Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091444/00079
 Material Information
Title: Winter Park-Maitland observer
Alternate Title: Winter Park Maitland observer
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 44 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: G.J.W. Munster
Place of Publication: Winter Park FL
Publication Date: March 25, 2010
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Winter Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Maitland (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Orange County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Winter Park
United States -- Florida -- Orange -- Maitland
Coordinates: 28.596111 x -81.346667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with v. 1, no. 1, Jan. 26, 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 29 (July 16, 1992).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00091444
Volume ID: VID00079
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 26271684
lccn - sn 92000170
issn - 1064-3613

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Winter Park / Maitland


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PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE OBSERVER
An office building stands empty along South Keller Road, Maitland, part of a growing problem of unfilled leases in the city's
largest economic corridor. The Maitland Center has topped 17 percent vacancies this year, eclipsing much of Central Florida.

How Maitland Center's vacancy rates could impact the city


ABRAHAM ABORAYA
GUEST REPORTER
It's Monday at 1:15 p.m. Less
than a dozen cars are in the
parking lot and only three
people are eating lunch in-
side Caf6 Marty.
The small strip mall off
of Keller Road in the Mait-
land Center, the commer-
cial heart of Maitland, is on
the verge of a ghost town.
There's Cafe Marty Hol-
lie's Nail and Spa and Keller
Cleaners open for business.
Beyond that, there's an
empty Quizno's and half a
dozen empty storefronts,
all with signs advertising
their availability for rent.
It's a microcosm of Mait-


land Center's larger prob-
lem: Vacancy rates are edg-
ing more than 17 percent
in the commercial park,
higher than any other place
in Maitland.
"Absolutely, it absolute-
ly does concern me," says
Marty Krever, the owner
of Caf6 Marty, behind the
register. "We need to get
these buildings full and get
people working. On a day-
to-day basis, I rely on these
businesses for my business.
If they're not filling up, if
the economy doesn't turn
around, people are brown
bagging it and not going
out to lunch as much as
they used to."
During the last quarter,


15.6 percent of Maitland's
commercial properties sat
empty citywide. But Mai-
tland Center, the sprawl-
ing, 6 million-square-foot
office park in the west end
of the city, edged higher at
17.3 percent, according to
Maitland commercial real
estate firm NAI Realvest.
It's disconcerting to
some at the city level be-
cause Maitland's tax base is
two-thirds commercial to
one-third residential, and
Maitland Center is the big-
gest part of that commer-
cial base. It's led some to
speculate that, ifoccupancy
rates continue to decline,

> turn to CENTER on PAGE 5


Census skips

seniors

KRISTY VICKERY
GUEST REPORTER

A four-page list contains
more than 200 names of
Winter Park seniors who
have yet to receive their
2010 census forms, and it's
still growing.
That has many at the May-
flower Retirement Commu-
nity worried that they won't
be counted, as the April 1
deadline to submit the form
has come and gone.
"About half of the resi-
dents here just didn't get one
sent to them yet," Mayflower
resident Janet Donahue, 83,
said. "And that kind of leaves
us up the creek."
Betty Nelson, Mayflower
community services direc-
tor, said the percentage of
residents that are still await-
ing their forms in the mail
could be even higher than
half, and the Mayflower is
doing all it can to get those
residents accounted for.
The residents on the list
will get a visit from a district
representative, who will
come bearing forms, as well
as help them to fill it out.
Orange County Complete
Count Community Liaison
Tiana Davis said she is not
sure why this happened to
the Mayflower Retirement
Community, but believes
it could have been because
they got termed as "group
quarters," a place that hous-
es a specific group of people,
which therefore gets count-

> turn to CENSUS on PAGE 7


Maitland org to raffle off BMW

New Hope for Kids, which counsels grieving families, hosts fundraiser on April 16


KAREN McENANY-PHILLIPS
OBSERVER STAFF
Danielle Scherrer was born
with three holes in her heart,
but 11 years later the suicide
of her "Uncle Freddy" left a
gaping hole no heart sur-
geon could mend.
Fred Rice, the ex-husband
of Danielle's mother, Mi-
chelle, "loved her like a sec-
ond dad since she was a tod-
dler," Michelle said. Danielle
and Michelle experienced
sadness and guilt for being
unable to prevent Rice from


taking his own life in Sep-
tember 2007.
Danielle attended a six-
week counseling program
at school but was asked not
to discuss the circumstances
of Rice's death for fear of up-
setting other children. She
grew sullen and angry.
"Her grades were slip-
ping," said Michelle, "I was
losing her."
Then a coworker told Mi-
chelle about The Center for
Grieving Children in Mait-

> turn to NEW HOPE on PAGE 2


O Pa' H' OP E




PHOTO BY KAREN McENANY-PHILLIPS -THE OBSERVER
A shiny new BMW 128i, donated by Fields BMW, sits in the front yard of New Hope for
Kids' Center for Grieving Children in Maitland. The car is being given away on April 16.


Community Bulletin ........6
Calendar of Events .......8
City Talks ................10
Cinem a ................... 13
Josh Garrick ..............15
Home Magnifier ...........19
Marketplace/Games......23


0 94922 95642 2









NEW HOPE I Families who have lost loved ones are encouraged to attend biweekly grief sessions


< continued from front page 2

land, part of the New Hope
for Kids non-profit organi-
zation, which provides free
grief support services to
children and their families.
The Center will host a
fundraiser and will auction
off a new 2010 BMW 128i
courtesy of Fields BMW on
Friday, April 16. Tickets are
$100 and two tickets are
$150.
The grief center is in
a vintage two-story gold

MEMO=S


stucco home surrounded by
beautiful landscaping, shel-
tering trees and a screened
front porch, rather than be-
ing housed in a sterile office.
The home puts families at
ease with comfy sofas, hard-
wood floors, flowers and
area rugs.
"After the first visit, Dan-
ielle asked 'How soon can
we come back?'" Michelle
said. "Once Danielle real-
ized she could finally talk
about what happened, she
couldn't stop."
Program Director Tamari
Miller also knows grief. She
was 17 when her mother
died of cancer. "Grief is ta-
boo in our society; no one
talks about death until it
happens, then people don't
know what to say. However
it is a journey you can't walk
alone," she said.
Miller has helped more
than 2,500 families and
3,300 children in the past
decade. Families meet bi-
weekly and break into age
groups 3-6 years, 7-12 years,
13-18 years and adult. The
children sit on the floor in a
circle, introduce themselves
and name the loved one
who died. A grief beach ball
covered with questions is
tossed about, and children
are encouraged to answer


whatever question the ball
lands on. Then each child
chooses an activity room.
"We have rooms for arts
and crafts, dress up, paint-
ing, air hockey and a sand
room as well as our hurri-
cane room," said CoryJohns,
Marketing and Volunteer
Programs manager.
Most rooms have wall
murals, stuffed animals and
pillows to hug. "Our walls
upstairs are covered floor to
ceiling with their artwork,
which is very therapeutic.
The youngest children often
cannot express themselves
in words. But they may bury
a plastic dinosaur, police car
or ambulance in the sand."
Families are encouraged
to commit to a year of bi-
weekly visits. Miller said
some families stay longer.
"It isn't just about coping
with grief; it is learning how
to get through it." There will
always be members along
the journey to give encour-
agement to newer mem-
bers, Miller said.
Danielle's favorite room
was the hurricane room.
Named for its blue padded
floors and walls and signa-
ture punching bag, kids can
vent aggression.
New Hope for Kids,
formerly Children's Wish


Foundation, grants wishes
to children with life-threat-
ening illnesses and also op-
erates the largest indepen-
dent grief support center in
Florida.
After completing the pro-
gram many decide to volun-
teer, such as Michelle Scher-
rer, who lost her job last
year. Michelle helps with
office duties, snack prepa-
ration, activities and art
projects. Executive Direc-
tor David Joswick is proud
of their work. "It is truly a
team effort everyone is
committed to the mission
of helping these kids and
their families."
Danielle and Michelle
celebrate Fred's memory on
his birthday by watching his
favorite movie, eating his
favorite foods and releasing
pink and green balloons -
Danielle's favorite color is
pink and green celebrates
"Uncle Freddy the Frog".
Danielle recently graduated
from the center's program
after two years. Her mom
proudly reports that Dan-
ielle prevented a classmate's
suicide and wants to be a
grief facilitator.
New Hope hosts three
key fundraisers per year
supported by Art of the Vine
organizations such as Fields


BMW Winter Park. General
Manager John Mantione,
who has been involved from
the beginning, said, "New
Hope helps families thrown
in the most horrific condi-
tions when a loved one is
lost. They are extraordinary
people doing extraordinary
work, and we continue to
support it the best we can."
Joswick says the center
always needs volunteers for
events and summer camp.
He is currently seeking as-
sistance to resurface the
center's parking lot.
"The grieving process is
like a roller coaster you're
never sure which crazy turn
is going to spin you around.
You appreciate the highs
but you know the lows are
lurking," Miller said.


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Shred-Fest


Protect your identity and free up your space at Dorman Finaal Manageent

and BankFIRST's document shredding event being held at BankFIRST's i

Winter Park location. Bring in your old important documents to\ red and enjoy

snacks and refreshments. Plus, participate in these two exciting contests



* Register to win your own personal shredder just for attending he event.

* Bring the oldest document to be shredded and win a gift as

iy 'pal .


Page 2 Thursday, April 8, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer






Thursday, April 8,2010 Page 3


Lighting the path to employment

More than 70 percent of blind people are unemployed; Lighthouse project will create jobs for them


KATIE ADAMS
OBSERVER STAFF
Getting a job is a major
hurdle for blind people, but
Lighthouse Central Florida
is working to change that.
Lighthouse President
and CEO Lee Nasehi and
the staff at Lighthouse have
been working on a project
to employ the visually im-
paired a group that has a
70 percent unemployment
rate, Nasehi said.
Six months ago, they
brought in Russ Hauck, for-
mer executive director of
the National Simulation
Center, to get it running.
"We want to start our
own lines of business that
we will own and operate,
that will employ vision-im-
paired people," Hauck said.
Lighthouse Central Flor-


ida Vision Rehabilitation
Resources is the only non-
profit agency offering free
professional rehabilitation
services in Central Florida.
Serving about 1,000 people
each year, it helps those
with vision loss learn new
ways to approach tasks and
daily living, in everything
from discerning salt and
pepper to using computer
programs.
For many years, the or-
ganization has helped con-
nect its clients with existing
employers, but by the end of
the year, it hopes to become
one of those employers.
Employees would pro-
vide services and produce
office supplies and other
products for federal and
state governments, with
jobs available for a range of
skill and interest levels.


They're referring to the
new project as Lighthouse
Works! and are currently
seeking a new building to
facilitate the growth and
change it will bring.
Program Services Direc-
tor Lee Van Eepoel said they
brought Hauck on board to
explore the development of
new industries, to market
their new vocational and
employment services and
to do major higher level job
development, meeting and
building relationships with
area employers so they can
identify potential job place-
ment opportunities on a
larger scale. Hauck is a Navy
veteran and former mayor
of Altamonte Springs. His
experience with politics
and legislation has helped
Lighthouse Works! progress
quickly.


"We're all scrambling to
learn and educate ourselves,
and now we're rolling out
these new vocational pro-
grams. At the same time,
Russ has been making prog-
ress with the products we
plan to potentially pursue
for industries," she said.
"Agency-wide, we're turn-
ing the page and starting a
whole new adventure. This
is the most exciting thing
that I think has ever hap-
pened in our field since I've
been here."
Lighthouse's satellite of-
fice in Avalon Park is cur-
rently the hub of employ-
ment services. Lighthouse
was given an American Re-
covery and Reinvestment
Act contract stimulus award
through Florida's division
of blind services in March,
which pays for job develop-


PHOTO BY KATIE ADAMS
Russ Hauck was hired by Lighthouse
to help develop the program that will em-
ploy the visually impaired.

ment, placement specialists
and job readiness training.
"For us, it's all about em-
ploying people," Nasehi
said.


TW E Robert L. Bush, 65, of Orlando, be held April 8 at Ivey Funeral
Fla., passed away Saturday, April Home Chapel in Bainbridge, Ga.
BME M BE R 3, 2010 at Winter Park Memorial Online visitors may sign the guest
R UE M E M B E R 0 e Hospital. The funeral service will register at www.iveyfuneral.com.


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additional monthly fee. Performance will vary due to conditions outside of network control and no speed is guaranteed. Consistent speed claim as well as claim that your connection to Century Link's network is 100% yours is based on Century Link providing HSI subscribers with a dedicated, virtual-circuit connection
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Winter Park / Maitland Observer










Wildcats go nationwide in sports

Basketball falls a game short of national championship, while track dominates and baseball struggles


ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF
Twenty-six points of scor-
ing magic by Austin Rivers
wasn't enough to carry his
Winter Park basketball team
to a national championship
on Friday. They fell to Mont-
verde 62-56 in the semifinal
round.
The Wildcats had wowed
the organizers of the Na-
tional High School Invita-
tional, which invited only
eight teams nationwide for
the tournament.
The Cats entered the
tournament with a bang,
knocking off North Caro-
lina's Christ School 82-72 in
the first round. Montverde
had barely defeated Mon-
trose Christian 51-49 to ad-
vance to face Winter Park.
Montverde entered the
tournament as easily the
physically largest team,
sporting two monster cen-
ters that are 7 feet tall or
taller.
But the Wildcats had
led for much of the game,
as much as 8 points ahead








B e .u
fan on.







Lace bool
Witr ak-atln


of Montverde, but they
watched a horrifying chain
of events swing the score
around. A dunk, a steal, a
layup, a steal and a shot from
outside the arc changed the
score by 7 points in a matter
of seconds.
Suddenly the Wildcats
were playing catch-up. The
swing in morale proved
devastating, as the Wildcats'
scoring mojo seemed to go
out the door. In the final
seven minutes of the game,
the Cats only scored from
the charity stripe.
The 62-56 score ended
the Wildcats' tournament
run.

Baseball
The Winter Park baseball
team is struggling to evade
the .500 mark on the sea-
son after a 5-6 loss to Spruce
Creek last week.
The Cats faced off with
road games at Olympia and
Colonial at press time, re-
turning to their home field
at 7 p.m. Monday against
Colonial.


/
I


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK -THE OBSERVER
A tough 6-5 loss against Spruce Creek soured the Wildcats' spirits as the team struggled to build on a middling season.


Track and field
Winter Park dominated in
the four-mile relay at the


,. 1RA or
dl


Florida Relays last week- 21:40.55, and the boys fin-
end, with the girls finishing ishing fourth with a total of
second with a total time of 18:33.03.


In the article "Holler makes way for college" published April 1, Joseph Sarnovsky's title with Seminole State College was incorrect.
He is the vice president for administrative services and chief financial officer.



SWinter Park /Maitland

Observer


PUBLISHER
Kyle Taylor
407-563-7009
kyle@observernewspapers.com

MANAGING EDITOR
Jenny Andreasson
407-563-7026
jennya@observernewspapers.com

DESIGNER
Eric Sly
407-563-7054
erics@observernewspapers.com


Established in 1989 by Gerhard J.W. Munster
CONTACTS


REPORTERS
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Volume 22, Issue Number 14


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Winter Park/Maitland Observer 2010


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Published Thursday, April 8, 2010


Page 4 Thursday, April 8, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer






Thursday, April 8,2010 Page 5


Knights down, Tars up in conference

Despite a strong overall record, the Knights drop second C-USA series, as Rollins prevails over Lynn


ISAAC BABCOCK
OBSERVER STAFF
The Knights dropped their
second conference series in a
row last weekend, as they lost
two of a three game series to
UAB at home.
But Game 1 was a differ-
ent story for the Knights (18-
12, 2-4), as they opened their
second conference series of
the season with another win.
It was a big one, as they came
out on top of a 16-7 slugfest.
That included four RBIs
by third baseman Derek Lu-
ciano, who had three hits in
the game. Four other Knights
knocked in two runs of their
own in a series of rallies that
reached a high point in a
5-run fifth inning.
But bats cooled for the
Knights in the next two
games, as they only scored 3
runs combined in their fol-
lowing two losses.
In the final game of the
series Sunday, the Knights
scored just once, striking out
nine times against the one-
two punch of starter Ryan
Woolley and closer Nick
Graffeo.
On the Knights' side of
the mound, a short start for
Alex Besaw saw him giving up
two earned runs after shut-
ting down just four batters.


Joe Rogers would provide the
long relief for the Knights,
going more than six innings
while striking out four and
giving up three earned runs.
Brian Adkins was brought in
to face just one batter, who he
then beaned.
Finishing up for the
Knights, Matt Manning saved
his team from even more
embarrassment by ending a
threatening inning with two
strikeouts, though he did al-
low two runners who were al-
ready on board with the bases
loaded to score.
A long series of road trips
is on deck for the Knights, at
South Florida during press
time then a three game se-
ries in Hattiesburg, Miss.
against Southern Miss. They
return home April 13 against
Stetson.

Rollins Tars
The Rollins Tars swept Lynn
in three to improve to 23-13
on the season. The Tars are
also 7-5 in the conference.
Tim Griffin's nine-inning
complete game shutout
opened the series that includ-
ed seven strikeouts.
The Tars return to their
home field at 6 p.m. Friday
to face Tampa in a two-game
series. On Saturday they play
Tampa again at 1 p.m.


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK -THE OBSERVER
A strong game one performance wasn't enough for the Knights, who dropped the next two against UAB to lose the series.


CENTER I Maitland faces layoffs, service cuts


< continued from front page
the city could face huge shortfalls
in upcoming budgets.
And declined revenues, in some
places, have translated to higher
tax rates to balance budgets.
"I would never consider an in-
crease in taxes on residents," said
Maitland Mayor Doug Kinson. "You
can quote me on that. And my par-
ents always told me, never is a really
long time."
Maitland's mayor has pledged
that budget shortfalls won't result
in more taxes on residents. That,
however, leaves few alternatives.
As the commercial crisis contin-
ues, Maitland will have to get cre-
ative to get by without increasing
taxes. That could mean budget cuts,
layoffs and the like.
"I think it's going to be a concern
over the next few years, frankly,"
Kinson said. "We can't afford to
have a deep drop in assessments in
Maitland Center because there's lit-
erally no other way we can make up
those revenues."
Paul Partyka is a managing part-
ner at NAI Realvest, located in the
Maitland Center. While Maitland
Center is running the highest va-
cancy rates in the city, Partyka has
seen worse.
Longwood, for example, is push-
ing 20 percent vacant on the com-
mercial side, and Orlando Central
Park is at 21 percent. The best area
around, along University Boule-
vard, is tracking 10 percent unoc-
cupied.
That may seem low compared to
the area, but even 10 percent unoc-
cupied is high.
"There isn't a good area," Partyka
said. "When I say good, it's better
than some of the others, but rela-
tively speaking, these are all-time
high figures."


That's led to some landlords
leasing space at 50 percent of what
it went for in peak times. All com-
mercial properties have a break-
even point where, if occupancy
dips below it, landlords are no lon-
ger able to pay operating costs and
fixed costs such as bank loans -
from the money coming in.
But there's another tipping
point. To keep the businesses in a
center vibrant, a commercial prop-
erty can't be a dark space with emp-
ty storefronts.
Once that happens, the vibrant
surviving businesses will start to
struggle as well. And that's what's
led to landlords offering the huge
breaks.
"At least some of the dark spaces
are being taken up," Partyka said.
"You don't want a dark center. What
people have to understand is it's a
tenant's market right now."
The commercial market lags be-
hind the residential market, and as
vacancy rates rise, more and more
landlords won't be able to pay their
bank loans.
In 2009, more than 120 banks
closed nationwide, according to
the Federal Deposit Insurance Cor-
poration, and in 2010, 40 banks
have already closed their doors.
Partyka said the estimates between
200 and 400 banks will close this
year alone.
And economists are saying the
worst is yet to come.
"This particular recession, there
was no escaping the impact," said
Sean Snaith, a University of Central
Florida economist. "I think every-
one's getting hit in Florida because
of the recession and the nature of
the housing crisis and the credit
crunch. I think it's very difficult to
avoid a pretty powerful impact on
local government finance."


Winter Park / Maitland Observer









Community


The Junior League of Greater Or-
lando's annual Blue Note Ball held
February in Winter Park more than
doubled previous profits, resulting in
proceeds and donations of more than
$15,000, which will go directly to the
League's community programs. The
League also launched a new "brown
bag" campaign leading up to the Blue
Note Ball, asking attendees to fill a
brown bag with monetary donations
and bring it with them to the event.
For more information, visit www.jlgo.
org.
Independent charity Dress for Suc-
cess Greater Orlando is celebrating
10 years of community partnership.
Located in a donated portable on the
campus of Winter Park Tech since


inception, the charity's mission is to
support and encourage employment
for disadvantaged women by pro-
viding interview-appropriate attire
and career development tools. Their
employment retention program, Pro-
fessional Women's Group, conducts
ongoing training and support to aid
in career development. Last year
alone, 842 women were successfully
suited.
Austin Rivers, a 6 foot 3 inches
guard from Winter Park High School,
has been named to the second team
of PARADE's 54th annual All-America
High School Boys Basketball Team.
Many members of past teams have
gone on to star in college and the pros.
See the entire PARADE All-America


team at Parade.com/basketball.
The Give Kids the World Golf Classic
will take place at Orange Lake Resort
& Country Club, 8505 W. Irlo Bronson
Memorial Hwy., Kissimmee, at 9 a.m.
on Thursday, May 20. All proceeds
benefit Give Kids the World. Registra-
tion is $175 per player or $600 for a
team of four. Sponsorship opportuni-
ties are available. To register or learn
more, visit www.gktw.org/golfclassic
or contact Karen Cook at 1-800-995-
KIDS.
Miss Florida USA Megan Clementi
and Sonny's partnered in two of their
locations on two evenings from 5
p.m. to 9 p.m. to raise funds for Give
Kids the World and raised $1,000!


Give Kids the World is one of Megan's
"Charity of Choices." She will be
leaving to compete in the Miss USA
pageant in May.
During the month of April, the Or-
ange County Health Department
(OCHD) recognizes Sexually Transmit-
ted Diseases (STD) Awareness Month
by encouraging people to become
educated and empowered about STD
infections. The health department will
provide free STD/HIV testing from 8
a.m. to 3 p.m. on Friday, April 9, at the
Pine Hills Shopping Center, corner of
Pine Hills Road and Silver Star Road,
and from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Satur-
day, April 17, at Orlo Vista Park. For
information, visit www.orchd.com.


PHOTO COURTESY DRESS FOR SUCCESS
Dress for Success hosts a rummage sale.
It is celebrating its 10th year.


Business


Despite the turbulent economy,
Coastal Reconstruction Group has
expanded its presence in Central
Florida, with a new 13,600-square-
foot warehouse in Longwood and a
remodeled sales office in Winter Park.
The company also recently hired Keith
Freeman as an estimator.
Allstate Agents Rhonda DeMatteis
from Altamonte Springs, John Bren-
nan from Apopka and Gary Olson
from Winter Park received the Agency
Hands in the Community Award for
their commitment to helping others in
the community.


Attorney Drew Sorrell, a partner with
Lowndes, Drosdick, Doster, Kantor &
Reed, PA., recently presented "Rules
of the Internet Road" at the Crummer
Graduate School of Business at Rol-
lins College.
Cuhaci & Peterson Architects based
in Orlando's Baldwin Park was recent-
ly awarded a contract by Benchmark
Group, based in Buffalo, N.Y, to de-
sign the interior of a rug outlet at Lady
Lake Crossings in Sumter County.
The Central Florida office of SIKON
Construction, Maitland, announced a
boost to Neptune Beach's local econ-


omy where more than 200 construc-
tion workers are working on SIKON's
new Publix-anchored Seminole
Shoppes retail center located at At-
lantic Boulevard and Seminole Road
in Neptune Beach, near Jacksonville.
NAI Realvest recently negotiated
two new lease agreements for office
space in East Orlando and Oviedo to-
taling 3,727 square feet.
CenturyLink employees' Relay for
Life team recently held its Fifth An-
nual "Hoop it Up" charity basketball
tournament on Saturday, March 27
in Maitland. The tournament raised


more than $800 bringing the team's
year-to-date total to $3,200.
Observer Newspapers bids farewell
this week to Jonathan Gallagher, our
copy editor and legals/classifieds
designer. Gallagher, who has been
with the company for 2 1/2 years,
will spend five months blazing and
maintaining trails for the California
Conservation Corps. The newspaper
staff wishes him the absolute best.
We also would like to welcome Ashley
McBride, a recent graduate of Valen-
cia Community College's journalism
program, as Gallagher's replace-
ment.


WANT A FREE


MATTRESS?


RELAX IN COMFORT


Winter Park Village
5 shops down from Brio's
407-628-5657


Seminole Towne Mall
Upstair's outside of Dillard's
407-302-2090


DO YOU SUFFER FROM?


LACK OF RESTFUL SLEEP ?

LOWER BACK PAIN ?

NECK OR SHOULDER PAIN ?

TOSSING AND TURNING ?

SLEEP APNEA ?
ACID REFLUX ?


If you don't hurt when you go to bed
But you wake up hurting...
Your bed is to blame


A New Bed Today will Change all of your Tomorrow's


Concerned about

Identity Theft?

Proper disposal of documents
can help reduce your risk.












Commerce National Bank & Trust is providing

FREE SHRED SERVICE
Enjoy snacks and beverages while
your items are shredded.
Invite family and friends to take advantage
of this free service. Everyone is welcome!



Wednesday, April 28th

10:00 12:00

1201 South Orlando Avenue
in Winter Park
(corner of 17-92 & Orange Avenue)
Member
M embe Limit 6 boxes per person. To arrange for larger quantities, E 11AH
FDIC please call Pat Sideman at 407-622-8181 ext. 101. LENDER


Page 6 Thursday, April 8, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer






Thursday, April 8,2010 Page 7


Winter Park
Criminal mischief
An unknown suspect broke a business's win-
dow on the 400 block of West Fairbanks Av-
enue on March 26.

Vehicle burglaries and theft

An unknown suspect stole a white 1996 Acura
Integra on the 400 block of North Orlando Av-
enue on March 26. Lakeland police recovered
the vehicle on March 29.

An unknown suspect entered an unlocked ve-
hicle parked on the 1000 block of North Park
Avenue and stole two Channel Island surf-


boards, cash, a credit card, Fendi sunglasses
and two bottles of prescription medications on
March 26.

An unknown suspect broke the driver's side
window of a vehicle parked on the 1800 block
of Village Lane and stole a Garmin Nuvi 225W
GPS unit and checkbook on March 29.

An unknown suspect used a screw driver and
coat hanger to open a locked vehicle on the 600
block of Depugh Street and steal money from
the ashtray on March 29.

Residential Burglary
An unknown suspect entered a residence on


the 900 block of Golfside Drive through an un-
locked garage door and stole two iMac desktop
computers and a Sony Ericson cell phone on
March 28.

Commercial Burglary
An unknown suspect cut a hole in a fence on
the 1200 block of Miller Avenue and then cut a
lock to a storage shed that contained multiple
Echo trimmers, Stihl leaf blowers and two-cycle
oil on March 29.

An unknown suspect cut through a rear-door
deadbolt lock on the 500 block of North Orlan-
do Avenue and removed the floor safe and cash
register drawer on March 31.


March 26 to April 1

Robbery
A subject was arrested for stealing retail prop-
erty and then forcefully resisting the merchant's
attempt to recover the stolen property on March
31 on the 500 block of North Orlando Avenue.

Arrests were made in Winter Park between
March 26 and April 1 for crimes including grand
theft, making a false claim, refusing to sign a
citation, resisting without violence, driving with
a suspended license, warrant, harassing phone
calls, retail theft, driving under the influence,
robbery, petit theft, resisting a merchant, pos-
session of alcohol by a minor and leaving the
scene of an accident.


CENSUS I Each census form that's not returned could cost the county $850-$1,400 in federal funding


< continued from front page

ed as a group.
"This should not have
happened because they live
in apartments with individ-
ual addresses," she said. "But
I am glad to hear it's getting
worked out."
The impact of just one
person on federal funding
can be detrimental. The
loss in funding for govern-
ment services for just one
uncounted person in Or-
ange County is anywhere
between $850 and $1,400,
according to Census.gov.

Many forms
unaccounted for
Many Seminole and Orange


county residents who have
received their census forms
still have not returned the
little blue questionnaire.
Although April 1 was the
deadline for the 2010 Cen-
sus forms, they can still be
mailed in throughout the
month of April. In May, cen-
sus workers will begin circu-
lating to homes that haven't
returned the forms.
The 2000 Census re-
sponse rate was 44 percent
for Orange County and 54
percent for Seminole Coun-
ty. The national average was
52 percent.
"It's important that ev-
eryone be counted, because
for everyone that is count-
ed, we receive our fair share
of dollars that can help sup-


port resources that we cur-
rently have," Davis said. "Ev-
eryone can benefit from it."
This small form is more
than just a statistical count
of the number of people liv-
ing in a household; it can af-
fect the number of seats the
state occupies in the U.S.
House of Representatives,
as well as determines how
much of the $400 billion
in federal funding will be
spent on infrastructure and
services, such as schools,
hospitals, senior centers
and other public works
projects.
"Anything that we are
eligible for that benefits the
community and quality of
life that we recognize here
is important," Seminole


County principal planner
Tony Mathews said. "We are
trying to make the commu-
nity aware of the census and
the importance of the cen-
sus and at the end of the day
increase that return rate."

Community outreach
Both counties are trying to
demonstrate the impor-
tance of the forms by reach-
ing out to residents, espe-
cially in minority areas that
have otherwise had poor
response rates by spreading
the word through the com-
munity at churches or other
community events.
"We have done a lot of
community outreach, what-
ever community event was


going on within our coun-
ty ... we attended whether
it was minority-geared or
not," Davis said.
Davis said Orange Coun-
ty has gone door-to-door
passing out fliers in minor-
ity areas, reminding resi-
dents of the importance of
the forms.
"Our goal this year is
to have 70 percent of the
population within the en-
tire Orange County, that
includes all the municipali-
ties' participation in the
mail-back response rate,"
Davis said. "So that when
the census takers do come
out maybe our percentage
will be higher."


"Moving To The Mayflower

Is An Investment In Peace Of Mind"


For Ann and Donald Paulsen,
The Mayflower means peace of
mind. "We wanted to make
our own plans for this next
phase of our lives, rather than
depending on our children,"
says Ann. "With healthcare
costs going up, moving to
The Mayflower was definitely
a good investment for our


future. In a troubled economy,
who knows what long-term
care is going to cost several
years from now?"
If you're looking at retirement
living options, take a look at
The Mayflower. It's a good
plan for the future.
Call today to secure a spot
on our waiting list.

(407) 672-1620



0
THE MAYFLOWER
A Plan for the Future-*
1620 Mayflower Court
Winter Park, Florida 32792
o((iVU www.themayflower.com
First SB'


I O p e n 6 :3 0a- 6 :3I Iw w w p ag sch o ol. c o m I


SUniversity Park Campus
10250 University Blvd., Orlando, FL 407.678.0333
Ages 2 through Grade 8
Towne Center Campus
100 Aero Lane, Sanford, FL 407.324.1144
Ages 2 through Grade 8


Winter Park / Maitland Observer










Calendar


There are still some seats left at
the upcoming JCC Professional Lead-
ership Luncheon at noon on Wednes-
day, April 14 featuring Otis Smith,
the General Manager of the Orlando
Magic. The luncheon will be held at
the Citrus Club. To RSVP, visit Orland-
oJCC.org by Thursday, April 8.

At 8 p.m. on Friday, April 9, and 11
a.m. for a family concert on Saturday,
April 10, the Bach Festival Society
presents the Baroque ensemble Red
Priest. The group will perform "Pi-
rates of the Baroque," which features
music from known and unknown Ba-
roque composers. The performance
will be held in Tiedtke Concert Hall in
the Keene Music Building at Rollins
College, 1000 Holt Ave., Winter Park.


PHOTO COURTESY OF ROLLINS COLLEGE
The Asian Cultural Association presents
an Evening on Indian Music on April 17.


Call the Box Office at 407-646-2182
or visit www.bachfestivalflorida.org
for more information.

At 7 p.m. on Thursday, April 8, The
Central Florida Anthropological Soci-
ety (CFAS) will meet at Harry P. Leu
Gardens, 1920 N. Forest Ave., Or-
lando. The free, public meeting will
feature "The Cultural Heritage of St.
David's Islanders," a presentation
by Dr. Rosalyn Howard, an associ-
ate professor of anthropology and
director of the North American Indian
Studies program at the University of
Central Florida. For more information,
call 321-948-3994.

From 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Thurs-
day, April 8 through Saturday, April
10, and from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. on
Sunday, April 11, Earth Inspired Liv-
ing, 300 N. ParkAve., Winter Park, will
have a Spring Fling Trollbead Trunk
Show. More than $10,000 worth of
Trollbeads have been brought in and
there are plenty of special prices.

At 6:30 p.m. on Friday, April 9 is
Florida Film Festival's Opening Night
Film and Party No Grits, No Glory!
- at the Regal Winter Park Village
20, Enzian & Eden Bar. Cost is $100;
discount options available. Tickets for
just the opening night film that starts
at 6:30 p.m., "Paper man," are $30.
Tickets for just the opening night par-
ty that starts at 8 p.m. are $80. For
more information, visit www.florida-
filmfestival.com.

On Saturday, April 10, from 8:30
a.m. to 5 p.m., come to Baldwin Park
at the corner of New Broad Street and
Jake Street for a 5K to benefit the


Wounded Warrior Project. For more
information, contact Melissa at 386-
956-6843 or Melissa.Mabrey@ya-
hoo.com.

On Tuesday, April 13, from 5:30 p.m.
to 8:30 p.m., the International Asso-
ciation of Administrative Profession-
als Winter Park Chapter will have
a meeting featuring guest speaker
Howie Appel. The meeting is free and
starts at 6 p.m. at the Clarion Inn &
Conference Center, 230 W. Highway
436, Altamonte Springs. Please regis-
ter by April 9 by e-mailing Cheryl Hol-
lister, CPS/CAP, at cherylh@nodarse.
com.

The UCF Communication Disorders
Clinic, Florida Hospital Cancer In-
stitute and The Ear Nose and Throat
Surgical Associates will jointly offer
free screenings for oral, head and
neck cancer in observance of Oral,
Head and Neck Cancer Awareness
Week. The screenings will take place
from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Thursday, April
15, at the Winter Park Memorial Hos-
pital Medical Library, 200 N. Lake-
mont Ave., Winter Park, and from 11
a.m. to noon on Friday, April 16, at the
UCF Communication Disorders Clinic,
12424 Research Parkway, Suite 155,
in Orlando's Central Florida Research
Park. For more information about the
UCF Communication Disorders Clinic,
visit www.ucfspeechlanguagethera-
py.com.

The Asian Cultural Association will
present an Evening of Indian Music,
featuring a trio of world-renowned
musicians, from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30
p.m. on Saturday, April 17 at Rollins
College's Tiedtke Concert Hall in the


Keene Music Building. Direct from
India, performers include sitar master
Purbyan Chatterjee and acclaimed
flautist Rakesh Chaurasia. The con-
cert includes an open-forum dialogue
with the performers. Tickets are $15.
To purchase, call the box office at
407-333-3667. To learn more about
the Asian Cultural Association, visit
www.ACA-Florida.org.


From noon to 6 p.m. on Sunday,
April 25, Friends of First Response, a
Maitland-based non-profit, is hosting
their Second Annual Kickball tourna-
ment at Keller Road Baseball Complex
to raise funds for Maitland's police
and fire departments. For informa-
tion, call Dr. Mark Round at 407-629-
7091 or e-mail roundmark@hotmail.
com.


Brandywine Square

* Courtyard Shopping Sidewalk Cafe *
Located Just 10 Steps North of the Morse Museum

Brandywine Deli Cida's of Winter Park Antiques
Cida's of Winter Park featuring On the Avenue
Enjoy eating outside on The Original Consignment Quality Antiques
beautiful ParkAvenue. Buffet Collection. Owned by Hardy Hudson.
catering specialist since 1972 407-644-5635 407-657-2100

Family Comics & Cards Essence NOW OPEN!
Followtheexploitsofyourfavorite Salon & Day Spa Ultimate Fitness
comics from yesterdayand today Hair-Manicures-Pedicures-Nail by Yatska
cmls rmyes r, erayanst Extensions-Facials-Waxing
Trading cards for every taste 407-629-2588 407-782-9171


NOW OPEN!
Mauruarend Fine
Arts Gallery
321-282-6780


407-657-5555 or
407-467-5397 I


Winter Park Hair Studio
*Hair cuts/Hair styling at
407-629-5106
*Hair Loss
*Massage Therapy at
407-443-1805


Thimble Works
Alterations for all of
Winter Park
407-629-7699


U


Park Avenue Jeweler
Diamonds. Gemstones.
Gold & Silver Jewelry
Custom Design.
Repairs done on premises.


Grace Clinic
Christian Counseling
Offering Hope & Healing through
Redemptive Relationships. Offering
Mental Health Counseling.


UCF Book Festival
MORGRIDGE INTERNATIONAL READING CENTER

60 Authors and Poets Children's Activities
I 17 2 | Panel Discussions Book Signings
A P R IL 17Book Sales & Appraisals Exhibitors
9:00 AM-5:30 PM AT THE UCF ARENA FREE ADMISSION

bookfestival.ucf.edu


Authentic Brazilian Steak House

Nelore is a churrascaria, a Brazil-
ian steakhouse that features grilled
meats served tableside. The chur-
rascaria concept is a tough sell for
the sophisticated gourmet crowd.
It is, after all, an all-you-can-eat
scheme. And even though it fea-
tures servers who bring the main
courses to your table, it starts with
a salad bar that requires diners to
queue up and serve themselves.

Actually it goes far beyond mere salads. You'll also find taboule, asparagus and
grilled portobello mushrooms, as well as an assortment of cheeses, salmon, and
shrimp. And roasted peppers and hearts of palm. And hot items, such as black
beans and rice, ground yuca, pasta and mashed potatoes.

For dinner, diners are given a little disk to put next to their plates. One side is
green and the other side is red. Green, go; red, stop. As long as the green side
is facing up, the servers will offer you meats. When you've had enough, or just
need a breather, turn the red side up.

The meats are on big skewers that the gauchos carry throughout the dining
room. Seeing green disks, they will ask if you'd like the particular meat they're
carrying. Each guest also has a small pair of tongs. As the gaucho slices the
meat, the guest grabs a corner and keeps it from falling to the table.

Nelore boasts an array of 15 meats, including lamb chops, filet mignon, flank
steak, beef ribs, parmesan crusted pork, rump roast, top sirloin and shrimp, as
well as sausages and chicken.
Nelore joins the Park Avenue pantheon of restaurants and adds to its growing
international flavor.


*Nelore Steakhouse
115 Lyman Ave, Winter Park

407-645-1112
WWW.NeloreSteakHouse.com


pd. adv.


Page 8 Thursday, April 8, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer





Winter Park / Maitland Observer


But it made us a better bank.
Today we are well-capitalized, a truly solid and reliable
Central Florida financial institution.


FEDERAL
TRUST BANK

De+evwrved +o do more


LENDER


Federal Trust Bank is a wholly owned subsidiary of The Hartford Financial Services Group, Inc.


I


I


Thursday, April 8, 2010 Page 9


2009

wns n TOUG











VIR R5







Page 10 Thursday, April 8,2010 Winter Park / Maitlanci Obseiver


Maitland CityTalk
BY DOUGLAS T. KINSON
MAYOR


Strategic planning

guides our future


Strategic planning is a
multi-year process that
guides and directs a
business or city such that
long-term financial and
organizational stability may
be sustained. This week,
Maitland's City Council
and key members of staff
met to discuss our current
and long-term financial
challenges.
The successes of past
planning sessions can be
seen all around us. From
attracting new businesses
to our community to
succession planning to
communicating more
effectively with our
residents, we have utilized
strategic planning to
become a more vibrant
community.
And although our
priorities for the coming
year are no less important,


the majority of our time
and discussion this
year centered on the
expectation that our single
greatest challenge would
be how to address the
coming fiscal year's budget
shortfall.
Just like last year,
mandates by government,
a deteriorating economy,
depleting resources
and growth issues
were all factors that
entered greatly into our
discussions. Reductions in
taxes and other revenue
sources, combined with
skyrocketing costs have
brought us to the stark
reality that should our
economy worsen, Maitland
will have to do not more
with less, but get by with
less with less.
The stark reality for
our city is that Maitland


could face a budget deficit
of nearly 5 percent of our
overall budget, or about $1
million. Some say Chicken
Little really does exist, and
it is rumored he was even
in the room, but on this
day, given the talent in the
room, nobody involved in
planning Maitland's future
would dare say the sky was
falling.
We are using sound
business practices have
helped Maitland through
tougher economic times,
and this year will be no
different. The key to
addressing Maitland's
short-term financial woes
will be to leverage revenues
and keep expenses in
check. We discussed a
renewed concentration on
securing grants, securing
event-related sponsors
and focusing on new and
existing public-private
partnerships, all of which
would result in driving
new revenues to our
city. But balancing the
coming year's budget will
not be accomplished by
securing new revenues
alone, but by keeping
each and every expense in
check. Each department
was directed to analyze
ways to reduce expenses,
including but not limited
to a critical review of staff
in order to identify ways
to consolidate duties and


responsibilities in order to
provide efficiencies in our
greatest asset and expense
- personnel.
I have every confidence
that Maitland will meet
our short-term financial
objectives, but the key
to a sustainable city lies
in our ability to provide
core services without an
unnecessary financial
burden to our taxpayers.
Enhancing our resident's
quality of life while keeping
taxes low has been the
watchword of strategic
planning sessions of the
past. Accomplishing this
with the financial pressures
of today will be nothing
short of a miracle, yet I
have every confidence with
the talent and experience
we have with staff and on
Council, that all of our
objectives will be met with
flying colors.
Our priorities for the
coming year will include
the following:

* Complete a new
downtown fire station
* Begin construction of
City Hall
* Secure a new west side
park
* Plan appropriately for
downtown and Maitland's
west side
* Maintain employee moral
* Increase volunteerism
* Promote green city


VIS Cedt ar 'A efesin
FIXD RtesAltrnaive t
aslw s99%dCovnional

Ceertn 0Yaso~rieGl t e S akig-
40-81884 45A.Hihwy179
w wgufstae- .og CREDIT UNION.MitnF 25


APRIL 12 COMMISSION
WORK SESSION
There will be a City
Commission Work Session
at 2 p.m. Monday, April 12
in City Hall Commission
Chambers to discuss the
upcoming 90-day plan
and the strategic planning
session.
The public is invited to
attend, however, no public
comment will be taken.

APRIL 12 COMMISSION
MEETING TOPICS
OF INTEREST
There will be a City
Commission meeting
on Monday, April 12, at
3:30 p.m., in City Hall
Commission Chambers.
Below are a few topics of
interest:
BOARD UPDATES:
-Tree Preservation Board
MAYOR'S REPORT:
-Election of Vice Mayor


-Presentation of Mead
Garden Birding Checklist
Pamphlet by Dexter
Richardson
-The Friends of Mead
Garden check presentation
-Employee of the
Quarter Presentation to
Ron Moore
-Proclamation
of Administrative
Professionals Week
-Recognition of the
110th Anniversary of the
Winter Park Fire-Rescue
Department
CITY MANAGER'S REPORT:
-Discussion of scheduling
a work session with Canin
& Associates regarding the
Form Based Codes Project
-Schedule executive
session
-Union negotiations
-Pro Shop update
CITY ATTORNEY'S REPORT:
-Commuter rail discussion
CONSENT AGENDA:
-Approve the minutes of
March 22.


-Approve the Fire-Rescue
Department's 2010-2015
Strategic Plan.
-Approve bid for
PVC Pipe to HD Supply
Waterworks and Ferguson
Waterworks.
-Approve the three-year
contract renewal with the
YMCA for the operation of
the Cady Way swimming
pool to expire on April 17,
2013.
ACTION ITEMS REQUIRING
DISCUSSION:
-Potential 2010
Comprehensive Plan
changes.
-Extension of
Conditional Use for the
Residences at Morse
Boulevard and Knowles
Avenue (170 S. Knowles
Ave.)
-Extension of
Conditional Use for
the Morse Boulevard/
Pennsylvania Aveenue
parking garage.
-Proposed Plug-In policy.
-Recommendations
from the Ethics Board.
PUBLIC HEARINGS:
-Resolution Notice of
Intent to use the uniform
method for collecting
special assessments within
the platted area defined
as Granville Drive and


Williams Drive, to fund
the city's undergrounding
of the neighborhood
electrical/BrightHouse
Networks facilities.
-Resolution Notice of
Intent to use the uniform
method for collecting
special assessments within
the platted area defined
as Golfview Terrace and
North Park Avenue, within
the municipal boundaries
of the city of Winter
Park to fund the city's
undergrounding of the
neighborhood electrical/
Bright House Networks
facilities.
-Second reading of the
ordinance adopting new
zoning regulations Section
58-89 and Section 58-90,
amending the process
and procedures, standards
and criteria for approval
of changes to the zoning
regulations text and official
zoning map, and for
conditional uses.
-First reading of the
ordinance authorizing
the refunding of the
outstanding Park Avenue
Improvement Revenue
Bonds, Series 1998;
providing for the issuance
of not exceeding $3 million
Park Avenue Refunding
Improvement Revenue


Bonds, Series 2010.
-First reading of the
ordinance changing zoning
on four properties:
Changing the existing
zoning designation of
Commercial (C-3A) to
Commercial (C-2) at 400 W.
New England Ave.
Changing the existing
zoning designation of
Commercial (C-3) to
Commercial (C-2) District
at 463 W. New England
Ave, 535 W. New England
Ave. and at 227 E. Hannibal
Square.
-First reading of the
ordinance changing
the Future Land Use
Designation of Commercial
to Central Business District
at 301 W. New England Ave.
CITY COMMISSION
REPORTS:
Commissioner Dillaha
-CoffeeTalk schedules
-Winter Park Memorial
Hospital master plan
You can find the
Commission's full agenda
at www.cityofwinterpark.
org and by clicking on
Government > City
Commission > Packets.
Visit the city's official
Web site at www.
cityofwinterpark. org, find
us on Facebook and follow
us on Twitter


ITTo_ (;L7'Re I1eRIT4cIE
Winter Park City Talk
BY RANDY KNIGHT
CITY MANAGER


initiatives

But as we approach the
coming year, we cannot
lose sight of our long-
term goals of realizing the
dreams of a pedestrian-
friendly downtown, a
rejuvenated west side,
connectivity throughout
our community, and the
integration of culture and
partners in everything we
do as a community.
The good news is that
the years to come will be
met with a rebounding and
more vibrant economy.
Maitland's focus on keeping
control of expenses, while
incenting businesses to
locate and grow in our
city has helped us survive
the worst of economic
times. With the talent we
have working toward a
better future, I have every
confidence Maitland will
not only win our economic
battle, but be much
stronger financially and
economically down the
road.
So let's all do our part,
stay involved and help
make Maitland the best it
can be A Community For
Life.
Our thanks to Marilyn
Crotty with the UCF
Institute of Government
for her efforts in Maitland's
strategic planning process.


Page 10 Thursday, April 8, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer











Lifestyles


PHOTOS COURTESY OF ENZIAN THEATER
From left, 'The Young Composers Challenge,' 'New Low' and 'Keep your Head Up' are Florida films being showcased at the 19th Florida Film Festival. The screenings will be at the Enzian Theater and Regal Cinema.

A UCF professor, a former Full Sail student and a Dr. Phillips High student debut at Florida Film Festival


BRITTNI JOHNSON
GUEST REPORTER

A few Florida-based films
will be showcased at this
year's 19th annual Florida
Film Festival. The Festival,
produced by the Enzian, be-
gins on Friday, April 9, and
runs for 10 days. The Festi-
val premieres newAmerican
and international films at
three theaters: the Enzian,


1300 S. Orlando Ave., Regal
Winter Park Village, 510 N.
Orlando Ave., and new this
year, the Plaza Cinema Cafe,
at 155 S. Orange Ave.

"New Low"
For Florida native Adam
Bowers, the Florida Film
Festival won't be the first
showing of his film, "New
Low." The feature was also


shown at the Sundance Film
Festival.
Bowers based what he
calls an "anti-romantic com-
edy" on his own search for
the perfect girl. He plays the
main character in the film,
a neurotic man who can't
seem to decide whether he
wants to be with the best or
worst girl he's ever met. For
Bowers, who wrote, pro-
duced, edited and starred in


the film, the neurosis wasn't
just an act. Being in charge
of everything on the film
made it easier for him.
"I'm really OCD," he said.
"I could recite the script
from beginning to end right
now."
The film, shot and set in
Gainesville, will show at the
Enzian on Thursday, April
15, at 4:15 p.m. and Winter
Park Village on Saturday,


April 17, at 4 p.m.

"The Young Composers
Challenge"
Lisa Mills, also a Florida na-
tive, will debut her film "The
Young Composers Chal-
lenge" at the Enzian on Sun-
day, April 11, at 3:45 p.m.
The Winter Springs resi-
dent and assistant profes-
> turn to FILM on 14


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Thursday, April 8, 2010 Page 11









Family a

Calendar .......


From 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. on
Wednesday, April 21, join
Maitland Middle School as it
displays its creative talents by
transforming the courtyard into
the streets of Paris. The event
will feature artists, musicians and
wandering mimes throughout the
evening. The Book Fair will also be
open to the public.

Audition materials for the 2010-
2011 season with the Florida
Symphony Youth Orchestra (FSYO)
are now available for download
from www.fsyo.org. Applications
are due by Wednesday, April
28. For more information or
questions, call the FSYO office at
407-999-7800. Comprised of four
ensembles (Symphonic Orchestra,
Philharmonia Orchestra, Prelude
Orchestra, Overture Strings), the
youth orchestra annually trains
more than 200 students from
eight Central Florida counties,
with musicians from second grade
through second year of college
students.

On April 29, the Kindergarten
class at St. Margaret Mary Catholic
School will be hosting the Second
Annual Kindergarten Dime Bake
Sale. The children will use all of
the proceeds from their bake sale
to assist in the relief efforts for the
school's sister parish, St. Joan of
Arc School in Haiti. The students
will dress like chefs and sell baked
goods at all lunches, from 11:30
a.m. to 12:50 p.m., in the school
cafeteria. Items will be priced from
$.50 to $1, and only dimes may be
used for purchase, so the children
easily practice counting money.
For more information, visit www.
smmknight.org.

From 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. on
Thursday, April 29, The Hebrew
Day School will hold a Nutrition
and Fitness Expo in the school's
multipurpose room, 851 N.
Maitland Ave., Maitland. The
Expo, which is open to the public,
will feature an "ask the expert"
area where leading physicians
from the community will be on
hand to provide information and
hands-on activities. Companies or
individuals interested in exhibiting
or sponsoring this event are
encouraged to call Shari Wladis at
407-647-0713.

Events this month at the
Maitland Public Library, 501 S.
Maitland Ave.:
-At 7 p.m. on Mondays is Bedtime
Stories.
-At 10:30 a.m. on Tuesdays is
story time for ages 36 months to
preschoolers.
-At 10:30 a.m. on Thursdays is
story time for babies up to 36
months old.
-At 4 p.m. on Thursdays is Reading
Buddies.
For more details, contact 407-
647-7700.

Take Care Clinics, located at
select Walgreens drugstores
throughout the country, will
be offering camp and sports
physicals for $35 through the
end of September. Visit www.
takecarehealthsystem.com for
more information.


PHOTO BY BRITTNI JOHNSON
Rob Burwell, Angel Hamby's stepfather and coach, helps her put on her boxing gloves before a spar at M.C. Boxing Club in Winter Park on March 23.


IH UBSEHVEH


Angel Hamby started boxing at age 8; now she's working toward 2012 Olympics


BRITTNI JOHNSON
GUEST REPORTER
Rows of storage garages fill
a parking lot. There's little
noise besides the passing
rumble of a truck, until you
step inside the M.C. Boxing
Club in Winter Park. Inside
there's chatter, the sharp
pound of fists on punching
bags, whips of jump ropes
cutting the air and weights
clattering to the floor. The
small gym is filled with men
and teenage boys. And then
there's Angel.
"I only spar with boys,"
said 17-year-old high school
junior Angel Hamby.
But she isn't one of the
boys. She covers sparkly
purple eye shadow and
perfectly straightened hair
with headgear, pushes box-
ing gloves over French man-
icured nails and -- possibly
the one hint at her life's love
- hands away a necklace of
dainty boxing glove charms
to her mom before heading
into the ring.
And while she doesn't
look like one of the boys,
her sparring partners have
learned that she leaves the
girl outside the ring, and
leads with her skills as a
boxer.


"She's like a man in there,"
said Steven Pineiro, one of
her sparring partners.
Because she trains with
boys, when she competes
against girls, it's no big deal.
"Girls don't hit as hard,"



4' I


ONLY


SPAR


WITH


BOYS.9
-ANGEL HAMBY
17-YEAR-OLD
HIGH SCHOOL JUNIOR
she said with a laugh.
Angel hopes to par-
ticipate in the first ever
Olympic women's boxing
competition in 2012. She's
ranked No. 11 in the U.S.
in the featherweight divi-
sion, according to USAB-
oxing.org. She's been the
Ringside World Champion,


National Police Athletic
League Champion, and Best
Boxer PAL, all twice, just to
name a few of the compe-
titions she's won. To get to
the Olympic tryouts, Angel
must do well in the next
three tournaments she has
coming up. Nicknamed the
"female beast of Florida" by
fellow boxers and coach-
es, Angel isn't worried she
won't make the team.
"I'm really confident -
some people may say I'm
cocky, but those people
don't know what I'm capa-
ble of," she said.
Her stepfather and coach,
Rob Burwell, isn't worried
either.
"If she keeps her head on,
and barring boys and inju-
ries, she'll more than hold
her own," Burwell joked.
Angel said nothing would
hold her back from doing
her best to get on the Olym-
pic team. She cried for joy
when she found out they
were hosting women's box-
ing for the first time. She
trains six days a week after
school, sometimes until well
after dusk. Angel admits she
gives up a lot as a teen to
chase this dream "I go to
school and I box" but she


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LEA ING EDGE TITLE
Leading You Home


has no regrets.
"If I have to make sacri-
fices to be an Olympian and
get a gold medal, that's what
I'm going to do."
This is an attitude she's
had since age 8, when she
first picked up a pair of
boxing gloves. Her mother,
Tammy Hamby, said she
knew she was meant to be
an athlete.
"She was standing on her
head at 2," Tammy said.
So when Angel was 7 and
wanted to kick box with her
brothers, Tammy, a boxer
herself, thought she'd be
fine. But she was more than
fine, she was a natural. Her
first fight was against anoth-
er boy, and it was a draw. In
the last 10 years since then,
she's only lost four fights.
"She has something you
can't teach," said Tammy.
"She's just so talented it's
unreal; her mind just thinks
boxing."
Angel wasn't always a
confident boxer; her mom
called her a "skirt clinger" as
a child because she wouldn't
ever let go of her leg when
they were out. Since learn-
ing and succeeding at box-
ing, Angel's broken out of
her shell.
Angel said she likes how
it makes her feel.
"It's just fun... after it's
the best feeling ever; it's in-
describable."
That's a feeling she hopes
to continue as she forges her
way to the next Olympics.

Getin he in


" "


Page 12 Thursday, April 8, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer





Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Cinema


A showcase of this week's releases,
and a look ahead to upcoming movies.


'Please Give'

Coming May 7


'Iron Man 2'


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I Ped riest







Page 14 Thursday, April 8, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


FILM I Movies and events galore will be held from April 9-18 at the Enzian, Regal and Plaza Cinema Cafe


< continued from page 11


sor of film at UCF follows
five teens while they go
about their everyday lives
and work over the summer,
competing against dozens
of other kids, to create their
own classical composition
in the hopes of winning the
Young Composers Chal-
lenge.
"This film is about what
it's like to be a teenager who
also happens to compose,"
Mills said.
In the end, six out of
more than 40 competitors
are chosen and get to hear
their composition played by
the Orlando Philharmonic
Orchestra. One of the mu-
sicians in the documentary
achieves this honor.
"I really fell in love with
all five of these teenagers,"


Mills said. "When I was film-
ing the judging it was hard
to be quiet, I was silently
rooting for them."


"Keep Your Head Up"
Michael Patti, director of
the music video "Keep Your
Head Up," might have more
interests in common with
Mills, but his life is more like
the young composers in her
film. Patti, who won his way



"I USED


into the FFF by being the
best of Brouhaha, is only a
senior at Dr. Phillips High.
He said he doesn't let age in-
timidate him.
"Being on that level is
exhilarating," he said. "But
creativity stands higher
than age or stance."
Patti, who made the mu-
sic video for the Florida
band Dang We're On Fire,
shot the video himself all
around Orlando and pro-
duced the whole thing.
"I used talent as my crew,"
he said.


TALENT AS "What's Organic About'

MY CREW. 9 Organic?"'
This documentary film ex-

-MICHAEL PATTI, plores the challenges that
DIRECTOR OF occur when a grass-roots ag-
P R EC ricultural movement or-
"KEEP YOUR HEAD UP, ganic farming turns into


a booming international
market. The film hopes to
show audiences how sup-
porting the organic move-
ment is a social responsi-
bility, as it has the power to
solve many environmental
problems. Director Shel-
ley Rogers hopes to teach
through her film.
"I'm not a big advocate
of telling people what to do,
but I want to make people
more aware so that they
have the opportunity to
make better decisions."
The film, which features
stories from farmers who
steward land from New
York to Florida, spends a lot
of time in Gainesville with
Marty Mesh, executive di-
rector of Florida Organic
Growers and Consumers.
"He's the voice of the
small farmer," she said.


The film will be screened
Saturday, April 10, at 3:30
p.m. at the Enzian.


"Bomber"
In this film, an elderly man
convinces his son to drive
him and his wife back to a
small village in Germany to
atone for something he did
there. The film follows the
family along this road trip.
Editor and Full Sail alum
Matt Maddox described it as
a "bittersweet family come-
dy-drama."
"There's a real earnest-
ness about the film, it's com-
pelling and funny," Maddox
said.
Maddox, who said he has
many great memories of the
Enzian, hopes to make it to
the April 12 screening at the
Winter Park Village.


2010 FLORIDA FILM FESTIVAL GUIDE/SCHEDULE


FRIDAY, APRIL 9TH
REGAL WINTER PARK VILLAGE
6:30 9PM OPENING NIGHT FILM:
PAPER MAN PRECEDED
BY MY RABIT HOPPY


ENZIAN
8-11PM


OPENING NIGHT PARTY:
NO GRITS, NO GLORY!


SATURDAY, APRIL 10
ENZIAN
1 2:30PM SOUTHERN COMFORT:
LUNCHEON AND DISCUSSION
2 -7PM FARMER'S MARKET
3:30 5:15PM WHAT'S "ORGANIC" ABOUT
ORGANIC? PRECEDED BY
THE BAKE SHOP GHOST
6:30 8:15PM THE TIGER NEXT DOOR
PRECEDED BY DEVOLUTION
9:15 11PM CLEANFLIX PRECEDED BY
WATERMELON MAN
12MID-1:45AM MIDNIGHT SHORTS

REGAL WINTER PARK VILLAGE
11:30AM-12:45PM THE SECRET OF KELLS
12 1:35PM HOW TO FOLD A FLAG
PRECEDED BY THOMPSON
1:15-3PM SHORTS #2: "BURN"
2:15-3:45PM HOMEWRECKER
3:30 5:20PM SHORTS #4 "EXTINGUISH"
4:15 6:05PM MY SUICIDE
6 -7:40PM WINTER'S BONE
6:30 8:45PM HOME FILM: CHINATOWN
8:30 11:05PM THE GIRL WITH THE
DRAGON TATTOO


9:15 -10:55PM
11:30-1:20AM
12MID-1:45AM


DRONES
THE REVENANT
CROPSEY


BORDERS WINTER PARK
11AM -12PM CELEBRITY CHEF
BOOK SIGNING
PRIVATE MANOR HOME
6:30 10PM TENNESSEE WILLIAMS'
SOUTHERN GOTHIC
"FAMILY" REUNION


TENNESSEE WILLIAMS'
SOUTHERN GOTHIC
"FAMILY" REUNION

SATURDAY, APRIL 10,
6:30PM, STARTING AT $175

Great Food, Dramatic
Setting, Celebrity Chefs


SUNDAY, APRIL 11
ENZIAN
10:30AM -12PM DIAL B FOR BACON: CHEF
JOSH'S SOUTHERN BRUNCH
11AM-12:15PM THE SECRET OF KELLS
1 -2:50PM SHORTS #1: "IGNITE"
3:45 5:30PM FLORIDA DOC: THE YOUNG
COMPOSERS CHALLENGE
PRECEDED BY YAMASONG
6:30- 8PM LOVELY, STILL
9-10:40PM CUMMINGS FARM


REGAL WINTER PARK VILLAGE
12- 1:40PM DON'T LET ME DROWN
12:30-2:30PM THE LOTTERY PRECEDED BY
LESSONS LEARNED
2:30 4:05PM DUMBSTRUCK PRECEDED BY
THE POODLE TRAINER
3 -4:45PM COOKING WITH STELLA
4:30- 6:20PM OBSELIDIA
5:15 6:55PM NO. 4 STREET OF OUR LADY
PRECEDED BY OVERNIGHT STAY
6:45 8:30PM SHORTS #3: "SMOLDER"
7:30 9:30PM CON ARTIST PRECEDED BY
MEET ME AT GERONIMO'S
9-11PM COCO CHANEL & IGOR
STRAVINSKY
10- 11:30PM CROPSEY
LAKE EOLA BANDSHELL DOWNTOWN ORLANDO
8 -10PM COCOON

MONDAY, APRIL 12
ENZIAN
6:30- 7:45PM MID-AUGUST LUNCH
7:45 8:45PM OLIVE GARDEN ITALIAN
CINEMA NIGHT WINE &
CHEESE RECEPTION
8:45- 10:45 PM I AM LOVE
REGAL WINTER PARK VILLAGE
6:30 8PM LOST SPARROW PRECEDED
BY MY LIFE AS CHERRY
7 -8:25PM BOMBER
8:30 10:15PM BEST WORST MOVIE
PRECEDED BY THE S FROM HELL
9 -10:30 PM PUNCHING THE CLOWN

TUESDAY, APRIL 18
ENZIAN
6:30 8:30PM HOW TO FOLD A FLAG
PRECEDED BY THOMPSON
9:30 -11:30PM CON ARTIST PRECEDED BY
MEET ME AT GERONIMO'S
REGAL WINTER PARK VILLAGE
4 -6PM THE WIND JOURNEYS
4:45 6:20PM 3 X REAL: DOC SHORTS
SHOWCASE
6:30 8:30PM DON'T LET ME DROWN
7 -8:55PM SHORTS #4: "EXTINGUISH"
9 -11:05PM CUMMINGS FARM
9:30 11:10PM STRANGE POWERS:
STEPHIN MERRITT AND THE
MAGNETIC FIELDS
FULL SAIL UNIVERSITY'S FILM BACKLOT
10AM & 2PM KODAK FORUM: "STOP BY.
LEARN FILM. SHOOT FILM"
CENTRAL PARK, WINTER PARK
8 10:05PM POPCORN FLICK: THE APARTMENT

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 14
ENZIAN
10AM & 2PM KODAK FORUM: "STOP BY.
LEARN FILM. SHOOT FILM"
3:30 5:30PM WINTER'S BONE
6:30 8:30PM SHORTS #5: ANIMATED SHORTS
9:30-11:15PM HOMEWRECKER
REGAL WINTER PARK VILLAGE
1:30-3:15PM LOVELY, STILL
3:30 5:30PM THE TIGER NEXT DOOR
PRECEDED BY DEVOLUTION
4 -5:55PM SHORTS #1: "IGNITE"


6-8PM RACING DREAMS
PRECEDED BY Q &A
6:30 8:45PM HOME FILM: THAT'S
ENTERTAINMENT!


9-11PM


BEST WORST MOVIE
PRECEDED BYTHE S FROM HELL


9:30PM-12:05AM THE GIRL WITH THE
DRAGON TATTOO
PLAZA CINEMA CAFE
7 8:45PM HARRY BROWN
9:30- 11:PM THE TOPP TWINS:
UNTOUCHABLE GIRLS
EMBER DOWNTOWN ORLANDO
8 -11PM FILMMAKER WELCOME PARTY

THURSDAY, APRIL 15
ENZIAN
11AM-12:30PM PERSEVERANCE:
WOMEN IN INDUSTRY FORUM
1:30 3:30PM NO. 4 STREET OF OUR LADY
PRECEDED BY OVERNIGHT STAY
4:30 6:40PM THE LOTTERY PRECEDED BY
LESSONS LEARNED
7:30 9PM FLORIDA FEATURE: NEW LOW
9:45 11:45PM DUMBSTRUCK PRECEDED BY
THE POODLE TRAINER
REGAL WINTER PARK VILLAGE
4 -6PM SHORTS #3: "SMOLDER"
4:30 6:15PM PUNCHING THE CLOWN
6:30 8:15PM WAKING SLEEPING BEAUTY
7:15-9PM BOMBER
9 -10:50PM SHORTS #2: "BURN"
9:30 -11:40PM MY SUICIDE
PLAZA CINEMA CAFE
7PM-9PM I AM LOVE
9:30 -11:50PM K-20: THE FIEND WITH
TWENTY FACES
ORANGE COUNTY REGIONAL HISTORY CENTER
7 -10PM V.I.P. RECEPTION

FRIDAY, APRIL 16
ENZIAN
11AM-12:30PM THEARTOFTHE
PRODUCER FORUM
1:30 3:30PM OBSELIDIA


4:30 6:30 PM
7:30- 10:30PM


DRONES
A CASSAVETES EVENING
WITH GENA ROWLANDS
AND SEYMOUR CASSEL;
HOME FILM: FACES


12MID-1:30AM A MILLION IN THE MORNING
PRECEDED BY STONEY
REGAL WINTER PARK VILLAGE
1:30-3PM FILMMAKER FORUM
1:30 3:20PM LOST SPARROW PRECEDED BY
MY LIFE AS CHERRY
3:30 4:45 PM MID-AUGUST LUNCH
4 -6PM CLEANFLIX PRECEDED BY
WATERMELON MAN
5:30 7:15PM INTERNATIONAL SHORTS
6:30 8:15PM SPACE TOURISTS
7:45 9:30PM SHORTS #5: ANIMATED SHORTS
8:45- 10:30PM WELCOME
10- 11:35PM THE SUN CAME OUT
12MID-1:50AM THE REVENANT
PLAZA CINEMA CAFE
7 8:45PM LEAVES OF GRASS
9:30 11PM SOLITARY MAN
12MID-1:35AM TROLL 2


URBAN FLATS DOWNTOWN ORLANDO
8 -11PM INDUSTRY PARTY

SATURDAY, APRIL 17
ENZIAN
10 -11:30AM AWARDS BRUNCH
4-6PM RACING DREAMS
PRECEDED BY Q&A
7 8:30PM WAKING SLEEPING BEAUTY
9:30 11PM STRANGE POWERS:
STEPHIN MERRITT AND THE
MAGNETIC FIELDS
12MID-1:45AM MIDNIGHT SHORTS
REGAL WINTER PARK VILLAGE
12:15-2:15PM 3 X REAL: DOC SHORTS
SHOWCASE
1:30 3:30PM FLORIDA SHORTS: BEST
OF BROUHAHA
2:45 4:20PM THE SUN CAME OUT
4 5:45PM FLORIDA FEATURE: NEW LOW
5 6:45PM COOKING WITH STELLA
6:30 8:25PM THE WARLORDS
7:15 8:45PM THE TOPP TWINS:
UNTOUCHABLE GIRLS
9 10:45PM HARRY BROWN
9:30-11:05PM INTERNATIONAL
ANIMATED SHORTS
11:30PM -1:05AM TROLL 2
12MID-1:30AM A MILLION IN THE MORNING
PRECEDED BY STONEY

FULL SAIL UNIVERSITY'S FILM BACKLOT
8 -11PM REVEL19

SUNDAY, APRIL 18
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Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Culture
worthy of your calendar







A host of new art

and a world premiere


If you've heard about but
never attended 'Fringe,' this
is the year to discover and
become a fan of Orlando's
fantabulous Fringe Festival.
'Fringe' is an over-the-top
play/drama/cabaret festival
which is unique, concep-
tual, funky, and often beau-
tiful. The actual Festival
will take place the last two
weeks of May, but there
is a Fringe Preview Party
planned for April 12 from 7
p.m. to 11 p.m. at Lowndes
Shakespeare Center. With
more than 70 plays, acts,
and performances to
choose from at the Festival,
the Preview Party will of-
fer 3-minute teasers from
35 of the 75 companies
scheduled for the 2010
Fringe a perfect way to
make early choices. Tickets


for the Preview Party are
$28 including your official
2010 Fringe Button (which
you need to buy tickets for
any of the Fringe shows.)
The Festival Preview is at
812 E. Rollins Street; they
share a parking lot with the
Orlando Museum of Art.
Call 407-648-0077 or visit
Orlandofringe.org

32 Artists from UCF in
Downtown Maitland
In an inspired combination
of fine art, education, and
commerce, 32 artists from
the University of Central
Florida will exhibit their
work at The Village at Lake
Lily. Called Maximum Ca-
pacity, the free exhibit runs
from April 9 to April 16,
at the luxury apartment
complex at 925 S. Orlando


Ave. in Maitland. The UCF
student/artists have come
together to market, design
and construct their own
gallery opening. Under the
supervision of Professor
Robert Reedy, who under-
stands the importance of
giving his students 'real-
world' experience, the art-
ists have transformed raw
retail space into an urban
art gallery, beginning that
all-important transition
from student artist to ex-
hibiting artist. The space
is available thanks to the
generosity of Jon Wood,
President of Urbanscape
Properties. Opening recep-
tions (there are two) will be
Friday and Saturday, April
9 and 10, from 8 p.m. to
midnight. The gallery will
be open daily through Fri-
day, April16 from noon to 8
p.m. For more information
call Robert Reedy at 407-
719-9754 or email max-
cap2010@gmail.com.


Third Thursday
I've often written about
the fun openings that hap-
pen on "Third Thursday" in
downtown Orlando. That's
the night each month -
when all the downtown
galleries have openings
(free) for their new exhib-
its. Third Thursday arrives
next week April 15 from 6


p.m. to 9 p.m. In addition to
the must-see galleries that
fill the City Arts Factory and
the Gallery at Avalon Island
(both on Pine Street), other
businesses have found ways
to make Third Thursday
work for them and for the
artists they present pre-
senting art that is related to
their business.
That is definitely the case
at Dog & Friends at 431 E.
Central Blvd. who invite
the public to an 'opening'
where they will present
paintings and sculptures
by Sally Evans and Heather
Sooder. Sally Evans' bold,
colorful pet portraits have
received national acclaim
and Heather Sooder's soul-
ful sculptures bring an ar-
tistic depth to the subject
of animals. Curated by Brad
Biggs of BiggsLee Artistic
Services, the opening is part
of Third Thursday (April
15) from 6-9 p.m. Call
407-247-4552, or email
bbiggs214@aol.com


Orlando Philharmonic Offers
World Premiere
There is more than a hint
of Easter in the Orlando
Philharmonic's upcoming
symphony concert, which
it is are calling Color Cathe-
dral. Led by Music Director
Christopher Wilkins, the


Thursday, April 8,2010 Page 15

Philharmonic will perform
Rimsky-Korsakov's Russian
Easter Overture, Respighi's
Church Windows, and De-
bussy's Sunken Cathedral.
A significant addition to
this program is a world pre-
miere work by Composer-
In-Residence Stella Sung, ti-
tled The Circle Closes. Sung
describes the work as "two
distinct sections joined
together without break.
Ultimately, I found myself
thinking of this composi-
tion as a 'Yin and Yang' ex-
pression, the Asian circular
symbol that represents and
encompasses the duality of
heaven and earth with the
intent for unified balance."
As a unique feature, crystal
'singing bowls' will be used
as part of the instrumenta-
tion. The concert will take
place Saturday, April 17 at
8 p.m. at the Bob Carr Per-
forming Arts Centre. For
tickets, call 407-770-0071,
or visit www.orlandophil.
org




SGARRICK
Josh Garrick is a writer, photographer,
educator, and fine art curator. He is a
member of the Curatorial Council for the
Museum of Florida Art. Garrick can be
reached at joshgarrick9@gmail.com
or 407-522-3906.


105 S. Magnolia Ave, Orlando, FL


The 8th Annual Orlando

Cabaret Festival


April 30 May 16

Karen Akers
Mad Cow Theatre's intimate 2-the-
atre complex in downtown Orlando
plays host to The Eighth Annual
Orlando Cabaret Festival, April 30 -
May 16, 2010. Over 40 performances
of jazz, pop, Broadway, comedy, and
a few surprises will feature many
of Central Florida's favorite artists
along with artists from the New York KT Sullivan
Cabaret scene. This year we are
presenting three world-class head-
liners that define both classic and
contemporary cabaret at its greatest:
Karen Akers, KT Sullivan and The
Broadway Boys.

407-927-8788
The Broadway Boys

Mad Cow Theatre
In the heart of Downtown Orlando
Convenient Parking across the street in the Library Garage


I


I


www.orlandocabaret.com


I


1










Opinion/ Editorial


Perspectives

by...







On the perfectibility of

man. Of males.


"I sometimes think that God,
in creating man, somewhat
overestimatedHis ability."
- Oscar Wilde

I am going to give a "talk" in
May at the Winter Park Uni-
versity Club. This rambling
essay is a search for a topic.
Over the past few years,
I've explored the nature
of beauty and have made
the case for optimism (a
distinct challenge). I've re-
counted the contributions
four specific men made to
the quality of my life as well
as touched on the value of
history.
I am intrigued by the re-
search on the human brain
and how "some" scientists
argue that men and women
really do think differently
and, as a result, reach dif-
ferent conclusions. This
seems "old hat" ever since,
well, that book came out
titled, "Men Are from Mars
...". Nonetheless, science
seems to be validating that
premise with research and
clinical observation.
What intrigues me about
our species is how we are so
beastly and women seem to
get a pass on that, as if they
are not, somehow, complic-
it in what we are. Whenever
I hear of the latest whole-
sale atrocity (99.9 percent
of the time committed by
men or gangs of men) I


wonder if I am capable of
that? Recall the mass kill-
ings of the Tutsis by the Hu-
tus. Nearly 900,000 people
were slaughtered in a mat-
ter of days by men wielding
machetes in 1994 Africa.
Could I have been a Nazi?
A concentration camp
guard? Could I have been
a soldier who rounded up
Cherokee Indians in 1838
Georgia and marched them
to their deaths during the
infamous "Trail of Tears"?
Just following orders, don't-
cha see. Such a timeless jus-
tification.
Could I have been just
another Southern '60s
redneck who terrorized
blacks by lynching uppity
"negras"? Or burned crosses
and bombed churches?
Men who do such things
are, for all intents and pur-
poses, just like all other
men, just different.
But where does that dif-
ference originate and why
do women seemingly get a
pass on accountability con-
cerning any of the atroci-
ties that are so common in
our species?
To women who suggest
"beastly" behavior is strictly
a male prerogative, I ask
one fundamental question:
"Where exactly do males
come into existence and
spend their many formative
months?" That's correct.


Tucked securely, motherly
in your tummies. Out of
which came Adolf Hitler,
Mao, Stalin and any of the
countless machete-wield-
ing marauders who hacked
to death tens of thousands
of innocents in Rwanda
or who unloaded Jews at
Auschwitz.
No, just as it takes two to
tango, it takes two to create
our species and we are the
gnarliest, nastiest, tough-
est species on the planet.
Thank you, Dad. And a tip
of the hat to Mom, too.
We are, after all, your little
boundless bundles of joy.
Just look what the stork de-
livered! Is that you, Adolf?
But if we (mankind)
were merely atrocious,
what sort of story would
that be? So very boooring!
We create incredibly "beau-
tiful" art in all its many
manifestations and we are
capable, too, of inspired
acts of compassion and
self-sacrifice (although sci-
ence is suggesting such acts
may not be so altruistic).
And, as my sister says, "We
are the universe talking to
itself," at least in this part of
the Milky Way. We are such
clever little monkeys. Ya-
kety-yak! Can we talk about
it? She asked.
Actually, right there is
a beeeeeeg difference be-
tween men and women.
I don't mind (so much)
talking about "something"
oh, say, six or seven times.
Really, I don't. I'm a Chatty-
Cathy, up to a point and on
a subject of my (or mutu-
ally agreed-upon) choosing.
But, after something has
been discussed, after the
differences of opinion(s)
have been formed, delineat-
ed and discussed (debated,
if you will), what is gained
by revisiting the subject
yet again? Clarification has
been achieved. If"X" is 100
percent clear and under-


stood, what is to be gained
by going over it again? And
again. Ad nauseam.
I don't want to make a
broad generalization but
I will. "Some" women will
"jaw" some things to death.
Literally. Just to make a
point. Or, at least, until the
conversation is no longer,
hmmm, quite so engaging.
Hah! This subject would
be an appropriate topic
for further exploration. So
many examples abound.
I am interested, at the
moment, however, in fa-
thers and fatherhood. I've
been a father for 40 years.
My daughter turned 40 on
April 6. I've not done any-
thing in my life that has
been as rewarding or as
challenging. Children, to
state the obvious, change
your perspective. I believe
humans are selfish and
men, generally speak-
ing, are more selfish than
women. Whatever the sci-
ence behind that assertion
(on females being less self-
ish), I have sufficient anec-
dotal evidence to make that
claim and do.
Fathers are one of the
"really big" themes of lit-
erature. We all have one
and/or are one. It's about as
basic as it gets. Either dad
measures up or he doesn't.
He's either a force or he is
absent. He sets and enforc-
es standards or he acqui-
esces. He's either comfort-
able with who he is or he is
troubled. He is either lov-
ing, affectionate and sup-
portive or something less
than. Most men are fathers
and they comprise a whole
myriad of qualities that are
a mixture of both the posi-
tive and negative. At times.
They may be strong, ener-
getic and ambitious when
young yet inexplicably (to
you) surly and bitter when
old. They may be unfaithful
but loyal husbands or some


combination in between.
They may be treacherous,
demonic and complete
scoundrels but love you un-
conditionally as their child.
Fathers can gut an enemy
one day yet cry heartfelt
tears over missing their
loved ones the next.
I've said before that
there is no bigger gift a
child can receive than a lov-
ing, caring mother. From
that, all else follows. It's
both a leg up and a head
start. If a child gets an
equivalent father, he/she is
doubly blessed.
I marvel at the complex-
ity of life and specifically, I
marvel at the human spe-
cies. We are both the de-
monic and angelic. And no-
where is that more clearly
demonstrated, our dual na-
tures (our dueling nature),
than in men (as in male).
It is no wonder to me
that the gods mankind
has forever created have
this duality of personal-
ity. I think immediately of
Shiva (a Hindu god), the de-
stroyer and the benefactor.
Or, Yahweh. Two brotherly
peas in the godly pod.
That is our story (is us)
encapsulated by what we
worship.
Yet I share Henry David
Thoreau's sentiment, "I
know of no more encourag-
ing fact than the unques-
tionable ability of man to
elevate his life by conscious
behavior." I so want to be-
lieve that.
Now there's a subject: On
the perfectibility of man. Of
males.
Do we have our work cut
out for us?



TALK JEPSON

Chris Jepson's opinions are made
independently of the newspaper.
Write him at jepson@MEDIAmerica.us.


Letters tothe Editor


Teacher pay should
be performance-based
Recently there's been a sig-
nificant amount of debate
surrounding the proposed
legislation regarding Senate
Bill 6 and House Bill 7189.
The focus of this legisla-
tion shifts compensation
toward rewarding excellent
teachers for student learn-
ing gains versus the current
structure that focuses on


teacher longevity.
The bill would require
school districts to adopt
performance appraisals
for teachers and school
administrators to evaluate
performance in the class-
room. Beginning with the
2014-2015 school year, per-
formance appraisals will be
based on student learning
gains and other factors re-
lating to the instructional


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practices used by the teach-
er, including knowledge
of the subject matter and
classroom management.
This bill does not re-
quire that a teacher bring
students to grade level if
he or she receives the stu-
dents two to three years
behind grade level. Rather,
it evaluates and rewards the
gains that a teacher makes
with students over a year's


time. Learning gains are
to be measured by exist-
ing assessments statewide.
School districts have the
next three years to develop
or acquire end-of-course
assessments to measure
learning gains in subjects
and grade-levels not tested
by these examinations.
The bill also authorizes
school districts to finan-
cially encourage teachers


luFM89


FM 89m9 Iuso


to take on the greater chal-
lenges in our education
system. The bill requires
school districts to provide
incentives for high-priority
schools and critical short-
ages areas, such as math
and science, in order to bet-
ter prepare all students to
be successful. By providing
incentives for teaching in
high-priority schools and
critical shortage areas, we
will be able to continue de-
creasing the gap between
the highest performing
schools and the lowest.
The current system cat-
egorizes teachers as either
successful or unsuccessful.
However, in 2008-2009,
99.7 percent of teachers
received a "satisfactory"
evaluation, yet 50 percent
of high school students, 35
percent of middle school
> turn to LETTERS on PAGE 18


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Page 16 Thursday, April 8, 2010





Winter Park/Maitland Observer


Play On!
y "


Conservative commentary
& opinions of Louis Roney
Harvard'42-Distinguished Prof, Em.-
UCF
2004 Fla. Alliance for the Arts award
(Assisted by b.w.:Joy Roney)
"You are entitled to your own opinions-
you are not entitled to your own facts"
Daniel Patrick Moynihan

Noted & quoted
My greatest fears
are coming true
when I see our lefty
President Barack Obama
walking in step with Nasty
Pelousy, Hugo Chavez, Fidel
Castro, Vladimir Putin, and
the rest. It's not a matter of
where we're going. What
scares me is, we're almost
there.
Two years ago I said to my
b.w., "If the U.S. does not re-
turn to original principles, I
sense with my whole being
that we have seen the best
years that this country has
to offer, that from here on
it's downhill all the way."
B.w. agreed.
From The Patriot Post, Feb-
ruary 15: "In lecturing us
about blowing our money,
The Great Ozbama displays
breathtaking gall.... I hold
in my casino chip-calloused
fingers a list procured ... of


Mrs. Obama's staff and their
salaries. She reportedly
has a staff of 22 assistants.
... a Chief of Staff costing
$172,000 a year; a Deputy
Chief of Staff at $90,000; a
Director of Policy and Proj-
ects at $140,000; a Direc-
tor of Communications at
$102,000; a Deputy Director
of Scheduling at $62,000;
two Social Secretaries...
one at $65,000, one at
$64,000; an Associate Direc-
tor of Correspondence at
$45,000, an Assistant to the
Social Secretary at $36,000,
and more, in total consum-
ing $6.3-million annually
...." Columnist Dan Ken-
nedy
Obama is messin' up bad
with his: 1. alienation of
our best allies, i.e., Israel,
Poland, Czech Republic,
Colombia, etc., and 2. his
eradication of the world's
best health care system -
which involves 1/6 of the
U.S. economy.
President Obama took
from our pockets some
$787 billion to pep up the
economy before unem-
ployment ran rampant
in the land. Little of this
money has yet been spent
to make jobs. This money
may mysteriously reappear
when Dems need campaign
money to elect their guys in
November FDR used this
ploy way back in the '30s
and it worked! Are Obama
and FDR characters drawn
straight from the "bad
boys" of history?
"Democracy is a pathetic
belief in the collective
wisdom of individual igno-
rance." H.L. Mencken
Many school teachers re-
port that kids today pay


Thursday, April 8,2010 Page 17


no attention to lectures or
instruction. They also do
not listen to their parents.
One likely communica-
tive method is that one kid
hears something on TV and
passes it on to others. How
far can secondhand soaps
get you when you live in the
real world?
I'm trying once again this
year to get my b.w. to go out
and buy some "new spring
clothes." As yet she has "not
been in the mood." I bet
plenty of other husbands
will view me as a menace
influencing their clothes-
hungry mates.
"Recession is when your
neighbor loses his job, De-
pression is when you lose
your job, Recovery is when
Obama loses his job" -
Anonymous
Eric Massa, former New
York U.S. Representative,
can't tell his preposterous
"tickle fight" story to people
who have served in the
U.S. Navy. In my four years'
experience as a shipboard
naval officer, I assure you
that any guy starting that
kind of thing may well have
ended up over the side in
the middle of the night.
Mr. Obama is perennially
depending on his "unpopu-
lar" platform. Also, hardly a
day seems to go by without
reference to his question-
able credentials for lead-
ing our land. Sinking polls
don't seem to bother him,
and sinking our national
wealth into his favorite
projects seems to afford
him his best jollies.
Did you catch the short an-
nouncement on radio that
His Divine Majesty Obama


is planning to control all
fishing, by sports and pro-
fessional anglers in both
freshwater and saltwater?
He's no longer preaching;
he's now meddlin' in dan-
gerous waters.
A Longwood neighbor
sends me the following:
"Thank God For Obama!
WHY? Obama is destroy-
ing the Democratic Party
before our eyes! Dennis
Moore quit, had never lost a
race Evan Bayh quit, had
never lost a race Byron
Dorgan quit, had never lost
a race Harry Reid Soon
to be GONE. (We hope!)
These are just a handful of
the Democrats whose po-
litical careers Obama has
destroyed! Thanks Obama!"
As Ronald Reagan said, "The
trouble with our liberal
friends is not that they're
ignorant; it's just that they
know so much that isn't
so."
Asked to name the two best
presidents in my memory, I


mused a moment and said:
Dwight Eisenhower and
Ronald Reagan.
We simple citizens darn
well better learn to under-
stand thejargon that flows
in the narratives about
"government doings." The
Truth may or may not be
buried in the Maelstrom
that is written to suck us in,
and to enlighten us. How-
ever, if we don't discover
the truth or the lack of
it the scoundrels will
never be found out, and we
all will go down with the
ship...
"The budget should be bal-
anced, the Treasury should
be refilled, public debt
should be reduced, the ar-
rogance of officialdom
should be tempered and
controlled, and the as-
sistance to foreign lands
should be curtailed lest
Rome become bankrupt.
People must learn to work,
instead of living on public
assistance." Cicero, 55 BC


"Copyrighted Material



SSyndicated'Content



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Providers"



*u/7


ERIC MASSA, FORMER NEW YORK

U.S. REPRESENTATIVE, CAN'T TELL

HIS PREPOSTEROUS "TICKLE FIGHT"

STORY TO PEOPLE WHO HAVE SERVED IN

THE U.S. NAVY. IN MY FOUR YEARS'

EXPERIENCE AS A SHIPBOARD NAVAL

OFFICER, I ASSURE YOU THAT ANY GUY

STARTING THAT KIND OF THING MAY

WELL HAVE ENDED UP OVER THE SIDE IN

THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT.


Edtonal


Available


^_- |


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- lommqw-


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LETTERS I Proposed legislation would give teacher raises based on their students' learning gains


< continued from page 16

66THE STATUS QUO

CLEARLY IS NOT

WORKING WHEN

IT COMES TO

DETERMINING

WHICH TEACHERS

ARE HELPING OUR

STUDENTS MAKE

THE LEARNING

GAINS THAT

THEY NEED TO BE

SUCCESSFUL. 9


students, and 30 percent of el-
ementary students did not make
a year's worth of progress (and 60
percent, 40 percent and 30 per-
cent, respectively, were not reading
on grade level).
The status quo clearly is not
working when it comes to deter-
mining which teachers are helping
our students make the learning
gains that they need to be success-
ful.
This common-sense approach
maintains teacher salaries at pres-
ent levels, so no teacher will see a
salary reduction under this plan.
But performance increases will be
focused on allowing school dis-
tricts to recognize and reward ex-
cellence in teaching by establishing
a performance-based appraisal sys-
tem for increases in compensation.
The bill revises contracts for
teachers hired on or after July of
this year, introducing one proba-
tionary contract and up to four
annual contracts. By establishing


yearly contracts, school districts
can continue to reward its teach-
ers, now with raises based on
classroom success, as well as re-
move those teachers who are not
providing an opportunity for their
students to learn. Current teach-
ers are grandfathered-in under this
system. The bill does not eliminate
tenure for the current 175,000
Florida teachers.
The bill creates a performance
fund for purposes of implement-
ing the requirements of the bill,
including performance pay, per-
formance appraisal systems, and
end-of-course assessments. The
performance fund equals 5 percent
of the state, local and federal FEFP
funds. The bill sets aside more than
$900 million a year that must be
used to raise salaries for teachers in
high-poverty schools, teachers of
subjects that are in high demand,
and teachers whose students are
making learning gains.
My two children and I are proud


products of Orange County Pub-
lic Schools, and I would never
do anything to jeopardize future
generations from attending the
world-class education opportuni-
ties we have here in our commu-
nity. I recognize that a quality K-12
education program is vital to the
constituents of District 38. As your
state representative, one of my top
priorities has been ensuring that
all students have access to a high-
quality education that will enable
them to succeed alongside the best
and brightest not just in the U.S.,
but also around the world.
Due to my committee assign-
ments, I will not be able to cast a
vote on this important legislation
until it is on the House floor, but I
will continue to give input to my
fellow members as the bill pro-
gresses.
-Florida Rep. Bryan Nelson


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for that) it is best to convert now while taxes are at their lowest in years.
Q. But I still have to pay taxes on Social Security benefits. I really hate that.
A. Changing to a Roth-IRA can actually reduce or eliminate paying taxes on Social Security
Benefits altogether!
Q. What about the required minimum distributions. Do I still have to take those?
A. When you convert to a Roth-IRA you no longer have to take forced withdrawals. And
can leave them to accumulate for interest that can be income tax-free.
Q. Fact is, I really don't need additional income from those withdrawals.
A. Then you're in luck. You can use the Roth-IRA to grow a large cash reserve (using the
extra tax free interest or earnings) to pass on to your spouse, children and grandchildren
100% income TAX free for generations which will provide for their retirement. Or you can
use the money yourself to pay for any unexpected catastrophic event such as nursing
home costs, etc.
Don't miss this opportunity to learn why you should do a
ROTH-IRA Conversion sooner than later!
(Later can cost you thousands in tax-free retirement income)
Prepare Now!
Attend the Roth "Taxed to Tax-Free" Seminar.
Attendance is Free!
Seating is limited, so to guarantee seating please reserve early.
Thursday, April 15, 2010 2:00 P.M. 4:00 P.M.
Tuesday, April 20, 2010 10:00 A.M. Noon
Winter Park Public Library
460 E. New England AV., 3rd Floor Melanson Room
Winter Park, FL 32789
RSVP at 877-209-0101
Visit us at: www.asafeharbor.com ~ OR
Email us at Bob@asafeharbor.com for a Free analysis on the Roth Conversion
*It would be closer to 27 months but only if the conversion was done 1/1/2010.
If conversion was done 2/1/2010 then it would be 26 months. If done 3/1/2010 then 25 months etc.


Page 18 Thursday, April 8, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer





Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Thursday, April 8,2010 Page 19


Observer


Homes


gould+
company
real estate solutions
240 N. Pennsylvania Ave., Suite 102
Winter Park, Florida 32789
407.622.6412
www.gouldandcompany.net


1739 Sunset Dr., Winter Park
$755,000 or $3,500 Per Month
2,600 SF 4 Bedrooms, 3.5 Baths
Contact Linda Ivey
407.619.0200


iVliltauctl YIC)r ie, vin Yv r lLIal I lll i a nI V a e, vv lILCI ar i l
Private retreat within minutes to Park Ave. Cus- Location plus! Downtown on Park Ave. Loads of
tom 4bed 2full+ 2 half baths. Large screened charm and move-in condition. Just steps to golf
and heated pool. Great home for entertaining, course and shopping. $799,000.
$699,000.


541 2
541 CENTRAL AVE.TMAITLAND
1950's home has been continuously updated and maintained. The
backyard is a paradise featuring: summer kitchen, TV/stereo, bar,
salt-water pool, upgrades and move-in condition.
Tami Klein, Realtor I 407.538-4688
tami@tamiklein.com


Together, we will:
Tami Klein, REALTOR Togetherwe w
407.538.4688 Secure a Qualified Tenant
Handle Full Accounting
Suzy M. Barnes, REALTOR Act as Liaison for Tenant/Services
321.277.2182 Inspect Premises on Regular Basis


486 Penny Lane
Gated Maitland neighborhood. Light open floor
plan. Large corner lot backs to conservation area.
Plantation shutters, ten foot ceilings. Affordable
$299,000.


1531 SUNSET DRIVE, W ER PARK
Light & bright, custom 2-story pool home on brick street! Down-
stairs Master. Family room w/fireplace opens to patio & pool! 3
Bedrooms upstairs + bonus room! $549,000.
Ruth Anne Arch, REALTOR I 407-761-2799
www.oldetownbrokers.com


CANTON AVE: Best kept secret in Win-
ter Park! 5th floor end unit with numer-
ous upgrades. 2 bedrooms, 2 baths plus
glassed sun room with storage. One block
to Park Avenue shops and restaurants.
Great opportunity to own in Downtown
Winter Park. $329,000


Land Company

Celebrating Over 100 Years of Hand-
shake Integrity! Since 1904...

407-644-2900
ww tMd
l


AZALEA IN THE WOOD -HISTORIC
HOME On Little Lake Fairview, the
setting has wonderful oak trees, with ap-
prox. 2.5 acres and lake frontage of 163'.
The main house has 3,882 sq.ft. with
three bedrooms downstairs and three up-
stairs. Two guest apartments. $1,450,000


Janis B. Fuller
407.247.7314

407.644.1234 x119
janis@fanniehillman. com
www.fanniehi lman. com


311 E. Morse Blvd. 6-10, Winter Park 311 E. Morse Blvd. 1-3, Winter Park
2/2 with open kitchen. Screened porch with view LAKEFRONT on Lake Osceola. Updated with
of pool and slight view of Lake Osceola. Under- two bedrooms and two baths Plus Large Office.
ground garage, laundry in unit. 3rd floor. Pets Master has a walk-in-closet. Includes 2 parking
allowed. Reduced to $275,000 spaces. 2nd Floor.......Reduced to $569,000.


Allaallla I onEaKe VlalalllaU
Absolutely beautiful 2/2 with hardwood floors.
great storage, inside laundry and walk-in closet.
A great lifestyle and pets are welcome. 3rd Floor
unit, only $330,000


;11,


John McDade
407.721.7275

407.644.1234 x120
john@fanniehillman.com
www.fanniehillman.com


Fnie ila

ASO IAE


FaneHila


Homes brought to you by:
Fannie Hillman + Associates


Serving Central
Florida for over
29 years!

407.644.1234
fanniehillman.com






Page 20 Thursday, April 8, 2010 Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Pending sales reach all-time high; median price makes a monthly gain


Members of the Orlando Regional
Realtor Association filed 4,043 new
sales contracts in the month of Feb-
ruary, the greatest monthly tally since
the organization began recording the


Zip Code
32751
Overall

Single Family
Overall
Bank Owned
Short Sales
Normal

Multi Family
Overall
Bank Owned
Short Sales
Normal

Zip
32789
Overall

Single Family
Overall
Bank Owned
Short Sales
Normal

Multi Family
Overall
Bank Owned
Short Sales
Normal


Sales
32


8
2
1
5


24
13
4
7



Sales
37


29
7
6
16


8
4
0
4


statistic in 2005, at the height of Or-
lando's red-hot market. The number
represents a jump of 66.11 percent
more new contracts filed in February
2010 than in February 2009 (2,434).


Avg List $
$151,103


$386,775
$207,200
$309,000
$474,160


$72,546
$55,546
$97,500
$89,857



Avg List $
$450,149


$500,597
$672,371
$178,133
$546,369


$267,274
$34,574
$0
$499,975


Average
$139,014


$345,250
$203,500
$290,000
$413,000


$70,269
$56,188
$79,625
$91,071



Average
$405,097


$448,211
$598,918
$138,917
$498,262


$248,811
$34,247
$0
$463,375


Median
$69,575


$251,000
$203,500
$29,000
$212,000


$48,000
$40,000
$79,750
$48,000



Median
$257,000


$340,000
$350,700
$127,000
$406,500


$57,250
$33,500
$0
$245,000


The following is a snapshot of area
zip codes 32751 and 32789 that are
following this regional trend:


Days on
Mkt
81


128
119
17
153


65
22
301
10

Days on
Mkt
205


197
81
189
251


234
33
0
436


Days to
Close
49


46
30
133
36


49
30
125
41

Days to
Close
44


48
24
108
35


30
29
0
31


ioul raim Avenue, winter rarK
1,876 sqft. 3 beds, 3 baths + office, open
kitchen to family room, 2 car garage,
screen patio, roof (09), plumbing (05),
double pane windows, freshly painted in-
side on large lot 84x136. Move in ready.
$299,000.


MaryStuart Day + Megan Cross
407.620.8683 + 407.353.9997
marystuart @fanniehillman.com
fanniehillman.com


* Fop Producers
past 5 years.

* AwardecdFive Star Best
in Client Satisfaction
SRealtor.com Marketing
iAwardof Exce lence


100 DESTINY COVE, ALTAMONTE SPRINGS: 4/3, 3384SF
in gated Spring Lake Hills with lake access. Beautifully
updated. Spectacular screened pool, gourmet kitchen and
luxurious master suite. Great value at $449,000.
Bill Adams, Realtor I 407.463-9560 I 407.644.1234x222
bill@fanniehillman.com I www.fanniehillman.com


Winter Park Village


Finished ground floor office space for lease.
3500 square feet next to Guitar Center.
Excellent visibility and access. $15 psf Gross.
George Brusco, CCIM. Casto Southeast Realty Services
LLC. 941.552.2705. www.castolp.com
Brokers protected


FIRST

FLORIDA
t LENDING CORPORATION



hWistoicallky low rates
tkalk aPdr~l o
AK T *A


1107 SHADY LANE, MAITLAND: Magnificent 5000+ s.f. in
beautiful Maitland Forest. 5 bed / 5.5 bath home boosts
wood floors, gourmet kitchen, a fireplace, screened pool.
The WP/Maitland schools are top notch. $979,000.
Bill Adams, Realtor I 407.463-9560 I 407.644.1234x222
bill@fanniehillman.com I www.fanniehillman.com


WEST COVE CONDO, CONDO ON LAKE MAITLAND.
Units range from lovely 2 bdrm 1200 SF unit up to 2500 SF
penthouse. Condo features pool/spa, picnic area, marina, fitness
center, clubhouse. $289,900-$599,000.
JoAnn Beck I 407-629-6369
Beck Realty, LLC


Home Expo 2010
- It's where the
experts are
Looking to buy, sell or
renovate your home? Not
sure where to start? The
Home Builders Associa-
tion of Metro Orlando is
here to help! For the first
time ever, members of the
Home Builders Associa-
tion will come together
in one venue to meet
with consumers and of-
fer professional advice on
building, renovating and
purchasing a home. Doz-
ens of homebuilders, re-
modelers, lenders and in-
dustry professionals will
be available to answer
questions and provide
valuable information de-
signed to help guide con-
sumers through the entire
process.
The Home Builders Asso-
ciation of Metro Orlando
will be hosting a consum-
er Home Expo on Satur-
day, April 10 from noon to
4 p.m. The event will take
place at The Home Depot
at Millennia, 4403 Millen-
nia Plaza Way, Orlando.
The Home Expo will fea-
ture home buying semi-
nars. Monty Anderson
Construction Group will
be building a beautiful
1,800 square foot, func-
tional home in the park-
ing lot in the four days
leading up to the Expo.
when the show opens on
Saturday.


AMi


Page 20 Thursday, April 8, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer





Winter Park / Maitland Observer


Homebuyer credit deadline looms


A Realtor can help you find just the right home and guide the purchase process before June 30


The clock is ticking: Only
a few weeks remain for
homebuyers to take advan-
tage of the federal home-
buyer tax credit. Buyers
must sign a home purchase
contract by April 30 and
close on the deal by June
30, 2010, or they'll miss out
on the chance to earn mon-
ey back from Uncle Sam.
First-time homebuyers
can receive up to $8,000 in
tax credits, while buyers
who already own a home
may qualify for up to $6,500
in tax credits. Since the
first-time homebuyer tax
credit was approved, it has
helped more than 1.2 mil-
lion people purchase their
first home, according to
housing analysts.
Lower sales prices, an
inventory well stocked with
homes at all price points,
stable interest rates, and


the recent extension and
expansion of the federal
income tax credit have cre-
ated a great market for buy-
ers in Orlando.
But buyers today face
many difficult questions: Is
now the right time to invest
in a home or condomin-
ium? How do I know if a
home I like is really a good
value? Am I better off pur-
chasing a property in fore-
closure that needs repairs,
or should I buy a more ex-
pensive home in 'mint' con-
dition? Can I qualify for a
mortgage loan? Do I qualify
for the federal tax credit -
up to $8,000?
In today's fast-changing
market, buyers benefit
from a Realtor's training,
experience, and expertise.
By drawing on their knowl-
edge of the local real estate
market, housing trends,


and home values, they
help buyers avoid poten-
tially costly mistakes and
keep the process running
smoothly. A Realtor can
guide buyers at every step
of the transaction, saving
them time, money, and ag-
gravation.
Unlike a real estate li-
censee who has simply
met the state's licensing re-
quirements to do business
in Florida, a Realtor takes
the profession to the next
level by voluntarily agree-
ing to act under, and abide
by, a code of ethics. Realtors
must agree to a set of pro-
fessional principles, serve
clients fairly, and maintain
a high level of knowledge
about the process of buying
and selling real estate.
A Realtor can provide a
homebuyer with a full com-
plement of services:


Identify suitable prop-
erties for your lifestyle and
wallet.
Provide information
about neighborhoods, com-
munities and condo devel-
opments.
Determine the right
price range how much
home you can afford to buy.
Offer advice about the
personal and financial data
needed to apply for a home
loan.
Answer your questions
about real estate values,
taxes, utility costs, city or
county services and facili-
ties, and potential zoning
changes.
Discuss the pros and
cons of buying a property
in financial distress.
Help you negotiate the
purchase, including fac-
tors like price negotiation,
financing, terms, date of


possession, repairs, and fur-
nishings or equipment.
Assist you in finding
qualified professionals to
do property investigations
and provide written re-
ports.
Provide guidance
through the closing process
to make sure the transac-
tion completes smoothly.
Buying a home is a huge
commitment and a major
financial investment. With
a Realtor involved, a buyer
can relax knowing the pur-
chase is in safe, knowledge-
able, capable, and caring
hands.
For more information or
to find an Orlando realtor,
visit the Orlando Regional
Realtor Association Web
site at www.orlrealtor.com.

-Orlando Regional
RealtorAssociation


c0MPAN


851 Georgia Ave. $3,500,000
4BR I 3.1 BA I 4,314 SF
Prestiaious Winter Park estate.


441 E. Kings Way $1,195,000 141 Trismen Terr. $1,595,000 1710 Lake Shore Dr. $1,349,000
4 BR I 3.2 BA I 4,189 SF 4 BR I 3.1 BA I 4,748 SF 4 BR I 4.1 BA I 4,042 SF
Olde Winter Park pool home. Fabulous views of Lake Virginia. Rose Isle lakefront pool home.
V 000011011ww- .........


620 Darcey Dr. $359,900
4BR I 2BA I 2,068 SF
Renovated in Brookshire Heights


1431 Mayfield Ave. $569,000 1192 Valley Creek Run. $229,500
5 BR I 2.5 BA I 2,661 SF 3 BR I 2 BA I 1,993 SF


Two-story Winter Park pool home


Adorable Lost Creek home.


1558 Indian Dance Ct. $584,900
5 BR I 3 BA I 2,952 SF
Oaks of Maitland pool home


Thursday, April 8, 2010 Page 21








Page 22 Thursday, April 8, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer


ItepalNotices EIEEIE~.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE No. 2009CA3668-14
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY,
AS TRUSTEE IN TRUST FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE
CERTIFICATEHOLDERS FOR ARGENT SECURITIES
INC. 2006-W4, ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-W4,
PLAINTIFF,
VS.
ALl VOLKAN GUL, ET AL.
DEFENDANT(S).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 31, 2010
in the above action, I will sell to the highest bid-
der for cash at Seminole, Florida, on JUN 03 2010,
at 11:00 AM, at Room S201 of Courthouse 301
N. Park Ave., Sanford, FL 32771 for the following
described property:

Condominium Unit 268, The Stratford, A
Winter Park Condominium, together with an
undivided interest in the common elements,
according to the Declaration of Condominium
thereof recorded in Official Record Book
5851, Page 763, as amended from time
to time, of the Public Records of Seminole
County, Florida

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale. The Court, in its dis-
cretion, may enlarge the time of the sale. Notice
of the changed time of sale shall be published as
provided herein.
Dated MAR 31 2010
MARYANNE MORSE
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By Tina Smith
Deputy Clerk of the Court
Prepared by:
Gladstone Law Group, P.A.
1499 W. Palmetto Park Rd, Suite 300
Boca Raton, FL 33486

If you are a person with a disability who needs
accommodation in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, for
the provision of certain assistance. Please con-
tact Court Administration at 301 N. Park Avenue,
Sanford, Florida 32771, telephone number (407)
665-4227, within 2 working days of your receipt of
this document; If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-
955-8771.
4/8,4/15



IN THE COUNTY COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.: 09-CC-15099
OVERLOOKAT PARKSIDE ERROL ESTATES CONDO-
MINIUM ASSOCIATION, INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
DELTA CROOKS and ARIEL SMITH,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: ARIEL SMITH
710 Ashworth Overlook Drive, Unit A
Apopka, FL 32712
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to enforce a lien
foreclosure on the following property in Orange
County, Florida:
Unit A, Building No. 60, OVERLOOK AT
PARKSIDE CONDOMINIUM, according to the
Declaration of Condominium thereof as re-
corded in Official Records Book 8585, Page
715, amended in Official Records Book 8654,
Page 813, Official Records Book 8771, Page
1234, Official Records Book 8793, Page
1664, and any amendments thereto, of the
Public Records of Orange County, Florida
A lawsuit has been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your written defenses,
if any, to it on JEFF A. STONE, ESQUIRE, Plaintiff's
Attorney, whose address is CLAYTON & MCCULLOH,
1065 MAITLAND CENTER COMMONS BLVD., MAI-
TLAND, FLORIDA 32751, within thirty (30) days
after the first publication of this notice, and file the
original with the Clerk of this Court either before
service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately there-
after; otherwise a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the Lien Foreclosure
Complaint.
DATED on 03/17/10.
Lydia Gardner
Clerk of the Circuit & County Courts
By: KERRY BRICKNER
CIVIL COURT SEAL
As Deputy Clerk
NOTICE TO PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please
contact Court Administration at 425 North Orange
Avenue, Suite 2130, Orlando, Florida 32801, tele-
phone (407)836-2303, within 2 working days of
your receipt of this Summons; if you are hearing
impaired, call 1-800-955-8771; if you are voice
impaired, call: 1-800-955-8770.
4/1,4/8



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE No. 59-2009-CA-005165
THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK
OF NEWYORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATE-
HOLDERS CWABS, INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFI-
CATES, SERIES 2005-AB5,
PLAINTIFF,
VS.
JORGE BERNAL, ET AL.
DEFENDANT(S).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 20, 2009
in the above action, I will sell to the highest bid-
der for cash at Seminole, Florida, on May 27, 2010,
at 11:00 AM, at Room S201 of Courthouse 301
N. Park Ave., Sanford, FL 32771 for the following
described property:

LOT 38, SANDALWOOD, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOFAS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
18, PAGE 11, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
SEMINOLE COUNTY, FLORIDA BY VIRTUE
OF THAT CERTAIN / WARRANTY DEED / RE-
CORDED / 11/04/03 IN OFFICIAL RECORDS
BOOK/ 5085 / PAGE 698, PUBLIC RECORDS
OF SEMINOLE COUNTY, FLORIDA.

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale. The Court, in its dis-
cretion, may enlarge the time of the sale. Notice
of the changed time of sale shall be published as
provided herein.
Dated APR1 2010
MARYANNE MORSE
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By Katheryn Limback
Deputy Clerk of the Court
Prepared by:
Gladstone Law Group, P.A.
1499 W. Palmetto Park Rd, Suite 300
Boca Raton, FL 33486

"If you are a person with a disability who needs any
accommodation in order to participate in this pro-
ceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the
provision of certain assistance. Please contact the
ADA Coordinator, Ms. Stacy Brady at 2825 Judge
Fran Jamieson Way, Viera, FL 32940; telephone
number 321-633-2171 two (2) working days of
your receipt of this notice; if you are hearing im-
paired, call the Florida Relay Services at 1-800-
955-8771 (TTY); if you are voice impaired, call the
Florida Relay Services at 1-800-955-8770."
4/8, 4/15


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR VOLUSIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2010-10580-PRDL
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARIANNE REINHARDT
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Marianne
Reinhardt, deceased, whose date of death was
January 18, 2008, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Volusia County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is P. 0. Box 6043, DeLand, FL
32721. The names and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is April
1,2010.

Attorney for Personal Representative:
Catherine E. Davey
Attorney for George H. Reinhardt, Jr.
Florida Bar No. 0991724
Post Office Box 941251
Maitland, FL 32794 1251
Telephone: (407) 645 4833
Fax: (407) 645 4832


Personal Representative:
George H. Reinhardt, Jr.
2952 Portsmouth Street
Deltona, Florida 32738


4/1,4/8


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 9th JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 09-CA-33732
ANDOVER LAKES PHASE I HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIA-
TION, INC.
Plaintiff,
v.
RAUL RIVERA and JOHN DOE and JANE DOE, as
unknown tenants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
To: RAUL RIVERA
10855 Norcross Circle
Orlando, Florida 32825
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a
lien on the following described property in Orange
County, Florida:
Lot 10, ANDOVER LAKES PHASE 1-A, ac-
cording to the Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 28, Pages 142 through 147, Public
Records of Orange County, Florida.
has been filed against you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it
on Matt G. Firestone, Esq., the Plaintiff's attorney,
whose address is POHL & SHORT, P.A., 280 W. Can-
ton Avenue, Suite 410, Post Office Box 3208, Winter
Park, Florida 32790, on or before May 1, 2010, and
file the original with the clerk of this court either
before service on the Plaintiff's attorney or immedi-
ately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
DATED: March 26, 2010.
LYDIA GARDNER
CLERK OF COURTS
By: DEBRA S. MILLS
CIVIL COURT SEAL
As Deputy Clerk
In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities
Act, persons with disabilities needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding
should contact Court Administration, at 425 N.
Orange Avenue, Orlando, Florida 32801, telephone
(407) 836-2303, not later than two (2) days prior to
the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-
955-8771, or Voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida
Relay Service.
4/1,4/8


Notice of Public Auction
Pursuant to Ch 715.109 FS and/or 83.801 and/or
677.210 FS etal United American Lien & Recovery
as agent with power of attorney will sell at public
auction the following property(s) to the high-
est bidder subject to any liens for the purpose of
satisfying claim of lien and/or disposition of aban-
doned property(s); owner/lienholder may redeem
property(s) for cash sum of lien; all auctions held
in reserve
Inspect 1 week prior @ lien facility; cash or cashier
check; 15% buyer prem; any persons interested ph
(954) 563-1999

Sale date April 23, 2010 @ 10:00 am 3411 NW 9th
Ave #707 Ft Lauderdale FL 33309
1978 1974 Fern hs vin#: 60123965F tenant: karen
b finnell

Licensed & bonded auctioneers flab422 flau 765
&1911
4/8,4/15


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2010CP0462
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SHELLEY M. STRAIN, JR.,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(summary administration)
The administration of the estate of SHELLEY M.
STRAIN, JR., deceased, File Number 2010CP0462,
is pending in the Circuit Court for Seminole County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is
301 N. Park Avenue, Sanford, Florida 32771. The
names and addresses of the petitioner and the peti-
tioner's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate, including un-matured, contingent or unliq-
uidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is
served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against the dece-
dent's estate, including un-matured, contingent or
unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this
Court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is
April 8, 2010.

Attorney for Person Giving Notice:
Edward W. Soulsby
Attorney for Petitioner
Florida Bar No. 488216
KENNETH B. WHEELER, LL.M. TAX, P.A.
1155 Louisiana Avenue, Suite 100
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone: (407) 645-1779

Person Giving Notice:
David J. Strain
1911 Long Pond Drive
Longwood, FL 32779
4/8,4/15


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 9th JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 08-CA-9843
Division: #37
WATERFORD LAKES COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION,
INC.
Plaintiff,
v.
MARCIA DEL CARPIO, EDUARDO ALFREDO Z. DEL
CARPIO, and JOHN DOE and JANE DOE, as unknown
tenants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
To: Eduardo Alfredo Z. Del Carpio
603 Spring Island Way
Orlando, Florida 32828
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a
lien on the following described property in Orange
County, Florida:
Lot 42, Waterford Lakes Tract N-25A, Phase
I, according to the plat thereof as recorded
in Plat Book 32, Pages 132 and 133, of the
Public Records of Orange County, Florida.
has been filed against you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it
on Matt G. Firestone, Esq., the Plaintiff's attorney,
whose address is POHL & SHORT, P.A., 280 W. Can-
ton Avenue, Suite 410, Post Office Box 3208, Winter
Park, Florida 32790, on or before May 1, 2010, and
file the original with the clerk of this court either
before service on the Plaintiff's attorney or immedi-
ately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
DATED: March 25, 2010.
LYDIA GARDNER
CLERK OF COURTS
By: Christopher Clements
Civil Court Seal
As Deputy Clerk
In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities
Act, persons with disabilities needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding
should contact Court Administration, at 425 N.
Orange Avenue, Orlando, Florida 32801, telephone
(407) 836-2303, not later than two (2) days prior to
the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD)1-800-
955-8771, or Voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida
Relay Service.
4/1,4/8


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case Number: 2009-CA-022961-0
Division: 39
HANCOCK BANK, as assignee of PEOPLES FIRST
COMMUNITY BANK,
Plaintiff,
v.
LUIS E. SIGCHA; ELAINE SIGCHA, husband and wife;
and ORANGE COUNTY, a political subdivision of the
STATE OF FLORIDA,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that on the 22nd day of July,
2010, at 11:00 a.m. in Room 350 of the Courthouse
of Orange County, Florida, 425 S. Orange Avenue,
Orlando FL 32801, the undersigned Clerk will offer
for sale the following described real property:
The East 105 feet of Tract 60, CAPE OR-
LANDO ESTATES UNIT 4A, F/K/A ROCKET
CITY UNIT 4A, according to the plat thereof,
as recorded in Plat Book Z, Page 110, of the
Public Records of Orange County, Florida.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to the
Final Judgment of Foreclosure in Civil Case No.
2009-CA-022961-0; Division 39, now pending in
the Circuit Court in Orange County, Florida.
In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities
Act, persons with disabilities needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding
should contact Court Administration at 37 North Or-
ange Avenue, Suite 1130, Orlando, Florida 32801,
telephone number 407/836-2050, not later than
seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing
impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V)
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale.
Dated this 17 day of March, 2010.
(SEAL)
By: ROBERT J. FRAXEDAS, Attorney
Florida Bar No. 20888
JEFFRY R. JONTZ
ERIC B. JONTZ
SWANN & HADLEY, P.A.
Post Office Box 1961
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 647-2777
Facsimile No.: (407) 647-2157
4/1,4/8


NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Public notice is hereby given that, on the date and
at the time listed below, and continuing from day
to day until all goods are sold, we will sell at public
auction, to the highest bidder, for cash, at the ware-
house of United Stor-All, at 965 S. Semoran Blvd.,
Winter Park, FL 32792, the contents of the following
storage units containing household and/or business
goods, for rent and other charges for which a lien on
same is claimed, to wit.

DATE OF SALE: April 23, 2010
TIME OF SALE: 12:00 PM or thereafter
Brandon Nevius #41, Furniture, Big Screen TV; Ja-
net Mackin #185 Household Items; Luis E Cordo-
vez #387 Household Items, tools; Carlos Moscoso
#302 Household Items; Janet Mackin #404 House-
hold Items, Furniture; Robin Tamariz Howell #441
Household Items, tools.

Auctioneer: Storage Protection Auction Services
-license 593. The above notice is to be published
once a week for two consecutive weeks. Said sale
to be under and by virtue of the statues of the State
of Florida, in such cases made and provided.
Thank you
JORGE HITSCHFELD PROPERTY MANAGER
4/1,4/8


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.: 2009-CA-024290-0
FIRSTBANK PUERTO RICO d/b/a FIRSTBANK
FLORIDA,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MARK A. KORNACK, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POS-
SESSION NO.1, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSES-
SION NO. 2, and WALDEN PALMS CONDOMINIUM
ASSOCIATION, INC.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
To the Defendant, Mark A. Kornack, and all others
whom it may concern:
You are hereby notified that an action to foreclose
a mortgage lien on the following property in Orange
County, Florida:
Unit 1731, Building 17, Walden Palms, a con-
dominium, according to the Declaration of
Condominium thereof, as recorded in Official
Records Book 8444, Page 2553, as thereaf-
ter amended, of the Public Records of Orange
County, Florida.
has been filed against you. You are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on
Michael C. Caborn, Esquire, Winderweedle, Haines,
Ward & Woodman, P.A., Plaintiff's attorney, whose
address is 390 N. Orange Avenue, Suite 1500, Or-
lando, Florida 32801, within thirty (30) days after
the first publication of this notice, and file the origi-
nal with the Clerk of this Court either before service
on Plaintiff's attorneys or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the complaint or petition.
Dated on 3/15/10.
Lydia Gardner
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Kerry Brickner
As Deputy Clerk
4/1, 4/8


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 9th JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 09-CA-11396-0
DIVISION: #34
IRMA LAKES HOMEOWNERS' ASSOCIATION, INC.,
Plaintiff,
v.
MARISOL RUIZ; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MARI-
SOL RUIZ; and JOHN DOE and JANE DOE, as un-
known tenants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF RE-SCHEDULED SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Default
Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above
styled cause in the Circuit Court of Orange County,
Florida, the Clerk of Court will sell the property lo-
cated in Orange County, Florida, described as:
Lot 14, IRMA LAKES, as recorded in Plat Book
63, Page 125 through 133, of the Public Re-
cords of Orange County, Florida.
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for
cash, in the Orange County Courthouse, 425 N. Or-
ange Avenue, Room 350, Orlando, Florida 32801, at
11:00 a.m. on the 4th day of May, 2010. Any person
claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the property owner as of the date
of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to a Fi-
nal Judgment entered in this cause on August 26,
2009.
DATED this 28th day of January, 2010.

Matt G. Firestone, Esq.
Florida Bar No.: 381144
Pohl&Short, P.A.
280 W. Canton Avenue, Suite 410
Post Office Box 3208
Winter Park, Florida 32789
Telephone (407) 647-7645
Facsimile (407) 647-2314
Attorneys for Plaintiff
In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities
Act, persons with disabilities needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding
should contact Court Administration, at 425 N.
Orange Avenue, Orlando, Florida 32801, telephone
(407) 836-2303, not later than two (2) days prior to
the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-
955-8771, or Voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida
Relay Service.
4/8,4/15


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ORANGE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File Number: 48-2010-CP-527-0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
Elinor Caines a/k/a Elinor H. Caines,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Elinor Caines
a/k/a Elinor H. Caines, deceased, whose date
of death was January 5, 2010 is pending in the
Circuit Court for Orange County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 425 North Orange
Avenue, Room 340, Orlando, FL 32801. The names
and addresses of the Personal Representative and
the Personal Representative's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against the de-
cedent's estate must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is
4/1/10.

Personal Representative:
Bank of America, N.A.
329 Park Avenue North, 2nd Floor
P.O. Box 880
Winter Park, FL 32790

W. Graham White
Attorney for Personal Representative
Florida Bar No. 0777544
Winderweedle, Haines, Ward & Woodman, P.A.
329 Park Avenue North, 2nd Floor, P.O. Box 880,
Winter Park, FL 32790
Telephone: (407) 423-4246
4/1,4/8


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 9th JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 09-CA-34183-0
ANDOVER LAKES PHASE I HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIA-
TION, INC.
Plaintiff,
v.
RICARDO WILLIAMSON and NEUTNE M. WILLIAM-
SON and JOHN DOE and JANE DOE, as unknown
tenants,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF ACTION
To: Neutne M. Williamson
10981 Norcross Circle
Orlando, Florida 32825

Neutne M. Williamson
24 Coral Court
Malverne, New York 11565

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a
lien on the following described property in Orange
County, Florida:
Lot 29, ANDOVER LAKES, PHASE 1-A, ac-
cording to the Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 28, Pages 142 through 147, Public
Records of Orange County, Florida.
has been filed against you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it
on Matt G. Firestone, Esq., the Plaintiff's attorney,
whose address is POHL & SHORT, P.A., 280 W. Can-
ton Avenue, Suite 410, Post Office Box 3208, Winter
Park, Florida 32790, on or before May 1, 2010, and
file the original with the clerk of this court either
before service on the Plaintiff's attorney or immedi-
ately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
DATED: March 26, 2010.
LYDIA GARDNER
CLERK OF COURTS
By: DEBRA S. MILLS
CIVIL COURT SEAL
As Deputy Clerk
In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities
Act, persons with disabilities needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding
should contact Court Administration, at 425 N.
Orange Avenue, Orlando, Florida 32801, telephone
(407) 836-2303, not later than two (2) days prior to
the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-
955-8771, or Voice (V)1-800-955-8770, via Florida
Relay Service.
4/1,4/8


NOTICE OF SALE OF MOTOR VEHICLE
Pursuant to Florida Statute 713.585, Mid-Florida
Lien And Recovery, will sell at public sale for cash
the following described vehicle located at lienor's
place to satisfy a claim of lien. 1994 MAZDA VIN:
1YVGE22COR5207209. Lien Amt:$3251.18. Lienor/
AAMCO TRANSMISION. 1563 S. HWY 1792 LONG-
WOOD, FL 407-339-3017. Sale Date: April 26,
2010, 10:00 AM. At Mid Florida Lien & Recovery
3001 Aloma Ave. Winter Park FL 32792. Said ve-
hicle may be redeemed by satisfying the lien prior
to sale date. You have the right to a hearing at any
time prior to sale date by filing a demand for hearing
in the circuit court. Owner has the right to recover
possession of vehicle by posting a bond in accor-
dance with F.S. 559.917. Any proceeds in excess
of the amount of the lien will be deposited with
the Clerk of Circuit Court in the county where the
vehicle is held.
4/8


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 48-2009-CA-003919-0
Division: 35
TRUSTCO BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JULIO BOTEX; and ALTAGRACIA BOTEX,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that on the 10th day of
August, 2010, at 11:00 a.m. in Room 350 of the
Courthouse of Orange County, Florida, 425 S. Or-
ange Avenue, Orlando FL 32801, the undersigned
Clerk will offer for sale the following described real
property:
LOT 24, BLOCK 5, TANGELO PARK, SECTION
ONE, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT
THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK W
PAGE 100, PUBLIC RECORDS OF ORANGE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to the
Final Judgment of Foreclosure in Civil Case No.
48-2009-CA-003919-0; Division 35 now pending
in the Circuit Court in Orange County, Florida.
In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities
Act, persons with disabilities needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding
should contact Court Administration at 37 North Or-
ange Avenue, Suite 1130, Orlando, Florida 32801,
telephone number 407/836-2050, not later than
seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing
impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V)
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale.
Dated this 1st day of April, 2010.

By: ROBERT J. FRAXEDAS, Attorney
Florida Bar No. 20888
JEFFRY R. JONTZ
ERIC B. JONTZ
ROBERT J. FRAXEDAS
SWANN & HADLEY, P.A.
Post Office Box 1961
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 647-2777
Facsimile No.: (407) 647-2157
4/8,4/15


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
Case No.: 09-CC-4751-20L-S
MT. GREENWOOD COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION, INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
HELEN JETER,
Defendant.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: HELEN JETER
304 Woodgreen Lane
Winter Springs, Florida 32708
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to enforce a lien
foreclosure on the following property in Seminole
County, Florida:
LOT 75, UNIT TWO OF MOUNT GREENWOOD,
ACCORDING TO THE POLAT THEREOF AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 35, PAGES 19,
20 AND 21, PUBLIC RECORDS OF SEMINOLE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
A lawsuit has been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your written defenses,
if any, to it on SONIA A. BOSINGER, ESQUIRE,
Plaintiff's Attorney, whose address is CLAYTON &
MCCULLOH, 1065 MAITLAND CENTER COMMONS
BLVD., MAITLAND, FLORIDA 32751, within thirty
(30) days after the first publication of this notice,
and file the original with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief demanded in the
Lien Foreclosure Complaint.
DATED on MAR 22 2010.
MARYANNE MORSE
Clerk of County Court
By: Sharon Butt
Deputy Clerk
4/1,4/8


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE NINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 2009-CA-022305-0; Division 33
TRUSTCO BANK,
Plaintiff,
v.
GARY J. CAMARDA; FLOYD M. MARTIN; and DE-
PARTMENT OF TREASURY-INTERNAL REVENUE
SERVICE,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that on the 3 day of May,
2010, at 11:00 a.m. in Room 350 of the Courthouse
of Orange County, Florida, 425 S. Orange Avenue,
Orlando FL 32801, the undersigned Clerk will offer
for sale the following described real property:
LOTS 15, 16 AND 17, PLUS LAND AND WA-
TER ON SOUTHEAST TO 40ACRES LINE (LESS
30 FEET), BLOCK G, JESSAMINE BEACH,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK J PAGE 78 PUBLIC
RECORDS OF ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to the
Final Judgment of Foreclosure in Civil Case No.
2009-CA-022305-0; Division 33 now pending in
the Circuit Court in Orange County, Florida.
In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities
Act, persons with disabilities needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding
should contact Court Administration at 37 North Or-
ange Avenue, Suite 1130, Orlando, Florida 32801,
telephone number 407/836-2050, not later than
seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing
impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V)
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale.
Dated this 17 day of March, 2010.
By: ERIC B. JONTZ, Attorney
Florida Bar No. 64905
JEFFRY R. JONTZ
ERIC B. JONTZ
SWANN & HADLEY, P.A.
Post Office Box 1961
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Telephone: (407) 647-2777
Facsimile No.: (407) 647-2157
4/1,4/8


CITY OF WINTER PARK
401 Park Avenue South
Winter Park, Florida 32789
CITY OF WINTER PARK
NOTICE OF INTENT AND
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING


Notice is hereby given that the City of Winter Park intends to use the uniform method for collecting
special assessments within the platted area defined as Granville Drive and Williams Drive, within the
municipal boundaries of the City of Winter Park to fund the City's undergrounding of the neighborhood
electrical/BHN facilities.
Notice is further given that the City Commission of the City of Winter Park, Florida will hold a Public
Hearing at the City Commission Chambers, City Hall, 401 Park Avenue South, Winter Park, Florida
32789 on April 12, 2010 at 3:30 or soon thereafter to consider adoption of a Resolution expressing
its intent to use the uniform method for collecting the assessments levied against certain properties
along Granville Drive and Williams Drive.
"If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he/she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, he/she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based." (F.S. 286.0105)
"Persons with disabilities needing assistance to participate in any of these proceedings should contact
the City Clerk's office (407-599-3277) at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting."
/s/
Cynthia S. Bonham, City Clerk
3/18, 3/25, 4/1, 4/8



CITY OF WINTER PARK
401 Park Avenue South
Winter Park, Florida 32789
CITY OF WINTER PARK
NOTICE OF INTENT AND
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING


Notice is hereby given that the City of Winter Park intends to use the uniform method for collecting
special assessments within the platted area defined as Golfview Terrace and North Park Avenue,
within the municipal boundaries of the City of Winter Park to fund the City's undergrounding of the
neighborhood electrical/BHN facilities.
Notice is further given that the City Commission of the City of Winter Park, Florida will hold a Public
Hearing at the City Commission Chambers, City Hall, 401 Park Avenue South, Winter Park, Florida
32789 on April 12, 2010 at 3:30 p.m. or soon thereafter to consider adoption of a Resolution express-
ing its intent to use the uniform method for collecting the assessments levied against certain proper-
ties abutting Golfview Terrace and North Park Avenue.
"If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he/she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, he/she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based." (F.S. 286.0105)
"Persons with disabilities needing assistance to participate in any of these proceedings should contact
the City Clerk's office (407-599-3277) at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting."
/s/
Cynthia S. Bonham, City Clerk
3/18, 3/25, 4/1, 4/8





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Job Description: Responsible for greeting
customers, processing cash transactions,
and making deposits. Maintains a neat
and clean cashier station, stocks retail
merchandise, and processes guest
transactions. Work days and hours may
vary.
Pay Rate: $8.25 per hour
Job Order Number: 9471674
Crew Leader
Job Description: Responsible forsupervising/
training up to four crew members and for
working as part of a grounds maintenance
team. Mows, trims, edges, weed eats,
plants and mulches properties. Performs
vehicle inspections, adjusts work patterns to
meet client needs, ensures work schedules
are adhered to, and helps enforce safety
rules and best practices. Work days and
hours may vary.
Pay Rate: $10.00-$12.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9459197
Order Selector
Job Description: Responsible for selecting
orders, loading/unloading trailers, and
scanning orders. Work Sunday-Thursday,
6:30pm-4:00am.
Pay Rate: $11.00-$12.00 per hour
Job Order Number: 9471244


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WINTER PARK VILLAGE

Finished ground floor office space for lease


3500 square feet next to Guitar Center
Excellent visibility and access
$15 psf Gross

George Brusco, CCIM
Casto Southeast Realty Services LLC

941.552.2705

www.castolp.com


Brokers protected


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Thursday, April 8, 2010 Page 23


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Page 24 Thursday, April 8, 2010 Winter Park / Maitlanci Obseiver


It's fashionable.

It's delicious.

It's fun.
Save big on fashion, housewares, gifts,
and more at these fine shops:
BORDERS
INLAND OCEAN
JOHNNY ROCKETS
JOS. A. BANK CLOTHIERS
LEARNING EXPRESS TOYS
LIZ CLAIBORNE
OWEN ALLEN
PATCHINGTON
RELAX IN COMFORT
STELLA LUCA
WALK ON WATER
... AND MORE!













.* WINTER PARK

VILLAGE

SHighway 17-92 between Fairbanks and Lee Road
407.571.2700
Shop Monday-Saturday 10am to 9pm,
Sunday 12-6pm


Page 24 Thursday, April 8, 2010


Winter Park / Maitland Observer




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