
projects, well it's essentially
extortion in my mind," Dil-
laha said. "Essentially there
are no caps."
Mayor Ken Bradley
agreed that if the Commis-
sion wanted to see a change
or even keep the agreement
the same, it needed to put
the item on a Commission
agenda to vote on it, rather
than just discussing it.
"We've read this, and I
think each of us probably
have our own opinion on
this," Bradley said. "If we
want to open this up for
dialog, if we want to open
it up to terminate it, if we
want open this up to amend
it, open it up to keep it, then
it needs to be [put on the
agenda]."
Brown said that if the
city decides to change or
terminate the agreement,
it should have the legal
grounds to do so.
"If you direct us to re-
negotiate an agreement, I
think it's very doable," he
said.


Page 6 Thursday, April 15, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer






Thursday, April 15, 2010 Page 7


Business Briefs


A busy and strong 2009 for RE/
MAX 200 Realty and RE/MAX Town
& Country Realty may be a sign that
the real estate market is on the rise.
In 2009, the agents sold more than
1,500 transactions. Browse thou-
sands of listings at www.Metro0r-
landoProperties.com.

The Central Florida office of SIKON
Construction, one of the nation's
leading retail-commercial contrac-
tors, announced that the company's
Promenade at Coconut Creek re-


ceived LEED Silver Certification from
the U.S. Green Building Council.

NAI Realvest ranked as one of the
biggest winners at the recent Hall-
mark Awards by the Central Florida
Commercial Association of Realtors.

Teen Xpress, a program offered by
the Howard Phillips Center for Chil-
dren & Families, was awarded the
2010 Children's Week Community In-
novation Award.


Moore Stephens Lovelace is pleased
to announce that Ron Shuck was pre-
sented with the Florida Association
of Homes and Services for the Aging
2010 Outstanding Advocacy Award.

SchenkelShultz Architecture an-
nounced that Martin Cot6 has joined
the firm as an Associate Principal in
its Orlando office.

Krista Agapito has been promoted
to manager of the Winter Park show-
room of S&W Kitchens. Inc.


Cotter-Ryan Commercial LLC, based
in Longwood, was awarded a contract
to expand the 18,000-square-foot
Aloma Cinema Grill and Draft House
on Aloma Avenue off Lakemont Av-
enue in Winter Park.

Andrew Lane is finishing his tenure
as Principal Pops Conductor with the
Orlando Philharmonic. You will still be
able to see and hear concerts under
the direction of Andy Lane with the
Florida Symphony Youth Orchestra,


where he serves as music director
and conductor.

Cuhaci & Peterson Architects,
based in Orlando's Baldwin Park, has
appointed Scott A. Tillema as project
manager.

NCG Medical, an electronic health
records company in Central Florida,
has donated software and technical
support valued at $1.25 million over
five years to UCF


Community Bulletin


---


Justin Wright, a Rollins College junior
majoring in chemistry and biochem-
istry, has been named a 2010 Barry
M. Goldwater Scholar. Wright is one


of 278 Goldwater Scholars selected
on the basis of academic merit from a
field of 1,111 mathematics, science,
and engineering students who were
nominated by the faculties of colleges
and universities from across the U.S.
Rollins students interested in the
Goldwater program or other competi-
tive external scholarships and fellow-
ships should contact Jay Shivamoggi
at jshivamoggi@rollins.edu. For more
information, visit www.act.org/gold-
water.

Sarah Dittmer, a Trinity graduate in
2006, has been named one of Boone
High School's Valedictorians for
2010.

Orange County firefighters Mark
Aguiar, Jared Boes, Randy Chaney II,
Troy Feliciano, Will Flinn, Ryan Gar-
ner, Alexandria Laure, Brent Moss,
and Josue Rivera have been chosen


by the American Lung Association's
Volunteer Development Committee of
the Nationwide Assembly to receive
the 2010 National Volunteer Excel-
lence Award.

Central Florida College, a leading
post-secondary education institution
in Winter Park, has become Fortis
College. As part of the collaborative
Fortis network of colleges and insti-
tutes, the Winter Park campus will
continue to embrace the same core
values for which it is known, but now
will also be able to draw upon addi-
tional resources and have access to
higher-level educational program of-
ferings and technology. Fortis College
in Winter Park offers diploma and
degree programs in cosmetology and
allied health. For more information,
call 407-843-3984.

Orange County Animal Services


will hold its annual Adopt-a-Thon
Saturday, May 1 from 10 a.m. to 3
p.m. The event will feature free food
and beverages, educational work-
shops and exciting prize giveaways.
The event will take place at Orange
County Animal Services 2769 Conroy
Road, Orlando. For more information,
visit www.ocnetpets.com or call 407-
254-9150.

The Goldenrod Chamber is open-
ing its sponsorship opportunities for
this year's Tastefully Goldenrod, Food
Tasting & Silent Auction event held
June 11. Now is the time to reserve
your spot on the list! Opportunities
include a corporate sponsorship for
$500, which includes a corporate
table with signage and reserved
seating for eight people. In addition,
your company logo will appear on
all printed material sent out in con-
junction with the event. Table spon-


sorships are also available for $200,
which includes a reserved table with
signage for eight people. Contact Ex-
ecutive Director Darlene Dangel at
407-677-5980.


FlM u


FM 899 OumO


THE DAVEY TREE EXPERT COMPANY
Discover The Davey Difference.
Complete Tree, Shrub & Lawn Care
Quality Pruning
Insect & Disease Management
Deep-Root Fertilization
ISA Certified Arborists
www.davey.com


407-331-8020


A caption with the April 8 article "Empty pockets: How Maitland Center's vacancy rates could impact the city" misstated the occupancy of the building at
429 S. Keller Road in Maitland Center. It is 90 percent occupied.



O Winter Park/Maitland

Observer


Published Thursday, April 15, 2010


PUBLISHER
Kyle Taylor
407-563-7009
kyle@observernewspapers.com

MANAGING EDITOR
Jenny Andreasson
407-563-7026
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DESIGNER
Eric Sly
407-563-7054
erics@observernewspapers.com


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CONTACTS


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Volume 22, Issue Number 15


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Member of: PO. Box 2426 1500 Park Center Dr. USPS 00-6186
* Florida Press Association Winter Park, FL 32790 Orlando, FL 32835-5705 ISSN 1064-3613
* Maitland Area/ Winter Park/
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Publisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor Submission does not guarantee publication. All rights reserved.
Winter Park/Maitland ObserverO 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer







Page 8 Thursday, April 15,2010 Winter Park / Maitlanci Observer


APRIL 12 CITY COMMIS-
SION MEETING HIGH-
LIGHTS
The City Commission
met at 3:30 p.m. April 12
in City Hall Commission
Chambers. Below are a few
highlights of the major
decisions that were made:
BOARD UPDATES:
A presentation was made
by the Tree Preservation
Board updating the City
Commission on its past and
upcoming projects.
MAYOR'S REPORT:
Commissioner Beth
Dillaha was nominated and
approved as Vice Mayor.
Presentations were made
regarding a Mead Garden
Birding Checklist Pamphlet,
Mead Garden check
presentation, Employee of
the Quarter, Administrative
Professionals Week and the
110th Anniversary of the
Winter Park Fire-Rescue
Department.
CITY MANAGER'S REPORT:
More information was
asked to come forward
regarding the Form Based
Codes Project.
An executive session was
scheduled for Monday, May
3.
The city's strategic
planning session was also
scheduled for Monday, May
3.
An update was provided
regarding the pro shop and
will be brought forward to
a future meeting for further


discussion.
CITY ATTORNEY'S REPORT:
The City Attorney
presented his opinion
regarding the existing
commuter rail contract
with Orange County.
CONSENT AGENDA:
The minutes of 3/22/10
City Commission were
modified and approved.
The Winter Park Fire-
Rescue Department's 2010-
2015 Strategic Plan was
approved.
The bid for PVC Pipe to
HD Supply Waterworks and
Ferguson Waterworks was
approved.
The three-year contract
renewal with the YMCA
for the operation of the
Cady Way swimming pool
to expire on April 17, 2013,
was approved.
Action Items Requiring
Discussion:
The potential 2010
Comprehensive Plan
changes were discussed,
modified and will be
referred to the Planning
& Zoning Commission for
public hearings.
The extension of
Conditional Use for the
Residences at Morse
Boulevard and Knowles
Avenue was approved for
an additional five years
until 2016.
The extension of
Conditional Use for
the Morse Boulevard/
Pennsylvania Avenue
parking garage was tabled.
The proposed Plug-In


Winter Park City Talk
BY RANDY KNIGHT
CITY MANAGER


policy was approved.
The recommendations
from the Ethics Board were
approved with exception
to seeking a special act
of Legislature to restrict
campaign contributions
to no more than two per
related artificial entity.
PUBLIC HEARINGS:
The resolution regarding
the Notice of Intent to
use the uniform method
for collecting special
assessments within the
platted area defined
as Granville Drive and
Williams Drive, to fund
the city's undergrounding
of the neighborhood
electrical/BrightHouse
Networks facilities was
approved.
The resolution regarding
the Notice of Intent to
use the uniform method
for collecting special
assessments within the
platted area defined as
Golfview Terrace and
North Park Avenue, within
the municipal boundaries
of the City of Winter
Park to fund the city's
undergrounding of the
neighborhood electrical/
BrightHouse Networks
facilities was approved.
Second reading of
the ordinance adopting
new zoning regulations
Section 58-89 and Section
58-90, amending the
process and procedures,
standards and criteria for
approval of changes to the
zoning regulations text
and official zoning map,
and for conditional uses
was approved with an
amendment.
The first reading of the
ordinance authorizing
the refunding of the
outstanding Park Avenue
Improvement Revenue
Bonds, Series 1998;


providing for the issuance
of not exceeding $3 million
Park Avenue Refunding
Improvement Revenue
Bonds, Series 2010 was
approved.
The first reading of
the ordinance changing
zoning designation on four
properties located at 400 W.
New England Ave., 463 W.
New England Ave., 535 W.
New England Ave., and 227
Hannibal Square, east was
tabled.
The first reading of
the ordinance changing
the Future Land Use
Designation of Commercial
to Central Business District
at 301 W. New England Ave.
was approved.
A full copy of the April
12 City Commission
minutes will be available on
the city's official Web site
at www.cityofwinterpark.
org the week of April 26
pending approval by the
City Commission.

BECOME A WINTER PARK
AMBASSADOR
The recently created Winter
Park Ambassador Program
enhances customer service
for the thousands of guests
that visit City Hall to do a
variety of things including
paying their utility bills,
picking up a building
permit or applying for a job.
Current Ambassadors work
twice a month for two-
hour shifts. If any member
of the public is interested
in volunteering as a Winter
Park Ambassador e-mail
jgrant@cityofwinterpark.
org or call 407-599-3245 by
Friday, April 16.

STUDENTS PLANT TREES
FOR PEACE
Over 60 students and
faculty representing


Art at the heart of Maitland


This week, the city of
Maitland is alive with
events that will bring tens
of thousands of art patrons
to our community. The
22nd Annual Maitland
Spring Festival of the Arts
will showcase arts and
crafts and bring thousands
to the heart of our city
on Saturday, April 17. In
addition, the Florida Film
Festival, whose home base
is Maitland's very own
Enzian Theater, kicked
off last Friday and runs
through Sunday, April 18.
As if that weren't
enough, Maximum
Capacity, an art
presentation and show,
which features the
artwork of 32 budding
contemporary artists from
the University of Central


Florida, is presented at the
Village at Lake Lily for the
first time in the history of
the program at UCF.
This show is unique
because it brings together
community, culture and
commerce to showcase
how partnerships
throughout a community
serve to strengthen the
bonds of that community
like no other.
Conducting themselves
as professional artists,
these UCF students who
are displaying senior
art thesis projects have
come together to design,
construct and market
their own gallery opening.
Under the supervision of
UCF Professor of Art Robert
Reedy, the artists have been
challenged to transform an


alternative space into an art
gallery rivaling venues in
New York and Los Angeles.
In partnership with
UCF and recognizing
this creative capital here
in Central Florida, the
Maitland Art Center will
award studio scholarships
to two of the artists.
Recipients are selected by
a jury panel of local and
distinguished professional
artists. And due to the
generosity and special
efforts made byJon
C. Wood, president of
Urbanscape Properties/
Morgan Group, the diverse
group of artists is able to
create a contemporary and
dynamic space for their
work. The group came up
with the title "Maximum
Capacity" to showcase the
large number of artists with
exceptional talent in an
enormous space.
Rob Reedy said it best
in his introduction to his
students, "The impossible
has been made possible.
The bar has been raised!
We can look back to this
moment and remember
the creative spirit that
coursed through this
event. Our hope is that, in


PHOTO COURTESY OF CITY OF MAITLAND
From left, Jack Lew, Richard Colvin, Mayor Doug Kinson, Les Jarvela, Lizette Vala-
rino, Randy Smith, Jeff Shonkwiler, Rob Reedy, Kristine Wood and Jon Wood have fun.


some way, it continues. We
have seen and confirmed
the incredible things
accomplished when we
work in unison. We will
always reflect on this time
together."
Generally, this art show
has been presented on
campus, but through the
leadership of the students,
UCF and local businesses,
the show has brought an
element of art to the heart
of Maitland never seen
before.
Through the Spring
Festival of the Arts, the
Florida Film Festival and
now Maximum Capacity,
downtown Maitland has
been transformed into a
creative village that I dare


say marvels any in the
country.
You won't want to miss
any of the events this
weekend:

Maitland Spring Festival of
the Arts, Lake Lily
Saturday and Sunday, 9 a.m.
to 5 p.m.

Maximum Capacity, Village
at Lake Lily
Through April 18, noon 8
p.m.

Florida Film Festival
For a schedule, visit www.
floridafilmfestival.com


the Hebrew Day School,
the Geneva Christian
School and the Leaders
Preparatory School will
join together to plant trees
in the spirit of unity at the
7th annual Trees For Peace
Interfaith Tree Planting
Project on Monday, April
19, at Lake Island Park
located at 1050 W. Morse
Blvd.
The project also
teaches students to be
"stewards of the earth"
by learning lessons
about environmental
responsibility. Special
thanks to Keep Winter
Park Beautiful and the
city's Forestry Division for
helping to make this event
possible.

EARTH DAY IN
CENTRAL PARK
The City of Winter Park will
proudly celebrate Earth
Day on Thursday, April 22,
beginning at 10 a.m., at
the main stage in Central
Park. Earth Day is designed
to inspire awareness and
appreciation for the earth's
environment.
The city's Forestry
Division will perform
a live tree-planting
demonstration and
give away 3-gallon
containerized trees to city
residents until 2 p.m., or
while supplies last.
Orange County's
Environmental Protection
Department will inform
residents about new energy
efficiency programs funded
by federal stimulus dollars.
For more information, call
the city's Forestry Division
at 407-599-3325.
Visit the city's official
Web site at www.
cityofwinterpark.org, find
us on Facebook and follow
us on Twitter.


Page 8 Thursday, April 15, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer






Thursday, April 15, 2010 Page 9


MAITLAND I Official says vote was rushed through before councilman change


< continued from the front page

bated everything from the
number of parking spaces
to the size of the building to
be allotted to the buffer that
will separate the nearby
community of Lake Colony
from the new site.
"The problem is the build-
ing is too big for the lot,"
said Councilman Phil Bo-
nus. "They came in and told
the neighbors they were go-
ing to build a 9000-square-
foot building with 50 park-
ing spaces, and they came
back to council with a
12,000-square-foot building
and 30 parking spaces."
The white elephant that
stepped in and out of the
room was the issue of help-
ing a nonprofit versus fol-
lowing planning and zon-
ing codes.
"There was not a single
speaker in favor of New
Hope who was able to sepa-
rate emotion for their mis-
sion from their compliance
with code," Bonus said.
One after another, sup-
porters approached the
podium. Many of them had
a personal need for New


Hope and had a strong de-
sire to see it move forward.
Grady, who had come
with a prepared statement,
urged council members to
see New Hope for its name-
sake and said how impor-
tant the group had been to
the healing of her and her
two sons.
Despite the overwhelm-
ing amount of support, New
Hope Director Dave Jos-
wick wasn't convinced that
the more powerful people
in the room were aware of
the organization's role in
the community.
"I don't think people un-
derstand how we operate,"
Joswick said. "Unless you're
there every day, you can't re-
ally understand."
Joswick was at least
pleased that they had
trudged through some of
the mechanics of the issue,
acknowledging there were
still some wrinkles that
needed to be ironed out.
"There's [council] people
that want to go by a formula
[...] and we don't meet that
formula."
Incoming Councilman
Howard Schieferdecker was


present for the meeting and
spoke during the public pe-
riod. He said that although
he was in support of the or-
ganization, they should still
follow the same rules and
regulations that everyone
else has to follow.
"I understand that it's
a wonderful organiza-
tion," said Schieferdecker,
who said he didn't under-
stand why another site was
not picked within the 25-
mile radius that was given.
"Things may change. Things
may happen. I could just
see a nightmare for the city,
and then when the building
transfers to another owner,
then what's going to hap-
pen?"
Bonus said the issue came
to council at a convenient
time.
"The three of them knew
that this was the last chance
to get the 3-2 vote because
it's Flowers' last meeting,"
said Bonus who, although
he voted no, is in support
of the organization and its
development as long as ev-
eryone is clear on the deci-
sions.
Mayor Doug Kinson vot-


PHOTO BY KAREN McENANY-PHILLIPS -THE OBSERVER
A drawing on the wall at New Hope for Kids, a nonprofit in Maitland that offers
grief counseling, reminds families how people can leave marks on our hearts.


ed yes and said he hopes to
see some progress made.
"I've worked with them
ever since I've been mayor,"
said Kinson. "There's al-
ways going to be some resi-
dents that are unhappy that
any development is taking


place."
Kinson said that even
though the motion has
passed, no one knows ex-
actly when construction
will begin on the new build-
ing.


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Winter Park / Maitland Observer





Page 10 ThursdayApril 15,2010 Winter Park / Maitlanci Observer


It's fashionable.

It's delicious.

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Sunday 12-6pm


Page 10 Thursday, April 15, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer






Thursday, April 15, 2010 Page 11


Calendar


"History of Fashion: A to Z" is an
exhibit opening in new "We Make
History" community gallery at the
Maitland Historical Museum, 221 W.
Packwood Ave. in Maitland. The ex-
hibit will display an alphabet sam-
pling of fashion trends based on the
book "History of Fashion: A to Z" by
Sue Dyer. The opening reception is
Thursday, April 15 from 5:30-7 p.m.
It is free for Society members, $5
for non-members. R.S.V.P. by calling
407-644-2451.

At 7 p.m. on Thursday, April 15, the
Orange Audubon Society will present
a free program on Everglades Birding
by Loretta Lynn Leda with additional
photography by Milton Heiberg at Leu
Gardens, 1920 N. Forest Ave., Or-
lando. For information, call 407-637-
2525 or visit www.orangeaudubonfl.
org.

Two-time Academy Award-nomi-
nated actress Gena Rowlands and
Academy Award-nominated actor
Seymour Cassel will honor the late
independent film pioneer John Cas-
savetes with a rare 35mm screening
of this three-time Oscar-nominated
breakthrough classic, Faces (1968)
at the Enzian Theater. The event will
take place Friday, April 16 at 7:30
p.m. Rowlands and Cassel will be
present for a question and answer
session with attendees. Individual
tickets are $20. To purchase, visit
www.FloridaFilmFestival.com or call
407-629-1088 ext. 225.

Ever wonder if the earrings you
are wearing are right for your face
shape? The answer to this question
will be available when jewelry artist
Patricia Daunis joins Timothy's Gallery
at 236 N. Park Ave. on Friday, April 16
from 11 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. and Satur-
day, April 17 from 10 am to 5:30pm.
For more information, call Jill at 407-
629-0707.

The Ninth Annual Art of the Vine
to benefit New Hope for Kids, a local
non-profit, will take place from 6-10
p.m. Friday, April 16 at Fields BMW,
963 Wymore Road, Winter Park. There


will also be a drawing for a 2010 128i
BMW donated by Fields BMW. For
more information, call 407-331-3059
ext. 10.

The Asian Cultural Association will
present an Evening of Indian Music,
featuring a trio of world-renowned
musicians, from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30
p.m. on Saturday, April 17 at Rollins
College's Tiedtke Concert Hall in the
Keene Music Building. Direct from
India, performers include sitar master
Purbyan Chatterjee and acclaimed
flautist Rakesh Chaurasia. Tickets are
$15 and available for purchase by
calling 407-333-3667. To learn more,
visit www.ACA-Florida.org.

Have you ever wondered if a Revo-
lutionary War patriot ancestor could
be hidden in your family tree? Perhaps
you are eligible to join the Daughters
of the American Revolution (DAR) or
the Sons of the American Revolution
(SAR). If you would like to find out,
this free workshop is for you! The Ge-
nealogy Workshop will be held from
10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday, April
17 at First Congregational Church,
225 S. Interlachen Ave., Winter Park.
Call 407-645-0698 or e-mail ema-
cintosh@cfl.rr.com for more informa-
tion.

Worldwide Auction Realty Services
announced that it will be conducting a
court-ordered bankruptcy auction for
the remaining developer-owned units
at The Plaza in downtown Orlando.
The auction will require prior registra-
tion of bidders submitted by April 19
at 5 p.m. The live auction will be held
April 21 at The Plaza at 4 p.m. on the
16th floor of the North Tower at 121
S. Orange Ave. For details about the
auction and minimum bid prices, go
to www.OrlandoPlazaAuction.com.

The clear, sweet sounds of jazz mu-
sic will fill the air April 19 at the third
annual Jazz Under the Starz event
and Silent Auction at Boone High
School. The free, outdoor evening
event begins at 7 p.m. and is open to
the public, with performances by the
Boone High School Jazz Ensemble


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and by composer Benoit Glazer with
his jazz musician friends. William R.
Boone High School is located at 2000
S. Mills Ave. For more information,
visit www.soundofthebraves.com/
jazz.

"Health Care: The Reality," is a de-
bate set for 7 p.m., Tuesday, April 20
at the University Club of Winter Park,
841 N. Park Ave., Winter Park. For
more details about this free event call
644-6147.

On Wednesday, April 21, the Win-
ter Park Chamber of Commerce will
celebrate the 25th anniversary of
Taste of Winter Park, presented by
CenturyLink. The Taste of Winter Park
is held from 5-8 p.m. at the Winter
Park Farmers' Market, 200 W. New
England Ave., Winter Park. Tickets are
available for $40 in advance for Win-
ter Park Chamber members, $45 for
non-members and $45 at the door.
Tickets can be purchased at the Win-
ter Park Chamber of Commerce, 151
W. Lyman Ave., Winter Park, by calling
407-644-8281 or visiting www.win-
terpark.org.

On Wednesday, April 21, there will


be a Leadership and Citizenship in
Action session held at Rollins College
from 6:15-8 p.m. Broaden your spiri-
tual understanding with an interfaith
discussion of issues related to faith,
anti-Semitism and anti-Arab stereo-
types, and other provocative topics.
It is held at the Holt School, Second
Floor, 203 E. Lyman Ave., Winter Park.
Contact Rev. Bryan Fulwider, Senior
Minister, First Congregational Church
of Winter Park at 407-647-2416 ext.
103 for more details.

The Winter Park Institute welcomes
computer scientist, composer, vi-
sual artist, author and creator of the
phrase 'virtual reality' Jaron Lanier
at 7 p.m. Thursday, April 22. The free
event is open to the public and will
be held at the Tiedtke Concert Hall at
Rollins College. Call 407-691-1995
or e-mail winterparkinstitute@rollins.
edu to learn more.

On April 23, 24 and 25, the 33rd an-
nual Greek Festival carries on its tra-
dition at Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox
Church, which is located on the corner
of Oranole Road and Wymore Road.
Experience a taste of Greece through
authentic, handmade food delicacies.


PHOTO COURTESY OF HOLY TRINITY
Above are some of the offerings at last
year's Annual Greek Festival.
Festival hours on Friday are from 4
p.m. to 11 p.m., Saturday from 11
a.m. to 11 p.m., and Sunday from 11
a.m. to 6 p.m. Admission tickets are
$3. More information is available on-
line at www.OrlandoGreekFest.com
and on its Facebook page (search
Orlando Greek Fest!).


"The summer is for relaxing. I'lljust

take all my classes in the fall."


"With enrollment at an all-time high,

you might not get the classes you

need this fall."


SUMMER CLASSES START MAY 10.
Visit: Hurry UpSign Up.com


VALENCIA


I


Winter Park / Maitland Observer











Lifestyles


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK OBSERVER STAFF
Kim DePasquale performs a yoga pose atop a paddle board on Lake Virginia in Winter Park as she instructs students in her stand up paddling yoga class, which helps students master balance.


A new water sport is catching on in the lakes of Winter Park thanks to a Baldwin Park woman


BRITTNI JOHNSON
GUEST REPORTER
A business in Orlando is
bringing a new water sport
to lake-filled Winter Park.
Stand up paddling, SUP
for those in the know, put
simply, is standing on an
oversized surfboard and
paddling on top of water.
Modern SUP became popu-
lar in the 1960s in Hawaii.
It's re-emerged in the past


couple of years, and its pop-
ularity has spread from the
West Coast all the way to the
inland lakes of Winter Park.
Paddleboard Orlando,
started by Baldwin Park res-
ident Kim DePasquale, of-
fers rentals, private lessons
and sells the boards.
DePasquale first tried it
last May in Anna Maria Is-
land, fell in love, and when
she couldn't find a rental


place close to home, decid-
ed to start the company.
"I just can't get enough of
paddling; I get a new experi-
ence each time," DePasquale
said. "If I could paddle every
day I would."
DePasquale boasts that
it's incredibly easy to learn,
so don't let the surfboard
part intimidate you.
"Anybody can do this, it
doesn't matter what size or


shape you are," she said.
This makes it a great
family sport, she said. She
spends much of her time
paddling with her fam-
ily. Her youngest sits on the
front of her board, while
her other daughter and hus-
band paddle on their own.
Paddleboard Orlando
offered an open event for
anyone to try SUP on March
22. Most in attendance were


first-time paddlers, and all
hopped on with ease, cruis-
ing around Lake Virginia
within minutes. While some
were timid at first, once se-
curely in place on the board,
they seemed excited about
their accomplishment.
"I was nervous that I was
going to fall in, but it is real-
ly stable," said Carla Bruce, a
first-time paddler. "It's just
> turn to PADDLING on PAGE 15


To learn more about our
community in Kissimmee,
call us at 1-800-859-1550 or visit us
at www.good-sam.com/kissimmee


Good .
S Samantan
SSocietyiM
KISSIMMEE VILLAGE
4250 Village Dr. Kissimmee, FL
I All faiths or beliefs are welcome. 09-G1384 AL#11474,
eme HH#21899096 HH#299991031 SNF#1267096


Page 12 Thursday, April 15, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


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Winter Park / Maitland Observer





Calendar



At 11 a.m. on Saturday, April
17, the Winter Park Borders will
celebrate National Poetry Month
with a special Fancy Nancy
Poetry Storytime Event for Kids.
Come dressed in your fanciest,
and get ready to learn and love
poetry at 600 N. Orlando Ave. For
more information, call 407-647-
3300.

From 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. on
Wednesday, April 21, join
Maitland Middle School, 1901
Choctaw Trail, Maitland, as it
displays its creative talents by
transforming the courtyard into
the streets of Paris. The event will
feature artists, musicians and
wandering mimes.

The Orlando Public Library and
The Center for Contemporary
Dance join together to celebrate
National Dance Week (April 23-
May 2) by presenting a variety
of fun and exciting dance events.
From noon to 1 p.m.Friday,April 23
they will host The Nia Technique,
which blends dance, yoga and
the martial arts. Ages 6 to adult
and all levels are welcome. Visit
www.TheCenterForDance.org for
more details.

Israel Independence Day
presented by Roth JCC will be
held from 3-8 p.m. Sunday, April
25 at the Jewish Community
Center of Greater Orlando, 851
N. Maitland Ave., Maitland.
Celebrate Israel's 62nd birthday
with carnival rides, Middle
Eastern food, activities, shopping
and a children's interactive Israel
area. It's free but certain activities
have a nominal cost. Contact
Julie Varkonyi at 407-645-5933
or visit www.israeldayorlando.
org.

Audition materials for the 2010-
2011 season with the Florida
SymphonyYouth Orchestra (FSYO)
are now available for download
from www.fsyo.org. Applications
are due by Wednesday, April
28. For more information or
questions, call the FSYO office at
407-999-7800.

On April 29, the kindergarten
class atSt. Margaret Mary Catholic
School will host the Second
Annual Kindergarten Dime Bake
Sale. The children will use all
of the proceeds from their bake
sale to assist in the relief efforts
for the school's sister parish, St.
Joan of Arc School in Haiti. It is
from 11:30 a.m. to 12:50 p.m., in
the school cafeteria. Only dimes
may be used for purchase. Visit
www.smmknight.org for more
information.

From 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. on
Thursday, April 29, The Hebrew
Day School will hold a Nutrition
and Fitness Expo in the school's
multipurpose room, 851 N.
Maitland Ave., Maitland.The Expo,
which is open to the public, will
feature an "ask the expert" area,
where leading physicians from
the community will be on hand to
provide information and hands-
on activities. Call Shari Wladis at
407-647-0713 for details.


Thursday, April 15, 2010 Page 13


PHOTOS COURTESY OF WENDY AUSTIN AND MIKE WALl
Clockwise from left, the team checks its robot for inspection; Matt Kaplan, Ennio Claretti and Skylar Goodell compete last year; the team's mascot chills.


'ars


Orlando's Exploding Bacon Robotics team prepares to

compete in an international robotics championship on

Thursday in Atlanta, after winning regionals April 1


BRITTNI JOHNSON
GUEST REPORTER

Some teens play soccer, and
some teens make robots
that play soccer.
The Exploding Bacon Ro-
botics team from Orlando
will be traveling to Atlanta
this week, where they will
be pitted against 344 teams
representing six countries
at the FIRST (For Inspira-
tion and Recognition of
Science and Technology)
Robotics Championship on
Thursday, April 15.
They've spent every day
for the last six weeks build-
ing their robot, with the
help of an engineer mentor.
Now, the 30-person team,
made up of students from
12 Orlando-area schools,
including eight from Win-
ter Park High School, will
toggle, spin and thrust their
robot through a game of
remote-controlled soccer in
the hopes of winning it all.
They just got back from
the Inaugural North Caroli-
na Regional held in Raleigh,
N.C. on April 1, where they
were a part of the winning
alliance along with teams
1086 Blue Cheese from Vir-


ginia and 48 Delphi Elite
from Ohio. The team also
won the General Motors
Industrial Design Award,
which celebrates form and
function in design.
It won't be Bacon's first
time at the Super Bowl of
youth robotics competi-
tions. They've gone every
year since they started their
club in team mom Wen-
dy Austin's living room in
2006.
"I would not trust myself
to design a robot, but I'm
thrilled that my children
can," Wendy joked.
Wendy and a few other
mentors started the club
when her son's high school
didn't have one. She's seen
him be a "driver," the remote
control operator of the ro-
bot, on one of the final four
teams in the champion-
ships. He's since gone onto
college. Now her daughter
Katie Austin, 16, helps build
the robot.
"I love doing anything
mechanical because I get to
build things. I get to get my
hands dirty," said Katie, who
plans to major in engineer-
ing in college.
Katie was also on the pit


crew in the regional com-
petition they won to qualify
them for the championship.
It's much like a pit crew at a
NASCAR race.
"It's exciting, it's crazy
and it gets a little crowded,"
Katie said.
Between matches, the pit
crew must repair any dam-
ages done to the robot dur-
ing competition. Because
the matches are chosen ran-
domly, a team could have
anywhere from 10 minutes
to three hours to fix their
robot.
Kris Walters, 14, who was
also on the pit crew, called it
being the "handyman of the
robot."
The team's handy work
paid off, and they brought
home the gold. And the
team said there was lots of
hugging going around after
the announcement of their
win.
"I may have knocked
some people over," Wendy
said.
That warm family feeling
is what the team said sets
them apart. And like their
Web site says, they're not

> turn to BACON on PAGE 17


Exploding Bacon Ro-
botics, which includes
eight Winter Park H.S.
students, will be com-
peting in the Super
Bowl of youth robotics
in Atlanta Thursday,
April 15 through Satur-
day, April 17.


Watch the competition
live by visiting www.
robotics.nasa.gov. They
are on the Newton
field. It is also televised
on the NASA channel.

For more information,
visit explodingbacon.
com.






Page 14 ThursdayApril 15, 2010 Winter Park / Maitland Observer


WANT A FREE


MATTRESS?


RELAX IN COMFORT


Winter Park Village
5 shops down from Brio's
407-628-5657


Seminole Towne Mall
Upstair's outside of Dillard's
407-302-2090


DO YOU SUFFER FROM?


LACK OF RESTFUL SLEEP ?
LOWER BACK PAIN ?
NECK OR SHOULDER PAIN ?
TOSSING AND TURNING ?
SLEEP APNEA ?
ACID REFLUX ?


If you don't hurt when you go to bed
But you wake up hurting...
Your bed is to blame


A New Bed Today will Change all of your Tomorrow's


ART CENTER

CHILDREN'S

ART
Saturday, April 24, 2010
10 am- 2 pm
The theme for this year is in honor of the 40th anniversary of Earth Day. We will transform
the Art Center into a visual environment focused on the green fun of our lives, recycling, found
objects, reuse and most importantly, being kind to our planet Earth.
The event is FREE for children under 12 and $4/adult.
ACTIVITIES AND ENTERTAINMENT
The public is welcome to come and experience this hands-on cultural environment.


ART ACTIVITIES:
* Crazy Green Fun House
* Have it your way with clay
* Oh my sod
* Seeds of greatness
* One potato, two potato- Printmaking
* Rock on Painting
* Earth day cookies to decorate
* Edible and butterfly garden

COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT
The Maitland Historical Society, the
Maitland Library, the Scribes of Central
Florida, Watercolor Society and Weavers of
Orlando, will also provide hands-on fun.


SPECIAL GUESTS:
* Colby Center for Dance
* Animals from the Central Florida Zoo
* Spore Project with Doug Rhodehamel
* Mother Nature Storyteller
* Van Go Mobile Art
* Chandler Performing Arts Theatre
project

ABC -ART BY CHILDREN
Coalition for the Homeless

Special Thanks to Creative Directors Sandy
Bonus and Jill Altomare for their amazing
creativity and commitment to this signa-
ture festival.


IN THE GALLERY: OIL ON CANVAS
Park Maitland School 6th grade art exhibit featuring the student's display on forced perspectives.
SPONSERED BY:
bright
house
NETWORKS
The Maitland Art Center is located at 231 W Packwood Avenue, Maitland FL 32751 407.539.2181 and is a not-for-profit educational institution operated
for the benefit and enjoyment of all who live and visit in Central Florida. The Art Center activities are sponsered in part by United Arts of Central Florida,
Inc.; by the Florida Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs and the Florida Arts Council; and by the National Endowment for the Arts. www.
maitlandartcenter,org


Page 14 Thursday, April 15, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer






Thursday, April 15, 2010 Page 15


PADDLING I Winter park instructor said she is one of the first to teach yoga on a floating paddleboard


< continued from page 12

kind of freeing once you're
out there."
Not only is SUP a way
to spend some time out-
doors, it's quite a workout.
DePasquale described one
hour of paddling as being
like running a 5K. She also
loves that it's a multipur-
pose activity for her.
"It's the only sport where
I can hang out with my girl-
friends, get a workout and


PaddIeboiar
-Ii.and


enjoy nature at the same
time," she said.
DePasquale, a certified
yoga instructor, is also tak-
ing the workout to a new
level, what she calls "yoga
on water." She's coined this
phrase and said she's one
of the first to practice yoga
on the boards. She plans to
offer classes where her stu-
dents are literally surround-
ed by nature. The idea came
the first time she tried the
sport.
"When I got on the board
I thought, 'This is a yoga mat
on water.'"
Ibrahim Toure, a fellow
yoga teacher and new pad-
dler, said that the tranquil-
ity of the water makes it a
perfect match for yoga. The
peace of mind he'd get from
practicing on water would
be the draw for him to use
the board again.


N


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK OBSERVER STAFF
Theresia Portoghese tests her balance while trying not to get her feet wet during a Stand Up Paddling exercise.


"A good workout is an ac-
cessory benefit," Toure said.
But his tranquility was
disturbed for a moment
when he tried a complicat-


ed yoga move on the board
and fell in the water.
"It was wonderful; once I
fell in I was able to not fear
falling anymore."


That's the kind of atti-
tude DePasquale said is nec-
essary for the sport.
"Keep an open mind and
give it a shot," she said.


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Winter Park / Maitland Observer







Page 16 Thursday, April 15, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


2010 FLORIDA FILM FESTIVAL GUIDE/SCHEDULE


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 14 THURSDAY, APRIL 15

ENZIAN ENZIAN


10AM & 2PM KODAK FORUM: "STOP BY.
LEARN FILM. SHOOT FILM"

3:30- 5:30PM WINTER'S BONE

6:30 8:30PM SHORTS #5: ANIMATED SHORTS
9:30-11:15PM HOMEWRECKER

REGAL WINTER PARK VILLAGE
1:30-3:15PM LOVELY, STILL

3:30- 5:30PM THE TIGER NEXT DOOR
PRECEDED BY DEVOLUTION

4 5:55PM SHORTS #1: "IGNITE"

6-8PM RACING DREAMS
PRECEDED BY O &A
6:30 8:45PM HOME FILM: THAT'S
ENTERTAINMENT!


9-11PM BEST
PREC

9:30PM-12:05AM THE
DRA

PLAZA CINEMA CAFE
7 -8:45PM HAR
9:30 11PM THE


T WORST MOVIE
:EDED BY THE S FROM HELL

GIRL WITH THE
,GON TATTOO


RY BROWN
TOPP TWINS:
OUCHABLE GIRLS


11AM-12:30PM PERSEVERANCE:


1:30 3:30PM


4:30- 6:40PM


WOMEN IN INDUSTRY FORUM

NO. 4 STREET OF OUR LADY
PRECEDED BY OVERNIGHT STAY

THE LOTTERY PRECEDED BY
LESSONS LEARNED


7:30 9PM FLORIDA FEATURE: NEW LOW


9:45-11:45PM


DUMBSTRUCK PRECEDED BY
THE POODLE TRAINER


REGAL WINTER PARK VILLAGE
4 -6PM SHORTS #3: "SMOLDER"


4:30-6:15PM
6:30 8:15PM
7:15-9PM
9- 10:50PM
9:30 11:40PM


PUNCHING THE CLOWN
WAKING SLEEPING BEAUTY
BOMBER
SHORTS #2: "BURN"
MY SUICIDE


PLAZA CINEMA CAFE
7-9PM I AM LOVE
9:30 -11:50PM K-20: THE FIEND WITH
TWENTY FACES

ORANGE COUNTY REGIONAL HISTORY CENTER
7 -10PM V.I.P. RECEPTION


EMBER DOWNTOWN ORLANDO
8 -11PM FILMMAKER WELCOME PARTY


FRIDAY, APRIL 16

ENZIAN
11AM -12:30PM THE ART OF THE
PRODUCER FORUM

1:30-3:30PM OBSELIDIA

4:30- 6:30PM DRONES

7:30 10:30PM A CASSAVETES EVENING
WITH GENA ROWLANDS
AND SEYMOUR CASSEL;
HOME FILM: FACES

11:59PM -1:30AM A MILLION IN THE MORNING
PRECEDED BY STONEY

REGAL WINTER PARK VILLAGE
1:30-3PM FILMMAKER FORUM
1:30 3:20PM LOST SPARROW PRECEDED BY
MY LIFE AS CHERRY
3:30 4:45PM MID-AUGUST LUNCH
4 -6PM CLEANFLIX PRECEDED BY
WATERMELON MAN
5:30 7:15PM INTERNATIONAL SHORTS
6:30 8:15PM SPACE TOURISTS
7:45 9:30PM SHORTS #5: ANIMATED SHORTS
8:45- 10:30PM WELCOME
10- 11:35PM THE SUN CAME OUT
11:59PM -1:50AM THE REVENANT

PLAZA CINEMA CAFE
7 8:45PM LEAVES OF GRASS
9:30-11PM SOLITARY MAN
11:59PM-1:35AM TROLL2

URBAN FLATS DOWNTOWN ORLANDO
8 -11PM INDUSTRY PARTY


WARDS BRUNCH I APRIL 1 1 OAM

Experience the excitement of an
awards ceremony with the
satisfaction of afilling
Saturday morning brunch.

Hot, Delicious Buffet | 20
Brunch and Awards LU

SATURDAY, APRIL 17

ENZIAN
10 11:30AM AWARDS BRUNCH
1:30 3PM A SPECIAL SNEAK PREVIEW

AT I:30PM CATCH

A SPECIAL

SNEAK PREVIEW OF
THE SURPRISING AND

ARTISTIC HIT OF

SUNDANC[ AND BERLIN

4 -6PM RACING DREAMS
PRECEDED BY Q&A
7 8:30PM WAKING SLEEPING BEAUTY


9:30 11PM STRANGE POWERS:
STEPHIN MERRITT AND THE
MAGNETIC FIELDS
11:59PM -1:45AM MIDNIGHT SHORTS

REGAL WINTER PARK VILLAGE
12:15-2:15PM 3 X REAL: DOC SHORTS
SHOWCASE
1:30 3:30PM FLORIDA SHORTS: BEST
OF BROUHAHA
2:45 -4:20PM THE SUN CAME OUT
4 5:45PM FLORIDA FEATURE: NEW LOW
5 -6:45PM COOKING WITH STELLA
6:30 8:25PM THE WARLORDS
7:15 8:45PM THE TOPP TWINS:
UNTOUCHABLE GIRLS
9 -10:45PM HARRY BROWN
9:30 11:05PM INTERNATIONAL
ANIMATED SHORTS
11:30PM -1:05AM TROLL 2
12MID-1:30AM A MILLION IN THE MORNING
PRECEDED BY STONEY

FULL SAIL UNIVERSITY'S FILM BACKLOT
8-11PM REVEL19


SUNDAY, APRIL 18

ENZIAN
1 -3:15PM HOME FILM: I REMEMBER MAMA
4:15 5:50PM INTERNATIONAL
ANIMATED SHORTS
6:45 8:30PM INTERNATIONAL SHORTS
9:30 -11:10PM CLOSING NIGHT RETRO: PSYCHO


REGAL WINTER PARK VILLAGE
12 1:40PM SPACE TOURISTS
1-3PM THE YOUNG COMPOSERS
CHALLENGE PRECEDED BY
YAMASONG
2:15-4PM WELCOME
3:45 5:15PM SOLITARY MAN
4:30 6:30PM THE WIND JOURNEYS
6 -7:45PM WILD GRASS
7 8:55PM THE WARLORDS
8:30 -10:50PM K-20: THE FIEND WITH
TWENTY FACES
9:30-11:15PM LEAVES OF GRASS




FILM VENUES


ENZIAN
1300 S. ORLANDO AVE., MAITLAND

REGAL WINTER PARK
VILLAGE 20
510 N. ORLANDO AVE. WINTER PARK

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Thursday, April 15, 2010 Page 17


It's Baroque, but somehow they fix it

Rollins College hosted Red Priest, a quartet of instrumentalists, on April 9


LOUIS RONEY
OBSERVER STAFF
A gimmick can make you rich and
famous these days if you know ex-
actly how to serve it up. An example
of a gimmick is to play Baroque mu-
sic in any style you feel inclined.
When I threw a towel around
myself and sashayed into the kitch-
en, singing a Bach cantata aria, my
beloved wife thought it not funny
indeed, and I escaped just ahead of
an airborne dinner plate.
However, a quartet of instru-
mentalists who call themselves Red
Priest did something on the same
order at Rollins College's Tiedtke
Hall, on April 9, and my wife finds it
a very entertaining affair.
Granted, to say that the four in-
strumentalists recorder player
Piers Adams, violinist David Green-
berg, cellist Angela East, and harpsi-


" THESE FOUR

ANACHRONISTIC

HIPSTERS TAKE

A BAROQUE PIECE

(SAY BY BACH)

AND DRESS IT UP

SO THAT BACH IS

IN A DIFFERENT

SUIT OF CLOTHES.9


chordist Howard Beach play vir-
tuosically would be a rank under-
statement.
Of course, it ain't just what they
play, it's the way they play it that
makes a program of beautiful Ba-
roque music a lot of fun.
These four anachronistic "hip-
sters" take a Baroque piece (say by
Bach) and dress it up so that Bach
is in a different suit of clothes. The
program included examples of pla-
giarism by Baroque composers, guys
who made a habit of such purloin-
ing, but included Red Priest's up-to-
date contributions to the practice.
Musically speaking, everyone had
his hand in someone else's pocket.
Works heard during the evening
were: Telemann's "Sonata in A mi-
nor," traditional Sea Chanty's of the
era, Albanoni's "Adagio", Vivaldi's
"Sea Storm Sonata", Bach's Toccata
and Fugue in D minor and the Pre-


lude from Suite #1 for Cello, Reels
and Hornpipes on Bach motifs, Tar-
tini's "Senti lo Mare", Leclair's "Tam-
bourin", and Corelli's Concert Fan-
tasy on "La Folia."
Red Priest surprisingly played
the entire concert from memory, a
feat enhanced by the fact that the
selections were highly complex and
exacting.
The four players' perfectly ren-
dered nuances were breathtaking.
Recorder player Piers Adams add-
ed an interesting aspect by his use
of four different-sized recorders.
How fortunate is this communi-
ty that Rollins College brings such
recitals to the music-loving public?
Such a formidable artistic per-
formance puts us momentarily on
a par with the great cities of North
America and Europe. Carnegie Hall
is at our doorstep.


BACON I All team alumni have gone on to college


< continued from page 13

just about building robots, they're
about building people. Walters at-
tested to that, and said he felt like
he walked into a room of friends
when he went to his first meeting.
That friendly atmosphere
might also be what drives the kids
to work so hard on the robot. Most
of the members of the team have
no idea how to engineer a robot
when they join the club, so a lot
of dedication and hard work goes
into it. The team met every day for
the six-week build. Watching them
learn is what the mentors agreed
was the most satisfying.
"It's rewarding to see the kids
accomplish a goal you helped
with," said mentor Kelly Wilder-
muth. "You feel proud. It's really
cool to see them succeed and you
feel like you've succeeded too."
Wendy is most proud of the fact
that all of the team's alumni have
gone to college. Many of them ma-
jored in engineering, which is the


FIRST organization's goal to
spark an interest in science and
technology-based careers. Being
in the club gets teens working with
professionals in the field as early as
middle school and offers opportu-
nities to network and build confi-
dence in business atmospheres.
Wendy said that getting kids to
consider technological careers is
important for America's economy,
because the country is starting to
"lose the race" in that category. One
problem, though, is that most kids
don't realize how fun engineering
is, mentor Ryan Morin said.
"If we don't start treating engi-
neers like rock stars we're going to
fall behind," Wendy said. "And this
is one way middle school and high
school kids can become rock stars
even if they can't sink a basket."
Walters knows the value of be-
ing around intellectual rock stars.
"The best strategy in life is to
hang out with people who are bet-
ter than you, so that you always
have drive to better yourself," he
said.


Sunday, May 9th at the
Silver Spurs Arena in Kissimmee.


Email Tracy Craft
tcraft@observernewspapers.com
to enter drawing


nI 1rmTT 7T


$2900 REFUND
GET YOUR EARNED INCOME CREDIT REFUND.
EVEN IF YOU DIDN'T WORK FOR ANYONE.
IF YOU HAVE CHILDREN OR DEPENDENTS.
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REFUND.

Get a larger refund (up to $5057) if you have more children or
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You can file anytime of the year and you can amend your tax return
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Contact
LORI CARPENTER
352-484-4312


Winter Park / Maitland Observer










Opinion/ Editorial


Perspectives

by...



ek9a


Are you a liberal?


What is fair? As in what is a
fair amount of taxes for an
individual to pay to local,
state and federal govern-
ments? I recently read that
about 45 percent of Ameri-
can households pay no fed-
eral taxes. At all.
This seems inexplicable
to me. Do you not travel
on federal highways? Do
you not enjoy the protec-
tion of America's armed
forces? Have you not been
in a national park or forest?
So, why would you not con-
tribute "something" to the
national pot? Because, the
argument goes, I/you don't
make enough to kick-in
any amount.
I am occasionally asked,
"Jepson, are you a liberal?"
And, I unabashedly answer,
"Yes."
I come to my "liberal"
position from one essential
perspective. But before I
explain why I am a liberal,
I must confess that I am a
liberal, not from the heart
but from the brain.
I am fundamentally (to
use labels) an independent,
mind-your-own-business,
leave-me-alone, I'll take
care of my own business
anarchist, thank you very
much. I do not want any-
one, anytime in my face
even remotely telling me
what to do, when or how.
My favorite quote is "The
cowards never started and
the weak died along the
way." I will choose exactly
whom I will help if I deem
them worthy. My heart does
not break for those who
have made poor choices.
Live the consequences of
your decisions. And, by
gawd, leave me alone to live


mine.
I don't like whiners,
hangers-on, sycophants,
suck-ups or deadbeats. Or
bootlicking, whimpering
simpletons. I am singularly
unimpressed with those
who have inherited wealth
(although I support genera-
tional transfers) and who
have ended up dissipated
and desiccated with/by
their lame, conservative
thinking. Little is more
laughable than listening to
an overstuffed turd blos-
som whose wealth was
acquired through grand-
daddy's initiative, yet who
talks as if he has some keen
insight into how to live.
Puh-leaseeee.
I don't have a soft spot
for humanity cuz we're so
cute and cuddly. I don't get
dewy-eyed over the aborted
unborn. I'd rather invest in
art museums than home-
less shelters. Guns don't
bother me and if some duf-
fus of a gunowner's child
blows his foot off because
daddy left a loaded pistol in
his nightstand, well, unfor-
tunate and as tragic as that
is, perhaps it's Darwinism
working on that particular
genetic line.
Capital punishment is
OK by me. (Except for the
unresolvable problem of
executing the innocent.)
Some crimes against hu-
manity are so egregious
as to warrant expulsion
from the tribe. Pedophiles,
rapists, "some" murder-
ers, "some" swindlers
(Think Bernie Madoff), war
criminals all just might
warrant execution. Are
we short people in the ol'
rowboat of humanity such


that all men are needed at
the oars? I don't think so.
Well then, as the Red Queen
so succinctly uttered, "Off
with their heads!" And why
not? It is not as if they have
endeared themselves to the
tribe through exemplar ser-
vice to mankind.
Oh, and don't get me
started on the shiftless,
lazy hangers-on of society.
Whose only effort some
days is tearing open a gov-
ernment support check.
Who, worse, breed and
breed and breed and have
child after child after child
they cannot afford and ex-
pect "us" to support. I, per-
sonally, do not want to sup-
port another man's child. I
simply do not. You have ba-
bies; you take care of them.
You house, feed, insure and
educate your children. And,
I'll do the same for my kin,
thank you very much. That
is what responsible adults
do.
You know what though?
A lot of what I wrote above
was much more appropri-
ate for an 1840 America
than a 2010 America.
While I am an anarchist
at heart, I am a liberal
through reflection. What
else can an intelligent per-
son be?
America is well on its
way to 400 million people.
If we lived in the best of
all possible worlds (read
Votaire's "Candide"), all
adults would be thought-
ful and responsible. All
children would be planned
and properly cared for with
"Lake Wobegon" abilities.
There would be no crime,
and if there were, there
would be no extenuating
or mitigating factors. There
would be no shades of gray,
no ambiguity, doubt or un-
certainty as to the right and
wrong ways to live or how
to conduct one's self. Busi-
nesses and corporations
would be honorable. They
would play by the rules and
would be as interested in
the "morality" of what they
do as they are in making
profits. Humans wouldn't
be killing (consuming)


the very planet they call
home. Governments would
be stellar reflections of
an honorable, generous
populace. Graft, corruption,
avarice and murderous
thuggery wouldn't be in our
vocabulary. Wouldn't be in
our bloodstream, our DNA,
wouldn't be what we are.
Alas. Sigh.
If America is at 325 mil-
lion today and 10 percent
of the population is inca-
pable of sustaining itself,
what do we do with such
folk? That's 30 million plus
people. If corporations,
left to their own devices,
would not unconsciona-
bly rape and pillage the
environment for profits,
well, that really isn't the
case, is it? If our financial
institutions and banking
industry were conscien-
tious corporate citizens
that placed profits and
community service as equal
objectives, well, again, that
isn't the case either. If only
responsible adults had chil-
dren, I wouldn't have to be
concerned with their chil-
dren's welfare. But that isn't
America's reality either, is
it? Children do not ask to be
born to bums, drug addicts,
whores or reprobates.
Let alone the nation's
wretched stain of slavery
and racism.
I, once upon a time,
worked for an organiza-
tion that provided funding
for legal services for poor
Americans folks so im-
poverished and destitute
that their children some-
times had teeth literally
growing into their cheeks.
They would be forced to
seek legal assistance (a
lawyer) to force the Social
Security Administration to
pay for their child's dental
care. This, after months of
pain for the child. Ameri-
cans detest the poor and
they dislike nothing more
than a poor person with a
lawyer. But so what? That
child needed help and our
government, that's us, was
too indifferent, too bureau-
cratic to care.
But what kind of people


are we who mouth the
simplicities I stated earlier?
Goofs, that's who. It's one
thing to spout, as did I, the
platitudes of "rugged indi-
vidualism," to even attempt
to live such a life, oh, say,
back when the pre-indus-
trial North American con-
tinent was virtually empty,
when the weak did, simply,
die along the way. But that
ain't America today and
hasn't been for well over
100 years.
We live in a complex and
complicated world where
life relentlessly dishes up
victims (humans in great
need) like so much can-
non fodder. They are real,
suffering people with real
problems that only through
our collective action (that's
government) can we, with
any hope, begin to address.
I embrace liberalism
because historically as
America has grown, all
the problems associated
with being an urbanized,
industrialized nation have
grown, too. And liberal-
ism is and has been the
only legitimate attempt at
addressing and rectifying
those problems inherent
in our system. Liberalism
is imperfect to be sure, but
nonetheless necessary.
The unsophisticated,
somewhat juvenile Tea
Party rhetoric I feel emo-
tionally (of my don't tread
on me individualism, etc.)
isn't what is required to
solve America's problems.
Simplistic, chest-beating
rhetoric espousing conser-
vative values won't house
the poor, clean the environ-
ment or protect the nation
(us) from rapacious busi-
ness practices.
But I still would like ev-
ery American to, at least,
put a little in the kitty, other
than just their hand taking
something out.


TALKJEPSON

Chris Jepson's opinions are made
independently of the newspaper.
Write him at jepson@MEDIAmerica.us.


Letters tothe Editor


Politicians should stand up
for the middle class
We are all struggling with
the high cost of everything.
My wife and I live on our
only income, Social Secu-
rity. We were not given a
cost of living increase this
year, as you well know. We
have six children, four boys
and two girls. All fine young
adults. Three of our chil-
dren lost their jobs, and are
presently doing what they
can in odd jobs, to try and
get by.
Needless to say, we are
trying to help them with
their responsibilities with


food and money. It is be-
coming hopeless for us as
parents to continue this
way.
It's time for you, our
public servants, to go to bat
for the common man.
It is us, the middle class,
who takes the beatings
from the big cats, for their
own interest.
It is time to take a stand
for Middle America. God
speed!
-James McLaughlin
Altamonte Springs

Stop bank lobbyists from
killing reforms


America needs financial
reform. Without it, banks,
Wall Street and the stock
market will crash again. We
do not need more bailouts.
We need fiscal responsibil-
ity. No company is too big
or too small to fail if the
company or corporation
doesn't practice fiscal re-
sponsibility.
A company or corpora-
tion that uses excess funds
rather than be held ac-
countable for their actions
shouldn't be in business.
Reckless behavior by big
banks, mortgage lenders
and credit card companies
have cost millions of Ameri-


cans their jobs, their re-
tirement savings and their
financial well-being.
Strong reforms currently
before the Senate would
hold big banks accountable
and crack down on abuses
by credit card companies.
There is an army of lob-
byists on Capitol Hill fight-
ing to protect the bonuses,
loopholes and sweetheart
deals that some Wall Street
banks enjoy, while millions
of Americans lose their jobs
and savings. Close all loop-
holes.
Senators must make sure
that any final bill protects
states' rights, requires that


investment advice be based
on the needs of the client -
not the financial institution
- and provides consumers
with a watchdog to protect
their financial security.
Americans deserve to
know whose side their
senators are on: working
families who play by the
rules or the big banks who
got us into this mess. Those
responsible for these prob-
lems need to be held ac-
countable for their reckless
actions.
-Lois Hemm
Orlando


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Page 18 Thursday, April 15, 2010





Winter Park/Maitland Observer



Play On!
yI


Conservative commentary
& opinions of Louis Roney
Harvard'42-Distinguished Prof, Em.-
UCF
2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award
(Assisted by b.w.:Joy Roney)

"You are entitled to your own opinions-
you are not entitled to your own facts"
Daniel Patrick Moynihan

Barack and a hard
place

nyone with bat
brains knows that
1 strength is the best
defense against being
picked on. It's quite natu-
ral to wish to admire our
U.S. Presidents. However,
Barack Obama seems the
weakest and the least ex-
perienced of any President
I can remember. Obama's
latest announcement left
me amazed, even stunned.
Whether he has considered
it carefully or not, Obama's
benign dream of mutual
atomic disarmament by
the U.S. and Russia could
potentially lead to an Iran
with nuclear possibilities,
i.e., a mighty threat to a dis-
armed USA. One can imag-
ine that the Irani's and any
other potential enemies
were gleeful to hear that
Obama would conceivably
tie our hands behind our
back.
If the United States had


Thursday, April 15, 2010 Page 19


been militarily powerful in
1941, would the Japanese
have dared to attack Pearl
Harbor? If the Japanese
had thought we could over-
whelm them immediately
thereafter, they would have
kept their ship and planes
at home.
Obama proves for all the
world to see that he is as
short-sighted in power pol-
itics, as he is in running the
U.S. economy. Many aware
citizens will not sleep well
until Obama is out of the
White House, and the world
again knows that our for-
eign policy is built upon an-
nihilating retaliation.
House of Representa-
tives member Susan Kos-
mas went on record nega-
tively re: the Health Bill.
Since then she was pursued
aggresively in intense meet-
ings with Nancy Pelosi. Su-
san then reversed her vote.
Does this fact mean that
Pelosi's pressure con-
tained outright bribes and/
or threats? The passage of
this HealthCare Bill altered
life in the U.S. as we knew
it. We can hope that Susan
Kosmas has made her final
political decision, and her
peace with whatever gods
rule her.
*The following text is
from a county emergency
manager in Minot, North
Dakota:
"Weather bulletin: Up
here in the northern part
of North Dakota we just re-
covered in past weeks from
an Historic event may I
even say a 'Weather Event
of Biblical Proportions'? -
with an historic blizzard
of up to 25 inches of snow
and winds 50 mph that
broke trees in half, knocked
down utility poles, stranded
hundreds of motorists in
lethal snow banks, closed
all roads, isolated scores of
communities and cut pow-


er to 10s of thousands.
FYI: Obama did not show
up.
FEMA did nothing.
We didn't want 'em. We'll
fix it ourselves, said locals."
Egypt, after voting 79
percent of the time against
the United States in the
United Nations, still re-
ceives $2 billion annually
in U.S. foreign aid! (Won-
der what we give to our
friends?)
Despite the power of
the forceful American Jew-
ish Lobby, President Obama
continues to amaze with
his inamicability against Is-
rael and its leaders.
Baltimore, Orlando and
Connecticut opera compa-
nies have closed as well as
many others. Cutbacks are
being felt at the Met, New
York City Opera Company,
Los Angeles and Washing-
ton opera companies. En-
dowments have shrunk,
ticket sales are down, and
donors are disappearing.
Are we to assume the aw-
ful-awful: that opera as a
prominent art-form in our
culture is dead? Is a "night
at the opera" to become
just another night at the
movie theater?
"With hurricanes, tor-
nados, fires out of control,
mud slides, flooding, severe
thunderstorms tearing up
the country from one end
to another, and with the
threat of bird flu and ter-
rorist attacks, are we sure
this is good time to take
God out of the Pledge of Al-
legiance?"- Jay Leno
(From a reader):"This
woman's husband had
been slipping in and out of
a coma for several months,
yet she had stayed by his
bedside every single day.
One day, when he came to,
he motioned for her to come
nearer. As she sat by him,
he whispered, eyes full of


tears, 'You know what? You
have been with me through
all the bad times. When I
got fired, you were there to
support me. When my busi-
ness failed, you were there.
When I got shot, you were
by my side. When we lost
the house, you stayed right
here. When my health start-
ed failing, you were still by
my side...You know what?
"What dear', she gently
asked, smiling as her heart
began to fill with warmth.
'I'm beginning to think you
bring me bad luck."'
Recently, still another
letter to the editor about
the nature of downtown
Winter Park was in the Ob-
server. Once again, we are
reminded that things that
happen in the future of our
downtown will surely in-
fluence the life that we live
here. The letter-writer took
no side. I do not think that
one has to be an antedelu-
vian conservative to sug-
gest that we exercise in-
telligent forethought. Pres-
ent day Winter Park might
be likened to an attractive
young woman. Do we want
her to dress and make her-
self up tastefully, or would
we rather that she pull out
all the stops to please ev-
ery Johnny-come-lately?
My thought is that Winter
Park's tasteful mien is what
attracts desirable residents.
Looking for a guy to
spend all your money? A
guy to bully all the small
countries that used to like
us? A guy that has doubled
the people on food stamps
in one year? A guy who has
doubled the welfare rolls in
a year? A guy who is tripling
our deficit? A guy who has
insulted Israel and many
other of our biggest and
best friends? A guy who has
single-handedly scrapped
the greatest medical sys-
tem the world has ever


known? A guy who abhors
the U.S. Constitution? A
guy who practices crony-
ism religiously? A guy who's
treasury chief didn't pay
his own taxes? A guy who
studies Marx avidly and
has friends whose favorite
philosophers are Mao and
Marx? A guy who votes the
opposite of what national
polls tell him the people
want? A guy whom the peo-
ple warn not to bankrupt
the country-after he has
already bankrupted it? A
guy who preaches unity and
yet has divided the country
to his own advantage, and
the disadvantage of us all?
The guy is easy to find -
you (not I!) put him in the
White House.
President Woodrow
Wilson's wacko Progres-
sive notions sure -as-shoo-
tin' laid the ground-work
for the Obama administra-
tion's foggy approach to in-
ternational affairs.
*Many people feel that
something cataclysmic is in
the wings, something that
will change us forever. This
feeling should not be con-
fused with the mouthings
of Obama, and other Leftie
pols, who look to political
ranting to guide them. Is it
possible that such a meta-
morphosis could emerge
organically from the col-
lective sensibilities of all
mankind? The advent and
proliferation of weapons
of mass distruction leave
the choice up to humanity.
It's life or death. We're all
in it. Take your choice- it
may be the last choice you
get....
*Michelle Obama states:
"On our trip, Barack and I
went to his home country
of Kenya." Obama sure has
fine digs whenever he de-
cides to be a visitor in the
USA, doesn't he?


ISendyouhugtss

orgless) tomanaingedito


Fun&Gamsm

LI'


0 an rs


"Copyrighte'd Material : : -



Syndicated&Content '



Available from Commercial News Providers"


Q








Page 20 Thursday, April 15, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


ILegggi-e


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE No. 2009CA3668-14
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY,
AS TRUSTEE IN TRUST FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE
CERTIFICATEHOLDERS FOR ARGENT SECURITIES
INC. 2006-W4, ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-W4,
PLAINTIFF,
VS.
ALI VOLKAN GUL, ET AL.
DEFENDANT(S).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 31, 2010
in the above action, I will sell to the highest bid-
der for cash at Seminole, Florida, on JUN 03 2010,
at 11:00 AM, at Room S201 of Courthouse 301
N. Park Ave., Sanford, FL 32771 for the following
described property:

Condominium Unit 268, The Stratford, A
Winter Park Condominium, together with an
undivided interest in the common elements,
according o the Declaration of Condominium
thereof recorded in Official Record Book
5851, Page 763, as amended from time
to time, of the Public Records of Seminole
County, Florida

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale. The Court, in its dis-
cretion, may enlarge the time of the sale. Notice
of the changed time of sale shall be published as
provided herein.
Dated MAR 31 2010
MARYANNE MORSE
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By Tina Smith
Deputy Clerk of the Court
Prepared by:
Gladstone Law Group, P.A.
1499 W. Palmetto Park Rd, Suite 300
Boca Raton, FL 33486

If you are a person with a disability who needs
accommodation in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, for
the provision of certain assistance. Please con-
tact Court Administration at 301 N. Park Avenue,
Sanford, Florida 32771, telephone number (407)
665-4227, within 2 working days of your receipt of
this document; If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-
955-8771.
4/8,4/15





IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 2008-CA-024623-0
Division: 43A
TRUSTCO BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
NATHANIEL WILLIAMS; and GLORIA WILLIAMS,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that on the 11th day of
June 2010, at 11:00 a.m. in Room 350 of the
Courthouse of Orange County, Florida, 425 S. Or-
ange Avenue, Orlando FL 32801, the undersigned
Clerk will offer for sale the following described
real property:

LOT 9, BLOCK L, LONDONDERRY HILLS, SEC-
TION TWO, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF
AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOKW PAGES 149
PUBLIC RECORDS OF ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.

The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to the
Final Judgment of Foreclosure in Civil Case No.
2008-CA-024623-0; Division: 43A, now pending in
the Circuit Court in Orange County, Florida.
In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities
Act, persons with disabilities needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding
should contact Court Administration at 37 North
Orange Avenue, Suite 1130, Orlando, Florida
32801, telephone number 407/836-2050, not later
than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If
hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice
(V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale.
Dated this 8th day of April, 2010.
By: Eric B. Jontz
ERIC B. JONTZ, Attorney
Florida Bar No.133990


JEFFRY R. JONTZ
ERIC B. JONTZ
SWANN & HADLEY, P.A.
Post Office Box 1961
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 647-2777
Facsimile No.: (407) 647-2157


4/15,4/22


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE No. 59-2009-CA-005165
THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK
OF NEWYORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATE-
HOLDERS CWABS, INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFI-
CATES, SERIES 2005-AB5,
PLAINTIFF,
VS.
JORGE BERNAL, ET AL.
DEFENDANT(S).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 20, 2009
in the above action, I will sell to the highest bid-
der for cash at Seminole, Florida, on May 27, 2010,
at 11:00 AM, at Room S201 of Courthouse 301
N. Park Ave., Sanford, FL 32771 for the following
described property:

LOT 38, SANDALWOOD, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOFAS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
18, PAGE 11, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
SEMINOLE COUNTY, FLORIDA BY VIRTUE
OF THAT CERTAIN / WARRANTY DEED / RE-
CORDED / 11/04/03 IN OFFICIAL RECORDS
BOOK/ 5085 / PAGE 698, PUBLIC RECORDS
OF SEMINOLE COUNTY, FLORIDA.

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale. The Court, in its dis-
cretion, may enlarge the time of the sale. Notice
of the changed time of sale shall be published as
provided herein.
Dated APR1 2010
MARYANNE MORSE
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By Katheryn Limback
Deputy Clerk of the Court
Prepared by:
Gladstone Law Group, P.A.
1499 W. Palmetto Park Rd, Suite 300
Boca Raton, FL 33486

"If you are a person with a disability who needs any
accommodation in order to participate in this pro-
ceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the
provision of certain assistance. Please contact the
ADA Coordinator, Ms. Stacy Brady at 2825 Judge
Fran Jamieson Way, Viera, FL 32940; telephone
number 321-633-2171 two (2) working days of
your receipt of this notice; if you are hearing im-
paired, call the Florida Relay Services at 1-800-
955-8771 (TTY); if you are voice impaired, call the
Florida Relay Services at 1-800-955-8770."
4/8,4/15


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case Number: 2009-CA-25622 -0
Division 39
HANCOCK BANK, as assignee of PEOPLES FIRST
COMMUNITY BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
HAGEN PROPERTIES, LLC, a Florida limited Liability
company; DEBORAH D. HAGEN,
Individually; and TERRY D. HAGEN, Individually,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that on the 24th day of
June, 2010, at 11:00 a.m. in Room 350 of the
Courthouse of Orange County, Florida, 425 S. Or-
ange Avenue, Orlando FL 32801, the undersigned
Clerk will offer for sale the following described
real property:
LOT 1 AND THE NORTH 5 FEET OF LOTS 3 AND
4 IN BLOCKA, OF OAKDALE PARK SUBDIVI-
SION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK R, AT PAGE 6, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to the
Final Judgment of Foreclosure in Civil Case No.
2009-CA-25622-0; Division 39, now pending in
the Circuit Court in Orange County, Florida.
In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities
Act, persons with disabilities needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding
should contact Court Administration at 37 North
Orange Avenue, Suite 1130, Orlando, Florida
32801, telephone number 407/836-2050, not later
than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If
hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice
(V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale.
Dated this 6th day of April, 2010.
By: Eric B. Jontz
ERIC B. JONTZ, Attorney
Florida Bar No. 64905


JEFFRY R. JONTZ
ERIC B. JONTZ
SWANN & HADLEY, P.A.
Post Office Box 1961
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 647-2777
Facsimile No.: (407) 647-2157


4/15,4/22


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 9th JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 09-CA-14153

WATERFORD LAKES COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION,
INC.,
Plaintiff,
v.
HERNAN A. RIOS and KENDY RIOS, and JOHN DOE
and JANE DOE, as unknown tenants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on the 3rd day of
May, 2010, at 11:00 a.m., at room 350 of the
Orange County Courthouse, 425 N. Orange Avenue,
Orlando, Florida 32801, the Clerk of Courts will
offer for sale the real estate described as follows:

Lot 27, WATERFORD LAKES TRACT
N-33, according to the Plat thereof as recorded
in Plat Book 30, Pages 91-93, of the Public
Records of Orange County, Florida.

together with all structures, improvements,
fixtures, and appurtenances on said land or used in
conjunction therewith.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to a Final
Judgment entered in this cause on April 1, 2010.
DATED this 1st day of April, 2010.

Matt G. Firestone, Esq.
Florida Bar No.: 381144
Pohl & Short, P.A.
280 W. Canton Avenue, Suite 410
Post Office Box 3208
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone (407) 647-7645
Facsimile (407) 647-2314
Attorneys for Plaintiff
CERTIFICATE OF SERVICE
I HEREBY CERTIFY that a copy of the foregoing
was sent, via U.S. Mail, to: Hernan A. Rios, 8978
Arlingdale Way, Spring Valley, California 91977 and
Kendy Rios, 8978 Arlingdale Way, Spring Valley,
California 91977, on this 1 st day of April, 2010.
Matt G. Firestone, Esq.
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to
the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact Court Administration at 425 North
Orange Avenue, Suite 2130, Orlando, Florida
32801, telephone (407)836-2303, within 2 working
days of your receipt of this Summons; if you are
hearing impaired, call 1-800-955-8771; if you are
voice impaired, call: 1-800-955-8770.
4/15,4/22


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2010CP0462
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SHELLEY M. STRAIN, JR.,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(summary administration)
The administration of the estate of SHELLEY M.
STRAIN, JR., deceased, File Number 2010CP0462,
is pending in the Circuit Court for Seminole County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is
301 N. Park Avenue, Sanford, Florida 32771. The
names and addresses of the petitioner and the peti-
tioner's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate, including un-matured, contingent or unliq-
uidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is
served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against the dece-
dent's estate, including un-matured, contingent or
unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this
Court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is
April 8, 2010.

Attorney for Person Giving Notice:
Edward W. Soulsby
Attorney for Petitioner
Florida Bar No. 488216
KENNETH B. WHEELER, LL.M. TAX, P.A.
1155 Louisiana Avenue, Suite 100
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone: (407) 645-1779

Person Giving Notice:
David J. Strain
1911 Long Pond Drive
Longwood, FL 32779
4/8,4/15


Notice of Public Auction
Pursuant to Ch 713.585(6) F.S. United American
Lien & Recovery as agent with power
of attorney will sell the following vehicle(s) to the
highest bidder subject to any liens; net
proceeds deposited with the clerk of court; owner/
lienholder has right to hearing and post
bond; owner may redeem vehicle for cash sum of
lien; all auctions held in reserve
Inspect 1 week prior @ lienor facility; cash or
cashier check; 15% buyer prem; any
persons interested ph (954) 563-1999

Sale date May 7, 2010 @ 10:00 am 3411 NW 9th
Ave Ft Lauderdale FL 33309
21867 1990 Chevrolet vin#: 2GCHC39N5L1204621
lienor: as auto repair shop 1055
Nursery Rd #131 Winter Spgs FL (407) 745-7376
lien amt $3137.80
21868 1999 Volkswagon vin#:
WVWMA63B3XE068806 lienor: r team autobody &
collision ctr 5629 Edgewater Drive Orlando FL
407-290-1500 lien amt. $5664.50

Sale date May 14, 2010 @ 10:00 am 3411 NW 9th
Ave #707 Ft Lauderdale FL 33309
21894 1998 Mercedes vin#: WDBHA23GX-
WA577267 lienor: contemporary cars inc
mercedes benz of orlando 810 N Orlando Ave
Maitland FL 407-645-4222 lien amt $2053.73
21895 2004 Pontiac vin#: 5Y2WSL628X4Z416323
lienor: pat's auto & trk repair 480 1/2
Fairvella Rd Orlando FL 407-578-8643 lien amt
$3035.00

Licensed & bonded auctioneers flab422 flau 765
&1911
4/15




IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 9th JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 09-CA-36767
ANDOVER LAKES PHASE 3 HOMEOWNERS AS-
SOCIATION, INC.
Plaintiff,
v.
RICK L. RAMOS, and JOHN DOE and
JANE DOE, as unknown tenants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
To:RICK L. RAMOS
3030 Bellingham Drive
Orlando, Florida 32825
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a
lien on the following described property in Orange
County, Florida:
Lot 127, Andover Lakes Phase 3-A, according
to the Plat recorded in Plat Book 33, Pages
45 and 51, Public Records of Orange County,
Florida.
has been filed against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any,
to it on Matt G. Firestone, Esq., the Plaintiff's
attorney, whose address is POHL & SHORT, P.A.,
280 W. Canton Avenue, Suite 410, Post Office Box
3208, Winter Park, Florida 32790, on or before
May 17, 2010, and file the original with the clerk
of this court, Civil Division, 425 North Orange
Avenue, Room 310, Orlando, Florida 32801-1526,
either before service on the Plaintiff's attorney or
immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
DATED: April 9, 2010.
LYDIA GARDNER
CLERK OF COURTS
By: CORINE HENRY
As Deputy Clerk
In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities
Act, persons with disabilities needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding
should contact Court Administration, at 425 N.
Orange Avenue, Orlando, Florida 32801, telephone
(407) 836-2303, not later than two (2) days prior
to the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD)
1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V)1-800-955-8770,
via Florida Relay Service.
4/15, 4/22













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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 9th JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 09-CA-11396-0
DIVISION: #34
IRMA LAKES HOMEOWNERS' ASSOCIATION, INC.,
Plaintiff,
v.
MARISOL RUIZ; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MARI-
SOL RUIZ; and JOHN DOE and JANE DOE, as un-
known tenants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF RE-SCHEDULED SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Default
Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above
styled cause in the Circuit Court of Orange County,
Florida, the Clerk of Court will sell the property lo-
cated in Orange County, Florida, described as:
Lot 14, IRMA LAKES, as recorded in Plat Book
63, Page 125 through 133, of the Public Re-
cords of Orange County, Florida.
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for
cash, in the Orange County Courthouse, 425 N. Or-
ange Avenue, Room 350, Orlando, Florida 32801, at
11:00 a.m. on the 4th day of May, 2010. Any person
claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the property owner as of the date
of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to a Fi-
nal Judgment entered in this cause on August 26,
2009.
DATED this 28th day of January, 2010.

Matt G. Firestone, Esq.
Florida Bar No.: 381144
Pohl & Short, P.A.
280 W. Canton Avenue, Suite 410
Post Office Box 3208
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone (407) 647-7645
Facsimile (407) 647-2314
Attorneys for Plaintiff
In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities
Act, persons with disabilities needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding
should contact Court Administration, at 425 N.
Orange Avenue, Orlando, Florida 32801, telephone
(407) 836-2303, not later than two (2) days prior to
the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-
955-8771, or Voice (V)1-800-955-8770, via Florida
Relay Service.
4/8,4/15


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 2009-CA-030279-0
Division: 43A
HANCOCK BANK, as assignee of
PEOPLES FIRST COMMUNITY BANK,
Plaintiff,
v.
HEIDENESCHER HOMES, INC.; RICHARD E. HEIDEN-
ESCHER; and HEIDI L. HEIDENESCHER,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that on the 24th day of
June, 2010, at 11:00 a.m. in Room 350 of the
Courthouse of Orange County, Florida, 425 S. Or-
ange Avenue, Orlando FL 32801, the undersigned
Clerk will offer for sale the following described
real property:
Lots 3 and 52, BELLARIA, ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 60, PAGES 81 AND 82, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to the
Final Judgment of Foreclosure in Civil Case No.
2009-CA-32079-0; Division 43A, now pending in
the Circuit Court in Orange County, Florida.
In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities
Act, persons with disabilities needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding
should contact Court Administration at 37 North
Orange Avenue, Suite 1130, Orlando, Florida
32801, telephone number 407/836-2050, not later
than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If
hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice
(V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale.
Dated this 8th day of April, 2010.
By: ERIC B. JONTZ, Attorney
Florida Bar No. 64905


JEFFRY R. JONTZ
ERIC B. JONTZ
SWANN & HADLEY, P.A.
Post Office Box 1961
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 647-2777
Facsimile No.: (407) 647-2157


4/15,4/22


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FL
CASE NO.: 09-CA-27156-0
DIVISION: 43 A
GENERAL CIVIL DIVISION
SUNTRUST BANK,
Plaintiff,
v.
MO'MUZIK ENTERTAINMENT, INC., a Florida cor-
poration; JONATHAN BERNARD, IF A NAMED DE-
FENDANT IS DECEASED, THE SURVIVING SPOUSE,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, CREDITORS
AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER OR AGAINST THAT DEFENDANT(S) WHO
ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER
SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM
AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, AND ALL CLAIMANTS, PERSONS OR
PARTIES, NATURAL OR CORPORATE, OR WHOSE
EXACT STATUS IS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING UNDER
ANY OF THE ABOVE NAMED OR DESCRIBED
DEFENDANTS,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final
Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-
styled cause in the Circuit Court of Orange County,
Florida, Lydia Gardner, as Clerk of the Circuit Court
and County Courts in and for the Ninth Judicial
Circuit, will sell the property situate in Orange
County, Florida, described as:
Unit No. 5A of OLD WINTER GARDEN ROAD
COMMERCE CENTER, a Condominium, ac-
cording to The Declaration of Condominium
recorded in O.R. Book 7465, Page 2020, and
all exhibits and amendments thereof, Public
Records of Orange County, Florida.
at public sale, to the highest bidder for cash, on
April 30, 2010, at 11:00 a.m. at the Orange County
Courthouse, Room 350, 425 North Orange Avenue,
Orlando, Florida 32801.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
Dated: April 9, 2010.
CAREY, O'MALLEY, WHITAKER & MUELLER, P.A.
712 South Oregon Avenue
Tampa, Florida 33606-2516
Tel. 813-250-0577
Fax 813-250-9898
Attorneys for Plaintiff
By: _/s/Angela M. Covington

E. Ashley McRae
Florida Bar No. 157317
Angela M. Covington
Florida Bar No. 39625
CERTIFICATE OF SERVICE

I hereby certify that a conformed copy of the
foregoing has been filed electronically with
the Orange County Clerk of Courts by using the ECF
system; and furnished via regular U.S.Mail to Jona-
than Terrell Bernard, FCI Coleman Low, Federal
Correctional Institution, Register Number 27109-
018, P.O. Box 1031, Coleman, FL 33521; Mo'Muzik
Entertainment, Inc., 3231 Old Winter Garden Road,
Suite 5A, Orlando, FL 32805; Harold Jackson, c/o
Omega Recording Studios, 13800 Morning Frost
Dr., Orlando, FL 32828; Troy Taylor, 5218 Stacy
Street, No. 10, West Palm Beach, Florida 33417;
and Old Winter Garden Road Commerce Center
Condo Association, c/o Bruce C. Myrick, R A, 7748
Minnie Rouse Lane, Orlando FL 32835; all on this
9th day of April, 2010.
/s/
Angela M. Covington
Attorney
4/15,4/22


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 48-2009-CA-003919-0
Division: 35
TRUSTCO BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JULIO BOTEX; and ALTAGRACIA BOTEX,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that on the 10th day of
August, 2010, at 11:00 a.m. in Room 350 of the
Courthouse of Orange County, Florida, 425 S. Or-
ange Avenue, Orlando FL 32801, the undersigned
Clerk will offer for sale the following described real
property:
LOT 24, BLOCK 5, TANGELO PARK, SECTION
ONE, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT
THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK W
PAGE 100, PUBLIC RECORDS OF ORANGE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to the
Final Judgment of Foreclosure in Civil Case No.
48-2009-CA-003919-0; Division 35 now pending
in the Circuit Court in Orange County, Florida.
In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities
Act, persons with disabilities needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding
should contact Court Administration at 37 North Or-
ange Avenue, Suite 1130, Orlando, Florida 32801,
telephone number 407/836-2050, not later than
seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing
impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V)
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale.
Dated this 1st day of April, 2010.

By: ROBERT J. FRAXEDAS, Attorney
Florida Bar No. 20888
JEFFRY R. JONTZ
ERIC B. JONTZ
ROBERT J.FRAXEDAS
SWANN & HADLEY, P.A.
Post Office Box 1961
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 647-2777
Facsimile No.: (407) 647-2157
4/8,4/15


Notice of Public Auction
Pursuant to Ch 715.109 FS and/or 83.801 and/or
677.210 FS etal United American Lien & Recovery
as agent with power of attorney will sell at public
auction the following property(s) to the high- ,l l
est bidder subject to any liens for the purpose of
satisfying claim of lien and/or disposition of aban- S I l *lI
doned property(s); owner/lienholder may redeem
property(s) for cash sum of lien; all auctions held i i
in reserve
Inspect 1 week prior @ lien facility; cash or cashier g ,
check; 15% buyer prem; any persons interested ph
(954) 563-1999 r* *F

Sale date April 23, 2010 @ 10:00 am 3411 NW 9th
Ave #707 Ft Lauderdale FL 33309
1978 1974 Fern hs vin#: 60123965F tenant: karen
bfinnell S

Licensed & bonded auctioneers flab422 flau 765 ,* ~ I
& 1911
4/8,4/15 Ia


NOTICE OF SALE OF MOTOR VEHICLE
Pursuant to Florida Statute 713.585, Mid-Florida
Lien And Recovery, will sell at public sale for cash
the following described vehicles located at lienor's
place to satisfy a claim of lien. 2000 CHEVROLET
VIN: 1GNDX03E6YD223756. Lien Amt: $3478.55.
Lienor/AUTO CARE CLINIC 1208 S ELM AVENUE
SANFORD, FL 407-688-9399. 2002 FORD VIN: ESTATE S
1 FTNX21 FX2EC13866. Lien Amt: $4992.29. ES ATE S
Lienor/AAMCO TRANSMISSION.1563 S. HWY 1792 213-1482-W ??Furi
LONGWOOD, FL 407-339-3017. Sale Date: May D0ihes, Art Tots, etc. 1
03, 2010, 10:00 AM. At Mid Florida Lien & Recov- Orlado
ery 3001 Aloma Ave. Winter Park FL 32792. Said
vehicles may be redeemed by satisfying the lien
prior to sale date. You have the right to a hearing
at any time prior to sale date by filing a demand
for hearing in the circuit court. Owner has the right
to recover possession of vehicle by posting a bond
in accordance with F.S. 559.917. Any proceeds in
excess of the amount of the lien will be deposited
with the Clerk of Circuit Court in the county where
the vehicle is held.


lealnoic-


inThIbsrvr


Qick inepeniv

an m es all. stautr

-eqire ent



407-53-705


CITY OF WINTER PARK
401 Park Avenue South
Winter Park, Florida 32789
CITY OF WINTER PARK
NOTICE OF INTENT AND
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING


Notice is hereby given that the City of Winter Park intends to use the uniform method for collecting
special assessments within the platted area defined as Temple Grove (Plat Book 6 Page 87) and
Comstock Park (Plat Book K Page 87) as recorded in the public records of Orange County, Florida,
within the municipal boundaries of the City of Winter Park to fund the City's undergrounding of the
neighborhood electrical/Bright House Networks (BHN) facilities.
Notice is further given that the City Commission of the City of Winter Park, Florida will hold a Public
Hearing at the City Commission Chambers, City Hall, 401 Park Avenue South, Winter Park, Florida
32789 on May 10, 2010 to consider adoption of a Resolution expressing its intent to use the uniform
method for collecting the assessments levied against certain properties located within the Temple
Grove subdivision and Comstock Park subdivision.
"If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Commission with respect to any matter con-
sidered at such meeting or hearing, he/she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, he/she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based." (F.S. 286.0105)
"Persons with disabilities needing assistance to participate in any of these proceedings should contact
the City Clerk's office (407-599-3277) at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting.""
/s/
Cynthia S. Bonham, City Clerk
4/15, 4/22, 4/29, 5/6





VSTUOLN


OBSERVR. Ce


CITY OF WINTER PARK
401 Park Avenue South
Winter Park, Florida 32789


CITY OF WINTER PARK
PUBLIC NOTICE


Notice is hereby given that public hearings will be held by the City Commission of the City of Winter
Park, Florida, on Monday, April 26, 2010, at 3:30 p.m. in the Commission Chambers of City Hall, 401
Park Avenue, South, to consider the following:
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF WINTER PARK, FLORIDA, AUTHORIZING THE REFUNDING OF THE
OUTSTANDING PARKAVENUE IMPROVEMENT REVENUE BONDS, SERIES 1998, OF THE CITY; PROVID-
ING FOR THE ISSUANCE OF NOT EXCEEDING $3,000,000 PARK AVENUE REFUNDING IMPROVEMENT
REVENUE BONDS, SERIES 2010, OF THE CITY TO BE APPLIED TO FINANCE THE COST THEREOF;
PROVIDING FOR THE PAYMENT OF SUCH BONDS FROM LEGALLY AVAILABLE NON AD VALOREM
FUNDS OF THE CITY BUDGETED AND APPROPRIATED FOR SUCH PURPOSE; AND PROVIDING AN
EFFECTIVE DATE.
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF WINTER PARK, FLORIDA AMENDING CHAPTER 58, "LAND DEVELOP-
MENT CODE", ARTICLE I "COMPREHENSIVE PLAN" FUTURE LAND USE MAP SO AS TO CHANGE
THE FUTURE LAND USE DESIGNATION OF COMMERCIAL TO CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT ON THE
PROPERTY AT 301 WEST NEW ENGLAND AVENUE, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED HEREIN.
All interested parties are invited to attend and be heard. Additional information is available in the City
Clerk's office so that citizens may acquaint themselves with each issue and receive answers to any
questions they may have prior to the meeting. "If a person decides to appeal any decision made by
the Commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he/she will need
a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he/she may need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based." (F.S. 286.0105) Persons with disabilities needing assistance to participate
in any of these proceedings should contact the City Clerk's office (407-599-3277) at least 48 hours
in advance of the meeting.
/s/
Cynthia S. Bonham, City Clerk
4/15


17







Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Thursday, April 15, 2010 Page 21


TheMarketplace


Need A PROPERTY MANAGER?
If you need a Property Manager, we can
HELP! We will Secure a qualified tenant,
handle full accounting, act as a liason for
Tenant/Services, Inspect premises on regu-
lar basis. Call Tami Klein at 407-538-4688

Suzy M. Barnes, Realtor
321-277-2182




SOMEONE WILL BUY OR RENT
ME NOW! ONLY $229,000. JUST
REDUCED OR $1400.00 RENT.
Lowest Priced Home in Waterbridge. Near
Schools and Hospital. Now is the Time to get
a Tremendous Deal. Call Now to See. 407
222-6763 Linda Ramey, Coldwell Banker
Residential Real Estate
(4/8, 4/15, 4/22, 4/29, 5/6, 5/13, 5/22,
5/27)


AZALEA IN THE WOOD
HISTORIC HOME On Little Lake Fairview,
the setting has wonderful oak trees, with
approx. 2.5 acres and lake frontage of
163'. The main house has 3,882 sq.ft. with
three bedrooms downstairs and three up-
stairs. Two guest apartments. $1,450,000

Winter Park Land Company
407-644-2900
www.winterparkland.com


Canton Ave
Best kept secret in Winter Park! 5th floor
end unit with numerous upgrades. 2 bed-
rooms, 2 baths plus glassed sun room with
storage. One block to Park Avenue shops
and restaurants. Great opportunity to own
in Downtown Winter Park. $329,000

Winter Park Land Company
407-644-2900
www.winterparkland.com


FOR SALE
441 E. Kings Way
$1,195,000 I 4 BR/3 BA, 4,189 SF Olde Winter
Park pool home.
Kelly Price
407-645-4321
kelly@kellypriceandcompany.com



FOR SALE
1461 Palm Avenue, Winter Park
1,474 sqft. 3 beds/1 bath pool home, Updated
kitchen with granite and SS appliances, Original
wood floors, updated bathroom, double pane
windows and plantations shutters, Sun Room, &
screen patio. $275,000.
Megan Cross, REALTOR
407.353.9997
Megan@fanniehillman.com


1101 Park Ave, Winter Park
Location plus! Downtown on Park Ave. Loads of
charm and move-in condition. Just steps to golf
course and shopping. $799,000.
John McDade, REALTOR
407.721.7275
john@fanniehillman.com


1107 Shady Lane, Maitland
Magnificent 5000+ s.f. in beautiful Maitland
Forest. 5 bed / 5.5 bath home boosts wood floors,
gourmet kitchen, a fireplace, screened pool. The
WP/Maitland schools are top notch. $979,000
Bill Adams, REALTOR
407.463-9560
bill@fanniehillman.com


141 Trismen Terr.
$1,595,000 I 4 BR/3 BA, 4,748 SF with Fabulous
views of Lake Virginia.
Pam Birthisel
407-645-4321
www.KellyPriceAndCompany.com


1531 Sunset Drive, Winter Park
Light & bright, custom 2-story pool home on brick
street! Downstairs Master. Family room w/fireplace
opens to patio & pool! 3 Bedrooms upstairs +
bonus room! $549,000.
Ruth Anne Arch, Realtor
407-761-2799
www.oldetownbrokers.com


1739 Sunset Drive, Winter Park
New construction in "Olde Winter Park". Green
home completed in 2009! This 2,600 square foot
home offers 4 bedrooms, 3 full baths and 1 half
bath. Truly a gorgeous, quality built, efficient green
home! For Sale-$755,000 I For Rent-$3,500/mo.
Linda Ivey, Realtor
407-619-0200.
lindaivey2@aol.com


100 Destiny Cove
4/3, 3384SF in gated Spring Lake Hills with lake
access. Beautifully updated. Spectacular screened
pool, gourmet kitchen and luxurious master suite.
Great value at $449,000.
Bill Adams
407.463-9560
bill@fanniehillman.com


1558 Indian Dance Ct.
$584,900 I 5 BR / 3 BA I 2,952 SF, Oaks of
Maitland pool home.
Patrick Higgins
407.645.4321
www.KellyPriceAndCompany.com


1192 Valley Creek Run
$229,500 I 3 BR / 2 BA, 1,993 SF, Adorable Lost
Creek home.
Julie Bombardo
407.645.4321
www.KellyPriceAndCompany.com


I IU L K.e llule Ui .
$1,349,000 I 4 BR / 4 BA, 4,042 SF Rose Isle
lakefront pool home.
Catherine D'Amico
407-645-4321
www.KellyPriceAndCompany.com


851 Georgia Ave
$3,500,000 4 BR 3 BA 14,314 SF, Prestigious
Winter Park estate.
Cyn Watson
407.645.4321
www.KellyPriceAndCompany.com


1431 Mayfield Ave.
$569,000 I 5 BR / 2.5 BA, 2,661 SF, Two-story
Winter Park pool home.
Gwyn Clark
407.645.4321
www.KellyPriceAndCompany.com


620 Darcey Dr.
$359,900 I 4 BR / 2 BA, 2,068 SF, Renovated in
Brookshire Heights.
Pamela Birthisel
407.645.4321
www.KellyPriceAndCompany.com


West Cove Condo, Condo on Lake Maitland
Units range from lovely 2 bdrm 1200 SF unit up
to 2500 SF penthouse. Condo features pool/spa,
picnic area, marina, fitness center, clubhouse.
$289,900-$599,000.
JoAnn Beck, REALTOR
407-629-6369


2400 Versailles Ave. WP
"Adorable" and "pristine". Located on a canopied
dead-end street. 1,324 Square feet with 3
bedrooms and 2 baths. Property has been updated
from the original and newly carpeted and painted.
For Sale $155,000. Offered by Gould + Company
Real Estate Solutions.
Brenda Cole, Realtor
407-927-1863
brendacolebc@comcast.net


1010 Elizabeth Drive, Winter Park
Private retreat within minutes to Park Ave. Custom
4bed 2full+ 2 half baths. Large screened and heat-
ed pool. Great home for entertaining. $699,000.
John McDade, REALTOR
407.721.7275
john@fanniehillman.com


486 Penny Lane
Gated Maitland neighborhood. Light open floor
plan. Large corner lot backs to conservation area.
Plantation shutters, ten foot ceilings. Affordable
$299,000.
John McDade, REALTOR
407.721.7275
john@fanniehillman.com


FIRST FLORIDA LENDING
Take Advantage of Historically Low Mortgage
Rates. Call Sue TODAY!
Sue Haan Jacobs
407-647-5323


FOR SALE
1601 Palm Ave
1,876 sqft. 3 beds, 3 baths plus an office, open
kitchen to family room, 2 car garage, screen patio,
roof (09), plumbing (05), double pane windows,
freshly painted inside and out. Brick street & Large
lot 84x136. Move in ready. $299,000.
Mary Stuart Day, REALTOR
407.620.8683
marystuart@fanniehillman.com


311 E. Morse Blvd. 1-3, Winter Park
LAKEFRONT on Lake Osceola. Updated with two
bedrooms and two baths Plus Large Office. Master
has a walk-in-closet. Includes 2 parking spaces.
2nd Floor.......Reduced to $569,000.
Janis B. Fuller, REALTOR
407.247.7314
janis@fanniehillman.com


541 Central Ave., Maitland
3/2 home is located in Maitland, Lake Lily area.
1950's home has been continuously updated and
maintained. The backyard is a paradise featuring:
summer kitchen, TVistereo, bar, salt-water
pool, fireplace and areas for entertaining. Filled
upgrades and move-in condition.
Tami Klein, Realtor
407-538-4688
tami@tamiklein.com


Alabama on Lake Maitland
Absolutely beautiful 2/2 with hardwood floors.
Great storage, inside laundry and walk-in closet.
A great lifestyle and pets are welcome. 3rd Floor
unit, only $330,000
Janis B. Fuller, REALTOR
407.247.7314
janis@fanniehillman.com




help wante


311 E. Morse Blvd. 6-10, Winter Park
2/2 with open kitchen. Screened porch with
view of pool and slight view of Lake Osceola.
Underground garage, laundry in unit. 3rd floor.
Pets allowed. Reduced to $275,000
Janis B. Fuller, REALTOR
407.247.7314
janis@fanniehillman.com


4811 Saxon Drive, #B401, New Smyrna Beach
Walk out to seasonally heated pool and beach
at Seaward Condos. Terrific 3 bedroom, 2 bath
on ground level. 100 Yards from back porch to
the wide, white sand beach. Newly redecorated
and ready to move-in. Great rental unit! For Sale
-$349,000.
Lisa Gould, Realtor
407-721-7612
lisa@gouldandcompany.net


LOOKING FOR A SECURE RETIREMENT?
EARN EXTRA INCOME TO:* Get out of debt* In-
crease you savings* Earn ongoing residual income
* Work Part-Time from home. Potential to make
$500/$1000 or even $5000 a month. PLEASE
CALL 1-800-221-3872 listen to a pre-recorded
message.
Carlos Astacio
800-221-3872
castacio@saferforyourhome.com


"Copyrighted Material





bSyndicated Content




able from Commercial News Providers'


WINTER PARK VILLAGE

Finished ground floor office space for lease


3500 square feet next to Guitar Center

Excellent visibility and access

$15 psf Gross

George Brusco, CCIM
Casto Southeast Realty Services LLC

941.552.2705


www.castolp.com


I^^^ro


Brokers protected


REAL.ESTA E
Brut i nue J


Ionti nueI


4w 0 40#mwm






Page 22 Thursday, April 15, 2010 Winter Park / Maitlanci Obseiver


Culture
worthy of your calendar








Outdoor art,

dance art, sci-fi art

and 'heavenly' art


Friday night Art Stroll
Now that our weather
has returned to "Florida
normalcy," and we are
all seeking any reason to
spend time outdoors, the
Baldwin Park Merchants
Association is stepping up
to present the Art Stroll of
Baldwin Park. The Stroll be-
gins Friday night, April 16,
on New Broad Street from
6-9 p.m. The free event fea-
tures work by artists from
Central Florida including
painters creating artwork
on the sidewalk, original art
for sale and live music. The
Stroll provides a great way
to visit this new Orlando
community while enjoy-
ing the best weather of the
whole year. For more infor-


mation, call curator Brad
Biggs at 407-247-4552 or e-
mail bbiggs214@aol.com

Two chances to meet artist
Michael Whelan
Over three decades artist/
illustrator Michael Whelan
has created more than 350
book and album covers for
authors and artists, from
Isaac Asimov to Meatloaf.
The renowned illustrator is
scheduled to speak at the
Winter Park Public Library
on Saturday, April 17 at
11 a.m., while his illustra-
tions are on display at the
Albin Polasek Museum &
Sculpture Gardens, 633 Os-
ceola Ave. in Winter Park,
just down the street from


the Library. Part of the Mu-
seum's exhibit "Maidens
and Monsters: the Art of
Science Fiction, Adventure
and Fantasy," Whelan will
then be the honored guest
at the Polasek Museum on
Sunday, April 18 from 1-4
p.m. for the exhibit's clos-
ing reception. Since 1980,
Michael Whelan has won
an unprecedented 15 Hugo
Awards (Science Fiction's
Oscar), three World Fantasy
Awards, and the SuperHugo
as the Best Artist of the last
50 years. He is a member of
the Science Fiction Hall of
Fame and has also won a
gold medal from the Soci-
ety of Illustrators, a Vargas
Award and a Grumbacher
gold medal. Call 407-647-
6294 or visit www.polasek.
org for more details.

The Orlando Ballet goes
'classical'
The Orlando Ballet, which
has consistently thrilled
and surprised us in its first
full season with new Artis-
tic Director Rob Hill, will
end the current season by
showing off their classi-
cal side with a full-length
fantasy, pirate-themed
adventure called "Le Cor-
saire." With performances
April 23, 24, and 25 at the
Bob Carr Performing Arts
Centre, this dramatic love


story has all the memo-
rable dancing of other
great classical ballets, but
is rarely performed 'full-
length.' Gala goers will
know the "Corsaire pas de
deux" and "The Kingdom
of the Shades," one of the
most hauntingly beautiful
dances in all of ballet his-
tory. Vengeful pirates, ha-
rem girls and a kidnapped
princess make for a great
ballet story. Choreographed
by Robert Hill, after Marius
Petipa, this is also a great
way for the company to
show off the technical abili-
ties of the dancers. Tickets
for Friday, April 23 at 8 p.m.;
Saturday, April 24 at 8 p.m.
or Sunday, April 25 at 2 p.m.
may be purchased at 407-
426-1739 or visit Ticket-
master.com.

Xanadu ... the heavenly
musical
If one of your guilty plea-
sures is the cult 1980s mov-
ie Xanadu (which starred
Olivia Newton-John and
Gene Kelly), then prepare
yourself for the roller disco
love fest that is Xanadu the
musical. Xanadu makes
its Orlando premiere at
the Bob Carr on April 27
and plays through May 2.
I saw it on Broadway, and
the show is fall-out-of-
your-chair funny. With the


ingenue giving us most of
her performance on roller
skates, the show was called
"Heaven on wheels" by The
New York Times. This very
funny, roller skating musi-
cal adventure is set in the
year 1980. It's the story of
a magical 'Greek muse,'
who descends from heaven
to inspire great artistic
achievement and ends up
giving us the roller disco!
The heavenly creature then
falls in (forbidden) love
with a human and supreme
intervention is needed.
The score includes the hits,
"Magic," "Xanadu," "Party
All Over the World" and
"I'm Alive" all top 20 hits
(in the '80s). I highly rec-
ommend this show. Tickets
can be purchased at the
downtown box office, Am-
way Arena Box Office and
all Ticketmaster locations.
Call 1-800-982-2787 or
visit www.OrlandoBroad-
way.com.


TALKGARRICK

Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer,
educator, and fine art curator. He is a
member of the Curatorial Council for the
Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be
reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com
or 407-522-3906.


(ff9IEDO
OVIEDO-WINTER SPRINGS REGIONAL
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

SATURDAY, APRIL 17 FROM 10AM TO 6PM

OVIEDO BLVD
**Complimentary shuttle service from Oviedo Marketplace**


Featuring: Arts & Crafts, Regional Business Expo,
Area Cuisine, Beer &Wine, Entertainment, Kids'Taste,
Citrus & Celery Cookoff, Exotic Car Show plus much more!


Thank you to our sponsors
BAREFOOT WINE CAFI MOTORSPORT* CITIZENS BANK OF FLORIDA
CITIZENS FINANCIAL PARTNERS CITY OF OVIEDO *
CLEARCHNNEL OUTDooR CREATIVE PRINTING
DENTISTRY FOR CHILDREN DUDA ELEET TECHNOLOGIES GEICO
MIX 105.1 OnRLNDO SENTINEL OVIEDO-WINTER SPRINGS LIFE
PUBUX SELECT MAGAZINE SEMINOLE CHRONICLE SEMINOLE VOICE
SUNNY 105.9 WAYNE DENSCH WFTV CHANNEL 9 ZEPHYRHILLS WATER

For information about booths, sponsorships or attending, please visit
www.TasteofOviedo.org or call 407-278-4871


Page 22 Thursday, April 15, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer





Thursday, April 15, 2010 Page 23


Cinema


A showcase of this
week's releases, and
a look ahead to
upcoming movies.


Coming April


30

n1


'Nightmare on Elm
Street'

Coming May 7


'Babies'


Coming May 14


'Letters to Juliet'


SAT, APRIL 17 AT 8PM
MARDI GRAS-INSPIRED PARTY
CAJUN FOOD DANCING *YOU AND YOUR FRIENDS
LIVE MUSIC* GIVEAWAYS
Buy TicketsNowatwww.FloridaFilmFestival.com


FLORIDA
FILM FESTIVAL 201

APRIL -APRIL 18 ruL


8( -- channels BEr
FX local channels included* --
WVf F r CBS te t FOX 0 1 E : Anm a MJ
And many more o your favorite independent
channels in select markets n rl/w
For a Limited time get: And many mo


FREE
FOR 3 MONTHS^
Get 21 movie channels!
stiz oWIIMEn
12 ChanneLs 9 ChanneLs
Over $70 Value!


2 FREE
UPGRADES
HD DVR & HD RECEIVER


service address BILLCREDIT/PROGRAMMINGOFFER:Free SH TIEormonths avaueo$3897reeStarzandSHOWTIMEormonths avalueof$72 LIMITONEPROGRAMMINGOFFERPER
ACCOUNT Featured package names and prices: CHOCE$599/mo CHOCEXTRA$6399/mo CHOCE ULTIMATE $699/mo Upon DIRECTVSystemactivation,customerwill receive redemption
instructions (included in customer's first DIRECTV bill, a separate mailing, or, in the state of New York, from retailer)and must comply with the terms of the instructions. In order
to receive full credit, customer must submit rebate online and consent to emailalerts prior to rebate redemption. Online redemption requires valid emailaddress. Rebate begins 68
weeks after receipt of rebate form online or by mail Timing of promotional price depends on redemption date Account must be in good standing, as determined by DIRECTV in its sole discretion, to
remaineigible RECTVisnotresponsibleforlate ost, iegible,mutiated incomplete, misdrectedorpostagedue maiIFBYTHEENDOFPROMOTIONAL PRICEPERIOD(S)CUSTOMERDOESNOT
CONTACT DIRECTVTO CHANGE SERVICE THEN ALL SERVICES WILL AUTOMATICALLY CONTINUE AT THE THEN-PREVAILING RATES INCLUDING THE $5/M0. LEASE FEE FOR THE 2ND AND
EACH ADDITIONAL RECEIVER. IRECTV System has a eaure whchrestricts access tochannes n certain markets, programming/pricing mayvary INSTANT REBATE:Second dvancedproduc
offerforqualfiedcustomersonlywhoselect an H VRor H Receiver as thefirst freeequipment upgrade Advancedequipment instant rebaterequiresactivationof theCHOICEXTRApackageorabove
MASULTRAorabove Jadeworld oranyqualfying international servicebundle, whichshall include the PREFERRED CHOICEprogramming package [valuedat $3899/mo] } VRservice [$7/mo] required
for IVR and HD IVR lease HD Access fee [$i 10/mo ] required for HD and HD IVR lease LIMIT TWO ADVANCED EQUIPMENT REBATES PER DIRECTVACCOUNT INSTALLATION: Standard professional
nstalationonly Custom instaationextra SYSTEM LEASEPurchaseof24consecuivemonthsofanyDIRECTVbaseprogrammngpackage $2999/mo orabo quafy internaionalservces
bundle required FAILURE TOACTIVATE IN ACCORDANCEWITH THE EQUIPMENT LEASEADDENDUM MAY RESULT IN ACHARGE OF $150 PER RECEIVER. IF SERVICE IS TERMINATED BEFORE
THE END OF COMMITMENT, A CANCELLATION FEE OF $20/MONTH REMAINING WILLAPPLY. ALL EQUIPMENT IS LEASED AND MUST BE RETURNED TO DIRECTV UPON CANCELLATION, OR
UNRETURNED EQUIPMENT FEESAPPLY.Programming pricingermsandconditionssubjecttochangetanytimePricing residentiaTaxesnotincluded Receiptof IRECTVprogrammingsubjectto


FREE
PRO INSTALL
IN UP TO 4 ROOMS
JL.. M


I 754,,, wih aifioao&


Winter Park / Maitland Observer







Page 24 Thursday, April 15, 2010 Winter Park / Maitland Observer


CHAMBER OF COMMERCE


7-/-L k^ YbtfiJ r Y^-i Cr iLi^LC e Stf^ /
The businesses, organizations and individuals below have chosen to support your local Chamber
of Commerce in 2010 by renewing their membership. Please join us in thanking them for their
investment in our community the next time you shop, dine, or call on their business.


*310 Park South
AccuMap Surveying, LLC
ANTeater Pest & Lawn Services
AT&T
+Bank of America
Barefoot Wine
*Barnie's Coffee & Tea Company
Beverly's PureWorks
Boy Scouts of America C. Fla. Council
Carey Hand Cox-Parker Funeral Home
The Center for Independent Living
Central Florida Fair
Chateau E.I.E.I.O., Inc.
Chez Vincent Restaurant
Citizens Bank of Florida
City Communications
Commercial Business Finance
Consumer Debt Counselors, Inc.
Craig L. Ludin, CPA
Creative Influence, Inc.
Croissant Gourmet
J. Blair Culpepper
+*Current
Jere Daniels
David Lundberg Building & Roofing Contractor
+Sarah Grafton Devoe
DEX/Publisher of the Embarq Yellow Pages
+The Doggie Door
Elizabeth Morse Genius Foundation
Evergreen Park Apartments
Fiddler's Green
Florida Institute of Research
Florida Institute of Technology
Florida Restaurant &odng Assocation
Full Sail University
The Herring Group
The Jander Grou. Inc.


Johnny Mag Sax Musical Services
Kathleen Flammia, PA
Keller Outdoor, Inc.
Laptops Plus
Latham, Shuker, Eden & Beaudine, LLP
Law Offices of Todd Long
*Lilly Pulitzer
M &I Bank
Betty Jo MacKenzie
Mark Lang & Associates
*Martin M. Prague, CPA, PA
Massey Communications
Mattamy Homes
Matthews Roberts, Inc.
Miller's Hardware, Inc.
Morgan Stanley Smith Barney
+Morse Museum of American Art
Hon. Michael Murphy
Mystic Granite & Marble
Nelson's Tents & Events
Orange County Supervisor of Elections
*Orchid Thai Cuisine, LLC
Orlando Brewing, Inc.
Orlando Coca Cola Bottling Comp
Orlando Psychiatric Center


Seawright & Associates, Inc.
SESCO Lighting, Inc.
Sprinkles Cakes
Sun State Ford
+SunTrust Bank
Thorne & Storey, PA
**Thread
Threshold, Inc.
Track Shack of Orlando
Trinity Preparatory School
Allen Trovitlion
Tsunami Custom Printina


)F WINTER PARK


Presented by:


CenturyLink-


Wednesday, April 21
5:00 8:00 p.m.
Winter Park Farmers' Market
200 W. New England Ave.

Featuring:
Unlimited Samples from 30+
Food & Beverage Participants


Live Entertainment by
Johnny Mag Sax


All Inclusive Tickets:
$40 in advance
(Winter Park Chamber members)
$45 Non-Members
$45 At the Door

For tickets or information,
visit www.winterpark.org
or call (407) 644-8281

Must be 21 years or older to attend.
AMEX/Visa/MasterCard/Discover
accepted in advance.


Page 24 Thursday, April 15, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


L~CO~YL~YLS EL~ZL~




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